Science.gov

Sample records for active power loss

  1. The Power War: Male Response to Power Loss under Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Arnold

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the male response to anticipated loss of power as women continue to demand equality and equal power. Describes the scope of male power, and analyzes the importance of power to men in terms of the male sex-role stereotype. Hypothesizes some likely male responses to a loss of power. (BH)

  2. power loss in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, T. L.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; McLean, H. S.; Correll, D. L.

    2007-11-01

    An absolute calibration has been performed on each of the seven chords of the Hα diagnostic [Z. Wang, G.A. Wurden, C.W Barnes, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 1059 (2001)] at SSPX. Simple models are used to estimate the total power lost to Hα radiation throughout experimental shots. Using these models, high energy shots (Te > 500 eV) are compared to low energy shots.

  3. Localized power loss measurement using remote sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam, A.J.; Moses, A.J. . Wolfson Centre for Magnetics Technology)

    1993-11-01

    A computerized system was designed and constructed to scan and measure localized power loss over an area of an electrical steel lamination. The local components of flux density (B) and field (H) were detected by a remote search coil and a magnetoresistive sensor respectively. The results obtained show that the power loss varies over the sample surface and the surface of individual grains. A high average loss was observed over a grain with a yaw angle of 7[degree], the minimum average loss was measured in a grain with a tilt angle of approximately 2[degree] to 3[degree]. The bulk average power loss over an area is comparable to that of a Single Strip Tester (SST).

  4. Power losses in liquid metal current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Wallace, D. R.

    1980-05-01

    A numerical capability has been developed which will compute ohmic and viscous power losses in liquid metal current collectors. The present work extends previous analytical investigations in that semi-infinite collector geometries are no longer assumed. This new capability is based on the finite element method and makes use of electrical current densities computed by the heat transfer portion of the NASTRAN structural analysis program. Although some limitations and questions remain, a comparison between the new numerical capability and experiment shows very good agreement in the computation of the power losses.

  5. Loss of 115 kV Power

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.

    2001-08-22

    This report discusses the postulated loss of 115 kV power. Continuous electrical power to Savannah River Plant reactors is necessary to maintain water flow for heat removal and essential monitoring and control. Should power supplied to the plant 115 kV system from offsite be lost, on-site generation is sufficient to maintain all reactors in a safe shutdown mode for an indefinite period. Should on-site generators for the 115 kV grid also be lost, diesel-electric generators within each reactor building are also sufficient to maintain safe shutdown for a finite period. In all cases DC power for necessary monitoring and control would be available from battery systems with AC converter backup.

  6. Pinning Loss Power Density in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2015-03-01

    The pinning loss power density is theoretically derived based on the resistive energy dissipation when the flux lines are driven by the Lorentz force in a superconductor. The obtained loss power density does not depend on the viscosity or flow resistivity, but is proportional to the pinning force density only, and it possesses the nature of hysteresis loss, as commonly measured in experiments. These features are predicted by the critical state model, which was recently proved theoretically. The obtained pinning force density is consistent with the prediction of the coherent potential approximation theory, a kind of statistical summation theory, for flux pinning. Thus, the irreversible properties associated with the flux pinning can be comprehensively described by these flux pinning theories. The irreversible flux pinning in the superconductor is compared with similar irreversible phenomena such as the motion of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic materials and the friction in mechanical systems. The possibility is also discussed for a general theoretical description of these irreversible phenomena in which the hysteresis loss occurs.

  7. Economics of heat loss for power cables

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelison, K.E.

    1982-07-01

    Energy losses occur in power cables which cause a rise in the conductor temperature. A trend toward higher allowable conductor temperatures has increased the energy losses during operation. At the same time, the costs of the energy has increased dramatically. With a given installation and load, energy costs vary inversely with the conductor size. However, initial costs vary directly with the conductor size. This relationship can be utilized to select a conductor size which minimizes the sum of the initial costs an the energy costs. This paper reviews present value techniques and identifies the level of energy costs in some particular installation configurations. An analysis is made of the marginal costs and savings available by changing the size of the conductor in a cable circuit.

  8. Vision Loss With Sexual Activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michele D; Odel, Jeffrey G; Rudich, Danielle S; Ritch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old white man presented with multiple episodes of transient painless unilateral vision loss precipitated by sexual intercourse. Examination was significant for closed angles bilaterally. His visual symptoms completely resolved following treatment with laser peripheral iridotomies. PMID:25265010

  9. The Unseen Power Loss: Stemming the Flow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillett, Raphael

    2002-01-01

    Outlined an estimate-substitution strategy for a test comparing two means and developed an expected-power formula for the test. Demonstrated that for empirically representative distributions of effect size in psychology, the expected power deficit is large. (SLD)

  10. Power loss mechanisms in pathological tracheas.

    PubMed

    Bates, A J; Comerford, A; Cetto, R; Schroter, R C; Tolley, N S; Doorly, D J

    2016-07-26

    The effort required to inhale a breath of air is a critically important measure in assessing airway function. Although the contribution of the trachea to the total flow resistance of the airways is generally modest, pathological alterations in tracheal geometry can have a significant negative effect. This study investigates the mechanisms of flow energy loss in a healthy trachea and in four geometries affected by retrosternal goitre which can cause significant distortions of tracheal geometry including constriction and deviation with abnormal curvature. By separating out the component of energy loss related to the wall shear (frictional loss), striking differences are found between the patterns of energy dissipation in the normal and pathological tracheas. Furthermore the ratio of frictional to total loss is dramatically reduced in the pathological geometries. PMID:26686396

  11. Power losses in bent and elongated polymer optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chuan

    2007-07-20

    This study performs experimental and numerical investigations into the power losses induced in bent, elongated polymer optical fibers (POFs). The theoretical analysis is based on a three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite-element model and makes the assumption of a planar waveguide. The finite-element model is used to calculate the deformation of the elongated POFs such that the power loss can be analytically derived. The effect of bending on the power loss is examined by considering seven different bend radii ranging from 10 to 50 mm. The results show that bending and elongation have a significant effect on the power loss in POFs. The contribution of skew rays to the overall power loss in bent, elongated POFs is not obvious at large radii of curvature but becomes more significant as the radius is reduced. PMID:17609702

  12. Prediction of windage power loss in alternators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Simplified equations and constants, based on laminar and turbulent flow theory between parallel plates, estimate windage loss in rotating electrical machinery. Comparison of calculated results and experimental data for smooth cylindrical rotor and slotted alternator yields 7 percent maximum variation between calculated and experimental data.

  13. Analysis of power loss in Ni-Zn ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Chiba, T.; Yamada, S.; Otsuki, E.

    2000-05-01

    The power loss (Pcv) was analyzed by combining two methods. The first, Pcv, is divided into hysteresis loss (Ph) and residual loss (Pr) from the frequency dependence of the power loss according to the method of Otsuki et al., and, second, the loss factors are attributed to domain wall motion (Pw) and the rotation magnetization (Prot) by adapting the method proposed by Visser et al. It was found that Pw coincides with Ph in the lower frequency range, but the difference between them becomes significant as frequency goes up. The higher value of Pw, in comparison with Ph in the higher frequency range, can be attributed to the enhancement of loss due to the dynamic motion of the domain wall (Pwd) by raising the frequency. The hysteresis loss dominates Pcv in the frequency range below 500 kHz, while Pwd becomes predominant factor in the higher frequency range more than 500 kHz.

  14. Exercise and activity for weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    An active lifestyle and exercise routine, along with eating healthy foods, is the best way to lose weight. ... Calories used in exercise > calories eaten = weight loss. This means that to lose weight, the number of calories you burn by exercising needs ...

  15. Power losses and the efficiency of industrially used gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čarnogurská, Mária; Příhoda, Miroslav; Širillová, Ľubomíra

    2014-08-01

    This article gives the methodology for stating power losses and the efficiency of a gearbox working in natural cooling using dimensional analysis. The methodology reflects experimental research which investigated the effect of a change in revolutions and loading the gearbox on power losses. At the same time, it describes the conditions under which the proposed method may be applied for industrial, helical bevel geared motors.

  16. Radiation power losses and opacity of mid-Z impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Calisti, A.; Pain, J. C.; Gilleron, F.

    2010-08-01

    We present results on opacity and radiation losses of mid-Z impurities in ICF conditions. Two approaches were investigated. The first one is based on a detailed calculation where the atomic database is provided by the MCDF code. Then a lineshape code (PPP) based on a fast algorithm was adapted to the calculation of emissivity and opacity profiles. The second approach is a statistical one. It involves high-order moments of the radiative power losses. Atomic calculations were performed with the Cowan code. The Normal Inverse Gaussian and the Generalized Gaussian distributions were then used to calculate the radiation power loss profile.

  17. Dynamic power balance for nonlinear waves in unbalanced gain and loss landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Yannis

    2015-12-01

    The presence of losses in nonlinear photonic structures necessitates the introduction of active parts for wave power compensation resulting in unbalanced gain and loss landscapes where localized beam propagation is, in general, dynamically unstable. Here we provide generic sufficient conditions for the relation between the gain-loss and the refractive index profiles in order to ensure efficient wave trapping and stable propagation for a wide range of beam launching conditions such as initial power, angle of incidence, and position. The stability is a consequence of an underlying dynamic power balance mechanism related to a conserved quantity of wave dynamics.

  18. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. D.; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  19. Minimizing spacecraft power loss due to single-point failures

    SciTech Connect

    Billerbeck, W.

    1984-08-01

    This paper proposes the application of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), in the form of a calculation of the quantitative power loss resulting from single-point failures, as a tool for the design of satellite power systems. This approach differs from most of the previous work done on failure modes and effects analysis, which has been based on calculation of estimated probability of failure within the circuits. A number of failure-resistant communications spacecraft power system topologies and equipment configurations are described. Techniques are presented for analyzing the actual power system performance degradation resulting from various hypothesized single-point failures. Sample calculations are presented for both solar array and battery modes of operation. Design ground rules, circuit topologies, and mechanical configurations for minimizing spacecraft power loss due to single-point failures are described.

  20. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  1. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1998-12-08

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in US Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled ``Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System.`` The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity. 8 figs.

  2. Designing concrete EDS maglev guideways: Power losses in metallic reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Beto, D.; Plotkin, D.

    1997-05-01

    Conventional reinforced concrete designs will have to be altered when designing a guideway for a maglev using an electrodynamically suspended (EDS) propulsion system. This type of propulsion system generates large magnetic fields that will develop magnetically induced, circulating eddy currents in any conventional steel reinforcement in close proximity to the magnets. These eddy currents, if large enough, may produce significant power losses that could adversely effect operation of the system. This paper presents a method and explanation for civil engineers to use for estimating the power losses due to the presence of metallic reinforcement. This procedure may be used to help guide future designs in the selection and placement of reinforcing material.

  3. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1998-01-01

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled "Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System." The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity.

  4. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  5. Marginal Power Loss Extraction Method for Future High Output Power Density Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Kazuto; Adachi, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Yusuke; Ohashi, Hiromichi

    Novel exact MOSFET switching loss analysis and formulation methods have been proposed for designing high output power density converters. To analyze influences of circuit stray parameters on MOSFET switching loss with experiments, a parameter adjustable circuit board has been fabricated. The circuit board has a function to vary circuit stray inductance and capacitance values like a circuit simulator. Correlations between MOSFET switching loss energies and circuit stray parameters are successfully analyzed with the circuit board. Based on the analysis results, switching loss energies are formulated with empirical equations to establish a exact power loss calculation tool for the converter design. Switching loss energies caused by semiconductor device parameters are modeled by a capacitance charge/discharge model. The procedure to formulate the switching loss energies with empirical equations is presented. Switching loss energies calculated with empirical equations are verified with measurements, and high accuracy of more than 95% has been achieved.

  6. Power loss for high-voltage solar-cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    Electric field particle collection and power loss are calculated in program written in FORTRAN IV for use on UNIVAC 1100/40 computer. Program incorporates positive and negative and negative charge flows and balance between positive and negative flows is performed by iteration.

  7. Union Power, Cost of Job Loss, and Workers' Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Francis; McIntosh, Steven

    1998-01-01

    Data from 2,061 British companies in the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey supported the hypothesis that powerful unions reduce the external threat of job loss and therefore the pace of work in unionized firms is less responsive to such threats. (SK)

  8. Power losses in PWM-VSI inverter using NPT or PT IGBT devices

    SciTech Connect

    Blaabjerg, F.; Munk-Nielsen, S.; Pedersen, J.K.; Jaeger, U.

    1995-05-01

    This paper investigates the power losses for two different IGBT technologies (Non Punch Through and Punch Through) for use in PWM-VSI inverters in order to choose the right device technology for a given application. A loss model of the inverter is developed based on experimental determination of the power losses. The loss model is used on two different modulation strategies which are a sine wave with a third harmonic added and a 60{degree}-PWM modulation where only two inverterlegs are active at the same time. The two IGBT technologies are characterized on an advanced measurement system which is described. The total power losses in the inverter are estimated simulation at different conditions and it is concluded that the Non Punch Through technology is most useful for higher switching frequencies, while the Punch Through technology is special useful at lower switching frequencies and high load currents. It is also concluded the 60{degree}-PWM modulation has the lowest power losses and the power losses are almost independent of phase angle cos({phi}) for normal motor operation.

  9. Helicopter optimal descent and landing after power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An optimal control solution is obtained for the descent and landing of a helicopter after the loss of power in level flight. The model considers the helicopter vertical velocity, horizontal velocity, and rotor speed; and it includes representations of ground effect, rotor inflow time lag, pilot reaction time, rotor stall, and the induced velocity curve in the vortex ring state. The control (rotor thrust magnitude and direction) required to minimize the vertical and horizontal velocity at contact with the ground is obtained using nonlinear optimal control theory. It is found that the optimal descent after power loss in hover is a purely vertical flight path. Good correlation, even quantitatively, is found between the calculations and (non-optimal) flight test results.

  10. Dust Loss from Activated Asteroid P/2015 X6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; Licandro, J.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Pozuelos, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present observations and dust tail models of activated asteroid P/2015 X6 from deep imaging data acquired at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) from 2015 mid-December to 2016 late January. The results of the modeling indicate that the asteroid has undergone sustained dust loss over a period of two months or longer. The dust parameters, derived from multidimensional fits of the available images, are compatible with either ice sublimation or rotational instability processes. An impulsive event, as might be associated with an impact with another body, is less likely. A power-law distribution of particles, with minimum and maximum radii of 1 μm and 1 cm and a power index of ‑3.3, is found to be consistent with the observations. Depending on the model of ejection velocity adopted, the particle velocities are found to be in the range of 0.3–10 m s‑1. The activation time was between 18 and 26 days before discovery. The total mass ejected from that time to the most recent observation is in the range 5–9 × 106 kg. No dust features giving indication of past activity earlier than the activation time have been observed.

  11. Power loss measurement of implantable wireless power transfer components using a Peltier device balance calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ho Yan; Budgett, David M.; Taberner, Andrew; Hu, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Determining heat losses in power transfer components operating at high frequencies for implantable inductive power transfer systems is important for assessing whether the heat dissipated by the component is acceptable for implantation and medical use. However, this is a challenge at high frequencies and voltages due to limitations in electronic instrumentation. Calorimetric methods of power measurement are immune to the effects of high frequencies and voltages; hence, the measurement is independent of the electrical characteristics of the system. Calorimeters have been widely used to measure the losses of high power electrical components (>50 W), however it is more difficult to perform on low power components. This paper presents a novel power measurement method for components dissipating anywhere between 0.2 W and 1 W of power based on a heat balance calorimeter that uses a Peltier device as a balance sensor. The proposed balance calorimeter has a single test accuracy of ±0.042 W. The experimental results revealed that there was up to 35% difference between the power measurements obtained with electrical methods and the proposed calorimeter.

  12. Exercise and activity for weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... light activity such as cleaning house or playing baseball or golf 370 to 460 calories doing activity ... or karate class. You could also join a baseball or bowling team, or even a mall-walking ...

  13. Lower hybrid wave edge power loss quantification on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Baek, S. G.; Edlund, E.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Kuang, A. Q.; Reinke, M. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Walk, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    For the first time, the power deposition of lower hybrid RF waves into the edge plasma of a diverted tokamak has been systematically quantified. Edge deposition represents a parasitic loss of power that can greatly impact the use and efficiency of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) at reactor-relevant densities. Through the use of a unique set of fast time resolution edge diagnostics, including innovative fast-thermocouples, an extensive set of Langmuir probes, and a Lyα ionization camera, the toroidal, poloidal, and radial structure of the power deposition has been simultaneously determined. Power modulation was used to directly isolate the RF effects due to the prompt ( t < τ E ) response of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma to Lower Hybrid Radiofrequency (LHRF) power. LHRF power was found to absorb more strongly in the edge at higher densities. It is found that a majority of this edge-deposited power is promptly conducted to the divertor. This correlates with the loss of current drive efficiency at high density previously observed on Alcator C-Mod, and displaying characteristics that contrast with the local RF edge absorption seen on other tokamaks. Measurements of ionization in the active divertor show dramatic changes due to LHRF power, implying that divertor region can be a key for the LHRF edge power deposition physics. These observations support the existence of a loss mechanism near the edge for LHRF at high density ( n e > 1.0 × 10 20 (m-3)). Results will be shown addressing the distribution of power within the SOL, including the toroidal symmetry and radial distribution. These characteristics are important for deducing the cause of the reduced LHCD efficiency at high density and motivate the tailoring of wave propagation to minimize SOL interaction, for example, through the use of high-field-side launch.

  14. LH Power Losses In Front of the JET Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Arnoux, G.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.

    2009-11-26

    In recent JET experiments, Lower Hybrid (LH) power losses in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) were characterized using infra-red (IR) thermography. Hot spots were observed on objects intercepting the field lines passing in front of the LH launcher, i.e. on poloidal limiters and on dumplates located at the top of the tokamak; their locations being in good agreement with magnetic field line tracing using the EFIT equilibrium code. The dumplate temperature was monitored while scanning the launcher position so that the radial distance between field lines intercepting the hot spots and the launcher was increased up to 3.5 cm. The dissipation layer in front of the launcher was estimated to be at least 3.5 cm wide, in agreement with recent measurements on Tore-Supra, but not with simple models that predict a dissipation layer in the mm range.

  15. 76 FR 72875 - Passive Activity Losses and Credits Limited

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Department and the IRS promulgated temporary regulations under section 469 in 1988. See TD 8175, 53 FR 5686... any income, gain, loss, deduction, or credit from such activity that is attributable to an interest in a limited partnership as a limited partner; and (ii) Any gain or loss from such activity...

  16. Reduction in overvoltages and dynamic power losses in power switches of multilevel voltage inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, P. A.; Voronin, I. P.; Panfilov, D. I.; Rozhkov, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    A number of the circuit and design decisions that provide a reduction in overvoltage and dynamic power losses in power switches of multilevel voltage inverters with clamping diodes is considered. It is shown that the integral or unpackaged version is the most effective method for a reduction in the stray inductance in the multilevel circuit, which is the general cause for occurrence of dynamic overvoltage. To reduce dynamic losses of power, a method for resonant commutation on fronts, which provides commutation of switches in the multilevel circuit at zero voltage (SZV) and zero current (SZC), is proposed. The resonant switching method as applied to the multilevel circuit simultaneously solves a problem of dynamic overvoltage by means of limitation for the rate of voltage rise in the SZV mode or the mode of preliminary fault of energy stored in the inductance of the switching circuit in the SZC mode.

  17. Analysis of Power Converter Losses in Vector Control System of a Self-Excited Induction Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bašić, Mateo; Vukadinović, Dinko; Polić, Miljenko

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides analysis of losses in the hysteresis-driven three-phase power converter with IGBTs and free-wheeling diodes. The converter under consideration is part of the self-excited induction generator (SEIG) vector control system. For the analysis, the SEIG vector control system is used in which the induction generator iron losses are taken into account. The power converter losses are determined by using a suitable loss estimation algorithm reported in literature. The chosen algorithm allows the power converter losses to be determined both by type (switching/conduction losses) and by converter component (IGBT/diode losses). The overall power converter losses are determined over wide ranges of rotor speed, dc-link voltage and load resistance, and subsequently used for offline correction of the overall control system's losses (efficiency) obtained through control system simulations with an ideal power converter. The control system's efficiency values obtained after the correction are compared with the measured values.

  18. Continued Investigation of Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    Seal leakage decreases with increasing surface speed due to reduced clearances from disk centrifugal growth. Annular and labyrinth seal leakage are 2-3 times greater than brush and finger seal leakage. Seal leakage rates increase with increasing temperature because of seal clearance growth due to different coefficients of thermal expansion between the seal and test disk. Seal power loss is not strongly affected by inlet temperature. Seal power loss increases with increasing surface speed, seal pressure differential, mass flow rate or flow factor, and radial clearance. The brush and finger seals had nearly the same power loss. Annular and labyrinth seal power loss were higher than finger or brush seal power loss. The brush seal power loss was the lowest and 15-30% lower than annular and labyrinth seal power loss.

  19. Goal setting: Eating, Physical activity & Weight loss | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    No matter what your weight loss goal is, the key to reaching your goals is to make changes to your lifestyle like eating and physical activity. This involves setting realistic expectations and making a plan. 

  20. Efficiency and power loss in d. c. chopper circuits. [Theoretical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this paper was to investigate the efficiency and source of power losses of various classes of dc chopper circuits. The study involved a theoretical calculation of the power losses, supported by a considerable amount of practical work on full power-rated traction motor test bed. 3 refs.

  1. Impact Assessment of V2G on the Power Loss of Unbalanced Radial Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwu, Uwakwe Christian; Mahajan, Satish M.

