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Sample records for active plasmonic devices

  1. Active graphene plasmonics for terahertz device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Popov, Vyacheslav; Ryzhii, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in graphene active plasmonics for terahertz (THz) device applications. Two-dimensional plasmons in graphene exhibit unique optoelectronic properties and mediate extraordinary light-matter interactions. It has been discovered theoretically that when the population of Dirac fermionic carriers in graphene are inverted by optical or electrical pumping, the excitation of graphene plasmons by the THz photons results in propagating surface plasmon polaritons with giant gain in a wide THz range. Furthermore, when graphene is patterned into a micro- or nanoribbon array by grating metallization, the structure acts as an active THz plasmonic amplifier, providing a superradiant plasmonic lasing with a giant gain at the plasmon modes in a wide THz frequency range. These new findings can lead to the creation of new types of plasmonic THz emitters and lasers operating even at room temperature.

  2. Active plasmonic devices via electron spin.

    PubMed

    Baron, C A; Elezzabi, A Y

    2009-04-27

    A class of active terahertz devices that operate via particle plasmon oscillations is introduced for ensembles consisting of ferromagnetic and dielectric micro-particles. By utilizing an interplay between spin-orbit interaction manifesting as anisotropic magnetoresistance and the optical distance between ferromagnetic particles, a multifaceted paradigm for device design is demonstrated. Here, the phase accumulation of terahertz radiation across the device is actively modulated via the application of an external magnetic field. An active plasmonic directional router and an active plasmonic cylindrical lens are theoretically explored using both an empirical approach and finite-difference time-domain calculations. These findings are experimentally supported. PMID:19399088

  3. Active Metal-Insulator-Metal Plasmonic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diest, Kenneth Alexander

    As the field of photonics constantly strives for ever smaller devices, the diffraction limit of light emerges as a fundamental limitation in this pursuit. A growing number of applications for optical "systems on a chip" have inspired new ways of circumventing this issue. One such solution to this problem is active plasmonics. Active plasmonics is an emerging field that enables light compression into nano-structures based on plasmon resonances at a metal-dielectric interface and active modulation of these plasmons with an applied external field. One area of active plasmonics has focused on replacing the dielectric layer in these waveguides with an electro-optic material and designing the resulting structures in such a way that the transmitted light can be modulated. These structures can be utilized to design a wide range of devices including optical logic gates, modulators, and filters. This thesis focuses on replacing the dielectric layer within a metal-insulator-metal plasmonic waveguide with a range of electrically active materials. By applying an electric field between the metal layers, we take advantage of the electro-optic effect in lithium niobate, and modulating the carrier density distribution across the structure in n-type silicon and indium tin oxide. The first part of this thesis looks at fabricating metal-insulator-metal waveguides with ion-implantation induced layer transferred lithium niobate. The process is analyzed from a thermodynamic standpoint and the ion-implantation conditions required for layer transfer are determined. The possible failure mechanisms that can occur during this process are analyzed from a thin-film mechanics standpoint, and a metal-bonding method to improve successful layer transfer is proposed and analyzed. Finally, these devices are shown to naturally filter white light into individual colors based on the interference of the different optical modes within the dielectric layer. Full-field electromagnetic simulations show that

  4. A SERS-active microfluidic device with tunable surface plasmon resonances.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin-Bin; Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Wang, Huan; Liu, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Zhang, Ran; Jiang, Hao-Bo; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2011-11-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active microfluidic device with tunable surface plasmon resonances is presented here. It is constructed by silver grating substrates prepared by two-beam laser interference of photoresists and subsequent metal evaporation coating, as well as PDMS microchannel derived from soft lithography. By varying the period of gratings from 200 to 550 nm, surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) from the metal gratings could be tuned in a certain range. When the SPRs match with the Raman excitation line, the highest enhancement factor of 2×10(7) is achieved in the SERS detection. The SERS-active microchannel with tunable SPRs exhibits both high enhancement factor and reproducibility of SERS signals, and thus holds great promise for applications of on-chip SERS detection. PMID:22072533

  5. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOEpatents

    Shaner, Eric A.; Wasserman, Daniel

    2011-08-30

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  6. Novel windows for "solar commodities": a device for CO2 reduction using plasmonic catalyst activation.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Alexander; Muñoz, Sergio; Sanz-Moral, Luis M; Brandner, Juergen J; Pfeifer, Peter; Martín, Ángel; Dittmeyer, Roland; Cocero, María J

    2015-01-01

    A novel plasmonic reactor concept is proposed and tested to work as a visible energy harvesting device while allowing reactions to transform CO2 to be carried out. Particularly the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction has been tested as a means to introduce renewable energy into the economy. The development of the new reactor concept involved the synthesis of a new composite capable of plasmonic activation with light, the development of an impregnation method to create a single catalyst reactor entity, and finally the assembly of a reaction system to test the reaction. The composite developed was based on a Cu/ZnO catalyst dispersed into transparent aerogels. This allows efficient light transmission and a high surface area for the catalyst. An effective yet simple impregnation method was developed that allowed introduction of the composites into glass microchannels. The activation of the reaction was made using LEDs that covered all the sides of the reactor allowing a high power delivery. The results of the reaction show a stable process capable of low temperature transformations. PMID:26392210

  7. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  8. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  9. Devices based on surface plasmon interference filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Devices based on surface plasmon filters having at least one metal-dielectric interface to support surface plasmon waves. A multi-layer-coupled surface plasmon notch filter is provided to have more than two symmetric metal-dielectric interfaces coupled with one another to produce a transmission spectral window with desired spectral profile and bandwidth. Such notch filters can form various color filtering devices for color flat panel displays.

  10. Plasmonically enhanced hot electron based photovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Atar, Fatih B; Battal, Enes; Aygun, Levent E; Daglar, Bihter; Bayindir, Mehmet; Okyay, Ali K

    2013-03-25

    Hot electron photovoltaics is emerging as a candidate for low cost and ultra thin solar cells. Plasmonic means can be utilized to significantly boost device efficiency. We separately form the tunneling metal-insulator-metal (MIM) junction for electron collection and the plasmon exciting MIM structure on top of each other, which provides high flexibility in plasmonic design and tunneling MIM design separately. We demonstrate close to one order of magnitude enhancement in the short circuit current at the resonance wavelengths. PMID:23546103

  11. Microfluidic Devices Integrating Microcavity Surface-Plasmon-Resonance Sensors: Glucose Oxidase Binding-Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Alileche, Abdelkrim; Dragnea, Bogdan; Glazier, James A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed miniature (≈1 μm diameter) microcavity surface-plasmon-resonance sensors (MSPRS), integrated them with microfluidics and tested their sensitivity to refractive-index changes. We tested their biosensing capability by distinguishing the interaction of glucose oxidase (Mr 160 kDa) with its natural substrate (β-D-glucose, Mr 180 Da) from its interactions with non-specific substrates (L-glucose, D-mannose and 2-deoxy-D-glucose). We ran the identical protocol we had used with the MSPRS on a Biacore 3000 instrument using their bare gold chip. Only the MSPRS was able to detect β-D-glucose binding to glucose oxidase. Each MSPRS can detect the binding to its surface of fewer than 35,000 glucose-oxidase molecules (representing 9.6 fg or 60 zmol of protein), about 106 times fewer than classical surface-plasmon-resonance biosensors. PMID:19968248

  12. Nanocrystal Optoelectronic Devices in Plasmonic Nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kenneth Mellinger

    Optical trapping is an important tool for studying and manipulating nanoscale objects. Recent experiments have shown that subwavelength control of nanoparticles is possible by using patterned plasmonic nanostructures, rather than using a laser directly, to generate the electric fields necessary for particle trapping. In this thesis we present a theoretical model and experimental evidence for plasmonic optical trapping in nanoscale metal junctions. Further, we examine the use of the resultant devices as ultrasmall photodectors. Electromigrated nanojunctions, or "nanogaps", have a well-established plasmon resonance in the near-IR, leading to electric field enhancements large enough for single-molecule sensitivity in Surface-Enhance Raman (SERS) measurements. While molecule-based devices have been carefully studied, optically and electrically prob- ing individual quantum dots in nanoscale metal junctions remains relatively unex- plored. Plasmon-based optical trapping of quantum dots into prefabricated struc- tures could allow for inexpensive, scalable luminescent devices which are fully integrable into established silicon-based fabrication techniques. Additionally, these metal-nanocrystal-metal structures are ideal candidates to study optoelectronics in ultrasmall nanocrystals-based structures, as well as more exotic nanoscale phenom- ena such as blinking, plasmon-exciton interactions, and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF). We present experimental data supporting plasmon-based optical trapping in the nanogap geometry, and a corresponding numerical model of the electric field-generated forces in the nanogap geometry. Further, we give proof-of-concept measurements of photoconductance in the resultant quantum dot-based devices, as well as challenges and improvements moving forward.

  13. Active Nanorheology with Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G; Lee, Tung-Chun; Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Eslami, Sahand; Qiu, Tian; Gibbs, John G; Fischer, Peer

    2016-08-10

    Nanoplasmonic systems are valued for their strong optical response and their small size. Most plasmonic sensors and systems to date have been rigid and passive. However, rendering these structures dynamic opens new possibilities for applications. Here we demonstrate that dynamic plasmonic nanoparticles can be used as mechanical sensors to selectively probe the rheological properties of a fluid in situ at the nanoscale and in microscopic volumes. We fabricate chiral magneto-plasmonic nanocolloids that can be actuated by an external magnetic field, which in turn allows for the direct and fast modulation of their distinct optical response. The method is robust and allows nanorheological measurements with a mechanical sensitivity of ∼0.1 cP, even in strongly absorbing fluids with an optical density of up to OD ∼ 3 (∼0.1% light transmittance) and in the presence of scatterers (e.g., 50% v/v red blood cells). PMID:27367304

  14. Surface plasmon-enhanced photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Kostecki, Robert; Mao, Samuel

    2014-10-07

    Photovoltaic devices are driven by intense photoemission of "hot" electrons from a suitable nanostructured metal. The metal should be an electron source with surface plasmon resonance within the visible and near-visible spectrum range (near IR to near UV (about 300 to 1000 nm)). Suitable metals include silver, gold, copper and alloys of silver, gold and copper with each other. Silver is particularly preferred for its advantageous opto-electronic properties in the near UV and visible spectrum range, relatively low cost, and simplicity of processing.

  15. Exploiting plasmon-induced hot electrons in molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Conklin, David; Nanayakkara, Sanjini; Park, Tae-Hong; Lagadec, Marie F; Stecher, Joshua T; Chen, Xi; Therien, Michael J; Bonnell, Dawn A

    2013-05-28

    Plasmonic nanostructures can induce a number of interesting responses in devices. Here we show that hot electrons can be extracted from plasmonic particles and directed into a molecular electronic device, which represents a new mechanism of transfer from light to electronic transport. To isolate this phenomenon from alternative and sometimes simultaneous mechanisms of plasmon-exciton interactions, we designed a family of hybrid nanostructure devices consisting of Au nanoparticles and optoelectronically functional porphyin molecules that enable precise control of electronic and optical properties. Temperature- and wavelength-dependent transport measurements are analyzed in the context of optical absorption spectra of the molecules, the Au particle arrays, and the devices. Enhanced photocurrent associated with exciton generation in the molecule is distinguished from enhancements due to plasmon interactions. Mechanisms of plasmon-induced current are examined, and it is found that hot electron generation can be distinguished from other possibilities. PMID:23550717

  16. Solar energy conversion with tunable plasmonic nanostructures for thermoelectric devices.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yujie; Long, Ran; Liu, Dong; Zhong, Xiaolan; Wang, Chengming; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Xie, Yi

    2012-08-01

    The photothermal effect in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) should be fully utilized when integrating plasmonics into solar technologies for improved light absorption. In this communication, we demonstrate that the photothermal effect of silver nanostructures can provide a heat source for thermoelectric devices for the first time. The plasmonic band of silver nanostructures can be facilely manoeuvred by tailoring their shapes, enabling them to interact with photons in different spectral ranges for the efficient utilization of solar light. It is anticipated that this concept can be extended to design a photovoltaic-thermoelectric tandem cell structure with plasmonics as mediation for light harvesting. PMID:22614804

  17. Aluminum plasmonic nanostructures for improved absorption in organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergin, Vladimir; Neely, Lauren; Jao, Chih-Yu; Robinson, Hans D.

    2011-03-01

    We model the absorption enhancement in organic photovoltaic devices induced by incorporating Al, Ag, and Au nanoparticles in the active layer. We find that Al nanoparticles should yield significantly greater enhancement than Ag or Au. This is because the much higher plasma frequency of Al ensures a better overlap between plasmon resonance and absorption band of organic semiconductors. Our predictions are verified experimentally by demonstrating enhanced absorbance in a poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester layer with embedded functionalized Al nanoparticles.

  18. Activation Energies of Plasmonic Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Dumett Torres, Daniel; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-05-11

    The activation energy of a catalytic reaction serves not only as a metric of the efficacy of a catalyst but also as a potential indicator of mechanistic differences between the catalytic and noncatalytic reaction. However, activation energies are quite underutilized in the field of photocatalysis. We characterize in detail the effect of visible light excitation on the activation enthalpy of an electron transfer reaction photocatalyzed by plasmonic Au nanoparticles. We find that in the presence of visible light photoexcitation, the activation enthalpy of the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is significantly reduced. The reduction in the activation enthalpy depends on the excitation wavelength, the incident laser power, and the strength of a hole scavenger. On the basis of these results, we argue that the activation enthalpy reduction is directly related to the photoelectrochemical potential built-up on the Au nanoparticle under steady-state light excitation, analogous to electrochemical activation. Under optimum light excitation conditions, a potential as high as 240 mV is measured. The findings constitute more precise insights into the mechanistic role and energetic contribution of plasmonic excitation to chemical reactions catalyzed by transition metal nanoparticles. PMID:27064549

  19. Transmission and reflection of terahertz plasmons in two-dimensional plasmonic devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sydoruk, Oleksiy; Choonee, Kaushal; Dyer, Gregory Conrad

    2015-03-10

    We found that plasmons in two-dimensional semiconductor devices will be reflected by discontinuities, notably, junctions between gated and non-gated electron channels. The transmitted and reflected plasmons can form spatially- and frequency-varying signals, and their understanding is important for the design of terahertz detectors, oscillators, and plasmonic crystals. Using mode decomposition, we studied terahertz plasmons incident on a junction between a gated and a nongated channel. The plasmon reflection and transmission coefficients were found numerically and analytically and studied between 0.3 and 1 THz for a range of electron densities. At higher frequencies, we could describe the plasmons by a simplifiedmore » model of channels in homogeneous dielectrics, for which the analytical approximations were accurate. At low frequencies, however, the full geometry and mode spectrum had to be taken into account. Moreover, the results agreed with simulations by the finite-element method. As a result, mode decomposition thus proved to be a powerful method for plasmonic devices, combining the rigor of complete solutions of Maxwell's equations with the convenience of analytical expressions.« less

  20. Transmission and reflection of terahertz plasmons in two-dimensional plasmonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sydoruk, Oleksiy; Choonee, Kaushal; Dyer, Gregory Conrad

    2015-03-10

    We found that plasmons in two-dimensional semiconductor devices will be reflected by discontinuities, notably, junctions between gated and non-gated electron channels. The transmitted and reflected plasmons can form spatially- and frequency-varying signals, and their understanding is important for the design of terahertz detectors, oscillators, and plasmonic crystals. Using mode decomposition, we studied terahertz plasmons incident on a junction between a gated and a nongated channel. The plasmon reflection and transmission coefficients were found numerically and analytically and studied between 0.3 and 1 THz for a range of electron densities. At higher frequencies, we could describe the plasmons by a simplified model of channels in homogeneous dielectrics, for which the analytical approximations were accurate. At low frequencies, however, the full geometry and mode spectrum had to be taken into account. Moreover, the results agreed with simulations by the finite-element method. As a result, mode decomposition thus proved to be a powerful method for plasmonic devices, combining the rigor of complete solutions of Maxwell's equations with the convenience of analytical expressions.

  1. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams. PMID:26630376

  2. Nano-Assembled Plasmonic Crystals Devices for Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yi

    The ability of plasmonic nano-structures to concentrate light into sub-wavelength volumes offers the potential for developing new devices and applications. Surface plasmons are electron oscillations that propagate on a metal surface. The interaction of light with surface plasmons can be tailored by periodic nano-structures on a surface, thus allowing miniaturized photonic devices with length scales much smaller than those currently achieved. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop a low cost self-assembly method to fabricate large area plasmonic crystals and study the physical properties of surface plasmons. Several plasmonic devices are designed using the self-assembled gold nanobump arrays. A polystyrene sphere self-assembly technique was developed for fabricating holes or bumps as small as 150 nm with spacing controlled by the sphere diameter (typically 500--700 nm). Several applications were developed, which were based on the sensitivity of the photon-plasmons coupling to 1) the surface dielectric and 2) the incident angle. A sensitivity to refractive index changes of about 100 nm per refractive index units was demonstrated by varying the surrounding dielectric environment with several chemicals for sensing applications. An increasing variation in the color of a vanadium oxides thermochromic device was observed by using surface plasmons to enhance the variation in reflection. Surface plasmons were also used in an optical modulator, where excitation by one wavelength was used to changes the transmission at a different wavelength. Using the angular sensitivity of the nano-structured plasmonic thin films, an angle of arrival sensor was fabricated. This sensor can be used to track the position of the sun or other collimated light sources like lasers. The polarization dependency of the device was studied and its behavior was explained by the lattice momentum matching mechanism. Inspired by the novel concept of this angle of arrival sensor, a wavefront sensor

  3. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a "naturally" energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted. PMID:22973502

  4. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-09-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a ``naturally'' energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted.

  5. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a “naturally” energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted. PMID:22973502

  6. Palladium on Plastic Substrates for Plasmonic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zuppella, Paola; Pasqualotto, Elisabetta; Zuccon, Sara; Gerlin, Francesca; Corso, Alain Jody; Scaramuzza, Matteo; De Toni, Alessandro; Paccagnella, Alessandro; Pelizzo, Maria Guglielmina

    2015-01-01

    Innovative chips based on palladium thin films deposited on plastic substrates have been tested in the Kretschmann surface plasmon resonance (SPR) configuration. The new chips combine the advantages of a plastic support that is interesting and commercially appealing and the physical properties of palladium, showing inverted surface plasmon resonance (ISPR). The detection of DNA chains has been selected as the target of the experiment, since it can be applied to several medical early diagnostic tools, such as different biomarkers of cancers or cystic fibrosis. The results are encouraging for the use of palladium in SPR-based sensors of interest for both the advancement of biodevices and the development of hydrogen sensors. PMID:25585102

  7. Fano Resonance in an Electrically Driven Plasmonic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Yuval; Cohen-Hoshen, Eyal; Shalem, Guy; Bar-Joseph, Israel

    Electrically driven plasmonic devices offer unique opportunities as a research tool and for practical applications. In such devices, current that flows across a metallic tunnel junction excites a plasmon, which gives rise to light emission. This local nature of the excitation allows access into ''dark'' modes, which are not easily excited by far field illumination. We present an electrically driven plasmonic device, based on a gold nanoparticle single-electron-transistor, and investigate the light emission due to the tunneling current. The applied voltage determines the emitted spectral lineshape, enables an excellent control of the plasmonic spectrum. We show that the use of this structure allows us to characterize the electrical properties of the two tunnel barriers, and determine their role in the light emission process. Furthermore, we find a Fano resonance, resulting from interference between the nanoparticle and electrodes dipoles. This resonance is seen due to the local nature of the excitation, and is manifested as a sharp asymmetrical spectral dip. We show that the spectral position of this resonance can be conveniently controlled by the design of the structural parameters. Such devices may be a step toward the realization of an on-chip nano-optical emitters and sensors.

  8. Fano Resonance in an Electrically Driven Plasmonic Device.

    PubMed

    Vardi, Yuval; Cohen-Hoshen, Eyal; Shalem, Guy; Bar-Joseph, Israel

    2016-01-13

    We present an electrically driven plasmonic device consisting of a gold nanoparticle trapped in a gap between two electrodes. The tunneling current in the device generates plasmons, which decay radiatively. The emitted spectrum extends up to an energy that depends on the applied voltage. Characterization of the electrical conductance at low temperatures allows us to extract the voltage drop on each tunnel barrier and the corresponding emitted spectrum. In several devices we find a pronounced sharp asymmetrical dip in the spectrum, which we identify as a Fano resonance. Finite-difference time-domain calculations reveal that this resonance is due to interference between the nanoparticle and electrodes dipolar fields and can be conveniently controlled by the structural parameters. PMID:26717292

  9. Nanoscale devices based on plasmonic coaxial waveguide resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahigir, A.; Dastmalchi, P.; Shin, W.; Fan, S.; Veronis, G.

    2015-02-01

    Waveguide-resonator systems are particularly useful for the development of several integrated photonic devices, such as tunable filters, optical switches, channel drop filters, reflectors, and impedance matching elements. In this paper, we introduce nanoscale devices based on plasmonic coaxial waveguide resonators. In particular, we investigate threedimensional nanostructures consisting of plasmonic coaxial stub resonators side-coupled to a plasmonic coaxial waveguide. We use coaxial waveguides with square cross sections, which can be fabricated using lithography-based techniques. The waveguides are placed on top of a silicon substrate, and the space between inner and outer coaxial metals is filled with silica. We use silver as the metal. We investigate structures consisting of a single plasmonic coaxial resonator, which is terminated either in a short or an open circuit, side-coupled to a coaxial waveguide. We show that the incident waveguide mode is almost completely reflected on resonance, while far from the resonance the waveguide mode is almost completely transmitted. We also show that the properties of the waveguide systems can be accurately described using a single-mode scattering matrix theory. The transmission and reflection coefficients at waveguide junctions are either calculated using the concept of the characteristic impedance or are directly numerically extracted using full-wave three-dimensional finite-difference frequency-domain simulations.

  10. Graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Satou, Akira; Popov, Vyacheslav; Ryzhii, Victor

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers. We theoretically discovered that when the population of Dirac Fermionic carriers in graphene are inverted by optical or electrical pumping the excitation of graphene plasmons by the THz photons results in propagating surface plasmon polaritons with giant gain in a wide THz range. Furthermore, when graphene is patterned in a micro- or nano-ribbon array by grating gate metallization, the structure acts as an active plasmonic metamaterial, providing a super-radiant plasmonic lasing with giant gain at the plasmon modes in a wide THz frequency range.

  11. Integrated optic/nanofluidic fluorescent detection device with plasmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsanik, J. S.; Bernstein, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    Integrated optic/microfluidic devices have proven to be useful tools in many sensing applications. However, the resolution and sensitivity of existing devices is limited by the processes and materials chosen for their fabrication. A procedure for the production of a new family of low-noise, high-resolution integrated microfluidic optical detection devices is presented, along with results from a prototype device. The device architecture is presented, highlighting design choices made in fluidics and optical integration to minimize scattered light. Diffused waveguides were fabricated, characterized, and modeled. A plasmonic resonator is designed, simulated, and integrated into the system to achieve electric field enhancement and localization to sub-micron dimensions. The device was tested to demonstrate both field enhancement and localization. The procedure that was developed enables the creation of integrated devices capable of high-resolution detection of fluorescent samples. The interrogation region was 200 nm long in the direction of flow, achieving sub-wavelength resolution in an integrated device. Furthermore, discrete fluorescent particles 20 nm in diameter were individually detected, demonstrating the high resolution and sensitivity capabilities of this family of devices.

  12. Plasmonic Metamaterials for Active and Passive Light Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Danyong Dylan

    Fundamental study on plasmonics excites surface plasmons opening possibility for stronger light-matter interaction at nanoscales and optical frequencies. On the other hand, metamaterials, known as artificial materials built with designable subwavelength units, offer unprecedented new material properties not existing in nature. By combining unique advantages in these two areas, plasmonic metamaterials gain tremendous momentum for fundamental research interest and potential practical applications through the active and passive interaction with and control of light. This thesis is focused on the theoretical and experimental study of plasmonic metamaterials with tunable plasmonic properties, and their applications in controlling spontaneous emission process of quantum emitters, and manipulating light propagation, scattering and absorption. To break the limitation of surface plasmon properties by existing metal materials, composite- and multilayer-based metamaterials are investigated and their tunable plasmonic properties are demonstrated. Nanopatterned multilayer metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion relations are further utilized to enhance spontaneous emission rates of molecules at desired frequencies with improved far-field radiative power through the Purcell effect. Theoretical calculations and experimental lifetime characterizations show the tunable broadband Purcell enhancement of 76 fold on the hyperbolic metamaterials that better aligns with spontaneous emission spectra and the emission intensity improvement of 80 fold achieved by the out-coupling effect of nanopatterns. This concept is later applied to quantum-well light emitting devices for improving the light efficiency and modulation speed at blue and green wavelengths. On the passive light manipulation, in contrast to strong plasmonic scattering from metal patterns, anomalously weak scattering by patterns in multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials is observed and experimentally demonstrated to be

  13. An autonomous photosynthetic device in which all charge carriers derive from surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Singh, Nirala; Krämer, Stephan; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Solar conversion to electricity or to fuels based on electron-hole pair production in semiconductors is a highly evolved scientific and commercial enterprise. Recently, it has been posited that charge carriers either directly transferred from the plasmonic structure to a neighbouring semiconductor (such as TiO₂) or to a photocatalyst, or induced by energy transfer in a neighbouring medium, could augment photoconversion processes, potentially leading to an entire new paradigm in harvesting photons for practical use. The strong dependence of the wavelength at which the local surface plasmon can be excited on the nanostructure makes it possible, in principle, to design plasmonic devices that can harvest photons over the entire solar spectrum and beyond. So far, however, most such systems show rather small photocatalytic activity in the visible as compared with the ultraviolet. Here, we report an efficient, autonomous solar water-splitting device based on a gold nanorod array in which essentially all charge carriers involved in the oxidation and reduction steps arise from the hot electrons resulting from the excitation of surface plasmons in the nanostructured gold. Each nanorod functions without external wiring, producing 5 × 10(13) H₂ molecules per cm(2) per s under 1 sun illumination (AM 1.5 and 100 mW cm(-2)), with unprecedented long-term operational stability. PMID:23435280

  14. Electrical detection of surface plasmon resonance phenomena by a photoelectronic device integrated with gold nanoparticle plasmon antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Fukunishi, Yurie; Zheng, Bin; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2013-02-01

    We have proposed a concept of a photoelectronic hybrid device utilizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which are supposed to function not only as the plasmon antenna but also as the sensing part. The photocurrent in the fabricated device, consisting of a transparent Nb-doped TiO2 channel and Au electrodes, was enhanced more than eight times at a specific wavelength with GNP arrays located between the electrodes, indicating that surface plasmon resonance was electrically detected with the hybrid device. This result will open new doors for ultra-small biosensor chips integrated with multi-functional solid-state devices.

  15. Gapped Surface Plasmon Polariton Waveguide Device Based on a Liquid Crystal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    We propose a gapped surface plasmon polariton waveguide (G-SPPW) device based on a liquid crystal (LC) at a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The G-SPPW device is composed of an input 2.0-μm-wide and 5.0-μm-long insulator-metal-insulator waveguide (IMI-W), an 8-μm-long gap, and an output 2.0-μm-wide and 25.0-μm-long IMI-W. The LC is used for the gap and the 5.15-μm-thick upper and lower dielectric layers. The input surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagate and jump over the gap in the G-SPPW with a coupling loss of less than ~0.68 dB. The propagation and coupling losses of the 38-μm-long G-SPPW device are varied in the range of ~0.5268 dB to ~2.6716 dB and ~0.1446 dB to ~0.6784 dB, respectively, with LC tilt angles (θ1,2) = 0°~90° at a fixed 90° twist angle. The normalized transmission of the G-SPPW device is also varied in the range from -3.351 dB to -0.6714 dB with θ1,2 = 0°~90° at a fixed 90° twist angle. The output SPP characteristics of the G-SPPW device can be properly controlled by the orientation of the LC molecules. The proposed G-SPPW device shows potential for new active plasmonic device applications. PMID:26726399

  16. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  17. Plasmon enhanced broadband optical absorption in ultrathin silicon nanobowl array for photoactive devices applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui-Nan; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Bo; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-07-01

    Both photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are key optical components of photoactive devices for light harvesting, enabling solar cells with significant thickness reduction, and light detectors capable of detecting photons with sub-band gap energies. In this work, we study the plasmon enhanced broadband light absorption and electrical properties of silicon nanobowl (SiNB) arrays. The SiNB-metal photonic-plasmonic nanostructure-based devices exhibited superior light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to the infrared regime well below the band edge of Si due to effective optical coupling between the SiNB array and incident sunlight, as well as electric field intensity enhancement around metal nanoparticles due to localized surface plasmon resonance. The photonic-plasmonic nanostructure is expected to result in infrared-light detectors and high-efficiency solar cells by extending light-harvesting to infrared frequencies.

  18. Plasmon enhanced broadband optical absorption in ultrathin silicon nanobowl array for photoactive devices applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rui-Nan; Peng, Kui-Qing Hu, Bo; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-07-06

    Both photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are key optical components of photoactive devices for light harvesting, enabling solar cells with significant thickness reduction, and light detectors capable of detecting photons with sub-band gap energies. In this work, we study the plasmon enhanced broadband light absorption and electrical properties of silicon nanobowl (SiNB) arrays. The SiNB-metal photonic-plasmonic nanostructure-based devices exhibited superior light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to the infrared regime well below the band edge of Si due to effective optical coupling between the SiNB array and incident sunlight, as well as electric field intensity enhancement around metal nanoparticles due to localized surface plasmon resonance. The photonic-plasmonic nanostructure is expected to result in infrared-light detectors and high-efficiency solar cells by extending light-harvesting to infrared frequencies.

  19. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  20. Distinguishing between plasmon-induced and photo-excited carriers in a device geometry (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hangqi; Zheng, Bob Y.; Manjavacas, Alejandro; McClain, Michael J.; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2015-09-01

    The use of surface plasmons, charge density oscillations of conduction electrons of metallic nanostructures, could drastically alter how sunlight is converted into electricity or fuels by increasing the efficiency of light-harvesting devices through enhanced light-matter interactions. Surface plasmons can decay directly into energetic electron-hole pairs, or "hot" carriers, which can be used for photocurrent generation or photocatalysis. However, little has been understood about the fundamental mechanisms behind plasmonic carrier generation. Here we use metallic nano-wire based hot carrier devices on a wide-bandgap semiconductor substrate to show that plasmonic hot carrier generation is proportional to field intensity enhancement instead of bulk material absorption. We also show that interband carrier generation results in less energetic carriers than plasmon-induced generation, and a plasmon is required to inject electrons over a large energy barrier. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used for theoretical calculations, which match well with experimental results. This work points to a clear route to increasing the efficiency of plasmonic hot carrier devices and drastically simplifies the theoretical framework for understanding the mechanisms of hot carrier generation.

  1. Bias field tailored plasmonic nano-electrode for high-power terahertz photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Il-Min; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Eui Su; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Ko, Hyunsung; Han, Sang-Pil; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Photoconductive antennas with nano-structured electrodes and which show significantly improved performances have been proposed to satisfy the demand for compact and efficient terahertz (THz) sources. Plasmonic field enhancement was previously considered the dominant mechanism accounting for the improvements in the underlying physics. However, we discovered that the role of plasmonic field enhancement is limited and near-field distribution of bias field should be considered as well. In this paper, we clearly show that the locally enhanced bias field due to the size effect is much more important than the plasmonic enhanced absorption in the nano-structured electrodes for the THz emitters. Consequently, an improved nano-electrode design is presented by tailoring bias field distribution and plasmonic enhancement. Our findings will pave the way for new perspectives in the design and analysis of plasmonic nano-structures for more efficient THz photonic devices. PMID:26347288

  2. Bias field tailored plasmonic nano-electrode for high-power terahertz photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Il-Min; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Eui Su; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Ko, Hyunsung; Han, Sang-Pil; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Photoconductive antennas with nano-structured electrodes and which show significantly improved performances have been proposed to satisfy the demand for compact and efficient terahertz (THz) sources. Plasmonic field enhancement was previously considered the dominant mechanism accounting for the improvements in the underlying physics. However, we discovered that the role of plasmonic field enhancement is limited and near-field distribution of bias field should be considered as well. In this paper, we clearly show that the locally enhanced bias field due to the size effect is much more important than the plasmonic enhanced absorption in the nano-structured electrodes for the THz emitters. Consequently, an improved nano-electrode design is presented by tailoring bias field distribution and plasmonic enhancement. Our findings will pave the way for new perspectives in the design and analysis of plasmonic nano-structures for more efficient THz photonic devices. PMID:26347288

  3. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Enhanced ZnO/Si Heterojunction Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chong

    The objective of this work focuses on ZnO and Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film deposition and characterization, and developing reliable ZnO/Si heterojunction thin film optoelectronic devices. Producing and integration of plasmonic nanostructures were also studied for improving device performance with plasmonic light trapping effects. Enhanced ZnO/Si heterojunction metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors with plasmonic Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were realized. Self-assembled Ag NPs with different sizes, densities and distributions were produced on the surface of ZnO/Si MSM photodetector devices. By tuning the characteristic of these NPs, a higher-performance MSM detector has been achieved with photocurrent enhancement up to 680%. The spectral enhancement was broadband from 350 nm to 850 nm. To investigate the nanoplasmonic effects for enhanced solar cell devices, a relatively simple device structure, Si Schottky solar cell with the metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure, was studied first. By introducing Ag NPs and SiO2 spacer layers on top of Si Schottky solar cells, we demonstrated a positive and tunable light trapping effect introduced by metallic NPs. Enhanced light trapping effects at distinct resonance wavelengths were observed in the optical spectra of the plasmonic-enhanced devices. Electrical measurements confirmed the expected photocurrent improvement at these corresponding wavelengths. It was also revealed that the Ag NPs enhance the carrier generation rate inside of the Si active layer without sacrificing carrier collection efficiency of the device. The short-circuit current density (Jsc) of the best cell we obtained was improved from13.7 mA/cm2 to 19.7 mA/cm2, with an enhancement factor of 43.7%. Periodic nanostructures formed with nanoimprint technique and annealing process were studies to utilize in the Al-ZnO/Si heterojunction solar cell devices. The size, inter-particle distance and shape of these nanostructures can be easily tuned by changing

  4. Distinguishing between plasmon-induced and photoexcited carriers in a device geometry

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bob Y.; Zhao, Hangqi; Manjavacas, Alejandro; McClain, Michael; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of surface plasmons, charge density oscillations of conduction electrons of metallic nanostructures, to boost the efficiency of light-harvesting devices through increased light-matter interactions could drastically alter how sunlight is converted into electricity or fuels. These excitations can decay directly into energetic electron–hole pairs, useful for photocurrent generation or photocatalysis. However, the mechanisms behind plasmonic carrier generation remain poorly understood. Here we use nanowire-based hot-carrier devices on a wide-bandgap semiconductor to show that plasmonic carrier generation is proportional to internal field-intensity enhancement and occurs independently of bulk absorption. We also show that plasmon-induced hot electrons have higher energies than carriers generated by direct excitation and that reducing the barrier height allows for the collection of carriers from plasmons and direct photoexcitation. Our results provide a route to increasing the efficiency of plasmonic hot-carrier devices, which could lead to more efficient devices for converting sunlight into usable energy. PMID:26165521

  5. Fabrication of novel plasmonics-active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Anuj; Gerhold, Michael; Du, Yan; Misra, Veena; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes methodologies for fabricating of highly efficient plasmonics-active SERS substrates - having metallic nanowire structures with pointed geometries and sub-5 nm gap between the metallic nanowires enabling concentration of high EM fields in these regions - on a wafer-scale by a reproducible process that is compatible with large-scale development of these substrates. Excitation of surface plasmons in these nanowire structures leads to substantial enhancement in the Raman scattering signal obtained from molecules lying in the vicinity of the nanostructure surface. The methodologies employed included metallic coating of silicon nanowires fabricated by employing deep UV lithography as well as controlled growth of silicon germanium on silicon nanostructures to form diamond-shaped nanowire structures followed by metallic coating. These SERS substrates were employed for detecting chemical and biological molecules of interest. In order to characterize the SERS substrates developed in this work, we obtained SERS signals from molecules such as p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) and cresyl fast violet (CFV) attached to or adsorbed on the metal-coated SERS substrates. It was observed that both gold-coated triangular shaped nanowire substrates as well as gold-coated diamond shaped nanowire substrates provided very high SERS signals for the nanowires having sub-15 nm gaps and that the SERS signal depends on the closest spacing between the metal-coated silicon and silicon germanium nanowires. SERS substrates developed by the different processes were also employed for detection of biological molecules such as DPA (Dipicolinic Acid), an excellent marker for spores of bacteria such as Anthrax.

  6. Plasmon enhanced organic devices utilizing highly ordered nanoimprinted gold nanodisks and nitrogen doped graphene.

    PubMed

    Teridi, Mohd Asri Mat; Sookhakian, Mehran; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Zakaria, R; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; da Silva, Wilson Jose; Kim, Jaeyeon; Lee, Seung Joo; Kim, Hyeong Pil; Yusoff, Abd Rashid bin Mohd; Jang, Jin

    2015-04-28

    High performance organic devices including polymer solar cells (PSCs) and light emitting diodes (PLEDs) were successfully demonstrated with the presence of highly ordered nanoimprinted Au nanodisks (Au NDs) in their solution-processed active/emissive layers, respectively. PSCs and PLEDs were fabricated using a low bandgap polymer and acceptor, nitrogen doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes poly[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl] thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl] (n-MWCNTs:PTB7), and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) and (4,4-N,N-dicarbazole) biphenyl (CBP) doped with tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium(iii) (Ir(ppy)3) as active/emissive layers, respectively. We synthesized nitrogen doped graphene and used it as anodic buffer layer in both devices. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect from Au NDs clearly contributed to the increase in light absorption/emission in the active layers from electromagnetic field enhancement, which originated from the excited LSPR in PSCs and PLEDs. In addition to the high density of LSPR and strong exciton-SP coupling, the electroluminescent (EL) enhancement is ascribed to enhanced spontaneous emission rates. This is due to the plasmonic near-field effect induced by Au NDs. The PSCs and PLEDs exhibited 14.98% (8.08% to 9.29%) under one sun of simulated air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination (100 mW cm(-2)) and 19.18% (8.24 to 9.82 lm W(-1)) enhancement in the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to the control devices without Au NDs. PMID:25640454

  7. Plasmon enhanced organic devices utilizing highly ordered nanoimprinted gold nanodisks and nitrogen doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Sookhakian, Mehran; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Zakaria, R.; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; da Silva, Wilson Jose; Kim, Jaeyeon; Lee, Seung Joo; Kim, Hyeong Pil; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-04-01

    High performance organic devices including polymer solar cells (PSCs) and light emitting diodes (PLEDs) were successfully demonstrated with the presence of highly ordered nanoimprinted Au nanodisks (Au NDs) in their solution-processed active/emissive layers, respectively. PSCs and PLEDs were fabricated using a low bandgap polymer and acceptor, nitrogen doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes poly[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl] thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl] (n-MWCNTs:PTB7), and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) and (4,4-N,N-dicarbazole) biphenyl (CBP) doped with tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium(iii) (Ir(ppy)3) as active/emissive layers, respectively. We synthesized nitrogen doped graphene and used it as anodic buffer layer in both devices. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect from Au NDs clearly contributed to the increase in light absorption/emission in the active layers from electromagnetic field enhancement, which originated from the excited LSPR in PSCs and PLEDs. In addition to the high density of LSPR and strong exciton-SP coupling, the electroluminescent (EL) enhancement is ascribed to enhanced spontaneous emission rates. This is due to the plasmonic near-field effect induced by Au NDs. The PSCs and PLEDs exhibited 14.98% (8.08% to 9.29%) under one sun of simulated air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination (100 mW cm-2) and 19.18% (8.24 to 9.82 lm W-1) enhancement in the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) compared to the control devices without Au NDs.

  8. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  9. Magnetic plasmonic metamaterials in actively pumped host medium and plasmonic nanolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, Andrey K.; Tartakovsky, Gennady

    2006-08-01

    We consider plasmonic nanoantennas immersed in active host medium. Specifically shaped metal nanoantennas can exhibit strong magnetic properties in the optical spectral range due to the excitation of Magnetic Resonance Plasmons (MRP). A case when a metamaterial comprising such nanoantennas can demonstrate both "left-handiness" and negative permeability in the optical range is considered. We show that high losses predicted for optical "left-handed" materials can be compensated in the gain medium. Gains required to achieve local generation in such magnetic active metamaterials are calculated for real metals

  10. Computational Electromagnetic Modeling of Optical Responses in Plasmonically Enhanced Nanoscale Devices Fabricated with Nanomasking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Eric; Debu, Desalegn; Saylor, Cameron; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    This work computationally explores plasmonic nanoscale devices fabricated with a recently developed nanomasking technique that is based on the self-aligned process. Computational electromagnetic modeling has determined enhancement factors and the plasmonic and optical properties of these structures. The nanomasking technique is a new process that is employed to overcome the resolution limits of traditional electron beam lithography and can also be used to increase resolution in photolithography fabrication as well. This technique can consistently produce accurate features with nanostructures and gaps smaller than 10 nm. These smaller dimensions can allow for increased and more localized plasmonically enhanced electric fields. These unique metal devices encompass tunable, enhanced plasmonic and optical properties that can be useful in a wide range of applications. Finite element methods are used to approximate the electromagnetic responses, giving the ability to alter the designs and dimensions in order to optimize the enhancement. Ultimately, we will fabricate devices and characterize the plasmonic properties with optical techniques, including dark-field spectroscopy, to confirm the properties with the goal of generating more efficient devices.

  11. Active plasmonic band-stop filters based on graphene metamaterial at THz wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhongchao; Li, Xianping; Yin, Jianjun; Huang, Rong; Liu, Yuebo; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongzhan; Meng, Hongyun; Liang, Ruisheng

    2016-06-27

    Active plasmonic band-stop filters based on single- and double-layer doped graphene metamaterials at the THz wavelengths are proposed and investigated numerically by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The metamaterial unit cell structure is composed of two parallel graphene nanoscale ribbons. Simulated results exhibit that significant resonance wavelength shifts can be achieved with a slight variation of the doping concentration of the graphene ribbons. Besides, the asymmetry double-layer graphene metamaterial device has two apparent filter dips while the symmetry single-, double-layer and asymmetry single-layer graphene metamaterial devices just only one. The metamaterials with symmetry single-layer and asymmetry double-layer graphene can be used as a high-sensitivity refractive sensor with the sensitivity up to 5100 nm/RIU and a two-circuit switch, respectively. These prospects pave the way towards ultrafast active graphene-based plasmonic devices for THz applications. PMID:27410588

  12. Toward Self-Assembled Plasmonic Devices: High-Yield Arrangement of Gold Nanoparticles on DNA Origami Templates.

    PubMed

    Gür, Fatih N; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Ye, Jingjing; Diez, Stefan; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2016-05-24

    Plasmonic structures allow the manipulation of light with materials that are smaller than the optical wavelength. Such structures can consist of plasmonically active metal nanoparticles and can be fabricated through scalable bottom-up self-assembly on DNA origami templates. To produce functional devices, the precise and high-yield arrangement of each of the nanoparticles on a structure is of vital importance as the absence of a single particle can destroy the functionality of the entire device. Nevertheless, the parameters influencing the yield of the multistep assembly process are still poorly understood. To overcome this deficiency, we employed a test system consisting of a tubular six-helix bundle DNA origami with binding sites for eight oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles. We systematically studied the assembly yield as a function of a wide range of parameters such as ionic strength, stoichiometric ratio, oligonucleotide linker chemistry, and assembly kinetics by an automated high-throughput analysis of electron micrographs of the formed heterocomplexes. Our optimized protocols enable particle placement yields up to 98.7% and promise the reliable production of sophisticated DNA-based multiparticle plasmonic devices for applications in photonics, optoelectronics, and nanomedicine. PMID:27159647

  13. Electron-beam induced diamond-like-carbon passivation of plasmonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Sadatnajafi, Catherine; Langley, Daniel; Lin, Jiao; Kou, Shan Shan; Abbey, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Engineered materials with feature sizes on the order of a few nanometres offer the potential for producing metamaterials with properties which may differ significantly from their bulk counterpart. Here we describe the production of plasmonic colour filters using periodic arrays of nanoscale cross shaped apertures fabricated in optically opaque silver films. Due to its relatively low loss in the visible and near infrared range, silver is a popular choice for plasmonic devices, however it is also unstable in wet or even ambient conditions. Here we show that ultra-thin layers of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) can be used to prevent degradation due to oxidative stress, ageing and corrosion. We demonstrate that DLC effectively protects the sub-micron features which make up the plasmonic colour filter under both atmospheric conditions and accelerated aging using iodine gas. Through a systematic study we confirm that the nanometre thick DLC layers have no effect on the device functionality or performance.

  14. Efficient photo-thermal activation of gold nanoparticle-doped polymer plasmonic switches.

    PubMed

    Weeber, J-C; Hassan, K; Saviot, L; Dereux, A; Boissière, C; Durupthy, O; Chaneac, C; Burov, E; Pastouret, A

    2012-12-01

    We report on the photo-thermal activation of dielectric loaded plasmonic switches comprised of gold nanoparticle-doped polymer deposited onto a gold film. The plasmonic switches rely on a multi-mode interferometer design and are fabricated by electron beam lithography applied to a positive resin doped with gold nanoparticles at a volume ratio of 0.52%. A cross-bar switching is obtained at telecom wavelengths by pumping the devices with a visible beam having a frequency within the localized surface plasmon resonance band of the embedded nanoparticles. By comparing the switching performances of doped and undoped devices, we show that for the modest doping level we consider, the power needed to activate the doped switches is reduced by a factor 2.5 compared to undoped devices. The minimization of activation power is attributed to enhanced light-heat conversion and optimized spatial heat generation for doped devices and not to a change of the thermo-optic coefficient of the doped polymer. PMID:23262712

  15. Plasmon device design: Conversion from surface to junction plasmons with grating-couplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling calculations and numerical studies are used to show that grating couplers provide effective energy transfer between surface plasmons and slower modes localized in the tunnel diodes. Within first order perturbation theory in grating amplitude, 90% efficiency energy transfer occurs within micrometers for realistic structures and materials parameters. Scaling laws are derived. Seventy to 90% of the electromagnetic field energy is concentrated in the oxide layer of an MOM diode after the energy is distributed by longer range modes that have less than 0.1% overlap with the tunneling region. The mode conversion allows the requirements separation for energy transport and power production by inelastic tunneling.

  16. Plasmon device design: conversion from surface to junction plasmons with grating-couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling calculations and numerical studies are used to show that grating couplers provide effective energy transfer between surface plasmons and slower modes localized in the tunnel diodes. Within first order perturbation theory in grating amplitude, 90% efficiency energy transfer occurs within micrometers for realistic structures and materials parameters. Scaling laws are derived. Seventy to 90% of the electromagnetic field energy is concentrated in the oxide layer of an MOM diode after the energy is distributed by longer range modes that have less than 0.1% overlap with the tunneling region. The mode conversion allows the requirements separation for energy transport and power production by inelastic tunneling.

  17. Tunable plasmonic nanoparticles with catalytically active high-index facets.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hao; Zhang, Qingfeng; Large, Nicolas; Yu, Chunmei; Blom, Douglas A; Nordlander, Peter; Wang, Hui

    2014-06-11

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been of tremendous interest due to their intriguing size- and shape-dependent plasmonic and catalytic properties. Combining tunable plasmon resonances with superior catalytic activities on the same metallic nanoparticle, however, has long been challenging because nanoplasmonics and nanocatalysis typically require nanoparticles in two drastically different size regimes. Here, we demonstrate that creation of high-index facets on subwavelength metallic nanoparticles provides a unique approach to the integration of desired plasmonic and catalytic properties on the same nanoparticle. Through site-selective surface etching of metallic nanocuboids whose surfaces are dominated by low-index facets, we have controllably fabricated nanorice and nanodumbbell particles, which exhibit drastically enhanced catalytic activities arising from the catalytically active high-index facets abundant on the particle surfaces. The nanorice and nanodumbbell particles also possess appealing tunable plasmonic properties that allow us to gain quantitative insights into nanoparticle-catalyzed reactions with unprecedented sensitivity and detail through time-resolved plasmon-enhanced spectroscopic measurements. PMID:24842375

  18. Tunable Plasmonic Nanoparticles with Catalytically Active High-Index Facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hao; Large, Nicolas; Zhang, Qinfeng; Nordlander, Peter; Wang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been of tremendous interest due to their intriguing size- and shape-dependent plasmonic and catalytic properties. Combining tunable plasmon resonances with superior catalytic activities on the same metallic nanoparticle, however, has long been challenging because nanoplasmonics and nanocatalysis typically require nanoparticles in two drastically different size regimes. Here, we demonstrate that creation of high-index facets on subwavelength metallic nanoparticles provides a unique approach to the integration of desired plasmonic and catalytic properties on the same nanoparticle. Through site-selective surface etching of metallic nanocuboids whose surfaces are dominated by low-index facets, we have controllably fabricated nanorice and nanodumbbell shaped particles, which exhibit drastically enhanced catalytic activities arising from the catalytically active high-index facets abundant on the particle surfaces. The nanorice and nanodumbbell particles also possess appealing tunable plasmonic properties that allow us to gain quantitative insights into nanoparticle-catalyzed reactions with unprecedented sensitivity and detail through time-resolved plasmon-enhanced spectroscopic measurements. Past affiliation: Rice University.

  19. Plasmonic nanoring fabrication tuned to pitch: Efficient, deterministic, and large scale realization of ultra-small gaps for next generation plasmonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lehr, D.; Dietrich, K.; Siefke, T.; Kley, E.-B.; Alaee, R.; Filter, R.; Lederer, F.; Rockstuhl, C.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-10-06

    A double-patterning process for scalable, efficient, and deterministic nanoring array fabrication is presented. It enables gaps and features below a size of 20 nm. A writing time of 3 min/cm{sup 2} makes this process extremely appealing for scientific and industrial applications. Numerical simulations are in agreement with experimentally measured optical spectra. Therefore, a platform and a design tool for upcoming next generation plasmonic devices like hybrid plasmonic quantum systems are delivered.

  20. High Chromaticity Aluminum Plasmonic Pixels for Active Liquid Crystal Displays.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Basu, Tiyash; Huang, Da; Schlather, Andrea E; Zheng, Bob; Halas, Naomi J; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan

    2016-01-26

    Chromatic devices such as flat panel displays could, in principle, be substantially improved by incorporating aluminum plasmonic nanostructures instead of conventional chromophores that are susceptible to photobleaching. In nanostructure form, aluminum is capable of producing colors that span the visible region of the spectrum while contributing exceptional robustness, low cost, and streamlined manufacturability compatible with semiconductor manufacturing technology. However, individual aluminum nanostructures alone lack the vivid chromaticity of currently available chromophores because of the strong damping of the aluminum plasmon resonance in the visible region of the spectrum. In recent work, we showed that pixels formed by periodic arrays of Al nanostructures yield far more vivid coloration than the individual nanostructures. This progress was achieved by exploiting far-field diffractive coupling, which significantly suppresses the scattering response on the long-wavelength side of plasmonic pixel resonances. In the present work, we show that by utilizing another collective coupling effect, Fano interference, it is possible to substantially narrow the short-wavelength side of the pixel spectral response. Together, these two complementary effects provide unprecedented control of plasmonic pixel spectral line shape, resulting in aluminum pixels with far more vivid, monochromatic coloration across the entire RGB color gamut than previously attainable. We further demonstrate that pixels designed in this manner can be used directly as switchable elements in liquid crystal displays and determine the minimum and optimal numbers of nanorods required in an array to achieve good color quality and intensity. PMID:26639191

  1. Hybrid plasmonic lattices with tunable magneto-optical activity.

    PubMed

    Kataja, Mikko; Pourjamal, Sara; Maccaferri, Nicolò; Vavassori, Paolo; Hakala, Tommi K; Huttunen, Mikko J; Törmä, Päivi; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-22

    We report on the optical and magneto-optical response of hybrid plasmonic lattices that consist of pure nickel and gold nanoparticles in a checkerboard arrangement. Diffractive far-field coupling between the individual emitters of the lattices results in the excitation of two orthogonal surface lattice resonance modes. Local analyses of the radiation fields indicate that both the nickel and gold nanoparticles contribute to these collective resonances and, thereby, to the magneto-optical activity of the hybrid arrays. The strong effect of noble metal nanoparticles on the magneto-optical response of hybrid lattices opens up new avenues for the realization of sensitive and tunable magneto-plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26907022

  2. Boosting the Performance of Organic Optoelectronic Devices Using Multiple-Patterned Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Ho; Lee, Tae Kyung; Song, Inho; Yu, Hojeong; Lee, Jiwon; Ko, Hyunhyub; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Oh, Joon Hak

    2016-07-01

    Multiple-patterned nanostructures prepared by synergistically combining block-copolymer lithography with nano-imprinting lithography have been used as back reflectors for enhancing light absorption in organic optoelectronic devices. The multiple-patterned electrodes have significantly boosted the performance of organic photovoltaics and photo-transistors, owed to the highly effective light scattering and plasmonic effects, extending the range of their practical applications. PMID:27146332

  3. Electrically driven plasmon chip: Active plasmon lens in the visible range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Ohtsu, Tomoya; Ishii, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We propose an active plasmon lens (APL) consisting of a nanoslit array with an electrically tunable focal profile. Since the transmission phase of a nanoslit is a function of the slit width, applying bias to the nanoslit mechanically alters the nanoslit width and hence shifts the phase front. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrates that applying a bias voltage of 5 V at 633 nm tunes the transmission profile of the fabricated APL. Our active lens is planar and only 400 nm thick, which gives it advantages for fabrication and integration.

  4. Active multistable twisting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Two similarly shaped, such as rectangular, shells are attached to one another such that they form a resulting thin airfoil-like structure. The resulting device has at least two stable equilibrium shapes. The device can be transformed from one shape to another with a snap-through action. One or more actuators can be used to effect the snap-through; i.e., transform the device from one stable shape to another. Power to the actuators is needed only to transform the device from one shape to another.

  5. Portable multichannel surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih Han; Chuang, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, How-Foo

    2016-03-01

    For the purpose of point of care (POC), a disposable polymer-molding prism with two parabolic side surfaces is employed for the ultra compact SPRI biosensor. A compact SPRI biosensor downsized to a form factor of 20 cm *15 cm*5 cm with extremely high sensitivity and large dynamic range is proposed in this study. With the cost effective and disposable polymer-molding prism design, the cross contamination between samples can be avoided. In this demonstration, we integrated the CCD detection system and multichannel fluidic system into this device that allows users to quickly screen various samples simultaneously.

  6. A PMMA-metal lamella grating-based surface plasmon resonance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yongjun; Choi, Kyongsik; Kim, Hwi; Kim, Seyoon; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2006-02-01

    Recently, a lot of interests have been focused on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), generated by the charge density oscillation existing on the interface between dielectric and metal surface. This particular surface wave has been widely used for sub-wavelength scale photonic circuits, fluorescence microscopy, bio-sensing devices, and photonic display applications. Also, it has a lot of potentials from holographic optical devices to holographic display applications. The measurement of SPR can be simply evaluated by the well-known Kretchmann-Raether attenuated total reflection geometry using angle multiplexing of the incident wave. Based on these concepts, we propose and analyze a plasmon-coupled waveguide and a polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) metal thin film grating structure for optical beam coupling and splitting applications. For efficient beam coupling and splitting, we analyze the SPR phenomenon and design plasmon-coupled waveguide structures and the grating structures. To form the PMMA-metal lamella grating structure, we inscribe the grating on the PMMA layer by using excimer laser with the wavelength of 244nm. Then, we deposit gold on the PMMA grating. Finally some experimental results, discussion, and its practical photonic applications are provided.

  7. Active loaded plasmonic antennas at terahertz frequencies: Optical control of their capacitive-inductive coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, G.; Tserkezis, C.; Schaafsma, M. C.; Aizpurua, J.; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the photogeneration of loaded dipole plasmonic antennas resonating at THz frequencies. This is achieved by the patterned optical illumination of a semiconductor surface using a spatial light modulator. Our experimental results indicate the existence of capacitive and inductive coupling of localized surface plasmon polaritons. By varying the load in the antenna gap we are able to switch between both coupling regimes. Furthermore, we determine experimentally the effective impedance of the antenna load and verify that this load can be effectively expressed as a LC resonance formed by a THz inductor and capacitor connected in a parallel circuit configuration. These findings are theoretically supported by full electrodynamic calculations and by simple concepts of lumped circuit theory. Our results open new possibilities for the design of active THz circuits for optoelectronic devices.

  8. Active display and encoding by integrated plasmonic polarizer on light-emitting-diode

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L.; Li, T.; Guo, R. Y.; Xia, W.; Xu, X. G.; Zhu, S. N.

    2013-01-01

    An electrical pumped microscopic active display with integration of plasmonic polarizer and light-emitting-diode is proposed. Thanks to the strong polarized emission through the rectangular nanoholes, well designed pixels with respect to different polarizations are engineered, which give rise to flexible and controllable active display. As results, polarization multiplexed letter encoding, single and double gray-scale images and animation movies are successfully realized. Our results demonstrate a new strategy in electro-optical integration and indicate potential applications in designing new type of microscopic electro-optical devices. PMID:24008314

  9. Localized surface plasmon resonance effect in organic light-emitting devices with Ag islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Noritaka; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    We report on luminescence enhancement of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with silver islands (i-Ag) by a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect. The devices were fabricated using tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) as the red emission material, bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl] benzidine (α-NPD) as the blue emission and hole transport material, and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as the electron transport material. To clarify the position of emission enhancement by energy transfer from i-Ag, an ultrathin TPP layer located within the α-NPD layer. In the device with i-Ag and the TPP layer located over 10 nm from i-Ag, TPP emission was enhanced in comparison with the device without i-Ag. The enhancement of TPP emission was suggested to be the effect of the enhanced electric field resulting from LSPR excited by α-NPD emission.

  10. Performance enhancement of organic photovoltaic devices enabled by Au nanoarrows inducing surface plasmonic resonance effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujun; Li, Zhiqi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Liu, Chunyu; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-09-21

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of metal nanoparticles is widely employed in organic solar cells to enhance device performance. However, the light-harvesting improvement is highly dependent on the shape of the metal nanoparticles. In this study, the significantly enhanced performance upon incorporation of Au nanoarrows in solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices is demonstrated. Incorporating Au nanoarrows into the ZnO cathode buffer layer results in superior broadband optical absorption improvement and a power conversion efficiency of 7.82% is realized with a 27.3% enhancement compared with the control device. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that the introduction of Au nanoarrows not only increases optical trapping by the SPR effect but also facilitates exciton generation, dissociation, and charge transport inside the thin film device. PMID:27531663

  11. Plasmonic silver nanosphere enhanced ZnSe nanoribbon/Si heterojunction optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ran; Ren, Zhi-Fei; Ge, Cai-Wang; Liu, Zhen-Xing; He, Shu-Juan; Yu, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Chun-Yan; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we report a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced optoelectronic device based on a ZnSe:Sb nanoribbon (NR)/Si nano-heterojunction. We experimentally demonstrated that the LSPR peaks of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be readily tuned by changing their size distribution. Optical analysis reveals that the absorption of ZnSe:Sb NRs was increased after the decoration of the Ag NPs with strong LSPR. Further analysis of the optoelectronic device confirmed the device performance can be promoted: for example, the short-circuit photocurrent density of the ZnSe/Si heterojunction solar cell was improved by 57.6% from 11.75 to 18.52 mA cm‑2 compared to that without Ag NPs. Meanwhile, the responsivity and detectivity of the ZnSe:Sb NRs/Si heterojunction device increased from 117.2 to 184.8 mA W‑1, and from 5.86 × 1011 to 9.20 × 1011 cm Hz1/2 W‑1, respectively.

  12. Plasmonic silver nanosphere enhanced ZnSe nanoribbon/Si heterojunction optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ran; Ren, Zhi-Fei; Ge, Cai-Wang; Liu, Zhen-Xing; He, Shu-Juan; Yu, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Chun-Yan; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2016-05-27

    In this study, we report a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced optoelectronic device based on a ZnSe:Sb nanoribbon (NR)/Si nano-heterojunction. We experimentally demonstrated that the LSPR peaks of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be readily tuned by changing their size distribution. Optical analysis reveals that the absorption of ZnSe:Sb NRs was increased after the decoration of the Ag NPs with strong LSPR. Further analysis of the optoelectronic device confirmed the device performance can be promoted: for example, the short-circuit photocurrent density of the ZnSe/Si heterojunction solar cell was improved by 57.6% from 11.75 to 18.52 mA cm(-2) compared to that without Ag NPs. Meanwhile, the responsivity and detectivity of the ZnSe:Sb NRs/Si heterojunction device increased from 117.2 to 184.8 mA W(-1), and from 5.86 × 10(11) to 9.20 × 10(11) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1), respectively. PMID:27082740

  13. Plasmonic devices and sensors built from ordered nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Kobayashi, Yoji; Houk, Ronald J. T.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Long, Jeffrey R.; Robertson, Ian M.; House, Stephen D.; Graham, Dennis D.; Talin, Albert Alec; Chang, Noel N.; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this project is to lay the foundation for using ordered nanoporous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to create devices and sensors whose properties are determined by the dimensions of the MOF lattice. Our hypothesis is that because of the very short (tens of angstroms) distances between pores within the unit cell of these materials, enhanced electro-optical properties will be obtained when the nanopores are infiltrated to create nanoclusters of metals and other materials. Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles in disordered templates or in solution typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report results of synthetic efforts. First, we describe a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions {le} 1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag{sub 3} clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible. Second, a preliminary study of methods to incorporate fulleride (K{sub 3}C{sub 60}) guest molecules within MOF pores that will impart electrical conductivity is described.

  14. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. PMID:26092694

  15. Peptide Functionalized Gold Nanorods for the Sensitive Detection of a Cardiac Biomarker Using Plasmonic Paper Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Kuang, Zhifeng; Jiang, Qisheng; Liu, Keng-Ku; Fisher, Marilee A.; Morrissey, Jeremiah J.; Kharasch, Evan D.; Slocik, Joseph M.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanostructures to adsorbates lends itself to a powerful class of label-free biosensors. Optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures are dependent on the geometrical features and the local dielectric environment. The exponential decay of the sensitivity from the surface of the plasmonic nanotransducer calls for the careful consideration in its design with particular attention to the size of the recognition and analyte layers. In this study, we demonstrate that short peptides as biorecognition elements (BRE) compared to larger antibodies as target capture agents offer several advantages. Using a bioplasmonic paper device (BPD), we demonstrate the selective and sensitive detection of the cardiac biomarker troponin I (cTnI). The smaller sized peptide provides higher sensitivity and a lower detection limit using a BPD. Furthermore, the excellent shelf-life and thermal stability of peptide-based LSPR sensors, which precludes the need for special storage conditions, makes it ideal for use in resource-limited settings. PMID:26552720

  16. Peptide Functionalized Gold Nanorods for the Sensitive Detection of a Cardiac Biomarker Using Plasmonic Paper Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Kuang, Zhifeng; Jiang, Qisheng; Liu, Keng-Ku; Fisher, Marilee A.; Morrissey, Jeremiah J.; Kharasch, Evan D.; Slocik, Joseph M.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2015-11-01

    The sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanostructures to adsorbates lends itself to a powerful class of label-free biosensors. Optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures are dependent on the geometrical features and the local dielectric environment. The exponential decay of the sensitivity from the surface of the plasmonic nanotransducer calls for the careful consideration in its design with particular attention to the size of the recognition and analyte layers. In this study, we demonstrate that short peptides as biorecognition elements (BRE) compared to larger antibodies as target capture agents offer several advantages. Using a bioplasmonic paper device (BPD), we demonstrate the selective and sensitive detection of the cardiac biomarker troponin I (cTnI). The smaller sized peptide provides higher sensitivity and a lower detection limit using a BPD. Furthermore, the excellent shelf-life and thermal stability of peptide-based LSPR sensors, which precludes the need for special storage conditions, makes it ideal for use in resource-limited settings.

  17. Infrared two-wave mixing technique for characterization of graphene THz plasmonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Dennis; Jadidi, Mohammad; Sushkov, Andrei; Cai, Xinghan; Suess, Ryan; Mittendorff, Martin; Murphy, Thomas; Fuhrer, Michael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, Kurt

    We have studied the heterodyne mixing of two beams from infrared lasers on graphene plasmonic devices and detectors. The nonlinear thermal response of graphene allows us to measure a DC photovoltage that depends on the heterodyne difference frequency and gate voltage. The inversion symmetry of the graphene device is broken by using dissimilar metal contacts to allow a net photo-thermoelectric signal. The power, frequency, and temperature dependence of the photoresponse are used to probe the graphene hot-electron cooling rates and mechanisms. We will discuss the use of photothermal effects in graphene to excite surface plasmons at the difference frequency. The high mobility of the free carriers in graphene is important for this experiment. We have measured exfoliated graphene on SiO2/Si substrate detector and we are working on BN graphene and intercalated SiC graphene devices. This work was sponsored by the U.S. ONR (N000141310865) and the U.S. NSF (ECCS 1309750).

  18. Optical activity and circular dichroism of plasmonic nanorod assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Liu, Na; Govorov, Alexander O.

    Plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) has offered an efficient spectroscopy method for the electronic, chemical, and structural properties of different types of light active molecules in the subwavelength regime. Among the different chiral geometries of metal nanoparticles utilized by the plasmonic CD spectroscopy, gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown strong CD signals in the visible frequency range. In this work, we theoretically study the CD signals of AuNR arrangements in order to mimic structures and chemical bonds of chiral biomolecules. In particular, our twisted three-AuNR geometries resemble a molecular structure of tartaric acid. This molecule played an important role in the discovery of chemical chirality. In our study, we show that the strength of CD signals changes dramatically by tuning the interparticle distances and angles. Since the CD signals are typically weak, we develop reliable computational approaches to calculate the plasmonic CD. Manipulating interparticle distances, size, and molecular bond angles result in full control over peak positions, handedness, and positive and negative bands which are observed in the CD spectra. This work has been supported under the grant from Volkswagen Foundation. We also acknowledge the financial support of Condensed Matter and Surface Science program of Ohio University.

  19. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, Devin; Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2014-09-01

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  20. Magnetic activity of surface plasmon resonance using dielectric magnetic materials fabricated on quartz glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuki; Ashizawa, Yoshito; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Lorenz, Michael; Grundmann, Marius; Nakagawa, Katsuji

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic activity of surface plasmons in Au/MFe2O4 (M = Ni, Co, and Zn) polycrystalline bilayer films fabricated on a quartz glass substrate was studied for future magnetic sensor applications using surface plasmon resonance. The excitation of surface plasmons and their magnetic activity were observed in all investigated Au/MFe2O4 films. The magnetic activity of surface plasmons of the polycrystalline Au/NiFe2O4 film was larger than those of the other polycrystalline Au/MFe2O4 films, the epitaxial NiFe2O4 film, and metallic films. The large magnetic activity of surface plasmons of the polycrystalline film is controlled by manipulating surface plasmon excitation conditions and magnetic properties.

  1. Laser activated MTOS microwave device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A light-activated semiconductor device usable as an optoelectronic switch, pulse generator or optical detector is provided. A semiconductor device is disclosed which provides back-to-back metal-thin oxide-silicon (MTOS) capacitors. Each capacitor includes a thin, light-absorptive aluminum electrode which overlies a thin oxide layer and a lightly doped region implanted in an intrinsic silicon substrate.

  2. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics. PMID:27049633

  3. Hybrid grapheme plasmonic waveguide modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansell, D.; Thackray, B. D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thomas, P.; Auton, G. H.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene allow one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with sub-wavelength field confinement of plasmonic/metallic structures is not fully realized. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for light modulation at telecom and near-infrared. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications.

  4. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Bae, J; Lee, S W; Jang, J-W

    2015-11-01

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times (2530%), by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light (λ = 425-475 nm) illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ∼ V(m)) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation under blue light illumination. These results prove that the performance of non-single crystallized polymer nanowire devices can also be improved by plasmonic enhancement. PMID:26413791

  5. Engineering of composite metallic microfibers towards development of plasmonic devices for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, A.; Antonopoulos, G.; Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Kakarantzas, G.; Hewak, D. W.; Zervas, M. N.; Riziotis, C.

    2016-03-01

    The paper discusses the analysis of tapered hybrid composite microfibers based on a metal-core and dielectric-cladding composite material system. Its advantages over the pure metal tips conventionally used, are the inherent enhanced environmental robustness due to inert borosilicate cladding and the capability of multiple excitation of the tapered nanowire through the length of the fiber due to the enabled total internal reflection at the borosilicate/air interface. Simulations through finite element method (FEM) have demonstrated an improved field enhancement at the tapered region of such microfibers. Furthermore, experimental results on tapering in copper based microfibers together with light coupling and propagation studies will be demonstrated revealing the potential for the development of plasmonic devices for sensing applications.

  6. Enhancing the brightness of Si nanocrystal light-emitting devices with electro-excited surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The use of electro-excited surface plasmons (SPs) in Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) is shown to enhance the brightness of Si nanocrystal light-emitting devices (Si-NC LEDs). The Ag-NPs are prepared on the Si-NC thin film by ultrasonic irradiation and postannealing treatments. Electro-excited SPs on Ag-NPs are found, which are induced by electron impact on Ag-NPs and the front electrode Al layer during the charge injection process of LED. The electro-excited SPs enhance the electroluminescence of Si-NC, or LED brightness, via the SP field coupling to the exciton dipole moment of Si-NC. A maximal 5.2-fold brightness enhancement of Si-NC LED is achieved at the postannealing temperature of 200 °C. Remnant far-field radiations arising from electro-excited SPs are detected, which further supports the existence of such SPs.

  7. Influence of substrates in ZnO devices on the surface plasmon enhanced light emission.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peihong; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2008-06-01

    The substrates in emitting structure were found to have an influence on the surface plasmon mediated light emission of ZnO films. Ag film mediated photoluminescence was quenched for ZnO on silicon substrate but enhanced for ZnO on quartz or sapphire substrate. Through a theoretical simulation, the quenching for ZnO on silicon substrate is ascribed to the power lost to the substrate mode nonradiatively at the expense of the power coupled to the SP mode. The substrate with a high refractive index may capture and dissipate the emitting power which limits the efficiency of SP mediated light extraction. Therefore, a proper arrangement of the refractive index of the substrate and emitting layers in the device structure is decisive for the SP coupled light emission enhancement. Base on the theoretical analysis, a four-layered structure was advanced to recover SP mediated emission enhancement from ZnO film on silicon substrate. PMID:18545602

  8. Localized surface plasmon fiber device coated with carbon nanotubes for the specific detection of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, T.; Arif, R.; Neal, R.; Kalli, K.; Kundrát, V.; Rozhin, A.; Culverhouse, P.; Webb, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    We explored the potential of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating working in conjunction with a recently developed localized surface plasmon (LSP) device (based upon a nanostructured thin film consisting of of nano-wires of platinum) with ultra-high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding index. The uncoated LSP sensor's transmission resonances exhibited a refractive index sensitivity of Δλ/Δn ~ -6200nm/RIU and ΔΙ/Δn ~5900dB/RIU, which is the highest reported spectral sensitivity of a fiber optic sensor to bulk index changes within the gas regime. The complete device provides the first demonstration of the chemically specific gas sensing capabilities of CNTs utilizing their optical characteristics. This is proven by investigating the spectral response of the sensor before and after the adhesion of CNTs to alkane gases along with carbon dioxide. The device shows a distinctive spectral response in the presence of gaseous CO2 over and above what is expected from general changes in the bulk refractive index. This fiber device yielded a limit of detection of 150ppm for CO2 at a pressure of one atmosphere. Additionally the adhered CNTs actually reduce sensitivity of the device to changes in bulk refractive index of the surrounding medium. The polarization properties of the LSP sensor resonances are also investigated and it is shown that there is a reduction in the overall azimuthal polarization after the CNTs are applied. These optical devices offer a way of exploiting optically the chemical selectivity of carbon nanotubes, thus providing the potential for real-world applications in gas sensing in many inflammable and explosive environments.

  9. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsun Su, Yen; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien; Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  10. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hsun Su, Yen; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien; Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2013-08-05

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  11. Maximum modulation of plasmon-guided modes by graphene gating.

    PubMed

    Radko, Ilya P; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Grigorenko, Alexander N

    2016-04-18

    The potential of graphene in plasmonic electro-optical waveguide modulators has been investigated in detail by finite-element method modelling of various widely used plasmonic waveguiding configurations. We estimated the maximum possible modulation depth values one can achieve with plasmonic devices operating at telecom wavelengths and exploiting the optical Pauli blocking effect in graphene. Conclusions and guidelines for optimization of modulation/intrinsic loss trade-off have been provided and generalized for any graphene-based plasmonic waveguide modulators, which should help in consideration and design of novel active-plasmonic devices. PMID:27137265

  12. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rourke, D; Ahn, S; Nardes, AM; van de Lagemaat, J; Kopidakis, N; Park, W

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer: fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  13. Millimeter and terahertz detectors based on plasmon excitation in InGaAs/InP HEMT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader Esfahani, Nima; Peale, Robert E.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua R.; Cleary, Justin W.

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in the investigation of millimeter-wave and THz detectors based on plasmon excitation in the twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) of a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) is reported. A tunable resonant polarized photoresponse to mm-wave radiation in the frequency range of 40 to 110 GHz is demonstrated for a gratinggated InGaAs/InP based device. The gate consisted of a metal grating with period of 9 μm specifically designed for excitation of sub-THz plasmons. The resonant excitation of plasmons, which shifts with gate-bias, changes the channel conductance. This resonant change in channel conductance enables potential applications in chip-scale frequency-agile detectors, which can be scaled to mid-THz frequencies.

  14. Optically active metasurface with non-chiral plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Shaltout, Amr; Liu, Jingjing; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2014-08-13

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate an optically active metasurface of λ/50 thickness that rotates linearly polarized light by 45° over a broadband wavelength range in the near IR region. The rotation is achieved through the use of a planar array of plasmonic nanoantennas, which generates a fixed phase-shift between the left circular polarized and right circular polarized components of the incident light. Our approach is built on a new supercell metasurface design methodology: by judiciously designing the location and orientation of individual antennas in the structural supercells, we achieve an effective chiral metasurface through a collective operation of nonchiral antennas. This approach simplifies the overall structure when compared to designs with chiral antennas and also enables a chiral effect which quantitatively depends solely on the supercell geometry. This allows for greater tolerance against fabrication and temperature effects. PMID:25051158

  15. Ultrafast active control of localized surface plasmon resonances in silicon bowtie antennas.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Audrey; Ulbricht, Ronald; Bonn, Mischa; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2010-10-25

    Localized surface plasmon polaritons (LSPPs) provide an efficient means of achieving extreme light concentration. In recent years, their active control has become a major aspiration of plasmonic research. Here, we demonstrate direct control of semiconductor bowtie antennas, enabling active excitation of LSPPs, at terahertz (THz) frequencies. We modify the LSPPs by ultrafast optical modulation of the free carrier density in the plasmonic structure itself, allowing for active control of the semiconductor antennas on picosecond timescales. Moreover, this control enables the manipulation of the field intensity enhancements in ranges of four orders of magnitude. PMID:21164664

  16. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Bae, J.; Lee, S. W.; Jang, J.-W.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times (2530%), by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light (λ = 425-475 nm) illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~ Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation under blue light illumination. These results prove that the performance of non-single crystallized polymer nanowire devices can also be improved by plasmonic enhancement.In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times

  17. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  18. Giant optical activity from the radiative electromagnetic interactions in plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Li; Wang, Rongyao; Ji, Yinglu; Zhai, Dawei; Wu, Xiaochun; Liu, Yu; Chen, Keqiu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain strong optical activity from a chiral plasmonic nanostructure. Our study demonstrates here an alternative strategy for achieving huge chiroptical response of a chiral plasmonic nanostructure based on far-field, radiative electromagnetic interactions of metallic nanoparticles. Theoretical simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. This study may provide more flexible ways to design chiral plasmon nanostructures with strong CD responses for various applications.We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain

  19. Plasmonic activation of a fluorescent carbazole-oxazine switch.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Swaminathan, Subramani; Sortino, Salvatore; Raymo, Françisco M

    2014-08-11

    The covalent attachment of a carbazole fluorophore to an oxazine photochrome permits the reversible activation of fluorescence under optical control. Ultraviolet irradiation with a pulsed laser opens the oxazine ring to shift bathochromically the absorption of the carbazole component. Concomitant visible illumination excites selectively the carbazole fluorophore of the photochemical product to produce fluorescence. The photogenerated and fluorescent species reverts spontaneously on a submicrosecond timescale to the initial nonemissive state of the carbazole-oxazine dyad. The photochemical and photophysical properties engineered into this particular molecular switch allow the convenient monitoring of plasmonic effects on photochemical reactions with fluorescence measurements. In close proximity to silver nanoparticles, visible illumination with a continuous-wave laser also results in fluorescence activation. The metallic nanostructures enable the two-photon excitation of the oxazine component to induce the photochromic transformation and then facilitate the one-photon excitation of the photochemical product to generate fluorescence. Thus, these operating principles offer the opportunity to avoid altogether the need of pulsed ultraviolet irradiation to trigger the photochromic transformation and, instead, allow fluorescence activation with a single visible source operating at low illumination power. PMID:25056267

  20. Electrostrictive effect for active control of surface plasmon signals.

    PubMed

    Karperien, Lucas; Sabat, Ribal Georges

    2016-06-13

    Real-time surface plasmon modulation was achieved by electrically varying the pitch of a nanoscale surface relief diffraction grating inscribed on an azobenzene thin film covered with a layer of silver. The azobenzene film was spin coated on an electrostrictive Lead Lanthanum Zirconate Titanate (PLZT) ceramic substrate and a combination of DC bias and AC electric fields were applied longitudinally on the PLZT ceramic causing a change in the grating's pitch as well as the surface plasmon's resonance wavelength. This method permits extremely accurate control of the surface plasmon wavelength for tunable optics applications. PMID:27410344

  1. Plasmon-enhanced Electrically Light-emitting from ZnO Nanorod Arrays/p-GaN Heterostructure Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junfeng; Shi, Zengliang; Wang, Yueyue; Lin, Yi; Zhu, Qiuxiang; Tian, Zhengshan; Dai, Jun; Wang, Shufeng; Xu, Chunxiang

    2016-01-01

    Effective and bright light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) have attracted broad interests in fundamental research and industrial application, especially on short wavelength LEDs. In this paper, a well aligned ZnO nanorod arrays grown on the p-GaN substrate to form a heterostructured light-emitting diode and Al nanoparticles (NPs) were decorated to improve the electroluminescence performance. More than 30-folds enhancement of the electroluminescence intensity was obtained compared with the device without Al NPs decoration. The investigation on the stable and transient photoluminescence spectraof the ZnO nanorod arrays before and after Al NPs decoration demonstrated that the metal surface plasmon resonance coupling with excitons of ZnO leads to the enhancement of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). Our results provide aneffective approach to design novel optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and plasmonic nanolasers. PMID:27181337

  2. Flexible Near-Infrared Photovoltaic Devices Based on Plasmonic Hot-Electron Injection into Silicon Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Dong; Gao, Yang; Ma, Jun; Long, Ran; Wang, Chengming; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-03-24

    The development of flexible near-infrared (NIR) photovoltaic (PV) devices containing silicon meets the strong demands for solar utilization, portability, and sustainable manufacture; however, improvements in the NIR light absorption and conversion efficiencies in ultrathin crystalline Si are required. We have developed an approach to improve the quantum efficiency of flexible PV devices in the NIR spectral region by integrating Si nanowire arrays with plasmonic Ag nanoplates. The Ag nanoplates can directly harvest and convert NIR light into plasmonic hot electrons for injection into Si, while the Si nanowire arrays offer light trapping. Taking the wavelength of 800 nm as an example, the external quantum efficiency has been improved by 59 % by the integration Ag nanoplates. This work provides an alternative strategy for the design and fabrication of flexible NIR PVs. PMID:26929103

  3. Plasmon-enhanced Electrically Light-emitting from ZnO Nanorod Arrays/p-GaN Heterostructure Devices.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junfeng; Shi, Zengliang; Wang, Yueyue; Lin, Yi; Zhu, Qiuxiang; Tian, Zhengshan; Dai, Jun; Wang, Shufeng; Xu, Chunxiang

    2016-01-01

    Effective and bright light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) have attracted broad interests in fundamental research and industrial application, especially on short wavelength LEDs. In this paper, a well aligned ZnO nanorod arrays grown on the p-GaN substrate to form a heterostructured light-emitting diode and Al nanoparticles (NPs) were decorated to improve the electroluminescence performance. More than 30-folds enhancement of the electroluminescence intensity was obtained compared with the device without Al NPs decoration. The investigation on the stable and transient photoluminescence spectraof the ZnO nanorod arrays before and after Al NPs decoration demonstrated that the metal surface plasmon resonance coupling with excitons of ZnO leads to the enhancement of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). Our results provide aneffective approach to design novel optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and plasmonic nanolasers. PMID:27181337

  4. Plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials: Active near field coupling between bright superconducting and dark metallic mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Caihong; Han, Jiaguang; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Zhang, Weili

    2013-09-01

    Structured plasmonic metamaterial devices offer the design flexibility to be size scaled for operation across the electromagnetic spectrum and are extremely attractive for generating electromagnetically induced transparency and slow-light behaviors via coupling of bright and dark subwavelength resonators. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a thermally active superconductor-metal coupled resonator based hybrid terahertz metamaterial on a sapphire substrate that shows tunable transparency and slow light behavior as the metamaterial chip is cooled below the high-temperature superconducting phase transition temperature. This hybrid metamaterial opens up the avenues for designing micro-sized active circuitry with switching, modulation, and "slowing down terahertz light" capabilities.

  5. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  6. Scattering efficiency and near field enhancement of active semiconductor plasmonic antennas at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Vincenzo; Berrier, Audrey; Maier, Stefan A; Sánchez-Gil, José Antonio; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2010-02-01

    Terahertz plasmonic resonances in semiconductor (indium antimonide, InSb) dimer antennas are investigated theoretically. The antennas are formed by two rods separated by a small gap. We demonstrate that, with an appropriate choice of the shape and dimension of the semiconductor antennas, it is possible to obtain large electromagnetic field enhancement inside the gap. Unlike metallic antennas, the enhancement around the semiconductor plasmonics antenna can be easily adjusted by varying the concentration of free carriers, which can be achieved by optical or thermal excitation of carriers or electrical carrier injection. Such active plasmonic antennas are interesting structures for THz applications such as modulators and sensors. PMID:20174108

  7. Surface plasmons and magneto-optic activity in hexagonal Ni anti-dot arrays.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Evangelos Th; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Melander, Emil; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Pappas, Spiridon D; Patoka, Piotr; Giersig, Michael; Fumagalli, Paul; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Ctistis, Georgios

    2011-11-21

    The influence of surface plasmons on the magneto-optic activity in a two-dimensional hexagonal array is addressed. The experiments were performed using hexagonal array of circular holes in a ferromagnetic Ni film. Well pronounced troughs are observed in the optical reflectivity, resulting from the presence of surface plasmons. The surface plasmons are found to strongly enhance the magneto-optic response (Kerr rotation), as compared to a continuous film of the same composition. The influence of the hexagonal symmetry of the pattern on the coupling between the plasmonic excitations is demonstrated, using optical diffraction measurements and theoretical calculations of the magneto-optic and of the angular dependence of the optical activity. PMID:22109411

  8. Theory-guided nano-engineering of organic electro-optic materials for hybrid silicon photonic, plasmonic, and metamaterial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Larry R.

    2013-03-01

    Coarse-grained Monte Carlo/molecular dynamic calculations are employed to explore the effect of various of intermolecular electrostatic interactions upon chromophore order, lattice dimensionality, and viscoelasticity in electrically-poled organic second order nonlinear optical materials. The following classes of organic macromolecular materials are considered: (1) Chromophore-polymer composites, (2) chromophores covalently incorporated into polymers and dendrimers, (3) chromophores incorporating additional dipolar or quadrupolar interactions that enhance poling efficiency, and (4) binary chromophore materials. For chromophore-polymer composites, the competition of chromophore-chromophore dipolar interactions and nuclear repulsive (steric) interactions define poling-induced acentric order. For covalently incorporated chromophores, covalent bond potentials also influence poling-induced order. These first two classes of materials basically behave as Langevin (3-D) lattice materials. Dipolar (e.g., coumarin) and quadrupolar (arene-perfluoroarene) interactions act to influence lattice dimensionality and thus enhance poling efficiency (the ratio of electro-optic activity to electric poling field strength). The long-range molecular cooperativity associated with these interactions influences viscoelastic properties critical to material processing and integration into silicon photonic, plasmonic, and metamaterial devices. The interaction between different chromophore species in binary chromophore materials also enhances poling efficiency. Polarized laser radiation applied to certain binary chromophore materials can also be used to enhance poling efficiency through control of lattice dimensionality. Poling efficiency approaching 5 (nm/V)2 has been achieved for these latter two classes of materials. Improvement in poling efficiency and control of material viscosity is particular important for integration of organic materials into complex device structures.

  9. Hybrid metamaterial device with wideband absorption and multiband transmission based on spoof surface plasmon polaritons and perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Jia; Gao, Jun; Cao, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Yue-Jun; Zhang, Chen; Zheng, Gui

    2015-05-01

    We reported on the design, realization, and numerical characterization of a hybrid metamaterial (HM) with the absorption and transmission at different frequencies based on the spoof surface plasmon polaritons and perfect absorber. A unit cell is composed of a three-layer metamaterial with double orthogonal split ring resonators and a ground plate loaded with two-sided metallic grooves. It is shown that the hybrid metamaterial primarily exhibits a broadband polarization-sensitive absorption from 6.57 to 28.16 GHz with a full-width at half-maximum in one direction and a multiband transmission in the opposite one. When the incidence is parallel to HM, the ground plate loaded with two-sided metallic grooves can support a structural vibration of spoof surface plasmon polaritons. To demonstrate design, a HM device easily implemented using common printed circuit board fabrication method is fabricated and measured and the experimental results agree well with the simulated results.

  10. Conformal Coating of Three-Dimensional Nanostructures via Atomic Layer Deposition for Development of Advanced Energy Storage Devices and Plasmonic Transparent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Gary A.

    Due to the prodigious amount of electrical energy consumed throughout the world, there exists a great demand for new and improved methods of generating electrical energy in a clean and renewable manner as well as finding more effective ways to store it. This enormous task is of great interest to scientists and engineers, and much headway is being made by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured materials. This work explores the application of two types of 3D nanostructured materials toward fabrication of advanced electrical energy storage and conversion devices. The first nanostructured material consists of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. This three-dimensional structure is opaque, electrically conducting, and contains active sites along the outside of each fiber that are conducive to chemical reactions. Therefore, they make the perfect 3D conducting nanostructured substrate for advanced energy storage devices. In this work, the details for transforming vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays into core-shell structures via atomic layer deposition as well as into a mesoporous manganese oxide coated supercapacitor electrode are given. Another unique type of three-dimensional nanostructured substrate is nanotextured glass, which is transparent but non-conducting. Therefore, it can be converted to a 3D transparent conductor for possible application in photovoltaics if it can be conformally coated with a conducting material. This work details that transformation as well as the addition of plasmonic gold nanoparticles to complete the transition to a 3D plasmonic transparent conductor.

  11. Fabrication of plasmon length-based surface enhanced Raman scattering for multiplex detection on microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Lee, Jeewon; Il Choi, Hong; Seok Kwak, Ho; Jun Sim, Sang

    2015-08-15

    The length of bioreceptors plays an important role in signal enhancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) due to amplification of electromagnetic fields generated by the excitation of localized surface plasmons. Herein, intact antibodies (IgG) and Fab fragments conjugated onto gold nanostar were used to fabricate two kinds of immunosensors for measurement of their SERS signals. Using CA125 as the antigen and Rhodamine-6G (R6G)-conjugated immunogolds, a SERS immunosensor was self-assembled by antigen-antibody interaction. The results showed that the SERS signal from the Fab immunosensor was 2.4 times higher than that of the IgG immunosensor. Furthermore, increased hot-spots by silver atom deposition onto the IgG and Fab immunosensor showed 2.1 and 1.4 times higher signals than before enhancement, respectively. For application, based on the Fab immunosensor, a SERS-compatible microfluidic system was designed for multiplex assays to overcome the drawbacks of conventional assays. This system can measure biological specimens directly from bio fluids instead of using a complex microfluidic device containing separation and detection elements. Four approved biomarkers of breast cancer, including cancer antigen (CA125), HER2, epididymis protein (HE4), and Eotaxin-1, were detected from patient-mimicked serum with limits of 15 fM, 17 fM, 21 fM, and 6.5 fM, respectively. The results indicated that the lengths and geometry of the bioreceptors determined the intensity of SERS signal from the interface and cavity of the sandwich immunosensor. Silver atom deposition at the cavity of the immunosensor increased the SERS signal. Finally, the SERS immunosensor built-in microfluidic system improved the performance of multiplex diagnostics. PMID:25841120

  12. Optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures: Theory & experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala Krishna, Juluri

    Metal nanoparticles and thin films enable localization of electromagnetic energy in the form of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) and propagating surface plasmons respectively. This research field, also known as plasmonics, involves understanding and fabricating innovative nanostructures designed to manage and utilize localized light in the nanoscale. Advances in plasmonics will facilitate innovation in sensing, biomedical engineering, energy harvesting and nanophotonic devices. In this thesis, three aspects of plasmonics are studied: 1) active plasmonic systems using charge-induced plasmon shifts (CIPS) and plasmon-molecule resonant coupling; 2) scalable solutions to fabricate large electric field plasmonic nanostructures; and 3) controlling the propagation of designer surface plasmons (DSPs) using parabolic graded media. The full potential of plasmonics can be realized with active plasmonic devices which provide tunable plasmon resonances. The work reported here develops both an understanding for and realization of various mechanisms to achieve tunable plasmonic systems. First, we show that certain nanoparticle geometries and material compositions enable large CIPS. Second, we propose and investigate systems which exhibit coupling between molecular and plasmonic resonances where energy splitting is observed due to interactions between plasmons and molecules. Large electric field nanostructures have many promising applications in the areas of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, higher harmonic light generation, and enhanced uorescence. High throughput techniques that utilize simple nanofabrication are essential their advancement. We contribute to this effort by using a salting-out quenching technique and colloidal lithography to fabricate nanodisc dimers and cusp nanostructures that allow localization of large electric fields, and are comparable to structures fabricated by conventional lithography/milling techniques. Designer surface plasmons (DSPs) are

  13. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    SciTech Connect

    Figus, Cristiana Quochi, Francesco Artizzu, Flavia Saba, Michele Marongiu, Daniela Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea

    2014-10-21

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  14. Highly directional emission via coupled surface-plasmon tunneling from electroluminescence in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jing; Okamoto, Takayuki; Kawata, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    We report that highly directional electroluminescence from top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TEOLEDs) can be achieved by using a two-dimensionally periodically corrugated silver film as a cathode and an organic dye with a narrow bandwidth of emission spectrum as an emitting material. The resonant excitation of surface plasmons on the silver film interfaces contributes to the light transmission through the silver cathode and to the directional emission. The TEOLEDs with a europium complex as an emissive layer show beam divergence of less than 4° and the beam direction is controlled by periodicity of the corrugation.

  15. Disposable Plasmonics: Plastic Templated Plasmonic Metamaterials with Tunable Chirality.

    PubMed

    Karimullah, Affar S; Jack, Calum; Tullius, Ryan; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Barron, Laurence D; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2015-10-01

    Development of low-cost disposable plasmonic substrates is vital for the applicability of plasmonic sensing. Such devices can be made using injection-molded templates to create plasmonic films. The elements of these plasmonic films are hybrid nanostructures composed of inverse and solid structures. Tuning the modal coupling between the two allows optimization of the optical properties for nanophotonic applications. PMID:26306427

  16. Plasmonic gas and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald; Liu, Na

    2014-06-01

    Sensitive and robust detection of gases and chemical reactions constitutes a cornerstone of scientific research and key industrial applications. In an effort to reach progressively smaller reagent concentrations and sensing volumes, optical sensor technology has experienced a paradigm shift from extended thin-film systems towards engineered nanoscale devices. In this size regime, plasmonic particles and nanostructures provide an ideal toolkit for the realization of novel sensing concepts. This is due to their unique ability to simultaneously focus light into subwavelength hotspots of the electromagnetic field and to transmit minute changes of the local environment back into the farfield as a modulation of their optical response. Since the basic building blocks of a plasmonic system are commonly noble metal nanoparticles or nanostructures, plasmonics can easily be integrated with a plethora of chemically or catalytically active materials and compounds to investigate processes ranging from hydrogen absorption in palladium to the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT). In this review, we will discuss a multitude of plasmonic sensing strategies, spanning the technological scale from simple plasmonic particles embedded in extended thin films to highly engineered complex plasmonic nanostructures. Due to their flexibility and excellent sensing performance, plasmonic structures may open an exciting pathway towards the detection of chemical and catalytic events down to the single molecule level.

  17. Plasmon-mediated photocatalytic activity of wet-chemically prepared ZnO nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thang Duy; Han, Gui; Arai, Nono; Nabatame, Toshihide; Wada, Yoshiki; Hoang, Chung Vu; Aono, Masakazu; Nagao, Tadaaki

    2015-03-21

    We report on measurements and simulations of the efficient sunlight-driven and visible-active photocatalysts composed of plasmonic metal nanoparticles and ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays fabricated via an all-wet-chemical route. Because of the coupling between the ZnO dielectric response and the excitation of the Ag or Au nanoparticles, efficient electronic excitation can be induced in the vicinity of the metal-ZnO interfaces because optically-excited plasmonic particles can not only concentrate the electromagnetic field at the ZnO/particle interface, but also act as efficient sources of plasmonic hot electrons to be injected into the conduction band of the ZnO catalyst. The catalytic activities of the fabricated ZnO NWs are examined by photodegradation of methylene blue and by photocurrent measurements in a photovoltaic configuration. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were used to understand the behavior of the light on the nanometer-scale to clarify the catalytic enhancement mechanisms in both the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (VIS) regions. In addition, simulation results indicated that a near-surface normal but slightly tilted ZnO NW array geometry would provide an increased optical path length and enhanced multiple scattering and absorption processes arising from the localized surface plasmon resonances of the nanoparticles. The results obtained here clarify the role of the plasmon resonance and provide us with useful knowledge for the development of metal-oxide nano-hybrid materials for solar energy conversion. PMID:25700130

  18. Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Ning, Yuesheng; Zhao, Binyuan; Yin, Fujun; Du, Cuiling; Wang, Fei; Lai, Yijian; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Shuan; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures. PMID:26337008

  19. Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Ning, Yuesheng; Zhao, Binyuan; Yin, Fujun; Du, Cuiling; Wang, Fei; Lai, Yijian; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Shuan; Chen, Li

    2015-09-01

    Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

  20. Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Ning, Yuesheng; Zhao, Binyuan; Yin, Fujun; Du, Cuiling; Wang, Fei; Lai, Yijian; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Shuan; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures. PMID:26337008

  1. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Jaw-Won

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times, by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation. Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (no. 2013K1A3A1A32035429 and 2015R1A1A1A05027681).

  2. Development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave device for the characterization of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Florian; Roach, Paul; Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Newton, Michael I.; McHale, Glen; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-12-01

    It is known that acoustic sensor devices, if operated in liquid phase, are sensitive not just to the mass of the analyte but also to various other parameters, such as size, shape, charge and elastic constants of the analyte as well as bound and viscously entrained water. This can be used to extract valuable information about a biomolecule, particularly if the acoustic device is combined with another sensor element which is sensitive to the mass or amount of analyte only. The latter is true in good approximation for various optical sensor techniques. This work reports on the development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave sensor system which is designed for the investigation of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA. Results for the deposition of neutravidin and DNA are reported.

  3. Plasmonic Nanorattles as Next-Generation Catalysts for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Mediated Oxidations Promoted by Activated Oxygen.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Anderson G M; Rodrigues, Thenner S; Correia, Valquírio G; Alves, Tiago V; Alves, Rafael S; Ando, Rômulo A; Ornellas, Fernando R; Wang, Jiale; Andrade, Leandro H; Camargo, Pedro H C

    2016-06-13

    Nanorattles, comprised of a nanosphere inside a nanoshell, were employed as the next generation of plasmonic catalysts for oxidations promoted by activated O2 . After investigating how the presence of a nanosphere inside a nanoshell affected the electric-field enhancements in the nanorattle relative to a nanoshell and a nanosphere, the SPR-mediated oxidation of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) functionalized at their surface was investigated to benchmark how these different electric-field intensities affected the performances of Au@AgAu nanorattles, AgAu nanoshells and Au nanoparticles having similar sizes. The high performance of the nanorattles enabled the visible-light driven synthesis of azobenzene from aniline under ambient conditions. As the nanorattles allow the formation of electromagnetic hot spots without relying on the uncontrolled aggregation of nanostructures, it enables their application as catalysts in liquid phase under mild conditions using visible light as the main energy input. PMID:27159199

  4. From tunable core-shell nanoparticles to plasmonic drawbridges: Active control of nanoparticle optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Chad P.; Zhang, Hui; Swearer, Dayne F.; Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Hoener, Benjamin S.; Huang, Da; Hoggard, Anneli; Chang, Wei-Shun; Mulvaney, Paul; Ringe, Emilie; Halas, Naomi J.; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan; Landes, Christy F.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles are highly sensitive to interparticle distance, giving rise to dramatic but frequently irreversible color changes. By electrochemical modification of individual nanoparticles and nanoparticle pairs, we induced equally dramatic, yet reversible, changes in their optical properties. We achieved plasmon tuning by oxidation-reduction chemistry of Ag-AgCl shells on the surfaces of both individual and strongly coupled Au nanoparticle pairs, resulting in extreme but reversible changes in scattering line shape. We demonstrated reversible formation of the charge transfer plasmon mode by switching between capacitive and conductive electronic coupling mechanisms. Dynamic single-particle spectroelectrochemistry also gave an insight into the reaction kinetics and evolution of the charge transfer plasmon mode in an electrochemically tunable structure. Our study represents a highly useful approach to the precise tuning of the morphology of narrow interparticle gaps and will be of value for controlling and activating a range of properties such as extreme plasmon modulation, nanoscopic plasmon switching, and subnanometer tunable gap applications. PMID:26665175

  5. Design of plasmonic photodetector with high absorptance and nano-scale active regions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel plasmonic photodetector with high responsivity, utilizing nano-scale active regions. This design can be applied to diverse materials (group III-V or IV materials) and different operation wavelengths covering the O-U bands. The periodic structure utilizing Surface Plasmon Polariton Bloch Waves (SPP-BWs) has low optical power loss. FDTD simulation shows an absorptance of 74.4% which means a responsivity of about 0.74 A/W at 1550 nm. The low capacitance brings low noise, reduced power consumption, and a high electrical bandwidth which is estimated to be 140 GHz. Among the plasmonic PDs with inherent high speeds but low responsivities, our design makes the obvious progress on improving the absorptance. PMID:27505787

  6. Plasmonic Au nanoparticles embedding enhances the activity and stability of CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guiyang; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Jungang; Wu, Shujie; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    The activity and stability of CdS for visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution could be significantly enhanced by embedding plasmonic Au nanoparticles. The plasmon resonance energy field of Au nanoparticles could increase the formation rate and lifetime of e(-)/h(+) pairs in CdS semiconductors. PMID:26732587

  7. A two-compartment microfluidic device for long-term live cell detection based on surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shijie; Yu, Xinglong; Liu, Ran; Chen, Weixing; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    A two-compartment microfluidic device integrated with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) interferometric imaging system has been developed for long-term and real-time cell detection. The device uses a porous membrane sandwiched between two chambers to obtain an exact medium exchange rate and minimal fluid shear stress for cell culture. The two-compartment device was optimized by COMSOL simulations and fabricated using Poly (dimethylsiloxane) elastomer replica molding methods. To confirm the capability of the microfluidic device to maintain the cell physiological environment over long intervals, HeLa cells were cultured in the device for up to 48 h. The cell proliferation process was monitored by both SPR and microscopic time-lapse imaging. The SPR response showed four phases with different growth rates, and agreed well with the time-lapse imaging. Furthermore, real-time detection of cell behaviors under different doses of Paclitaxel and Cisplatin was performed. The SPR responses revealed dose-dependent inhibitions of cell proliferation, with distinct drug action kinetics. PMID:27570574

  8. Experimental study of plasmon in a grating coupled graphene device with a resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Fang, Jingyue; Qin, Shiqiao; Liu, Yongtao; Zhou, Yingqiu; Li, Renbing; Zhang, Xue-Ao

    2015-11-01

    Plasmon was probed from graphene which was grown by chemical vapor deposition using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at room temperature. Graphene was laid on a resonant cavity, and metal grating was then deposited on top of them. For the THz light polarized along the grid fingers, the optical conductivity of graphene changed from Drude response into strongly Lorentz behavior with a peak formed in the THz-region. These experimental results are highly consistent with the theoretical prediction of a single layer graphene. It confirms that the graphene plasmon frequency can be tuned by the length of grating. Moreover, the extinction in the transmission of single-layer graphene can also be increased beyond 60%.