    2013-08-01

    Electric distribution feeders are inherently unbalanced and therefore have potential for severe power loss. The penetration of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) into the distribution feeders is expected to impact the power losses in the system. This is a pressing issue since power loss affects the operations, economics, and quality of service for the electric power systems. In this article, the impact of V2G parking lots on power losses of a radial distribution network is investigated. Two test networks were used in the study, namely: IEEE 13 and IEEE 123 Node test feeder networks. The test feeders and the V2G facilities were modeled in Radial Distribution Analysis Package (RDAP). Load flow results provided information on the power losses of the network. Results show that for a given penetration level, the impact of 3-phase and system-wide V2G integration on the power loss results in less power losses than 1-phase V2G integration. Results also indicate that operating the entire system such that V2G facilities will not compromise "near-balanced" state of operation and will have an improved impact on the power loss than highly unbalanced operation. The results obtained will be a useful tool for studying the impact of V2G on the power loss of a distribution network.

  2. Analysis of Loss-of-Offsite-Power Events 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    Loss of offsite power (LOOP) can have a major negative impact on a power plant’s ability to achieve and maintain safe shutdown conditions. Risk analyses performed loss of all alternating current power contributes over 70% of the overall risk at some U.S. nuclear plants. LOOP event and subsequent restoration of offsite power are important inputs to plant probabilistic risk assessments. This report presents a statistical and engineering analysis of LOOP frequencies and durations at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The data used in this study are based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1998 through 2012. Frequencies and durations were determined for four event categories: plant-centered, switchyard-centered, grid-related, and weather-related. The EDG failure modes considered are failure to start, failure to load and run, and failure to run more than 1 hour. The component reliability estimates and the reliability data are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for reliability are provided for the entire active period. A statistically significant increase in industry performance was identified for plant-centered and switchyard-centered LOOP frequencies. There is no statistically significant trend in LOOP durations.

  3. Analysis of Loss-of-Offsite-Power Events 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-02-01

    Loss of offsite power (LOOP) can have a major negative impact on a power plant’s ability to achieve and maintain safe shutdown conditions. Risk analyses suggest that loss of all alternating current power contributes over 70% of the overall risk at some U.S. nuclear plants. LOOP event and subsequent restoration of offsite power are important inputs to plant probabilistic risk assessments. This report presents a statistical and engineering analysis of LOOP frequencies and durations at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The data used in this study are based on the operating experience during calendar years 1997 through 2013. Frequencies and durations were determined for four event categories: plant-centered, switchyard-centered, grid-related, and weather-related. The emergency diesel generator failure modes considered are failure to start, failure to load and run, and failure to run more than 1 hour. The component reliability estimates and the reliability data are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for reliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends in LOOP frequencies over the 1997–2013 period are identified. There is a possibility that a significant trend in grid-related LOOP frequency exists that is not easily detected by a simple analysis. Statistically significant increases in recovery times after grid- and switchyard-related LOOPs are identified.

  4. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  5. Power loss in open cavity diodes and a modified Child-Langmuir law

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Kumar, Raghwendra; Puri, R.R.

    2005-09-15

    Diodes used in most high power devices are inherently open. It is shown that under such circumstances, there is a loss of electromagnetic radiation leading to a lower critical current as compared to closed diodes. The power loss can be incorporated in the standard Child-Langmuir framework by introducing an effective potential. The modified Child-Langmuir law can be used to predict the maximum power loss for a given plate separation and potential difference as well as the maximum transmitted current for this power loss. The effectiveness of the theory is tested numerically.

  6. ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W.

    2012-07-01

    U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event

  7. Lower Hybrid wave edge power loss quantification on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, I. C.

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, the power deposition of Lower Hybrid RF waves into the edge plasma of a diverted tokamak has been systematically quantified. Edge deposition represents a parasitic loss of power that can greatly impact the use and efficiency of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) at reactor-relevant densities. Through the use of a unique set of fast time resolution edge diagnostics, including innovative fast-thermocouples, an extensive set of Langmuir probes, and a Lyα ionization camera, the toroidal, poloidal and radial structure of the power deposition has been simultaneously determined. Power modulation was used to directly isolate the RF effects due to the prompt (t <τE) response of the scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma to LHRF power. LHRF power was found to absorb more strongly in the edge at higher densities. It is found that a majority of this edge-deposited power is promptly conducted to the divertor. This correlates with the loss of current drive efficiency at high density previously observed on Alcator C-Mod, and displaying characteristics that contrast with the local RF edge absorption seen on other tokamaks. Measurements of ionization in the active divertor show dramatic changes due to LHRF power, implying that divertor region can be key for the LHRF edge power deposition physics. These observations support the existence a loss mechanism near the edge for LHRF at high density (ne > 1 . 0 .1020 [m-3]). Results will be shown addressing the distribution of power within the SOL, including the toroidal symmetry and radial distribution. These characteristics are important for deducing the cause of the reduced LHCD efficiency at high density and motivates the tailoring of wave propagation to minimize SOL interaction, for example, through the use of high-field-side launch. This work was performed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DoE Office of Science user facility, and is supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  8. Multipulse current source offers low power losses and high reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Pulse current source uses low loss, high reliability, LC circuits to provide the necessary high impedance for magnetic memory cores, frequently used in digital computational equipment. Square-loop reactors replace the semiconductor switches previously used.

  9. Novel binary PSO algorithm based optimization of transmission expansion planning considering power losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuty; Haryono, T.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission expansion planning (TEP) is one of the issue that have to be faced caused by addition of large scale power generation into the existing power system. Optimization need to be conducted to get optimal solution technically and economically. Several mathematic methods have been applied to provide optimal allocation of new transmission line such us genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization and tabu search. This paper proposed novel binary particle swarm optimization (NBPSO) to determine which transmission line should be added to the existing power system. There are two scenerios in this simulation. First, considering transmission power losses and the second is regardless transmission power losses. NBPSO method successfully obtain optimal solution in short computation time. Compare to the first scenario, the number of new line in second scenario which regardless power losses is less but produces high power losses that cause the cost becoming extremely expensive.

  10. Low-Power Testing of Losses in Millimeter-Wave Transmission Lines for High-Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S. T.; Comfoltey, E. N.; Shapiro, Michael; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Tax, David; Temkin, Richard J; Woskov, P. P.; Chang, Won; Rasmussen, David A

    2008-08-01

    We report the measurement of small losses in transmission line (TL) components intended for high-power millimeter-wave applications. Measurements were made using two different low-power techniques: a coherent technique using a vector network analyzer (VNA) and an incoherent technique using a radiometer. The measured loss in a 140 GHz 12.7 mm diameter TL system, consisting of 1.7 m of circular corrugated waveguide and three miter bends, is dominated by the miter bend loss. The measured loss was 0.3 {+-} 0.1 dB per miter bend using a VNA; and 0.22 {+-} 0.1 dB per miter bend using a radiometer. Good agreement between the two measurement techniques implies that both are useful for measuring small losses. To verify the methodology, the VNA technique was employed to measure the extremely small transmission loss in a 170 GHz ITER prototype TL system consisting of three lengths of 1 m, 63.5 mm diameter, circular corrugated waveguide and two miter bends. The measured loss of 0.05 {+-} 0.02 dB per miter bend may be compared with the theoretical loss of 0.027 dB per miter bend. These results suggest that low-power testing of TL losses, utilizing a small, simple TL system and a VNA, is a reliable method for evaluating performance of low-loss millimeter-wave TL components intended for use in high-power applications.

  11. 10 CFR 50.63 - Loss of all alternating current power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., each light-water-cooled nuclear power plant licensed under subpart C of 10 CFR part 52 after the... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Loss of all alternating current power. 50.63 Section 50.63..., Limitations, and Conditions of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.63 Loss of all alternating current...

  12. 10 CFR 50.63 - Loss of all alternating current power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., each light-water-cooled nuclear power plant licensed under subpart C of 10 CFR part 52 after the... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Loss of all alternating current power. 50.63 Section 50.63..., Limitations, and Conditions of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.63 Loss of all alternating current...

  13. 10 CFR 50.63 - Loss of all alternating current power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., each light-water-cooled nuclear power plant licensed under subpart C of 10 CFR part 52 after the... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loss of all alternating current power. 50.63 Section 50.63..., Limitations, and Conditions of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.63 Loss of all alternating current...

  14. 10 CFR 50.63 - Loss of all alternating current power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., each light-water-cooled nuclear power plant licensed under subpart C of 10 CFR part 52 after the... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Loss of all alternating current power. 50.63 Section 50.63..., Limitations, and Conditions of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.63 Loss of all alternating current...

  15. 10 CFR 50.63 - Loss of all alternating current power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., each light-water-cooled nuclear power plant licensed under subpart C of 10 CFR part 52 after the... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loss of all alternating current power. 50.63 Section 50.63..., Limitations, and Conditions of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.63 Loss of all alternating current...

  16. Effect of geometry and operating conditions on spur gear system power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an analysis of the effects of spur gear size, pitch, width, and ratio on total mesh power loss for a wide range of speeds, torques, and oil viscosities are presented. The analysis uses simple algebraic expressions to determine gear sliding, rolling, and windage losses and also incorporates an approximate ball bearing power loss expression. The analysis shows good agreement with published data. Large diameter and fine pitched gears had higher peak efficiencies but low part load efficiency. Gear efficiencies were generally greater than 98 percent except at very low torque levels. Tare (no-load) losses are generally a significant percentage of the full load loss except at low speeds.

  17. Continued Investigation of Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary seal leakage in jet engine applications results in power losses to the engine cycle. Likewise, seal power loss in jet engines not only result in efficiency loss but also increase the heat input into the engine resulting in reduced component lives. Experimental work on labyrinth and annular seals was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center to quantify seal leakage and power loss at various temperatures, seal pressure differentials, and surface speeds. Data from annular and labyrinth seals are compared with previous brush and finger seal test results. Data are also compared to literature. Annular and labyrinth seal leakage rates are 2 to 3 times greater than brush and finger seal rates. Seal leakage decreases with increasing speed but increases with increasing test temperature due to thermal expansion mismatch. Also seal power loss increases with surface speed, seal pressure differential, mass flow rate, and radial clearance. Annular and labyrinth seal power losses were higher than those of brush or finger seal data. The brush seal power loss was 15 to 30 percent lower than annular and labyrinth seal power loss.

  18. A new approach to the minimum weight/loss design of switching power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Rahman, S.; Wu, C. J.; Kolacki, J.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique using the mathematical nonlinear programming ALAG is proposed to facilitate design optimizations of switching power converters. This computer-aided approach provides a minimum weight (or loss) design down to the details of component level and concurrently satisfies all related power-circuit performance requirements. It also provides such design insights as tradeoffs between power loss and system weight as the switching frequency is increased.

  19. Analysis of Apex Seal Friction Power Loss in Rotary Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Owen, A. Karl

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of the frictional losses from the apex seals in a rotary engine was developed. The modeling was initiated with a kinematic analysis of the rotary engine. Next a modern internal combustion engine analysis code was altered for use in a rotary engine to allow the calculation of the internal combustion pressure as a function of rotor rotation. Finally the forces from the spring, inertial, and combustion pressure on the seal were combined to provide the frictional horsepower assessment.

  20. The effect of solar array voltage patterns on plasma power losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Katz, I.; Steen, P. G.; Schnuelle, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    The use of high-voltage solar arrays in space is discussed in connection with the draining of array power by currents flowing between exposed surfaces through the surrounding plasma. The possibility of reducing the power loss by arranging solar cell strings in repeated small-area modules to eliminate any large areas at high potentials is investigated. It is found that the difference in power loss between modular and linear patterned high-voltage arrays is fairly small. Although the use of modular patterns can reduce the effective mean potential by about 10%, for the type of configuration being considered there is also a 10% increase in sheath area, leading to only a few percent change in total power loss. It is concluded that plasma power loss should not be a primary consideration in designing the physical arrangement of high-voltage arrays.

  1. Balancing Type I Risk and Loss of Power in Ordered Bonferroni Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Cani, John S.

    1984-01-01

    While Bonferroni procedures control the risk of Type I errors, their cost is loss of power. Ordered Bonferroni procedures conserve power for more important tests while sacrificing power for less important tests. Both costs and benefits should be considered when choosing weights for individual tests and the overall level of Type I error protection.…

  2. Impact of V2G on Distribution Feeder: A Power Loss Reduction Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwu, Uwakwe C.; Mahajan, Satish M.

    2013-08-01

    The penetration of Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) into the electrical distribution system has potential to create room for many operational benefits. A V2G facility installed on a distribution feeder line segment may affect power loss in the distribution system. Mathematical models are developed to study how magnitude of V2G reactive power injection and different mixes of uniformly distributed loads and lumped loads can impact power loss on a distribution system feeder. The V2G facilities assumed in this research are V2G parking lots with provision for injecting reactive currents into the feeder of a distribution network. It is shown that loss reduction can be greatly influenced by the pattern of loading, the amount of V2G reactive injection as well as position and number of V2G parking lot along the feeder segment. Useful results are obtained, with a promise that more than 95% power loss reduction (relative to power loss in the system without V2G installed) is possible by optimally locating a V2G parking lot along the feeder. It is observed that location and capacity injection of a V2G facility are the most critical for loss reduction. It was concluded that proper system planning and operational practice are required in order to reduce power losses.

  3. Low-Power Testing of Losses in Millimeter-Wave Transmission Lines for High-Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Han, S T; Comfoltey, E N; Shapiro, M A; Sirigiri, J R; Tax, D S; Temkin, R J; Woskov, P P; Rasmussen, D A

    2008-11-01

    We report the measurement of small losses in transmission line (TL) components intended for high-power millimeter-wave applications. Measurements were made using two different low-power techniques: a coherent technique using a vector network analyzer (VNA) and an incoherent technique using a radiometer. The measured loss in a 140 GHz 12.7 mm diameter TL system, consisting of 1.7 m of circular corrugated waveguide and three miter bends, is dominated by the miter bend loss. The measured loss was 0.3±0.1 dB per miter bend using a VNA; and 0.22±0.1 dB per miter bend using a radiometer. Good agreement between the two measurement techniques implies that both are useful for measuring small losses. To verify the methodology, the VNA technique was employed to measure the extremely small transmission loss in a 170 GHz ITER prototype TL system consisting of three lengths of 1 m, 63.5 mm diameter, circular corrugated waveguide and two miter bends. The measured loss of 0.05±0.02 dB per miter bend may be compared with the theoretical loss of 0.027 dB per miter bend. These results suggest that low-power testing of TL losses, utilizing a small, simple TL system and a VNA, is a reliable method for evaluating performance of low-loss millimeter-wave TL components intended for use in high-power applications. PMID:19081774

  4. Low-Power Testing of Losses in Millimeter-Wave Transmission Lines for High-Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. T.; Comfoltey, E. N.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Tax, D. S.; Temkin, R. J.; Woskov, P. P.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the measurement of small losses in transmission line (TL) components intended for high-power millimeter-wave applications. Measurements were made using two different low-power techniques: a coherent technique using a vector network analyzer (VNA) and an incoherent technique using a radiometer. The measured loss in a 140 GHz 12.7 mm diameter TL system, consisting of 1.7 m of circular corrugated waveguide and three miter bends, is dominated by the miter bend loss. The measured loss was 0.3±0.1 dB per miter bend using a VNA; and 0.22±0.1 dB per miter bend using a radiometer. Good agreement between the two measurement techniques implies that both are useful for measuring small losses. To verify the methodology, the VNA technique was employed to measure the extremely small transmission loss in a 170 GHz ITER prototype TL system consisting of three lengths of 1 m, 63.5 mm diameter, circular corrugated waveguide and two miter bends. The measured loss of 0.05±0.02 dB per miter bend may be compared with the theoretical loss of 0.027 dB per miter bend. These results suggest that low-power testing of TL losses, utilizing a small, simple TL system and a VNA, is a reliable method for evaluating performance of low-loss millimeter-wave TL components intended for use in high-power applications. PMID:19081774

  5. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Arnold, D; Dombrowski, H; Laubenstein, M; Wieslander, E; Vermaercke, P; Murari, A; Popovichev, S; Mlynar, J

    2010-10-01

    In ITER, α particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed. PMID:21058458

  6. Loss of Consciousness Is Associated with Stabilization of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Solovey, Guillermo; Alonso, Leandro M.; Yanagawa, Toru; Fujii, Naotaka; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Cecchi, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    What aspects of neuronal activity distinguish the conscious from the unconscious brain? This has been a subject of intense interest and debate since the early days of neurophysiology. However, as any practicing anesthesiologist can attest, it is currently not possible to reliably distinguish a conscious state from an unconscious one on the basis of brain activity. Here we approach this problem from the perspective of dynamical systems theory. We argue that the brain, as a dynamical system, is self-regulated at the boundary between stable and unstable regimes, allowing it in particular to maintain high susceptibility to stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we performed stability analysis of high-density electrocorticography recordings covering an entire cerebral hemisphere in monkeys during reversible loss of consciousness. We show that, during loss of consciousness, the number of eigenmodes at the edge of instability decreases smoothly, independently of the type of anesthetic and specific features of brain activity. The eigenmodes drift back toward the unstable line during recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, we show that stability is an emergent phenomenon dependent on the correlations among activity in different cortical regions rather than signals taken in isolation. These findings support the conclusion that dynamics at the edge of instability are essential for maintaining consciousness and provide a novel and principled measure that distinguishes between the conscious and the unconscious brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT What distinguishes brain activity during consciousness from that observed during unconsciousness? Answering this question has proven difficult because neither consciousness nor lack thereof have universal signatures in terms of most specific features of brain activity. For instance, different anesthetics induce different patterns of brain activity. We demonstrate that loss of consciousness is universally and reliably associated with stabilization

  7. Wave activated power generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.

    1983-08-09

    A wave activated power generation system of the float type is disclosed, comprising at least one piston-cylinder device having an anchored cylinder and a piston slidable in the cylinder and cooperating with the cylinder to form a pumping chamber above the piston and a low pressure chamber below the piston. The cylinder has an intake port and an exhaust port both formed at an upper port thereof to communicate with the pumping chamber and each provided with a check valve. A float is connected through a cable to the piston of the piston- cylinder device. A pair of fluid storages are connected to the intake port and the exhaust port of the pumping chamber, respectively. A waterwheel generator is driven by the fluid flowing from one of the fluid storages to another. A pressure regulating device is connected to the low pressure chamber so as to maintain the low pressure chamber at a pressure lower than the pressure in the pumping chamber, the difference in pressure ceaselessly applying a downward force on the piston to keep the cable in a tensed condition.

  8. Theory of ac loss in power transmission cables with second generation high temperature superconductor wires

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, J. R.; Malozemoff, A. P.

    2010-02-22

    While a considerable amount of work has been done in an effort to understand ac losses in power transmission cables made of first generation high temperature superconductor (HTS) wires, use of second generation (2G) HTS wires brings in some new considerations. The high critical current density of the HTS layer in 2G wires reduces the surface superconductor hysteretic losses, for which a new formula is derived. Instead, gap and polygonal losses, flux transfer losses in imbalanced two-layer cables and ferromagnetic losses for wires with NiW substrates constitute the principal contributions. A formula for the flux transfer losses is also derived with a paramagnetic approximation for the substrate. Current imbalance and losses associated with the magnetic substrate can be minimized by orienting the substrates of the inner winding inward and the outer winding outward.

  9. Low-Loss Transmission Lines for High-Power Terahertz Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Applications of high-power Terahertz (THz) sources require low-loss transmission lines to minimize loss, prevent overheating and preserve the purity of the transmission mode. Concepts for THz transmission lines are reviewed with special emphasis on overmoded, metallic, corrugated transmission lines. Using the fundamental HE11 mode, these transmission lines have been successfully implemented with very low-loss at high average power levels on plasma heating experiments and THz dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Loss in these lines occurs directly, due to ohmic loss in the fundamental mode, and indirectly, due to mode conversion into high order modes whose ohmic loss increases as the square of the mode index. An analytic expression is derived for ohmic loss in the modes of a corrugated, metallic waveguide, including loss on both the waveguide inner surfaces and grooves. Simulations of loss with the numerical code HFSS are in good agreement with the analytic expression. Experimental tests were conducted to determine the loss of the HE11 mode in a 19 mm diameter, helically-tapped, three meter long brass waveguide with a design frequency of 330 GHz. The measured loss at 250 GHz was 0.029 ± 0.009 dB/m using a vector network analyzer approach and 0.047 ± 0.01 dB/m using a radiometer. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theory. These values of loss, amounting to about 1% or less per meter, are acceptable for the DNP NMR application. Loss in a practical transmission line may be much higher than the loss calculated for the HE11 mode due to mode conversion to higher order modes caused by waveguide imperfections or miter bends. PMID:23162673

  10. Low-loss Transmission Lines for High-power Terahertz Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio Alessandro; Jawla, Sudheer Kumar; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-07-01

    Applications of high-power Terahertz (THz) sources require low-loss transmission lines to minimize loss, prevent overheating and preserve the purity of the transmission mode. Concepts for THz transmission lines are reviewed with special emphasis on overmoded, metallic, corrugated transmission lines. Using the fundamental HE11 mode, these transmission lines have been successfully implemented with very low-loss at high average power levels on plasma heating experiments and THz dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Loss in these lines occurs directly, due to ohmic loss in the fundamental mode, and indirectly, due to mode conversion into high order modes whose ohmic loss increases as the square of the mode index. An analytic expression is derived for ohmic loss in the modes of a corrugated, metallic waveguide, including loss on both the waveguide inner surfaces and grooves. Simulations of loss with the numerical code HFSS are in good agreement with the analytic expression. Experimental tests were conducted to determine the loss of the HE11 mode in a 19 mm diameter, helically-tapped, three meter long brass waveguide with a design frequency of 330 GHz. The measured loss at 250 GHz was 0.029 ± 0.009 dB/m using a vector network analyzer approach and 0.047 ± 0.01 dB/m using a radiometer. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theory. These values of loss, amounting to about 1% or less per meter, are acceptable for the DNP NMR application. Loss in a practical transmission line may be much higher than the loss calculated for the HE11 mode due to mode conversion to higher order modes caused by waveguide imperfections or miter bends.