  9. Actively phase-controlled coupling between plasmonic waveguides via in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator: nanoscale optical logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kum-Song; Han, Yong-Ha; Ri, Chol-Song; Im, Song-Jin

    2016-08-15

    The development of nanoscale optical logic gates has attracted immense attention due to increasing demand for ultrahigh-speed and energy-efficient optical computing and data processing, however, suffers from the difficulty in precise control of phase difference of the two optical signals. We propose a novel conception of nanoscale optical logic gates based on actively phase-controlled coupling between two plasmonic waveguides via an in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator. Precise control of phase difference between the two plasmonic signals can be performed by manipulating pumping rate at an appropriate frequency detuning, enabling a high contrast between the output logic states "1" and "0." Without modification of the structural parameters, different logic functions can be provided. This active nanoscale optical logic device is expected to be quite energy-efficient with ideally low energy consumption on the order of 0.1 fJ/bit. Analytical calculations and numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed concept. PMID:27519077

  10. Nonlinear optics, active plasmonics and metamaterials with liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Iam Choon

    2014-03-01

    Nematic liquid crystals possess large and versatile optical nonlinearities suitable for photonics applications spanning the femtoseconds to milliseconds time scales, and across a wide spectral window. We present a comprehensive review of the physical properties and mechanisms that underlie these multiple time scales nonlinearities, delving into individual molecular electronic responses as well as collective ordered-phase dynamical processes. Several exemplary theoretical formalisms and feasibility demonstrations of ultrafast all-optical transmission switching and tunable metamaterials and plasmonic photonic structures where the liquid crystal constituents play the critical role of enabling the processes are discussed. Emphasis is placed on all-optical processes, but we have also highlighted cases where electro-optical means could provide additional control, flexibility and enhancement possibility. We also point out how another phase of chiral nematic, namely, Blue-Phase liquid crystals could circumvent some of the limitations of nematic and present new possibilities.

  11. Plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticles can promote neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paviolo, Chiara; Haycock, John W.; Yong, Jiawey; Yu, Aimin; McArthur, Sally L.; Stoddart, Paul R.

    2013-02-01

    As-synthesized, poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS)-coated and SiO2 coated gold nanorods were taken up by NG108-15 neuronal cells. Exposure to laser light at the plasmon resonance wavelength of gold nanorods was found to trigger the differentiation process in the nanoparticle treated cells. Results were assessed by measuring the maximum neurite length, the number of neurites per neuron and the percentage of neurons with neurites. When the intracellular Ca2+ signaling was monitored, evidence of photo-generated transients were recorded without altering other normal cell functions. These results open new opportunities for peripheral nerve regeneration treatments and for the process of infrared nerve stimulation.

  12. Surface plasmon enhanced cell microscopy with blocked random spatial activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taehwang; Oh, Youngjin; Lee, Wonju; Yang, Heejin; Kim, Donghyun

    2016-03-01

    We present surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence microscopy with random spatial sampling using patterned block of silver nanoislands. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was performed to confirm near-field localization on nanoislands. Random nanoislands were fabricated in silver by temperature annealing. By analyzing random near-field distribution, average size of localized fields was found to be on the order of 135 nm. Randomly localized near-fields were used to spatially sample F-actin of J774 cells (mouse macrophage cell-line). Image deconvolution algorithm based on linear imaging theory was established for stochastic estimation of fluorescent molecular distribution. The alignment between near-field distribution and raw image was performed by the patterned block. The achieved resolution is dependent upon factors including the size of localized fields and estimated to be 100-150 nm.

  13. All-optical switching of localized surface plasmon resonance in single gold nanosandwich using GeSbTe film as an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Kihara, Y.; Saiki, T.

    2015-01-19

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching was investigated in a Au/GeSbTe/Au nanosandwich as a key active element for plasmonic integrated circuits and devices. Near-infrared single-particle spectroscopy was conducted to examine the interaction of a Au nanorod (AuNR) and Au film, between which a GeSbTe layer was incorporated as an active phase-change media. Numerical calculation revealed that hybridized modes of the AuNR and Au film exhibit a significant change of scattering intensity with the phase change. In particular, the antisymmetric (magnetic resonance) mode can be modulated effectively by the extinction coefficient of GST, as well as its refractive index. Experimental demonstration of the switching operation was performed by alternate irradiation with a picosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization. Repeatable modulation was obtained by monitoring the scattering light around the LSPR peak at λ = 1070 nm.

  14. All-optical switching of localized surface plasmon resonance in single gold nanosandwich using GeSbTe film as an active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Kihara, Y.; Saiki, T.

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching was investigated in a Au/GeSbTe/Au nanosandwich as a key active element for plasmonic integrated circuits and devices. Near-infrared single-particle spectroscopy was conducted to examine the interaction of a Au nanorod (AuNR) and Au film, between which a GeSbTe layer was incorporated as an active phase-change media. Numerical calculation revealed that hybridized modes of the AuNR and Au film exhibit a significant change of scattering intensity with the phase change. In particular, the antisymmetric (magnetic resonance) mode can be modulated effectively by the extinction coefficient of GST, as well as its refractive index. Experimental demonstration of the switching operation was performed by alternate irradiation with a picosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization. Repeatable modulation was obtained by monitoring the scattering light around the LSPR peak at λ = 1070 nm.

  15. Ultra-long-range symmetric plasmonic waveguide for high-density and compact photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Chien

    2013-12-01

    This study reports a symmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide consisting of a cylindrical metal nanowire surrounded by low-index SiO₂ and high-index Si covered with SiO₂. The symmetric circumambience relative to the metal nanowire significantly facilitates the present design to minimize the energy attenuation resulting from Ohmic losses while retaining highly confined modes guided in the low-index nanoscale gaps between the metal nanowire and the high-index Si. The geometric dependence of the mode characteristics on the proposed structure is analyzed in detail, showing long propagation lengths beyond 10 mm with normalized mode areas on the order of 10⁻². In addition to enabling the building of long-range plasmonic circuit interconnects, the compactness and high-density integration of the proposed structure are examined by analyzing crosstalk in a directional coupler composed of two such waveguides and bending losses for a 90° bend. A relatively short coupling length of 1.16 μm is obtained at a center-to-center separation of 0.26 μm between adjacent waveguides. Increasing the separation to 1.65 μm could completely prevent coupling between waveguides. Power transmission exceeds 80% in the case of a 90° bend with small radius of curvature of 0.5 μm. Moreover, the dependence of spectral response on coupling length and the transmission of a 90° bend, ranging from telecom wavelengths of 1.40 to 1.65 μm, are investigated. Over a wide wavelength range, a strong coupling length dependence on wavelength and a high transmission for a 90° bend also make the proposed plasmonic waveguide promising for the realization of wavelength-selective components. PMID:24514506

  16. [Remote monitoring of active implantable medical device].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujing

    2013-09-01

    Active implantable medical device develops rapidly in recent years. The clinical demands and current application are introduced, the technical trends are discussed, and the safety risks are analyzed in this paper. PMID:24409793

  17. Plasmonic photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Lim Chen, Yu; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic photocatalysis has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible light irradiation, increasing the prospect of using sunlight for environmental and energy applications such as wastewater treatment, water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction. Plasmonic photocatalysis makes use of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed into semiconductor photocatalysts and possesses two prominent features—a Schottky junction and localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR). The former is of benefit to charge separation and transfer whereas the latter contributes to the strong absorption of visible light and the excitation of active charge carriers. This article aims to provide a systematic study of the fundamental physical mechanisms of plasmonic photocatalysis and to rationalize many experimental observations. In particular, we show that LSPR could boost the generation of electrons and holes in semiconductor photocatalysts through two different effects—the LSPR sensitization effect and the LSPR-powered bandgap breaking effect. By classifying the plasmonic photocatalytic systems in terms of their contact form and irradiation state, we show that the enhancement effects on different properties of photocatalysis can be well-explained and systematized. Moreover, we identify popular material systems of plasmonic photocatalysis that have shown excellent performance and elucidate their key features in the context of our proposed mechanisms and classifications.

  18. Hybrid graphene plasmonic waveguide modulators.

    PubMed

    Ansell, D; Radko, I P; Han, Z; Rodriguez, F J; Bozhevolnyi, S I; Grigorenko, A N

    2015-01-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene make possible the fabrication of novel optoelectronic devices. One of the most exciting graphene characteristics is the tunability by gating which allows one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with subwavelength field confinement of plasmonic waveguides remains largely unexplored. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic waveguide modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for telecom applications. The modulator working at the telecom range is demonstrated, showing a modulation depth of >0.03 dB μm(-1) at low gating voltages for an active device area of just 10 μm(2), characteristics which are already comparable to those of silicon-based waveguide modulators while retaining the benefit of further device miniaturization. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications. PMID:26554944

  19. Hybrid graphene plasmonic waveguide modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansell, D.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene make possible the fabrication of novel optoelectronic devices. One of the most exciting graphene characteristics is the tunability by gating which allows one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with subwavelength field confinement of plasmonic waveguides remains largely unexplored. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic waveguide modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for telecom applications. The modulator working at the telecom range is demonstrated, showing a modulation depth of >0.03 dB μm-1 at low gating voltages for an active device area of just 10 μm2, characteristics which are already comparable to those of silicon-based waveguide modulators while retaining the benefit of further device miniaturization. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications.

  20. Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daehan; Johnson, Timothy W; Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-11-24

    We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication. PMID:26402066

  1. Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication. PMID:26402066

  2. The bright side of plasmonic gold nanoparticles; activation of Nrf2, the cellular protective pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Alona; Soroka, Yoram; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Lewis, Aaron; Kohen, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely investigated for cancer therapy, due to their ability to strongly absorb light and convert it to heat and thus selectively destroy tumor cells. In this study we shed light on a new aspect of AuNPs and their plasmonic excitation, wherein they can provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection by stimulating the cellular protective Nrf2 pathway. Our study was carried out on cells of the immune system, macrophages, and on skin cells, keratinocytes. A different response to AuNPs was noted in the two types of cells, explained by their distinct uptake profiles. In keratinocytes, the exposure to AuNPs, even at low concentrations, was sufficient to activate the Nrf2 pathway, without any irradiation, due to the presence of free AuNPs inside the cytosol. In contrast, in macrophages, the plasmonic excitation of the AuNPs by a low, non-lethal irradiation dose was required for their release from the constraining vesicles. The mechanism by which AuNPs activate the Nrf2 pathway was studied. Direct and indirect activation were suggested, based on the inherent ability of the AuNPs to react with thiol groups and to generate reactive oxygen species, in particular, under plasmonic excitation. The ability of AuNPs to directly activate the Nrf2 pathway renders them good candidates for treatment of disorders in which the up-regulation of Nrf2 is beneficial, specifically for topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  3. The bright side of plasmonic gold nanoparticles; activation of Nrf2, the cellular protective pathway.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alona; Soroka, Yoram; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Lewis, Aaron; Kohen, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely investigated for cancer therapy, due to their ability to strongly absorb light and convert it to heat and thus selectively destroy tumor cells. In this study we shed light on a new aspect of AuNPs and their plasmonic excitation, wherein they can provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection by stimulating the cellular protective Nrf2 pathway. Our study was carried out on cells of the immune system, macrophages, and on skin cells, keratinocytes. A different response to AuNPs was noted in the two types of cells, explained by their distinct uptake profiles. In keratinocytes, the exposure to AuNPs, even at low concentrations, was sufficient to activate the Nrf2 pathway, without any irradiation, due to the presence of free AuNPs inside the cytosol. In contrast, in macrophages, the plasmonic excitation of the AuNPs by a low, non-lethal irradiation dose was required for their release from the constraining vesicles. The mechanism by which AuNPs activate the Nrf2 pathway was studied. Direct and indirect activation were suggested, based on the inherent ability of the AuNPs to react with thiol groups and to generate reactive oxygen species, in particular, under plasmonic excitation. The ability of AuNPs to directly activate the Nrf2 pathway renders them good candidates for treatment of disorders in which the up-regulation of Nrf2 is beneficial, specifically for topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27224746

  4. Cosmetic devices based on active transdermal technologies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica A; Banga, Ajay K

    2015-09-01

    Active transdermal technology, commonly associated with drug delivery, has been used in recent years by the cosmetic industry for the aesthetic restoration of skin and delivery of cosmetic agents. In this article, we provide an overview of the skin's structure, various skin types, skin's self-repair mechanisms that are stimulated from the usage of cosmetic devices and discuss cosmetic applications. Summaries of the most common active transdermal technologies such as microneedles, iontophoresis, sonophoresis, lasers and microdermabrasion will be provided, in relation to the marketed cosmetic devices available that incorporate these technologies. Lastly, we cover combinations of active technologies that allow for more enhanced cosmetic results, and the current limitations of cosmetic devices. PMID:26389853

  5. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  6. Ultrafast Photophysics of Pentacene Coupled to Surface Plasmon Active Nanohole Films

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. C.; Reilly III, T. R.; Kanarr, A. C.; van de Lagemaat, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pentacene, a model organic semiconductor, is shown to couple with surface plasmon (SP) active silver nanohole films to produce enhanced excited-state absorption. In addition, the dynamics of triplet formation and decay on a subpicosecond time scale are altered due to the coupling of the excited state with the resonant SP, possibly involving the interplay between singlet fission and triplet-triplet annihilation. Shifting the resonance of the SP with respect to the pentacene excitations and introducing a dielectric spacer between pentacene and metal lead to changes in the spectra and dynamics that can be explained qualitatively. These results are compared with recent literature reports of molecule/plasmon hybridization and are placed in context with efforts to utilize SPs for enhanced solar energy conversion.

  7. Hybrid phase-change plasmonic crystals for active tuning of lattice resonances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y G; Kao, T S; Ng, B; Li, X; Luo, X G; Luk'yanchuk, B; Maier, S A; Hong, M H

    2013-06-01

    Tunable lattice resonances are demonstrated in a hybrid plasmonic crystal incorporating the phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) as a 20-nm-thick layer sandwiched between a gold nanodisk array and a quartz substrate. Non-volatile tuning of lattice resonances over a range Δλ of about 500 nm (1.89 µm to 2.27 µm) is achieved experimentally via intermediate phase states of the GST layer. This work demonstrates the efficacy and ease of resonance tuning via GST in the near infrared, suggesting the possibility to design broadband non-volatile tunable devices for optical modulation, switching, sensing and nonlinear optical devices. PMID:23736622

  8. Plasmonic lens enhanced mid-infrared quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, Andreas Schwarz, Benedikt; Gansch, Roman; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2014-10-27

    We demonstrate monolithic integrated quantum cascade detectors enhanced by plasmonic lenses. Surface normal incident mid-infrared radiation is coupled to surface plasmon polaritons guided to and detected by the active region of the detector. The lens extends the optical effective active area of the device up to a 5 times larger area than for standard mesa detectors or pixel devices while the electrical active region stays the same. The extended optical area increases the absorption efficiency of the presented device as well as the room temperature performance while it offers a flexible platform for various detector geometries. A photocurrent response increase at room temperature up to a factor of 6 was observed.

  9. The observation of super-long range surface plasmon polaritons modes and its application as sensory devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-L; Song, J-F; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D-L

    2010-10-11

    In this communication, we will describe one unique phenomenon and the potential application of it. In this work, the dispersion relation of an air-silver-silicon-silver-fluid (air-Ag-Si-Ag-fluid) five-layer slab is analyzed theoretically, in which the super-long range surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) modes, whose energy penetrates deeply into the fluid, are found with their losses being extremely small and sensitive to the change of the fluid refractive index when operating near their interspace cut-off regions, where the dispersion curves are non-continuous. By applying this phenomenon in detecting the fluid refractive index change, a SPP sensor based on intensity measurement is proposed. It is a waveguide structure with an Ag-Si-Ag slab together with a flow cell filled with the detecting fluid. It is found that a large scale of linear detection (e.g., 0.08, for 1550 nm ~1.33 to 1.41) with high resolution (e.g., 7.9 × 10(-6) Refractive Index Units) can be achieved for a very short device, which is 200 μm. PMID:20941145

  10. Plasmon-Coupled CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/CdS/ZnS Coreshells for Hybrid Light Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Rice, Quinton; Hayes, Anderson; Jung, Sungsoo; Wang, Andrew; Cho, Hyoyoung; Kim, Wan-Joong; Abdel-Fattah, Mahmoud; Tabibi, Bagher; Seo, Jaetae

    2016-02-01

    Plasmon-coupled CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/CdS/ZnS coreshells are investigated for their optoelectronic applications because of their high color purity, wide optical tunability, large PL enhancement, and compact and easy integration into electronic devices. The quantum confinement of carriers within quantum dots (QDs) with sizes near the exciton Bohr radius (CdSe ~ 5.8 nm, CdTe ~ 7 nm) exhibits the features of discrete energy states and blue-shift from the bulk bandgap (CdSe ~718 nm, CdTe ~ 863 nm) in the optical spectrum. While the fluorescence from the QDs is attributable to the exciton carrier recombination, large PL enhancement and fast emission time is achieved through plasmon-exciton coupling via the Coulomb interaction. Large PL enhancement of QDs in the vicinity of plasmonic particles was observed and attributed to the reduction of the non-radiative decay rate and large local field enhancement. The large PL enhancement and wide optical tunability along with high color purity from plasmon-coupled QDs enables the realization of hybrid LEDs. PMID:27433706

  11. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily activity assist device. (a) Identification....

  12. Enhancement of the power conversion efficiency for inverted organic photovoltaic devices due to the localized surface plasmonic resonant effect of Au nanoparticles embedded in ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Hun; Kim, Dae Hun; Lee, Dea Uk; Li, Fushan; Kim, Tae Whan

    2015-07-01

    The absorption spectra and input photon-to-converted current efficiency curves showed that Au nanoparticles increased the plasmonic broadband light absorption, thereby enhancing the short-circuit current density of the inverted organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with a Au-ZnO nanocomposite electron transport layer (ETL). The power conversion efficiency of the inverted OPV cell fabricated with a Au-ZnO nanocomposite ETL was higher by 40% than that of the inverted OPV cell fabricated with a ZnO nanoparticle ETL, which could be attributed to the enhanced photon absorption in the active layer due to the localized surface plasmonic resonance of the Au nanoparticles.

  13. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  14. Active modulation of visible light with graphene-loaded ultrathin metal plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Renwen; Pruneri, Valerio; García de Abajo, F. Javier

    2016-01-01

    Electro-optical modulation of visible and near-infrared light is important for a wide variety of applications, ranging from communications to sensing and smart windows. However, currently available approaches result in rather bulky devices, suffer from low integrability, and can hardly operate at the low power consumption levels and fast switching rates required by microelectronic drivers. Here we show that planar nanostructures patterned in ultrathin metal-graphene hybrid films sustain highly tunable plasmons in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Strong variations in the reflection and absorption of incident light take place when the plasmons are tuned on- and off-resonance with respect to externally incident light. As a result, a remarkable modulation depth (i.e., the maximum relative variation with/without graphene doping) exceeding 90% in transmission and even more dramatic in reflection (>600%) is predicted for graphene-loaded silver films of 1–5 nm thickness and currently attainable lateral dimensions. These new structures hold great potential for fast low-power electro-optical modulation. PMID:27561789

  15. Active modulation of visible light with graphene-loaded ultrathin metal plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Renwen; Pruneri, Valerio; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2016-01-01

    Electro-optical modulation of visible and near-infrared light is important for a wide variety of applications, ranging from communications to sensing and smart windows. However, currently available approaches result in rather bulky devices, suffer from low integrability, and can hardly operate at the low power consumption levels and fast switching rates required by microelectronic drivers. Here we show that planar nanostructures patterned in ultrathin metal-graphene hybrid films sustain highly tunable plasmons in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Strong variations in the reflection and absorption of incident light take place when the plasmons are tuned on- and off-resonance with respect to externally incident light. As a result, a remarkable modulation depth (i.e., the maximum relative variation with/without graphene doping) exceeding 90% in transmission and even more dramatic in reflection (>600%) is predicted for graphene-loaded silver films of 1-5 nm thickness and currently attainable lateral dimensions. These new structures hold great potential for fast low-power electro-optical modulation. PMID:27561789

  16. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development. PMID:27367063

  17. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco P; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-22

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas. PMID:27494498

  18. A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity based on enzyme-controlled gold nanoparticles growth in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei; Tian, Danbi

    2015-03-01

    A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity was developed based on one-pot nanoparticle growth. Tween 80 was selected not only as the substrate for lipase recognition but also as the reducing and stabilizing agent for the sensor fabrication. The different molecular groups in Tween 80 could have different roles in the fabrication procedure; the H2O2 produced by the autoxidation of the ethylene oxide subunits in Tween 80 could reduce the AuCl4- ions to Au atoms, meanwhile, the lipase could hydrolyze its carboxyl ester bond, which could, in turn, control the rate of nucleation of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tailor the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the AuNP transducers. The color changes, which depend on the absence or presence of the lipase, could be used to sense the lipase activity. A linear response ranging from 0.025 to 4 mg mL-1 and a detection limit of the lipase as low as 3.47 μg mL-1 were achieved. This strategy circumvents the problems encountered by general enzyme assays that require sophisticated instruments and complicated assembling steps. The methodology can benefit the assays of heterogeneous-catalyzed enzymes.A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity was developed based on one-pot nanoparticle growth. Tween 80 was selected not only as the substrate for lipase recognition but also as the reducing and stabilizing agent for the sensor fabrication. The different molecular groups in Tween 80 could have different roles in the fabrication procedure; the H2O2 produced by the autoxidation of the ethylene oxide subunits in Tween 80 could reduce the AuCl4- ions to Au atoms, meanwhile, the lipase could hydrolyze its carboxyl ester bond, which could, in turn, control the rate of nucleation of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tailor the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the AuNP transducers. The color changes, which depend on the absence or presence of the lipase, could be used to sense the lipase activity. A linear response

  19. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Marco P.; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J.; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas.

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  1. Lossless propagation in metal-semiconductor-metal plasmonic waveguides using quantum dot active medium.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, K; Granpayeh, N; Ahmadi, V; Pahlavan, S

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze and simulate the lossless propagation of lightwaves in the active metal-semiconductor-metal plasmonic waveguides (MSMPWs) at the wavelength range of 1540-1560 nm using a quantum dot (QD) active medium. The Maxwell's equations are solved in the waveguide, and the required gains for achieving lossless propagation are derived. On the other hand, the rate equations in quantum dot active regions are solved by using the Runge-Kutta method, and the achievable optical gain is derived. The analyses results show that the required optical gain for lossless propagation in MSMPWs is achievable using the QD active medium. Also, by adjusting the active medium parameters, the MSMPWs loss can be eliminated in a specific bandwidth, and the propagation length increases obviously. PMID:25967191

  2. Characterization of lipid films by an angle-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Qiong; Yang, Zhong; Wang, Wangang; Hu, Ning; Luo, Hongyan; Liao, Yanjian; Zheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Surface topographies of lipid films have an important significance in the analysis of the preparation of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In order to achieve accurately high-throughput and rapidly analysis of surface topographies of lipid films, a homemade SPR imaging device is constructed based on the classical Kretschmann configuration and an angle interrogation manner. A mathematical model is developed to accurately describe the shift including the light path in different conditions and the change of the illumination point on the CCD camera, and thus a SPR curve for each sampling point can also be achieved, based on this calculation method. The experiment results show that the topographies of lipid films formed in distinct experimental conditions can be accurately characterized, and the measuring resolution of the thickness lipid film may reach 0.05 nm. Compared with existing SPRi devices, which realize detection by monitoring the change of the reflective-light intensity, this new SPRi system can achieve the change of the resonance angle on the entire sensing surface. Thus, it has higher detection accuracy as the traditional angle-interrogation SPR sensor, with much wider detectable range of refractive index. PMID:25697808

  3. Plasmonic-induced inhibition and enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity of Pd-Au hetero-nanoraspberries for ethanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyu; Zheng, Weitao; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic modulation of the catalytic performances of metallic nanostructures shows great potential in the development of novel materials for catalysis. In addition to the challenges of devising new catalysts with high activity while maintaining controllable plasmonic properties, the mechanisms underlying the enhancement of the activity by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are still under exploration. Here, we design a Pd-Au bimetallic hetero structure and use the well-defined SPR property of the core Au NPs to tune its surface electro catalytic activity. The hot electrons are transferred into the Pd nanopetals from the Au core with visible-light irradiation, resulting in an enhancement of the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol on Au concurrent with an inhibition on Pd. The anti-poisoning and stability of the as-prepared heterostructures is also enhanced by visible-light irradiation.

  4. Plasmonics of graphene laced stratified media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparajita, Upali; Roslyak, Oleksiy

    Strong overlap of fields of graphene physics and photonics drawn a lot of attention recently. Not only graphene possesses intrinsic highly tunable plasmons but a combination of grapheme with noble metal nano structures promises a variety of existing applications for conventional plasmonics , such as novel optical devices working in a broad range from THz to visible spectra. We report simulations of those devices using combination of discrete dipole approximation (DDA) and boundary element methods (BEM). While DDA is an essential tool for modeling large molecule polarizabilities and scattering the BEM provides necessary Green's function tensors when those molecules are in close proximity to the nano-structures. As an example of that technique we study electron energy loss and Raman spectra for complex molecules in presence of metal plasmon active nano particles embedded into a stratified graphene laced medium.

  5. A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity based on enzyme-controlled gold nanoparticles growth in situ.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei; Tian, Danbi

    2015-04-14

    A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity was developed based on one-pot nanoparticle growth. Tween 80 was selected not only as the substrate for lipase recognition but also as the reducing and stabilizing agent for the sensor fabrication. The different molecular groups in Tween 80 could have different roles in the fabrication procedure; the H2O2 produced by the autoxidation of the ethylene oxide subunits in Tween 80 could reduce the AuCl4(-) ions to Au atoms, meanwhile, the lipase could hydrolyze its carboxyl ester bond, which could, in turn, control the rate of nucleation of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tailor the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the AuNP transducers. The color changes, which depend on the absence or presence of the lipase, could be used to sense the lipase activity. A linear response ranging from 0.025 to 4 mg mL(-1) and a detection limit of the lipase as low as 3.47 μg mL(-1) were achieved. This strategy circumvents the problems encountered by general enzyme assays that require sophisticated instruments and complicated assembling steps. The methodology can benefit the assays of heterogeneous-catalyzed enzymes. PMID:25766647

  6. Tracking mesenchymal stromal cells using an ultra-bright TAT-functionalized plasmonic-active nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Gomez, Jose A; Chien, Jennifer S; Zhang, Lunan; Wilson, Christy M; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald A; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution tracking of stem cells remains a challenging task. An ultra-bright contrast agent with extended intracellular retention is suitable for in vivo high-resolution tracking of stem cells following the implantation. Here, a plasmonic-active nanoplatform was developed for tracking mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in mice. The nanoplatform consisted of TAT peptide-functionalized gold nanostars (TAT-GNS) that emit ultra-bright two-photon photoluminescence capable of tracking MSCs under high-resolution optical imaging. In vitro experiment showed TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs retained a similar differentiability to that of non-labeled MSCs controls. Due to their star shape, TAT-GNS exhibited greater intracellular retention than that of commercial Q-Tracker. In vivo imaging of TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs five days following intra-arterial injections in mice kidneys showed possible MSCs implantation in juxta-glomerular (JG) regions, but non-specifically in glomeruli and afferent arterioles as well. With future design to optimize GNS labeling specificity and clearance, plasmonic-active nanoplatforms may be a useful intracellular tracking tool for stem cell research. An ultra-bright intracellular contrast agent is developed using TAT peptide-functionalized gold nanostars (TAT-GNS). It poses minimal influence on the stem cell differentiability. It exhibits stronger two-photon photoluminescence and superior labeling efficiency than commercial Q-Tracker. Following renal implantation, some TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs permeate blood vessels and migrate to the juxta-glomerular region. PMID:27095616

  7. Encoding Active Device Elements at Nanowire Tips.

    PubMed

    No, You-Shin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor nanowires and other one-dimensional materials are attractive for highly sensitive and spatially confined electrical and optical signal detection in biological and physical systems, although it has been difficult to localize active electronic or optoelectronic device function at one end of such one-dimensional structures. Here we report a new nanowire structure in which the material and dopant are modulated specifically at only one end of nanowires to encode an active two-terminal device element. We present a general bottom-up synthetic scheme for these tip-modulated nanowires and illustrate this with the synthesis of nanoscale p-n junctions. Electron microscopy imaging verifies the designed p-Si nanowire core with SiO2 insulating inner shell and n-Si outer shell with clean p-Si/n-Si tip junction. Electrical transport measurements with independent contacts to the p-Si core and n-Si shell exhibited a current rectification behavior through the tip and no detectable current through the SiO2 shell. Electrical measurements also exhibited an n-type response in conductance versus water-gate voltage with pulsed gate experiments yielding a temporal resolution of at least 0.1 ms and ∼90% device sensitivity localized to within 0.5 μm from the nanowire p-n tip. In addition, photocurrent experiments showed an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V at illumination power of ∼28.1 μW, exhibited linear dependence of photocurrent with respect to incident illumination power with an estimated responsivity up to ∼0.22 A/W, and revealed localized photocurrent generation at the nanowire tip. The tip-modulated concept was further extended to a top-down/bottom-up hybrid approach that enabled large-scale production of vertical tip-modulated nanowires with a final synthetic yield of >75% with >4300 nanowires. Vertical tip-modulated nanowires were fabricated into >50 individually addressable nanowire device arrays showing diode-like current-voltage characteristics. These tip

  8. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  9. Hotspot-mediated ultrafast nonlinear control of multifrequency plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abb, Martina; Wang, Yudong; de Groot, C. H.; Muskens, Otto L.

    2014-09-01

    Plasmonic devices have a unique ability to concentrate and convert optical energy into a small volume. There is a tremendous interest in achieving active control of plasmon resonances, which would enable switchable hotspots for applications such as surface-enhanced spectroscopy and single molecule emission. The small footprint and strong-field confinement of plasmonic nanoantennas also holds great potential for achieving transistor-type devices for nanoscale-integrated circuits. To achieve such a functionality, new methods for nonlinear modulation are required, which are able to precisely tune the nonlinear interactions between resonant antenna elements. Here we demonstrate that resonant pumping of a nonlinear medium in a plasmonic hotspot produces an efficient transfer of optical Kerr nonlinearity between different elements of a multifrequency antenna. By spatially and spectrally separating excitation and readout, isolation of the hotspot-mediated ultrafast Kerr nonlinearity from slower, thermal effects is achieved.

  10. Double plasmonic profile of tryptophan-silver nano-crystals—Temperature sensing and laser induced antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sarita; Basak, Soumen; Ray, Pulak; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr.

    2012-10-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for spherical shaped silver nanoparticles showing double maxima at ∼390 nm and ∼520 nm respectively is reported. Self assembly of silver nanoparticles grown on tryptophan template leads to emergence of equal intensity double plasmon resonance (EIDPR). While for rod shaped nano-forms such double plasmon is explainable but for spherical shaped forms, such double plasmon can be explained on the basis of bidirectional formation of silver cluster in which attachment of silver at two nitrogen atom locations of tryptophan molecule seems to be obligatory. The absence of double resonance in case of silver nanoclusters formed with other amino acids or N-acetyl L-tryptophanamide (NATA), where bidirectional sbnd NH2 attachment is not possible, validates the proposed EIDPR mechanism. Electron micrograph of EIDPR particle indicates a bi-periodic fringe pattern indicating unusual crystalline property. Apart from sensing tryptophan, the double plasmon peaks are sensitive to temperature. Furthermore, the particle can be used as a smart killing agent showing bactericidal activity only upon exposure to low power laser.

  11. Hybrid nano ridge plasmonic polaritons waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jianwei; Chen, Lin; Li, Xun; Huang, Wei-Ping; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-subwavelength surface plasmonic polaritons waveguide, which can confine light in the nano-scale region with comparable low propagation loss. The mode can be squeezed to one thousandth of the diffraction spot size with micro-meter scale propagation distance and is highly sensitive to the buffer layer materials and geometric parameters. This design improves the performance of previous surface plasmonic polaritons waveguides and lends itself to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible fabrication. These waveguides can be used as a platform for active devices as well as for nano-sensing applications.

  12. Compact nanomechanical plasmonic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B. S.; Haftel, M. I.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Lopez, D.; Blumberg, G.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2015-03-30

    Highly confined optical energy in plasmonic devices is advancing miniaturization in photonics. However, for mode sizes approaching ≈10 nm, the energy increasingly shifts into the metal, raising losses and hindering active phase modulation. Here, we propose a nanoelectromechanical phase-modulation principle exploiting the extraordinarily strong dependence of the phase velocity of metal–insulator–metal gap plasmons on dynamically variable gap size. We experimentally demonstrate a 23-μm-long non-resonant modulator having a 1.5π rad range, with 1.7 dB excess loss at 780 nm. Analysis shows that by simultaneously decreasing the gap, length and width, an ultracompact-footprint π rad phase modulator can be realized. This is achieved without incurring the extra loss expected for plasmons confined in a decreasing gap, because the increasing phase-modulation strength from a narrowing gap offsets rising propagation losses. Such small, high-density electrically controllable components may find applications in optical switch fabrics and reconfigurable plasmonic optics.

  13. Tunable excitation of two-dimensional plasmon modes in InGaAs/InP HEMT devices for terahertz detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader Esfahani, Nima; Qiao, Xin; Peale, Robert E.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua R.; Cleary, Justin W.

    2013-12-01

    THz electromagnetic waves resonantly excite plasmons in the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) via grating-gate couplers. These excitations can induce measureable photoresponse. Biasing the grating gate tunes the photoresponse via control of 2DEG carrier density. Plasmons are investigated here in an InGaAs/InP HEMT with a 9 μm period grating gate at 78 and 106 GHz free-space radiation and 4K sample temperature. The dependence of the photoresponse on applied Source-Drain bias is also investigated. The minimum noise equivalent power (NEP) is estimated to be 113 pW/Hz1/2 , with maximum responsivity of 200 V/W. Such plasmonic alterations in channel conductance provide a means for voltage-tunable THz and sub-THz detectors or filters.

  14. 2010 PLASMONICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE/GORDON-KENAN GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR, JUNE 13-18

    SciTech Connect

    Naomi Halas

    2010-06-18

    The field of plasmonics lies at the forefront of current revolutionary developments in optics at nanoscale dimensions, with broad applications in the fields of biology, chemistry, and engineering. Advancing these applications will require an enhanced focus on the fundamental science of plasmonics in new and exotic regimes. This 2010 Gordon Conference on Plasmonics will focus on recent advances in fundamental and applied plasmonics. As with past conferences, this meeting will bring together top researchers and future leaders for substantial interactions between students, young speakers, and senior figures in the field. Participants should expect lively discussion during the sessions, intermingled with unstructured time where ideas move, collaborations form, and connections are made. Invited talks will cover a diverse range of topics, including active devices, coherence effects, metamaterials and cloaking, quantum optical phenomena, and plasmons in exotic media and in new wavelength regimes. At the conclusion of the conference, our final session will look forward and begin defining upcoming challenges and opportunities for plasmonics.

  15. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y.-J.; Ansell, D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thackray, B.; Britnell, L.; Belle, B. D.; Withers, F.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics has established itself as a branch of physics which promises to revolutionize data processing, improve photovoltaics, and increase sensitivity of bio-detection. A widespread use of plasmonic devices is notably hindered by high losses and the absence of stable and inexpensive metal films suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics. PMID:24980150

  16. Actively Tunable Visible Surface Plasmons in Bi2 Te3 and their Energy-Harvesting Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Nengyue; Song, Peng; Bosman, Michel; Peng, Bo; Sun, Baoquan; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Xu, Qing-Hua; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-04-01

    Hexagonal Bi2 Te3 nanoplates support visible-range surface plasmons, of which the resonance energy is tuned as wide as 400 nm by Se doping and the resonance intensity is modulated by utilizing the phase change between the crystalline and amorphous states. The potential of Bi2 Te3 for reconfigurable plasmonics, plasmon-enhanced solar cells, and photoluminescence is demonstrated. PMID:26923685

  17. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  18. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  20. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  1. Plasmonic coupled-cavity system for enhancement of surface plasmon localization in plasmonic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, K. J. A.; Bai, P.; Gu, M. X.; Ang, L. K.

    2012-07-01

    A plasmonic coupled-cavity system, which consists of a quarter-wave coupler cavity, a resonant Fabry-Pérot detector nanocavity, and an off-resonant reflector cavity, is used to enhance the localization of surface plasmons in a plasmonic detector. The coupler cavity is designed based on transmission line theory and wavelength scaling rules in the optical regime, while the reflector cavity is derived from off-resonant resonator structures to attenuate transmission of plasmonic waves. We observed strong coupling of the cavities in simulation results, with an 86% improvement of surface plasmon localization achieved. The plasmonic coupled-cavity system may find useful applications in areas of nanoscale photodetectors, sensors, and an assortment of plasmonic-circuit devices.

  2. Toward Quantum Plasmonics with Plasmon Drag Effect. Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durach, Maxim; Lepain, Matthew; Mapes, Zoe; Rono, Vincent; Noginova, Natalia

    Giant plasmon drag effect observed in plasmonic metal films and nanostructures brings new fundamental insights into ways in which light-matter interaction occurs. We demonstrate analytically, numerically and experimentally that rectified drag forces acting upon electrons in plasmonic metals are intimately related to the absorption of plasmonic excitations. The plasmon energy quanta absorbed by the metal plasma are associated with momentum quanta, which are also transferred to electrons upon energy absorption. We show that this picture directly applies to plasmon drag effect in a variety of systems, and, to our knowledge for the first time, is capable to explain and predict the magnitude of the effect not only qualitatively, but with close quantitative agreement. The plasmon drag effect opens new avenues for plasmonic-based electronics providing opportunities for incorporation of plasmonic circuits into electronic devices, and for optical sensing offering a new operational principle and an opportunity to substitute the bulky optical set-ups with diffraction limited sensing by electronics. Our work not only adds more clarity into the mechanism behind the plasmon drag effect but also contributes to the emerging field of quantum plasmonics.

  3. Industrial fabrication of an optical security device for document protection using plasmon resonant transmission through a thin corrugated metallic film embedded on a plastic foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage-Vincent, Jean; Jourlin, Yves; Tonchev, Svetlen; Veillas, Colette; Claude, Pedri; Parriaux, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Known since a long time in polymer banknotes and presented in the few years in paper banknotes, the principle of windowed documents has been currently extended to ID documents. We present an innovative solution which combines resonant transmission and Zero Order Device technologies and which is dedicated to improve windows in terms of the overt security level. With this R&D program, Hologram Industries targeted to obtain an overt visual security device that should be readily checked in transmission in the same manner as the established paper watermark. The proposed solution is based on the propagation of resonant modes in a thin continuous corrugated metallic layer embedded (encapsulated) between two dielectric layers of near equal refractive index. The mode of most interest is the Long Range Plasmon Mode. The coupling condition to the Long Range Mode is principally related to the corrugation, the metal layer thickness and the index of the two dielectric layers. If the condition of the mode excitation through the grating is fulfilled, a predetermined wavelength will be coupled to the Long Range Plasmon Mode. This mode will propagate at each metal/dielectric interface with a low loss and will concentrate the electric field inside the metal layer. This effect of coupling enables the transmission of a peak at this wavelength through the metallic layer. It defines the so called "extraordinary resonant transmission".

  4. Energy harvesting in semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor junctions through excitation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Holloway, Terence; Mundle, Rajeh; Dondapati, Hareesh; Bahoura, M.

    2012-02-01

    We have demonstrated a simple approach for developing a photovoltaic device consisting of semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (SIS) heterojunction using surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) generated in one of the semiconductors (Al:ZnO) and propagated through the dielectric barrier (SiO2) to other (Si). This robust architecture based on surface plasmon excitation within an SIS device that produces power based on spatial confinement of electron excitation through plasmon absorption in Al:ZnO in a broad spectrum of visible to infrared wavelengths enhancing the photovoltaic activities. This finding suggests a range of applications for photovoltaics, sensing, waveguides, and others using SPPs enhancement on semiconductors without using noble metals.

  5. Plasmonics without negative dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic phenomena are exhibited in light-matter interaction involving materials whose real parts of permittivity functions attain negative values at operating wavelengths. However, such materials usually suffer from dissipative losses, thus limiting the performance of plasmon-based optical devices. Here, we utilize an alternative methodology that mimics a variety of plasmonic phenomena by exploiting the well-known structural dispersion of electromagnetic modes in bounded guided-wave structures filled with only materials with positive permittivity. A key issue in the design of such structures is prevention of mode coupling, which can be achieved by implementing thin metallic wires at proper interfaces. This method, which is more suitable for lower frequencies, allows designers to employ conventional dielectrics and highly conductive metals for which the loss is low at these frequencies, while achieving plasmonic features. We demonstrate, numerically and analytically, that this platform can provide surface plasmon polaritons, local plasmonic resonance, plasmonic cloaking, and epsilon-near-zero-based tunneling using conventional positive-dielectric materials.

  6. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  7. Bayesian Estimation of the Active Concentration and Affinity Constants Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Kepler, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has previously been employed to measure the active concentration of analyte in addition to the kinetic rate constants in molecular binding reactions. Those approaches, however, have a few restrictions. In this work, a Bayesian approach is developed to determine both active concentration and affinity constants using SPR technology. With the appropriate prior probabilities on the parameters and a derived likelihood function, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is applied to compute the posterior probability densities of both the active concentration and kinetic rate constants based on the collected SPR data. Compared with previous approaches, ours exploits information from the duration of the process in its entirety, including both association and dissociation phases, under partial mass transport conditions; do not depend on calibration data; multiple injections of analyte at varying flow rates are not necessary. Finally the method is validated by analyzing both simulated and experimental datasets. A software package implementing our approach is developed with a user-friendly interface and made freely available. PMID:26098764

  8. Bayesian Estimation of the Active Concentration and Affinity Constants Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technology

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Feng; Kepler, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has previously been employed to measure the active concentration of analyte in addition to the kinetic rate constants in molecular binding reactions. Those approaches, however, have a few restrictions. In this work, a Bayesian approach is developed to determine both active concentration and affinity constants using SPR technology. With the appropriate prior probabilities on the parameters and a derived likelihood function, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is applied to compute the posterior probability densities of both the active concentration and kinetic rate constants based on the collected SPR data. Compared with previous approaches, ours exploits information from the duration of the process in its entirety, including both association and dissociation phases, under partial mass transport conditions; do not depend on calibration data; multiple injections of analyte at varying flow rates are not necessary. Finally the method is validated by analyzing both simulated and experimental datasets. A software package implementing our approach is developed with a user-friendly interface and made freely available. PMID:26098764

  9. Aluminum plasmonic photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Wang, Chenxi; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Du, Deyang; Han, Di; Qiu, Teng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic processes is dictated largely by plasmonic materials with the capability to enhance light absorption as well as the energy conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate how to improve the plasmonic photocatalytic properties of TiO2/Al nano-void arrays by overlapping the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes with the TiO2 band gap. The plasmonic TiO2/Al arrays exhibit superior photocatalytic activity boasting an enhancement of 7.2 folds. The underlying mechanisms concerning the radiative energy transfer and interface energy transfer processes are discussed. Both processes occur at the TiO2/Al interface and their contributions to photocatalysis are evaluated. The results are important to the optimization of aluminum plasmonic materials in photocatalytic applications. PMID:26497411

  10. Graphene Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Shin; Abeysinghe, Don; Nader, Nima; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin; Elhamri, Said

    Plasmon, the collective free charge carrier oscillation, has been a popular research theme recently mostly associated with surface plasmon in metal nanoparticles. After the discovery of graphene, researchers soon began to study plasmonic effects with or within graphene, for instance, decorating graphene with metal nanoparticles to enhance optical processes via plasmonic field enhancement. Following that, people also gained interests in studying the intrinsic plasmon of graphene. Graphene, a tunable semimetal under field effect, demonstrates tunable plasmon resonances at room temperature, which enables new capabilities beyond those of metal-nanoparticle surface plasmons. In this project, we would like to show intrinsic graphene plasmon resonances in that we experimentally demonstrated polarization dependent and gate-bias tunable plasmon-resonance absorption in the mid-infrared regime of 5-14 um by utilizing an array of graphene nanoribbon resonators. By scaling nanoribbon width and charge densities, we probed graphene plasmons with plasmon resonance energy as high as 0.26 meV (2100 cm-1) for 40 nm wide nanoresonators. The result reveals the intriguing nature of graphene plasmon in graphene nanoribbons where the nanoribbon edge plays critical roles by introducing extra doping and damping the graphene plasmon resonance.

  11. Localized plasmonic field enhancement in shaped graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Xia, Sheng-Xuan; Zhai, Xiang; Wang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Qi; Wen, Shuang-Chun

    2016-07-25

    Graphene nanoribbon (GNR), as a fundamental component to support the surface plasmon waves, are envisioned to play an important role in graphene plasmonics. However, to achieve extremely confinement of the graphene surface plasmons (GSPs) is still a challenging. Here, we propose a scheme to realize the excitation of localized surface plasmons with very strong field enhancement at the resonant frequency. By sinusoidally patterning the boundaries of GNRs, a new type of plasmon mode with field energy concentrated on the shaped grating crest (crest mode) can be efficiently excited, creating a sharp notch on the transmission spectra. Specifically, the enhanced field energies are featured by 3 times of magnitude stronger than that of the unpatterned classical GNRs. Through theoretical analyses and numerical calculations, we confirm that the enhanced fields of the crest modes can be tuned not only by changing the width, period and Fermi energy as traditional ribbons, but also by varying the grating amplitude and period. This new technique of manipulating the light-graphene interaction gives an insight of modulating plasmon resonances on graphene nanostrutures, making the proposed pattern method an attractive candidate for designing optical filters, spatial light modulators, and other active plasmonic devices. PMID:27464087

  12. Plasmonic Vesicles of Amphiphilic Nanocrystals: Optically Active Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jibin; Huang, Peng; Duan, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-15

    Vesicular structures with compartmentalized, water-filled cavities, such as liposomes of natural and synthetic amphiphiles, have tremendous potential applications in nanomedicine. When block copolymers self-assemble, the result is polymersomes with tailored structural properties and built-in releasing mechanisms, controlled by stimuli-responsive polymer building blocks. More recently, chemists are becoming interested in multifunctional hybrid vesicles containing inorganic nanocrystals with unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. In this Account, we review our recent progress in assembling amphiphilic plasmonic nanostructures to create a new class of multifunctional hybrid vesicles and applying them towards cancer diagnosis and therapy. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gives plasmonic nanomaterials a unique set of optical properties that are potentially useful for both biosensing and nanomedicine. For instance, the strong light scattering at their LSPR wavelength opens up the applications of plasmonic nanostructures in single particle plasmonic imaging. Their superior photothermal conversion properties, on the other hand, make them excellent transducers for photothermal ablation and contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Of particular note for ultrasensitive detection is that the confined electromagnetic field resulting from excitation of LSPR can give rise to highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for molecules in close proximity. We have explored several ways to combine well-defined plasmonic nanocrystals with amphiphilic polymer brushes of diverse chemical functionalities. In multiple systems, we have shown that the polymer grafts impart amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly to the hybrid nanoparticles. This has allowed us to synthesize well-defined vesicles in which we have embedded plasmonic nanocrystals in the shell of collapsed hydrophobic polymers. The hydrophilic brushes extend into external and interior aqueous

  13. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  14. Subwavelength plasmonics for graded-index optics on a chip.

    PubMed

    Grajower, Meir; Lerman, Gilad M; Goykhman, Ilya; Desiatov, Boris; Yanai, Avner; Smith, David R; Levy, Uriel

    2013-09-15

    Planar plasmonic devices are becoming attractive for myriad applications, owing to their potential compatibility with standard microelectronics technology and the capability for densely integrating a large variety of plasmonic devices on a chip. Mitigating the challenges of using plasmonics in on-chip configurations requires precise control over the properties of plasmonic modes, in particular their shape and size. Here we achieve this goal by demonstrating a planar plasmonic graded-index lens focusing surface plasmons propagating along the device. The plasmonic mode is manipulated by carving subwavelength features into a dielectric layer positioned on top of a uniform metal film, allowing the local effective index of the plasmonic mode to be controlled using a single binary lithographic step. Focusing and divergence of surface plasmons is demonstrated experimentally. The demonstrated approach can be used for manipulating the propagation of surface plasmons, e.g., for beam steering, splitting, cloaking, mode matching, and beam shaping applications. PMID:24104796

  15. Broadly tunable graphene plasmons using an ion-gel top gate with low control voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hai; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Debo; Li, Zhenjun; Bai, Bing; Yang, Xiaoxia; Dai, Qing

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic tunability of graphene is vital in the field of active plasmons and would be beneficial in tunable infrared and terahertz optical element applications. The key to realizing broad tunability is achieving high carrier densities in graphene. Here we use an ion-gel, currently one of the most efficient dielectrics with ultra-high capacitance, to realize broadly tunable graphene plasmons (~1270 cm-1) with low voltage modulation (~4 V shifted from the Dirac point). We further explore the coupling between graphene plasmons and the molecular vibration modes of the ion-gel, since strong plasmon-phonon coupling can split the plasmon resonance peak into multi-peaks and reduce their tunability. Our experiments demonstrate weak plasmon-phonon coupling in the graphene/ion-gel system, which has limited effects on plasmon properties. These properties make ion-gels an effective dielectric for broadly tunable graphene plasmonic devices, such as new optical modulators, filters and wavelength multiplexers.The electrostatic tunability of graphene is vital in the field of active plasmons and would be beneficial in tunable infrared and terahertz optical element applications. The key to realizing broad tunability is achieving high carrier densities in graphene. Here we use an ion-gel, currently one of the most efficient dielectrics with ultra-high capacitance, to realize broadly tunable graphene plasmons (~1270 cm-1) with low voltage modulation (~4 V shifted from the Dirac point). We further explore the coupling between graphene plasmons and the molecular vibration modes of the ion-gel, since strong plasmon-phonon coupling can split the plasmon resonance peak into multi-peaks and reduce their tunability. Our experiments demonstrate weak plasmon-phonon coupling in the graphene/ion-gel system, which has limited effects on plasmon properties. These properties make ion-gels an effective dielectric for broadly tunable graphene plasmonic devices, such as new optical modulators

  16. Cognitive Inference Device for Activity Supervision in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human activity, life span, and quality of life are enhanced by innovations in science and technology. Aging individual needs to take advantage of these developments to lead a self-regulated life. However, maintaining a self-regulated life at old age involves a high degree of risk, and the elderly often fail at this goal. Thus, the objective of our study is to investigate the feasibility of implementing a cognitive inference device (CI-device) for effective activity supervision in the elderly. To frame the CI-device, we propose a device design framework along with an inference algorithm and implement the designs through an artificial neural model with different configurations, mapping the CI-device's functions to minimise the device's prediction error. An analysis and discussion are then provided to validate the feasibility of CI-device implementation for activity supervision in the elderly. PMID:25405211

  17. Double-shelled plasmonic Ag-TiO2 hollow spheres toward visible light-active photocatalytic conversion of CO2 into solar fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shichao; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Yong; Li, Ping; Tu, Wenguang; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Double-shelled hollow hybrid spheres consisting of plasmonic Ag and TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through a simple reaction process. The analysis reveals that Ag nanoparticles were dispersed uniformly in the TiO2 nanoparticle shell. The plasmonic Ag-TiO2 hollow sphere proves to greatly enhance the photocatalytic activity toward reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapor under visible-light irradiation. The possible formation mechanism of the hollow sphere and related plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic performance were also briefly discussed.

  18. Double-shelled plasmonic Ag-TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres toward visible light-active photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} into solar fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shichao; Wang, Meng; Li, Ping; Tu, Wenguang; Zhou, Yong; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Double-shelled hollow hybrid spheres consisting of plasmonic Ag and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through a simple reaction process. The analysis reveals that Ag nanoparticles were dispersed uniformly in the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle shell. The plasmonic Ag-TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere proves to greatly enhance the photocatalytic activity toward reduction of CO{sub 2} into renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH{sub 4}) in the presence of water vapor under visible-light irradiation. The possible formation mechanism of the hollow sphere and related plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic performance were also briefly discussed.

  19. Elucidating the localized plasmonic enhancement effects from a single Ag nanowire in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Qing; Yip, Jing Ngei; Yu, Guannan; Xiong, Qihua; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2014-10-28

    The origins of performance enhancement in hybrid plasmonic organic photovoltaic devices are often embroiled in a complex interaction of light scattering, localized surface plasmon resonances, exciton-plasmon energy transfer and even nonplasmonic effects. To clearly deconvolve the plasmonic contributions from a single nanostructure, we herein investigate the influence of a single silver nanowire (NW) on the charge carriers in bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells using spatially resolved optical spectroscopy, and correlate to electrical device characterization. Polarization-dependent photocurrent enhancements with a maximum of ∼ 36% over the reference are observed when the transverse mode of the plasmonic excitations in the Ag NW is activated. The ensuing higher absorbance and light scattering induced by the electronic motion perpendicular to the NW long axis lead to increased exciton and polaron densities instead of direct surface plasmon-exciton energy transfer. Finite-difference time-domain simulations also validate these findings. Importantly, our study at the single nanostructure level explores the fundamental limits of plasmonic enhancement achievable in organic solar cells with a single plasmonic nanostructure. PMID:25198060

  20. Two-dimensional complex source point solutions: application to propagationally invariant beams, optical fiber modes, planar waveguides, and plasmonic devices.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Kou, Shan S; Lin, Jiao

    2014-12-01

    Highly convergent beam modes in two dimensions are considered based on rigorous solutions of the scalar wave (Helmholtz) equation, using the complex source point formalism. The modes are applicable to planar waveguide or surface plasmonic structures and nearly concentric microcavity resonator modes in two dimensions. A novel solution is that of a vortex beam, where the direction of propagation is in the plane of the vortex. The modes also can be used as a basis for the cross section of propagationally invariant beams in three dimensions and bow-tie-shaped optical fiber modes. PMID:25606756

  1. Hot electron pump: a plasmonic rectifying antenna (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanik, Ahmet A.; Hossain, Golam I.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have been widely explored to improve absorption efficiency of conventional solar cells, either by employing them as a light scatterer, or as a source of local field enhancement. Unavoidable ohmic loss associated with the plasmonic metal nanostructures in visible spectrum, limits the efficiency improvement of photovoltaic devices by employing this local photon density of states (LDOS) engineering approach. Instead of using plasmonic structures as efficiency improving layer, recently, there has been a growing interest in exploring plasmoinc nanoparticle as the active medium for photovoltaic device. By extracting hot electrons that are created in metallic nanoparticles in a non-radiative Landau decay of surface plasmons, many novel plasmonic photovoltaic devices have been proposed. Moreover, these hot electrons in metal nanoparticles promises high efficiency with a spectral response that is not limited by the band gap of the semiconductors (active material of conventional solar cell). In this work, we will show a novel photovoltaic configuration of plasmonic nanoparticle that acts as an antenna by capturing free space ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic wave and rectify them through an ultrafast hot electron pump and eventually inject DC current in the contact of the device. We will introduce a bottom-up quantum mechanical approach model to explain fundamental physical processes involved in this hot electron pump rectifying antenna and it's ultrafast dynamics. Our model is based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, a robust theoretical framework to investigate transport and design nanoscale electronic devices. We will demonstrate some fundamental limitations that go the very foundations of quantum mechanics.

  2. Plasmonic silver nanoparticles loaded titania nanotube arrays exhibiting enhanced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishanthi, S. T.; Iyyapushpam, S.; Sundarakannan, B.; Subramanian, E.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical anodization and photochemical reduction is employed to fabricate highly ordered silver loaded titania nanotubes (Ag/TNT) arrays. The Ag/TNT samples show an extended optical absorbance from UV to visible region owing to the surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag. The photoluminescence intensity of Ag/TNT is significantly lower than that of pure titania revealing a decrease in charge carrier recombination. The photoelectrochemical properties of the prepared samples are studied using linear sweep and transient photocurrent measurements. Compared with pure TNT, the Ag loaded samples show a higher photoelectrochemical activity. The results demonstrate an efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and the consequent increase in lifetime of charge carriers by Ag/TNT. The photocatalytic results of methyl orange dye degradation show that the Ag/TNT-3-05 sample exhibits the maximum degradation efficiency of 98.85% with kinetic rate constant of 0.0236(5) min-1 for 180 min light illumination.

  3. Guided-mode-resonance-coupled plasmonic-active SiO2 nanotubes for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaobin; Hasan, Dihan; Wang, Lei; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, D. L.; Wang, Alan X.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate by integrating plasmonic-active SiO2 nanotubes into Si3N4 gratings. First, the dielectric grating that is working under guided mode resonance (GMR) provides enhanced electric field for localized surface plasmon polaritons on the surface of metallic nanoparticles. Second, we use SiO2 nanotubes with densely assembled silver nanoparticles to provide a large amount of “hot spots” without significantly damping the GMR mode of the grating. Experimental measurement on Rhodamine-6G shows a constant enhancement factor of 8 ∼ 10 in addition to the existing SERS effect across the entire surface of the SiO2 nanotubes. PMID:22685345

  4. C60 as an Active Smart Spacer Material on Silver Thin Film Substrates for Enhanced Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission

    PubMed Central

    Mulpur, Pradyumna; Podila, Ramakrishna; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah; Rao, Apparao M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present the use of C60 as an active spacer material on a silver (Ag) based surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) platform. In addition to its primary role of protecting the Ag thin film from oxidation, the incorporation of C60 facilitated the achievement of 30-fold enhancement in the emission intensity of rhodamine b (RhB) fluorophore. The high signal yield was attributed to the unique π-π interactions between C60 thin films and RhB, which enabled efficient transfer of energy of RhB emission to Ag plasmon modes. Furthermore, minor variations in the C60 film thickness yielded large changes in the enhancement and angularity properties of the SPCE signal, which can be exploited for sensing applications. Finally, the low-cost fabrication process of the Ag-C60 thin film stacks render C60 based SPCE substrates ideal, for the economic and simplistic detection of analytes. PMID:25785916

  5. Direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic reaction activity of Au nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxides by SERS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; You, Tingting; Liu, Dapeng; Lang, Xiufeng; Tan, Enzhong; Shi, Jihua; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-04-21

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have recently attracted tremendous research interest in the field of catalysis due to their unique optical and electronic properties. However, direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles (NPs) supported on reduced graphene oxides (Au/rGO) has rarely been reported. Herein, based on the reduction from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), the catalytic property of Au/rGO nanocomposites was investigated and compared with corresponding Au NP samples with similar size distribution. Our results show that Au/rGO nanocomposites could serve as a good catalytic and analytic platform for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In addition, systematic comparisons were conducted during power- and time-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments, which exhibited a lower power threshold and higher catalytic efficiency for Au/rGO as compared to Au NPs toward the reaction. PMID:25793752

  6. Multifunctional Au-ZnO Plasmonic Nanostructures for Enhanced UV Photodetector and Room Temperature NO Sensing Devices

    PubMed Central

    Gogurla, Narendar; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Santra, Sumita; Manna, Santanu; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this study we report the enhancement of UV photodetection and wavelength tunable light induced NO gas sensing at room temperature using Au-ZnO nanocomposites synthesized by a simple photochemical process. Plasmonic Au-ZnO nanostructures with a size less than the incident wavelength have been found to exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that leads to a strong absorption, scattering and local field enhancement. The photoresponse of Au-ZnO nanocomposite can be effectively enhanced by 80 times at 335 nm over control ZnO. We also demonstrated Au-ZnO nanocomposite's application to wavelength tunable gas sensor operating at room temperature. The sensing response of Au-ZnO nancomposite is enhanced both in UV and visible region, as compared to control ZnO. The sensitivity is observed to be higher in the visible region due to the LSPR effect of Au NPs. The selectivity is found to be higher for NO gas over CO and some other volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with a minimum detection limit of 0.1 ppb for Au-ZnO sensor at 335 nm. PMID:25255700

  7. Activated-Carbon Sorbent With Integral Heat-Transfer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1996-01-01

    Prototype adsorption device used, for example, in adsorption heat pump, to store natural gas to power automobile, or to separate components of fluid mixtures. Device includes activated carbon held together by binder and molded into finned heat-transfer device providing rapid heating or cooling to enable rapid adsorption or desorption of fluids. Concepts of design and fabrication of device equally valid for such other highly thermally conductive devices as copper-finned tubes, and for such other high-surface-area sorbents as zeolites or silicates.

  8. Ultrafast optical control of terahertz surface plasmons in subwavelength hole-arrays at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Zhang, Weili; O'Hara, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength metallic hole-arrays has been an active research area since its first demonstration. The frequency selective resonance properties of subwavelength metallic hole arrays, generally known as surface plasmon polaritons, have potential use in functional plasmonic devices such as filters, modulators, switches, etc. Such plasmonic devices are also very promising for future terahertz applications. Ultrafast switching or modulation of the resonant behavior of the 2-D metallic arrays in terahertz frequencies is of particular interest for high speed communication and sensing applications. In this paper, we demonstrate ultrafast optical control of surface plasmon enhanced resonant terahertz transmission in two-dimensional subwavelength metallic hole arrays fabricated on gallium arsenide based substrates. Optically pumping the arrays creates a thin conductive layer in the substrate reducing the terahertz transmission amplitude of both the resonant mode and the direct transmission. Under low optical fluence, the terahertz transmission is more greatly affected by resonance damping than by propagation loss in the substrate. An ErAs:GaAs nanoisland superlattice substrate is shown to allow ultrafast control with a switching recovery time of ~10 ps. We also present resonant terahertz transmission in a hybrid plasmonic film comprised of an integrated array of subwavelength metallic islands and semiconductor hole arrays. Optically pumping the semiconductor hole arrays favors excitation of surface plasmon resonance. A large dynamic transition between a dipolar localized surface plasmon mode and a surface plasmon resonance near 0.8 THz is observed under near infrared optical excitation. The reversal in transmission amplitude from a stop-band to a pass-band and up to π/ 2 phase shift achieved in the hybrid plasmonic film make it promising in large dynamic phase modulation, optical changeover switching, and active terahertz

  9. Robust Phonon-Plasmon Coupling in Quasifreestanding Graphene on Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Koch, R J; Fryska, S; Ostler, M; Endlich, M; Speck, F; Hänsel, T; Schaefer, J A; Seyller, Th

    2016-03-11

    Using inelastic electron scattering in combination with dielectric theory simulations on differently prepared graphene layers on silicon carbide, we demonstrate that the coupling between the 2D plasmon of graphene and the surface optical phonon of the substrate cannot be quenched by modification of the interface via intercalation. The intercalation rather provides additional modes like, e.g., the silicon-hydrogen stretch mode in the case of hydrogen intercalation or the silicon-oxygen vibrations for water intercalation that couple to the 2D plasmons of graphene. Furthermore, in the case of bilayer graphene with broken inversion symmetry due to charge imbalance between the layers, we observe a similar coupling of the 2D plasmon to an internal infrared-active mode, the LO phonon mode. The coupling of graphene plasmons to vibrational modes of the substrate surface and internal infrared active modes is envisioned to provide an excellent tool for tailoring the plasmon band structure of monolayer and bilayer graphene for plasmonic devices such as plasmon filters or plasmonic waveguides. The rigidity of the effect furthermore suggests that it may be of importance for other 2D materials as well. PMID:27015502

  10. Robust Phonon-Plasmon Coupling in Quasifreestanding Graphene on Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R. J.; Fryska, S.; Ostler, M.; Endlich, M.; Speck, F.; Hänsel, T.; Schaefer, J. A.; Seyller, Th.

    2016-03-01

    Using inelastic electron scattering in combination with dielectric theory simulations on differently prepared graphene layers on silicon carbide, we demonstrate that the coupling between the 2D plasmon of graphene and the surface optical phonon of the substrate cannot be quenched by modification of the interface via intercalation. The intercalation rather provides additional modes like, e.g., the silicon-hydrogen stretch mode in the case of hydrogen intercalation or the silicon-oxygen vibrations for water intercalation that couple to the 2D plasmons of graphene. Furthermore, in the case of bilayer graphene with broken inversion symmetry due to charge imbalance between the layers, we observe a similar coupling of the 2D plasmon to an internal infrared-active mode, the LO phonon mode. The coupling of graphene plasmons to vibrational modes of the substrate surface and internal infrared active modes is envisioned to provide an excellent tool for tailoring the plasmon band structure of monolayer and bilayer graphene for plasmonic devices such as plasmon filters or plasmonic waveguides. The rigidity of the effect furthermore suggests that it may be of importance for other 2D materials as well.

  11. Open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qian; Yang, Fan; Jin, Tian Yu; Lei Mei, Zhong; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    We propose open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation. Compared with the closed configurations of active cloaking and illusion devices, we focus on improving the distribution schemes for the controlled sources, which do not have to surround the protected object strictly. Instead, the controlled sources can be placed in several small discrete clusters, and produce the desired voltages along the controlled boundary, to actively hide or disguise the protected object. Numerical simulations are performed with satisfactory results, which are further validated by experimental measurements. The open cloaking and illusion devices have many advantages over the closed configurations in various potential applications.

  12. SNS Devices With Pinhole-Defined Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D.; Barner, Jeffrey B.

    1996-01-01

    Superconductor/normal conductor/superconductor (SNS) microbridge devices with pinhole-defined active regions undergoing development. Device includes thin, electrically insulating layer deposited epitaxially, with controlled formation of pinholes, on one of two superconducting layers. Normally conducting metal deposited epitaxially in pinholes and on insulating layer, forming electrical contact between two superconducting layers. Junction resistances and maximum junction voltages expected to be increased.

  13. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  14. Plasmonic activation of gold nanorods for remote stimulation of calcium signaling and protein expression in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Sauer, Jeremy P; Stanley, Sarah A; Qian, Xi; Gottesdiener, Andrew; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    Remote activation of specific cells of a heterogeneous population can provide a useful research tool for clinical and therapeutic applications. Here, we demonstrate that photostimulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) using a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser at specific longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelengths can induce the selective and temporal internalization of calcium in HEK 293T cells. Biotin-PEG-Au nanorods coated with streptavidin Alexa Fluor-633 and biotinylated anti-His antibodies were used to decorate cells genetically modified with His-tagged TRPV1 temperature-sensitive ion channel and AuNRs conjugated to biotinylated RGD peptide were used to decorate integrins in unmodified cells. Plasmonic activation can be stimulated at weak laser power (0.7-4.0 W/cm(2) ) without causing cell damage. Selective activation of TRPV1 channels could be controlled by laser power between 1.0 and 1.5 W/cm(2) . Integrin targeting robustly stimulated calcium signaling due to a dense cellular distribution of nanoparticles. Such an approach represents a functional tool for combinatorial activation of cell signaling in heterogeneous cell populations. Our results suggest that it is possible to induce cell activation via NIR-induced gold nanorod heating through the selective targeting of membrane proteins in unmodified cells to produce calcium signaling and downstream expression of specific genes with significant relevance for both in vitro and therapeutic applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2228-2240. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27563853

  15. Promoting Active Species Generation by Plasmon-Induced Hot-Electron Excitation for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigao; Li, Peng; Zhao, Guixia; Wang, Xin; Kong, Jintao; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Huabin; Chang, Kun; Meng, Xianguang; Kako, Tetsuya; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-07-27

    Water splitting represents a promising technology for renewable energy conversion and storage, but it is greatly hindered by the kinetically sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, using Au-nanoparticle-decorated Ni(OH)2 nanosheets [Ni(OH)2-Au] as catalysts, we demonstrate that the photon-induced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) excitation on Au nanoparticles could significantly activate the OER catalysis, specifically achieving a more than 4-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile affording a markedly decreased overpotential of 270 mV at the current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and a small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec(-1) (no iR-correction), which is much better than those of the benchmark IrO2 and RuO2, as well as most Ni-based OER catalysts reported to date. The synergy of the enhanced generation of Ni(III/IV) active species and the improved charge transfer, both induced by hot-electron excitation on Au nanoparticles, is proposed to account for such a markedly increased activity. The SPR-enhanced OER catalysis could also be observed over cobalt oxide (CoO)-Au and iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH)-Au catalysts, suggesting the generality of this strategy. These findings highlight the possibility of activating OER catalysis by plasmonic excitation and could open new avenues toward the design of more-energy-efficient catalytic water oxidation systems with the assistance of light energy. PMID:27380539

  16. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  17. A twin-free single-crystal Ag nanoplate plasmonic platform: hybridization of the optical nano-antenna and surface plasmon active surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoban; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Kang, Taejoon; Seo, Min-Kyo; Kim, Bongsoo

    2013-12-01

    Surface plasmons based on metallic nanostructures enable light manipulation beyond the optical diffraction limit. We have epitaxially synthesized twin-free single-crystal Ag nanoplates on SrTiO3 substrates. Unlike the nanoplates synthesized in a solution phase, these nanoplates have perfectly clean surfaces as well as a quite large size of tens of micrometers. As-synthesized defect-free single-crystal Ag nanoplates have an atomically flat surface and sides with well-defined angles, allowing long distance propagation of surface plasmons and highly reliable plasmonic integration. By spatially separating receiving and transmitting antennas and plasmonically interfacing them, the signal quality of transmission/reception can be largely improved. Furthermore, by combining sub-dimensional nanostructures onto the two-dimensional space effective hierarchical plasmonic nano-complexes can be built up. Theoretical simulations well reproduced unique experimental results of coupling between SPPs and free-space radiation by the nanoplate antenna sides, low-loss long-range SPP propagation, and tunneling or scattering of SPPs at a nano-gap as well as a nano-structure introduced on the nanoplate. The single-crystal Ag nanoplate will find superb applications in plasmonic nano-circuitry and lab-on-a-chip for biochemical sensing.Surface plasmons based on metallic nanostructures enable light manipulation beyond the optical diffraction limit. We have epitaxially synthesized twin-free single-crystal Ag nanoplates on SrTiO3 substrates. Unlike the nanoplates synthesized in a solution phase, these nanoplates have perfectly clean surfaces as well as a quite large size of tens of micrometers. As-synthesized defect-free single-crystal Ag nanoplates have an atomically flat surface and sides with well-defined angles, allowing long distance propagation of surface plasmons and highly reliable plasmonic integration. By spatially separating receiving and transmitting antennas and plasmonically

  18. Geometric investigation of a gaming active device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Fabio; Remondino, Fabio; Battisti, Roberto; Nocerino, Erica

    2011-07-01

    3D imaging systems are widely available and used for surveying, modeling and entertainment applications, but clear statements regarding their characteristics, performances and limitations are still missing. The VDI/VDE and the ASTME57 committees are trying to set some standards but the commercial market is not reacting properly. Since many new users are approaching these 3D recording methodologies, clear statements and information clarifying if a package or system satisfies certain requirements before investing are fundamental for those users who are not really familiar with these technologies. Recently small and portable consumer-grade active sensors came on the market, like TOF rangeimaging cameras or low-cost triangulation-based range sensor. A quite interesting active system was produced by PrimeSense and launched on the market thanks to the Microsoft Xbox project with the name of Kinect. The article reports the geometric investigation of the Kinect active sensors, considering its measurement performances, the accuracy of the retrieved range data and the possibility to use it for 3D modeling application.

  19. Flexible transformation plasmonics using graphene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei Bing; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Hong Ju; Ni, Zhen Hua; Dong, Zheng Gao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-05-01

    The flexible control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is important and intriguing due to its wide application in novel plasmonic devices. Transformation optics (TO) offers the capability either to confine the SPP propagation on rigid curved/uneven surfaces, or to control the flow of SPPs on planar surfaces. However, TO has not permitted us to confine, manipulate, and control SPP waves on flexible curved surfaces. Here, we propose to confine and freely control flexible SPPs using TO and graphene. We show that SPP waves can be naturally confined and propagate on curved or uneven graphene surfaces with little bending and radiation losses, and the confined SPPs are further manipulated and controlled using TO. Flexible plasmonic devices are presented, including the bending waveguides, wave splitter, and Luneburg lens on curved surfaces. Together with the intrinsic flexibility, graphene can be served as a good platform for flexible transformation plasmonics. PMID:23669904

  20. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays. PMID:26066375

  1. Polarization-independent actively tunable colour generation on imprinted plasmonic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Vazquez-Guardado, Abraham; Modak, Sushrut; Boroumand, Javaneh; Xu, Daming; Wu, Shin-Tson; Chanda, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Structural colour arising from nanostructured metallic surfaces offers many benefits compared to conventional pigmentation based display technologies, such as increased resolution and scalability of their optical response with structure dimensions. However, once these structures are fabricated their optical characteristics remain static, limiting their potential application. Here, by using a specially designed nanostructured plasmonic surface in conjunction with high birefringence liquid crystals, we demonstrate a tunable polarization-independent reflective surface where the colour of the surface is changed as a function of applied voltage. A large range of colour tunability is achieved over previous reports by utilizing an engineered surface which allows full liquid crystal reorientation while maximizing the overlap between plasmonic fields and liquid crystal. In combination with imprinted structures of varying periods, a full range of colours spanning the entire visible spectrum is achieved, paving the way towards dynamic pixels for reflective displays. PMID:26066375

  2. Molecular plasmonics for biology and nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Kiraly, Brian; Weiss, Paul S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The optical excitation of surface plasmons in metal nanoparticles leads to nanoscale spatial confinement of electromagnetic fields. The confined electromagnetic fields can generate intense, localized thermal energy and large near-field optical forces. The interaction between these effects and nearby molecules has led to the emerging field known as molecular plasmonics. Recent advances in molecular plasmonics have enabled novel optical materials and devices with applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this article, we categorize three main types of interactions between molecules and surface plasmons: optical, thermal and mechanical. Within the scope of each type of interaction, we will review applications of molecular plasmonics in biology and nanomedicine. We include a wide range of applications that involve sensing, spectral analysis, imaging, delivery, manipulation and heating of molecules, biomolecules or cells using plasmonic effects. We also briefly describe the physical principles of molecular plasmonics and progress in the nanofabrication, surface functionalization and bioconjugation of metal nanoparticles. PMID:22630155

  3. Ultrafast optical control of terahertz surface plasmons in subwavelength hole-arrays at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Chen, Hou - Tong; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John

    2010-12-10

    Extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength metallic hole-arrays has been an active research area since its first demonstration. The frequency selective resonance properties of subwavelength metallic hole arrays, generally known as surface plasmon polaritons, have potential use in functional plasmonic devices such as filters, modulators, switches, etc. Such plasmonic devices are also very promising for future terahertz applications. Ultrafast switching or modulation of the resonant behavior of the 2-D metallic arrays in terahertz frequencies is of particular interest for high speed communication and sensing applications. In this paper, we demonstrate optical control of surface plasmon enhanced resonant terahertz transmission in two-dimensional subwavelength metallic hole arrays fabricated on gallium arsenide based substrates. Optically pumping the arrays creates a conductive layer in the substrate reducing the terahertz transmission amplitude of both the resonant mode and the direct transmission. Under low optical fluence, the terahertz transmission is more greatly affected by resonance damping than by propagation loss in the substrate. An ErAs:GaAs nanoisland superlattice substrate is shown to allow ultrafast control with a switching recovery time of {approx}10 ps. We also present resonant terahertz transmission in a hybrid plasmonic film comprised of an integrated array of subwavelength metallic islands and semiconductor holes. A large dynamic transition between a dipolar localized surface plasmon mode and a surface plasmon resonance near 0.8 THz is observed under near infrared optical excitation. The reversal in transmission amplitude from a stopband to a passband and up to {pi}/2 phase shift achieved in the hybrid plasmonic film make it promising in large dynamic phase modulation, optical changeover switching, and active terahertz plasmonics.

  4. Enhanced Plasmonic Resonance Energy Transfer in Mesoporous Silica-Encased Gold Nanorod for Two-Photon-Activated Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chung, Ming-Fang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Ching-Mao; Chu, Chia-Hui; Chou, Pi-Tai; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of gold nanorods (GNRs) have recently drawn considerable interest from those working in in vivo biomolecular sensing and bioimaging. Especially appealing in these applications is the plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of GNRs induced by two-photon excitation at infrared wavelengths, owing to the significant penetration depth of infrared light in tissue. Unfortunately, many studies have also shown that often the intensity of pulsed coherent irradiation of GNRs needed results in irreversible deformation of GNRs, greatly reducing their two-photon luminescence (TPL) emission intensity. In this work we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of mesoporous silica-encased gold nanorods (MS-GNRs) that incorporate photosensitizers (PSs) for two-photon-activated photodynamic therapy (TPA-PDT). The PSs, doped into the nano-channels of the mesoporous silica shell, can be efficiently excited via intra-particle plasmonic resonance energy transfer from the encased two-photon excited gold nanorod and further generates cytotoxic singlet oxygen for cancer eradication. In addition, due to the mechanical support provided by encapsulating mesoporous silica matrix against thermal deformation, the two-photon luminescence stability of GNRs was significantly improved; after 100 seconds of 800 nm repetitive laser pulse with the 30 times higher than average power for imaging acquisition, MS-GNR luminescence intensity exhibited ~260% better resistance to deformation than that of the uncoated gold nanorods. These results strongly suggest that MS-GNRs with embedded PSs might provide a promising photodynamic therapy for the treatment of deeply situated cancers via plasmonic resonance energy transfer. PMID:24955141

  5. Charge carrier dynamics and surface plasmon interaction in gold nanorod-blended organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Aniket; Gupta, Neeraj; Lochan, Abhiram; Sharma, G. D.; Chand, Suresh; Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Rajiv K.

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of plasmonic nanoparticles into organic solar cell enhances the light harvesting properties that lead to higher power conversion efficiency without altering the device configuration. This work defines the consequences of the nanoparticle overloading amount and energy transfer process between gold nanorod and polymer (active matrix) in organic solar cells. We have studied the hole population decay dynamics coupled with gold nanorods loading amount which provides better understanding about device performance limiting factors. The exciton and plasmon together act as an interacting dipole; however, the energy exchange between these two has been elucidated via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) mechanism. Further, the charge species have been identified specifically with respect to their energy levels appearing in ultrafast time domain. The specific interaction of these charge species with respective surface plasmon resonance mode, i.e., exciton to transverse mode of oscillation and polaron pair to longitudinal mode of oscillations, has been explained. Thus, our analysis reveals that PRET enhances the carrier population density in polymer via non-radiative process beyond the concurrence of a particular plasmon resonance oscillation mode and polymer absorption range. These findings give new insight and reveal specifically the factors that enhance and control the performance of gold nanorods blended organic solar cells. This work would lead in the emergence of future plasmon based efficient organic electronic devices.

  6. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    PubMed

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers. PMID:24861280

  7. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  8. Plasmons in graphene on uniaxial substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Arrazola, I.; CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián ; Hillenbrand, R.; Nikitin, A. Yu.

    2014-01-06

    Placing graphene on uniaxial substrates may have interesting application potential for graphene-based photonic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we analytically derive the dispersion relation for graphene plasmons on uniaxial substrates and discuss their momentum, propagation length, and polarization as a function of frequency, propagation direction, and both ordinary and extraordinary dielectric permittivities of the substrate. We find that the plasmons exhibit an anisotropic propagation, yielding radially asymmetric field patterns when a point emitter launches plasmons in the graphene layer.

  9. Plasmonic Hot Carrier Transport and Collection in Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Adam; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Goddard, William; Atwater, Harry; Joint CenterArtificial Photosynthesis Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Plasmonic resonances provide a promising pathway for efficiently capturing photons from solar radiation and improving photo-catalytic activity via hot carrier generation. Previous calculations have provided the prompt energy-momentum distributions of hot carriers, but have left open the question of their transport to collection surfaces [Accepted in Nature Communications]. As the overall efficiency of plasmonic devices is dependent not just on how many carriers are collected but also on their energy distribution, a transport model which tracks this distribution is of key importance. Here, we provide a first-principles model of this transport based upon at the linearized Boltzmann equation with the diffusive and ballistic regimes handled separately, and investigate the role of geometry on plasmonic hot carrier collection.

  10. Synergistic concurrent enhancement of charge generation, dissociation, and transport in organic solar cells with plasmonic metal-carbon nanotube hybrids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Min; Lim, Joonwon; Lee, Nayeun; Park, Hyung Il; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Taewoo; Nam, Soo Ah; Kim, Jehan; Shin, Jonghwa; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-03-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures are synthesized by decorating B- or N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with Au nanoparticles. While the plasmonic nanoparticles promote exciton generation and dissociation, the B- and N-doped CNTs enable charge-selective transport enhancement in the organic active layer. Such concurrent enhancements of all the principal energy-harvesting steps improve the device efficiency up to 9.98% for organic single-junction solar cells. PMID:25515531

  11. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  12. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based 'adaptors/connectors' with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties. PMID:25813537

  13. Effect of Interface energy and electron transfer on shape, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of supported surfactant-free gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Giangregorio, Maria M.; Dastmalchi, Babak; Suvorova, Alexandra; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Hingerl, Kurt; Bruno, Giovanni; Losurdo, Maria

    2014-01-01

    For device integration purposes plasmonic metal nanoparticles must be supported/deposited on substrates. Therefore, it is important to understand the interaction between surfactant-free plasmonic metal nanoparticles and different substrates, as well as to identify factors that drive nanoparticles nucleation and formation. Here we show that for nanoparticles grown directly on supports, the substrate/nanoparticle interfacial energy affects the equilibrium shape of nanoparticles. Therefore, oblate, spherical and prolate Au nanoparticles (NPs) with different shapes have been deposited by radiofrequency sputtering on substrates with different characteristics, namely a dielectric oxide Al2O3 (0001), a narrow bandgap semiconductor Si (100), and a polar piezoelectric wide bandgap semiconductor 4H–SiC (0001). We demonstrate that the higher the substrate surface energy, the higher the interaction with the substrate, resulting in flat prolate Au nanoparticles. The resulting localized surface plasmon resonance characteristics of Au NPs/Al2O3, Au NPs/Si and Au NPs/SiC have been determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and correlated with their structure and shape studied by transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we have demonstrated the diverse response of the tailored plasmonic substrates as ultrasensitive SERS chemical sensors. Flat oblates Au NPs on SiC result in an enhanced and more stable SERS response. The experimental findings are validated by numerical simulations of electromagnetic fields.

  14. Free-Standing Optically Switchable Chiral Plasmonic Photonic Crystal Based on Self-Assembled Cellulose Nanorods and Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chu, Guang; Wang, Xuesi; Yin, Hang; Shi, Ying; Jiang, Haijing; Chen, Tianrui; Gao, Jianxiong; Qu, Dan; Xu, Yan; Ding, Dajun

    2015-10-01

    Photonic crystals incorporating with plasmonic nanoparticles have recently attracted considerable attention due to their novel optical properties and potential applications in future subwavelength optics, biosensing and data storage device. Here we demonstrate a free-standing chiral plasmonic film composed of entropy-driven self-co-assembly of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The CNCs-GNPs composite films not only preserve the photonic ordering of the CNCs matrix but also retain the plasmonic resonance of GNPs, leading to a distinct plasmon-induced chiroptical activity and a strong resonant plasmonic-photonic coupling that is confirmed by the stationary and ultrafast transient optical response. Switchable optical activity can be obtained by either varying the incidence angle of lights, or by taking advantage of the responsive feature of the CNCs matrix. Notably, an angle-dependent plasmon resonance in chiral nematic hybrid film has been observed for the first time, which differs drastically from that of the GNPs embed in three-dimensional photonic crystals, revealing a close relation with the structure of the host matrix. The current approach for fabricating device-scale, macroscopic chiral plasmonic materials from abundant CNCs with robust chiral nematic matrix may enable the mass production of functional optical metamaterials. PMID:26378345

  15. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  16. Nanoglassified, optically-active monolayer films of gold nanoparticles for in situ orthogonal detection by localized surface plasmon resonance and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yuan; Hinman, Samuel S; Duan, Jicheng; Cheng, Quan

    2014-12-16

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) represents a sensitive and versatile method for detection of biomolecules in a label-free fashion, but identification of bound analytes can be challenging with LSPR alone, especially for samples in a complex medium. We report the fabrication of an optically active, plasmonic film of gold nanoparticles by using a self-assembly and calcination process, which offers orthogonal measurements enabling multifaceted characterization on the same surface with LSPR and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This proof-of-concept study involves plasmonic characterization of the fabricated nanofilm, real-time monitoring of vesicle-surface interactions toward formation of fluid lipid bilayer, and mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and cytochrome c digest. This multifunction-enabling surface material can yield complementary analytical information, providing new tools for comprehensive analysis of biomolecular samples. PMID:25417963

  17. Nanoglassified, Optically-Active Monolayer Films of Gold Nanoparticles for in Situ Orthogonal Detection by Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-MS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) represents a sensitive and versatile method for detection of biomolecules in a label-free fashion, but identification of bound analytes can be challenging with LSPR alone, especially for samples in a complex medium. We report the fabrication of an optically active, plasmonic film of gold nanoparticles by using a self-assembly and calcination process, which offers orthogonal measurements enabling multifaceted characterization on the same surface with LSPR and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This proof-of-concept study involves plasmonic characterization of the fabricated nanofilm, real-time monitoring of vesicle–surface interactions toward formation of fluid lipid bilayer, and mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and cytochrome c digest. This multifunction-enabling surface material can yield complementary analytical information, providing new tools for comprehensive analysis of biomolecular samples. PMID:25417963

  18. Tailoring terahertz plasmons with silver nanorod arrays

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei; Song, Chunyuan; Lanier, Thomas E.; Singh, Ranjan; O'Hara, John F.; Dennis, William M.; Zhao, Yiping; Zhang, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic materials that strongly interact with light are ideal candidates for designing subwavelength photonic devices. We report on direct coupling of terahertz waves in metallic nanorods by observing the resonant transmission of surface plasmon polariton waves through lithographically patterned films of silver nanorod (100 nm in diameter) micro-hole arrays. The best enhancement in surface plasmon resonant transmission is obtained when the nanorods are perfectly aligned with the electric field direction of the linearly polarized terahertz wave. This unique polarization-dependent propagation of surface plasmons in structures fabricated from nanorod films offers promising device applications. We conclude that the anisotropy of nanoscale metallic rod arrays imparts a material anisotropy relevant at the microscale that may be utilized for the fabrication of plasmonic and metamaterial based devices for operation at terahertz frequencies.

  19. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level. PMID:26670551

  20. Triton X-100 for three-plasmon gold nanostars with two photothermally active NIR (near IR) and SWIR (short-wavelength IR) channels.

    PubMed

    Pallavicini, Piersandro; Donà, Alice; Casu, Alberto; Chirico, Giuseppe; Collini, Maddalena; Dacarro, Giacomo; Falqui, Andrea; Milanese, Chiara; Sironi, Laura; Taglietti, Angelo

    2013-07-18

    Five-branched gold nanostars are obtained using Triton X-100 in a seed-growth synthesis. They have the uncommon feature of two intense localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the 600-900 and 1100-1600 nm ranges. Both LSPRs convert laser radiation into heat, offering two photothermally active channels in the NIR and SWIR ranges. PMID:23728398

  1. Active metameric security devices using an electrochromic material.

    PubMed

    Baloukas, Bill; Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Martinu, Ludvik

    2011-03-20

    In order to increase the anticounterfeiting performance of interference security image structures, we propose to implement an active component using an electrochromic material. This novel device, based on metamerism, offers the possibility of creating various surprising optical effects, it is more challenging to duplicate due to its complexity, and it adds a second level of authentication. By designing optical filters that match the bleached and colored states of the electrochromic device, one can obtain two hidden images-one appearing when the device is tilted, and the other one disappearing when the device is colored under an applied potential. Specifically, we present an example of a filter that is metameric with the colored state of the electrochromic device, demonstrate how the dynamic nature of the device offers more fabrication flexibility, and discuss its performance. We also describe a design methodology for metameric filters based on the luminous efficiency curve of the human eye: this approach results in filters with a lower number of layers and hence lower fabrication costs, and with a lower color difference sensitivity under various illuminants and for nonstandard observers. PMID:21460974

  2. Approaching the strong coupling limit in single plasmonic nanorods interacting with J-aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Gülis; Johansson, Göran; Johansson, Peter; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Käll, Mikael; Shegai, Timur

    2013-01-01

    We studied scattering and extinction of individual silver nanorods coupled to the J-aggregate form of the cyanine dye TDBC as a function of plasmon – exciton detuning. The measured single particle spectra exhibited a strongly suppressed scattering and extinction rate at wavelengths corresponding to the J-aggregate absorption band, signaling strong interaction between the localized surface plasmon of the metal core and the exciton of the surrounding molecular shell. In the context of strong coupling theory, the observed “transparency dips” correspond to an average vacuum Rabi splitting of the order of 100 meV, which approaches the plasmon dephasing rate and, thereby, the strong coupling limit for the smallest investigated particles. These findings could pave the way towards ultra-strong light-matter interaction on the nanoscale and active plasmonic devices operating at room temperature. PMID:24166360

  3. Compact magnetic antennas for directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Palomba, Stefano; Park, Yongshik; Zentgraf, Thomas; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonics is considered as one of the most promising candidates for implementing the next generation of ultrafast and ultracompact photonic circuits. Considerable effort has been made to scale down individual plasmonic components into the nanometer regime. However, a compact plasmonic source that can efficiently generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and deliver SPPs to the region of interest is yet to be realized. Here, bridging the optical antenna theory and the recently developed concept of metamaterials, we demonstrate a subwavelength, highly efficient plasmonic source for directional generation of SPPs. The designed device consists of two nanomagnetic resonators with detuned resonant frequencies. At the operating wavelength, incident photons can be efficiently channeled into SPP waves modulated by the electric field polarization. By tailoring the relative phase at resonance and the separation between the two nanoresonators, SPPs can be steered to predominantly propagate along one specific direction. This novel magnetic nanoantenna paves a new way to manipulate photons in the near-field, and also could be useful for SPP-based nonlinear applications, active modulations, and wireless optical communications. PMID:22845720

  4. Hot electron generation by aluminum oligomers in plasmonic ultraviolet photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kaya, Serkan; Pala, Nezih

    2016-06-13

    We report on an integrated plasmonic ultraviolet (UV) photodetector composed of aluminum Fano-resonant heptamer nanoantennas deposited on a Gallium Nitride (GaN) active layer which is grown on a sapphire substrate to generate significant photocurrent via formation of hot electrons by nanoclusters upon the decay of nonequilibrium plasmons. Using the plasmon hybridization theory and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, it is shown that the generation of hot carriers by metallic clusters illuminated by UV beam leads to a large photocurrent. The induced Fano resonance (FR) minimum across the UV spectrum allows for noticeable enhancement in the absorption of optical power yielding a plasmonic UV photodetector with a high responsivity. It is also shown that varying the thickness of the oxide layer (Al2O3) around the nanodisks (tox) in a heptamer assembly adjusted the generated photocurrent and responsivity. The proposed plasmonic structure opens new horizons for designing and fabricating efficient opto-electronics devices with high gain and responsivity. PMID:27410381

  5. Solar-Powered Plasmon-Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naldoni, Alberto; Riboni, Francesca; Guler, Urcan; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2016-06-01

    Photocatalysis uses semiconductors to convert sunlight into chemical energy. Recent reports have shown that plasmonic nanostructures can be used to extend semiconductor light absorption or to drive direct photocatalysis with visible light at their surface. In this review, we discuss the fundamental decay pathway of localized surface plasmons in the context of driving solar-powered chemical reactions. We also review different nanophotonic approaches demonstrated for increasing solar-to-hydrogen conversion in photoelectrochemical water splitting, including experimental observations of enhanced reaction selectivity for reactions occurring at the metalsemiconductor interface. The enhanced reaction selectivity is highly dependent on the morphology, electronic properties, and spatial arrangement of composite nanostructures and their elements. In addition, we report on the particular features of photocatalytic reactions evolving at plasmonic metal surfaces and discuss the possibility of manipulating the reaction selectivity through the activation of targeted molecular bonds. Finally, using solar-to-hydrogen conversion techniques as an example, we quantify the efficacy metrics achievable in plasmon-driven photoelectrochemical systems and highlight some of the new directions that could lead to the practical implementation of solar-powered plasmon-based catalytic devices.

  6. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications. PMID:27328022

  7. Tunable Terahertz Hybrid Metal-Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; Sushkov, Andrei B; Myers-Ward, Rachael L; Boyd, Anthony K; Daniels, Kevin M; Gaskill, D Kurt; Fuhrer, Michael S; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E

    2015-10-14

    We report here a new type of plasmon resonance that occurs when graphene is connected to a metal. These new plasmon modes offer the potential to incorporate a tunable plasmonic channel into a device with electrical contacts, a critical step toward practical graphene terahertz optoelectronics. Through theory and experiments, we demonstrate, for example, anomalously high resonant absorption or transmission when subwavelength graphene-filled apertures are introduced into an otherwise conductive layer. These tunable plasmon resonances are essential yet missing ingredients needed for terahertz filters, oscillators, detectors, and modulators. PMID:26397718

  8. Plasmon-Enhanced Enzymatic Reactions 2:Optimization of Enzyme Activity by Surface Modification of Silver Island Films with Biotin-Poly (Ethylene-glycol)-Amine.

    PubMed

    Abel, Biebele; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    Surface modification of silver island films (SIFs) was carried out with Biotin-Poly (Ethylene-glycol)-Amine (BEA), which acts as a cross-linker between the silver surface and horse radish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme for optimum plasmon-enhanced enzymatic activity. SIFs-deposited blank glass slides and SIFs-deposited 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane(APTES)-coated glass slides were used as our plasmonic surfaces.In this regard, three different extent of loading of SIFs were also prepared (low, medium and high) on APTES-coated glass slides. Streptavidin-linked HRP enzyme was attached to SIFs-deposited blank glass slides and SIFs-deposited APTES-coated glass slides through the well-known biotin-streptavidin interactions. The characterization of these surfaces was done using optical absorption spectroscopy. The loading of SIFs on glass slides was observed to have significant effect on the efficiency of plasmon-enhanced enzymatic activity, where an enhancement of 200% in the enzymatic activity was observed when compared to our previously used strategies for enzyme immobilization in our preceding work[1]. In addition, SIFs-deposited on APTES-coated glass slides were found to be re-usable for plasmon-enhanced enzymatic reactions unlike SIFs deposited on to blank glass slides. PMID:22485194

  9. Nonlinear Terahertz Absorption of Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; König-Otto, Jacob C; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-04-13

    Subwavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, subwavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a terahertz pump-terahertz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results. The model shows that the observed strong linearity is caused by an unexpected red shift of plasmon resonance together with a broadening and weakening of the resonance caused by the transient increase in electron temperature. The model further predicts that even greater resonant enhancement of the nonlinear response can be expected in high-mobility graphene, suggesting that nonlinear graphene plasmonic devices could be promising candidates for nonlinear optical processing. PMID:26978242

  10. Increasing physical activity through mobile device interventions: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Adrià; Vidal-Conti, Josep; Palou, Pere

    2016-09-01

    Physical inactivity is a health problem that affects people worldwide and has been identified as the fourth largest risk factor for overall mortality (contributing to 6% of deaths globally). Many researchers have tried to increase physical activity levels through traditional methods without much success. Thus, many researchers are turning to mobile technology as an emerging method for changing health behaviours. This systematic review sought to summarise and update the existing scientific literature on increasing physical activity through mobile device interventions, taking into account the methodological quality of the studies. The articles were identified by searching the PubMed, SCOPUS and SPORTDiscus databases for studies published between January 2003 and December 2013. Studies investigating efforts to increase physical activity through mobile phone or even personal digital assistant interventions were included. The search results allowed the inclusion of 11 studies that gave rise to 12 publications. Six of the articles included in this review reported significant increases in physical activity levels. The number of studies using mobile devices for interventions has increased exponentially in the last few years, but future investigations with better methodological quality are needed to draw stronger conclusions regarding how to increase physical activity through mobile device interventions. PMID:25649783

  11. Substrate-Phonon-Mediated Plasmon Hybridization in Coplanar Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoxia; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Bai, Bing; Li, Zhenjun; Hu, Hai; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Mode hybridization between adjacent graphene nanoribbons determines the integration density of graphene-based plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate this plasmon hybridization by characterizing the coupling strength of plasmons in graphene nanoribbon arrays in terms of graphene Fermi level and inter-ribbon spacing. Both experimental and computational results showed that the plasmon coupling is strongly mediated by the substrate phonons. For polar substrate, the plasmon coupling strength was limited by the plasmon-phonon interaction. In contrast, nonpolar substrate affects neither the energy distribution of original plasmon modes in graphene nanostructures nor their plasmon interactions, which increase exponentially as the inter-ribbon spacing decreases. To further explore the potential of graphene broadband plasmonics on nonpolar substrate, we propose a scheme that uses a metal-dielectric heterostructure to prevent the overlap of plasmons between neighboring graphene nanoribbons. The device structures retain the plasmon resonance frequency of the graphene ribbons and maximally isolate the plasmonic components from the surrounding electromagnetic environment, allowing modular design in integrated plasmonic circuits. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51372045).

  12. Localized surface plasmons in vibrating graphene nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihua; Li, Bo-Hong; Stassen, Erik; Mortensen, N Asger; Christensen, Johan

    2016-02-14

    Localized surface plasmons are confined collective oscillations of electrons in metallic nanoparticles. When driven by light, the optical response is dictated by geometrical parameters and the dielectric environment and plasmons are therefore extremely important for sensing applications. Plasmons in graphene disks have the additional benefit of being highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters, such as molecules, for future nanophotonic devices. PMID:26815600

  13. Dynamics of plasmon in graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Mahapatra, D. R.; Raha, S.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic effects of plasmon such as scattering with defect boundaries and oxygen impurities in the graphene oxide are investigated. Study of plasmon dynamics helps in understanding electronic, opto-electronic and biological applications of graphene based nanostructures. Tuning or control over such applications is made possible by graphene nanostructure engineering. We have modeled defects with increased smoothing of defect edge in graphene keeping area of the defect constant. Scattering of plasmons in graphene with defects is modeled using an electromagnetic field coupled inter-atomic potential approach with finite element discretization of the atomic vibrational and electromagnetic field degrees of freedom. Our calculations show π+σ plasmon red shifting under sharp defect edges whereas π plasmon show high extinction efficiency. Strong localization of electric fields near the sharp defect edges is observed. Observations on plasmons and its dynamics draws attention in designing novel optoelectronic devices and binders for bio-molecules.