  11. Low-Loss Transmission Lines for High-Power Terahertz Radiation.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Jawla, Sudheer K; Shapiro, Michael A; Woskov, Paul P; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-07-01

    Applications of high-power Terahertz (THz) sources require low-loss transmission lines to minimize loss, prevent overheating and preserve the purity of the transmission mode. Concepts for THz transmission lines are reviewed with special emphasis on overmoded, metallic, corrugated transmission lines. Using the fundamental HE(11) mode, these transmission lines have been successfully implemented with very low-loss at high average power levels on plasma heating experiments and THz dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Loss in these lines occurs directly, due to ohmic loss in the fundamental mode, and indirectly, due to mode conversion into high order modes whose ohmic loss increases as the square of the mode index. An analytic expression is derived for ohmic loss in the modes of a corrugated, metallic waveguide, including loss on both the waveguide inner surfaces and grooves. Simulations of loss with the numerical code HFSS are in good agreement with the analytic expression. Experimental tests were conducted to determine the loss of the HE(11) mode in a 19 mm diameter, helically-tapped, three meter long brass waveguide with a design frequency of 330 GHz. The measured loss at 250 GHz was 0.029 ± 0.009 dB/m using a vector network analyzer approach and 0.047 ± 0.01 dB/m using a radiometer. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theory. These values of loss, amounting to about 1% or less per meter, are acceptable for the DNP NMR application. Loss in a practical transmission line may be much higher than the loss calculated for the HE(11) mode due to mode conversion to higher order modes caused by waveguide imperfections or miter bends. PMID:23162673

  12. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Markers of Inflammation: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 11 PM to 3 AM). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor- α differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes. PMID:19520155

  13. Effect of geometry and operating conditions on spur gear system power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an analysis of the effects of spur gear size, pitch, width and ratio on total mesh power loss for a wide range of speeds, torques and oil viscosities are presented. The analysis uses simple algebraic expressions to determine gear sliding, rolling and windage losses and also incorporates an approximate ball bearing power loss expression. The analysis shows good agreement with published data. Large diameter and fine-pitched gears had higher peak efficiencies but lower part-load efficiency. Gear efficiencies were generally greater than 98 percent except at very low torque levels. Tare (no-load) losses are generally a significant percentage of the full-load loss except at low speeds.

  14. Pump combiner loss as a function of input numerical aperture power distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sévigny, Benoit; Poirier, Pierre; Faucher, Mathieu

    2009-02-01

    High-power combiner designs (such as kilowatt-class combiners and beyond) are increasingly aggressive on brightness conservation in order to reduce the brightness loss of the pumps as much as possible in both direct diode combining and pump and signal coupling, especially with the advent of next-generation high-power pumps. Since most of the pump loss is due to brightness loss across the combiner, tighter designs (close to the brightness limit) are considerably more sensitive to variations in the input power distribution as a function of numerical aperture; for instance, next-generation, high-power multi-emitter pumps are likely to have larger numerical apertures than conventional single-emitter diodes. As a consequence, pump insertion loss for a given combiner design sitting close to the brightness limit should be dependant on the input power distribution. Aside from presenting a manufacturing challenge, high brightness combiners also imply more sophisticated testing to allow a deeper understanding of the loss with respect to the far-field distribution of the pump inputs and thus enable the extrapolation of loss for an arbitrary, cylindrically symmetric radiant intensity distribution. In this paper, we present a novel test method to measure loss as a function of numerical aperture (NA) fill factor using a variable NA source with square-shaped far field distributions. Results are presented for a range of combiners, such as 7x1 and 19x1 pump combiners, with different brightness ratio and fiber inputs. Combiners violating the brightness conservation equation are also characterized in order to estimate the loss as a function of input power vs. NA distribution and fill factor.

  15. Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Fleming, P.; Zhang, Y. C.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Scholbrook, A.; Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Pao, L.; Singhvi, V.; Tuohy, A.; Pourbeik, P.; Brooks, D.; Bhatt, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a comprehensive study undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Electric Power Research Institute, and the University of Colorado to understand how the contribution of wind power providing active power control (APC) can benefit the total power system economics, increase revenue streams, improve the reliability and security of the power system, and provide superior and efficient response while reducing any structural and loading impacts that may reduce the life of the wind turbine or its components. The study includes power system simulations, control simulations, and actual field tests using turbines at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The study focuses on synthetic inertial control, primary frequency control, and automatic generation control, and analyzes timeframes ranging from milliseconds to minutes to the lifetime of wind turbines, locational scope ranging from components of turbines to large wind plants to entire synchronous interconnections, and additional topics ranging from economics to power system engineering to control design.

  16. Accuracy of telemetry signal power loss in a filter as an estimate for telemetry degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerner, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    When telemetry data is transmitted through a communication link, some degradation in telemetry performance occurs as a result of the imperfect frequency response of the channel. The term telemetry degradation as used here is the increase in received signal power required to offset this filtering. The usual approach to assessing this degradation is to assume that it is equal to the signal power loss in the filtering, which is easily calculated. However, this approach neglects the effects of the nonlinear phase response of the filter, the effect of any reduction of the receiving system noise due to the filter, and intersymbol interference. Here, an exact calculation of the telemetry degradation, which includes all of the above effects, is compared with the signal power loss calculation for RF filtering of NRZ data on a carrier. The signal power loss calculation is found to be a reasonable approximation when the filter follows the point at which the receiving system noise is introduced, especially if the signal power loss is less than 0.5 dB. The signal power loss approximation is less valid when the receiving system noise is not filtered.

  17. Computer model for electrochemical cell performance loss over time in terms of capacity, power, and conductance (CPC)

    2015-09-01

    Available capacity, power, and cell conductance figure centrally into performance characterization of electrochemical cells (such as Li-ion cells) over their service life. For example, capacity loss in Li-ion cells is due to a combination of mechanisms, including loss of free available lithium, loss of active host sites, shifts in the potential-capacity curve, etc. Further distinctions can be made regarding irreversible and reversible capacity loss mechanisms. There are tandem needs for accurate interpretation of capacity atmore » characterization conditions (cycling rate, temperature, etc.) and for robust self-consistent modeling techniques that can be used for diagnostic analysis of cell data as well as forecasting of future performance. Analogous issues exist for aging effects on cell conductance and available power. To address these needs, a modeling capability was developed that provides a systematic analysis of the contributing factors to battery performance loss over aging and to act as a regression/prediction platform for cell performance. The modeling basis is a summation of self-consistent chemical kinetics rate expressions, which as individual expressions each covers a distinct mechanism (e.g., loss of active host sites, lithium loss), but collectively account for the net loss of premier metrics (e.g., capacity) over time for a particular characterization condition. Specifically, sigmoid-based rate expressions are utilized to describe each contribution to performance loss. Through additional mathematical development another tier of expressions is derived and used to perform differential analyses and segregate irreversible versus reversible contributions, as well as to determine concentration profiles over cell aging for affected Li+ ion inventory and fraction of active sites that remain at each time step. Reversible fade components are surmised by comparing fade rates at fast versus slow cycling conditions. The model is easily utilized for predictive

  18. Computer model for electrochemical cell performance loss over time in terms of capacity, power, and conductance (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.

    2015-09-01

    Available capacity, power, and cell conductance figure centrally into performance characterization of electrochemical cells (such as Li-ion cells) over their service life. For example, capacity loss in Li-ion cells is due to a combination of mechanisms, including loss of free available lithium, loss of active host sites, shifts in the potential-capacity curve, etc. Further distinctions can be made regarding irreversible and reversible capacity loss mechanisms. There are tandem needs for accurate interpretation of capacity at characterization conditions (cycling rate, temperature, etc.) and for robust self-consistent modeling techniques that can be used for diagnostic analysis of cell data as well as forecasting of future performance. Analogous issues exist for aging effects on cell conductance and available power. To address these needs, a modeling capability was developed that provides a systematic analysis of the contributing factors to battery performance loss over aging and to act as a regression/prediction platform for cell performance. The modeling basis is a summation of self-consistent chemical kinetics rate expressions, which as individual expressions each covers a distinct mechanism (e.g., loss of active host sites, lithium loss), but collectively account for the net loss of premier metrics (e.g., capacity) over time for a particular characterization condition. Specifically, sigmoid-based rate expressions are utilized to describe each contribution to performance loss. Through additional mathematical development another tier of expressions is derived and used to perform differential analyses and segregate irreversible versus reversible contributions, as well as to determine concentration profiles over cell aging for affected Li+ ion inventory and fraction of active sites that remain at each time step. Reversible fade components are surmised by comparing fade rates at fast versus slow cycling conditions. The model is easily utilized for predictive

  19. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1987-04-20

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  20. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Graham, Robert A.; Morosin, Bruno

    1988-01-01

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

  1. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1988-11-08

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  2. Power to Production: Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Univ., Lowell. Tsongas Industrial History Center.

    This field trip program consists of a 90-minute interpretive tour and a 90-minute hands-on workshop. The tour and workshop explore the role of water power in the Industrial Revolution. On the tour, students discover firsthand the unique resources of Lowell, Massachusetts, and the Park, while the workshop brings these historic resources to life as…

  3. Behavior Change Strategies for Successful Long-Term Weight Loss: Focusing on Dietary and Physical Activity Adherence, Not Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongu, Nobuko; Kataura, Martha P.; Block, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals guide individuals in a successful long-term weight loss program. A program should focus on behavioral changes (improving eating habits and physical activity), not just weight loss. In order to do this, Extension professionals should implement behavior change strategies that motivate individuals to…

  4. Experimental load capacity and power loss of herringbone grooved gas lubricated journal bearings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.; Fleming, D. P.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Load capacity, attitude angle, and power loss were determined for 1-1/2-in.-diam herringbone grooved journal bearings operating in air to speeds of 60,000 rpm. Results showed that groove-to-ridge-clearance ratios of 2.0 to 2.4 give a greater load capacity than do ratios outside this optimum range. Agreement with a small-eccentricity pressure perturbation theory was good for groove-to-ridge-clearance ratios in the optimum range. Power loss, relative to that calculated for a plain bearing of the same dimensions, did not vary widely for the range of geometric variables used. Relative power loss generally increased with speed and was generally comparable to that for a plain bearing.

  5. Power losses of soft magnetic composite materials under two-dimensional excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. G.; Zhong, J. J.; Ramsden, V. S.; Guo, Y. G.

    1999-04-01

    Soft magnetic composite materials produced by powder metallurgy techniques can be very useful for construction of low cost small motors. However, the rotational core losses and the corresponding B-H relationships of soft magnetic composite materials with two-dimensional rotating fluxes have neither been supplied by the manufacturers nor reported in the literature. This article reports the core loss measurement of a soft magnetic composite material, SOMALOY™ 500, Höganäs AB, Sweden, under two-dimensional excitations. The principle of measurement, testing system, and power loss calculation are presented. The results are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced brush and finger seal technologies offer reduced leakage rates over conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines. To address engine manufacturers concerns about the heat generation and power loss from these contacting seals, brush, finger, and labyrinth seals were tested in the NASA High Speed, High Temperature Turbine Seal Test Rig. Leakage and power loss test results are compared for these competing seals for operating conditions up to 922 K (1200 F) inlet air temperature, 517 KPa (75 psid) across the seal, and surface velocities up to 366 m/s (1200 ft/s).

  7. Emergency preparedness for power outages and wi-fi loss: tips for students and educators of online courses.

    PubMed

    Heithaus, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Severe weather can impact online education due to a loss of power and Internet access that can last hours or weeks. Planning for such losses is essential to enable participation in the online classroom. This article discusses measures that can be used to maintain an online presence in the event of a power outage or loss of Wi-Fi. PMID:25647316

  8. Using Reanalysis Data for the Prediction of Seasonal Wind Turbine Power Losses Due to Icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtch, D.; Mullendore, G. L.; Delene, D. J.; Storm, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Plains region of the United States is home to a significant amount of potential wind energy. However, in winter months capturing this potential power is severely impacted by the meteorological conditions, in the form of icing. Predicting the expected loss in power production due to icing is a valuable parameter that can be used in wind turbine operations, determination of wind turbine site locations and long-term energy estimates which are used for financing purposes. Currently, losses due to icing must be estimated when developing predictions for turbine feasibility and financing studies, while icing maps, a tool commonly used in Europe, are lacking in the United States. This study uses the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset in conjunction with turbine production data to investigate various methods of predicting seasonal losses (October-March) due to icing at two wind turbine sites located 121 km apart in North Dakota. The prediction of icing losses is based on temperature and relative humidity thresholds and is accomplished using three methods. For each of the three methods, the required atmospheric variables are determined in one of two ways: using industry-specific software to correlate anemometer data in conjunction with the MERRA dataset and using only the MERRA dataset for all variables. For each season, a percentage of the total expected generated power lost due to icing is determined and compared to observed losses from the production data. An optimization is performed in order to determine the relative humidity threshold that minimizes the difference between the predicted and observed values. Eight seasons of data are used to determine an optimal relative humidity threshold, and a further three seasons of data are used to test this threshold. Preliminary results have shown that the optimized relative humidity threshold for the northern turbine is higher than the southern turbine for all methods

  9. Analysis on heat loss characteristics of a 10 kV HTS power substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yuping; Dai, Shaotao; Song, Naihao; Zhang, Jingye; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhiqin; Zhou, Weiwei; Wei, Zhourong; Lin, Liangzhen; Xiao, Liye

    2014-09-01

    A 10 kV High Temperature Superconducting power substation (10 kV HTS substation), supported by Chinese State 863 projects, was developed and has been running to supply power for several factories for more than two years at an industrial park of Baiyin, Gansu province in Northwest China. The system of the 10 kV HTS substation compositions, including a HTS cable, a HTS transformer, a SFCL, and a SMES, are introduced. The SMES works at liquid helium temperature and the other three apparatus operates under liquid nitrogen condition. There are mainly four types of heat losses existing in each HTS apparatus of the 10 kV HTS substation, including AC loss, Joule heat loss, conductive heat, and leak-in heat from cryostat. A small quantity of AC loss still exists due to the harmonic component of the current when it carries DC for HTS apparatus. The principle and basis for analysis of the heat losses are introduced and the total heat loss of each apparatus are calculated or estimated, which agree well with the test result. The analysis and result presented are of importance for the design of the refrigeration system.

  10. Power loss of a single electron charge distribution confined in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mehramiz, A.; Mahmoodi, J.; Sobhanian, S.

    2011-05-15

    The dielectric tensor for a quantum plasma is derived by using a linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory. The wave functions for a nanostructure bound system have been investigated. Finally, the power loss for an oscillating charge distribution of a mixed state will be calculated, using the dielectric function formalism.

  11. Loss rate of NO y from a power plant plume based on aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillani, N. V.; Luria, M.; Valente, R. J.; Tanner, R. L.; Imhoff, R. E.; Meagher, J. F.

    1998-09-01

    This study was motivated by the recent work of Buhr et al. [1996] which reported losses of NOy from large power plant plumes as high as 0.25 hour-1, much higher than generally accepted values. If true, conclusions pertaining to the efficiency of ozone and nitrate production in the lower troposphere would need major revisions. The results of Buhr et al. were based on aircraft measurements in four TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) power plant plumes on July 7, 1995, as part of the Nashville/Middle Tennessee Ozone Study, a measurement program of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS), whereas the results reported in this paper are also based on measurements made in the same SOS study aboard another instrumented aircraft (the TVA helicopter), in plumes of one of these power plants (the Cumberland Steam Plant in northwestern Tennessee) during five different days in 1994 and 1995. Between the 1994 and 1995 sampling periods, emissions of SO2 at the Cumberland plant were reduced by nearly 95% by installation of scrubbers. Our data from the one 1994 day show that the ratio of excess SO2 to NOy, in the plume core increased significantly with plume age, indicating a potentially high differential loss rate of NOy (excess loss of NOy relative to SO2) of about 0.12 hour-1. However, results based on the larger 1995 data set indicate a low differential NOy loss rate of only 0.00±0.03 hour-1, consistent with accepted low loss rates. Because the SOS-Nashville/Middle Tennessee Ozone Study was not specifically designed to explore the NOy loss issue, the question of NOy loss rates in plumes is not currently resolved and additional focused field studies are needed.

  12. Emissivity-corrected power loss calibration for lock-in thermography measurements on silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, Martin; Walter, Benjamin; Meinhardt, Christoph; Ebser, Jan; Kwapil, Wolfram; Warta, Wilhelm

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes power loss calibration procedures with implemented emissivity correction. The determination of our emissivity correction matrix does neither rely on blackbody reference measurements nor on the knowledge of any sample temperatures. To describe the emissivity-corrected power calibration procedures in detail, we review the theory behind lock-in thermography and show experimentally that the lock-in signal is proportional to the power dissipation in the solar cell. Experiments show the successful application of our emissivity correction procedure, which significantly improves the informative value of lock-in thermography images and the reliability of the conclusions drawn from these images.

  13. AC loss in high-temperature superconducting conductors, cables and windings for power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, M. P.; Rieger, J.; Hussennether, V.; Leghissa, M.

    2004-05-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) transformers and reactor coils promise decreased weight and volume and higher efficiency. A critical design parameter for such devices is the AC loss in the conductor. The state of the art for AC-loss reduction in HTS power devices is described, starting from the loss in the single HTS tape. Improved tape manufacturing techniques have led to a significant decrease in the magnetization loss. Transport-current loss is decreased by choosing the right operating current and temperature. The role of tape dimensions, filament twist and resistive matrix is discussed and a comparison is made between state-of-the-art BSCCO and YBCO tapes. In transformer and reactor coils the AC loss in the tape is influenced by adjacent tapes in the coil, fields from other coils, overcurrents and higher harmonics. These factors are accounted for by a new AC-loss prediction model. Field components perpendicular to the tape are minimized by optimizing the coil design and by flux guidance pieces. High-current windings are made of Roebel conductors with transposed tapes. The model iteratively finds the temperature distribution in the winding and predicts the onset of thermal instability. We have fabricated and tested several AC windings and used them to validate the model. Now we can confidently use the model as an engineering tool for designing HTS windings and for determining the necessary tape properties.

  14. Numerical power balance and free energy loss analysis for solar cells including optical, thermodynamic, and electrical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich, Johannes Höffler, Hannes; Würfel, Uli; Rein, Stefan

    2013-11-28

    A method for analyzing the power losses of solar cells is presented, supplying a complete balance of the incident power, the optical, thermodynamic, and electrical power losses and the electrical output power. The involved quantities have the dimension of a power density (units: W/m{sup 2}), which permits their direct comparison. In order to avoid the over-representation of losses arising from the ultraviolet part of the solar spectrum, a method for the analysis of the electrical free energy losses is extended to include optical losses. This extended analysis does not focus on the incident solar power of, e.g., 1000 W/m{sup 2} and does not explicitly include the thermalization losses and losses due to the generation of entropy. Instead, the usable power, i.e., the free energy or electro-chemical potential of the electron-hole pairs is set as reference value, thereby, overcoming the ambiguities of the power balance. Both methods, the power balance and the free energy loss analysis, are carried out exemplarily for a monocrystalline p-type silicon metal wrap through solar cell with passivated emitter and rear (MWT-PERC) based on optical and electrical measurements and numerical modeling. The methods give interesting insights in photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion, provide quantitative analyses of all loss mechanisms, and supply the basis for the systematic technological improvement of the device.

  15. Synthesis of a low loss Mn-Zn ferrite for power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakaloudi, Vasiliki; Zaspalis, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    Current market trends of the switching power supplies industry require even lower energy losses in power conversion systems with maintenance of satisfactory initial permeability levels. Typical operation conditions refer to a frequency of 100 kHz, an induction level of 200 mT and a steady state temperature of 100° C. In this work the development of a polycrystalline Mn-Zn ferrite material that exhibits initial relative magnetic permeability above 2500 and very low power losses at 100 kHz, 200 mmT and 100° C is presented. The Mn-Zn ferrite samples were prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method. Sintering was performed under controlled atmosphere conditions. The combinatorial role of TiO2 and CoO together with Zn content, as well as the effects of the process parameters on the magnetic performance of the Mn-Zn ferrite was evaluated. It is shown that the development of the adequate polycrystalline microstructure that is characterized by (a) high sintered density, (b) homogenous grain size that is free of morphological or chemical pinning defects and (c) high resistivity grain boundary structure, can be achieved by means of appropriate compositional and dopant adjustment, anisotropy control and specific resistivity optimization. The newly developed Mn-Zn ferrite is characterized by high sintered density of 4.91 g/cm3, initial magnetic permeability of 2512 (at 10 kHz, 0.1 mT, 25 °C), high saturation magnetic flux density of 560 mT (at 10 kHz, 1200 A/m, 25 °C) and very low power losses (Pv) of 224 mW/cm3 (at 100 kHz, 200 mT, 100 °C) combined with very low power losses of 470 mW/cm3 even at room temperature, establishing it as ideal for power applications.

  16. A Student Activity on Visual Resolving Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, T. H.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple activity in which students measure the resolving power of their eyes. The approach can be used at various levels of sophistication with students having a wide variety of skills and scientific training. We discuss our experiences using this activity with a class of non-science majors as well as with a group of pre-engineering…

  17. Influence of microstructure on permeability dispersion and power loss of NiZn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Jing, Yulan

    2008-05-01

    Permeability spectra of NiZn ferrite with different microstructures had been resolved into contributions of domain wall resonance and spin rotation relaxation. The fitting results of permeability dispersion revealed the relationships among domain wall resonance, spin rotation relaxation mechanisms, and microstructures. Pcv (power loss) was analyzed by dividing Pcv into Ph (hysteresis loss) and Pe+Pr (eddy current loss and residual loss) from the frequency dependence of the power loss. When excited under large flux density, sample with larger average grain size and closed pores could obtain lower Pcv. This could be attributed to the fact that closed pores were not easy to block domain wall movement and grain boundaries became the predominant domain wall pinning factor. However, for the low induction condition, sample with small grain size had better performance on Pcv due to the fact that influence of the closed pores was more significant. With increasing frequency, Pe+Pr gradually became the predominant factors in Pcv, so the sample with small grain size was more suitable for high-frequency use.

  18. Mass Loss from the Nuclei of Active Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, Michael; Kraemer, Steven B.; George, Ian M.

    2003-01-01

    Blueshifted absorption lines in the UV and X-ray spectra of active galaxies reveal the presence of massive outflows of ionized gas from their nuclei. The intrinsic UV and X-ray absorbers show large global covering factors of the central continuum source, and the inferred mass loss rates are comparable to the mass accretion rates. Many absorbers show variable ionic column densities which are attributed to a combination of variable ionizing flux and motion of gas into and out of the line of sight . Detailed studies of the intrinsic absorbers. with the assistance of monitoring observations and photoionization models. provide constraints on their kinematics] physical conditions. and locations relative to the central continuum source. which range from the inner nucleus (approx.0.01 pc) to the galactic disk or halo (approx.10 kpc) . Dynamical models that make use of thermal winds. radiation pressure. and/or hydromagnetic flows have reached a level of sophistication that permits comparisons with the observational constraints .

  19. Reflectance loss of prospective solar concentrator mirrors in erosive environments. The Crosbyton Solar Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bethea, R.M.; Barringer, M.T.; Chin, S.; Collier, E.G.; Cooper, A.M.; Reichert, J.D. Jr.; Williams, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    The problem addressed in this phase of the Crosbyton Solar Power Project was that of the effect of weathering of solar concentrator mirrors proposed for use in the fixed-mirror, distributed-focus (solar bowl) system with particular emphasis on erosion due to exposure during dust storms. The specific objectives of this research were to evaluate the mirrors with respect to initial reflectance, loss of reflectance due to dust storms and other outdoor exposure phenomena, and dimensional stability; and to develop a rapid technique for the simulation of dust storms so that a model for such reflectance loss as a function of exposure could be developed.

  20. TLS-like temperature and power dependence for loss in superconducting coplanar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Khalil, M.; Osborn, K.

    2013-03-01

    Loss in 2D superconducting coplanar resonators and qubits is often limited by two-level systems thought to be on the metal and substrate surfaces. While these TLSs are thought to be similar to those found in amorphous dielectrics, their nature is generally different. In most experiments, loss in coplanar resonators shows power and temperature dependence which disagrees with TLS theory. Here we will show new data from high-quality Al on sapphire coplanar resonators which is in qualitative agreement with TLS theory, and discuss the quantitative differences to TLS theory. The data on surface TLS behavior will be compared to resonator measurements of ALD-grown thin films.

  1. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; and others

    2014-02-12

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict

  2. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, Nicola; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Green, David L; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B; Kramer, G.; McLean, Adam G; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, C. K.; Podesta, M.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Sabbagh, S. A.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict

  3. Using reanalysis data for the prediction of seasonal wind turbine power losses due to icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtch, Daniel G.

    The Northern Plains region of the United States is home to a significant amount of potential wind energy. However, in winter months capturing this potential power is severely impacted by the meteorological conditions, in the form of icing. Predicting the expected loss in power production due to icing is a valuable parameter that can be used in wind turbine operations, determination of wind turbine site locations and long-term energy estimates which are used for financing purposes. Currently, losses due to icing must be estimated when developing predictions for turbine feasibility and financing studies, while icing maps, a tool commonly used in Europe, are lacking in the United States. This study uses the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset in conjunction with turbine production data and in-situ wind measurements to investigate six methods of predicting seasonal losses (October-March) due to icing at two sites located in Petersburg, ND and Valley City, ND. The prediction of icing losses is based on temperature and relative humidity thresholds and is accomplished using six methods. Three methods use a Measure-Correlate-Predict (MCP) and flow model (WAsP) analysis for the determination of wind speeds and MERRA for temperature and relative humidity, while three methods use MERRA for all three variables. For each season from 2002 to 2010, the predicted losses due to icing are determined for a range of relative humidity thresholds and compared with observed icing losses. An optimal relative humidity is then determined and tested on all seasons from 2002 to 2013. The prediction methods are then compared to a common practice used in the wind energy industry of assuming a constant percentage loss for icing over the same time period. The three methods using MERRA data alone show severe deficiencies in the accurate determination of wind speeds which leads to a large underprediction in accurate power output. Of the three MCP

  4. Relationship of Physical Activity to Eating Behaviors and Weight Loss in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakicic, John M.; Wing, Rena R.; Winters-Hart, Carena

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether change in physical activity would relate to compliance with changes in dietary intake and eating behaviors in an 18-month behavioral weight loss program, also noting the contribution of exercise to weight loss. Data on 104 women indicated that physical activity related to long-term weight loss and was part of a constellation of…

  5. Self-Directed Weight Loss Strategies: Energy Expenditure Due to Physical Activity Is Not Increased to Achieve Intended Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Elbelt, Ulf; Schuetz, Tatjana; Knoll, Nina; Burkert, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Reduced physical activity and almost unlimited availability of food are major contributors to the development of obesity. With the decline of strenuous work, energy expenditure due to spontaneous physical activity has attracted increasing attention. Our aim was to assess changes in energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits in obese subjects aiming at self-directed weight loss. Methods: Energy expenditure and physical activity patterns were measured with a portable armband device. Nutritional habits were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Results: Data on weight development, energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits were obtained for 105 patients over a six-month period from an initial cohort of 160 outpatients aiming at weight loss. Mean weight loss was −1.5 ± 7.0 kg (p = 0.028). Patients with weight maintenance (n = 75), with substantial weight loss (>5% body weight, n = 20) and with substantial weight gain (>5% body weight, n = 10) did not differ in regard to changes of body weight adjusted energy expenditure components (total energy expenditure: −0.2 kcal/kg/day; non-exercise activity thermogenesis: −0.3 kcal/kg/day; exercise-related activity thermogenesis (EAT): −0.2 kcal/kg/day) or patterns of physical activity (duration of EAT: −2 min/day; steps/day: −156; metabolic equivalent unchanged) measured objectively with a portable armband device. Self-reported consumption frequency of unfavorable food decreased significantly (p = 0.019) over the six-month period. Conclusions: An increase in energy expenditure or changes of physical activity patterns (objectively assessed with a portable armband device) are not employed by obese subjects to achieve self-directed weight loss. However, modified nutritional habits could be detected with the use of a food frequency questionnaire. PMID:26193310

  6. The influence of bending strains on AC power losses in multifilamentary BSCCO-2223/Ag tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Ciszek, M.; Suzuki, H.; Ogawa, J.

    2006-08-01

    Recent advances in the manufacturing of multifilamentary high temperature superconducting composite wires allow for wider practical applications of the conductors, e.g. in power transmission cables, transformers and motors. The wires, based mainly on BSCCO-2223 and YBCO-123 cuprates, are used in the forms of variously shaped coils; therefore they are subjected to different kinds of mechanical stresses and strains. These, in turn, lead to some changes in the physical parameters of the superconducting material, mainly in the critical current density, and thus in the dissipated electromagnetic energy, when subjected to changing magnetic fields and transport currents. In this work we report some experimental results related to the AC loss characteristics of Bi-2223/Ag multifilamentary tapes and their dependences on bending strains. These losses are compared to the losses of virgin, straight tapes. The total AC losses, i.e. transport current and magnetization losses, in the Bi-2223/Ag tapes, were measured by means of the electrical and calorimetric methods. The experimental data obtained are compared with the critical state model predictions for AC loss behaviour in the experimental conditions presented here.

  7. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  8. Effect of physical activity on weight loss, energy expenditure and energy intake during diet induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kelley, David E.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Jakicic, John M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Objective measurements of physical activity (PA), energy expenditure (EE) and energy intake can provide valuable information regarding appropriate strategies for successful sustained weight loss. Design and methods We examined total EE by doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate, PA with activity monitors, and energy intake by the Intake/Balance technique in 116 severely obese undergoing intervention with diet alone (DO) or diet plus PA (D-PA). Results Weight loss of 9.6±6.8 kg resulted in decreased EE which was not minimized in the D-PA group. Comparing the highest and lowest quartiles of increase in PA revealed a lower decrease in TDEE (−122±319 vs. −376±305 kcal/d), elimination of the drop in AEE (83±279 vs. −211±284 kcal/d) and greater weight loss (13.0±7.0 vs. 8.1±6.3 kg). Increased PA was associated with greater adherence to energy restriction and maintenance of greater weight loss during months 7–12. Conclusion Noncompliance to prescribed PA in the DO and D-PA groups partially masked the effects of PA to increase weight loss and to minimize the reduced EE. Increased PA was also associated with improved adherence to prescribed caloric restriction. A strong recommendation needs to be made to improve interventions that promote PA within the context of behavioral weight loss interventions. PMID:23804562

  9. Cochlear Outer-Hair-Cell Power Generation and Viscous Fluid Loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles R; Puria, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of otoacoustic emissions and outer hair cell (OHC) motility, the fundamental question of whether the cochlea produces mechanical power remains controversial. In the present work, direct calculations are performed on power loss due to fluid viscosity and power generated by the OHCs. A three-dimensional box model of the mouse cochlea is used with a feed-forward/feed-backward approximation representing the organ of Corti cytoarchitecture. The model is fit to in vivo basilar membrane motion with one free parameter for the OHCs. The calculations predict that the total power output from the three rows of OHCs can be over three orders of magnitude greater than the acoustic input power at 10 dB sound pressure level (SPL). While previous work shows that the power gain, or the negative damping, diminishes with intensity, we show explicitly based on our model that OHC power output increases and saturates with SPL. The total OHC power output is about 2 pW at 80 dB SPL, with a maximum of about 10 fW per OHC. PMID:26792556

  10. Cochlear Outer-Hair-Cell Power Generation and Viscous Fluid Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles R.; Puria, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of otoacoustic emissions and outer hair cell (OHC) motility, the fundamental question of whether the cochlea produces mechanical power remains controversial. In the present work, direct calculations are performed on power loss due to fluid viscosity and power generated by the OHCs. A three-dimensional box model of the mouse cochlea is used with a feed-forward/feed-backward approximation representing the organ of Corti cytoarchitecture. The model is fit to in vivo basilar membrane motion with one free parameter for the OHCs. The calculations predict that the total power output from the three rows of OHCs can be over three orders of magnitude greater than the acoustic input power at 10 dB sound pressure level (SPL). While previous work shows that the power gain, or the negative damping, diminishes with intensity, we show explicitly based on our model that OHC power output increases and saturates with SPL. The total OHC power output is about 2 pW at 80 dB SPL, with a maximum of about 10 fW per OHC. PMID:26792556

  11. Low-power SXGA active matrix OLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Prache, Olivier; Ghosh, Amal

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the design and first evaluation of a full-color 1280×3×1024 pixel, active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) microdisplay that operates at a low power of 200mW under typical operating conditions of 35fL, and offers a precision 30-bit RGB digital interface in a compact size (0.78-inch diagonal active area). The new system architecture developed by eMagin for the SXGA microdisplay, based on a separate FPGA driver and AMOLED display chip, offers several benefits, including better power efficiency, cost-effectiveness, more features for improved performance, and increased system flexibility.

  12. Minimalist coupled evolution model for stellar X-ray activity, rotation, mass loss, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Owen, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Late-type main-sequence stars exhibit an X-ray to bolometric flux ratio that depends on {tilde{R}o}, the ratio of rotation period to convective turnover time, as {tilde{R}o}^{-ζ } with 2 ≤ ζ ≤ 3 for {tilde{R}o} > 0.13, but saturates with |ζ| < 0.2 for {tilde{R}o} < 0.13. Saturated stars are younger than unsaturated stars and show a broader spread of rotation rates and X-ray activity. The unsaturated stars have magnetic fields and rotation speeds that scale roughly with the square root of their age, though possibly flattening for stars older than the Sun. The connection between faster rotators, stronger fields, and higher activity has been established observationally, but a theory for the unified time-evolution of X-ray luminosity, rotation, magnetic field and mass loss that captures the above trends has been lacking. Here we derive a minimalist holistic framework for the time evolution of these quantities built from combining a Parker wind with new ingredients: (1) explicit sourcing of both the thermal energy launching the wind and the X-ray luminosity via dynamo produced magnetic fields; (2) explicit coupling of X-ray activity and mass-loss saturation to dynamo saturation (via magnetic helicity build-up and convection eddy shredding); (3) use of coronal equilibrium to determine how magnetic energy is divided into wind and X-ray contributions. For solar-type stars younger than the Sun, we infer conduction to be a subdominant power loss compared to X-rays and wind. For older stars, conduction is more important, possibly quenching the wind and reducing angular momentum loss. We focus on the time evolution for stars younger than the Sun, highlighting what is possible for further generalizations. Overall, the approach shows promise towards a unified explanation of all of the aforementioned observational trends.

  13. Influence of size distribution and field amplitude on specific loss power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boskovic, M.; Goya, G. F.; Vranjes-Djuric, S.; Jovic, N.; Jancar, B.; Antic, B.

    2015-03-01

    Herein we present the results of specific loss power (SLP) analysis of polydisperse water based ferrofluids, Fe3O4/PEG200 and Fe3O4/PEG6000, with average Fe3O4 particle size of 9 nm and 11 nm, respectively. Specific loss power was measured in alternating magnetic field of various amplitudes and at fixed frequency of 580.5 kHz. Maximum SLP values acquired were 195 W/g for Fe3O4/PEG200 and 60 W/g for Fe3O4/PEG6000 samples. The samples were labeled as superparamagnetic by magnetization measurements, but SLP field dependence showed deviation from the behavior predicted by the commonly employed linear response theory. The scope of this theory for both samples with wide particle size distribution is discussed. Deviation from the expected behavior is explained by referring to polydisperse nature of the samples and field dependent relaxation rates.

  14. Status of several Stirling loss characterization efforts and their significance for Stirling space power development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA-Lewis and other U.S. Government agencies have supported experimental and analytical programs for the characterization of Stirling cycle engines' thermodynamic losses, with a view to the improvement of Stirling engine design capabilities. The Space Power Demonstrator Engine is noted to have benefited from these efforts; test data and model predictions suggest that even greater performance improvements would be obtainable through additional modifications of engine regenerator and heater hardware.

  15. Solar power generation by use of Stirling engine and heat loss analysis of its cavity receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tassawar

    Since concentrated power generation by Stirling engine has the highest efficiency therefore efficient power generation by concentrated systems using a Stirling engine was a primary motive of this research. A 1 kW Stirling engine was used to generate solar power using a Fresnel lens as a concentrator. Before operating On-Sun test, engine's performance test was conducted by combustion test. Propane gas with air was used to provide input heat to the Stirling Engine and 350W power was generated with 14% efficiency of the engine. Two kinds of receivers were used for On-Sun test, first type was the Inconel tubes with trapped helium gas and the second one was the heat pipe. Heat pipe with sodium as a working fluid is considered the best approach to transfer the uniform heat from the receiver to the helium gas in the heater head of the engine. A Number of On-Sun experiments were performed to generate the power. A minimum 1kW input power was required to generate power from the Stirling engine but it was concluded that the available Fresnel lens was not enough to provide sufficient input to the Stirling engine and hence engine was lagged to generate the solar power. Later on, for a high energy input a Beam Down system was also used to concentrate the solar light on the heater head of the Stirling engine. Beam down solar system in Masdar City UAE, constructed in 2009 is a variation of central receiver plant with cassegrainian optics. Around 1.5kW heat input was achieved from the Beam Down System and it was predicted that the engine receiver at beam down has the significant heat losses of about 900W. These high heat losses were the major hurdles to get the operating temperature (973K) of the heat pipes; hence power could not be generated even during the Beam Down test. Experiments were also performed to find the most suitable Cavity Receiver configuration for maximum solar radiation utilizations by engine receiver. Dimensionless parameter aperture ration (AR=d/D) and aperture

  16. Losses at magnetic nulls in pulsed-power transmission line systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, C. W.; Pointon, T. D.; Savage, M. E.; Seidel, D. B.; Magne, I.; Vézinet, R.

    2006-04-01

    Pulsed-power systems operating in the terawatt regime must deal with large electron flows in vacuum transmission lines. In most parts of these transmission lines the electrons are constrained by the self-magnetic field to flow parallel to the conductors. In very low impedance systems, such as those used to drive Z-pinch radiation sources, the currents from multiple transmission lines are added together. This addition necessarily involves magnetic nulls that connect the positive and negative electrodes. The resultant local loss of magnetic insulation results in electron losses at the anode in the vicinity of the nulls. The lost current due to the magnetic null might or might not be appreciable. In some cases the lost current due to the null is not large, but is spatially localized, and may create a gas and plasma release from the anode that can lead to an excessive loss, and possibly to catastrophic damage to the hardware. In this paper we describe an analytic model that uses one geometric parameter (aside from straightforward hardware size measurements) that determines the loss to the anode, and the extent of the loss region when the driving source and load are known. The parameter can be calculated in terms of the magnetic field in the region of the null calculated when no electron flow is present. The model is compared to some experimental data, and to simulations of several different hardware geometries, including some cases with multiple nulls, and unbalanced feeds.

  17. Losses at magnetic nulls in pulsed-power transmission line systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Pointon, T.D.; Savage, M.E.; Seidel, D.B.; Magne, I.; Vezinet, R.

    2006-04-15

    Pulsed-power systems operating in the terawatt regime must deal with large electron flows in vacuum transmission lines. In most parts of these transmission lines the electrons are constrained by the self-magnetic field to flow parallel to the conductors. In very low impedance systems, such as those used to drive Z-pinch radiation sources, the currents from multiple transmission lines are added together. This addition necessarily involves magnetic nulls that connect the positive and negative electrodes. The resultant local loss of magnetic insulation results in electron losses at the anode in the vicinity of the nulls. The lost current due to the magnetic null might or might not be appreciable. In some cases the lost current due to the null is not large, but is spatially localized, and may create a gas and plasma release from the anode that can lead to an excessive loss, and possibly to catastrophic damage to the hardware. In this paper we describe an analytic model that uses one geometric parameter (aside from straightforward hardware size measurements) that determines the loss to the anode, and the extent of the loss region when the driving source and load are known. The parameter can be calculated in terms of the magnetic field in the region of the null calculated when no electron flow is present. The model is compared to some experimental data, and to simulations of several different hardware geometries, including some cases with multiple nulls, and unbalanced feeds.

  18. Losses at magnetic nulls in pulsed-power transmission line systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, I.; Savage, Mark Edward; Seidel, David Bruce; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David; Vezinet, R.

    2004-08-01

    Pulsed-power systems operating in the terawatt regime must deal with large electron flows in vacuum transmission lines. In most parts of these transmission lines the electrons are constrained by the self-magnetic field to flow parallel to the conductors. In very low impedance systems, such as those used to drive Z-pinch radiation sources, the currents from multiple transmission lines are added together. This addition necessarily involves magnetic nulls that connect the positive and negative electrodes. The resultant local loss of magnetic insulation results in electron losses at the anode in the vicinity of the nulls. The lost current due to the magnetic null might or might not be appreciable. In some cases the lost current due to the null is not large, but is spatially localized, and may create a gas and plasma release from the anode that can lead to an excessive loss, and possibly to catastrophic damage to the hardware. In this paper we describe an analytic model that uses one geometric parameter (aside from straightforward hardware size measurements) that determines the loss to the anode, and the extent of the loss region when the driving source and load are known. The parameter can be calculated in terms of the magnetic field in the region of the null calculated when no electron flow is present. The model is compared to some experimental data, and to simulations of several different hardware geometries, including some cases with multiple nulls, and unbalanced feeds.

  19. Active control of the resistive wall mode with power saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Liu Yue; Liu Yueqiang

    2012-01-15

    An analytic model of non-linear feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode is presented. The non-linearity comes from either the current or the voltage saturation of the control coil power supply. For the so-called flux-to-current control, the current saturation of active coils always results in the loss of control. On the contrary, the flux-to-voltage control scheme tolerates certain degree of the voltage saturation. The minimal voltage limit is calculated, below which the control will be lost.

  20. Improved designs for p-i-n OLEDs towards the minimal power loss of devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dashan

    2014-05-01

    Currently, the low yield, high power loss, and poor stability of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) panels are remaining as the obstacles to the fast growth of the OLED industry, especially for the lighting application. The p-i-n OLEDs have been widely recognized as the promising method to circumvent these bottleneck factors, due to the unique merit of the electrical doping to enable low power loss. In p-i-n OLEDs, the frequently used n-doped electron transport layers (n-ETL1) such as n-BCP, n-Alq3 possess markedly lower conductivities but better capabilities of injecting electrons into ETL such as BCP, Alq3, as compared to another class of n-doped ETLs (n-ETL2), e.g., n-NTCDA, n-PTCDA, n-C60. Thus, in order to minimize the electron loss, we provide the structure of uniting two n-doped layers, cathode/ n-ETL2/ n-ETL1/ ETL. In p-i-n OLEDs, the hole current injected from the single p-doped hole transport layer (p-HTL) into the neat HTL must be limited, because the higher conductivity p-HTL has the higher lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level, leading to a larger hole transport energy barrier (φB) at the interface with the neat HTL. Therefore, in order to minimize the hole loss, we suggest the structure of uniting two p-HTLs, anode/ p-HTL2/ p-HTL1/ HTL. The p-HTL2 possesses high-lying HOMO level and thereby high conductivity, decreasing the ohmic loss in the hole conduction; the p-HTL1 features a low-lying HOMO level, reducing the φB.

  1. Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense active matter, from bacterial suspensions and microtubule bundles driven by motor proteins to cellular monolayers and synthetic Janus particles, is characterized by mesoscale turbulence, which is the emergence of chaotic flow structures. By immersing an ordered array of symmetric rotors in an active fluid, we introduce a microfluidic system that exploits spontaneous symmetry breaking in mesoscale turbulence to generate work. The lattice of rotors self-organizes into a spin state where neighboring discs continuously rotate in permanent alternating directions due to combined hydrodynamic and elastic effects. Our virtual prototype demonstrates a new research direction for the design of micromachines powered by the nematohydrodynamic properties of active turbulence. PMID:27419229

  2. Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulence.