  14. Localized surface plasmons in vibrating graphene nanodisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weihua; Li, Bo-Hong; Stassen, Erik; Mortensen, N. Asger; Christensen, Johan

    2016-02-01

    Localized surface plasmons are confined collective oscillations of electrons in metallic nanoparticles. When driven by light, the optical response is dictated by geometrical parameters and the dielectric environment and plasmons are therefore extremely important for sensing applications. Plasmons in graphene disks have the additional benefit of being highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters, such as molecules, for future nanophotonic devices.

  15. Active tailoring of nanoantenna plasmonic fields using few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Ciappina, M. F.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Landsman, A. S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, D.

    2016-02-01

    Plasmonic nanoatennas are a versatile tool for coherently manipulating light on a nanoscale by confining electric fields of the driving laser into subwavelength volumes, thereby significantly enhancing electric near fields. It is normally assumed that the time-dependent spectral properties of these near fields are independent of the duration of the driving laser pulse. Here we show that when a few-cycle laser pulse shines on a bow-tie nanoantenna, its spectral properties are dramatically modified, as evidenced by a large shift of the center wavelength of the near field, relative to the driving laser. In addition, for certain geometries, a second color appears in the near field, creating conditions for generation of an isolated attosecond pulse at megahertz repetition rate. Our results open the door to frequency-tunable ultrafast sources at nanometer scale without tuning the frequency of the driving laser.

  16. Experimental demonstration of line-width modulation in plasmonic lithography using a solid immersion lens-based active nano-gap control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won-Sup; Kim, Taeseob; Choi, Guk-Jong; Lim, Geon; Joe, Hang-Eun; Gang, Myeong-Gu; Min, Byung-Kwon; Park, No-Cheol; Moon, Hyungbae; Kim, Do-Hyung; Park, Young-Pil

    2015-02-02

    Plasmonic lithography has been used in nanofabrication because of its utility beyond the diffraction limit. The resolution of plasmonic lithography depends on the nano-gap between the nanoaperture and the photoresist surface—changing the gap distance can modulate the line-width of the pattern. In this letter, we demonstrate solid-immersion lens based active non-contact plasmonic lithography, applying a range of gap conditions to modulate the line-width of the pattern. Using a solid-immersion lens-based near-field control system, the nano-gap between the exit surface of the nanoaperture and the media can be actively modulated and maintained to within a few nanometers. The line-widths of the recorded patterns using 15- and 5-nm gaps were 47 and 19.5 nm, respectively, which matched closely the calculated full-width at half-maximum. From these results, we conclude that changing the nano-gap within a solid-immersion lens-based plasmonic head results in varying line-width patterns.

  17. Microchamber Device for Detection of Transporter Activity of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsugane, Mamiko; Uejima, Etsuko; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to detect the transporter activity of intact adherent cells using a microchamber device. When adherent cells are seeded onto the poly-di-methyl siloxane substrate having microchambers with openings smaller than the size of a cell, the cells form a confluent layer that covers the microchambers, creating minute, confined spaces. As substances exported across the cell membrane accumulate, transporter activity can be detected by observing the fluorescence intensity increase in the microchamber. We tested the microchamber device with HeLa cells over-expressing MDR1, an ATP-binding cassette transporter, and succeeded in detecting the transport of fluorescence-conjugated paclitaxel, the anti-cancer drug, at the single-cell level. PMID:25853126

  18. Multi-band terahertz active device with complementary metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Shen; Zhang, Yaxin Sun, Linlin; Sun, Han; Xu, Gaiqi; Zhao, Yuncheng; Yang, Ziqiang; Liang, Shixiong

    2015-09-28

    We describe a multi-band terahertz-active device using a composite structure made of complementary metamaterial and doped silicon that can be dynamically controlled. This special complementary metamaterial exhibits three resonances that produce three pass-bands. The pass-bands can be uniformly manipulated by exploiting the photoinduced characteristics of the doped silicon. Simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic field and surface current distributions. The simulation results agree well with experimental results obtained from terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Using an 808-nm-wavelength laser beam, a modulation depth of up to 80% was obtained. In numerical simulations, we used a conductivity mode to characterize photoinduction. The development of multi-band terahertz-active devices has many potential applications, for example, in filters, modulators, switches, and sensors.

  19. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings. PMID:27472609

  20. Wireless device for activation of an underground shock wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Akhvlediani, I.; Bochorishvili, N.; Mataradze, E.

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes the mechanism and design of the wireless device for activation of energy absorber for localization of blast energy in underground openings. The statistics shows that the greatest share of accidents with fatal results associate with explosions in coal mines due to aero-methane and/or air-coal media explosion. The other significant problem is terrorist or accidental explosions in underground structures. At present there are different protective systems to reduce the blast energy. One of the main parts of protective Systems is blast Identification and Registration Module. The works conducted at G. Tsulukidze Mining Institute of Georgia enabled to construct the wireless system of explosion detection and mitigation of shock waves. The system is based on the constant control on overpressure. The experimental research continues to fulfill the system based on both threats, on the constant control on overpressure and flame parameters, especially in underground structures and coal mines. Reaching the threshold value of any of those parameters, the system immediately starts the activation. The absorber contains a pyrotechnic device ensuring the discharge of dispersed water. The operational parameters of wireless device and activation mechanisms of pyrotechnic element of shock wave absorber are discussed in the paper.

  1. Chiral plasmonic nanostructures on achiral nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Bongjun; Zhang, Huanan; Zhang, Hui; Park, Jai Il; Kim, Kyoungwon; Govorov, Alexander O; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-11-13

    Chirality of plasmonic films can be strongly enhanced by three-dimensional (3D) out-of-plane geometries. The complexity of lithographic methods currently used to produce such structures and other methods utilizing chiral templates impose limitations on spectral windows of chiroptical effects, the size of substrates, and hence, further research on chiral plasmonics. Here we demonstrate 3D chiral plasmonic nanostructures (CPNs) with high optical activity in the visible spectral range based on initially achiral nanopillars from ZnO. We made asymmetric gold nanoshells on the nanopillars by vacuum evaporation at different inclination and rotation angles to achieve controlled symmetry breaking and obtained both left- and right-rotating isomers. The attribution of chiral optical effects to monolithic enantiomers made in this process was confirmed by theoretical calculations based on their geometry established from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The chirality of the nanoshells is retained upon the release from the substrate into a stable dispersion. Deviation of the incident angle of light from normal results in increase of polarization rotation and chiral g-factor as high as -0.3. This general approach for preparation of abiological nanoscale chiral materials can be extended to other out-of plane 3D nanostructures. The large area films made on achiral nanopillars are convenient for sensors, optical devices, and catalysis. PMID:24111695

  2. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor detects the downstream events of active PKCbeta in antigen-stimulated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Maiko; Hiragun, Takaaki; Tsutsui, Tomoko; Yanase, Yuhki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hide, Michihiro

    2008-06-15

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors detect large changes of angle of resonance (AR) when RBL-2H3 mast cells are cultured on a sensor chip and stimulated with antigen. However, the detail of molecular events that are responsible for such large changes of AR remained unknown. In this study, we investigated the relationship between intracellular signaling events induced by antigen and the change of AR, by genetic manipulation of intracellular signaling molecules; spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), src-like adaptor protein (SLAP), linker for activation of T cells (LAT), growth-factor-receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor protein (Gads), and isotypes of protein kinase C (PKC). RBL-2H3 mast cells overexpressing dominant-negative Syk or SLAP, which both interfere with active Syk, exhibited only minimal increase of AR in response to antigen stimulation. Likewise, the interference of the activation of LAT and Gads, by expressing dominant-negative LAT and Gads, respectively, resulted in nearly complete suppression of the antigen-induced increase of AR. The cells overexpressing PKCs, apart from PKCbeta, showed a reduced extent of increase of AR in response to antigen stimulation. Moreover, the introduction of the small interfering RNA targeted against PKCbeta suppressed the antigen-induced increase of AR. These results indicate that the activation of Syk, LAT, Gads, and subsequent PKCbeta is indispensable for the antigen-induced increase of AR of mast cells detected by SPR biosensors. PMID:18339533

  3. Infrared biosensors based on graphene plasmonics: modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Hu, Xiang; Chen, Guanxiong; Zhang, Xuanru; Tan, Ziqi; Chen, Junhua; Ruoff, Rodney S; Zhu, Yanwu; Lu, Yalin

    2013-10-28

    We propose a biosensor by exploiting localized plasmons in graphene and biomolecule adsorption on it. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the sensitivity of such a device can achieve a high value of up to 1697 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) when the wavelength shift at the plasmon resonance is detected. The transparent substrate supporting graphene can be chosen potentially from a wide range of materials including insulators, semiconductors, polymers, and gels. The plasmon resonance wavelength can be tuned with electrostatic doping and/or structure modulation of graphene. Furthermore, the device works in a wide angle range of incident light since the transverse magnetic (TM) polarization is independent of incident angles. PMID:24005890

  4. Plasmonic photodetectors based on asymmetric nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Junyu; Luo, Manlin; Zou, Wanghui; Peng, Wei; Duan, Huigao

    2016-08-01

    Hot electrons excited by plasmon resonance in nanostructure can be employed to enhance the properties of photodetectors, even when the photon energy is lower than the bandgap of the semiconductor. However, current research has seldom considered how to realize the efficient collection of hot electrons, which restricts the responsivity of the device. In this paper, a type of plasmonic photodetector based on asymmetric nanogap electrodes is proposed. Owing to this structure, the device achieves responsivities as high as 0.45 and 0.25 mA/W for wavelengths of 1310 and 1550 nm, respectively. These insights can aid the realization of efficient plasmon-enhanced photodetectors for infrared detection.

  5. Plasmonics in Biology and Plasmon-Controlled Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence technology is fully entrenched in all aspects of biological research. To a significant extent, future advances in biology and medicine depend on the advances in the capabilities of fluorescence measurements. As examples, the sensitivity of many clinical assays is limited by sample autofluorescence, single-molecule detection is limited by the brightness and photostability of the fluorophores, and the spatial resolution of cellular imaging is limited to about one-half of the wavelength of the incident light. We believe a combination of fluorescence, plasmonics, and nanofabrication can fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in metallic surfaces and particles. Surface plasmons, without fluorescence, are already in use to a limited extent in biological research. These applications include the use of surface plasmon resonance to measure bioaffinity reactions and the use of metal colloids as light-scattering probes. However, the uses of surface plasmons in biology are not limited to their optical absorption or extinction. We now know that fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons that radiate into the far field and that fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These reciprocal interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location, and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to these phenomena as plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF). We predict that PCF will result in a new generation of probes and devices. These likely possibilities include ultrabright single-particle probes that do not photobleach, probes for selective multiphoton excitation with decreased light intensities, and distance measurements in biomolecular assemblies in the range from 10 to 200 nm. Additionally, PCF is likely to allow

  6. On-chip molecular electronic plasmon sources based on self-assembled monolayer tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Wang, Tao; Chu, Hong-Son; Wu, Lin; Liu, Rongrong; Sun, Song; Phua, Wee Kee; Wang, Lejia; Tomczak, Nikodem; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular electronic control over plasmons offers a promising route for on-chip integrated molecular plasmonic devices for information processing and computing. To move beyond the currently available technologies and to miniaturize plasmonic devices, molecular electronic plasmon sources are required. Here, we report on-chip molecular electronic plasmon sources consisting of tunnel junctions based on self-assembled monolayers sandwiched between two metallic electrodes that excite localized plasmons, and surface plasmon polaritons, with tunnelling electrons. The plasmons originate from single, diffraction-limited spots within the junctions, follow power-law distributed photon statistics, and have well-defined polarization orientations. The structure of the self-assembled monolayer and the applied bias influence the observed polarization. We also show molecular electronic control of the plasmon intensity by changing the chemical structure of the molecules and by bias-selective excitation of plasmons using molecular diodes.

  7. Plasmonic spectroscopy of metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Weihai

    gap distance between assembled nanorods. Moreover, dye--Au nanorod hybrid nanostructures have also been successfully fabricated for the study of the coupling between the transition dipole resonance and the plasmonic resonance. The coupling-induced plasmon shift is found to be strongly dependent on molecular properties, the dye concentration in solutions, and the spacer thickness between dye molecules and the surface of Au nanorods. The coupling can be switched off by means of laser-induced photodecomposition of dye molecules. Next, I will present my studies on the applications of metallic nanostructures. A SERS substrate has been constructed by assembling silver nanoparticles along silica nanofibers. The enhancement factors are found to be 2 x 10 5 for 4-mercaptobenzoic acid and 4-mercaptophenol, and 7 x 10 7 for rhodamine B isothiocyanate. A novel plasmonic optical fiber device has further been fabricated to detect small changes in the local dielectric environment. For individual Au nanorods, the index sensitivity and figure of merit (FOM) are found to be linearly dependent on the longitudinal plasmon resonance wavelength and reach 200 nm/RIU and 3.8, respectively. For nanorod ensembles, the index sensitivity and FOM of the longitudinal plasmon resonance are found to be 138 nm/RIU and 1.2, respectively. I believe that my research work on the plasmonic spectroscopy of metallic nanostructures has provided an in-depth fundamental understanding of the localized surface plasmon resonance and will have a number of implications for the applications of metallic nanostructures in optics, optoelectronics, and biotechnology.

  8. Highly efficient plasmonic tip design for plasmon nanofocusing in near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Umakoshi, Takayuki; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-14

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) combined with plasmon nanofocusing is a powerful nano-analytical tool due to its attractive feature of efficient background suppression as well as light energy compression to the nanoscale. In plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM, the metallic tip plays an important role in inducing plasmon nanofocusing. It is, however, very challenging to control plasmonic properties of tips for plasmon nanofocusing with existing tip fabrication methods, even though the plasmonic properties need to be adjusted to experimental environments such as the sample or excitation wavelength. In this study, we propose an efficient tip design and fabrication which enable one to actively control plasmonic properties for efficient plasmon nanofocusing. Because our method offers flexibility in the material and structure of tips, one can easily modify the plasmonic properties depending on the requirements. Importantly, through optimization of the plasmonic properties, we achieve almost 100% reproducibility in plasmon nanofocusing in our experiments. This new approach of tip fabrication makes plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM practical and reliable, and opens doors for many scientists working in related fields. PMID:26892672

  9. Highly efficient plasmonic tip design for plasmon nanofocusing in near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umakoshi, Takayuki; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) combined with plasmon nanofocusing is a powerful nano-analytical tool due to its attractive feature of efficient background suppression as well as light energy compression to the nanoscale. In plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM, the metallic tip plays an important role in inducing plasmon nanofocusing. It is, however, very challenging to control plasmonic properties of tips for plasmon nanofocusing with existing tip fabrication methods, even though the plasmonic properties need to be adjusted to experimental environments such as the sample or excitation wavelength. In this study, we propose an efficient tip design and fabrication which enable one to actively control plasmonic properties for efficient plasmon nanofocusing. Because our method offers flexibility in the material and structure of tips, one can easily modify the plasmonic properties depending on the requirements. Importantly, through optimization of the plasmonic properties, we achieve almost 100% reproducibility in plasmon nanofocusing in our experiments. This new approach of tip fabrication makes plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM practical and reliable, and opens doors for many scientists working in related fields.

  10. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  11. Graphene-plasmon polaritons: From fundamental properties to potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Zhu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-Hong; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-04-01

    With unique possibilities for controlling light in nanoscale devices, graphene plasmonics has opened new perspectives to the nanophotonics community with potential applications in metamaterials, modulators, photodetectors, and sensors. In this paper, we briefly review the recent exciting progress in graphene plasmonics. We begin with a general description of the optical properties of graphene, particularly focusing on the dispersion of graphene-plasmon polaritons. The dispersion relation of graphene-plasmon polaritons of spatially extended graphene is expressed in terms of the local response limit with an intraband contribution. With this theoretical foundation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, we then discuss recent exciting progress, paying specific attention to the following topics: excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons, electron-phonon interactions in graphene on polar substrates, and tunable graphene plasmonics with applications in modulators and sensors. Finally, we address some of the apparent challenges and promising perspectives of graphene plasmonics.

  12. Gold nanostars: Benzyldimethylammonium chloride-assisted synthesis, plasmon tuning, SERS and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ndokoye, Pancras; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Li, Tingting; Tade, Moses O; Liu, Shaomin

    2016-01-15

    Fabrication of Au nanostars (AuNSs) can expand the application range of Au nanoparticles because of their high electron density and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on branches. Exploiting this potential requires further refinement of length of the branches and radius of their tips. To this end, we successfully synthesized AuNSs with uniform and sharply-pointed branches by combining benzyldimethylammonium chloride (BDAC) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at low BDAC/CTAB ratios. Once mixed with CTAB, BDAC lowers the critical micelle concentration (CMC) for quick formation of the micelles, which provides favorable growth templates for AuNSs formation. Besides, BDAC increases the concentration of Cl(-), which favors Ag(+) in adsorbing on Au facets. This feature is crucial for the yield boosting and synergic shape control of AuNSs regardless of types of Au seeds used. Use of less amounts of seeds as the center of nucleation benefited sharper and longer growth of the branches. AuNSs exhibited excellent enhancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensities as the result of high electron density localized at the tips; however, the enhancement degree varied in accordance with the size of branches. In addition, AuNSs showed high catalytic performance toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP). Efficient catalysis over AuNSs originates from their corners, stepped surfaces and high electron density at the tips. PMID:26476203

  13. EDITORIAL: Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Silver has long been valued not just for its rarity but also for its broad ranging attractive properties as a conductor, catalyst and antimicrobial agent, among others. In nanoscale structures, silver takes on a number of additional attributes, as properties such as antimicrobial activity show size dependence. In addition plasmonic properties are exhibited, which enhance local electromagnetic fields and can be hugely beneficial in sensing and imaging applications. As a result silver nanoparticles are increasingly in demand. In this issue researchers describe a microplasma-assisted electrochemical synthesis that allows excellent control over the size and spacing of the resulting particles, which are important parameters for optimizing their performance in device applications [1]. Wet chemistry [2] and lithography [3] are common processes for silver nanoparticle synthesis. However, other methods are constantly in development. Biosynthesis approaches have been attracting increasing interest as more environmentally friendly alternatives. Takayuki Kuwabara and colleagues at Xiamen University in China used the sundried biomass of Cinnamomum camphora leaf to reduce silver nitrate [4], demonstrating a cost-efficient alternative to conventional methods which might also be suitable for large-scale production. At Zhejiang Normal University researchers noted that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can act as a capping scaffold in the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters [5]. In addition the resulting fluorescence of the nanocrystals can be used for detecting DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism. Researchers in Malaysia have also noted the potential sensing applications of nanoparticles of another noble metal for swine DNA [6]. They observed that single-strand DNA was absorbed on gold nanoparticles and led to a colour shift from pinkish-red to grey-purple. The shift was the result of a reduction in the surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and new features

  14. Analysis and design of a 1×2 ring resonator-based plasmonic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatuzian, Hassan; Keshavarz Moazzam, Mostafa

    2014-08-01

    Relying on the next generation chip-scale technology, Plasmonics, here is presented a novel plan for Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton-based Ring Resonator (DLSPP-RR) switching configuration. The device is a 1x2 switch with a left-rob Y splitter in the middle of coupling region to share the electromagnetic energy between the two straight and bend output waveguides. Like other active devices, specially switching structures, this plan also will have the potential to be prepared as an active device if its trapped-modes into ring resonator can be controlled on the frequency axis. We implemented simulation of the device by means of the rigorous 3D Finite Element Method (3D-FEM) to certificate its truly passive performance. The obtained results are mixed as transmission spectrums of two output ports on a relatively close frequency band around the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1550 nm.

  15. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  16. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  17. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices

    PubMed Central

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics—a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or “rectified”) by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured “primordial soup” of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath. PMID:27051883

  18. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices.

    PubMed

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics-a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath. PMID:27051883

  19. Active terahertz device based on optically controlled organometal halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Lv, Longfeng; He, Ting; Chen, Tianji; Zang, Mengdi; Zhong, Liang; Wang, Xinke; Shen, Jingling; Hou, Yanbing

    2015-08-01

    An active all-optical high-efficiency broadband terahertz device based on an organometal halide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3, MAPbI3)/inorganic (Si) structure is investigated. Spectrally broadband modulation of the THz transmission is obtained in the frequency range from 0.2 to 2.6 THz, and a modulation depth of nearly 100% can be achieved with a low-level photoexcitation power (˜0.4 W/cm2). Both THz transmission and reflection were suppressed in the MAPbI3/Si structure by an external continuous-wave (CW) laser. Enhancement of the charge carrier density at the MAPbI3/Si interface is crucial for photo-induced absorption. The results show that the proposed high-efficiency broadband optically controlled terahertz device based on the MAPbI3/Si structure has been realized.

  20. Integration of active devices on smart polymers for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano-Bolivar, Adrian Emmanuel

    The increasing ability to ever more precisely identify and measure neural interactions and other phenomena in the central and peripheral nervous systems is revolutionizing our understanding of the human body and brain. To facilitate further understanding, more sophisticated neural devices, perhaps using microelectronics processing, must be fabricated. Materials often used in these neural interfaces, while compatible with these fabrication processes, are not optimized for long-term use in the body and are often orders of magnitude stiffer than the tissue with which they interact. Using the smart polymer substrates described in this work, suitability for processing as well as chronic implantation is demonstrated. We explore how to integrate reliable circuitry onto these flexible, biocompatible substrates that can withstand the aggressive environment of the body. To increase the capabilities of these devices beyond individual channel sensing and stimulation, active electronics must also be included onto our systems. In order to add this functionality to these substrates and explore the limits of these devices, we developed a process to fabricate single organic thin film transistors with mobilities up to 0.4 cm2/Vs and threshold voltages close to 0V. A process for fabricating organic light emitting diodes on flexible substrates is also addressed. We have set a foundation and demonstrated initial feasibility for integrating multiple transistors onto thin-film flexible devices to create new applications, such as matrix addressable functionalized electrodes and organic light emitting diodes. A brief description on how to integrate waveguides for their use in optogenetics is addressed. We have built understanding about device constraints on mechanical, electrical and in vivo reliability and how various conditions affect the electronics' lifetime. We use a bi-layer gate dielectric using an inorganic material such as HfO 2 combined with organic Parylene-c. A study of

  1. Low-threshold absolute two-plasmon decay instability in the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments in toroidal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. Yu; Gusakov, E. Z.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of the X-mode parametric decay into two short wavelength upper hybrid (UH) plasmons propagating in opposite directions is analyzed. Due to the huge convective power loss of both the UH plasmons along the inhomogeneity direction, the power threshold of the convective parametric decay instability (PDI), which can be excited in the presence of a monotonous density profile is derived to exceed the gyrotron power range currently available. In the presence of the magnetic island possessing the local density maximum at its O-point the daughter UH plasmons can be trapped in the radial direction that suppresses their energy loss from the decay layer in full and makes the power threshold of the convective two-plasmon PDI drastically (three orders of magnitude) lower than in the previous case. The possibility of the absolute PDI being due to the finite size of the pump beam spot is demonstrated as well. The power threshold of the absolute instability is shown to be more than two orders of magnitude lower than the threshold of the convective instability at the monotonous density profile.

  2. Integrated plasmonic metasurfaces for spectropolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei Ting; Török, Peter; Foreman, Matthew R; Liao, Chun Yen; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pei Ru; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic metasurfaces enable simultaneous control of the phase, momentum, amplitude and polarization of light and hence promise great utility in realization of compact photonic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel chip-scale device suitable for simultaneous polarization and spectral measurements through use of six integrated plasmonic metasurfaces (IPMs), which diffract light with a given polarization state and spectral component into well-defined spatial domains. Full calibration and characterization of our device is presented, whereby good spectral resolution and polarization accuracy over a wavelength range of 500-700 nm is shown. Functionality of our device in a Müller matrix modality is demonstrated through determination of the polarization properties of a commercially available variable waveplate. Our proposed IPM is robust, compact and can be fabricated with a single photolithography step, promising many applications in polarization imaging, quantum communication and quantitative sensing. PMID:27114455

  3. Integrated plasmonic metasurfaces for spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei Ting; Török, Peter; Foreman, Matthew R.; Yen Liao, Chun; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pei Ru; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic metasurfaces enable simultaneous control of the phase, momentum, amplitude and polarization of light and hence promise great utility in realization of compact photonic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel chip-scale device suitable for simultaneous polarization and spectral measurements through use of six integrated plasmonic metasurfaces (IPMs), which diffract light with a given polarization state and spectral component into well-defined spatial domains. Full calibration and characterization of our device is presented, whereby good spectral resolution and polarization accuracy over a wavelength range of 500–700 nm is shown. Functionality of our device in a Müller matrix modality is demonstrated through determination of the polarization properties of a commercially available variable waveplate. Our proposed IPM is robust, compact and can be fabricated with a single photolithography step, promising many applications in polarization imaging, quantum communication and quantitative sensing.

  4. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  5. Towards Plasmonic Solar to Fuel Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Dayton Thomas

    The need to renewably store and utilize energy from chemical bonds has grown with recent economic and environmental concerns. Plasmonically-enabled devices have shown promise in various photosynthetic processes due to their scalable, cost-effective, and robust performance. Utilizing charge carriers derived from localized surface plasmons, these devices can drive various photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions, however at limited efficiencies due to incomplete solar absorption. To improve broadband solar absorption in wide bandgap semiconductors, the plasmon resonance of different metal nanostructures in the visible are synthesized using anodic and sol-gel templating methods. Preliminary results suggest that gold nanoparticles and helical metal nanowires are well suited for photosensitization of titania for visible light absorption. Characterization by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that these templated methods can be utilized as the basis for synthesizing a variety of photoelectrochemical devices as well as unique plasmonic materials for applications including energy storage, sensing, and catalysis.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Active Plasmonic Nanoparticles with Ultrasmall Interior Nanogap for Multiplex Quantitative Detection and Cancer Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuxing; Zhu, Zhi; Zhu, Bingqing; Ma, Yanli; Lin, Bingqian; Liu, Rudi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Tu, Song; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-01

    Due to its large enhancement effect, nanostructure-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technology had been widely applied for bioanalysis and cell imaging. However, most SERS nanostructures suffer from poor signal reproducibility, which hinders the application of SERS nanostructures in quantitative detection. We report an etching-assisted approach to synthesize SERS-active plasmonic nanoparticles with 1 nm interior nanogap for multiplex quantitative detection and cancer cell imaging. Raman dyes and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) thiol (mPEG-SH) were attached to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to prepare gold cores. Next, Ag atoms were deposited on gold cores in the presence of Pluronic F127 to form a Ag shell. HAuCl4 was used to etch the Ag shell and form an interior nanogap in Au@AgAuNPs, leading to increased Raman intensity of dyes. SERS intensity distribution of Au@AgAuNPs was found to be more uniform than that of aggregated AuNPs. Finally, Au@AgAuNPs were used for multiplex quantitative detection and cancer cell imaging. With the advantages of simple and rapid preparation of Au@AgAuNPs with highly uniform, stable, and reproducible Raman intensity, the method reported here will widen the applications of SERS-active nanoparticles in diagnostics and imaging. PMID:27385563

  7. Conversion of Carbon Dioxide by Methane Reforming under Visible-Light Irradiation: Surface-Plasmon-Mediated Nonpolar Molecule Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Meng, Xianguang; Dao, Thang Duy; Zhang, Huabin; Li, Peng; Chang, Kun; Wang, Tao; Li, Mu; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2015-09-21

    A novel CO2 photoreduction method, CO2 conversion through methane reforming into syngas (DRM) was adopted as an efficient approach to not only reduce the environmental concentration of the greenhouse gas CO2 but also realize the net energy storage from solar energy to chemical energy. For the first time it is reported that gold, which was generally regarded to be inactive in improving the performance of a catalyst in DRM under thermal conditions, enhanced the catalytic performance of Rh/SBA-15 in DRM under visible-light irradiation (1.7 times, CO2 conversion increased from 2100 to 3600 μmol g(-1) s(-1)). UV/Vis spectra and electromagnetic field simulation results revealed that the highly energetic electrons excited by local surface plasmon resonances of Au facilitated the polarization and activation of CO2 and CH4 with thermal assistance. This work provides a new route for CO2 photoreduction and offers a distinctive method to photocatalytically activate nonpolar molecules. PMID:26271348

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24734732

  9. Transverse plasmon mode in a screened two-dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Fateev, D. V. Melnikova, V. S.; Popov, V. V.

    2015-02-15

    The dispersion and damping of the transverse plasmon mode in a screened two-dimensional (2D) electron system are theoretically studied. It is shown that the transverse plasmon mode has a much larger quality factor and a smaller retardation factor at terahertz (THz) frequencies in comparison with those known for the longitudinal plasmon mode. In addition, the electric dipole moment of the transverse plasmon mode in the screened 2D electron system can be comparable with the dipole moment of the longitudinal plasmon mode. These properties of the transverse plasmon mode make it attractive for use in plasmon devices of the THz frequency range.

  10. h-BN nanosheets as simple and effective additives to largely enhance the activity of Au/TiO2 plasmonic photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Ide, Y; Nagao, K; Saito, K; Komaguchi, K; Fuji, R; Kogure, A; Sugahara, Y; Bando, Y; Golberg, D

    2016-01-01

    The activity of Au nanoparticle-loaded P25 TiO2 (Au/P25) plasmonic photocatalysts, evaluated by the oxidative decomposition of formic acid in water under visible light irradiation, was enhanced up to 3 times by simply mixing Au/P25 with photocatalytically inactive h-BN nanosheets as a result of electron transfer from photoexcited Au/TiO2 to the h-BN nanosheets and retardation of the charge recombination. PMID:26607027

  11. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  12. Surface plasmon polaritons in artificial metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, Jayson Lawrence

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been the focus of intense research due to their many unique properties such as high electromagnetic field localization, extreme sensitivity to surface conditions, and subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic waves. The area of potential impact is vast and includes promising advancements in photonic circuits, high speed photodetection, hyperspectral imaging, spectroscopy, enhanced solar cells, ultra-small scale lithography, and microscopy. My research has focused on utilizing these properties to design and demonstrate new phenomena and implement real-world applications using artificial metallic nanostructures. Artificial metallic nanostructures employed during my research begin as thin planar gold films which are then lithographically patterned according to previously determined dimensions. The result is a nanopatterned device which can excite surface plasmon polaritons on its surface under specific conditions. Through my research I characterized the optical properties of these devices for further insight into the interesting properties of surface plasmon polaritons. Exploration of these properties led to advancements in biosensing, development of artificial media to enhance and control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and hybrid plasmonic cavities. Demonstrations from these advancements include: label-free immunosensing of Plasmodium in a whole blood lysate, low part-per-trillion detection of microcystin-LR, enhanced refractive index sensitivity of novel resonant plasmonic devices, a defect-based plasmonic crystal, spontaneous emission modification of colloidal quantum dots, and coupling of plasmonic and optical Fabry-Perot resonant modes in a hybrid cavity.

  13. Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2008-02-01

    Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting device (AMOLED) realizing top emission by using bottom-emitting organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structure was proposed. The multilayer structure of OLED deposited in the conventional sequence is not on the thin film transistor (TFT) backplane but on the OLED plane. The contact between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode of TFT backplane and metal cathode of OLED plane is implemented by using transfer electrode. The stringent pixel design for aperture ratio of the bottom-emitting AMOLED, as well as special technology for the top ITO electrode of top-emitting AMOLED, is unnecessary in the laminated AMOLED.

  14. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz. PMID:25920885

  15. Epsilon-near-zero mode for active optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Vassant, S; Archambault, A; Marquier, F; Pardo, F; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Pelouard, J L; Greffet, J J

    2012-12-01

    The electromagnetic modes of a GaAs quantum well between two AlGaAs barriers are studied. At the longitudinal optical phonon frequency, the system supports a phonon polariton mode confined in the thickness of the quantum well that we call epsilon-near-zero mode. This epsilon-near-zero mode can be resonantly excited through a grating resulting in a very large absorption localized in the single quantum well. We show that the reflectivity can be modulated by applying a voltage. This paves the way to a new class of active optoelectronic devices working in the midinfrared and far infrared at ambient temperature. PMID:23368264

  16. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  17. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  18. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  19. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-08-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm(-2) was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature. PMID:26133744

  20. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  1. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    possible: i) increasing light absorption in the semiconductor by light trapping through scattering, ii) transferring hot carriers from metal to semiconductor after light absorption in the metal, and iii) non-radiative excitation of interband transitions in the semiconductor by plasmon-induced resonant energy transfer (PIRET). The effects of the metal on charge transport and carrier recombination were also revealed. Next, it has been shown that the strength and balance of the three enhancement mechanisms is rooted in the plasmon's dephasing time, or how long it takes the collective electron oscillations to stop being collective. The importance of coherent effects in plasmonic enhancement is also shown. Based on these findings, a thermodynamic balance framework has been used to predict the theoretical maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion in plasmonic metal-semiconductor heterojunctions. These calculations have revealed how plasmonics is best used to address the different light absorption problems in semiconductors, and that not taking into account the plasmon's dephasing is the origin of low plasmonic enhancement Finally, to prove these guidelines, each of the three enhancement mechanisms has been translated into optimal device geometries, showing the plasmon's potential for solar energy harvesting. This dissertation identifies the three possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for the first time, discovering a new enhancement mechanism (PIRET) in the process. It has also been shown for the first time that the various plasmon-semiconductor interactions could be rooted in the plasmon's dephasing. This has allowed for the first maximum efficiency estimates which have combined all three enhancement mechanisms to be performed, and revealed that changes in the plasmon's dephasing leads to the disparity in reported plasmonic enhancements. These findings are combined to create optimal device design guidelines, which are proven by fabrication of several devices with top

  2. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    possible: i) increasing light absorption in the semiconductor by light trapping through scattering, ii) transferring hot carriers from metal to semiconductor after light absorption in the metal, and iii) non-radiative excitation of interband transitions in the semiconductor by plasmon-induced resonant energy transfer (PIRET). The effects of the metal on charge transport and carrier recombination were also revealed. Next, it has been shown that the strength and balance of the three enhancement mechanisms is rooted in the plasmon's dephasing time, or how long it takes the collective electron oscillations to stop being collective. The importance of coherent effects in plasmonic enhancement is also shown. Based on these findings, a thermodynamic balance framework has been used to predict the theoretical maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion in plasmonic metal-semiconductor heterojunctions. These calculations have revealed how plasmonics is best used to address the different light absorption problems in semiconductors, and that not taking into account the plasmon's dephasing is the origin of low plasmonic enhancement Finally, to prove these guidelines, each of the three enhancement mechanisms has been translated into optimal device geometries, showing the plasmon's potential for solar energy harvesting. This dissertation identifies the three possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for the first time, discovering a new enhancement mechanism (PIRET) in the process. It has also been shown for the first time that the various plasmon-semiconductor interactions could be rooted in the plasmon's dephasing. This has allowed for the first maximum efficiency estimates which have combined all three enhancement mechanisms to be performed, and revealed that changes in the plasmon's dephasing leads to the disparity in reported plasmonic enhancements. These findings are combined to create optimal device design guidelines, which are proven by fabrication of several devices with top

  3. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user’s mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution. PMID:26343665

  4. High power VCSEL device with periodic gain active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Y. Q., II; Qin, L.; Sun, Y. F.; Li, T.; Cui, J. J.; Peng, B.; Liu, G. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, L. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2007-11-01

    High power vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with large aperture have been fabricated through improving passivation, lateral oxidation and heat dissipation techniques. Different from conventional three quantum well structure, a periodic gain active region with nine quantum wells was incorporated into the VCSEL structure, with which high efficiency and high power operation were expected. The nine quantum wells were divided into three groups with each of them located at the antinodes of the cavity to enhance the coupling between the optical field and the gain region. Large aperture and bottom-emitting configuration was used to improve the beam quality and the heat dissipation. A maximum output power of 1.4W was demonstrated at CW operation for a 400μm-diameter device. The lasing wavelength shifted to 995.5nm with a FWHM of 2nm at a current of 4.8A due to the internal heating and the absence of active water cooling. A ring-shape farfield pattern was induced by the non-homogeneous lateral current distribution in large diameter device. The light intensity at the center of the ring increased with increasing current. A symmetric round light spot at the center and single transverse mode operation with a divergence angle of 16° were observed with current beyond 4.8A.

  5. Dynamics of a plasmon-activated p-mercaptobenzoic acid layer deposited over Au nanoparticles using time-resolved SERS.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina; Girardon, Jean-Sébastien; Paul, Jean-François; Berrier, Elise

    2016-07-20

    Time-dependent SERS intensity recorded over a drop-coated coffee-ring pattern of p-MBA with gold colloids was investigated as a function of the specific laser power applied. Pure electromagnetic enhancement produced stochastic intensity variations of the whole SER spectra, which were mainly correlated with evolutions of the background intensity. Besides long-term, non-reversible spectral changes caused by plasmon-induced decarboxylation of p-MBA, transient original spectral profiles showing additional lines were also observed as the specific power reached 5.5 × 10(4) W cm(-2). An unprecedented qualitative and quantitative study of SERS intensity variations based on the complementary use of both extreme deviation and cross-correlation statistics is provided, which resulted in an improved understanding of SERS mechanisms. More precisely, cross-correlation analysis made it possible to follow the evolution of groups of modes assigned to one species or sharing the same symmetry while so-called individual events denote particular resonance structures, whose occurrence was tentatively related to a photo-thermally activated motion of the gold nanostructures. PMID:27156862

  6. Plasmonics: An ultrafast plasmonic tuning knob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin; Liu, Mengkun

    2016-04-01

    Near- and mid-infrared plasmonics are exciting research areas with applications in nanoscale energy concentration, sensing or ultrafast switching for telecommunication. Now, a new efficient way to manipulate plasmon resonances in semiconductor nanoarrays at ultrafast timescales has been found.

  7. Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, Adam; Noetzel, Richard

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

  8. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:26392832

  9. Integrating plasmonic diagnostics and microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lifang; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaodong; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is generally divided into two categories: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of electromagnetic modes propagating along a (noble) metal/dielectric interface and localized SPRs (LSPRs) on nanoscopic metallic structures (particles, rods, shells, holes, etc.). Both optical transducer concepts can be combined with and integrated in microfluidic devices for biomolecular analyte detections, with the benefits of small foot-print for point-of-care detection, low-cost for one-time disposal, and ease of being integrated into an array format. The key technologies in such integration include the plasmonic chip, microfluidic channel fabrication, surface bio-functionalization, and selection of the detection scheme, which are selected according to the specifics of the targeting analytes. This paper demonstrates a few examples of the many versions of how to combine plasmonics and integrated microfluidics, using different plasmonic generation mechanisms for different analyte detections. One example is a DNA sensor array using a gold film as substrate and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as the transduction method. This is then compared to grating-coupled SPR for poly(ethylene glycol) thiol interaction detected by angle interrogation, gold nanohole based LSPR chip for biotin-strepavidin detection by wavelength shift, and gold nanoholes/nanopillars for the detection of prostate specific antigen by quantum dot labels excited by the LSPR. Our experimental results exemplified that the plasmonic integrated microfluidics is a promising tool for understanding the biomolecular interactions and molecular recognition process as well as biosensing, especially for on-site or point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:26392832

  10. Giant optical response from graphene--plasmonic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Owen; Pantoja, Marcos; Katzer, Jens; Schroeder, Thomas; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2012-07-24

    The unique properties of graphene when coupled to plasmonic surfaces render a very interesting physical system with intriguing responses to stimuli such as photons. It promises exciting application potentials such as photodetectors as well as biosensing. With its semimetallic band structure, graphene in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures is expected to lead to non-negligible perturbation of the local distribution of electromagnetic field intensity, an interesting plasmonic resonance process that has not been studied to a sufficient extent. Efforts to enhance optoelectronic responses of graphene using plasmonic structures have been demonstrated with rather modest Raman enhancement factors of less than 100. Here, we examine a novel cooperative graphene-Au nanopyramid system with a remarkable graphene Raman enhancement factor of up to 10(7). Experimental evidence including polarization-dependent Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy points to a new origin of a drastically enhanced D-band from sharp folds of graphene near the extremities of the nanostructure that is free of broken carbon bonds. These observations indicate a new approach for obtaining detailed structural and vibrational information on graphene from an extremely localized region. The new physical origin of the D-band offers a realistic possibility of defining active devices in the form of, for example, graphene nanoribbons by engineered graphene folds (also known as wrinkles) to realize edge-disorder-free transport. Furthermore, the addition of graphene made it possible to tailor the biochemical properties of plasmonic surfaces from conventional metallic ones to biocompatible carbon surfaces. PMID:22712497

  11. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOEpatents

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  12. Engineering plasmon-enhanced Au light emission with planar arrays of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Gary F; Dal Negro, Luca

    2013-02-13

    By systematically investigating the light emission and scattering properties of arrays of Au nanoparticles with varying size and separation, we demonstrate tunability and control of metal photoluminescence and unveil the critical role of near-field plasmonic coupling for the engineering of active metal nanostructures. We show that the decay of photoexcited electron-hole pairs into localized surface plasmons (LSPs) dramatically modifies the Au emission wavelength, line shape, and quantum efficiency depending both on particles size and separation. In particular, in arrays with near-field coupled nanoparticles we demonstrate broad light scattering and emission spectra that scale differently with respect to nanoparticle size due to the enhanced LSP nonradiative decay caused by near-field interparticle coupling. Our experimental results are fully supported by semianalytical extinction simulations based on rigorous coupled wave analysis, which demonstrate the importance of tuning plasmonic near-field coupling for the engineering of active devices based on light emitting arrays of metallic nanoparticles. PMID:23339774

  13. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core–shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier.

  14. Semiconductor plasmonic nanolasers: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gwo, Shangjr; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2016-08-01

    Scaling down semiconductor lasers in all three dimensions holds the key to the development of compact, low-threshold, and ultrafast coherent light sources, as well as integrated optoelectronic and plasmonic circuits. However, the minimum size of conventional semiconductor lasers utilizing dielectric cavity resonators (photonic cavities) is limited by the diffraction limit. To date, surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser)-based plasmonic nanolaser is the only photon and plasmon-emitting device capable of this remarkable feat. Specifically, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the use of plasmonic cavities based on metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) nanostructures can indeed break the diffraction limit in all three dimensions. In this review, we present an updated overview of the current status for plasmonic nanolasers using the MIS configuration and other related metal-cladded semiconductor microlasers. In particular, by using composition-varied indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride core-shell nanorods, it is possible to realize all-color, single-mode nanolasers in the full visible wavelength range with ultralow continuous-wave (CW) lasing thresholds. The lasing action in these subdiffraction plasmonic cavities is achieved via a unique auto-tuning mechanism based on the property of weak size dependence inherent in plasmonic nanolasers. As for the choice of metals in the plasmonic structures, epitaxial silver films and giant colloidal silver crystals have been shown to be the superior constituent materials for plasmonic cavities due to their low plasmonic losses in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions. In this review, we also provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this exciting new research frontier. PMID:27459210

  15. Color plasmons and trains of plasmons.

    PubMed

    Dyankov, Georgi; Sekkat, Zouhair; Bousmina, Mosto

    2010-08-01

    We show that a broadband surface plasmon can be excited in a thin metal film. A train of two plasmons can be excited at conditions near the condition of broadband surface plasmon excitation. Also, a method for independent multichannel checks of biochips by wavelength addressing is proposed. PMID:20676187

  16. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Biosensor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Akshitha

    Improving the sensitivity of existing biosensors is an active research topic that cuts across several disciplines, including engineering and biology. Optical biosensors are the one of the most diverse class of biosensors which can be broadly categorized into two types based on the detection scheme: label-based and label-free detection. In label-based detection, the target bio-molecules are labeled with dyes or tags that fluoresce upon excitation, indicating the presence of target molecules. Label-based detection is highly-sensitive, capable of single molecule detection depending on the detector type used. One method of improving the sensitivity of label-based fluorescence detection is by enhancement of the emission of the labels by coupling them with metal nanostructures. This approach is referred as plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). PEF is achieved by increasing the electric field around the nano metal structures through plasmonics. This increased electric field improves the enhancement from the fluorophores which in turn improves the photon emission from the fluorophores which, in turn, improves the limit of detection. Biosensors taking advantage of the plasmonic properties of metal films and nanostructures have emerged an alternative, low-cost, high sensitivity method for detecting labeled DNA. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors employing noble metal nanostructures have recently attracted considerable attention as a new class of plasmonic nanosensors. In this work, the design, fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanostructures is carried out. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were performed using software from Lumerical Inc. to design a novel LSPR structure that exhibit resonance overlapping with the absorption and emission wavelengths of quantum dots (QD). Simulations of a composite Au/SiO2 nanopillars on silicon substrate were performed using FDTD software to show peak plasmonic enhancement at QD emission wavelength

  17. A spectroscopic refractometer based on plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a spectroscopic refractometer that employs plasmonic interferometry to measure the optical dielectric functions of materials in the visible range. The proposed device, dubbed a plasmonic refractometer, consists of an array of slit-groove plasmonic interferometers etched in a ˜300 nm-thick metal film (silver or gold) with arm lengths varying in steps of 25 nm up to ˜8 μm. The nano-groove in each interferometer is able to generate propagating surface plasmon polaritons efficiently in a broad wavelength range, without requiring prism- or grating-coupling configurations. An integrated microfluidic channel ensures uniform delivery of dielectric materials in liquid phase. Spectrally resolved plasmonic interferograms are generated by measuring light transmission spectra through the slit of each slit-groove plasmonic interferometer and plotting the normalized intensity as a function of arm length (0.26-8.16 μm) and incident wavelength (400-800 nm) for various combinations of metal/dielectric materials. Fits of the plasmonic interferograms with a surface plasmon interference model allow determination of the refractive index dispersion of a broad class of dielectric materials, over a wide range of wavelengths and dielectric constants. As proof of concept, we extract and report the dielectric functions of representative materials, such as silver, gold, water, methanol, and ethanol.

  18. Review of mid-infrared plasmonic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yujun; Malagari, Shyamala Devi; Hamilton, Travis; Wasserman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The field of plasmonics has the potential to enable unique applications in the mid-infrared (IR) wavelength range. However, as is the case regardless of wavelength, the choice of plasmonic material has significant implications for the ultimate utility of any plasmonic device or structure. In this manuscript, we review the wide range of available plasmonic and phononic materials for mid-IR wavelengths, looking in particular at transition metal nitrides, transparent conducting oxides, silicides, doped semiconductors, and even newer plasmonic materials such as graphene. We also include in our survey materials with strong mid-IR phonon resonances, such as GaN, GaP, SiC, and the perovskite SrTiO3, all of which can support plasmon-like modes over limited wavelength ranges. We will discuss the suitability of each of these plasmonic and phononic materials, as well as the more traditional noble metals for a range of structures and applications and will discuss the potential and limitations of alternative plasmonic materials at these IR wavelengths.

  19. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  20. Revolutionizing the FRET-based light emission in core-shell nanostructures via comprehensive activity of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Kochuveedu, Saji Thomas; Son, Taehwang; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Dong Ha

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the surface-plasmon-induced enhancement of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)using a model multilayer core-shell nanostructure consisting of an Au core and surrounding FRET pairs, i.e., CdSe quantum dot donors and S101 dye acceptors. The multilayer configuration was demonstrated to exhibit synergistic effects of surface plasmon energy transfer from the metal to the CdSe and plasmon-enhanced FRET from the quantum dots to the dye. With precise control over the distance between the components in the nanostructure, significant improvement in the emission of CdSe was achieved by combined resonance energy transfer and near-field enhancement by the metal, as well as subsequent improvement in the emission of dye induced by the enhanced emission of CdSe. Consequently, the Förster radius was increased to 7.92 nm and the FRET efficiency was improved to 86.57% in the tailored plasmonic FRET nanostructure compared to the conventional FRET system (22.46%) without plasmonic metals. PMID:24751860

  1. Integrated optical devices using bacteriorhodopsin as active nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dér, András; Fábián, László; Valkai, Sándor; Wolff, Elmar; Ramsden, Jeremy; Ormos, Pál

    2006-08-01

    Coupling of optical data-processing devices with microelectronics, telecocommunication and sensory functions, is among the biggest challenges in molecular electronics. Intensive research is going on to find suitable nonlinear optical materials that could meet the demanding requirements of optoelectronic applications, especially regarding high sensitivity and stability. In addition to inorganic and organic crystals, biological molecules have also been considered for use in integrated optics, among which the bacterial chromoprotein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) generated the most interest. bR undergoes enormous absorption and concomitant refractive index changes upon initiation of a cyclic series of photoreactions by a burst of actinic light. This effect can be exploited to create highly versatile all-optical logical elements. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by investigating the static and dynamic response of several basic elements of integrated optical devices. Our results show that, due to its relatively high refractive index changes, bR can be used as an active nonlinear optical material to produce a variety of integrated optical switching and modulation effects.