    PubMed

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M

    2016-07-01

    Dense active matter, from bacterial suspensions and microtubule bundles driven by motor proteins to cellular monolayers and synthetic Janus particles, is characterized by mesoscale turbulence, which is the emergence of chaotic flow structures. By immersing an ordered array of symmetric rotors in an active fluid, we introduce a microfluidic system that exploits spontaneous symmetry breaking in mesoscale turbulence to generate work. The lattice of rotors self-organizes into a spin state where neighboring discs continuously rotate in permanent alternating directions due to combined hydrodynamic and elastic effects. Our virtual prototype demonstrates a new research direction for the design of micromachines powered by the nematohydrodynamic properties of active turbulence. PMID:27419229

  3. 26 CFR 1.469-2 - Passive activity loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property is substantially appreciated if the fair market value of the interest in property exceeds 120...), section 1211 (relating to the limitation on capital losses), or section 1231 (relating to property used in... payment to a partner for services or the use of capital that is described in section 707(c), including...

  4. Use of Transition Modeling to Enable the Computation of Losses for Variable-Speed Power Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the penalties associated with using a variable speed power turbine (VSPT) in a rotorcraft capable of vertical takeoff and landing, various analysis tools are required. Such analysis tools must be able to model the flow accurately within the operating envelope of VSPT. For power turbines low Reynolds numbers and a wide range of the incidence angles, positive and negative, due to the variation in the shaft speed at relatively fixed corrected flows, characterize this envelope. The flow in the turbine passage is expected to be transitional and separated at high incidence. The turbulence model of Walters and Leylek was implemented in the NASA Glenn-HT code to enable a more accurate analysis of such flows. Two-dimensional heat transfer predictions of flat plate flow and two-dimensional and three-dimensional heat transfer predictions on a turbine blade were performed and reported herein. Heat transfer computations were performed because it is a good marker for transition. The final goal is to be able to compute the aerodynamic losses. Armed with the new transition model, total pressure losses for three-dimensional flow of an Energy Efficient Engine (E3) tip section cascade for a range of incidence angles were computed in anticipation of the experimental data. The results obtained form a loss bucket for the chosen blade.

  5. The role of exercise and physical activity in weight loss and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Lavie, Carl J; Earnest, Conrad P; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This review explores the role of physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) in the prevention of weight gain, initial weight loss, weight maintenance, and the obesity paradox. In particular, we will focus the discussion on the expected initial weight loss from different ET programs, and explore intensity/volume relationships. Based on the present literature, unless the overall volume of aerobic ET is very high, clinically significant weight loss is unlikely to occur. Also, ET also has an important role in weight regain after initial weight loss. Overall, aerobic ET programs consistent with public health recommendations may promote up to modest weight loss (~2 kg), however the weight loss on an individual level is highly heterogeneous. Clinicians should educate their patients on reasonable expectations of weight loss based on their physical activity program and emphasize that numerous health benefits occur from PA programs in the absence of weight loss. PMID:24438736

  6. Magnetic particle hyperthermia: power losses under circularly polarized field in anisotropic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nándori, I; Rácz, J

    2012-12-01

    The deterministic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation has been used to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of magnetization and the specific power loss in magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy driven by a rotating magnetic field, generalizing the results obtained for the isotropic case found by P. F. de Châtel, I. Nándori, J. Hakl, S. Mészáros, and K. Vad [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 21, 124202 (2009)]. As opposed to many applications of magnetization reversal in single-domain ferromagnetic particles, where losses must be minimized, in this paper, we study the mechanisms of dissipation used in cancer therapy by hyperthermia, which requires the enhancement of energy losses. We show that for circularly polarized field, the energy loss per cycle is decreased by the anisotropy compared to the isotropic case when only dynamical effects are taken into account. Thus, in this case, in the low-frequency limit, a better heating efficiency can be achieved for isotropic nanoparticles. The possible role of thermal fluctuations is also discussed. Results obtained are compared to experimental data. PMID:23367947

  7. High-power gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier with distributed wall losses and attenuating severs

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Shin, Y.Y.; You, Y.C.; Chen, L.K.

    2005-04-15

    Distributed-loss gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWTs) with high-gain, broadband, and millimeter-wave capabilities have been demonstrated. Most structures with distributed wall losses are stabilized in gyro-TWTs that operate at low beam currents. Attenuating severs are added to the interaction circuit of a distributed-loss gyro-TWT to prevent high beam currents that result in mode competition. Simulation results show that gyrotron backward-wave oscillations (gyro-BWOs) are not effectively suppressed by the lossy section; in contrast, the severed sections can effectively enhance the start-oscillation threshold of gyro-BWOs in the proposed gyro-TWT. Meanwhile, localized reflective oscillations seem not to occur in the gyro-TWT unless it operates at a high magnetic field or with a high interaction length. The stable gyro-TWT, operating in the low-loss TE{sub 01} mode, is predicted to yield a peak output power of 405 kW at 33 GHz with an efficiency of 20%, a saturated gain of 77 dB and a 3 dB bandwidth of 2.5 GHz for a 100 kV, 20 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of {delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z}=5%.

  8. Single and three-phase AC losses in HTS superconducting power transmission line prototype cables

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Boenig, H.J.; Maley, M.P.; Coulter, J.Y.; Fleshler, S.

    1997-11-01

    AC losses in two, one-meter-long lengths of HTS prototype multi-strand conductors (PMC`s) are measured with a temperature-difference calorimeter. Both single-phase and three-phase losses are examined with ac currents up to 1,000 A rms. The calorimeter, designed specifically for these measurements, has a precision of 1 mW. PMC {number_sign}1 has two helically-wound, non-insulated layers of HTS tape (19 tapes per layer), each layer wrapped with opposite pitch. PMC {number_sign}2 is identical except for insulation between the layers. The measured ac losses show no significant effect of interlayer insulation and depend on about the third power of the current--a result in agreement with the Bean-Norris model adapted to the double-helix configuration. The three-phase losses are a factor of two higher than those exhibited by a single isolated conductor, indicating a significant interaction between phases.

  9. The central power source in active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Roger; Stoner, Ronald

    Potential sources for the central power in AGN are examined. The continuum, emission line profiles, and time variability and broad emission line region for AGN are analyzed. The supermassive black hole hypothesis, the supermassive magnetized core model of Kundt (1978), and the model of Stoner and Ptak (1984) in which the supermassive stars maintain a kind of long-term quasi-stability, but accretion is balanced by mass loss and spherical bursts rather than in jets are considered. It is argued that the hypothesis that the supermassive blackholes are the central engines for AGN is based on theoretical principles; however, AGN emission line profiles and variability suggest a spherical geometry for the observed components of these engines. Also the supermassive black hole models do not account for all the AGN observations.

  10. Development of a current collection loss management system for SDI homopolar power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, W.F. III.

    1987-01-01

    High speed, high power density current collection systems have been identified as an enabling technology required to construct homopolar power supplies to meet SDI missions. This work is part of a three-year effort directed towards the analysis, experimental verification, and prototype construction of a current collection system designed to operated continuously at 2 kA/cm{sup 2}, at a rubbing speed of 200 m/s, and with acceptable losses in a space environment. To data, no system has achieved these conditions simultaneously. This is the annual report covering the first year period of performance on DOE contract DE-AC03-86SF16518. Major areas covered include design and construction of a cryogenically-cooled brush test rig, design of a high speed brush test rig, loss analysis of the current collection system, and an application study which defines the air core homopolar construction necessary to achieve the goal of 80--90 kW/kg generator power density. 15 figs.

  11. Development of a current collection loss management system for SDI homopolar power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    High speed, high power density current collection systems have been identified as an enabling technology required to construct homopolar power supplies to meet SDI missions. This work is part of a three-year effort directed towards the analysis, experimental verification, and prototype construction of a current collection system designed to operate continuously at 2 kA/cm{sup 2}, at a rubbing speed of 200 m/s, and with acceptable losses in a space environment. To data, no system has achieved these conditions simultaneously. This is the annual report covering the second year period of performance on DOE contract DE-AC03-86SF16518. Major areas covered include design, construction and operation of a cryogenically cooled brush test rig, design and construction of a high speed brush test rig, optimization study for homopolar machines, loss analysis of the current collection system, and an application study which defines the air-core homopolar construction necessary to achieve the goal of 80--90 kW/kg generator power density. 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Analysis of loss of off-site power with a PWR at shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Yoon, W.H.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    In many probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), loss of offsite power (LOOP) when a nuclear power plant is operating was found to be a significant contributor to core damage. The purpose of this study is to provide an analysis of a LOOP event that occurs while a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is shut down. The importance of such an analysis was recognized as part of a study to evaluate the core damage frequency due to a loss of decay heat removal (DHR) capability during an outage. When a PWR is in a shutdown condition, there are relatively few technical specification requirements on the operability of safety systems. In fact, some safety systems are intentionally disabled, i.e., the safety injection system and nonoperating charging pumps. Another problem when the reactor is shut down is that the reactor coolant system (RCS) may be partially drained and the steam generators may be unavailable. To determine the time available for operator actions, given that a LOOP occurs during shutdown and the DHR capability is lost, a simple thermal model has been developed. Similar calculations have been performed for other phases of refueling and maintenance outages. A total core damage frequency due to LOOP while the plant is in shutdown has been calculated to be 5.9 x 10/sup -6//yr. This is approximately twice the core damage frequency calculated for LOOP when the plant is at power.

  13. Extremely low-loss rectification methodology for low-power vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R.; Ryoo, K.; Schlichting, A.; Garcia, E.

    2013-06-01

    Because of its promise for the generation of wireless systems, energy harvesting technology using smart materials is the focus of significant reported effort. Various techniques and methodologies for increasing power extraction have been tested. One of the key issues with the existing techniques is the use of diodes in the harvesting circuits with a typical voltage drop of 0.7 V. Since most of the smart materials, and other transducers, do not produce large voltage outputs, this voltage drop becomes significant in most applications. Hence, there is a need for designing a rectification method that can convert AC to DC with minimal losses. This paper describes a new mechanical rectification scheme, designed using reed switches, in a full-bridge configuration that shows the capability of working with signals from millivolts to a few hundred volts with extremely low losses. The methodology has been tested for piezoelectric energy harvesters undergoing mechanical excitation.

  14. Power-law ansatz in complex systems: Excessive loss of information.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Chang, Chin-De; Chang, Ching-Hao; Tsai, Meng-Xue; Hsu, Nan-Jung; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquity of power-law relations in empirical data displays physicists' love of simple laws and uncovering common causes among seemingly unrelated phenomena. However, many reported power laws lack statistical support and mechanistic backings, not to mention discrepancies with real data are often explained away as corrections due to finite size or other variables. We propose a simple experiment and rigorous statistical procedures to look into these issues. Making use of the fact that the occurrence rate and pulse intensity of crumple sound obey a power law with an exponent that varies with material, we simulate a complex system with two driving mechanisms by crumpling two different sheets together. The probability function of the crumple sound is found to transit from two power-law terms to a bona fide power law as compaction increases. In addition to showing the vicinity of these two distributions in the phase space, this observation nicely demonstrates the effect of interactions to bring about a subtle change in macroscopic behavior and more information may be retrieved if the data are subject to sorting. Our analyses are based on the Akaike information criterion that is a direct measurement of information loss and emphasizes the need to strike a balance between model simplicity and goodness of fit. As a show of force, the Akaike information criterion also found the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and the scale-free model for a brain functional network, a two-dimensional sandpile, and solar flare intensity to suffer an excessive loss of information. They resemble more the crumpled-together ball at low compactions in that there appear to be two driving mechanisms that take turns occurring. PMID:26764792

  15. Power-law ansatz in complex systems: Excessive loss of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Chang, Chin-De; Chang, Ching-Hao; Tsai, Meng-Xue; Hsu, Nan-Jung; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquity of power-law relations in empirical data displays physicists' love of simple laws and uncovering common causes among seemingly unrelated phenomena. However, many reported power laws lack statistical support and mechanistic backings, not to mention discrepancies with real data are often explained away as corrections due to finite size or other variables. We propose a simple experiment and rigorous statistical procedures to look into these issues. Making use of the fact that the occurrence rate and pulse intensity of crumple sound obey a power law with an exponent that varies with material, we simulate a complex system with two driving mechanisms by crumpling two different sheets together. The probability function of the crumple sound is found to transit from two power-law terms to a bona fide power law as compaction increases. In addition to showing the vicinity of these two distributions in the phase space, this observation nicely demonstrates the effect of interactions to bring about a subtle change in macroscopic behavior and more information may be retrieved if the data are subject to sorting. Our analyses are based on the Akaike information criterion that is a direct measurement of information loss and emphasizes the need to strike a balance between model simplicity and goodness of fit. As a show of force, the Akaike information criterion also found the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and the scale-free model for a brain functional network, a two-dimensional sandpile, and solar flare intensity to suffer an excessive loss of information. They resemble more the crumpled-together ball at low compactions in that there appear to be two driving mechanisms that take turns occurring.

  16. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  17. Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss.

    PubMed

    Dur, Onur; DeGroff, Curt G; Keller, Bradley B; Pekkan, Kerem

    2010-03-01

    The Fontan operation is a palliative surgical procedure performed on children, born with congenital heart defects that have yielded only a single functioning ventricle. The total cavo-pulmonary connection (TCPC) is a common variant of the Fontan procedure, where the superior vena cava (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) are routed directly into the pulmonary arteries (PA). Due to the limited pumping energy available, optimized hemodynamics, in turn, minimized power loss, inside the TCPC pathway is required for the best optimal surgical outcomes. To complement ongoing efforts to optimize the anatomical geometric design of the surgical Fontan templates, here, we focused on the characterization of power loss changes due to the temporal variations in between SVC and IVC flow waveforms. An experimentally validated pulsatile computational fluid dynamics solver is used to quantify the effect of phase-shift between SVC and IVC inflow waveforms and amplitudes on internal energy dissipation. The unsteady hemodynamics of two standard idealized TCPC geometries are presented, incorporating patient-specific real-time PC-MRI flow waveforms of "functional" Fontan patients. The effects of respiration and pulsatility on the internal energy dissipation of the TCPC pathway are analyzed. Optimization of phase-shift between caval flows is shown to lead to lower energy dissipation up to 30% in these idealized models. For physiological patient-specific caval waveforms, the power loss is reduced significantly (up to 11%) by the optimization of all three major harmonics at the same mean pathway flow (3 L/min). Thus, the hemodynamic efficiency of single ventricle circuits is influenced strongly by the caval flow waveform quality, which is regulated through respiratory dependent physiological pathways. The proposed patient-specific waveform optimization protocol may potentially inspire new therapeutic applications to aid postoperative hemodynamics and improve the well being of the Fontan

  18. Statistical Performances of Resistive Active Power Splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalléchère, Sébastien; Ravelo, Blaise; Thakur, Atul

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and sensitivity analysis of an active power splitter (PWS) is proposed. It is based on the active cell composed of a Field Effect Transistor in cascade with shunted resistor at the input and the output (resistive amplifier topology). The PWS uncertainty versus resistance tolerances is suggested by using stochastic method. Furthermore, with the proposed topology, we can control easily the device gain while varying a resistance. This provides useful tool to analyse the statistical sensitivity of the system in uncertain environment.

  19. Eddy current disruption: effect on nuclear magnetic resonance coil impedance and power loss.

    PubMed

    Harpen, M D

    1989-01-01

    We present a theoretical development and experimental verification of a description of power loss and sample resistance for a lossy sample in a nuclear magnetic resonance radio frequency coil for a sample geometry where the eddy current streamlines are disrupted from their usually assumed circular paths. Specifically treated is the case of a lossy hemisphere. The problem is solved for two orientations; with the induction parallel and perpendicular to the flat surface of the hemisphere. Results of this analysis as well as those for the full sphere as presented by Hoult and Lauterbur are compared with observation for a variety of sample conductivities and orientation. PMID:2811760

  20. Measured Mass-Loss Rates of Solar-like Stars as a Function of Age and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Zank, Gary P.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2002-07-01

    Collisions between the winds of solar-like stars and the local interstellar medium result in a population of hot hydrogen gas surrounding these stars. Absorption from this hot H I can be detected in high-resolution Lyα spectra of these stars from the Hubble Space Telescope. The amount of absorption can be used as a diagnostic for the stellar mass-loss rate. We present new mass-loss rate measurements derived in this fashion for four stars (ɛ Eri, 61 Cyg A, 36 Oph AB, and 40 Eri A). Combining these measurements with others, we study how mass loss varies with stellar activity. We find that for the solar-like GK dwarfs, the mass loss per unit surface area is correlated with X-ray surface flux. Fitting a power law to this relation yields M~F1.15+/-0.20X. The active M dwarf Proxima Cen and the very active RS CVn system λ And appear to be inconsistent with this relation. Since activity is known to decrease with age, the above power-law relation for solar-like stars suggests that mass loss decreases with time. We infer a power-law relation of M~t-2.00+/-0.52. This suggests that the solar wind may have been as much as 1000 times more massive in the distant past, which may have had important ramifications for the history of planetary atmospheres in our solar system, that of Mars in particular. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  1. 26 CFR 1.469-2T - Passive activity loss (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Passive activity loss (temporary). 1.469-2T Section 1.469-2T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-2T Passive activity loss (temporary). (a) Scope of...

  2. Loss Analysis of High Power Stirling-Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Hiratsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For the purpose of cooling high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, such as superconductor motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and current fault limiters, cryocoolers should be compact in size, light-weight, and have high efficiency and reliability. In order to meet the demand of HTS devices world-wide, the cryocooler needs to have COP efficiency >0.1. We have developed a high power Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) with an in-line expander. The experimental results were reported in June 2012[1]. The cooling capacity was 210 W at 77 K and the minimum temperature was 37 K when the compressor input power was 3.8 kW. Accordingly, the COP was about 0.055. To further improve the efficiency, the energy losses in the cryocooler were analyzed. The experimental results and the numerical calculation results are reported in this paper.

  3. Analysis of power loss data for the 200 Area Tank Farms in support of K Basin SAR work

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, M.V. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    An analysis of power loss data for the 200 Area Tank Farms was performed in support of K Basin safety analysis report work. The purpose of the analysis was to establish a relationship between the length of a power outage and its yearly frequency. This relationship can be used to determine whether the duration of a specific power loss is a risk concern. The information was developed from data contained in unusual occurrence reports (UORs) spanning a continuous period of 19.75 years. The average frequency of power loss calculated from the UOR information is 1.22 events per year. The mean of the power loss duration is 32.5 minutes an the median duration is 2 minutes. Nine events resulted in loss of power to both 200 East and 200 West areas simultaneously. Seven events (not necessarily the same events that resulted in loss of power to both 200 areas) resulted in outage durations exceeding 5 minutes. Approximately one-half of the events were caused by human error. The other half resulted from natural phenomena or equipment failures. None of the outages were reported to have any adverse effect on the tank farms.

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  5. In-Situ Measurement of Power Loss for Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Thermal Cycling and Mechanical Loading Stress Testing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Pater; Sera, Dezso

    2015-09-15

    We analyze the degradation of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules undergoing simultaneous thermal, mechanical, and humidity stress testing to develop a dark environmental chamber in-situ measurement procedure for determining module power loss. From the analysis we determine three main categories of failure modes associated with the module degradation consisting of: shunting, recombination losses, increased series resistance losses, and current mismatch losses associated with a decrease in photo-current generation by removal of some cell areas due to cell fractures. Based on the analysis, we propose an in-situ module power loss monitoring procedure that relies on dark current-voltage measurements taken during the stress test, and initial and final module flash testing, to determine the power degradation characteristic of the module.

  6. Complex additive systems for Mn-Zn ferrites with low power loss

    SciTech Connect

    Töpfer, J. Angermann, A.

    2015-05-07

    Mn-Zn ferrites were prepared via an oxalate-based wet-chemical synthesis process. Nanocrystalline ferrite powders with particle size of 50 nm were sintered at 1150 °C with 500 ppm CaO and 100 ppm SiO{sub 2} as standard additives. A fine-grained, dense microstructure with grain size of 4–5 μm was obtained. Simultaneous addition of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ZrO{sub 2}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and SnO{sub 2} results low power losses, e.g., 65 mW/cm{sup 3} (500 kHz, 50 mT, 80 °C) and 55 mW/cm{sup 3} (1 MHz, 25 mT, 80 °C). Loss analysis shows that eddy current and residual losses were minimized through formation of insulating grain boundary phases, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Addition of SnO{sub 2} increases the ferrous ion concentration and affects anisotropy as reflected in permeability measurements μ(T)

  7. Complex additive systems for Mn-Zn ferrites with low power loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, J.; Angermann, A.

    2015-05-01

    Mn-Zn ferrites were prepared via an oxalate-based wet-chemical synthesis process. Nanocrystalline ferrite powders with particle size of 50 nm were sintered at 1150 °C with 500 ppm CaO and 100 ppm SiO2 as standard additives. A fine-grained, dense microstructure with grain size of 4-5 μm was obtained. Simultaneous addition of Nb2O5, ZrO2, V2O5, and SnO2 results low power losses, e.g., 65 mW/cm3 (500 kHz, 50 mT, 80 °C) and 55 mW/cm3 (1 MHz, 25 mT, 80 °C). Loss analysis shows that eddy current and residual losses were minimized through formation of insulating grain boundary phases, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Addition of SnO2 increases the ferrous ion concentration and affects anisotropy as reflected in permeability measurements μ(T).

  8. Minimization of power losses in hybrid electric vehicles in view of the prolonging of battery life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Meisam; Esfahanian, Mohsen; Hairi-Yazdi, Mohammad Reza; Esfahanian, Vahid

    Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) are becoming more popular than pure electric ones, nowadays. This is because of their better performance, economic advantages and higher operating range. However, their potential advantages extremely depend on their system design, most importantly their battery system design. Batteries' life requirements as well as the cost of replacing them at the end of their life period, currently limit manufacturers to bring HEVs into play, even though their fuel economy reduces their everyday cost considerably. Generally, inappropriate discharge/charge patterns would result in loss in batteries' life. In the present study, an optimization based control strategy has been proposed for the series HEVs in order to maximize the efficiency of the power-train while minimizing the loss. A genetic algorithm is implemented to optimally evaluate the control algorithm's parameters. The approach is then compared to two main control strategies, namely thermostatic control strategy and power follower control strategy. The computational procedure of the genetic algorithm is discussed, and a simulation study based on a model of a series hybrid electric vehicle is given to validate the genetic algorithm results.

  9. Poynting flux in the neighbourhood of a point charge in arbitrary motion and radiative power losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-07-01

    We examine the electromagnetic fields in the neighbourhood of a ‘point charge’ in arbitrary motion and thereby determine the Poynting flux across a spherical surface of vanishingly small radius surrounding the charge. We show that the radiative power losses from a point charge turn out to be proportional to the scalar product of the instantaneous velocity and the first time-derivative of the acceleration of the charge. This may seem to be discordant with the familiar Larmor formula where the instantaneous power radiated from a charge is proportional to the square of acceleration. However, it seems that the root cause of the discrepancy actually lies in Larmor’s formula, which is derived using the acceleration fields but without due consideration for the Poynting flux associated with the velocity-dependent self-fields ‘co-moving’ with the charge. Further, while deriving Larmor’s formula, one equates the Poynting flux through a surface at some later time to the radiation loss by the enclosed charge at the retarded time. Poynting’s theorem, on the other hand, relates the outgoing radiation flux from a closed surface to the rate of energy decrease within the enclosed volume, all calculated for the same given instant only. Here we explicitly show the absence of any Poynting flux in the neighbourhood of an instantly stationary point charge, implying no radiative losses from such a charge, which is in complete conformity with energy conservation. We further show how Larmor’s formula is still able to serve our purpose in the vast majority of cases. It is further shown that Larmor’s formula in general violates momentum conservation and, in the case of synchrotron radiation, leads to a potentially incorrect conclusion about the pitch angle changes of the radiating charges, and that only the radiation reaction formula yields a correct result, consistent with special relativity.

  10. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  11. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

  12. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a 'sea' of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  13. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  14. A flexible active and reactive power control strategy for a variable speed constant frequency generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Xu, L.

    1995-07-01

    Variable-speed constant-frequency generating systems are used in wind power, hydro power, aerospace, and naval power generations to enhance efficiency and reduce friction. In these applications, an attractive candidate is the slip power recovery system comprising of doubly excited induction machine or doubly excited brushless reluctance machine and PWM converters with a dc link. In this paper, a flexible active and reactive power control strategy is developed, such that the optimal torque-speed profile of the turbine can be followed and overall reactive power can be controlled, while the machine copper losses have been minimized. At the same time, harmonics injected into the power network has also been minimized. In this manner, the system can function as both a high-efficient power generator and a flexible reactive power compensator.

  15. Denosumab--a powerful RANKL inhibitor to stop lytic metastases and other bone loss actions by osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kopper, László

    2012-10-01

    Denosumab is a perfect example on the targeted anticancer therapy. The inhibition of RANKL activity suppressed the osteoclasts' resorptive function and so prevented skeletal related events. This effect is useful not only against bone metastases, but also in the treatment of other diseases caused by bone loss. In different solid tumors with bone metastasis the quality of life also improved, although the overall survival usually showed no change. On the market the main competitors for denosumab are still the bisphosphonates (questions of costs and reimbursement are not discussed) and some potential new agents e.g. Src kinases (as dasatinib, saracatinib, bosutinib), cathepsin K inhibitors, (e.g. odanacatib), and new selective estrogen receptor modulators (e.g. bazedoxifene, lasofoxifene). Nevertheless, today denosumab is one of the most powerful agents in bone-saving area. PMID:22588706

  16. Reducing start-up time and minimizing energy losses of Microbial Fuel Cells using Maximum Power Point Tracking strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molognoni, Daniele; Puig, Sebastià; Balaguer, M. Dolors; Liberale, Alessandro; Capodaglio, Andrea G.; Callegari, Arianna; Colprim, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are considered to be an environmental friendly energy conversion technology. The main limitations that delay their industrialization include low current and power densities achievable and long start-up times. Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) has been proposed as a method to enhance MFCs electrical performances. However, the specialized literature is still lacking of experimental works on scaled-up reactors and/or real wastewater utilization. This study evaluates the impact of a MPPT system applied to MFCs treating swine wastewater in terms of start-up time and long-term performance. For this purpose, two replicate cells were compared, one with applied MPPT control and one working with fixed resistance. Both MFCs were continuously fed with swine wastewater to validate the control system under real and dynamic conditions. The study demonstrated that the automatic resistance control was able to reduce the start-up time of about one month. Moreover, MPPT system increased of 40% the Coulombic efficiency at steady-state conditions, reduced energy losses associated with anode and cathode reactions and limited methanogenic activity in the anode chamber. A power density of 5.0 ± 0.2 W m-3 NAC was achieved feeding the system at an organic loading rate of 10 kg COD m-3 d-1.

  17. Leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and periodontal attachment loss.

    PubMed

    Höglund Åberg, Carola; Haubek, Dorte; Kwamin, Francis; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative periodontitis-associated bacterium that expresses a toxin that selectively affects leukocytes. This leukotoxin is encoded by an operon belonging to the core genome of this bacterial species. Variations in the expression of the leukotoxin have been reported, and a well-characterized specific clonal type (JP2) of this bacterium with enhanced leukotoxin expression has been isolated. In particular, the presence of the JP2 genotype significantly increases the risk for the progression of periodontal attachment loss (AL). Based on these findings we hypothesized that variations in the leukotoxicity are linked to disease progression in infected individuals. In the present study, the leukotoxicity of 239 clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans was analysed with different bioassays, and the genetic peculiarities of the isolates were related to their leukotoxicity based on examination with molecular techniques. The periodontal status of the individuals sampled for the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was examined longitudinally, and the importance of the observed variations in leukotoxicity was evaluated in relation to disease progression. Our data show that high leukotoxicity correlates with an enhanced risk for the progression of AL. The JP2 genotype isolates were all highly leukotoxic, while the isolates with an intact leukotoxin promoter (non-JP2 genotypes) showed substantial variation in leukotoxicity. Genetic characterization of the non-JP2 genotype isolates indicated the presence of highly leukotoxic genotypes of serotype b with similarities to the JP2 genotype. Based on these results, we conclude that A. actinomycetemcomitans harbours other highly virulent genotypes besides the previously described JP2 genotype. In addition, the results from the present study further highlight the importance of the leukotoxin as a key virulence factor in aggressive forms of periodontitis. PMID:25093857

  18. Detection of power losses in busbar solder contacts by electroluminescence imaging of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazuz, Vladimir; Buerhop, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    Soldered contacts between busbar and interconnected ribbon can be missing or defective due to production or exploitation of solar cells. This causes an increase of total series resistance and thus more power losses in soldered solar cells or whole modules. There are many conventional methods for checking missing solder joints such as optical or mechanical; however they are quite complicated for practical application. We present a new method for quantitative and qualitative checking of the solar cell solder contacts. This method is based on analysis of the line-scan diagrams of the electroluminescence images of a solar cell's area by applying the appropriate voltage between front side and backside. As a theoretical justification we have used the equation for calculation of the electroluminescence emission and the equations for calculation of the voltage distribution and of series resistance in the solar cell's busbar.

  19. RHF RELAP5 Model and Preliminary Loss-Of-Offsite-Power Simulation Results for LEU Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, J. R.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Thomas, F.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  20. Effects of microstructure on permeability and power loss characteristics of the NiZn ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Shi, Yu

    Polycrystalline Ni 0.35Zn 0.55Cu 0.1Fe 2O 4 ferrites with different microstructures were investigated. It was found that although the two samples had greatly different microstructures, their initial permeability values were almost the same. This fact was attributed to the advantage of big grain size on permeability could be counteracted by the disadvantage of closed pores on permeability. The sample with large grain size had worse frequency stability due to the low-frequency resonance induced by big grain size. When samples excited under large flux density, the sample with large grain size and closed pores could obtain lower power loss (Pcv). However, for the low induction condition, the sample with small grain size had better performance on Pcv in our testing frequency range. These results were explained in terms of the influences of grain boundaries and closed pores to the domain wall movement.

  1. Transport ac loss of elliptical thin strips with a power-law E(J) relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chen-Xi; Chen, Du-Xing; Li, Shuo; Fang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    The transport ac loss Q of an elliptical thin strip of critical current I c with a power-law relation E\\propto {J}n is accurately computed as a function of current amplitude I m and frequency f. The resulting Q({I}m) is normalized to q({i}m) following the Norris critical-state formula, and converted to {q}*({i}m*) at a critical frequency f c based on a transport scaling law. Having a set of {q}*({i}m*) at several values of n as a base, a general expression of {q}*({i}m*,n) is obtained, which can be used to easily calculate q({i}m) for any practical purposes.

  2. Convective Power Loss Measurements in a Field Reversed Configuration with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Paul

    The Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) experiment achieves direct formation and sustainment of a field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma through rotating magnetic fields (RMF). The pre-ionized gas necessary for FRC formation is supplied by a magnetized cascade arc source that has been developed for TCSU. To ensure ideal FRC performance, the condition of the vacuum chamber prior to RMF start-up has been characterized with the use of a fast response ion gauge. A circuit capable of gating the puff valves with initial high voltage for quick response and then indefinite operational voltage was also designed. A fully translatable combination Langmuir / Mach probe was also built to measure the electron temperature, electron density, and ion velocity of the FRC. These measurements were also successfully completed in the FRC exhaust jets allowing for an accurate analysis of the FRC power loss through convection.

  3. An experimental study of energy loss mechanisms and efficiency consideration in the low power dc arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    The potential utility of the low power dc arcjet in auxiliary propulsion was investigated. It was indicated that improvements in the areas of stability, energy efficiency, reliability, and electrode erosion are necessary to obtain a useful device. A water-cooled arcjet simulator was tested to investigate both the energy loss mechanisms at the electrodes and the stability of different conventional arcjet configurations in the presence of a vortex flow field. It is shown that in certain configurations only 25 to 30% of the input energy is lost to the electrodes. It is also shown that vortex stabilization is not difficult to obtain in many cases at the flow rates used and that a careful starting procedure is effective in minimizing electrode damage.

  4. An experimental study of energy loss mechanisms and efficiency considerations in the low power dc arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    The potential utility of the low power dc arcjet in auxiliary propulsion was investigated. It was indicated that improvements in the areas of stability, energy efficiency, reliability, and electrode erosion are necessary to obtain a useful device. A water-cooled arcjet simulator was tested to investigate both the energy loss mechanisms at the electrodes and the stability of different conventional arcjet configurations in the presence of a vortex flow field. It is shown that in certain configurations only 25 to 30 percent of the input energy is lost to the electrodes. It is also shown that vortex stabilization is not difficult to obtain in many cases at the flow rates used and that a careful starting procedure is effective in minimizing electrode damage.

  5. Analytical model for estimation of eddy current and power loss in conducting plate and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gautam; Prabhu, S. S.

    2011-06-01

    A model is developed to study the eddy current induced in a thin conducting but nonmagnetic plate of finite size when exposed to a time varying magnetic field. The applied field may be uniform or vary in space. This model can accurately estimate the eddy current contour in the plate and loss due to eddy current. Power losses for plates of various dimensions and at different frequencies are calculated to establish the accuracy of the model. We have also calculated the magnetic field generated by the induced eddy current when the plate of finite size is placed between the two parallel poles of a dipole magnet made of magnetic material of very high permeability. The force acting on the plate due to the interaction of the induced eddy current and the applied external field is also calculated. The model can predict the time variation of force and eddy current. The model may be applicable to understand the effect of eddy current on the vacuum chamber of an accelerator. Various other applications, where this model is useful, are also reported. The results are compared against the results obtained by a simulation using a finite element based code. Here the rectangular plate is considered but the model can be applicable for other geometries as well.

  6. Exercise associated hormonal signals as powerful determinants of an effective fat mass loss.

    PubMed

    Bajer, B; Vlcek, M; Galusova, A; Imrich, R; Penesova, A

    2015-07-01

    Obesity management for achieving an effective weight loss includes dietary modification and exercise [resistance (strength), endurance (cardiovascular) or intervals training (high-intensity intermittent exercise)]. Regular exercise acutely increases fat oxidation, which induces loss of fat mass and increases energy expenditure. Moreover, it has a positive effect on the physical (improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, etc.) and mental health (mood, cognition, memory, sleep, etc.). Endocrine responses to muscle actions are affected by many factors, including the exercise muscle groups (lower and upper body), load/volume, time-under tension, and rest-period intervals between sets, training status, gender, and age. The aim of this review is to summarize, evaluate, and clarify the literature data focusing on the endocrine responses to different types of exercise, including the frequency, intensity, and type of movement with regard to the fat loss strategies. Many studies have investigated anabolic [growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone] and gluco- and appetite- regulatory (insulin, cortisol, ghrelin) hormone responses and adaptations of skeletal muscles to exercise. Muscle tissue is a critical endocrine organ, playing important role in the regulation of several physiological and metabolic events. Moreover, we are also describing the response of some other substances to exercise, such as myokines [irisin, apelin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), myostatin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21)]. It is proposed that reducing intra-abdominal fat mass and increasing cardiorespiratory fitness through improving nutritional quality, reducing sedentary behavior, and increase the participation in physical activity/exercise, might be associated with clinical benefits, sometimes even in the absence of weight loss. PMID:26238498

  7. Analysis on operational power and eddy current losses for applying coreless double-sided permanent magnet synchronous motor/generator to high-power flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Park, Ji-Hoon; You, Dae-Joon; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2009-04-01

    This paper deals with analytical approach of operational power defined as load power and rotor loss represented as eddy current loss for applying a permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motor/generator to the high-power flywheel energy storage system. The used model is composed of a double-sided Halbach magnetized PM rotor and coreless three-phase winding stator. For one such motor/generator structure, we provide the magnetic field and eddy current with space and time harmonics via magnetic vector potential in two-dimensional (2D) polar coordinate system. From these, the operational power is estimated by backelectromotive force according to the PM rotor speed, and the rotor loss is also calculated from Poynting theorem.

  8. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  9. Impact of Uncertainty on Calculations for Recovery from Loss of Offsite Power

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly

    2010-06-01

    Uncertainty, both aleatory and epistemic, can have a significant impact on estimated probabilities of recovering from loss of offsite power within a specified time window, and such probabilities are an input to risk-informed decisions as to the significance of inspection findings in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Reactor Oversight Process. In particular, the choice of aleatory model for offsite power recovery time can have a significant impact on the estimated nonrecovery probability, especially if epistemic uncertainty regarding parameters in the aleatory model is accounted for properly. In past and current analyses, such uncertainty has largely been ignored. This paper examines the impact of both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty on the results, using modern open-source Bayesian inference software, which implements Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. It includes examples of time-dependent convolution calculations to show the impact that uncertainty can have on this increasingly frequent type of calculation, also. The results show that the “point estimate” result, which is an input to risk-informed decisions, can easily be uncertain by a factor of 10 if both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties are considered. The paper also illustrates the use of Bayesian model selection criteria to aid in the choice of aleatory model.

  10. Calculated radiative power losses from mid- and high-Z impurities in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; May, M. J.; Pacella, D.; Gregory, B. C.; Rice, J. E.; Terry, J. L.; Finkenthal, M.; Goldstein, W. H.

    1998-09-01

    This paper summarizes recent calculations of the radiative cooling coefficient for molybdenum (Z=42), krypton (Z=36) and argon (Z=18). The radiative processes considered are collisional-radiative line emission, dielectronic recombination line emission, and radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung continuum emission. Collisional-radiative line emission dominates the power loss channels for a given impurity at all but the highest plasma electron temperatures. The atomic data for the line emission are computed ab initio with the HULLAC atomic physics suite of codes. Relativistic, ab initio atomic physics data are used to compute ionization and recombination rate coefficients; the resulting charge state distribution and recombination rates are used to estimate the radiative power from recombination processes. The calculations in the present work are benchmarked against absolute measurements of ion brightness profiles in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade plasma. Integrated measurements from tokamak plasmas such as bolometry are then simulated. The atomic physics data used to predict the emissivity of individual ions is validated; the calculated cooling coefficients agree well with bolometric measurements.

  11. Wind Powering America FY07 Activities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-02-01

    The Wind Powering America FY07 Activities Summary reflects the accomplishments of our state wind working groups, our programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and our partner organizations. The national WPA team remains a leading force for moving wind energy forward in the United States. WPA continues to work with its national, regional, and state partners to communicate the opportunities and benefits of wind energy to a diverse set of stakeholders. WPA now has 30 state wind working groups (welcoming Georgia and Wisconsin in 2007) that form strategic alliances to communicate wind's benefits to the state stakeholders. More than 140 members of national and state public and private sector organizations from 39 U.S. states and Canada attended the 6th Annual WPA All-States Summit in Los Angeles in June. WPA's emphasis remains on the rural agricultural sector, which stands to reap the significant economic development benefits of wind energy development. Additionally, WPA continues its program of outreach, education, and technical assistance to Native American communities, public power entities, and regulatory and legislative bodies.

  12. Wind Powering America FY06 Activities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-02-01

    The Wind Powering America FY06 Activities Summary reflects the accomplishments of our state wind working groups, our programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and our partner organizations. The national WPA team remains a leading force for moving wind energy forward in the United States. WPA continues to work with its national, regional, and state partners to communicate the opportunities and benefits of wind energy to a diverse set of stakeholders. WPA now has 29 state wind working groups (welcoming New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri in 2006) that form strategic alliances to communicate wind's benefits to the state stakeholders. More than 120 members of national and state public and private sector organizations from 34 states attended the 5th Annual WPA All-States Summit in Pittsburgh in June.

  13. Study on Frequency Dependency of ON-Resistance and Pulse-Loss Calculation of MOSFETs for Switch Mode Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Hideho; Sato, Ryohei; Iwata, Yoshiharu

    Global efforts toward energy conservation, increasing data centers, and the increasing use of IT equipments are leading to a demand in reduced power consumption of equipments, and power efficiency improvement of power supply units is becoming a necessity. MOSFETs are widely used for their low ON-resistances. Power efficiency is designed using time-domain circuit simulators, except for transformer copper-loss, which has frequency dependency which is calculated separately using methods based on skin and proximity effects. As semiconductor technology reduces the ON-resistance of MOSFETs, frequency dependency due to the skin effect or proximity effect is anticipated. In this study, ON-resistance of MOSFETs are measured and frequency dependency is confirmed. Power loss against rectangular current pulse is calculated. The calculation method for transformer copper-loss is expanded to MOSFETs. A frequency function for the resistance model is newly developed and parametric calculation is enabled. Acceleration of calculation is enabled by eliminating summation terms. Using this method, it is shown that the frequency dependent component of the measured MOSFETs increases the dissipation from 11% to 32% at a switching frequency of 100kHz. From above, this paper points out the importance of the frequency dependency of MOSFETs' ON-resistance, provides means of calculating its pulse losses, and improves loss calculation accuracy of SMPSs.

  14. Optically powered active sensing system for Internet Of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Jin; Yin, Long; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Wan, Hongdan

    2014-10-01

    Internet Of Things (IOT) drives a significant increase in the extent and type of sensing technology and equipment. Sensors, instrumentation, control electronics, data logging and transmission units comprising such sensing systems will all require to be powered. Conventionally, electrical powering is supplied by batteries or/and electric power cables. The power supply by batteries usually has a limited lifetime, while the electric power cables are susceptible to electromagnetic interference. In fact, the electromagnetic interference is the key issue limiting the power supply in the strong electromagnetic radiation area and other extreme environments. The novel alternative method of power supply is power over fiber (PoF) technique. As fibers are used as power supply lines instead, the delivery of the power is inherently immune to electromagnetic radiation, and avoids cumbersome shielding of power lines. Such a safer power supply mode would be a promising candidate for applications in IOT. In this work, we built up optically powered active sensing system, supplying uninterrupted power for the remote active sensors and communication modules. Also, we proposed a novel maximum power point tracking technique for photovoltaic power convertors. In our system, the actual output efficiency greater than 40% within 1W laser power. After 1km fiber transmission and opto-electric power conversion, a stable electric power of 210mW was obtained, which is sufficient for operating an active sensing system.

  15. Can loss of balance from mesoscale eddies adequately power deep ocean mixing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Haine, T. W.; Read, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    The global ocean thermohaline circulation is partly composed of the sinking of dense surface waters at high latitudes. But in order to close the circulation and maintain the abyssal stratification, the dense waters must rise up again through vertical mixing. This process requires a source of energy roughly estimated to be 2 TW. Previous work has concluded that tides and winds may adequately supply the required power, but the conceivable role of loss of balance from mesoscale eddies, resulting in the generation of internal inertia-gravity waves and associated vertical mixing, has hitherto been considered to be 'of unknown importance' (Wunsch and Ferrari, 2004). We investigate the potential role of loss of balance, by studying the generation of internal inertia-gravity waves by balanced flow in a rotating two-layer annulus laboratory experiment (Williams et al., 2008). A photograph from the experiment is shown in the figure. As the Rossby number of the balanced flow decreases, the amplitude of the emitted inertia-gravity waves also decreases, but much less rapidly than is predicted by several dynamical theories. This finding suggests that inertia-gravity waves might be far more energised than previously thought. The balanced flow leaks roughly one per cent of its energy each rotation period into internal inertia-gravity waves at the peak of their generation. Crude extrapolation of this result to the global ocean suggests that the flux of energy from mesoscale eddies into internal waves may be as large as 1.5 TW. We claim no accuracy for this figure which is only indicative. Nevertheless, we are persuaded that generation of inertia-gravity waves from the balanced mesoscale flow may be an important source of energy for deep interior mixing, and deserves further study. Reference Williams, PD, Haine, TWN and Read, PL (2008) Inertia-Gravity Waves Emitted from Balanced Flow: Observations, Properties, and Consequences. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 65(11), pp 3543

  16. Numerical study on AC loss characteristics of superconducting power transmission cables comprising coated conductors with magnetic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, N.; Nakahata, M.

    2007-10-01

    Electromagnetic field analyses were made for mono-layer conductors comprising coated conductors for superconducting power transmission cables in order to evaluate their AC loss characteristics. We focused on the magnetic properties of the substrates of coated conductors. The current distribution in each coated conductor and the magnetic flux profile around each coated conductor were visualized. The influence of relative permeability and the space between coated conductors on the AC loss characteristics of mono-layer conductors were studied based on the visualized current and magnetic flux distributions. The influence of a saturated magnetic property on a calculated AC loss was also discussed.