  2. Active Microfluidic Devices for Single-Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2003-03-01

    Microfluidic chips have become an increasingly powerful and versatile tool in the life sciences. Multilayer devices fabricated from soft silicone elastomers in a replication molding technique are especially promising, because they permit flexible integration of active elements such as valves and pumps. In addition, they are fairly easy and inexpensive to produce. In a wide range of applications, microfluidic chips are used in conjunction with optical detection and manipulation techniques. However their widespread use has been hampered due to problems with interconnect stability, optical accessibility, and ability to perform surface chemistry. We have developed a packaging technique that encapsulates the elastomer in an epoxy resin of high optical quality. This stabilizes the interconnects so that a chip can be repeatedly plugged in and out of a socket. Our technique also eliminates the need for a baking step that is conventionally used to attach a glass cover slip to the elastomer surface. This allows us to assemble devices that contain a cover slip coated with proteins, thereby permitting subsequent in situ attachment of DNA molecules to the bottom of the flow channels. We demonstrate the utility of our chips in single-molecule applications involving tethered-particles and optical tweezers. Support: NIH R01 GM065934 & Research Corporation

  3. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  4. Ultrasonically activated device for parenchymal division during open hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Limongelli, P.; Belli, A.; Fantini, C.; D'Agostino, A.; Cioffi, L.; Russo, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background. The use of new technological devices has gained popularity and has been proposed to improve the safety of liver resection. This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of the ultrasonically activated device (USAD) during open liver resection. Materials and methods. Indication for surgery, type of resection, need to perform a Pringle manoeuvre, operation time, blood loss, number of blood transfusions, morbidity and mortality rate were analyzed in 60 patients undergoing a formal open liver resection by means of USAD. Results. The overall mean operation time was 172 minutes (range 120–255 min); an intermittent warm ischemia was applied in 9 cases (15%). The overall mean blood loss was 410 mL (median 400 mL, range 50–950 ml). A median of one blood transfusion was administered in six patients (10%). The mean hospital stay was 10.2 days (median 11, range 8–16). The overall morbidity rate was 20% (12 out of 60 patients). No in-hospital mortality was recorded. By subdividing the patients according to the presence or absence of cirrhosis no statistical significant differences were found between the two subgroups in all peri-and postoperative outcomes. Conclusions. In conclusion, though there is a lack of data based on well conducted controlled studies and further on a greater number of patients are needed, the utilization of USAD may help to minimize blood loss during liver resection regardless of the condition of the liver, even in case of cirrhosis. PMID:18773104

  5. Thermodynamic Constraints in Using AuM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Mo) Alloys as N₂ Dissociation Catalysts: Functionalizing a Plasmon-Active Metal.

    PubMed

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2016-02-23

    The Haber-Bosch process for NH3 synthesis is arguably one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century, with a massive footprint in agriculture and, historically, warfare. Current catalysts for this reaction use Fe for N2 activation, conducted at high temperatures and pressures to improve conversion rate and efficiency. A recent finding shows that plasmonic metal nanoparticles can either generate highly reactive electrons and holes or induce resonant surface excitations through plasmonic decay, which catalyze dissociation and redox reactions under mild conditions. It is therefore appealing to consider AuM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Mo) alloys to combine the strongly plasmonic nature of Au and the catalytic nature of M metals toward N2 dissociation, which together might facilitate ammonia production. To this end, through density functional theory, we (i) explore the feasibility of forming these surface alloys, (ii) find a pathway that may stabilize/deactivate surface M substituents during fabrication, and (iii) define a complementary route to reactivate them under operational conditions. Finally, we evaluate their reactivity toward N2, as well as their ability to support a pathway for N2 dissociation with a low thermodynamic barrier. We find that AuFe possesses similar appealing qualities, including relative stability with respect to phase separation, reversibility of Fe oxidation and reduction, and reactivity toward N2. While AuMo achieves the best affinity toward N2, its strong propensity toward oxidation could greatly limit its use. PMID:26831377

  6. Conjugated polymer based active electric-controlled terahertz device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; Lv, Longfeng; Hou, Yanbing; Shen, Jingling

    2016-03-01

    A modulation of terahertz response in a highly efficient, electric-controlled conjugated polymer-silicon hybrid device with low photo-excitation was investigated. The polymer-silicon forms a hybrid structure, where the active depletion region modifies the semiconductor conductivity in real time by applying an external bias voltage. The THz transmission was efficiently modulated by effective controlling. In a THz-TDS system, the modulation depth reached nearly 100% when the applied voltage was 3.8 V at an external laser intensity of 0.3 W/cm2. The saturation voltage decreased with increasing photo-excited intensity. In a THz-CW system, a significant decline in THz transmission was also observed with increasing applied bias voltage. This reduction in THz transmission is induced by the enhancement of carrier density.

  7. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-07-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm-2 was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature.Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111

  8. Using DNA devices to track anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Kahanda, Dimithree; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Mcwilliams, Marc A; Boothman, David A; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-06-15

    It is beneficial to develop systems that reproduce complex reactions of biological systems while maintaining control over specific factors involved in such processes. We demonstrated a DNA device for following the repair of DNA damage produced by a redox-cycling anticancer drug, beta-lapachone (β-lap). These chips supported ß-lap-induced biological redox cycle and tracked subsequent DNA damage repair activity with redox-modified DNA monolayers on gold. We observed drug-specific changes in square wave voltammetry from these chips at therapeutic ß-lap concentrations of high statistical significance over drug-free control. We also demonstrated a high correlation of this change with the specific ß-lap-induced redox cycle using rational controls. The concentration dependence of ß-lap revealed significant signal changes at levels of high clinical significance as well as sensitivity to sub-lethal levels of ß-lap. Catalase, an enzyme decomposing peroxide, was found to suppress DNA damage at a NQO1/catalase ratio found in healthy cells, but was clearly overcome at a higher NQO1/catalase ratio consistent with cancer cells. We found that it was necessary to reproduce key features of the cellular environment to observe this activity. Thus, this chip-based platform enabled tracking of ß-lap-induced DNA damage repair when biological criteria were met, providing a unique synthetic platform for uncovering activity normally confined to inside cells. PMID:26901461

  9. Surface plasmon-mediated energy transfer of electrically-pumped excitons

    DOEpatents

    An, Kwang Hyup; Shtein, Max; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-08-25

    An electrically pumped light emitting device emits a light when powered by a power source. The light emitting device includes a first electrode, a second electrode including an outer surface, and at least one active organic semiconductor disposed between the first and second electrodes. The device also includes a dye adjacent the outer surface of the second electrode such that the second electrode is disposed between the dye and the active organic semiconductor. A voltage applied by the power source across the first and second electrodes causes energy to couple from decaying dipoles into surface plasmon polariton modes, which then evanescently couple to the dye to cause the light to be emitted.

  10. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  11. Degenerate four-wave mixing in silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Thorin J; Nielsen, Michael P; Diaz, Fernando; Palomba, Stefano; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides show high confinement well beyond the diffraction limit. Various devices have been demonstrated to outperform their dielectric counterparts at micrometer scales, such as linear modulators, capable of generating high field confinement and improving device efficiency by increasing access to nonlinear processes, limited by ohmic losses. By using hybridized plasmonic waveguide architectures and nonlinear materials, silicon-based plasmonic waveguides can generate strong nonlinear effects over just a few wavelengths. We have theoretically investigated the nonlinear optical performance of two hybrid plasmonic waveguides (HPWG) with three different nonlinear materials. Based on this analysis, the hybrid gap plasmon waveguide (HGPW), combined with the DDMEBT nonlinear polymer, shows a four-wave mixing (FWM) conversion efficiency of -16.4  dB over a 1 μm propagation length, demonstrating that plasmonic waveguides can be competitive with standard silicon photonics structures over distances three orders of magnitude shorter. PMID:26696182

  12. Plasmonic Au nanoparticles embedding enhances the activity and stability of CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Guiyang; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Jungang; Wu, Shujie; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst of embedding plasmonic Au nanoparticle into CdS (Au@CdS) was prepared with a cysteine-assisted hydrothermal approach. This structure could take fully advantage of electromagnetic fields at the surface of the Au nanoparticles under visible light illumination. The photocatalytic hydrogen evolution activity of CdS could be significantly improved. Without the use of any other metal or metal oxide as cocatalysts, the quantum efficiency can reach 12.1 % over 0.5%Au@CdS at 420 nm. When using 0.1%Pt as a cocatalyst, the quantum efficiency of 0.5%Au@CdS can be further improved to 45.6%. This efficiency can be maintained more than 100 h in the test 12 days, exhibiting a relatively high stability. Photoluminescence (PL) characterization shows that the formation rate of photoexcited e-/h+ was dramatically increased when Au nanoparticles were embedded into CdS. Time-resolved PL measurement shows that Au@CdS also has a longer luminescence lifetime than that of CdS, reflecting that the photoexcited electrons in Au@CdS be with much longer lifetime to reduce H+ forming H2. All these enhancements can be attributed to the effective energy transfer between the Au surface and CdS due to the well matched composite nanostructure. Dr. Xiang Wang gratefully acknowledges the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division for the support of this work.

  13. Electrically tuneable directional coupling and switching based on multimode interference effect in dielectric loaded graphene plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhe; Zhu, Zhihong; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jianfa; Guo, Chucai; Liu, Ken; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2016-06-01

    We have numerically demonstrated that electrically tuneable directional coupling and switching can be realized based on the multimode interference effect in dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides (DLGPWs) of our own design. The total field profile resulting from a superposition of all guided modes in the multimode dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguide is electrically controllable because the propagation properties of the first three guided modes supported by the DLGPW can be effectively manipulated by electrostatic doping of graphene. The functional size of the device is only several micrometres, which is much smaller than the working wavelength. Such electrically controlled multifunctional devices may find potential applications in high-density integrated active plasmonic circuits.

  14. Synthesis and functionalization of gold nanorods for probing plasmonic enhancement mechanisms in organic photovoltaic active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadams, Robert Christopher

    DNA nanotechnology is one of the most flourishing interdisciplinary research fields. Through the features of programmability and predictability, DNA nanostructures can be designed to self-assemble into a variety of periodic or aperiodic patterns of different shapes and length scales, and more importantly, they can be used as scaffolds for organizing other nanoparticles, proteins and chemical groups. By leveraging these molecules, DNA nanostructures can be used to direct the organization of complex bio-inspired materials that may serve as smart drug delivery systems and in vitro or in vivo bio-molecular computing and diagnostic devices. In this dissertation I describe a systematic study of the thermodynamic properties of complex DNA nanostructures, including 2D and 3D DNA origami, in order to understand their assembly, stability and functionality and inform future design endeavors. It is conceivable that a more thorough understanding of DNA self-assembly can be used to guide the structural design process and optimize the conditions for assembly, manipulation, and functionalization, thus benefiting both upstream design and downstream applications. As a biocompatible nanoscale motif, the successful integration, stabilization and separation of DNA nanostructures from cells/cell lysate suggests its potential to serve as a diagnostic platform at the cellular level. Here, DNA origami was used to capture and identify multiple T cell receptor mRNA species from single cells within a mixed cell population. This demonstrates the potential of DNA nanostructure as an ideal nano scale tool for biological applications.

  15. Through-space transfer of chiral information mediated by a plasmonic nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostovar Pour, Saeideh; Rocks, Louise; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan; Parchaňský, Václav; Bouř, Petr; Blanch, Ewan W.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to detect chirality gives stereochemically attuned nanosensors the potential to revolutionize the study of biomolecular processes. Such devices may structurally characterize the mechanisms of protein-ligand binding, the intermediates of amyloidogenic diseases and the effects of phosphorylation and glycosylation. We demonstrate that single nanoparticle plasmonic reporters, or nanotags, can enable a stereochemical response to be transmitted from a chiral analyte to an achiral benzotriazole dye molecule in the vicinity of a plasmon resonance from an achiral metallic nanostructure. The transfer of chirality was verified by the measurement of mirror image surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity spectra for the two enantiomers of both ribose and tryptophan. Computational modelling confirms these observations and reveals the novel chirality transfer mechanism responsible. This is the first report of colloidal metal nanoparticles in the form of single plasmonic substrates displaying an intrinsic chiral sensitivity once attached to a chiral molecule.

  16. Spontaneous emission noise in long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous emission noise is an important limit to the performance of active plasmonic devices. Here, we investigate the spontaneous emission noise in the long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope. A theoretical model of the sensitivity is established to study the incoherent multi-beam interference of spontaneous emission in the gyroscope. Numerical results show that spontaneous emission produces a drift in the transmittance spectra and lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio of the gyroscope. It also strengthens the shot noise to be the main limit to the sensitivity of the gyroscope for high propagation loss. To reduce the negative effects of the spontaneous emission noise on the gyroscope, an external feedback loop is suggested to estimate the drift in the transmittance spectra and therefor enhance the sensitivity. Our work lays a foundation for the improvement of long-range surface plasmon-polariton gyroscope and paves the way to its practical application. PMID:25234712

  17. Dynamics of quantum correlation between separated nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wan-li; An, Jun-Hong; Zhang, Cheng-jie; Chen, Chang-yong; Oh, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of quantum correlation between two separated nitrogen vacancy centers (NVCs) placed near a one-dimensional plasmonic waveguide. As a common medium of the radiation field of NVCs propagating, the plasmonic waveguide can dynamically induce quantum correlation between the two NVCs. It is interesting to find that such dynamically induced quantum correlation can be preserved in the long-time steady state by locally applying individual driving on the two NVCs. In particular, we also show that a large degree of quantum correlation can be established by this scheme even when the distance between the NVCs is much larger than their operating wavelength. This feature may open new perspectives for devising active decoherence-immune solid-state optical devices and long-distance NVC-based quantum networks in the context of plasmonic quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26493045

  18. Dynamics of quantum correlation between separated nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-li; An, Jun-Hong; Zhang, Cheng-jie; Chen, Chang-yong; Oh, C H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of quantum correlation between two separated nitrogen vacancy centers (NVCs) placed near a one-dimensional plasmonic waveguide. As a common medium of the radiation field of NVCs propagating, the plasmonic waveguide can dynamically induce quantum correlation between the two NVCs. It is interesting to find that such dynamically induced quantum correlation can be preserved in the long-time steady state by locally applying individual driving on the two NVCs. In particular, we also show that a large degree of quantum correlation can be established by this scheme even when the distance between the NVCs is much larger than their operating wavelength. This feature may open new perspectives for devising active decoherence-immune solid-state optical devices and long-distance NVC-based quantum networks in the context of plasmonic quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26493045

  19. Aspartame-stabilized gold-silver bimetallic biocompatible nanostructures with plasmonic photothermal properties, antibacterial activity, and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Fasciani, Chiara; Silvero, M Jazmin; Anghel, Maria Alexandra; Argüello, Gerardo A; Becerra, Maria Cecilia; Scaiano, Juan C

    2014-12-17

    Gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles stabilized with a common sweetener, aspartame (AuNP@Ag@Asm), combine the antimicrobial properties of silver with the photoinduced plasmon-mediated photothermal effects of gold. The particles were tested with several bacterial strains, while biocompatibility was verified with human dermal fibroblasts. PMID:25487127

  20. Fabrication of a Ag/Bi3TaO7 Plasmonic Photocatalyst with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity for Degradation of Tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bifu; Xu, Dongbo; Li, Di; Wu, Guoling; Wu, Miaomiao; Shi, Weidong; Chen, Min

    2015-08-12

    A novel Ag/Bi3TaO7 plasmonic photocatalyst has been prepared by a simple photoreduction process. The as-prepared Ag/Bi3TaO7 photocatalyst exhibited an enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of tetracycline (TC) compared to that of a bare Bi3TaO7 catalyst. The 1 wt % Ag-loaded Bi3TaO7 sample showed the highest photocatalytic efficiency for TC degradation (85.42%) compared with those of the other samples. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the synergistic effect of the surface plasmon resonance caused by Ag nanoparticles. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the incorporation of silver nanoparticles onto the Bi3TaO7 surface promoted the separation of photogenerated carriers. In addition, an electron spin resonance (ESR) and trapping experiment revealed that the photoinduced active species hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical were the main active species in the photocatalytic process of TC degradation. The photocatalytic reaction mechanism was discussed by active species trapping and ESR analysis. PMID:26167624

  1. Thermosensitive Ion Channel Activation in Single Neuronal Cells by Using Surface-Engineered Plasmonic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Numata, Tomohiro; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Shuji; Mori, Yasuo; Imahori, Hiroshi; Murakami, Tatsuya

    2015-09-28

    Controlling cell functions using external photoresponsive nanomaterials has enormous potential for the development of cell-engineering technologies and intractable disease therapies, but the former currently requires genetic modification of the target cells. We present a method using plasma-membrane-targeted gold nanorods (pm-AuNRs) prepared with a cationic protein/lipid complex to activate a thermosensitive cation channel, TRPV1, in intact neuronal cells. Highly localized photothermal heat generation mediated by the pm-AuNRs induced Ca(2+) influx solely by TRPV1 activation. In contrast, the use of previously reported cationic AuNRs that are coated with a conventional synthetic polymer also led to photoinduced Ca(2+) influx, but this influx resulted from membrane damage. Our method provides an optogenetic platform without the need for prior genetic engineering of the target cells and might be useful for novel TRPV1-targeted phototherapeutic approaches. PMID:26249533

  2. The Fault in Their Shapes: Investigating the Surface-Plasmon-Resonance-Mediated Catalytic Activities of Silver Quasi-Spheres, Cubes, Triangular Prisms, and Wires.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Anderson G M; Rodrigues, Thenner S; Wang, Jiale; Yamada, Liliam K; Alves, Tiago V; Ornellas, Fernando R; Ando, Rômulo A; Camargo, Pedro H C

    2015-09-22

    The surface-plasmon-resonance (SPR)-mediated catalytic activities of Ag and Au nanoparticles have emerged a relatively new frontier in catalysis in which visible light can be employed as an eco-friendly energy input to drive chemical reactions. Although this phenomenon has been reported for a variety of transformations, the effect of the nanoparticle shape and crystalline structure on the activities remains unclear. In this paper, we investigated the SPR-mediated catalytic activity of Ag quasi-spheres, cubes, triangular prisms, and wires toward the oxidation of p-aminothiophenol to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene by activated O2. The activities at 632.8 nm excitation followed the order triangular prisms and quasi-spheres > wires ≫ cubes. These results indicated that the shape, optical properties, and crystal structure played an important role in the detected SPR-mediated activities. PMID:26335725

  3. Focal Activation of Cells by Plasmon Resonance Assisted Optical Injection of Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Experimental methods for single cell intracellular delivery are essential for probing cell signaling dynamics within complex cellular networks, such as those making up the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show a quantitative and general method of interrogation of signaling pathways. We applied highly focused near-infrared laser light to optically inject gold-coated liposomes encapsulating bioactive molecules into single cells for focal activation of cell signaling. For this demonstration, we encapsulated either inositol trisphosphate (IP3), an endogenous cell signaling second messenger, or adenophostin A (AdA), a potent analogue of IP, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes, and injected these gold-coated liposomes and their contents into the cytosol of single ovarian carcinoma cells to initiate calcium (Ca2+) release from intracellular stores. Upon optical injection of IP3 or AdA at doses above the activation threshold, we observed increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration within the injected cell initiating the propagation of a Ca2+ wave throughout nearby cells. As confirmed by octanol-induced inhibition, the intercellular Ca2+ wave traveled via gap junctions. Optical injection of gold-coated liposomes represents a quantitative method of focal activation of signaling cascades of broad interest in biomedical research. PMID:24877558

  4. Effective Energy Transfer via Plasmon-Activated High-Energy Water Promotes Its Fundamental Activities of Solubility, Ionic Conductivity, and Extraction at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ho, Chia-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Water is a ubiquitous solvent in biological, physical, and chemical processes. Unique properties of water result from water’s tetrahedral hydrogen-bonded (HB) network (THBN). The original THBN is destroyed when water is confined in a nanosized environment or localized at interfaces, resulting in corresponding changes in HB-dependent properties. In this work, we present an innovative idea to validate the reserve energy of high-energy water and applications of high-energy water to promote water’s fundamental activities of solubility, ionic conductivity, and extraction at room temperature. High-energy water with reduced HBs was created by utilizing hot electrons with energies from the decay of surface plasmon excited at gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs). Compared to conventional deionized (DI) water, solubilities of alkali metal-chloride salts in high-energy water were significantly increased, especially for salts that release heat when dissolved. The ionic conductivity of NaCl in high-energy water was also markedly higher, especially when the electrolyte’s concentration was extremely low. In addition, antioxidative components, such as polyphenols and 2,3,5,4’-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-d-glucoside (THSG) from teas, and Polygonum multiflorum (PM), could more effectively be extracted using high-energy water. These results demonstrate that high-energy water has emerged as a promising innovative solvent for promoting water’s fundamental activities via effective energy transfer.

  5. Effective Energy Transfer via Plasmon-Activated High-Energy Water Promotes Its Fundamental Activities of Solubility, Ionic Conductivity, and Extraction at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ho, Chia-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Water is a ubiquitous solvent in biological, physical, and chemical processes. Unique properties of water result from water's tetrahedral hydrogen-bonded (HB) network (THBN). The original THBN is destroyed when water is confined in a nanosized environment or localized at interfaces, resulting in corresponding changes in HB-dependent properties. In this work, we present an innovative idea to validate the reserve energy of high-energy water and applications of high-energy water to promote water's fundamental activities of solubility, ionic conductivity, and extraction at room temperature. High-energy water with reduced HBs was created by utilizing hot electrons with energies from the decay of surface plasmon excited at gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs). Compared to conventional deionized (DI) water, solubilities of alkali metal-chloride salts in high-energy water were significantly increased, especially for salts that release heat when dissolved. The ionic conductivity of NaCl in high-energy water was also markedly higher, especially when the electrolyte's concentration was extremely low. In addition, antioxidative components, such as polyphenols and 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-d-glucoside (THSG) from teas, and Polygonum multiflorum (PM), could more effectively be extracted using high-energy water. These results demonstrate that high-energy water has emerged as a promising innovative solvent for promoting water's fundamental activities via effective energy transfer. PMID:26658304

  6. Effective Energy Transfer via Plasmon-Activated High-Energy Water Promotes Its Fundamental Activities of Solubility, Ionic Conductivity, and Extraction at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ho, Chia-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Water is a ubiquitous solvent in biological, physical, and chemical processes. Unique properties of water result from water’s tetrahedral hydrogen-bonded (HB) network (THBN). The original THBN is destroyed when water is confined in a nanosized environment or localized at interfaces, resulting in corresponding changes in HB-dependent properties. In this work, we present an innovative idea to validate the reserve energy of high-energy water and applications of high-energy water to promote water’s fundamental activities of solubility, ionic conductivity, and extraction at room temperature. High-energy water with reduced HBs was created by utilizing hot electrons with energies from the decay of surface plasmon excited at gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs). Compared to conventional deionized (DI) water, solubilities of alkali metal-chloride salts in high-energy water were significantly increased, especially for salts that release heat when dissolved. The ionic conductivity of NaCl in high-energy water was also markedly higher, especially when the electrolyte’s concentration was extremely low. In addition, antioxidative components, such as polyphenols and 2,3,5,4’-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-d-glucoside (THSG) from teas, and Polygonum multiflorum (PM), could more effectively be extracted using high-energy water. These results demonstrate that high-energy water has emerged as a promising innovative solvent for promoting water’s fundamental activities via effective energy transfer. PMID:26658304

  7. Integrated architecture for the electrical detection of plasmonic resonances based on high electron mobility photo-transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammito, Davide; de Salvador, Davide; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Biasiol, Giorgio; Ongarello, Tommaso; Massari, Michele; Ruffato, Gianluca; Morpurgo, Margherita; Silvestri, Davide; Maggioni, Gianluigi; Bovo, Gianluca; Gaio, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We report the design of an integrated platform for on-chip electrical transduction of the surface plasmon resonance supported by a nanostructured metal grating. The latter is fabricated on the active area of a GaAs/AlGaAs photo-HEMT and simultaneously works as the electronic gate of the device. The gold plasmonic crystal has a V-groove profile and has been designed by numerical optical simulations. By showing that the numerical models accurately reproduce the phototransistors experimental response, we demonstrate that the proposed architecture is suitable for the development of a new class of compact and scalable SPR sensors.We report the design of an integrated platform for on-chip electrical transduction of the surface plasmon resonance supported by a nanostructured metal grating. The latter is fabricated on the active area of a GaAs/AlGaAs photo-HEMT and simultaneously works as the electronic gate of the device. The gold plasmonic crystal has a V-groove profile and has been designed by numerical optical simulations. By showing that the numerical models accurately reproduce the phototransistors experimental response, we demonstrate that the proposed architecture is suitable for the development of a new class of compact and scalable SPR sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HEMTs optical response, device fabrication flow chart, estimate of device resolution based on numerical simulations, synthesis of thiolated biotin, biotin functionalization and avidin binding procedure. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04666d

  8. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity of visible-light-driven plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaojuan Tang, Duanlian; Tang, Fan; Zhu, Yunyan; He, Changfa; Liu, Minghua Lin, Chunxiang; Liu, Yifan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • A plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst has been successfully synthesized. • Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibit high visible light photocatalytic activity. • Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst is stable and magnetically separable. - Abstract: A visible-light-driven plasmonic Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has been successfully synthesized via a deposition–precipitation and photoreduction through a novel one-pot process. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were employed to investigate the crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology, and optical properties of the as-prepared nanocomposites. The photocatalytic activities of the nanocomposites were evaluated by photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol under visible light. The results demonstrated that the obtained Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites exhibited higher photocatalytic activity as compared to pure ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In addition, the sample photoreduced for 20 min and calcined at 500 °C achieved the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, the Ag/AgBr/ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite has high stability under visible light irradiation and could be conveniently separated by using an external magnetic field.

  9. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  10. Active pixel as dosimetric device for interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Baldaccini, F.; Biasini, M.; Checcucci, B.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Conti, E.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Dipilato, A. C.; Esposito, A.; Fanó, L.; Paolucci, M.; Passeri, D.; Pentiricci, A.; Placidi, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a subspecialty of radiology comprehensive of all minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed using radiological devices to obtain image guidance. The interventional procedures are potentially harmful for interventional radiologists and medical staff due to the X-ray diffusion by the patient's body. The characteristic energy range of the diffused photons spans few tens of keV. In this work we will present a proposal for a new X-ray sensing element in the energy range of interest for IR procedures. The sensing element will then be assembled in a dosimeter prototype, capable of real-time measurement, packaged in a small form-factor, with wireless communication and no external power supply to be used for individual operators dosimetry for IR procedures. For the sensor, which is the heart of the system, we considered three different Active Pixel Sensors (APS). They have shown a good capability as single X-ray photon detectors, up to several tens keV photon energy. Two dosimetric quantities have been considered, the number of detected photons and the measured energy deposition. Both observables have a linear dependence with the dose, as measured by commercial dosimeters. The uncertainties in the measurement are dominated by statistic and can be pushed at ˜5% for all the sensors under test.

  11. Frank Isakson Prize: Quantum Plasmonics and Plexcitonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlander, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Plasmon energies can be tuned across the spectrum by simply changing the geometrical shape of a nanostructure. Plasmons can efficiently capture incident light and focus it to nanometer sized hotspots which can enhance electronic and vibrational excitations in nearby structures. The plasmon energies and induced electric field enhancements can be strongly influenced by quantum mechanical effects such as electron tunneling across narrow junctions and non-local screening of the electromagnetic fields near the surfaces of the nanostructures. Large molecules can exhibit molecular plasmon resonances that exhibit classical-like behavior but have a quantum mechanical origin. The coupling of plasmonic and excitonic systems can lead to hybrid states referred to as ``plexcitons'' which can exhibit quantum mechanical effects and nonlinear optical properties. Another important but still relatively unexplored quantum mechanical property of plasmons, is that they can be efficient sources of hot energetic electrons which can transfer into nearby structures and induce a variety of processes. In the talk, I will discuss various quantum mechanical effects in plasmonic systems and how they can be exploited in applications: such as to induce chemical reactions in molecules physisorbed on a nanoparticle surface; to inject electrons directly into the conduction band of a nearby substrate; to dramatically enhance the light harvesting efficiency of photonic devices; to induce local doping of a nearby graphene sheet; and to induce phase transition in adjacent media.

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of Raman optical activity in molecules near metal nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Ramiro; Lombardini, Richard; Halas, Naomi J; Johnson, Bruce R

    2009-11-26

    Surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA) is investigated theoretically for molecules near a metal nanoshell. For this purpose, induced molecular electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole moments must all be included. The incident field and the induced multipole fields all scatter from the nanoshell, and the scattered waves can be calculated via extended Mie theory. It is straightforward in this framework to calculate the incident frequency dependence of SEROA intensities, i.e., SEROA excitation profiles. The differential Raman scattering is examined in detail for a simple chiroptical model that provides analytical forms for the relevant dynamical molecular response tensors. This allows a detailed investigation into circumstances that simultaneously provide strong enhancement of differential intensities and remain selective for molecules with chirality. PMID:19639972

  13. A versatile effect of chitosan-silver nanocomposite for surface plasmonic photocatalytic and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Nithya, Arjunan; JeevaKumari, Henry Linda; Rokesh, Karuppannan; Ruckmani, Kandasamy; Jeganathan, Kulandaivel; Jothivenkatachalam, Kandasamy

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan-silver (CS-Ag) nanocomposite was green synthesised without the aid of any external chemical-reducing agents. The synthesised nanocomposite was characterised by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and zeta potential analyser. The particle size of the synthesised CS-Ag nanocomposite was around 20 nm and was found to be thermally stable in comparison with pure chitosan. The prepared nanocomposite acts as a photocatalyst for dye decolourisation, with a maximum of 81% of methyl orange (MO) decolourisation that occurred under visible light irradiation. The kinetics was found to follow pseudo-first-order according to Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model. The nanocomposite also proved to be an excellent antimicrobial agent against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, possessing a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The zone of inhibition ranged between 16.000 ± 1.000 and 19.333 ± 1.155 (mm), proving its high susceptibility than chitosan itself. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were from 8 to 64 μg/mL, whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 128 μg/mL, with the highest antibacterial activity shown against Gram-positive Staphlococcus aureus. This report illustrates the eco-friendly approach for the reduction of silver using chitosan as a reducing agent, and its potential to dye decay and microbial contaminants. PMID:26562805

  14. Genetically engineered plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Forestiere, Carlo; Pasquale, Alyssa J; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Tamburrino, Antonello; Lee, Sylvanus Y; Reinhard, Björn M; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-04-11

    In the present Letter, we demonstrate how the design of metallic nanoparticle arrays with large electric field enhancement can be performed using the basic paradigm of engineering, namely the optimization of a well-defined objective function. Such optimization is carried out by coupling a genetic algorithm with the analytical multiparticle Mie theory. General design criteria for best enhancement of electric fields are obtained, unveiling the fundamental interplay between the near-field plasmonic and radiative photonic coupling. Our optimization approach is experimentally validated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements, which demonstrate how genetically optimized arrays, fabricated using electron beam lithography, lead to order of ten improvement of Raman enhancement over nanoparticle dimer antennas, and order of one hundred improvement over optimal nanoparticle gratings. A rigorous design of nanoparticle arrays with optimal field enhancement is essential to the engineering of numerous nanoscale optical devices such as plasmon-enhanced biosensors, photodetectors, light sources and more efficient nonlinear optical elements for on chip integration. PMID:22381056

  15. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  16. Electrical Detection of Single Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Renwen; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2016-08-23

    Plasmons-the collective oscillations of electrons in conducting materials-play a pivotal role in nanophotonics because of their ability to couple electronic and photonic degrees of freedom. In particular, plasmons in graphene-the atomically thin carbon material-offer strong spatial confinement and long lifetimes, accompanied by extraordinary optoelectronic properties derived from its peculiar electronic band structure. Understandably, this material has generated great expectations for its application to enhanced integrated devices. However, an efficient scheme for detecting graphene plasmons remains a challenge. Here we show that extremely compact graphene nanostructures are capable of realizing on-chip electrical detection of single plasmons. Specifically, we predict a 2-fold increase in the electrical current across a graphene nanostructure junction caused by the excitation of a single plasmon. This effect, which is due to the increase in electron temperature following plasmon decay, should persist during a picosecond time interval characteristic of electron-gas relaxation. We further show that a broad spectral detection range is accessible either by electrically doping the junction or by varying the size of the nanostructure. The proposed graphene plasmometer could find application as a basic component of future optics-free integrated nanoplasmonic devices. PMID:27472914

  17. Free-Standing Monolayered Metallic Nanoparticle Networks as Building Blocks for Plasmonic Nanoelectronic Junctions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoxi; Li, Chuanping; Zhao, Zhenlu; Li, Haijuan; Jin, Yongdong

    2016-01-27

    The effective coupling of optical surface plasmons (SPs) and electron transport in a plasmonic-electronic device is one of the fundamental issues in nanoelectronics and the emerging field of plasmonics, and offer promise in providing a solution to next generation nanocircuits in which all coupling is in the near field. Attempts toward this end, however, are limited because of the integration challenge to compatible nanodevices. To date, direct electrical detection of SP-electron coupling from metallic nanostructures alone are not reported, and thus it remains a great experimental challenge. In this paper, we succeed in preparing a new suspended-film-type nanoelectronic junction, in which free-standing 2D fractal nanoparticle networks act as plasmonically active nanocomponents. Direct electrical detection of optical collective SPs was evidenced by photocurrent response of the junction upon illumination. Room-temperature I-V characteristics, differing from nonlinear to Ohmic behaviors, are found to be sensitive to the nanometer-scale morphology changes of the nanomembranes. The finding and approach may enable the development of advanced plasmonic nanocircuits and new nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, and (solar) energy applications. PMID:26742433

  18. Stamping High-Aspect-Ratio Plasmonic Nanoarrays on SERS-Supporting Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, Deepak; Wells, Sabrina M; Polemi, Alessia; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Shuford, Kevin L; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The dielectric property of a nanoparticle-supporting film has recently garnered attention in the fabrication of plasmonic surfaces. A few studies have shown that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), and hence SERS, strongly depends on substrate refractive index. In order to create higher efficiency SERS-active surfaces, it is therefore necessary to consider substrate property along with nanoparticle morphology. However, due to certain limitations of conventional lithography, it is often not feasible to create well-defined plasmonic nanoarrays on a substrate of interest. Herein, an additive nanofabrication technique, nanotransfer printing (nTP), is implemented to integrate electron beam lithography (EBL) defined high-aspect-ratio nanofeatures on a variety of SERS-supporting surfaces. With the aid of suitable surface chemistries, a wide range of plasmonic particles were successfully integrated on surfaces of three physically and chemically distinct dielectric materials, viz Polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS), SU-8 photoresist, and glass surfaces, using silicon-based relief pillars. These nTP created metal nanoparticles strongly amplify Raman signal and complement the selection of suitable substrates for better SERS enhancement. Our experimental observations are also supported by the theoretical calculations. The implementation of nTP to stamp out metal nanoparticles on multitude conventional/unconventional substrates has novel applications in designing in-built plasmonic microanalytical devices for SERS sensing and other related photonic studies.

  19. A further comparison of graphene and thin metal layers for plasmonics.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyong; Gao, Pingqi; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-05-21

    Which one is much more suitable for plasmonic materials, graphene or metal? To address this problem well, the plasmonic properties of thin metal sheets at different thicknesses have been investigated and compared with a graphene layer. As demonstration examples, the propagation properties of insulator-metal-insulator and metamaterials (MMs) structures are also shown. The results manifest that the plasmonic properties of the graphene layer are comparable to that of thin metal sheets with the thickness of tens of nanometers. For the graphene MMs structure, by using the periodic stack structure in the active region, the resonant transmission strength significantly improves. At the optimum period number, 3-5 periods of graphene/SiO2, the graphene MMs structure manifests good frequency and amplitude tunable properties simultaneously, and the resonant strength is also strong with large values of the Q-factor. Therefore, graphene is a good tunable plasmonic material. The results are very helpful to develop novel graphene plasmonic devices, such as modulators, antenna and filters. PMID:27138936

  20. Plasmon and compositional mapping of plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringe, Emilie; Collins, Sean M.; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Skrabalak, Sara E.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2014-11-01

    Recently, co-reduction of Au and Pd has allowed the synthesis of complex Au core/AuPd shell nanoparticles with elongated tips and cubic-like symmetry. Optical studies have shown strong plasmonic behavior and high refractive index sensitivities. In this paper, we describe the composition and the near-field plasmonic behavior of those complex structures. Monochromated STEM-EELS, Cathodoluminescence, and EDS mapping reveals the different resonant modes in these particles, and shows that Pd, a poor plasmonic metal, does not prevent strong resonances and could actually be extremely helpful for plasmon-enhanced catalysis.

  1. Visible-Light-Active Plasmonic Ag-SrTiO3 Nanocomposites for the Degradation of NO in Air with High Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Huang, Yu; Xu, Lifeng; Cao, Jun-ji; Ho, Wingkei; Lee, Shun Cheng

    2016-02-17

    Harnessing inexhaustible solar energy for photocatalytic disposal of nitrogen oxides is of great significance nowadays. In this study, Ag-SrTiO3 nanocomposites (Ag-STO) were synthesized via one-pot solvothermal method for the first time. The deposition of Ag nanoparticles incurs a broad plasmonic resonance absorption in the visible light range, resulting in enhanced visible light driven activity on NO removal in comparison with pristine SrTiO3. The Ag loading amount has a significant influence on light absorption properties of Ag-STO, which further affects the photocatalytic efficiency. It was shown that 0.5% Ag loading onto SrTiO3 (in mass ratio) could remove 30% of NO in a single reaction path under visible light irradiation, which is twice higher than that achieved on pristine SrTiO3. Most importantly, the generation of harmful intermediate (NO2) is largely inhibited over SrTiO3 and Ag-STO nanocomposites, which can be ascribed to the basic surface property of strontium sites. As identified by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra,·O2(-) and ·OH radicals are the major reactive species for NO oxidation. Essentially speaking, the abundance of reactive oxygen radicals produced over Ag-STO nanocomposites are responsible for the improved photocatalytic activity. This work provides a facile and controllable route to fabricate plasmonic Ag-SrTiO3 nanocomposite photocatalyst featuring high visible light activity and selectivity for NO abatement. PMID:26796511

  2. Highly sensitive, localized surface plasmon resonance fiber device for environmental sensing, based upon a structured bi-metal array of nano-wires.

    PubMed

    Allsop, Thomas; Neal, Ron; Chengbo, Mou; Kalli, Kyriacos; Webb, David

    2014-10-15

    We demonstrate a bi-metal coated (platinum and gold or silver), localized surface plasmon resonance fiber sensor with an index sensitivity exceeding 11,900 nm/RIU, yielding an index resolution of 2×10⁻⁵ in the aqueous index regime. This is one of the highest index sensitivities achieved with an optical fiber sensor. The coatings consist of arrays of bi-metal nano-wires (typically 36 nm in radius and 20 μm in length), supported by a silicon dioxide thin film on a thin substrate of germanium, the nano-wires being perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the D-shaped fiber. PMID:25361088

  3. ONE-DIMENSIONAL PLASMONIC NANO-PHOTOCATALYSTS: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND PHOTOCATALYTIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2011-08-14

    This study describes a simple two-step approach to coat gold nanorods with a silica/titania shell. Gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of 2.5 (L = 48 {+-} 2 and d = 19 {+-} 1) are synthesized by a silver-seed mediated growth approach according to our previously reported procedure (Hunyadi Murph ACS Symposium Series, Volume 1064, Chapter 8, 2011, 127-163 and reference herein). Gold nanorods are grown on pre-formed gold nano-seeds in the presence of surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and a small amount of silver ions. A bifunctional linker molecule which has a thiol group at one end and a silane group at the other is used to derivatize gold nanorods. The silane group is subsequently reacted with both sodium silicate and titanium isopropoxide to a silica/titania shell around the gold nanorods. By fine tuning the reaction conditions, the silica/titania shell thickness can be controlled from {approx}5 to {approx}40nm. The resulting nanomaterials are stable, amenable to scale up and can be isolated without core aggregation or decomposition. These new materials have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. Photocatalytic activity of Au-silica/titania nanomaterials under visible and UV illumination is measured via degradation of a model dye, methyl orange (MO) under visible and UV illumination. The results indicate a 3 fold improvement in the photocatalytic decomposition rate of MO under visible illumination vs. UV illumination.

  4. Ultrasmooth patterned metals for plasmonics and metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Norris, David J

    2009-07-31

    Surface plasmons are electromagnetic waves that can exist at metal interfaces because of coupling between light and free electrons. Restricted to travel along the interface, these waves can be channeled, concentrated, or otherwise manipulated by surface patterning. However, because surface roughness and other inhomogeneities have so far limited surface-plasmon propagation in real plasmonic devices, simple high-throughput methods are needed to fabricate high-quality patterned metals. We combined template stripping with precisely patterned silicon substrates to obtain ultrasmooth pure metal films with grooves, bumps, pyramids, ridges, and holes. Measured surface-plasmon-propagation lengths on the resulting surfaces approach theoretical values for perfectly flat films. With the use of our method, we demonstrated structures that exhibit Raman scattering enhancements above 10(7) for sensing applications and multilayer films for optical metamaterials. PMID:19644116

  5. Tomography of Particle Plasmon Fields from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    We theoretically investigate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of metallic nanoparticles in the optical frequency domain. Using a quasistatic approximation scheme together with a plasmon eigenmode expansion, we show that EELS can be rephrased in terms of a tomography problem. For selected single and coupled nanoparticles we extract the three-dimensional plasmon fields from a collection of rotated EELS maps. Our results pave the way for a fully three-dimensional plasmon-field tomography and establish EELS as a quantitative measurement device for plasmonics.

  6. Plasmonics: an emerging field fostered by Nano Letters.

    PubMed

    Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-13

    While studies of surface plasmons on metals have been pursued for decades, the more recent appearance of nanoscience has created a revolution in this field with "Plasmonics" emerging as a major area of research. The direct optical excitation of surface plasmons on metallic nanostructures provides numerous ways to control and manipulate light at nanoscale dimensions. This has stimulated the development of novel optical materials, deeper theoretical insight, innovative new devices, and applications with potential for significant technological and societal impact. Nano Letters has been instrumental in the emergence of plasmonics, providing its readership with rapid advances in this dynamic field. PMID:20853888

  7. Frequency-selective propagation of localized spoof surface plasmons in a graded plasmonic resonator chain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Shastri, Kunal Krishnaraj; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Localized spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof-SPPs) in a graded spoof-plasmonic resonator chain with linearly increasing spacing are experimentally investigated at microwave frequencies. Transmission measurements and direct near-field mappings on this graded chain show that the propagation of localized spoof-SPPs can be cutoff at different positions along the graded chain under different frequencies due to the graded coupling between adjacent resonators. This mechanism can be used to guide localized spoof-SPPs in the graded chain to specific positions depending on the frequency and thereby implement a device that can work as a selective switch in integrated plasmonic circuits. PMID:27149656

  8. Frequency-selective propagation of localized spoof surface plasmons in a graded plasmonic resonator chain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Shastri, Kunal Krishnaraj; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Localized spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof-SPPs) in a graded spoof-plasmonic resonator chain with linearly increasing spacing are experimentally investigated at microwave frequencies. Transmission measurements and direct near-field mappings on this graded chain show that the propagation of localized spoof-SPPs can be cutoff at different positions along the graded chain under different frequencies due to the graded coupling between adjacent resonators. This mechanism can be used to guide localized spoof-SPPs in the graded chain to specific positions depending on the frequency and thereby implement a device that can work as a selective switch in integrated plasmonic circuits. PMID:27149656

  9. Frequency-selective propagation of localized spoof surface plasmons in a graded plasmonic resonator chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Shastri, Kunal Krishnaraj; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-01

    Localized spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof-SPPs) in a graded spoof-plasmonic resonator chain with linearly increasing spacing are experimentally investigated at microwave frequencies. Transmission measurements and direct near-field mappings on this graded chain show that the propagation of localized spoof-SPPs can be cutoff at different positions along the graded chain under different frequencies due to the graded coupling between adjacent resonators. This mechanism can be used to guide localized spoof-SPPs in the graded chain to specific positions depending on the frequency and thereby implement a device that can work as a selective switch in integrated plasmonic circuits.

  10. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window. PMID:22924610

  11. Generation of high power pulsed terahertz radiation using a plasmonic photoconductive emitter array with logarithmic spiral antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Christopher W.; Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona

    2014-02-24

    An array of 3 × 3 plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitters with logarithmic spiral antennas is fabricated on a low temperature (LT) grown GaAs substrate and characterized in response to a 200 fs optical pump from a Ti:sapphire mode-locked laser at 800 nm wavelength. A microlens array is used to split and focus the optical pump beam onto the active area of each plasmonic photoconductive emitter element. Pulsed terahertz radiation with record high power levels up to 1.9 mW in the 0.1–2 THz frequency range is measured at an optical pump power of 320 mW. The record high power pulsed terahertz radiation is enabled by the use of plasmonic contact electrodes, enhancing the photoconductor quantum efficiencies, and by increasing the overall device active area, mitigating the carrier screening effect and thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels.

  12. Metallic nanowires for subwavelength waveguiding and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Deng; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hong-Xing

    2013-09-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly developing field concerning light manipulation at the nanoscale with many potential applications, of which plasmonic circuits are promising for future information technology. Plasmonic waveguides are fundamental elements for constructing plasmonic integrated circuits. Among the proposed different plasmonic waveguides, metallic nanowires have drawn much attention due to the highly confined electromagnetic waves and relatively low propagation loss. Here we review the recent research progress in the waveguiding characteristics of metallic nanowires and nanowire-based nanophotonic devices. Plasmon modes of both cylindrical and pentagonal metallic nanowires with and without substrate are discussed. Typical methods for exciting and detecting the plasmons in metallic nanowires are briefly summarized. Because of the multimode characteristic, the plasmon propagation and emission in the nanowire have many unique properties, benefiting the design of plasmonic devices. A few nanowire-based devices are highlighted, including quarter-wave plate, Fabry—Pérot resonator, router and logic gates.

  13. Influence of stabilizing agent and synthesis temperature on the optical properties of silver nanoparticles as active materials in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudin, Lufsyi; Suharyadi, Edi; Utomo, Agung Bambang Setio; Abraha, Kamsul

    2016-04-01

    It has been successfully carried out the synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction method. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as metal precursors and trisodium citrate as the reducing agent. In the synthesis process, were varied the stabilizing agent of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and heating temperature. The formation of silver nanoparticles was observed visually with discoloration (yellowish). The formation and the structure of silver nanoparticles in colloidal solution were further examined through their optical properties by using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The wavelength absorption spectrum of colloidal silver nanoparticles shows that maximum surface plasmon absorption for the trisodium citrate-synthesized nanoparticles was at 429.43 nm for temperature of 90°C. The addition of the stabilizer sharpened spectrum curves and caused red shift in the maximum absorption peak of 429.01 nm and 427.09 nm for PVA and PVP respectively. Meanwhile, the addition of the synthesis temperature also sharpened the maximum surface plasmon absorption band and the red shift the maximum absorption peak of 428.79 nm and 428.58 nm for temperature of 110°C and 120°C respectively. Red shift of the maximum absorption peak indicates a smaller particle size. The maximum surface plasmon absorption band in the range of 427.09 nm to 429.43 nm indicates the presence of spherical or roughly spherical silver nanoparticles and TEM imaging confirmed this shape. TEM imaging results show that the diameter size of the silver nanoparticles range of 10 nm to 60 nm as well as the morphology (crystallites) of silver nanoparticles have spherical geometry with particle distribution which quite dispersive. The dispersibility of nanoparticles such as this could potentially be used as an active material of SPR biosensor.

  14. Embedding plasmonic nanostructure diodes enhances hot electron emission.

    PubMed

    Knight, Mark W; Wang, Yumin; Urban, Alexander S; Sobhani, Ali; Zheng, Bob Y; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-04-10

    When plasmonic nanostructures serve as the metallic counterpart of a metal-semiconductor Schottky interface, hot electrons due to plasmon decay are emitted across the Schottky barrier, generating measurable photocurrents in the semiconductor. When the plasmonic nanostructure is atop the semiconductor, only a small percentage of hot electrons are excited with a wavevector permitting transport across the Schottky barrier. Here we show that embedding plasmonic structures into the semiconductor substantially increases hot electron emission. Responsivities increase by 25× over planar diodes for embedding depths as small as 5 nm. The vertical Schottky barriers created by this geometry make the plasmon-induced hot electron process the dominant contributor to photocurrent in plasmonic nanostructure-diode-based devices. PMID:23452192

  15. Control of the plasmonic resonance of a graphene coated plasmonic nanoparticle array combined with a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sio, Luciano; Cataldi, Ugo; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a switchable plasmonic device based on a conductive graphene oxide (cGO) coated plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) array, layered with nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as an active medium. A monolayer of NPs has been immobilized on a glass substrate through electrostatic interaction, and then grown in place using nanochemistry. This monolayer is then coated with a thin (less then 100nm) cGO film which acts simultaneously as both an electro-conductive and active medium. The combination of the conductive NP array with a separate top cover substrate having both cGO and a standard LC alignment layer is used for aligning a NLC film in a hybrid configuration. The system is analysed in terms of morphological and electro-optical properties. The spectral response of the sample characterized after each element is added (air, cGO, NLC) reveals a red-shift of the localized plasmonic resonance (LPR) frequency of approximately 62nm with respect to the NP array surrounded by air. The application of an external voltage (8Vpp) is suitable to modulate (blue shift) the LPR frequency by approximately 22nm.