  17. Response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow during power operation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow followed by a PPS-activated scram are presented. The experimental results clearly indicate a smooth transition to natural convective flow with a quite modest incore temperature transient. The accompanying calculations using the NATDEMO code agree quite well with the measured temperatures and flow rates throughout the primary system. The only region of the plant where a significant discrepancy between the measurements and calculations occurred was in the IHX. The reasons for this result could not be definitively determined, but it is speculated that the one-dimensional assumptions used in the modeling may not be valid in the IHX during buoyancy driver flows.

  18. Computer Calculations of Eddy-Current Power Loss in Rotating Titanium Wheels and Rims in Localized Axial Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhall, D J; Stein, W; Gronberg, J B

    2006-05-15

    We have performed preliminary computer-based, transient, magnetostatic calculations of the eddy-current power loss in rotating titanium-alloy and aluminum wheels and wheel rims in the predominantly axially-directed, steady magnetic fields of two small, solenoidal coils. These calculations have been undertaken to assess the eddy-current power loss in various possible International Linear Collider (ILC) positron target wheels. They have also been done to validate the simulation code module against known results published in the literature. The commercially available software package used in these calculations is the Maxwell 3D, Version 10, Transient Module from the Ansoft Corporation.

  19. Vector Finite Element Modeling of the Full-Wave Maxwell Equations to Evaluate Power Loss in Bent Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J; Rieben, R; Rodrigue, G

    2004-12-09

    We measure the loss of power incurred by the bending of a single mode step-indexed optical fiber using vector finite element modeling of the full-wave Maxwell equations in the optical regime. We demonstrate fewer grid elements can be used to model light transmission in longer fiber lengths by using high-order basis functions in conjunction with a high order energy conserving time integration method. The power in the core is measured at several points to determine the percentage loss. We also demonstrate the effect of bending on the light polarization.

  20. Probabilistic assessment of decoupling loss-of-coolant accident and earthquake in nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.C.; Harris, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a research project conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to establish a technical basis for reassessing the requirement of combining large loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) and earthquake loads in nuclear power plant design. A large LOCA is defined herein as a double-ended guillotine break of the primary reactor coolant loop piping (the hot leg, cold leg, and crossover) of a pressureized water reactor (PWR). A systematic probability approach has been employed to estimate the probability of a large LOCA directly and indirectly induced by earthquakes. The probability of a LOCA directly induced by earthquakes was assessed by a numerical simulation of pipe rupture of a reactor coolant system. The simulation employed a deterministic fracture mechanics model which dictates the fatigue growth of pre-existing cracks in the pipe. The simulation accounts for the stochastic nature of input elements such as the initial crack size distribution, the crack occurrence rate, crack and leak detection probabilities as functions of crack size, plant transient occurrence rates, the seismic hazard, stress histories, and crack growth model parameters. Effects on final results due to variation an uncertainty of input elements were assessed by a limited sensitivity study. Results of the simulation indicate that the probability of a double-ended guillotine break, either with or without an earthquake, is very small (on the orer of 10/sup -12/). The probability of a leak was found to be several orders of magnitudes greater than that of a complete break.

  1. Design of Low-Loss 1–3 Piezoelectric Composites for High-Power Transducer Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun

    2013-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT)/polymer 1–3 composites have improved electromechanical properties compared with monolithic counterparts, but possess a low mechanical quality factor, limiting their use in high-power transducer applications. The goal of this work was to improve the mechanical quality factor of 1–3 PZT/polymer composites by optimizing the polymer materials. Theoretical analysis and modeling were performed for optimum composite design and various polymers were prepared and characterized. 1–3 piezocomposites were constructed and their electromechanical properties were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that the composites with high-thermal-conductivity polymers generally have degraded electromechanical properties with significantly decreased mechanical quality factors, whereas the composites filled with low-loss and low-moduli polymers were found to have higher mechanical quality factors with higher electrome-chanical coupling factors: Qm ~ 200 and kt ~ 0.68 for PZT4 composites; Qm ~ 400 and kt ~ 0.6 for PZT8 composites. The improved mechanical quality factor of 1–3 piezocomposites may offer improved performance and thermal stability of transducers under high-drive operation. PMID:23007769

  2. Three dimensional numerical prediction of icing related power and energy losses on a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagol, Ece

    Regions of Canada experience harsh winter conditions that may persist for several months. Consequently, wind turbines located in these regions are exposed to ice accretion and its adverse effects, from loss of power to ceasing to function altogether. Since the weather-related annual energy production loss of a turbine may be as high as 16% of the nominal production for Canada, estimating these losses before the construction of a wind farm is essential for investors. A literature survey shows that most icing prediction methods and codes are developed for aircraft, and, as this information is mostly considered corporate intellectual property, it is not accessible to researchers in other domains. Moreover, aircraft icing is quite different from wind turbine icing. Wind turbines are exposed to icing conditions for much longer periods than aircraft, perhaps for several days in a harsh climate, whereas the maximum length of exposure of an aircraft is about 3-4 hours. In addition, wind turbine blades operate at subsonic speeds, at lower Reynolds numbers than aircraft, and their physical characteristics are different. A few icing codes have been developed for wind turbine icing nevertheless. However, they are either in 2D, which does not consider the 3D characteristics of the flow field, or they focus on simulating each rotation in a time-dependent manner, which is not practical for computing long hours of ice accretion. Our objective in this thesis is to develop a 3D numerical methodology to predict rime ice shape and the power loss of a wind turbine as a function of wind farm icing conditions. In addition, we compute the Annual Energy Production of a sample turbine under both clean and icing conditions. The sample turbine we have selected is the NREL Phase VI experimental wind turbine installed on a wind farm in Sweden, the icing events at which have been recorded and published. The proposed method is based on computing and validating the clean performance of the turbine

  3. Design of low-loss 1-3 piezoelectric composites for high-power transducer applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun

    2012-09-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT)/polymer 1-3 composites have improved electromechanical properties compared with monolithic counterparts, but possess a low mechanical quality factor, limiting their use in high-power transducer applications. The goal of this work was to improve the mechanical quality factor of 1-3 PZT/polymer composites by optimizing the polymer materials. Theoretical analysis and modeling were performed for optimum composite design and various polymers were prepared and characterized. 1-3 piezocomposites were constructed and their electromechanical properties were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that the composites with high-thermal-conductivity polymers generally have degraded electromechanical properties with significantly decreased mechanical quality factors, whereas the composites filled with low-loss and low-moduli polymers were found to have higher mechanical quality factors with higher electromechanical coupling factors: Q(m) ~ 200 and k(t) ~ 0.68 for PZT4 composites; Q(m) ~ 400 and k(t) ~ 0.6 for PZT8 composites. The improved mechanical quality factor of 1-3 piezocomposites may offer improved performance and thermal stability of transducers under high-drive operation. PMID:23007769

  4. Computational analysis of the curvature distribution and power losses of metal strip in tension levellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinwender, L.; Kainz, A.; Krimpelstätter, K.; Zeman, K.

    2010-06-01

    Tension levelling is employed in strip processing lines to minimise residual stresses resp. to improve the strip flatness by inducing small elasto-plastic deformations. To improve the design of such machines, precise calculation models are essential to reliably predict tension losses due to plastic dissipation, power requirements of the driven bridle rolls (located upstream and downstream), reaction forces on levelling rolls as well as strains and stresses in the strip. FEM (Finite Element Method) simulations of the tension levelling process (based on Updated Lagrangian concepts) yield high computational costs due to the necessity of very fine meshes as well as due to the severely non-linear characteristics of contact, material and geometry. In an evaluation process of hierarchical models (models with different modeling levels), the reliability of both 3D and 2D modelling concepts (based on continuum and structural elements) was proved by extensive analyses as well as consistency checks against measurement data from an industrial tension leveller. To exploit the potential of computational cost savings, a customised modelling approach based on the principle of virtual work has been elaborated, which yields a drastic reduction of degrees of freedom compared to simulations by utilising commercial FEM-packages.

  5. Adolescents' Perceptions of Relative Weight and Self-Reported Weight Loss Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, Michael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Data from the 1990 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to examine adolescents' perceptions of relative weight and the relationship of these perceptions to physical activity levels, weight loss efforts, and television viewing time. About 25 percent (860) considered themselves too fat and reported little physical activity. (SM)

  6. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOEpatents

    Lal, Amit; Li, Hui; Blanchard, James P.; Henderson, Douglass L.

    2002-01-01

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  7. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses...

  8. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses and passive...

  10. Agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenhua

    The active hybridization technique provides an effective approach to combining the best properties of a heterogeneous set of power sources to achieve higher energy density, power density and fuel efficiency. Active hybrid power sources can be used to power hybrid electric vehicles with selected combinations of internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, and/or supercapacitors. They can be deployed in all-electric ships to build a distributed electric power system. They can also be used in a bulk power system to construct an autonomous distributed energy system. An important aspect in designing an active hybrid power source is to find a suitable control strategy that can manage the active power sharing and take advantage of the inherent scalability and robustness benefits of the hybrid system. This paper presents an agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed agent-based power sharing scheme, simulation studies are performed for a hybrid power source that can be used in a solar car as the main propulsion power module. Simulation results clearly indicate that the agent-based control framework is effective to coordinate the various energy sources and manage the power/voltage profiles.

  11. Impacts of propagating, frustrated and surface modes on radiative, electrical and thermal losses in nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic power generators.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Michael P; Dupré, Olivier; Blandre, Etienne; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of radiative, electrical and thermal losses on the performances of nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic (nano-TPV) power generators consisting of a gallium antimonide cell paired with a broadband tungsten and a radiatively-optimized Drude radiator are analyzed. Results reveal that surface mode mediated nano-TPV power generation with the Drude radiator outperforms the tungsten radiator, dominated by frustrated modes, only for a vacuum gap thickness of 10 nm and if both electrical and thermal losses are neglected. The key limiting factors for the Drude- and tungsten-based devices are respectively the recombination of electron-hole pairs at the cell surface and thermalization of radiation with energy larger than the cell absorption bandgap. A design guideline is also proposed where a high energy cutoff above which radiation has a net negative effect on nano-TPV power output due to thermal losses is determined. It is shown that the power output of a tungsten-based device increases by 6.5% while the cell temperature decreases by 30 K when applying a high energy cutoff at 1.45 eV. This work demonstrates that design and optimization of nano-TPV devices must account for radiative, electrical and thermal losses. PMID:26112658

  12. CrAlN coating to enhance the power loss and magnetostriction in grain oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Vishu; Anderson, Philip; Hall, Jeremy; Robinson, Fiona; Bohm, Siva

    2016-05-01

    Grain oriented electrical steels (GOES) are coated with aluminium orthophosphate on top of a forsterite (Mg2SiO4) layer to provide stress and insulation resistance to reduce the power loss and magnetostriction. In this work Chromium Aluminium Nitride (CrAlN) was coated on GOES samples with electron beam physical vapour deposition and was tested in the single strip and magnetostriction tester to measure the power loss and magnetostriction before and after coating. Power loss was reduced by 2% after coating and 6 % post annealing at 800 °C. For applied compressive stress of 6 MPa, the magnetostrictive strain was zero with the CrAlN coating as compared to 22 and 24 μɛ for fully finished GOES and GOES without phosphate coating. The thickness of the coating was found to be 1.9 ± 0.2 μm estimated with Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES). The magnetic domain imaging showed domain narrowing after coating. The reduction in power loss and magnetostriction was due to the large residual compressive stress and Young's modulus (270 GPa) of the coating.

  13. Impacts of propagating, frustrated and surface modes on radiative, electrical and thermal losses in nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic power generators

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Michael P.; Dupré, Olivier; Blandre, Etienne; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of radiative, electrical and thermal losses on the performances of nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic (nano-TPV) power generators consisting of a gallium antimonide cell paired with a broadband tungsten and a radiatively-optimized Drude radiator are analyzed. Results reveal that surface mode mediated nano-TPV power generation with the Drude radiator outperforms the tungsten radiator, dominated by frustrated modes, only for a vacuum gap thickness of 10 nm and if both electrical and thermal losses are neglected. The key limiting factors for the Drude- and tungsten-based devices are respectively the recombination of electron-hole pairs at the cell surface and thermalization of radiation with energy larger than the cell absorption bandgap. A design guideline is also proposed where a high energy cutoff above which radiation has a net negative effect on nano-TPV power output due to thermal losses is determined. It is shown that the power output of a tungsten-based device increases by 6.5% while the cell temperature decreases by 30 K when applying a high energy cutoff at 1.45 eV. This work demonstrates that design and optimization of nano-TPV devices must account for radiative, electrical and thermal losses. PMID:26112658

  14. Impacts of propagating, frustrated and surface modes on radiative, electrical and thermal losses in nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Michael P.; Dupré, Olivier; Blandre, Etienne; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2015-06-01

    The impacts of radiative, electrical and thermal losses on the performances of nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic (nano-TPV) power generators consisting of a gallium antimonide cell paired with a broadband tungsten and a radiatively-optimized Drude radiator are analyzed. Results reveal that surface mode mediated nano-TPV power generation with the Drude radiator outperforms the tungsten radiator, dominated by frustrated modes, only for a vacuum gap thickness of 10 nm and if both electrical and thermal losses are neglected. The key limiting factors for the Drude- and tungsten-based devices are respectively the recombination of electron-hole pairs at the cell surface and thermalization of radiation with energy larger than the cell absorption bandgap. A design guideline is also proposed where a high energy cutoff above which radiation has a net negative effect on nano-TPV power output due to thermal losses is determined. It is shown that the power output of a tungsten-based device increases by 6.5% while the cell temperature decreases by 30 K when applying a high energy cutoff at 1.45 eV. This work demonstrates that design and optimization of nano-TPV devices must account for radiative, electrical and thermal losses.

  15. Changes in choice evoked brain activations after a weight loss intervention in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mata, Fernanda; Verdejo-Roman, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Yücel, Murat; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate if treatment-related success in weight loss (i.e., reductions of BMI and fat percentage) is linked to significant changes in choice evoked brain activity in adolescents with excess weight. Sixteen adolescents with excess weight (age range: 12-18; BMI range: 22-36) performed the Risky-Gains Task during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) both before and after a 12-week weight loss intervention. Success in weight loss was selectively associated with increased activation in the anterior insula. We concluded that adolescents with the greatest increases in activation of the insula-related interoceptive neural circuitry also show greater reductions in BMI and fat mass. PMID:27058280

  16. Analysis of Germline Stem Cell Differentiation Following Loss of GLP-1 Notch Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Paul M.; Schedl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells generate the differentiated progeny cells of adult tissues. Stem cells in the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite germline are maintained within a proliferative zone of ∼230 cells, ∼20 cell diameters in length, through GLP-1 Notch signaling. The distal tip cell caps the germline and supplies GLP-1-activating ligand, and the distal-most germ cells that occupy this niche are likely self-renewing stem cells with active GLP-1 signaling. As germ cells are displaced from the niche, GLP-1 activity likely decreases, yet mitotically cycling germ cells are found throughout the proliferative zone prior to overt meiotic differentiation. Following loss of GLP-1 activity, it remains unclear whether stem cells undergo transit-amplifying (TA) divisions or more directly enter meiosis. To distinguish between these possibilities we employed a temperature-sensitive (ts) glp-1 mutant to manipulate GLP-1 activity. We characterized proliferative zone dynamics in glp-1(ts) mutants at permissive temperature and then analyzed the kinetics of meiotic entry of proliferative zone cells after loss of GLP-1. We found that entry of proliferative zone cells into meiosis following loss of GLP-1 activity is largely synchronous and independent of their distal-proximal position. Furthermore, the majority of cells complete only a single mitotic division before entering meiosis, independent of their distal-proximal position. We conclude that germ cells do not undergo TA divisions following loss of GLP-1 activity. We present a model for the dynamics of the proliferative zone that utilizes cell cycle rate and proliferative zone size and output and incorporates the more direct meiotic differentiation of germ cells following loss of GLP-1 activity. PMID:26158953

  17. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  18. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts.

  19. The role of physical activity in producing and maintaining weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Victoria A; Wyatt, Holly R

    2015-01-01

    Summary The majority of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) show only modest weight loss with exercise intervention alone, and slight increases in weight loss when exercise intervention is added to dietary restriction. In most RCTs, the energy deficit produced by the prescribed exercise is far smaller than that usually produced by dietary restriction. In prospective studies that prescribed high levels of exercise, enrolled individuals achieved substantially greater weight loss—comparable to that obtained after similar energy deficits were produced by caloric restriction. High levels of exercise might, however, be difficult for overweight or obese adults to achieve and sustain. RCTs examining exercise and its effect on weight-loss maintenance demonstrated mixed results; however, weight maintenance interventions were usually of limited duration and long-term adherence to exercise was problematic. Epidemiologic, cross-sectional, and prospective correlation studies suggest an essential role for physical activity in weight-loss maintenance, and post hoc analysis of prospective trials shows a clear dose–response relationship between physical activity and weight maintenance. This article reviews the role of physical activity in producing and maintaining weight loss. We focus on prospective, RCTs lasting at least 4 months; however, other prospective trials, meta-analyses and large systematic reviews are included. Limitations in the current body of literature are discussed. PMID:17581621

  20. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts. PMID:26553637

  1. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts. PMID:26553637

  2. Making Physical Activity Accessible to Older Adults with Memory Loss: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logsdon, Rebecca G.; McCurry, Susan M.; Pike, Kenneth C.; Teri, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), memory loss may prevent successful engagement in exercise, a key factor in preventing additional disability. The Resources and Activities for Life Long Independence (RALLI) program uses behavioral principles to make exercise more accessible for these individuals. Exercises are broken…

  3. Examination of Individual Differences in Participation in Outplacement Program Activities after a Job Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowan, Mary A.; Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the relationship among age, gender, and race relative to participation in self-awareness, action-oriented, and training activities after a job loss. Main effects were found for gender and for Age x Employment status. Implications of the study for outplacement programs, along with study limitations and future research directions, are…

  4. Low-loss smile-insensitive external frequency-stabilization of high power diode lasers enabled by vertical designs with extremely low divergence angle and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, Paul; Knigge, Steffen; Maaßdorf, Andre; Bugge, Frank; Hengesbach, Stefan; Witte, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Köhler, Bernd; Hubrich, Ralf; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Erbert, Götz; Traenkle, Guenther

    2013-02-01

    Broad area lasers with narrow spectra are required for many pumping applications and for wavelength beam combination. Although monolithically stabilized lasers show high performance, some applications can only be addressed with external frequency stabilization, for example when very narrow spectra are required. When conventional diode lasers with vertical far field angle, ΘV 95% ~ 45° (95% power) are stabilized using volume holographic gratings (VHGs), optical losses are introduced, limiting both efficiency and reliable output power, with the presence of any bar smile compounding the challenge. Diode lasers with designs optimized for extremely low vertical divergence (ELOD lasers) directly address these challenges. The vertical far field angle in conventional laser designs is limited by the waveguiding of the active region itself. In ELOD designs, quantum barriers are used that have low refractive index, enabling the influence of the active region to be suppressed, leading to narrow far field operation from thin vertical structures, for minimal electrical resistance and maximum power conversion efficiency. We review the design process, and show that 975 nm diode lasers with 90 μm stripes that use ELOD designs operate with ΘV 95% = 26° and reach 58% power conversion efficiency at a CW output power of 10 W. We demonstrate directly that VHG stabilized ELOD lasers have significantly lower loss and larger operation windows than conventional lasers in the collimated feedback regimes, even in the presence of significant (≥ 1 μm) bar smile. We also discuss the potential influence of ELOD designs on reliable output power and options for further performance improvement.