  16. Laser Activated Flow Regulator for Glaucoma Drainage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jeffrey L.; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Bhandari, Ramanath

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capabilities of a new glaucoma drainage device regulator in controlling fluid flow as well as to demonstrate that this effect may be titratable by noninvasive means. Methods A rigid eye model with two main ports was used. On the first port, we placed a saline solution column. On the second, we placed a glaucoma shunt. We then measured the flow and flow rate through the system. After placing the regulator device on the tip of the tube, we measured again with the intact membrane and with the membrane open 50% and 100%. For the ex vivo testing we used a similar setting, using a cadaveric porcine eye, we measured again the flow and flow rate. However, this time we opened the membrane gradually using laser shots. A one-way analysis of variance and a Fisher's Least Significant Difference test were used for statistical significance. We also calculated the correlation between the numbers of laser shots applied and the main outcomes. Results The flow through the system with the glaucoma drainage device regulator (membrane intact and 50% open) was statistically lower than with the membrane open 100% and without device (P < 0.05). The flow was successfully controlled by the number of laser shots applied, and showed a positive correlation (+ 0.9). The flow rate was almost doubled every 10 shots and statistically lower than without device at all time (P < 0.05). Conclusions The glaucoma drainage device regulator can be controlled noninvasively with laser, and allows titratable control of aqueous flow. Translational Relevance Initial results and evidence from this experiment will justify the initiation of in vivo animal trials with the glaucoma drainage device regulator; which brings us closer to possible human trials and the chance to significantly improve the existing technology to treat glaucoma surgically. PMID:25374772

  17. Repeated in vivo electrochemical activation and the biological effects of microelectromechanical systems drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Shawgo, Rebecca S; Voskerician, Gabriela; Duc, Hong Linh Ho; Li, Yawen; Lynn, Aaron; MacEwan, Matthew; Langer, Robert; Anderson, James M; Cima, Michael J

    2004-12-15

    The repeated activation of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) drug delivery device was studied in vivo in rats to examine the effect of implantation on the device operation and the effect of electrochemical activation on the inflammatory and wound-healing response. The MEMS devices were fabricated from a silicon wafer into which reservoirs were etched and covered with gold membranes. The membranes were electrochemically removed when an anodic voltage was applied. Devices were implanted subcutaneously both with and without stainless steel mesh cages for 4, 7, 14, 21, or 28 days before activation. Devices were activated every other day for five activations. Leukocyte concentrations indicated that both the application of voltage and the gold corrosion products elevated the inflammatory response which was resolved within 48 h after each activation. The efficiency of gold membrane removal was not impaired throughout the implantation, although a bimodal distribution of background current densities was observed after long implantation times. The thickness of the fibrous capsule surrounding the MEMS devices was similar between activated and control devices explanted at each time point. It was concluded that the repeated activation of MEMS drug delivery devices was successful and the activation produced an acceptable biological response that resolved promptly. PMID:15508122

  18. EDITORIAL: Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver Plasmas and plasmons: links in nanosilver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Silver has long been valued not just for its rarity but also for its broad ranging attractive properties as a conductor, catalyst and antimicrobial agent, among others. In nanoscale structures, silver takes on a number of additional attributes, as properties such as antimicrobial activity show size dependence. In addition plasmonic properties are exhibited, which enhance local electromagnetic fields and can be hugely beneficial in sensing and imaging applications. As a result silver nanoparticles are increasingly in demand. In this issue researchers describe a microplasma-assisted electrochemical synthesis that allows excellent control over the size and spacing of the resulting particles, which are important parameters for optimizing their performance in device applications [1]. Wet chemistry [2] and lithography [3] are common processes for silver nanoparticle synthesis. However, other methods are constantly in development. Biosynthesis approaches have been attracting increasing interest as more environmentally friendly alternatives. Takayuki Kuwabara and colleagues at Xiamen University in China used the sundried biomass of Cinnamomum camphora leaf to reduce silver nitrate [4], demonstrating a cost-efficient alternative to conventional methods which might also be suitable for large-scale production. At Zhejiang Normal University researchers noted that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can act as a capping scaffold in the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters [5]. In addition the resulting fluorescence of the nanocrystals can be used for detecting DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism. Researchers in Malaysia have also noted the potential sensing applications of nanoparticles of another noble metal for swine DNA [6]. They observed that single-strand DNA was absorbed on gold nanoparticles and led to a colour shift from pinkish-red to grey-purple. The shift was the result of a reduction in the surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and new features

  19. Plasmonic Enhancement of the Ellipsometric Measurement of Thin Metal Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mullane, Samuel

    In semiconductor manufacturing, defect analysis and process control are extremely important for optimal device performance and yield enhancement. One in-line tool used for quick optical characterization is the ellipsometer. Because it is nondestructive and largely automated, ellipsometers have become key tools in this process. Scatterometry based optical critical dimension (OCD) analysis is the full optical modeling of ellipsometric measurements using regression-based structures. Specifically for metallic gratings, OCD has a couple of challenges. First, the sensitivity to changes in the width of the metal lines is decreasing for smaller widths. Second, the main scatterometry spectral simulation method (rigorous coupled wave analysis, RCWA) can produce wildly inaccurate results if convergence is not maintained. The research that will follow demonstrates full convergence using RCWA and finite element method (FEM) simulations for metal gratings of this sort. Additionally, the main focus will be on design improvements to these metal gratings to boost sensitivity to their widths. The foundation of this improvement is plasmonic activity, realized for the first time in copper interconnect test structures. Both surface plasmon and localized plasmon activity will be discussed and seen in simulation spectra. The largest sensitivity improvement is due to localized plasmons which depend significantly on all feature dimensions of the metal grating. Importantly, the new cross-grating test structure design has increasing sensitivity with decreasing width. The proposed enhancement to sensitivity for these small metal lines is demonstrated through agreement between RCWA and FEM simulations. Due to considerably different methods and formulation, these simulations would only agree for physically measurable phenomena and converged spectra for each method.

  20. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle's plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated. PMID:27625072

  1. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  2. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  3. Single-plasmon interferences.

    PubMed

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  4. Single-plasmon interferences

    PubMed Central

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  5. Broadband and efficient plasmonic control in the near-infrared and visible via strong interference of surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Gan, C H; Nash, G R

    2013-11-01

    Broadband and tunable control of surface plasmon polaritons in the near-infrared and visible spectrum is demonstrated theoretically and numerically with a pair of phased nanoslits. We establish, with simulations supported by a coupled wave model, that by dividing the incident power equally between two input channels, the maximum plasmon intensity deliverable to either side of the nanoslit pair is twice that for an isolated slit. For a broadband source, a compact device with nanoslit separation of the order of a tenth of the wavelength is shown to steer nearly all the generated plasmons to one side for the same phase delay, thereby achieving a broadband unidirectional plasmon launcher. The reported effect can be applied to the design of ultra-broadband and efficient tunable plasmonic devices. PMID:24177117

  6. Reversible Gating of Plasmonic Coupling for Optical Signal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Christopher G; Fales, Andrew M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-07-20

    Amplification of optical signals is useful for a wide variety of applications, ranging from data signal transmission to chemical sensing and biomedical diagnostics. One such application in chemical sensing is surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), an important technique for increasing the Raman signal using the plasmonic effect of enhanced electromagnetic fields associated with metallic nanostructures. One of the most important limitations of SERS-based amplification is the difficulty to reproducibly control the SERS signal. Here, we describe the design and implementation of a unique hybrid system capable of producing reversible gating of plasmonic coupling for Raman signal amplification. The hybrid system is composed of two subsystems: (1) colloidal magneto-plasmonic nanoparticles for SERS enhancement and (2) a micromagnet substrate with an externally applied magnetic field to modulate the colloidal nanoparticles. For this proof of concept demonstration, the nanoparticles were labeled with a Raman-active dye, and it was shown that the detected SERS signal could be reproducibly modulated by controlling the externally applied magnetic field. The developed system provides a simple, robust, inexpensive, and reusable device for SERS signal modulation. These properties will open up new possibilities for optical signal amplification and gating as well for high-throughput, reproducible SERS detection. PMID:27347606

  7. Propagating plasmon excitation of molecular junctions for spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charlotte; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Natelson, Douglas

    Electronic transport and simultaneous optical measurements on molecule-containing junctions can provide critical information about the dissipation of energy through inelastic processes. Gold bowtie nanostructures have been used for electronic transport and as plasmonically active substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), conventionally with exciting light incident directly on the molecular junction. Electromigrating these devices created interelectrode nanogaps with single-molecule sensitivity in which the Raman scattering rate is dominated by plasmonically enhanced electromagnetic fields due to the presence of the metal nanojunction near the molecules of interest. Direct optical excitation of the junction region, however, can cause heating of the metal, molecular instability via conformational and chemical changes, and breakdown over time. Adding metallic gratings to the electrode design enables the excitation of propagating plasmon modes that can couple into the junction region without direct excitation by far-field radiation. We will present preliminary data on how the addition of these gratings affects single-molecule SERS and the electrical properties of the molecules in these junctions. This research was funded by NSF Graduate Research Fellowships Program DGE-1450681 and ARO Award W911 NF-13-1-0476.

  8. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; van Loon, R. V. A.; Brunets, I.; Schmitz, J.; Polman, A.

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  9. Multi-layer topological transmissions of spoof surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bai Cao; Zhao, Jie; Liao, Zhen; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in microwave frequency provide a high field confinement in subwavelength scale and low-loss and flexible transmissions, which have been widely used in novel transmission waveguides and functional devices. To play more important roles in modern integrated circuits and systems, it is necessary and helpful for the SPP modes to propagate among different layers of devices and chips. Owing to the highly confined property and organized near-field distribution, we show that the spoof SPPs could be easily transmitted from one layer into another layer via metallic holes and arc-shaped transitions. Such designs are suitable for both the ultrathin and flexible single-strip SPP waveguide and double-strip SPP waveguide for active SPP devices. Numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate the broadband and high-efficiency multi-layer topological transmissions with controllable absorption that is related to the superposition area of corrugated metallic strips. The transmission coefficient of single-strip SPP waveguide is no worse than -0.8 dB within frequency band from 2.67 GHz to 10.2 GHz while the transmission of double-strip SPP waveguide keeps above -1 dB within frequency band from 2.26 GHz to 11.8 GHz. The proposed method will enhance the realizations of highly complicated plasmonic integrated circuits. PMID:26939995

  10. Transparent conducting oxides for electro-optical plasmonic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing quest for ultra-compact optical devices has reached a bottleneck due to the diffraction limit in conventional photonics. New approaches that provide subwavelength optical elements, and therefore lead to miniaturization of the entire photonic circuit, are urgently required. Plasmonics, which combines nanoscale light confinement and optical-speed processing of signals, has the potential to enable the next generation of hybrid information-processing devices, which are superior to the current photonic dielectric components in terms of speed and compactness. New plasmonic materials (other than metals), or optical materials with metal-like behavior, have recently attracted a lot of attention due to the promise they hold to enable low-loss, tunable, CMOScompatible devices for photonic technologies. In this review, we provide a systematic overview of various compact optical modulator designs that utilize a class of the most promising new materials as the active layer or core— namely, transparent conducting oxides. Such modulators can be made low-loss, compact, and exhibit high tunability while offering low cost and compatibility with existing semiconductor technologies. A detailed analysis of different configurations and their working characteristics, such as their extinction ratio, compactness, bandwidth, and losses, is performed identifying the most promising designs.

  11. Multi-layer topological transmissions of spoof surface plasmon polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bai Cao; Zhao, Jie; Liao, Zhen; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in microwave frequency provide a high field confinement in subwavelength scale and low-loss and flexible transmissions, which have been widely used in novel transmission waveguides and functional devices. To play more important roles in modern integrated circuits and systems, it is necessary and helpful for the SPP modes to propagate among different layers of devices and chips. Owing to the highly confined property and organized near-field distribution, we show that the spoof SPPs could be easily transmitted from one layer into another layer via metallic holes and arc-shaped transitions. Such designs are suitable for both the ultrathin and flexible single-strip SPP waveguide and double-strip SPP waveguide for active SPP devices. Numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate the broadband and high-efficiency multi-layer topological transmissions with controllable absorption that is related to the superposition area of corrugated metallic strips. The transmission coefficient of single-strip SPP waveguide is no worse than −0.8 dB within frequency band from 2.67 GHz to 10.2 GHz while the transmission of double-strip SPP waveguide keeps above −1 dB within frequency band from 2.26 GHz to 11.8 GHz. The proposed method will enhance the realizations of highly complicated plasmonic integrated circuits. PMID:26939995

  12. Tuning the 3D plasmon field of nanohole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Maxime; Liang, Yuzhang; Poirier Richard, Hugo-Pierre; Faid, Rita; Peng, Wei; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2013-11-01

    Modern photonics is being revolutionized through the use of nanostructured plasmonic materials, which confine light to sub-diffraction limit resolution providing universal, sensitive, and simple transducers for molecular sensors. Understanding the mechanisms by which light interacts with plasmonic crystals is essential for developing application-focussed devices. The strong influence of grating coupling on electromagnetic field distribution, frequency and degeneracy of plasmon bands has now been characterized using hexagonal nanohole arrays. An equation for nanohole arrays was derived to demonstrate the strong influence of incidence and rotation angle on optical properties of 2D plasmonic crystals such as nanohole arrays. Consequently, we report experimental data that are in strong agreement with finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations that clearly demonstrate the influence of the grating coupling conditions on the optical properties (such as plasmon degeneracy and bandwidth), and on the distribution of the plasmon field around nanohole arrays (including tuneable penetration depths and highly localized fields). The tuneable 3D plasmon field allowed for controlled sensing properties and by increasing the angle of incidence to 30 degrees, the resonance wavelength was tuned from 1000 to 600 nm, and the sensitivity was enhanced by nearly 300% for a protein assay using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and by 40% with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors.Modern photonics is being revolutionized through the use of nanostructured plasmonic materials, which confine light to sub-diffraction limit resolution providing universal, sensitive, and simple transducers for molecular sensors. Understanding the mechanisms by which light interacts with plasmonic crystals is essential for developing application-focussed devices. The strong influence of grating coupling on electromagnetic field distribution, frequency and degeneracy of plasmon bands has now been

  13. Highly sensitive beam steering with plasmonic antenna

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Guanghao; Zhan, Qiwen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we design and study a highly sensitive beam steering device that integrates a spiral plasmonic antenna with a subwavelength metallic waveguide. The short effective wavelength of the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) mode supported by the metallic waveguide is exploited to dramatically miniaturize the device and improve the sensitivity of the beam steering. Through introducing a tiny displacement of feed point with respect to the geometrical center of the spiral plasmonic antenna, the direction of the radiation can be steered at considerably high angles. Simulation results show that steering angles of 8°, 17° and 34° are obtainable for a displacement of 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm, respectively. Benefiting from the reduced device size and the shorter SPP wavelength, the beam steering sensitivity of the beam steering is improved by 10-fold compared with the case reported previously. This miniature plasmonic beam steering device may find many potential applications in quantum optical information processing and integrated photonic circuits. PMID:25091405

  14. A Technique for Nanoscale Plasmonic Imaging via Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Daniel S.

    2009-03-01

    The scientific community is witnessing increased research activity on Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs). The potential applications of SPPs and plasmonic structures based on their control and manipulation are truly multi-disciplinary, spanning high speed nano-scale interconnects, meta-materials, chemical and biological sensing, sub-wavelength optics and waveguides, near-field optical trapping, high-density data storage, and the enhancement of non-linear effects. Measurement of the localized optical field intensity is a critical component in validating physical models and characterizing plasmonic structures. The dominant technique employed for this task is the Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope (SNOM) or Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM), whose contrast mechanism is based on measuring light scattered from the near-field with a probe. These techniques can provide high resolution images of the localized fields, but they are slow. Furthermore, tip-sample interactions can perturb the fields, yielding ambiguity between electric and magnetic fields and frustrating attempts at accurate optical characterization. One way to facilitate the advance of plasmonics is to develop new techniques for imaging and characterizing SPP behavior on the nanoscale. Recent efforts employing photoemission to reveal the localized fields have demonstrated that this technique can provide both high spatial (˜10nm) and temporal (fs) resolution when combined with a Photoelectron Emission Microscope (PEEM)[1-3]. The PEEM does not require a probe so the fields can be imaged without perturbation. It also provides a parallel image of the full field, so acquisition times are fast. We are expanding the capabilities of the PEEM to exploit a novel contrast mechanism which will broaden the spectrum of plasmonic devices observable. We present our experimental efforts in this area, detail the underlying physics of the contrast mechanism and discuss how it can be controlled to enable unique

  15. Efficient coupling of light to graphene plasmons by compressing surface polaritons with tapered bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A Yu; Alonso-González, P; Hillenbrand, R

    2014-05-14

    Graphene plasmons promise exciting nanophotonic and optoelectronic applications. Owing to their extremely short wavelengths, however, the efficient coupling of photons to propagating graphene plasmons-critical for the development of future devices-can be challenging. Here, we propose and numerically demonstrate coupling between infrared photons and graphene plasmons by the compression of surface polaritons on tapered bulk slabs of both polar and doped semiconductor materials. Propagation of surface phonon polaritons (in SiC) and surface plasmon polaritons (in n-GaAs) along the tapered slabs compresses the polariton wavelengths from several micrometers to around 200 nm, which perfectly matches the wavelengths of graphene plasmons. The proposed coupling device allows for a 25% conversion of the incident energy into graphene plasmons and, therefore, could become an efficient route toward graphene plasmon circuitry. PMID:24773123

  16. Generation of spin currents by surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, K.; Adachi, H.; Kikuchi, D.; Ito, S.; Qiu, Z.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmons, free-electron collective oscillations in metallic nanostructures, provide abundant routes to manipulate light–electron interactions that can localize light energy and alter electromagnetic field distributions at subwavelength scales. The research field of plasmonics thus integrates nano-photonics with electronics. In contrast, electronics is also entering a new era of spintronics, where spin currents play a central role in driving devices. However, plasmonics and spin-current physics have so far been developed independently. Here we report the generation of spin currents by surface plasmon resonance. Using Au nanoparticles embedded in Pt/BiY2Fe5O12 bilayer films, we show that, when the Au nanoparticles fulfill the surface-plasmon-resonance conditions, spin currents are generated across the Pt/BiY2Fe5O12 interface. This spin-current generation cannot be explained by conventional heating effects, requiring us to introduce nonequilibrium magnons excited by surface-plasmon-induced evanescent electromagnetic fields in BiY2Fe5O12. This plasmonic spin pumping integrates surface plasmons with spin-current physics, opening the door to plasmonic spintronics. PMID:25569821

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy of two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John F; Han, Jiaguang; Lu, Xinchao; Zhang, Weili

    2009-01-01

    The fascinating properties of plasmonic structures have had significant impact on the development of next generation ultracompact photonic and optoelectronic components. We study two-dimensional plasmonic structures functioning at terahertz frequencies. Resonant terahertz response due to surface plasmons and dipole localized surface plasmons were investigated by the state-of-the-art terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) using both transmission and reflection configurations. Extraordinary terahertz transmission was demonstrated through the subwavelength metallic hole arrays made from good conducting metals as well as poor metals. Metallic arrays m!lde from Pb, generally a poor metal, and having optically thin thicknesses less than one-third of a skin depth also contributed in enhanced THz transmission. A direct transition of a surface plasmon resonance from a photonic crystal minimum was observed in a photo-doped semiconductor array. Electrical controls of the surface plasmon resonances by hybridization of the Schottkey diode between the metallic grating and the semiconductor substrate are investigated as a function of the applied reverse bias. In addition, we have demonstrated photo-induced creation and annihilation of surface plasmons with appropriate semiconductors at room temperature. According to the Fano model, the transmission properties are characterized by two essential contributions: resonant excitation of surface plasmons and nonresonant direct transmission. Such plasmonic structures may find fascinating applications in terahertz imaging, biomedical sensing, subwavelength terahertz spectroscopy, tunable filters, and integrated terahertz devices.

  18. Flexible modulation of plasmon-induced transparency in a strongly coupled graphene grating-sheet system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Weiwei; Cai, Wei; Xiang, Yinxiao; Wang, Lei; Ren, Mengxin; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-03-21

    General actively tunable near-field plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) systems based on couplings between localized plasmon resonances of graphene nanostructures not only suffer from interantenna separations of smaller than 20 nm, but also lack switchable effect about the transparency window. Here, the performance of an active PIT system based on graphene grating-sheet with near-field coupling distance of more than 100 nm is investigated in mid-infrared. The transparency window in spectrum is analyzed objectively and proved to be more likely stemmed from Aulter-Townes splitting. The proposed system exhibits flexible tunability in slow-light and electro-optical switches, promising for practical active photonic devices. PMID:27136776

  19. Gain modulation by graphene plasmons in aperiodic lattice lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Marshall, O. P.; Folland, T. G.; Kim, Y.-J.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphene plasmon-based technologies will enable the development of fast, compact, and inexpensive active photonic elements because, unlike plasmons in other materials, graphene plasmons can be tuned via the doping level. Such tuning is harnessed within terahertz quantum cascade lasers to reversibly alter their emission. This is achieved in two key steps: first, by exciting graphene plasmons within an aperiodic lattice laser and, second, by engineering photon lifetimes, linking graphene’s Fermi energy with the round-trip gain. Modal gain and hence laser spectra are highly sensitive to the doping of an integrated, electrically controllable, graphene layer. Demonstration of the integrated graphene plasmon laser principle lays the foundation for a new generation of active, programmable plasmonic metamaterials with major implications across photonics, material sciences, and nanotechnology.

  20. Emerging Vocabulary Learning: From a Perspective of Activities Facilitated by Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Zengning

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the current mobile vocabulary learning practice to discover how far mobile devices are being used to support vocabulary learning. An activity-centered perspective is undertaken, with the consideration of new practice against existing theories of learning activities including behaviorist activities, constructivist activities,…

  1. Gap plasmon resonator arrays for unidirectional launching and shaping of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zeyu; Yang, Tian

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and experimental realization of a type of miniaturized device for efficient unidirectional launching and shaping of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Each device consists of an array of evenly spaced gap plasmon resonators with varying dimensions. Particle swarm optimization is used to achieve a theoretical two-dimensional launching efficiency of about 51%, under the normal illumination of a 5-μm waist Gaussian beam at 780 nm. By modifying the wavefront of the SPPs, unidirectional SPPs with focused, Bessel, and Airy profiles are launched and imaged with leakage radiation microscopy.

  2. A General Design Rule to Manipulate Photocarrier Transport Path in Solar Cells and Its Realization by the Plasmonic-Electrical Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Zhu, Hugh L.; Chen, Luzhou; Chew, Weng Cho; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that transport paths of photocarriers (electrons and holes) before collected by electrodes strongly affect bulk recombination and thus electrical properties of solar cells, including open-circuit voltage and fill factor. For boosting device performance, a general design rule, tailored to arbitrary electron to hole mobility ratio, is proposed to decide the transport paths of photocarriers. Due to a unique ability to localize and concentrate light, plasmonics is explored to manipulate photocarrier transport through spatially redistributing light absorption at the active layer of devices. Without changing the active materials, we conceive a plasmonic-electrical concept, which tunes electrical properties of solar cells via the plasmon-modified optical field distribution, to realize the design rule. Incorporating spectrally and spatially configurable metallic nanostructures, thin-film solar cells are theoretically modelled and experimentally fabricated to validate the design rule and verify the plasmonic-tunable electrical properties. The general design rule, together with the plasmonic-electrical effect, contributes to the evolution of emerging photovoltaics.

  3. A general design rule to manipulate photocarrier transport path in solar cells and its realization by the plasmonic-electrical effect.

    PubMed

    Sha, Wei E I; Zhu, Hugh L; Chen, Luzhou; Chew, Weng Cho; Choy, Wallace C H

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that transport paths of photocarriers (electrons and holes) before collected by electrodes strongly affect bulk recombination and thus electrical properties of solar cells, including open-circuit voltage and fill factor. For boosting device performance, a general design rule, tailored to arbitrary electron to hole mobility ratio, is proposed to decide the transport paths of photocarriers. Due to a unique ability to localize and concentrate light, plasmonics is explored to manipulate photocarrier transport through spatially redistributing light absorption at the active layer of devices. Without changing the active materials, we conceive a plasmonic-electrical concept, which tunes electrical properties of solar cells via the plasmon-modified optical field distribution, to realize the design rule. Incorporating spectrally and spatially configurable metallic nanostructures, thin-film solar cells are theoretically modelled and experimentally fabricated to validate the design rule and verify the plasmonic-tunable electrical properties. The general design rule, together with the plasmonic-electrical effect, contributes to the evolution of emerging photovoltaics. PMID:25686578

  4. A General Design Rule to Manipulate Photocarrier Transport Path in Solar Cells and Its Realization by the Plasmonic-Electrical Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Zhu, Hugh L.; Chen, Luzhou; Chew, Weng Cho; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that transport paths of photocarriers (electrons and holes) before collected by electrodes strongly affect bulk recombination and thus electrical properties of solar cells, including open-circuit voltage and fill factor. For boosting device performance, a general design rule, tailored to arbitrary electron to hole mobility ratio, is proposed to decide the transport paths of photocarriers. Due to a unique ability to localize and concentrate light, plasmonics is explored to manipulate photocarrier transport through spatially redistributing light absorption at the active layer of devices. Without changing the active materials, we conceive a plasmonic-electrical concept, which tunes electrical properties of solar cells via the plasmon-modified optical field distribution, to realize the design rule. Incorporating spectrally and spatially configurable metallic nanostructures, thin-film solar cells are theoretically modelled and experimentally fabricated to validate the design rule and verify the plasmonic-tunable electrical properties. The general design rule, together with the plasmonic-electrical effect, contributes to the evolution of emerging photovoltaics. PMID:25686578

  5. Molecular interfaces for plasmonic hot electron photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo García de Arquer, F.; Mihi, Agustín; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2015-01-01

    The use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to improve and tailor the photovoltaic performance of plasmonic hot-electron Schottky solar cells is presented. SAMs allow the simultaneous control of open-circuit voltage, hot-electron injection and short-circuit current. To that end, a plurality of molecule structural parameters can be adjusted: SAM molecule's length can be adjusted to control plasmonic hot electron injection. Modifying SAMs dipole moment allows for a precise tuning of the open-circuit voltage. The functionalization of the SAM can also be selected to modify short-circuit current. This allows the simultaneous achievement of high open-circuit voltages (0.56 V) and fill-factors (0.58), IPCE above 5% at the plasmon resonance and maximum power-conversion efficiencies of 0.11%, record for this class of devices.The use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to improve and tailor the photovoltaic performance of plasmonic hot-electron Schottky solar cells is presented. SAMs allow the simultaneous control of open-circuit voltage, hot-electron injection and short-circuit current. To that end, a plurality of molecule structural parameters can be adjusted: SAM molecule's length can be adjusted to control plasmonic hot electron injection. Modifying SAMs dipole moment allows for a precise tuning of the open-circuit voltage. The functionalization of the SAM can also be selected to modify short-circuit current. This allows the simultaneous achievement of high open-circuit voltages (0.56 V) and fill-factors (0.58), IPCE above 5% at the plasmon resonance and maximum power-conversion efficiencies of 0.11%, record for this class of devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Contact-potential differentiometry measurements, FTIR characterization, performance statistics and gold devices. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06356b

  6. Proposal for a topological plasmon spin rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Drew, H. D.; Fuhrer, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a device in which the spin-polarized ac plasmon mode in the surface state of a topological insulator nanostructure induces a static spin accumulation in a resonant, normal metal structure coupled to it. Using a finite-difference time-domain model, we simulate this spin-pump mechanism with drift, diffusion, relaxation, and precession in a magnetic field. This optically driven system can serve as a dc "spin battery" for spintronic devices.

  7. Plasmon-Enhanced Upconversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di M; García-Etxarri, Aitzol; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2014-11-20

    Upconversion, the conversion of photons from lower to higher energies, is a process that promises applications ranging from high-efficiency photovoltaic and photocatalytic cells to background-free bioimaging and therapeutic probes. Existing upconverting materials, however, remain too inefficient for viable implementation. In this Perspective, we describe the significant improvements in upconversion efficiency that can be achieved using plasmon resonances. As collective oscillations of free electrons, plasmon resonances can be used to enhance both the incident electromagnetic field intensity and the radiative emission rates. To date, this approach has shown upconversion enhancements up to 450×. We discuss both theoretical underpinnings and experimental demonstrations of plasmon-enhanced upconversion, examining the roles of upconverter quantum yield, plasmonic geometry, and plasmon spectral overlap. We also discuss nonoptical consequences of including metal nanostructures near upconverting emitters. The rapidly expanding field of plasmon-enhanced upconversion provides novel fundamental insight into nanoscale light-matter interactions while improving prospects for technological relevance. PMID:26276488

  8. Plasmonics in atomically thin materials.

    PubMed

    García de Abajo, F Javier; Manjavacas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The observation and electrical manipulation of infrared surface plasmons in graphene have triggered a search for similar photonic capabilities in other atomically thin materials that enable electrical modulation of light at visible and near-infrared frequencies, as well as strong interaction with optical quantum emitters. Here, we present a simple analytical description of the optical response of such kinds of structures, which we exploit to investigate their application to light modulation and quantum optics. Specifically, we show that plasmons in one-atom-thick noble-metal layers can be used both to produce complete tunable optical absorption and to reach the strong-coupling regime in the interaction with neighboring quantum emitters. Our methods are applicable to any plasmon-supporting thin materials, and in particular, we provide parameters that allow us to readily calculate the response of silver, gold, and graphene islands. Besides their interest for nanoscale electro-optics, the present study emphasizes the great potential of these structures for the design of quantum nanophotonics devices. PMID:25774774

  9. Single-crystalline aluminum film for ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Bo-Tsun; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Wu, Yen-Mo; Chung, Yi-Cheng; Hsueh, Wei-Jen; Lin, Shih-Wei; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2016-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of plasmonic devices in the past decade. Plasmonic nanolasers, which display interesting properties, have come to play an important role in biomedicine, chemical sensors, information technology, and optical integrated circuits. However, nanoscale plasmonic devices, particularly those operating in the ultraviolet regime, are extremely sensitive to the metal and interface quality. Thus, these factors have a significant bearing on the development of ultraviolet plasmonic devices. Here, by addressing these material-related issues, we demonstrate a low-threshold, high-characteristic-temperature metal-oxide-semiconductor ZnO nanolaser that operates at room temperature. The template for the ZnO nanowires consists of a flat single-crystalline Al film grown by molecular beam epitaxy and an ultrasmooth Al2O3 spacer layer synthesized by atomic layer deposition. By effectively reducing the surface plasmon scattering and metal intrinsic absorption losses, the high-quality metal film and the sharp interfaces formed between the layers boost the device performance. This work should pave the way for the use of ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers and related devices in a wider range of applications. PMID:26814581

  10. Single-crystalline aluminum film for ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Bo-Tsun; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Wu, Yen-Mo; Chung, Yi-Cheng; Hsueh, Wei-Jen; Lin, Shih-Wei; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2016-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of plasmonic devices in the past decade. Plasmonic nanolasers, which display interesting properties, have come to play an important role in biomedicine, chemical sensors, information technology, and optical integrated circuits. However, nanoscale plasmonic devices, particularly those operating in the ultraviolet regime, are extremely sensitive to the metal and interface quality. Thus, these factors have a significant bearing on the development of ultraviolet plasmonic devices. Here, by addressing these material-related issues, we demonstrate a low-threshold, high-characteristic-temperature metal-oxide-semiconductor ZnO nanolaser that operates at room temperature. The template for the ZnO nanowires consists of a flat single-crystalline Al film grown by molecular beam epitaxy and an ultrasmooth Al2O3 spacer layer synthesized by atomic layer deposition. By effectively reducing the surface plasmon scattering and metal intrinsic absorption losses, the high-quality metal film and the sharp interfaces formed between the layers boost the device performance. This work should pave the way for the use of ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers and related devices in a wider range of applications.

  11. Single-crystalline aluminum film for ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Bo-Tsun; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Wu, Yen-Mo; Chung, Yi-Cheng; Hsueh, Wei-Jen; Lin, Shih-Wei; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2016-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of plasmonic devices in the past decade. Plasmonic nanolasers, which display interesting properties, have come to play an important role in biomedicine, chemical sensors, information technology, and optical integrated circuits. However, nanoscale plasmonic devices, particularly those operating in the ultraviolet regime, are extremely sensitive to the metal and interface quality. Thus, these factors have a significant bearing on the development of ultraviolet plasmonic devices. Here, by addressing these material-related issues, we demonstrate a low-threshold, high-characteristic-temperature metal-oxide-semiconductor ZnO nanolaser that operates at room temperature. The template for the ZnO nanowires consists of a flat single-crystalline Al film grown by molecular beam epitaxy and an ultrasmooth Al2O3 spacer layer synthesized by atomic layer deposition. By effectively reducing the surface plasmon scattering and metal intrinsic absorption losses, the high-quality metal film and the sharp interfaces formed between the layers boost the device performance. This work should pave the way for the use of ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers and related devices in a wider range of applications. PMID:26814581

  12. Controlled spatial switching and routing of surface plasmons in designed single-crystalline gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könenkamp, R.; Word, R. C.; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Nadarajah, Athavan; Saliba, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Electron emission microscopy is used to visualize plasmonic routing in gold nano-structures. We show that in single-crystalline gold structures reliable routing can be achieved with polarization switching. The routing is due to the polarization dependence of the photon-to-plasmon coupling, which controls the mode distribution in the plasmonic gold film. We use specifically designed, single-crystalline planar structures. In these structures, the plasmon propagation length is sufficiently large such that significant plasmon power can be delivered to the near-field region around the end tips of the router. Solid state devices based on internal electron excitation and emission processes appear feasible.

  13. Feasibility of using a compact elliptical device to increase energy expenditure during sedentary activities

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Denlinger, LeAnn; Duveneck, Ellen; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Kong, Lan; Freivalds, Andris; Ray, Chester A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a compact elliptical device to increase energy expenditure during sedentary activities. A secondary aim was to evaluate if two accelerometers attached to the elliptical device could provide reliable and valid assessments of participants’ frequency and duration of elliptical device use. Design Physically inactive adults (n = 32, age range = 25–65) were recruited through local advertisements and selected using stratified random sampling based on sex, body mass index (BMI), and age. Methods Indirect calorimetry was used to assess participants’ energy expenditure while seated and while using the elliptical device at a self-selected intensity level. Participants also self-reported their interest in using the elliptical device during sedentary activities. Two Actigraph GT3X accelerometers were attached to the elliptical device to record time-use patterns. Results Participants expended a median of 179.1 kilocalories per hour while using the elliptical device (range = 108.2–269.0), or a median of 87.9 more kilocalories (range = 19.7–178.6) than they would expend per hour of sedentary sitting. Participants reported high interest in using the elliptical device during TV watching and computer work, but relatively low interest in using the device during office meetings. Women reported greater interest in using the elliptical device than men. The two accelerometers recorded identical time-use patterns on the elliptical device and demonstrated concurrent validity with time-stamped computer records. Conclusions Compact elliptical devices could increase energy expenditure during sedentary activities, and may provide proximal environmental cues for increasing energy expenditure across multiple life domains. PMID:24035273

  14. Plasmonic nanocrystal solar cells utilizing strongly confined radiation.

    PubMed

    Kholmicheva, Natalia; Moroz, Pavel; Rijal, Upendra; Bastola, Ebin; Uprety, Prakash; Liyanage, Geethika; Razgoniaev, Anton; Ostrowski, Alexis D; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2014-12-23

    The ability of metal nanoparticles to concentrate light via the plasmon resonance represents a unique opportunity for funneling the solar energy in photovoltaic devices. The absorption enhancement in plasmonic solar cells is predicted to be particularly prominent when the size of metal features falls below 20 nm, causing the strong confinement of radiation modes. Unfortunately, the ultrashort lifetime of such near-field radiation makes harvesting the plasmon energy in small-diameter nanoparticles a challenging task. Here, we develop plasmonic solar cells that harness the near-field emission of 5 nm Au nanoparticles by transferring the plasmon energy to band gap transitions of PbS semiconductor nanocrystals. The interfaces of Au and PbS domains were designed to support a rapid energy transfer at rates that outpace the thermal dephasing of plasmon modes. We demonstrate that central to the device operation is the inorganic passivation of Au nanoparticles with a wide gap semiconductor, which reduces carrier scattering and simultaneously improves the stability of heat-prone plasmonic films. The contribution of the Au near-field emission toward the charge carrier generation was manifested through the observation of an enhanced short circuit current and improved power conversion efficiency of mixed (Au, PbS) solar cells, as measured relative to PbS-only devices. PMID:25403025

  15. Ultraconfined Interlaced Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Marcos, João S.; Silveirinha, Mário G.; Maslovski, Stanislav I.

    2011-08-01

    We describe a mesoscopic excitation in strongly coupled grids of metallic nanorods, resulting from the hybridization of weakly bounded plasmons. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally that the characteristic spatial scale of the interlaced plasmons is determined by geometrical features, rather than from the electrical length of the nanorods, and that due to their wide band nature, weak sensitivity to metallic absorption, and subwavelength mode sizes, such plasmons may have exciting applications in waveguiding in the nanoscale.

  16. A General Method for Solvent Exchange of Plasmonic Nanoparticles and Self-Assembly into SERS-Active Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a general route for the transfer of Au and Ag nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes, from water into various organic solvents. The experimental conditions for each type of nanoparticles were optimized by using a combination of thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) and a hydrophobic capping agent, such as dodecanethiol. The functionalized nanoparticles were readily transferred into organic dispersions with long-term stability (months). Such organic dispersions efficiently spread out on water, leading to self-assembly at the air/liquid interface into extended nanoparticle arrays which could in turn be transferred onto solid substrates. The dense close packing in the obtained nanoparticle monolayers results in extensive plasmon coupling, rendering them efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy. PMID:26258732

  17. Surface plasmon inhibited photo-luminescence activation in CdSe/ZnS core–shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junsheng; Žídek, Karel; Abdellah, Mohamed; Al-Marri, Mohammed J.; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-06-01

    In a composite film of Cd x  Se y  Zn1‑x  S1‑y gradient core–shell quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanorods (NRs), the optical properties of the QDs are drastically affected by the plasmonic nanoparticles. We provide a careful study of the two-step formation of the film and its morphology. Subsequently we focus on QD luminescence photoactivation—a process induced by photochemical changes on the QD surface. We observe that even a sparse coverage of AuNRs can completely inhibit the photoactivation of the QDs’ emission in the film. We demonstrate that the inhibition can be accounted for by a rapid energy transfer between QDs and AuNRs. Finally, we propose that the behavior of emission photoactivation can be used as a signature to distinguish between energy and electron transfer in the QD-based materials.

  18. Surface plasmon inhibited photo-luminescence activation in CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junsheng; Žídek, Karel; Abdellah, Mohamed; Al-Marri, Mohammed J; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-06-29

    In a composite film of Cd x  Se y  Zn1-x  S1-y gradient core-shell quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanorods (NRs), the optical properties of the QDs are drastically affected by the plasmonic nanoparticles. We provide a careful study of the two-step formation of the film and its morphology. Subsequently we focus on QD luminescence photoactivation-a process induced by photochemical changes on the QD surface. We observe that even a sparse coverage of AuNRs can completely inhibit the photoactivation of the QDs' emission in the film. We demonstrate that the inhibition can be accounted for by a rapid energy transfer between QDs and AuNRs. Finally, we propose that the behavior of emission photoactivation can be used as a signature to distinguish between energy and electron transfer in the QD-based materials. PMID:27167726

  19. Direct mapping of the UV surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qiaoqiang; Zhou, Liangcheng; Dierolf, Volkmar; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2009-05-01

    Researchers employed various well-developed concepts from conventional optics in designing novel plasmonic devices, which allow us to construct a framework to describe the propagation, diffraction, and interference of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a chip. Here we present what we believe to be the first direct mapping of the UV SPPs on an Al2O3/Al surface using a UV-compatible near-field scanning optical microscope system. UV SPP modes launched by one-dimensional slits or two-dimensional groove arrays and corresponding interference phenomenon were both observed, which may enrich the studies on subwavelength optics on a chip. PMID:19412260

  20. Diffraction-managed superlensing using plasmonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.; Pastor, David; Caballero, María T.; Miret, Juan J.

    2012-07-01

    We show that subwavelength diffracted wave fields may be managed inside multilayered plasmonic devices to achieve ultra-resolving lensing. For that purpose we first transform both homogeneous waves and a broad band of evanescent waves into propagating Bloch modes by means of a metal/dielectric (MD) superlattice. Beam spreading is subsequently compensated by means of negative refraction in a plasmon-induced anisotropic medium that is cemented behind. A precise design of the superlens doublet may lead to nearly aberration-free images with subwavelength resolution in spite of using optical paths longer than a wavelength.

  1. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  2. Biomolecular Plasmonics for Quantitative Biology and Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Lee, Luke P.

    2012-01-01

    Free electrons in a noble metal nanoparticle can be resonantly excited, leading to their collective oscillation termed as a surface plasmon. These surface plasmons enable nanoparticles to absorb light, generate heat, transfer energy, and re-radiate incident photons. Creative designs of nanoplasmonic optical antennae (i.e. plasmon resonant nanoparticles) have become a new foundation of quantitative biology and nanomedicine. This review focuses on the recent developments in dual-functional nanoplasmonic optical antennae for label-free biosensors and nanoplasmonic gene switches. Nanoplasmonic optical antennae, functioning as biosensors to significantly enhance biochemical-specific spectral information via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), are discussed. Nanoplasmonic optical antennae, functioning as nanoplasmonic gene switches to enable spatiotemporal regulation of genetic activity, are also reviewed. Nanoplasmonic molecular rulers and integrated photoacoustic-photothermal contrast agents are also described. PMID:20801636

  3. Fabric-based integrated energy devices for wearable activity monitors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmook; Lee, Jongsu; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Minbaek; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-09-01

    A wearable fabric-based integrated power-supply system that generates energy triboelectrically using human activity and stores the generated energy in an integrated supercapacitor is developed. This system can be utilized as either a self-powered activity monitor or as a power supply for external wearable sensors. These demonstrations give new insights for the research of wearable electronics. PMID:25070873

  4. Water Pollution Scrubber Activity Simulates Pollution Control Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Edward C., III; Waggoner, Todd C.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory activity caused students to think actively about water pollution. The students realized that it would be easier to keep water clean than to remove pollutants. They created a water scrubbing system allowing them to pour water in one end and have it emerge clean at the other end. (JOW)

  5. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  6. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones

    PubMed Central

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  7. Nanomembrane-based plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Vuković, Slobodan M.; Buha, Jelena; Matovic, Jovan

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the main properties and applications of nanomembrane-based plasmonic structures, including some results presented here for the first time. Artificial nanomembranes are a novel building block in micro- and nanosystems technologies. They represent quasi-two-dimensional (2D) freestanding structures thinner than 100 nm and with giant aspect ratios that often exceed 1,000,000. They may be fabricated as various quasi-2D metal-dielectric nanocomposites with tailorable properties; they are fully symmetric in an electromagnetic sense and support long-range surface plasmon polaritons. This makes nanomembranes a convenient platform for different plasmonic structures such as subwavelength plasmonic crystals and metamaterials and applications such as plasmon waveguides and ultrasensitive bio/chemical sensors. Among other advantages of nanomembrane plasmonics is the feasibility to fabricate flexible, transferable plasmonic guides applicable to different substrates and dynamically tunable through stretching. There are various approaches to multifunctionalization of nanomembranes for plasmonics, including the use of transparent conductive oxide nanoparticles, but also the incorporation of switchable ion channels. Since the natural counterpart of the artificial nanomembranes are cell membranes, the multifunctionalization of synthetic nanomembranes ensures the introduction of bionic principles into plasmonics, at the same time extending the toolbox of the available nanostructures, materials and functions.

  8. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Maksymov, Ivan S; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  9. Self-activated mesh device using shape memory alloy for periosteal expansion osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kensuke; Takahashi, Tetsu; Tanaka, Kenko; Nogami, Shinnosuke; Kaneuji, Takeshi; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Lethaus, Bernd; Kessler, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The present study evaluated the use of this self-activated shape memory alloy (SMA) device, with a focus on its effects in the region under the periosteum. Twelve Japanese white rabbits were used in this study. The device was inserted under the periosteum at the forehead. In the experimental group, the device was pushed, bent, and attached to the bone surface and fixed with a titanium screw. In control group, the device was only inserted under the periosteum. After 14 days, the screw was removed and the mesh was activated in the experimental group. Rabbits were sacrificed 5 and 8 weeks after the operation and newly formed bone was histologically and radiographically evaluated. The quantitative data by the area and the occupation of newly formed bone indicated that the experimental group had a higher volume of new bone than the control group at each consolidation period. Histologically, some newly formed bone was observed and most of the subperiosteal space underneath the device was filled with fibrous tissue, and a thin layer of immature bone was observed in the control group. In the experimental group, multiple dome-shaped bones, outlined by thin and scattered trabeculae, were clearly observed under the SMA mesh device. The use of self-activated devices for the periosteal expansion technique may make it possible to avoid donor site morbidity, trans-skin activation rods, any bone-cutting procedure, and the following intermittent activation procedure. PMID:23359561

  10. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities. PMID:25208580

  11. On-Demand Coupling of Electrically Generated Excitons with Surface Plasmons via Voltage-Controlled Emission Zone Position

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to confine and manipulate light below the diffraction limit is a major goal of future multifunctional optoelectronic/plasmonic systems. Here, we demonstrate the design and realization of a tunable and localized electrical source of excitons coupled to surface plasmons based on a polymer light-emitting field-effect transistor (LEFET). Gold nanorods that are integrated into the channel support localized surface plasmons and serve as nanoantennas for enhanced electroluminescence. By precise spatial control of the near-infrared emission zone in the LEFET via the applied voltages the near-field coupling between electrically generated excitons and the nanorods can be turned on or off as visualized by a change of electroluminescence intensity. Numerical calculations and spectroscopic measurements corroborate significant local electroluminescence enhancement due to the high local density of photonic states in the vicinity of the gold nanorods. Importantly, the integration of plasmonic nanostructures hardly influences the electrical performance of the LEFETs, thus, highlighting their mutual compatibility in novel active plasmonic devices. PMID:26878028

  12. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Ning; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Pingping; Shen, Xuechu; Lu, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities.

  13. High-polarization-discriminating infrared detection using a single quantum well sandwiched in plasmonic micro-cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities. PMID:25208580

  14. Graphene-based plasmonic force switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, M.; Darbari, S.; Moravvej-Farshi, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    We take advantage of a Kretschmann configuration to design a plasmonic force switch. It consists of a prism/Au/SiO2 stack topped by a gated graphene sheet, as an electrically active optofluidic particle sorting system. We show that using a small gate voltage, one can switch the plasmon-wave induced force on a target particle, and hence its velocity. Simulations show that by electrical tuning of the graphene electrochemical potential in a narrow range of ˜65 meV—i.e., equivalent to an applied gate voltage of ˜4.3 V—the graphene surface plasmons can absorb the Au surface plasmons, switching off the plasmonic force exerted on the target particle with an ON/OFF ratio of more than 20. Numerical results also show that the maximum sensitivity of the particle's velocity to the graphene electrochemical potential is ˜1136 μm/eV-s. The proposed electrically active plasmonic force switch offers opportunities in developing tunable on-chip optical micromanipulations with multiple parallel functionalities and low power consumption.

  15. Plasmonic effects of au/ag bimetallic multispiked nanoparticles for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Vinogradova, Ekaterina; Ayon, Arturo A

    2014-09-10

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the use of plasmons, that is, free electron oscillations in conductors, to boost the performance of both organic and inorganic thin film solar cells. This has been driven by the possibility of employing thin active layers in solar cells in order to reduce materials costs, and is enabled by significant advances in fabrication technology. The ability of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures to guide and confine light in the nanometer scale has opened up new design possibilities for solar cell devices. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of highly monodisperse, reasonably stable, multipode Au/Ag bimetallic nanostructures using an inorganic additive as a ligand for photovoltaic applications. A promising surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect has been observed for the synthesized bimetallic Au/Ag multispiked nanoparticles, which compare favorably well with their Au and Ag spherical nanoparticle counterparts. The synthesized plasmonic nanostructures were incorporated on the rear surface of an ultrathin planar c-silicon/organic polymer hybrid solar cell, and the overall effect on photovoltaic performance was investigated. A promising enhancement in solar cell performance parameters, including both the open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current density (JSC), has been observed by employing the aforementioned bimetallic multispiked nanoparticles on the rear surface of solar cell devices. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) value as high as 7.70% has been measured in a hybrid device with Au/Ag multispiked nanoparticles on the rear surface of an ultrathin, crystalline silicon (c-Si) membrane (∼ 12 μm). This value compares well to the measured PCE value of 6.72% for a similar device without nanoparticles. The experimental observations support the hope for a sizable PCE increase, due to plasmon effects, in thin-film, c-Si solar cells in the near future. PMID:25137194

  16. Haptic device development based on electro static force of cellulose electro active paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gyu-young; Kim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Dong-Gu; Kim, Jaehwan

    2011-04-01

    Haptic is one of well-considered device which is suitable for demanding virtual reality applications such as medical equipment, mobile devices, the online marketing and so on. Nowadays, many of concepts for haptic devices have been suggested to meet the demand of industries. Cellulose has received much attention as an emerging smart material, named as electro-active paper (EAPap). The EAPap is attractive for mobile haptic devices due to its unique characteristics in terms of low actuation power, suitability for thin devices and transparency. In this paper, we suggest a new concept of haptic actuator with the use of cellulose EAPap. Its performance is evaluated depending on various actuation conditions. As a result, cellulose electrostatic force actuator shows a large output displacement and fast response, which is suitable for mobile haptic devices.

  17. Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    1994-02-01

    Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

  18. Measurements of the PLT and PDX device activation

    SciTech Connect

    Stavely, J.; Barnes, C.W.; Chrien, R.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1981-09-01

    Measurements of the activation levels around the PLT and PDX tokamaks have been made using a Ge(Li) gamma spectrometer and a Geiger counter. The activation results from radiation induced in the plasma by 14 MeV neutrons from the d(t,n)..cap alpha.. fusion reaction, 14.7 MeV protons from the d(/sup 3/He,p)..cap alpha.. fusion reaction, 10 ..-->.. 20 MeV hard x-rays from runaway electron induced bremmstrahlung, and 2.5 MeV neutrons from the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction. The magnitude of the activation is compared to that predicted for PDX on the basis of one-dimensional activation codes.

  19. Localized Surface Plasmons in Nanostructured Monolayer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zizhuo; Aydin, Koray

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic materials provide electric-field localization and light confinement at subwavelength scales due to strong light-matter interaction around resonance frequencies. Graphene has been recently studied as an atomically thin plasmonic material for infrared and terahertz wavelengths. Here, we theoretically investigate localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) in a monolayer, nanostructured black phosphorus (BP). Using finite-difference time-domain simulations, we demonstrate LSPRs at mid-infrared and far-infrared wavelength regime in BP nanoribbon and nanopatch arrays. Because of strong anisotropic in-plane properties of black phosphorus emerging from its puckered crystal structure, black phosphorus nanostructures provide polarization dependent, anisotropic plasmonic response. Electromagnetic simulations reveal that monolayer black phosphorus nanostructures can strongly confine infrared radiation in an atomically thin material. Black phosphorus can find use as a highly anisotropic plasmonic devices. PMID:27152653

  20. Distillation of photon entanglement using a plasmonic metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Motoki; Bechu, Muriel; Tame, Mark; Kaya Özdemir, Şahin; Ikuta, Rikizo; Güney, Durdu Ö.; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yang, Lan; Wegener, Martin; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly emerging platform for quantum state engineering with the potential for building ultra-compact and hybrid optoelectronic devices. Recent experiments have shown that despite the presence of decoherence and loss, photon statistics and entanglement can be preserved in single plasmonic systems. This preserving ability should carry over to plasmonic metamaterials, whose properties are the result of many individual plasmonic systems acting collectively, and can be used to engineer optical states of light. Here, we report an experimental demonstration of quantum state filtering, also known as entanglement distillation, using a metamaterial. We show that the metamaterial can be used to distill highly entangled states from less entangled states. As the metamaterial can be integrated with other optical components this work opens up the intriguing possibility of incorporating plasmonic metamaterials in on-chip quantum state engineering tasks. PMID:26670790

  1. Distillation of photon entanglement using a plasmonic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Asano, Motoki; Bechu, Muriel; Tame, Mark; Kaya Özdemir, Şahin; Ikuta, Rikizo; Güney, Durdu Ö; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yang, Lan; Wegener, Martin; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly emerging platform for quantum state engineering with the potential for building ultra-compact and hybrid optoelectronic devices. Recent experiments have shown that despite the presence of decoherence and loss, photon statistics and entanglement can be preserved in single plasmonic systems. This preserving ability should carry over to plasmonic metamaterials, whose properties are the result of many individual plasmonic systems acting collectively, and can be used to engineer optical states of light. Here, we report an experimental demonstration of quantum state filtering, also known as entanglement distillation, using a metamaterial. We show that the metamaterial can be used to distill highly entangled states from less entangled states. As the metamaterial can be integrated with other optical components this work opens up the intriguing possibility of incorporating plasmonic metamaterials in on-chip quantum state engineering tasks. PMID:26670790

  2. Real-time tunable lasing from plasmonic nanocavity arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ankun; Hoang, Thang B.; Dridi, Montacer; Deeb, Claire; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Schatz, George C.; Odom, Teri W.

    2015-04-01

    Plasmon lasers can support ultrasmall mode confinement and ultrafast dynamics with device feature sizes below the diffraction limit. However, most plasmon-based nanolasers rely on solid gain materials (inorganic semiconducting nanowire or organic dye in a solid matrix) that preclude the possibility of dynamic tuning. Here we report an approach to achieve real-time, tunable lattice plasmon lasing based on arrays of gold nanoparticles and liquid gain materials. Optically pumped arrays of gold nanoparticles surrounded by liquid dye molecules exhibit lasing emission that can be tuned as a function of the dielectric environment. Wavelength-dependent time-resolved experiments show distinct lifetime characteristics below and above the lasing threshold. By integrating gold nanoparticle arrays within microfluidic channels and flowing in liquid gain materials with different refractive indices, we achieve dynamic tuning of the plasmon lasing wavelength. Tunable lattice plasmon lasers offer prospects to enhance and detect weak physical and chemical processes on the nanoscale in real time.

  3. Plasmonics in the UV range with Rhodium nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Gutiérrez, Y.; Li, P.; Barreda, Á. I.; Watson, A. M.; Alcaraz de la Osa, R.; Finkelstein, G.; González, F.; Ortiz, D.; Saiz, J. M.; Sanz, J. M.; Everitt, H. O.; Liu, J.; Moreno, F.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonics in the UV-range constitutes a new challenge due to the increasing demand to detect, identify and destroy biological toxins, enhance biological imaging, and characterize semiconductor devices at the nanometer scale. Silver and aluminum have an efficient plasmonic performance in the near UV region, but oxidation reduces its performance in this range. Recent studies point out rhodium as one of the most promising metals for this purpose: it has a good plasmonic response in the UV and, as gold in the visible, it presents a low tendency to oxidation. Moreover, its easy fabrication through chemical means and its potential for photocatalytic applications, makes this material very attractive for building plasmonic tools in the UV. In this work, we will show an overview of our recent collaborative research with rhodium nanocubes (NC) for Plasmonics in the UV.

  4. Real-time tunable lasing from plasmonic nanocavity arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ankun; Hoang, Thang B.; Dridi, Montacer; Deeb, Claire; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Schatz, George C.; Odom, Teri W.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon lasers can support ultrasmall mode confinement and ultrafast dynamics with device feature sizes below the diffraction limit. However, most plasmon-based nanolasers rely on solid gain materials (inorganic semiconducting nanowire or organic dye in a solid matrix) that preclude the possibility of dynamic tuning. Here we report an approach to achieve real-time, tunable lattice plasmon lasing based on arrays of gold nanoparticles and liquid gain materials. Optically pumped arrays of gold nanoparticles surrounded by liquid dye molecules exhibit lasing emission that can be tuned as a function of the dielectric environment. Wavelength-dependent time-resolved experiments show distinct lifetime characteristics below and above the lasing threshold. By integrating gold nanoparticle arrays within microfluidic channels and flowing in liquid gain materials with different refractive indices, we achieve dynamic tuning of the plasmon lasing wavelength. Tunable lattice plasmon lasers offer prospects to enhance and detect weak physical and chemical processes on the nanoscale in real time. PMID:25891212

  5. Dynamical class of a two-dimensional plasmonic Dirac system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Érica de Mello

    2015-10-01

    A current goal in plasmonic science and technology is to figure out how to manage the relaxational dynamics of surface plasmons in graphene since its damping constitutes a hinder for the realization of graphene-based plasmonic devices. In this sense we believe it might be of interest to enlarge the knowledge on the dynamical class of two-dimensional plasmonic Dirac systems. According to the recurrence relations method, different systems are said to be dynamically equivalent if they have identical relaxation functions at all times, and such commonality may lead to deep connections between seemingly unrelated physical systems. We employ the recurrence relations approach to obtain relaxation and memory functions of density fluctuations and show that a two-dimensional plasmonic Dirac system at long wavelength and zero temperature belongs to the same dynamical class of standard two-dimensional electron gas and classical harmonic oscillator chain with an impurity mass.

  6. High Efficiency Alternating Current Driven Organic Light Emitting Devices Employing Active Semiconducting Gate Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we describe the role of semiconductor-polymer interfaces in alternating current (AC) driven organic electroluminescent (EL) devices. We implement inorganic semiconducting materials between the external contact and the active layers in organic light EL devices. Precise control of capacitance and charge injection is required to realize bright and efficient large area AC driven devices. We show how this architecture results in active gating to the polymer layers, resulting in the novel ability to control the capacitance and charge injection characteristics. We propose a model based on band bending at the semiconductor-polymer interface. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of the semiconductor-polymer interface on the internally coupled magnetic field generated in an alternating current driven organic light emitting device configuration. Magnetic fields can alter the ratios of singlet and triplet populations, and we show that internal generation of a magnetic field can dramatically alter the efficiency of light emission in organic EL devices.

  7. Forecasting of electronic devices lifetime on the basis of activation models of functional parameters drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, I. N.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a model of functional parameters drift for electronic devices, allowing predicting their lifetime. The method of model parameters estimation is developed. The developed model allows optimizing the accelerated tests modes, taking into account the complex impact of stress factors. The results are applicable for modern electronic devices with a failure rate less than 1 FIT. The results are applicable if the physical and chemical processes leading to electronic devices degradation have an activation mechanism; the activation process is due to the temperature.

  8. Molecular interfaces for plasmonic hot electron photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Pelayo García de Arquer, F; Mihi, Agustín; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2015-02-14

    The use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to improve and tailor the photovoltaic performance of plasmonic hot-electron Schottky solar cells is presented. SAMs allow the simultaneous control of open-circuit voltage, hot-electron injection and short-circuit current. To that end, a plurality of molecule structural parameters can be adjusted: SAM molecule's length can be adjusted to control plasmonic hot electron injection. Modifying SAMs dipole moment allows for a precise tuning of the open-circuit voltage. The functionalization of the SAM can also be selected to modify short-circuit current. This allows the simultaneous achievement of high open-circuit voltages (0.56 V) and fill-factors (0.58), IPCE above 5% at the plasmon resonance and maximum power-conversion efficiencies of 0.11%, record for this class of devices. PMID:25578026

  9. Plasmon-induced doping of graphene.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Wang, Yumin; Liu, Zheng; Schlather, Andrea; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Koppens, Frank H L; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-11-27

    A metallic nanoantenna, under resonant illumination, injects nonequilibrium hot electrons into a nearby graphene structure, effectively doping the material. A prominent change in carrier density was observed for a plasmonic antenna-patterned graphene sheet following laser excitation, shifting the Dirac point, as determined from the gate-controlled transport characteristic. The effect is due to hot electron generation resulting from the decay of the nanoantenna plasmon following resonant excitation. The effect is highly tunable, depending on the resonant frequency of the plasmonic antenna, as well as on the incident laser power. Hot electron-doped graphene represents a new type of hybrid material that shows great promise for optoelectronic device applications. PMID:22998468

  10. Miniature fiber optic surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Radan; Brynda, Eduard; Homola, Jiri; Ctyroky, Jiri

    1999-01-01

    A novel design of surface plasmon resonance fiber optic sensor is reported which leads to a compact, highly miniaturized sensing element with excellent sensitivity. The sensing device is based on a side-polished single-mode optical fiber with a thin metal overlayer supporting surface plasmon waves. The strength of interaction between a fiber mode and a surface plasmon wave depends strongly on the refractive index near the sensing surface. Therefore, refractive index changes associated with biospecific interaction between antibodies immobilized on the sensor and antigen molecules can be monitored by measuring light intensity variations. Detection of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) of the concentration of 100 ng/ml has been accomplished using the fiber optic sensor with a matrix of monoclonal antibodies against HRP immobilized on the sensor surface.

  11. Vivid, full-color aluminum plasmonic pixels

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Lifei; Chang, Wei-Shun; Foerster, Benjamin; King, Nicholas S.; Knight, Mark W.; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.; Link, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum is abundant, low in cost, compatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor manufacturing methods, and capable of supporting tunable plasmon resonance structures that span the entire visible spectrum. However, the use of Al for color displays has been limited by its intrinsically broad spectral features. Here we show that vivid, highly polarized, and broadly tunable color pixels can be produced from periodic patterns of oriented Al nanorods. Whereas the nanorod longitudinal plasmon resonance is largely responsible for pixel color, far-field diffractive coupling is used to narrow the plasmon linewidth, enabling monochromatic coloration and significantly enhancing the far-field scattering intensity of the individual nanorod elements. The bright coloration can be observed with p-polarized white light excitation, consistent with the use of this approach in display devices. The resulting color pixels are constructed with a simple design, are compatible with scalable fabrication methods, and provide contrast ratios exceeding 100:1. PMID:25225385

  12. Electro-optical graphene plasmonic logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kelvin J A; Chu, Hong Son; Bai, Ping; Ang, Lay Kee

    2014-03-15

    The versatile control of graphene's plasmonic modes via an external gate-voltage inspires us to design efficient electro-optical graphene plasmonic logic gates at the midinfrared wavelengths. We show that these devices are superior to the conventional optical logic gates because the former possess cut-off states and interferometric effects. Moreover, the designed six basic logic gates (i.e., NOR/AND, NAND/OR, XNOR/XOR) achieved not only ultracompact size lengths of less than λ/28 with respect to the operating wavelength of 10 μm, but also a minimum extinction ratio as high as 15 dB. These graphene plasmonic logic gates are potential building blocks for future nanoscale midinfrared photonic integrated circuits. PMID:24690855

  13. Harnessing surface plasmons for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    NASA research on the feasibility of solar-energy conversion using surface plasmons is reviewed, with a focus on inelastic-tunnel-diode techniques for power extraction. The need for more efficient solar converters for planned space missions is indicated, and it is shown that a device with 50-percent efficiency could cost up to 40 times as much per sq cm as current Si cells and still be competitive. The parallel-processing approach using broadband carriers and tunable diodes is explained, and the physics of surface plasmons on metal surfaces is outlined. Technical problems being addressed include phase-matching sunlight to surface plasmons, minimizing ohmic losses and reradiation in energy transport, coupling into the tunnels by mode conversion, and gaining an understanding of the tunnel-diode energy-conversion process. Diagrams illustrating the design concepts are provided.

  14. Photoelectric energy conversion of plasmon-generated hot carriers in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures.

    PubMed

    García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Mihi, Agustín; Kufer, Dominik; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2013-04-23

    Plasmonic excitation in metals has received great attention for light localization and control of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale with a plethora of applications in absorption enhancement, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, or biosensing. Electrically active plasmonic devices, which had remained underexplored, have recently become a growing field of interest. In this report we introduce a metal-insulator-semiconductor heterostructure for plasmo-electric energy conversion, a novel architecture to harvest hot-electrons derived from plasmonic excitations. We demonstrate external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 4% at 460 nm using a Ag nanostructured electrode and EQE of 1.3% at 550 nm employing a Au nanostructured electrode. The insulator interfacial layer has been found to play a crucial role in interface passivation, a requisite in photovoltaic applications to achieving both high open-circuit voltages (0.5 V) and fill-factors (0.5), but its introduction simultaneously modifies hot-electron injection and transport. We investigate the influence passivation has on these processes for different material configurations, and characterize different types of transport depending on the initial plasmon energy band, reporting power conversion efficiencies of 0.03% for nanopatterned silver electrodes. PMID:23495769

  15. Plasmonic nanostructures to enhance catalytic performance of zeolites under visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingguang; Ke, Xuebin; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption efficiency of heterogeneous catalysts has restricted their photocatalytic capability for commercially important organic synthesis. Here, we report a way of harvesting visible light efficiently to boost zeolite catalysis by means of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) supported on zeolites. Zeolites possess strong Brønsted acids and polarized electric fields created by extra-framework cations. The polarized electric fields can be further intensified by the electric near-field enhancement of Au-NPs, which results from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) upon visible light irradiation. The acetalization reaction was selected as a showcase performed on MZSM-5 and Au/MZSM-5 (M = H(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), or La(3+)). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the intensified polarized electric fields played a critical role in stretching the C = O bond of the reactants of benzaldehyde to enlarge their molecular polarities, thus allowing reactants to be activated more efficiently by catalytic centers so as to boost the reaction rates. This discovery should evoke intensive research interest on plasmonic metals and diverse zeolites with an aim to take advantage of sunlight for plasmonic devices, molecular electronics, energy storage, and catalysis. PMID:24448225

  16. Plasmonic nanostructures to enhance catalytic performance of zeolites under visible light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingguang; Ke, Xuebin; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption efficiency of heterogeneous catalysts has restricted their photocatalytic capability for commercially important organic synthesis. Here, we report a way of harvesting visible light efficiently to boost zeolite catalysis by means of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) supported on zeolites. Zeolites possess strong Brønsted acids and polarized electric fields created by extra-framework cations. The polarized electric fields can be further intensified by the electric near-field enhancement of Au-NPs, which results from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) upon visible light irradiation. The acetalization reaction was selected as a showcase performed on MZSM-5 and Au/MZSM-5 (M = H+, Na+, Ca2+, or La3+). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the intensified polarized electric fields played a critical role in stretching the C = O bond of the reactants of benzaldehyde to enlarge their molecular polarities, thus allowing reactants to be activated more efficiently by catalytic centers so as to boost the reaction rates. This discovery should evoke intensive research interest on plasmonic metals and diverse zeolites with an aim to take advantage of sunlight for plasmonic devices, molecular electronics, energy storage, and catalysis. PMID:24448225

  17. Plasmonic nanostructures to enhance catalytic performance of zeolites under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingguang; Ke, Xuebin; Du, Aijun; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-01-01

    Light absorption efficiency of heterogeneous catalysts has restricted their photocatalytic capability for commercially important organic synthesis. Here, we report a way of harvesting visible light efficiently to boost zeolite catalysis by means of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) supported on zeolites. Zeolites possess strong Brønsted acids and polarized electric fields created by extra-framework cations. The polarized electric fields can be further intensified by the electric near-field enhancement of Au-NPs, which results from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) upon visible light irradiation. The acetalization reaction was selected as a showcase performed on MZSM-5 and Au/MZSM-5 (M = H+, Na+, Ca2+, or La3+). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that the intensified polarized electric fields played a critical role in stretching the C = O bond of the reactants of benzaldehyde to enlarge their molecular polarities, thus allowing reactants to be activated more efficiently by catalytic centers so as to boost the reaction rates. This discovery should evoke intensive research interest on plasmonic metals and diverse zeolites with an aim to take advantage of sunlight for plasmonic devices, molecular electronics, energy storage, and catalysis.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity in Cu nanoparticles covered Cu2O microspheres for degrading organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yahui; Lin, Yuanjing; Xu, Jianping; He, Jie; Wang, Tianzhao; Yu, Guojun; Shao, Dawei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Lu, Feng; Li, Lan; Du, Xiwen; Wang, Weichao; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Rongkun

    2016-03-01

    Micron-sized Cu2O with different coverage of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) on the sphere has been synthesized by a redox procedure. The absorption spectra show that Cu NPs induce the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the wavelength of ∼565 nm. Methylene blue (MB) photodegrading experiments under visible-light display that the Cu2O-Cu-H2O2 system exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity to Cu2O-H2O2 or pure H2O2 with an evident dependency on Cu coverage. The maximum photodegradation rate is 88% after visible-light irradiating for 60 min. The role of the Cu NPs is clarified through photodegradation experiments under 420 nm light irradiation, which is different from the SPR wavelength of Cu NPs (∼565 nm). By excluding the SPR effect, it proves that Cu SPR plays a key role in the photodegradation. Besides, a dark catalytic activity is observed stemming from the Fenton-like reaction with the aid of H2O2. The radical quenching experiments indicate that both •O2- and •OH radicals contribute to the photocatalysis, while the dark catalysis is only governed by the •OH radicals, leading to a lower activity comparing with the photocatalysis. Therefore, with introducing Cu NPs and H2O2, the Cu2O-based photocatalytic activity could be significantly improved due to the SPR effect and dark catalysis.

  19. Single-mode lasers and parity-time symmetry broken gratings based on active dielectric-loaded long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Choloong; Song, Seok Ho; Oh, Cha Hwan; Berini, Pierre

    2015-07-27

    Single-mode distributed feedback laser structures and parity-time symmetry broken grating structures based on dielectric-loaded long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides are proposed. The structures comprise a thin Ag stripe on an active polymer bottom cladding with an active polymer ridge. The active polymer assumed is PMMA doped with IR140 dye providing optical gain at near infrared wavelengths. Cutoff top ridge dimensions (thickness and width) are calculated using a finite element method and selected to guarantee single-mode operation of the laser. Several parameters such as the threshold number of periods and the lasing wavelength are determined using the transfer matrix method. A related structure based on two pairs of waveguides of two widths, which have the same imaginary part but different real part of effective index, arranged within one grating period, is proposed as an active grating operating at the threshold for parity-time symmetry breaking (i.e., operating at an exceptional point). Such "exceptional point" gratings produce ideal reflectance asymmetry as demonstrated via transfer matrix computations. PMID:26367652

  20. Light manipulation with encoded plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenglong; Zhang, Jiasen; Liu, Yongmin

    2014-12-01

    Plasmonics, which allows for manipulation of light field beyond the fundamental diffraction limit, has recently attracted tremendous research efforts. The propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) confined on a metal-dielectric interface provide an ideal two-dimensional (2D) platform to develop subwavelength optical circuits for on-chip information processing and communication. The surface plasmon resonance of rationally designed metallic nanostructures, on the other hand, enables pronounced phase and polarization modulation for light beams travelling in three-dimensional (3D) free space. Flexible 2D and free-space propagating light manipulation can be achieved by encoding plasmonic nanostructures on a 2D surface, promising the design, fabrication and integration of the next-generation optical architectures with substantially reduced footprint. It is envisioned that the encoded plasmonic nanostructures can significantly expand available toolboxes for novel light manipulation. In this review, we presents the fundamentals, recent developments and future perspectives in this emerging field, aiming to open up new avenues to developing revolutionary photonic devices.

  1. A hybrid plasmonic waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo; Shah, Yash D.; Wallis, Robert; Klimont, Adam; Ren, Yuan; Jessop, David S.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.

    2015-02-01

    We present the realization of a quantum cascade laser emitting at around 2.85 THz, based on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a low refractive index dielectric cladding. This hybrid waveguide design allows the performance of a double-metal waveguide to be retained, while improving the emission far-field. A set of lasers based on the same active region material were fabricated with different metal layer thicknesses. A detailed characterization of the performance of these lasers revealed that there is an optimal trade-off that yields the best far-field emission and the maximum temperature of operation. By exploiting the pure plasmonic mode of these waveguides, the standard operation conditions of a double-metal quantum cascade laser were retrieved, such that the maximum operating temperature of these devices is not affected by the process. These results pave the way to realizing a class of integrated devices working in the terahertz range which could be further exploited to fabricate terahertz on-chip circuitry.

  2. A hybrid plasmonic waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo Shah, Yash D.; Wallis, Robert; Klimont, Adam; Ren, Yuan; Jessop, David S.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.

    2015-02-23

    We present the realization of a quantum cascade laser emitting at around 2.85 THz, based on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a low refractive index dielectric cladding. This hybrid waveguide design allows the performance of a double-metal waveguide to be retained, while improving the emission far-field. A set of lasers based on the same active region material were fabricated with different metal layer thicknesses. A detailed characterization of the performance of these lasers revealed that there is an optimal trade-off that yields the best far-field emission and the maximum temperature of operation. By exploiting the pure plasmonic mode of these waveguides, the standard operation conditions of a double-metal quantum cascade laser were retrieved, such that the maximum operating temperature of these devices is not affected by the process. These results pave the way to realizing a class of integrated devices working in the terahertz range which could be further exploited to fabricate terahertz on-chip circuitry.

  3. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (<1000 Hz) noise transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (<200 Hz). The device was applied to control noise transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  4. Plasmonic external cavity laser refractometric sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    Combining the high sensitivity properties of surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensing with a tunable external cavity laser, we demonstrate a plasmonic external cavity laser (ECL) for high resolution refractometric sensing. The plasmonic ECL utilizes a plasmonic crystal with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) as the wavelength-selective element, and achieves single mode lasing at the transmission peak of the EOT resonance. The plasmonic ECL refractometric sensor maintains the high sensitivity of a plasmonic crystal sensor, while simultaneously providing a narrow spectral linewidth through lasing emission, resulting in a record high figure of merit for refractometric sensing with an active or passive optical resonator. We demonstrate single-mode and continuous-wave operation of the electrically-pumped laser system, and show the ability to measure refractive index changes with a 3σ detection limit of 1.79 × 10−6 RIU. The demonstrated approach is a promising path towards label-free optical biosensing with enhanced signal-to-noise ratios for challenging applications in small molecule drug discovery and pathogen sensing. PMID:25321243

  5. Development of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gayatribahen K.

    Nanostructures (NSs) based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors have brought a transformation in development of sensing devices due to their ability to detect extremely small changes in surrounding refractive index (R.I.). NS-based LSPR sensing approaches have been employed to enhance the sensitivity for a variety of applications, such as diagnosis of disease, food and environmental analysis, and chemical and biological threat detection. Generally in LSPR spectroscopy, absorption and scattering of light is greatly enhanced at a frequency that excites the NS's LSPR and results in well-defined LSPR extinction peak (lambdaLSPR). This lambdaLSPR is highly dependent on the size, shape, and surrounding R.I. of NSs. Compositional and confirmational change within the surrounding R.I. near the NS could be detected by monitoring the shifts in lambdaLSPR. This thesis specifically focuses on the rational development of the plasmonic nanosensors for various sensing applications by utilizing the LSPR properties of Au NS with prismatic shape. First the chemical synthetic approach that can produce Au nanoprisms, which displayed lambdaLSPR in 650-850 nm range corresponding to 20-50 nm edge lengths has been developed. The chemically synthesized Au nanoprisms were attached to silanized glass substrate and employed as a solid-state sensing platform for the development of label-free plasmonic nanosensors. The size, shape, and surface of nanoprisms were characterized through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Further, the influence of the structure, size and surface ligand chemistry onto the lambda LSPR of nanoprisms were investigated in detail. Both bulk and local R.I. sensitivity, and the electromagnetic-field (EM-field) decay length were derived for various edge lengths of nanoprisms through measuring the lambda LSPR shifts by UV-visible spectroscopy. Finally, nanoprisms

  6. Hybrid plasmonic nanoantennas: Fabrication, characterization and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shengjie

    As optical counterpart of microwave antennas, plasmonic nanoantennas are important nanoscale devices for converting propagating optical radiation into confined/enhanced electromagnetic fields. Presently, nanoantennas, with a typical size of 200--500 nm, have found their applications in bio-sensing, bio-imaging, energy harvesting, and disease cure and prevention. With the device feature size of next generation IC goes down to 22 nm or smaller, and biological/chemical sensing reaches the Gene's level, the sizes of the corresponding nanoantennas have to be scaled down to sub-100nm level. In the literature, these sub-100nm nanoantennas are referred as deep subwavelength nanoantennas as size of such miniaturized nanoantennas is only a fraction of the wavelength of applied visible light range (390nm--750nm). One big problem of such small deep subwavelength nanoantennas lies in the fact that due to high propagation loss at this scale, signal attenuates so quickly that the propagation distance is only a few hundred nanometers. One feasible solution to overcome this propagation loss problem is through signal enhancement that explores hybrid plasmonic effect: plasmon polarization (SPP) coupled with localized surface plasmon (LSPR). In this dissertation, we designed a novel deep subwavelength nanoantenna structure which can effectively couple the SPP, which is excited by a thin metal film (around 50nm in thickness) under certain light wavelength, with LSPR located between any coupled nanoparticles. Current top-down fabrication methods using E-beam lithography and FIB cannot be used to manufacture the proposed deep subwavelength nanoantennas. In response to this fabrication problem, we invented a hybrid plasmonic nano-printing method that combines lithography and a direct metal nanoparticle patterning technique. This metal nanoparticle patterning technique allows the metallic nanoparticles to be dropped into the nanoantenna's grooves at the same time when this nanoantenna is

  7. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic `hot' carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions.We identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  8. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit devices for active array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    Two different aspects of active antenna array design were investigated. The transition between monolithic microwave integrated circuits and rectangular waveguides was studied along with crosstalk in multiconductor transmission lines. The boundary value problem associated with a discontinuity in a microstrip line is formulated. This entailed, as a first step, the derivation of the propagating as well as evanescent modes of a microstrip line. The solution is derived to a simple discontinuity problem: change in width of the center strip. As for the multiconductor transmission line problem. A computer algorithm was developed for computing the crosstalk noise from the signal to the sense lines. The computation is based on the assumption that these lines are terminated in passive loads.

  9. Terahertz Optoelectronics with Surface Plasmon Polariton Diode

    PubMed Central

    Vinnakota, Raj K.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics. PMID:24811083

  10. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-01-01

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics. PMID:24811083

  11. Effects of a Physical Education Supportive Curriculum and Technological Devices on Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily Dean; Sullivan, Eileen C.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education supportive curriculum and technological devices, heart rate monitor (HRM) and pedometer (PED), on physical activity. A single-subject ABAB research design was used to examine amount and level of participation in physical activity among 106 suburban fourth and fifth…

  12. An Ungrounded Hand-Held Surgical Device Incorporating Active Constraints with Force-Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christopher J.; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an ungrounded, hand-held surgical device that incorporates active constraints and force-feedback. Optical tracking of the device and embedded actuation allow for real-time motion compensation of a surgical tool as an active constraint is encountered. The active constraints can be made soft, so that the surgical tool tip motion is scaled, or rigid, so as to altogether prevent the penetration of the active constraint. Force-feedback is also provided to the operator so as to indicate penetration of the active constraint boundary by the surgical tool. The device has been evaluated in detailed bench tests to quantify its motion scaling and force-feedback capabilities. The combined effects of force-feedback and motion compensation are demonstrated during palpation of an active constraint with rigid and soft boundaries. A user study evaluated the combined effect of motion compensation and force-feedback in preventing penetration of a rigid active constraint. The results have shown the potential of the device operating in an ungrounded setup that incorporates active constraints with force-feedback. PMID:24744963

  13. Following a protein kinase activity using a field-effect transistor device.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ronit; Gill, Ron; Willner, Itamar

    2007-09-01

    The specific phosphorylation of a peptide-functionalized ion-sensitive field-effect transistor device by casein kinase II in the presence of ATP enables the electronic readout of the protein kinase activity; treatment of the phosphorylated surface with alkaline phosphatase results in the regeneration of the active sensing surface. PMID:17700878

  14. Controlling graphene plasmons with resonant metal antennas and spatial conductivity patterns.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, P; Nikitin, A Y; Golmar, F; Centeno, A; Pesquera, A; Vélez, S; Chen, J; Navickaite, G; Koppens, F; Zurutuza, A; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E; Hillenbrand, R

    2014-06-20

    Graphene plasmons promise unique possibilities for controlling light in nanoscale devices and for merging optics with electronics. We developed a versatile platform technology based on resonant optical antennas and conductivity patterns for launching and control of propagating graphene plasmons, an essential step for the development of graphene plasmonic circuits. We launched and focused infrared graphene plasmons with geometrically tailored antennas and observed how they refracted when passing through a two-dimensional conductivity pattern, here a prism-shaped bilayer. To that end, we directly mapped the graphene plasmon wavefronts by means of an imaging method that will be useful in testing future design concepts for nanoscale graphene plasmonic circuits and devices. PMID:24855026

  15. Site-directed immobilization of antibody using EDC-NHS-activated protein A on a bimetallic-based surface plasmon resonance chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Lee, Yeon Kyung

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of a waveguide-coupled bimetallic surface plasmon resonance (WcBiM SPR) sensor using (3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide(EDC)-N-hydroxysuccinimide(NHS)-activated protein A was investigated, and the detection of IgG using the EDC-NHS-activated protein A was studied in comparison with protein A and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The WcBiM sensor, which has a narrower full width at half maximum (FWHM) and a steeper slope, was selected since it leads to a larger change in the reflectance in the intensity detection mode. A preparation of the EDC-NHS-activated protein A for site-directed immobilization of antibodies was relative easily compared to the engineered protein G and A. In antigen-antibody interactions, the response to IgG at the concentrations of 50, 100, and 150 ng/ml was investigated. The results showed that the sensitivity of the WcBiM sensor using the EDC-NHS-activated protein A, protein A, and SAM was 0.0185 [%/(ng/ml)], 0.0065 [%/(ng/ml)], and 0.0101 [%/(ng/ml)], respectively. The lowest detectable concentrations of IgG with the EDC-NHS-activated protein A, protein A, and SAM were 4.27, 12.83, and 8.24 ng/ml, respectively. Therefore, the increased sensitivity and lower detection capability of the WcBiM SPR chip with the EDC-NHS-activated protein A suggests that it could be used in early diagnosis where the trace level concentrations of biomolecules should be detected.

  16. Ultrafast optical switching of infrared plasmon polaritons in high-mobility graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, G. X.; Wang, L.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wagner, M.; Fei, Z.; McLeod, A. S.; Liu, M. K.; Keilmann, F.; Özyilmaz, B.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Hone, J.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2016-04-01

    The success of metal-based plasmonics for manipulating light at the nanoscale has been empowered by imaginative designs and advanced nano-fabrication. However, the fundamental optical and electronic properties of elemental metals, the prevailing plasmonic media, are difficult to alter using external stimuli. This limitation is particularly restrictive in applications that require modification of the plasmonic response at sub-picosecond timescales. This handicap has prompted the search for alternative plasmonic media, with graphene emerging as one of the most capable candidates for infrared wavelengths. Here we visualize and elucidate the properties of non-equilibrium photo-induced plasmons in a high-mobility graphene monolayer. We activate plasmons with femtosecond optical pulses in a specimen of graphene that otherwise lacks infrared plasmonic response at equilibrium. In combination with static nano-imaging results on plasmon propagation, our infrared pump–probe nano-spectroscopy investigation reveals new aspects of carrier relaxation in heterostructures based on high-purity graphene.

  17. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing: Current Challenges and Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Unser, Sarah; Bruzas, Ian; He, Jie; Sagle, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has emerged as a leader among label-free biosensing techniques in that it offers sensitive, robust, and facile detection. Traditional LSPR-based biosensing utilizes the sensitivity of the plasmon frequency to changes in local index of refraction at the nanoparticle surface. Although surface plasmon resonance technologies are now widely used to measure biomolecular interactions, several challenges remain. In this article, we have categorized these challenges into four categories: improving sensitivity and limit of detection, selectivity in complex biological solutions, sensitive detection of membrane-associated species, and the adaptation of sensing elements for point-of-care diagnostic devices. The first section of this article will involve a conceptual discussion of surface plasmon resonance and the factors affecting changes in optical signal detected. The following sections will discuss applications of LSPR biosensing with an emphasis on recent advances and approaches to overcome the four limitations mentioned above. First, improvements in limit of detection through various amplification strategies will be highlighted. The second section will involve advances to improve selectivity in complex media through self-assembled monolayers, “plasmon ruler” devices involving plasmonic coupling, and shape complementarity on the nanoparticle surface. The following section will describe various LSPR platforms designed for the sensitive detection of membrane-associated species. Finally, recent advances towards multiplexed and microfluidic LSPR-based devices for inexpensive, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics will be discussed. PMID:26147727

  18. Novel 3D plasmonic nano-electrodes for cellular investigations and neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malerba, Mario; Dipalo, Michele; Messina, Gabriele C.; Amin, Hayder; La Rocca, Rosanna; Shalabaeva, Victoria; Simi, Alessandro; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; De Angelis, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    We propose the development of an innovative plasmonic-electronic multifunctional platform, capable at the same time of performing chemical analysis and electronic recordings from a cellular interface. The system, based on 3D hollow metallic nanotubes, integrated on customized multi-electrode-arrays, allows the study of neuronal signaling over different lengths, spanning from the molecular, to the cellular, to the network scale. Here we show that the same structures are efficient electric field enhancers, despite the continuous metal layer at the base, which connects them to the electric components of the integrated circuits. The methodology we propose, due to its simplicity and high throughput, has the potential for further improvements both in the field of plasmonics, and in the integration on large areas of commercial active electronic devices.

  19. Quantum-coherence-enhanced surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Jha, Pankaj K; Voronine, Dmitri V; Genevet, Patrice; Capasso, Federico; Scully, Marlan O

    2013-07-26

    We investigate surface plasmon amplification in a silver nanoparticle coupled to an externally driven three-level gain medium and show that quantum coherence significantly enhances the generation of surface plasmons. Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation is achieved in the absence of population inversion on the spasing transition, which reduces the pump requirements. The coherent drive allows us to control the dynamics and holds promise for quantum control of nanoplasmonic devices. PMID:23931365

  20. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  1. Strong modulation of plasmons in Graphene with the use of an Inverted pyramid array diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaiakakis, N.; Mizuta, H.; Charlton, M. D. B.

    2016-06-01

    An optical device configuration allowing efficient electrical tuning of surface plasmon wavelength and absorption in a suspended/conformal graphene film is reported. An underlying 2-dimensional array of inverted rectangular pyramids greatly enhances optical coupling to the graphene film. In contrast to devices utilising 1D grating or Kretchman prism coupling configurations, both s and p polarization can excite plasmons due to symmetry of the grating structure. Additionally, the excited high frequency plasmon mode has a wavelength independent of incident photon angle allowing multidirectional coupling. By combining analytical methods with Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis, absorption of plasmons is mapped over near infrared spectral range as a function of chemical potential. Strong control over both plasmon wavelength and strength is provided by an ionic gel gate configuration. 0.04eV change in chemical potential increases plasmon energy by 0.05 eV shifting plasmon wavelength towards the visible, and providing enhancement in plasmon absorption. Most importantly, plasmon excitation can be dynamically switched off by lowering the chemical potential and moving from the intra-band to the inter-band transition region. Ability to electrically tune plasmon properties can be utilized in applications such as on-chip light modulation, photonic logic gates, optical interconnect and sensing applications.

  2. Surface plasmon decay dynamics in nanostructured systems: A Feynman diagram approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Jermyn, Adam S.; Goddard, William A., III; Atwater, Harry A.

    2015-03-01

    The decay of surface plasmon resonances is usually a detriment in the field of plasmonics, but the possibility to capture the energy normally lost to heat would open new opportunities in photon sensors and energy conversion devices. In the context of hot-electron devices, the large extinction cross-section at a surface plasmon resonance enables nanostructures to absorb a significant fraction of the solar spectrum in very thin films. Despite the significant experimental work in this direction, a complete theoretical understanding of plasmon-driven hot carrier generation with electronic structure details has been evasive. Recently we analyzed the quantum decay of surface plasmon polaritons and found that the prompt distribution of generated carriers is extremely sensitive to the energy band structure of the plasmonic material. In this context, we use a Feynman diagram approach to describe processes involving plasmons, electrons and phonons in plasmonic hot carrier generation. Built upon this general theoretical and computational framework, we present results on higher order processes such as multi-plasmon decays in metals which are critical for plasmon-driven upconversion. Join Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology.

  3. Strong modulation of plasmons in Graphene with the use of an Inverted pyramid array diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Matthaiakakis, N.; Mizuta, H.; Charlton, M. D. B.

    2016-01-01

    An optical device configuration allowing efficient electrical tuning of surface plasmon wavelength and absorption in a suspended/conformal graphene film is reported. An underlying 2-dimensional array of inverted rectangular pyramids greatly enhances optical coupling to the graphene film. In contrast to devices utilising 1D grating or Kretchman prism coupling configurations, both s and p polarization can excite plasmons due to symmetry of the grating structure. Additionally, the excited high frequency plasmon mode has a wavelength independent of incident photon angle allowing multidirectional coupling. By combining analytical methods with Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis, absorption of plasmons is mapped over near infrared spectral range as a function of chemical potential. Strong control over both plasmon wavelength and strength is provided by an ionic gel gate configuration. 0.04eV change in chemical potential increases plasmon energy by 0.05 eV shifting plasmon wavelength towards the visible, and providing enhancement in plasmon absorption. Most importantly, plasmon excitation can be dynamically switched off by lowering the chemical potential and moving from the intra-band to the inter-band transition region. Ability to electrically tune plasmon properties can be utilized in applications such as on-chip light modulation, photonic logic gates, optical interconnect and sensing applications. PMID:27278301

  4. Strong modulation of plasmons in Graphene with the use of an Inverted pyramid array diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Matthaiakakis, N; Mizuta, H; Charlton, M D B

    2016-01-01

    An optical device configuration allowing efficient electrical tuning of surface plasmon wavelength and absorption in a suspended/conformal graphene film is reported. An underlying 2-dimensional array of inverted rectangular pyramids greatly enhances optical coupling to the graphene film. In contrast to devices utilising 1D grating or Kretchman prism coupling configurations, both s and p polarization can excite plasmons due to symmetry of the grating structure. Additionally, the excited high frequency plasmon mode has a wavelength independent of incident photon angle allowing multidirectional coupling. By combining analytical methods with Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis, absorption of plasmons is mapped over near infrared spectral range as a function of chemical potential. Strong control over both plasmon wavelength and strength is provided by an ionic gel gate configuration. 0.04eV change in chemical potential increases plasmon energy by 0.05 eV shifting plasmon wavelength towards the visible, and providing enhancement in plasmon absorption. Most importantly, plasmon excitation can be dynamically switched off by lowering the chemical potential and moving from the intra-band to the inter-band transition region. Ability to electrically tune plasmon properties can be utilized in applications such as on-chip light modulation, photonic logic gates, optical interconnect and sensing applications. PMID:27278301

  5. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  6. Device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-García, M. P.; Rey-Ronco, M. A.; Alonso-Sánchez, T.

    2014-11-01

    This paper discusses the device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis (CNAA). The aim of this investigation is defining through this device the fluorite content present on different samples from fluorspar concentration plant through the DGNAA (Delayed Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) method. This device is made of americium-beryllium neutron source, NaI (2"×2") and BGO (2"×2") gamma rays detectors, multichannel and an automatic mechanism which moves the samples from activation and reading position. This mechanism is controlled by a software which allows moving the samples precisely and in a safe way (~ms), which it is very useful when the radioactive isotopes have to be detected with a half time less than 8s.

  7. Development of a portable device for telemonitoring of physical activities during sleep.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Yeh-Liang; Young, Chang-Ming

    2008-12-01

    Low motor activity levels and prolonged episodes of uninterrupted immobility are characteristics of sleep. In clinical practice, the use of polysomnographic (PSG) recording is a standard procedure to assess sleep. However, PSG is not suitable for long-term monitoring in the home environment. This paper describes the development of a portable telemonitoring device that detects movements of a subject by conductive mats, and evaluates sleep stages via physical activity data. The device itself also serves as a Web server. Doctors and caregivers can access real-time and historical data via an IE browser or a remote application program for telemonitoring of physical activities and sleep/awake states during sleep, while the patients stay in their own homes. In our validation test with four normal subjects and four arousal subjects, this system showed a good performance in locating sleep epochs of a subject. The sensitivity of locating sleep epochs was 89.5% and the average positive prediction value was 94.8%, with a specificity of 84.3%. This device is not intended to be a diagnosis device, instead, it is to be used as a home telehealth tool for monitoring physical activity and sleep/awake states. This portable telemonitoring device provides a convenient approach to better understand and recognize a subject's sleep pattern through long-term sleep monitoring in the home environment. PMID:19119826

  8. Plasmonic nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ruiqian

    In the last three decades, a large number of different plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their unique optical properties. Those plasmonic nanostructures include nanoparticles, nanoholes and metal nanovoids. They have been widely utilized in optical devices and sensors. When the plasmonic nanostructures interact with the electromagnetic wave and their surface plasmon frequency match with the light frequency, the electrons in plasmonic nanostructures will resonate with the same oscillation as incident light. In this case, the plasmonic nanostructures can absorb light and enhance the light scattering. Therefore, the plasmonic nanostructures can be used as substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to enhance the Raman signal. Using plasmonic nanostructures can significantly enhance Raman scattering of molecules with very low concentrations. In this thesis, two different plasmonic nanostructures Ag dendrites and Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles are investigated. Simple methods were used to produce these two plasmonic nanostructures. Then, their applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering have been explored. Ag dendrites were produced by galvanic replacement reaction, which was conducted using Ag nitrate aqueous solution and copper metal. Metal copper layer was deposited at the bottom side of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. Silver wires formed inside AAO channels connected Ag nitrate on the top of AAO membrane and copper layer at the bottom side of AAO. Silver dendrites were formed on the top side of AAO. The second plasmonic nanostructure is Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles. They were fabricated by electroless plating (galvanic replacement) reaction in a silver plating solution. First, electrochemically evolved hydrogen bubbles were used as template through electroless deposition to produce hollow Au nanoparticles. Then, the Au nanoparticles were coated with Cu shells in a Cu plating solution. In the following step, a Ag

  9. (Plasmonic Metal Core)/(Semiconductor Shell) Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Caihong

    shape is maintained throughout the sulfidation process, with the edge length being increased gradually. TiO2 is one of the most important semiconductors that are employed in light-harvesting applications. It has been extensively studied for a variety of applications by virtue of its low toxicity, biological compatibility, chemical and thermal stability, resistance to photocorrosion, and relative abundance. However, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 is limited to the UV region because of its wide band gap, which limits its applications in light harvesting. Although (Au core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures can improve the photocatalytic activities of TiO2 in visible light, it has only been demonstrated in a few experiments and has been limited with Au nanospheres. Compared with Au nanospheres, Au nanorods offer more attractive plasmonic features, including stronger electric field enhancements and synthetically tunable longitudinal plasmon wavelengths over the visible to near-infrared region. The coating of Au nanorod therefore can largely improve light harvesting capability of TiO2. In this thesis, I developed a facile and versatile method for the preparation of (Au nanocrystal core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures by using a Ti(III) compound as the titania precursor. By employing Au nanorods with different sizes and varying the shell thickness, the plasmonic bands of the core/shell nanostructures can be tailored. TiO2 can also be grown on other monometallic and bimetallic Pd, Pt, Au nanocrystals. As a proof-of-concept application, (Au nanorod core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures were utilized in dye-sensitized solar cells to function as a scattering layer. The resultant solar cells exhibited higher power conversion efficiencies with a thinner thickness compared to the traditional TiO 2 solar cells. In addition, I also examined the property of plasmon-enhanced reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, the TiO2 shell with a high refractive index can efficiently couple with the

  10. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, < 400 nm), where significant opportunity exists for both fundamental and application research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50

  11. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound.

    PubMed

    Pookpanratana, S; Zhu, H; Bittle, E G; Natoli, S N; Ren, T; Richter, C A; Li, Q; Hacker, C A

    2016-03-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a 'click' reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The 'click' reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. PMID:26871549

  12. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-01-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light-matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene-light interaction. PMID:25897687

  13. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pookpanratana, S.; Zhu, H.; Bittle, E. G.; Natoli, S. N.; Ren, T.; Richter, C. A.; Li, Q.; Hacker, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices.

  14. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-01-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light–matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene–light interaction. PMID:25897687

  15. Performance limits of plasmon-enhanced organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Ginger, David S.; Salvador, Michael; Yao, Kai; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2014-07-21

    We use a combination of experiment and modeling to explore the promise and limitations of using plasmon-resonant metal nanoparticles to enhance the device performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). We focus on optical properties typical of the current generation of low-bandgap donor polymers blended with the fullerene (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71}-butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) and use the polymer poly(indacenodithiophene-co-phenanthro[9,10-b]quinoxaline) (PIDT-PhanQ) as our test case. We model the optical properties and performance of these devices both in the presence and absence of a variety of colloidal silver nanoparticles. We show that for these materials, device performance is sensitive to the relative z-position and the density of nanoparticles inside the active layer. Using conservative estimates of the internal quantum efficiency for the PIDT-PhanQ/PC{sub 71}BM blend, we calculate that optimally placed silver nanoparticles could yield an enhancement in short-circuit current density of over 31% when used with ∼ 80-nm-thick active layers, resulting in an absolute increase in power conversion efficiency of up to ∼2% for the device based on optical engineering.

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  17. Nonlinear Plasmonic Sensing.

    PubMed

    Mesch, Martin; Metzger, Bernd; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald

    2016-05-11

    We introduce the concept of nonlinear plasmonic sensing, relying on third harmonic generation from simple plasmonic nanoantennas. Because of the nonlinear conversion process we observe a larger sensitivity to a local change in the refractive index as compared to the commonly used linear localized surface plasmon resonance sensing. Refractive index changes as small as 10(-3) can be detected. In order to determine the spectral position of highest sensitivity, we perform linear and third harmonic spectroscopy on plasmonic nanoantenna arrays, which are the fundamental building blocks of our sensor. Furthermore, simultaneous detection of linear and nonlinear signals allows quantitative comparison of both methods, providing further insight into the working principle of our sensor. While the signal-to-noise ratio is comparable, nonlinear sensing gives about seven times higher relative signal changes. PMID:27050296

  18. Aluminum for plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Knight, Mark W; King, Nicholas S; Liu, Lifei; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2014-01-28

    Unlike silver and gold, aluminum has material properties that enable strong plasmon resonances spanning much of the visible region of the spectrum and into the ultraviolet. This extended response, combined with its natural abundance, low cost, and amenability to manufacturing processes, makes aluminum a highly promising material for commercial applications. Fabricating Al-based nanostructures whose optical properties correspond with theoretical predictions, however, can be a challenge. In this work, the Al plasmon resonance is observed to be remarkably sensitive to the presence of oxide within the metal. For Al nanodisks, we observe that the energy of the plasmon resonance is determined by, and serves as an optical reporter of, the percentage of oxide present within the Al. This understanding paves the way toward the use of aluminum as a low-cost plasmonic material with properties and potential applications similar to those of the coinage metals. PMID:24274662

  19. Plasmons and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrell, T. L.; Callcott, T. A.; Warmack, R. J.

    1985-08-01

    Plasmons, energy quanta related to electrical charge oscillations in condensed matter (such as metals), were first observed in 1955 by passing an electron beam through Al foil and measuring the resulting energy peaks of electrons which made it through. The energy, as predicted by quantum mechanics, is proportional to the associated frequency of the longitudinal waves set up as the oscillations propagate from electron to electron, and is a function of the free electron density. Plasmon data aid in characterizing the electronic state of matter under study. Performing spectroscopy of electrons bouncing off the surface permits characterizations of the electronic states of the surfaces. Plasmons can lose energy by emitting light. The wavelength of the light can be controlled by specifying the composition of a specimen. Techniques for coupling beam photons with surface plasmons to achieve excited states are discussed, along with emerging applications such as diffraction gratings for spectroscopy, holographic cameras and Raman scattering applied to biochemical studies.

  20. Transformational plasmon optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate efficiently molding surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) based on transformation optics. SPPs are surface modes of electromagnetic waves tightly bound at metal-dielectric interfaces, which allow us to scale optics beyond the diffraction limit. Taking advantage of transformation optics, here we show that the propagation of SPPs can be manipulated in a prescribed manner by careful control of the dielectric material properties adjacent to a metal. Since the metal properties are completely unaltered, this methodology provides a practical way for routing light at very small scales. For instance, our approach enables SPPs to travel at uneven and curved surfaces over a broad wavelength range, where SPPs would normally suffer significant scattering losses. In addition, a plasmonic 180 degrees waveguide bend and a plasmonic Luneburg lens with simple designs are presented. The unique design flexibility of the transformational plasmon optics introduced here may open a new door to nano optics and downscaling of photonic circuits. PMID:20465268