  5. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  6. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  7. Cariprazine delays ouabain-evoked epileptiform spikes and loss of activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Payne, Ralphiel S; Schurr, Avital; Gao, Yonglin; Lei, Zhemin; Kiss, Béla; Gyertyán, István; Adham, Nika

    2015-09-30

    In the only bipolar cycling in vitro model, rat hippocampal slices are treated with the sodium pump inhibitor ouabain, which induces epileptiform activity, followed by refractory activity loss that recovers and cycles back to epileptiform activity. Thus, clinical cycling seen in patients with bipolar disorder is modeled on a cellular level as alternating hyperactivity and hypoactivity interspersed with normal activity. In this study, we tested the ability of cariprazine a new antipsychotic candidate to block ouabain-induced changes in rat hippocampal slices. Cycling of population spikes and epileptiform bursts was evoked using an extracellular stimulation electrode located in the Schaeffer collaterals of 400-µm-thick rat hippocampal slices treated with ouabain (3.3μM) alone or in combination with cariprazine (1, 5, 25, and 50µM). Responses were recorded using an extracellular electrode placed in the cell body layer of the CA1 region. Cariprazine 25 and 50µM delayed ouabain-induced epileptiform burst onset and subsequent activity loss. Lower cariprazine concentrations were ineffective. Cariprazine delays the onset of ouabain-induced epileptiform bursts and the loss of spiking activity similarly to that previously demonstrated with the mood stabilizer lithium. These results suggest that cariprazine may have therapeutic potential for treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:26160196

  8. Calcium flux-independent NMDA receptor activity is required for Aβ oligomer-induced synaptic loss

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, J H; Bali, J; Rajendran, L; Nitsch, R M; Tackenberg, C

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic loss is one of the major features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and correlates with the degree of dementia. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) have been shown to mediate downstream effects of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in AD models. NMDARs can trigger intracellular cascades via Ca2+ entry, however, also Ca2+-independent (metabotropic) functions of NMDARs have been described. We aimed to determine whether ionotropic or metabotropic NMDAR signaling is required for the induction of synaptic loss by Aβ. We show that endogenous Aβ as well as exogenously added synthetic Aβ oligomers induced dendritic spine loss and reductions in pre- and postsynaptic protein levels in hippocampal slice cultures. Synaptic alterations were mitigated by blocking glutamate binding to NMDARs using NMDAR antagonist APV, but not by preventing ion flux with Ca2+ chelator BAPTA or open-channel blockers MK-801 or memantine. Aβ increased the activity of p38 MAPK, a kinase involved in long-term depression and inhibition of p38 MAPK abolished the loss of dendritic spines. Aβ-induced increase of p38 MAPK activity was prevented by APV but not by BAPTA, MK-801 or memantine treatment highlighting the role of glutamate binding to NMDARs but not Ca2+ flux for synaptic degeneration by Aβ. We further show that treatment with the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) did not prevent dendritic spine loss in the presence of Aβ oligomers. Our data suggest that Aβ induces the activation of p38 MAPK and subsequent synaptic loss through Ca2+ flux- and G protein-independent mechanisms. PMID:26086964

  9. Calcium flux-independent NMDA receptor activity is required for Aβ oligomer-induced synaptic loss.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J H; Bali, J; Rajendran, L; Nitsch, R M; Tackenberg, C

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic loss is one of the major features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and correlates with the degree of dementia. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) have been shown to mediate downstream effects of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in AD models. NMDARs can trigger intracellular cascades via Ca(2+) entry, however, also Ca(2+)-independent (metabotropic) functions of NMDARs have been described. We aimed to determine whether ionotropic or metabotropic NMDAR signaling is required for the induction of synaptic loss by Aβ. We show that endogenous Aβ as well as exogenously added synthetic Aβ oligomers induced dendritic spine loss and reductions in pre- and postsynaptic protein levels in hippocampal slice cultures. Synaptic alterations were mitigated by blocking glutamate binding to NMDARs using NMDAR antagonist APV, but not by preventing ion flux with Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA or open-channel blockers MK-801 or memantine. Aβ increased the activity of p38 MAPK, a kinase involved in long-term depression and inhibition of p38 MAPK abolished the loss of dendritic spines. Aβ-induced increase of p38 MAPK activity was prevented by APV but not by BAPTA, MK-801 or memantine treatment highlighting the role of glutamate binding to NMDARs but not Ca(2+) flux for synaptic degeneration by Aβ. We further show that treatment with the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) did not prevent dendritic spine loss in the presence of Aβ oligomers. Our data suggest that Aβ induces the activation of p38 MAPK and subsequent synaptic loss through Ca(2+) flux- and G protein-independent mechanisms. PMID:26086964

  10. Power loss minimizing blowing and suction profiles for drag reduction on a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Pritam; Shukla, Ratnesh

    2015-11-01

    Active and passive flow control strategies that facilitate drag reduction at low energetic costs are of considerable fundamental and practical relevance. Here, we investigate the efficacy of a zero net mass transpiration blowing and suction flow control strategy based on intake and expulsion of fluid from the boundary of a circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross flow of a viscous incompressible fluid. We find this control strategy to be most effective when the blowing and suction profile is such that the fluid intake and expulsion occur over upstream and downstream portions of the circular cylinder, respectively. With increasingly strong intake and expulsion, the vorticity production at the cylinder surface diminishes significantly and the unsteady vortex shedding is suppressed entirely. We find that for sufficiently strong blowing and suction strengths the net power consumption attains a minimum for a significantly reduced net drag force. At a Reynolds number of 1000 the drag is reduced by a factor of over 15 from its base value for a stationary cylinder with zero mass transpiration. We show that a self-propelling state with zero drag force is achieved for a configuration that corresponds to an irrotational flow with vanishing tangential but finite normal surface velocity.

  11. Late-onset MNGIE without peripheral neuropathy due to incomplete loss of thymidine phosphorylase activity.

    PubMed

    Massa, Roberto; Tessa, Alessandra; Margollicci, Maria; Micheli, Vanna; Romigi, Andrea; Tozzi, Giulia; Terracciano, Chiara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Bernardi, Giorgio; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondrial NeuroGastroIntestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and leukoencephalopathy with early onset and severe prognosis. Mutations in the TYMP/ECGF1 gene cause a loss of thymidine phosphorylase catalytic activity, disrupting the homeostasis of intramitochondrial nucleotide pool. We report a woman with a very late onset of MNGIE, lacking peripheral neuropathy. Thymidine phosphorylase activity was markedly reduced in cultured fibroblasts, but only mildly reduced in buffy coat, where the defect is usually detected, and plasma thymidine was mildly increased compared to typical MNGIE patients. TYMP/ECGF1 analysis detected two heterozygous mutations, including a novel missense mutation. These findings indicate that a partial loss of thymidine phosphorylase activity may induce a late-onset and incomplete MNGIE phenotype. PMID:19853446

  12. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Grier, Bryce D; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E J

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  13. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bryce D.; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  14. Active Faults and Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Neil; Berryman, Kelvin; Villamor, Pilar; Epstein, Woody; Cluff, Lloyd; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami brought into sharp focus the susceptibility of NPPs to natural hazards. This is not a new issue—seismic hazard has affected the development of plants in the United States, and volcanic hazard was among the reasons for not commissioning the Bataan NPP in the Philippines [Connor et al., 2009].

  15. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis mediates loss of intrinsic activity measured by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Brier, Matthew R; Day, Gregory S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tanenbaum, Aaron B; Ances, Beau M

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous brain activity is required for the development and maintenance of normal brain function. Many disease processes disrupt the organization of intrinsic brain activity, but few pervasively reduce the amplitude of resting state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI fluctuations. We report the case of a female with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, longitudinally studied during the course of her illness to determine the contribution of NMDAR signaling to spontaneous brain activity. Resting state BOLD fMRI was measured at the height of her illness and 18 weeks following discharge from hospital. Conventional resting state networks were defined using established methods. Correlation and covariance matrices were calculated by extracting the BOLD time series from regions of interest and calculating either the correlation or covariance quantity. The intrinsic activity was compared between visits, and to expected activity from 45 similarly aged healthy individuals. Near the height of the illness, the patient exhibited profound loss of consciousness, high-amplitude slowing of the electroencephalogram, and a severe reduction in the amplitude of spontaneous BOLD fMRI fluctuations. The patient's neurological status and measures of intrinsic activity improved following treatment. We conclude that NMDAR-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the mechanisms that give rise to organized spontaneous brain activity. Loss of intrinsic activity is associated with profound disruptions of consciousness and cognition. PMID:27025853

  16. Sustainable Buildings. Using Active Solar Power

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, M. Keith; Barnett, Russell

    2015-04-20

    The objective of this project is to promote awareness and knowledge of active solar energy technologies by installing and monitoring the following demonstration systems in Kentucky: 1) Pool heating system, Churchill Park School, 2) Water heating and daylighting systems, Middletown and Aiken Road Elementary Schools, 3) Photovoltaic street light comparison, Louisville Metro, 4) up to 25 domestic water heating systems across Kentucky. These tasks will be supported by outreach activities, including a solar energy installer training workshop and a Kentucky Solar Energy Conference.

  17. Loss of the Spectraplakin Short Stop Activates the DLK Injury Response Pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Valakh, Vera; Walker, Lauren J.; Skeath, James B.

    2013-01-01

    The MAPKKK dual leucine zipper-containing kinase (DLK, Wallenda in Drosophila) is an evolutionarily conserved component of the axonal injury response pathway. After nerve injury, DLK promotes degeneration of distal axons and regeneration of proximal axons. This dual role in coordinating degeneration and regeneration suggests that DLK may be a sensor of axon injury, and so understanding how DLK is activated is important. Two mechanisms are known to activate DLK. First, increasing the levels of DLK via overexpression or loss of the PHR ubiquitin ligases that target DLK activate DLK signaling. Second, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a calcium-dependent mechanism, can activate DLK. Here we describe a new mechanism that activates DLK in Drosophila: loss of the spectraplakin short stop (shot). In a genetic screen for mutants with defective neuromuscular junction development, we identify a hypomorphic allele of shot that displays synaptic terminal overgrowth and a precocious regenerative response to nerve injury. We demonstrate that both phenotypes are the result of overactivation of the DLK signaling pathway. We further show that, unlike mutations in the PHR ligase Highwire, loss of function of shot activates DLK without a concomitant increase in the levels of DLK. As a spectraplakin, Shot binds to both actin and microtubules and promotes cytoskeletal stability. The DLK pathway is also activated by downregulation of the TCP1 chaperonin complex, whose normal function is to promote cytoskeletal stability. These findings support the model that DLK is activated by cytoskeletal instability, which is a shared feature of both spectraplakin mutants and injured axons. PMID:24198375

  18. The production of activated carbon using the equipment of thermal power plants and heating plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osintsev, K. V.; Osintsev, V. V.; Dzhundubaev, A. K.; Kim, S. P.; Al'musin, G. T.; Akbaev, T. A.; Bogatkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The production technology of activated carbon using the conventional equipment of the thermal power stations and boiler houses is proposed. The obtained product is directed into the systems of chemical water preparation and water drain of enterprises. The production cycle is invariable when producing the activated carbon by the proposed technology. The fuel consumption and heat losses are considerably reduced when implementing this technology compared with the known analogs of the carbon sorbent. The production efficiency increases if small dust particles are preliminary separated and coal is activated in narrow ranges of fraction sizes.

  19. Temperature and strain measurements using the power, line-width, shape, and frequency shift of the Brillouin loss spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Smith, Jeffrey; Brown, Anthony W.

    2002-09-01

    A Brillouin scattering based fiber sensor system has been developed by our Fiber Optics Group for the structural monitoring and civil engineering related applications. In this paper, the Brillouin loss spectrum has been characterized in terms of its center frequency, peak power, line-width and shape. These parameters have been considered as a function of the input pump and probe laser powers, the pump pulse duration, strain and temperature. The measurement accuracy has been studied at different Brillouin frequency steps to study the uncertainty of the Brillouin frequency, line-width, peak power and shape factor vs. signal to noise ratio, so that we can optimize the system performance. Characterization of the Brillouin loss spectrum led to the development of an innovative technique to measure the strain and temperature simultaneously using the strain and temperature dependence on the peak power in conjunction with the Brillouin frequency for the single mode fiber with 3m spatial resolution, 3°C temperature resolution and 200 me (mm/m) strain accuracy.

  20. Simulations of the energy loss of ions at the stopping-power maximum in a laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayzac, W.; Frank, A.; Ortner, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Basko, M. M.; Bedacht, S.; Blažević, A.; Deppert, O.; Gericke, D. O.; Hallo, L.; Knetsch, A.; Kraus, D.; Malka, G.; Pépitone, K.; Schaumann, G.; Schlegel, T.; Schumacher, D.; Tauschwitz, An.; Vorberger, J.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.

    2016-03-01

    Simulations have been performed to study the energy loss of carbon ions in a hot, laser-generated plasma in the velocity region of the stopping-power maximum. In this parameter range, discrepancies of up to 30% exist between the various stopping theories and hardly any experimental data are available. The considered plasma, created by irradiating a thin carbon foil with two high-energy laser beams, is fully-ionized with a temperature of nearly 200 eV. To study the interaction at the maximum stopping power, Monte-Carlo calculations of the ion charge state in the plasma are carried out at a projectile energy of 0.5 MeV per nucleon. The predictions of various stopping-power theories are compared and experimental campaigns are planned for a first-time theory benchmarking in this low-velocity range.

  1. PARP-1 Inhibition Attenuates Neuronal Loss, Microglia Activation and Neurological Deficits after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Loane, David J.; Zhao, Zaorui; Kabadi, Shruti V.; Hanscom, Marie; Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Faden, Alan I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes neuronal cell death as well as microglial activation and related neurotoxicity that contribute to subsequent neurological dysfunction. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) induces neuronal cell death through activation of caspase-independent mechanisms, including release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and microglial activation. Administration of PJ34, a selective PARP-1 inhibitor, reduced cell death of primary cortical neurons exposed to N-Methyl-N'-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a potent inducer of AIF-dependent cell death. PJ34 also attenuated lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ-induced activation of BV2 or primary microglia, limiting NF-κB activity and iNOS expression as well as decreasing generation of reactive oxygen species and TNFα. Systemic administration of PJ34 starting as late as 24 h after controlled cortical impact resulted in improved motor function recovery in mice with TBI. Stereological analysis demonstrated that PJ34 treatment reduced the lesion volume, attenuated neuronal cell loss in the cortex and thalamus, and reduced microglial activation in the TBI cortex. PJ34 treatment did not improve cognitive performance in a Morris water maze test or reduce neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. Overall, our data indicate that PJ34 has a significant, albeit selective, neuroprotective effect after experimental TBI, and its therapeutic effect may be from multipotential actions on neuronal cell death and neuroinflammatory pathways. PMID:24476502

  2. Single-mode optical fiber for high-power, low-loss UV transmission.

    PubMed

    Colombe, Yves; Slichter, Daniel H; Wilson, Andrew C; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J

    2014-08-11

    We report large-mode-area solid-core photonic crystal fibers made from fused silica that resist ultraviolet (UV) solarization even at relatively high optical powers. Using a process of hydrogen loading and UV irradiation of the fibers, we demonstrate stable single-mode transmission over hundreds of hours for fiber output powers of 10 mW at 280 nm and 125 mW at 313 nm (limited only by the available laser power). Fiber attenuation ranges from 0.9 dB/m to 0.13 dB/m at these wavelengths, and is unaffected by bending for radii above 50 mm. PMID:25321060

  3. A three-dimensional model of mammalian tyrosinase active site accounting for loss of function mutations.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Thorsten; Olivares, Concepción; Solano, Francisco; Jaenicke, Elmar; García-Borrón, José Carlos; Decker, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Tyrosinases are the first and rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of melanin pigments responsible for colouring hair, skin and eyes. Mutation of tyrosinases often decreases melanin production resulting in albinism, but the effects are not always understood at the molecular level. Homology modelling of mouse tyrosinase based on recently published crystal structures of non-mammalian tyrosinases provides an active site model accounting for loss-of-function mutations. According to the model, the copper-binding histidines are located in a helix bundle comprising four densely packed helices. A loop containing residues M374, S375 and V377 connects the CuA and CuB centres, with the peptide oxygens of M374 and V377 serving as hydrogen acceptors for the NH-groups of the imidazole rings of the copper-binding His367 and His180. Therefore, this loop is essential for the stability of the active site architecture. A double substitution (374)MS(375) --> (374)GG(375) or a single M374G mutation lead to a local perturbation of the protein matrix at the active site affecting the orientation of the H367 side chain, that may be unable to bind CuB reliably, resulting in loss of activity. The model also accounts for loss of function in two naturally occurring albino mutations, S380P and V393F. The hydroxyl group in S380 contributes to the correct orientation of M374, and the substitution of V393 for a bulkier phenylalanine sterically impedes correct side chain packing at the active site. Therefore, our model explains the mechanistic necessity for conservation of not only active site histidines but also adjacent amino acids in tyrosinase. PMID:17850513

  4. A study using a Monte Carlo method of the optimal configuration of a distribution network in terms of power loss sensing.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun Ho; Lee, Jong Joo; Choi, Sang Yule; Cha, Jae Sang; Kang, Jang Mook; Kim, Jong Tae; Shin, Myong Chul

    2011-01-01

    Recently there have been many studies of power systems with a focus on "New and Renewable Energy" as part of "New Growth Engine Industry" promoted by the Korean government. "New And Renewable Energy"-especially focused on wind energy, solar energy and fuel cells that will replace conventional fossil fuels-is a part of the Power-IT Sector which is the basis of the SmartGrid. A SmartGrid is a form of highly-efficient intelligent electricity network that allows interactivity (two-way communications) between suppliers and consumers by utilizing information technology in electricity production, transmission, distribution and consumption. The New and Renewable Energy Program has been driven with a goal to develop and spread through intensive studies, by public or private institutions, new and renewable energy which, unlike conventional systems, have been operated through connections with various kinds of distributed power generation systems. Considerable research on smart grids has been pursued in the United States and Europe. In the United States, a variety of research activities on the smart power grid have been conducted within EPRI's IntelliGrid research program. The European Union (EU), which represents Europe's Smart Grid policy, has focused on an expansion of distributed generation (decentralized generation) and power trade between countries with improved environmental protection. Thus, there is current emphasis on a need for studies that assesses the economic efficiency of such distributed generation systems. In this paper, based on the cost of distributed power generation capacity, calculations of the best profits obtainable were made by a Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo simulations that rely on repeated random sampling to compute their results take into account the cost of electricity production, daily loads and the cost of sales and generate a result faster than mathematical computations. In addition, we have suggested the optimal design, which considers

  5. Bipedality and hair loss in human evolution revisited: The impact of altitude and activity scheduling.

    PubMed

    Dávid-Barrett, Tamás; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-05-01

    Bipedality evolved early in hominin evolution, and at some point was associated with hair loss over most of the body. One classic explanation (Wheeler 1984: J. Hum. Evol. 13, 91-98) was that these traits evolved to reduce heat overload when australopiths were foraging in more open tropical habitats where they were exposed to the direct effects of sunlight at midday. A recent critique of this model (Ruxton & Wilkinson 2011a: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 20965-20969) argued that it ignored the endogenous costs of heat generated by locomotion, and concluded that only hair loss provided a significant reduction in heat load. We add two crucial corrections to this model (the altitude at which australopiths actually lived and activity scheduling) and show that when these are included there are substantial reductions in heat load for bipedal locomotion even for furred animals. In addition, we add one further consideration to the model: we extend the analysis across the full 24 h day, and show that fur loss could not have evolved until much later because of the thermoregulatory costs this would have incurred at the altitudes where australopiths actually lived. Fur loss is most likely associated with the exploitation of open habitats at much lower altitudes at a much later date by the genus Homo. PMID:27178459

  6. Space Power Amplification with Active Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1993-01-01

    A space power amplifier composed of active linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA's) has been demonstrated and shown to have a gain of 30 dB at 20 GHz. In each of the antenna elements, a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) three-stage power amplifier is integrated with two LTSA's. The LTSA and the MMIC power amplifier has a gain of 11 dB and power added efficiency of 14 percent respectively. The design is suitable for constructing a large array using monolithic integration techniques.

  7. CENTAR modelling of the TOPAZ-II: Loss of vacuum chamber cooling during full power ground test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standley, Vaughn H.; Morris, D. Brent; Schuller, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The Code for Extended Non-linear Transient Analysis of Extraterrestrial Reactors (CENTAR) was used to model an electrically heated TOPAZ-II thermionic space reactor operating at full power following a loss of coolant to its enclosing vacuum chamber. The purpose of the work was to quantity the response time available to Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) operators following an interruption of vacuum chamber cooling and to test the utility of the CENTAR code for modelling a true-to-life application. A parametric study was done to test key assumptions and to refine the TOPAZ-II input deck being used. The vacuum chamber temperature history was then solved for under the assumption that full power would be maintained (at 115 kWth) during the loss of vacuum chamber cooling. The vacuum chamber temperatures were substituted into the CENTAR input deck for the space temperature variable. Each space temperature was associated with a point in time to simulate transient conditions in the electric heaters, thermionic elements, liquid metal coolant, and radiator. It was verified that the TOPAZ-II equilibrated fast enough such that CENTAR could run in steady state mode to generate a quasi-transient solution. Results indicated that TSET operators would have several minutes to regain total or partial cooling and that drastic action (emergency shutdown of the TOPAZ-II electric heater power, for example) would not be required.

  8. Analysis of the working process and mechanical losses in a Stirling engine for a solar power unit

    SciTech Connect

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a second level mathematical model for the computational simulation of the working process of a 1-kW Stirling engine has been used and the results obtained are presented. The internal circuit of the engine in the calculation scheme was divided into five chambers, namely, the expansion space, heater, regenerator, cooler and the compression space, and the governing system of ordinary differential equations for the energy and mass conservation were solved in each chamber by Euler`s method. In addition, mechanical losses in the construction of the engine have been determined and the computational results show that the mechanical losses for this particular design of the Stirling engine may be up to 50% of the indicated power of the engine.

  9. A compact and low-loss 1×8 optical power splitter using silica-based PLC on quartz substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangliang; An, Junming; Wu, Yuanda; Zhang, Jiashun; Wang, Yue; Li, Jianguang; Wang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Pan, Pan; Zhang, Liyao; Dai, Hongqing; Liu, Ruidan; Zhong, Fei; Zha, Qiang; Hu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Degang

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a compact, low-loss and good-uniformity 1×8 optical power splitter with new Y-branch structure is demonstrated using silica-based PLC technology on quartz substrate. Broadening waveguide and transition waveguide of the new Y-branch are optimized by using 3D BPM. The measurement results show that the insertion loss (IL) and the uniformity (UNIF) of the splitters are less than 9.5 dB and 0.35 dB, respectively, in the wavelength range from 1.26 μm to 1.65 μm, and the total product ratio of premium grade in a whole 6 in. wafer is more than 95%. The results mean that our technology completely satisfies the need of mass manufacture.

  10. Temperature thresholds for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdla, K.; Müller, R.

    2012-07-01

    Low stratospheric temperatures are known to be responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation that leads to polar ozone depletion. Here, we discuss the temperature threshold below which substantial chlorine activation occurs. We suggest that the onset of chlorine activation is dominated by reactions on cold binary aerosol particles, without the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), i.e. without any significant uptake of HNO3 from the gas phase. Using reaction rates on cold binary aerosol in a model of stratospheric chemistry, a chlorine activation threshold temperature, TACL, is derived. At typical stratospheric conditions, TACL is similar in value to TNAT (within 1-2 K), the highest temperature at which nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) can exist. TNAT is still in use to parameterise the threshold temperature for the onset of chlorine activation. However, perturbations can cause TACL to differ from TNAT: TACL is dependent upon H2O and potential temperature, but unlike TNAT is not dependent upon HNO3. Furthermore, in contrast to TNAT, TACL is dependent upon the stratospheric sulfate aerosol loading and thus provides a means to estimate the impact on polar ozone of strong volcanic eruptions and some geo-engineering options, which are discussed. A parameterisation of TACL is provided here, allowing it to be calculated for low solar elevation (or high solar zenith angle) over a comprehensive range of stratospheric conditions. Considering TACL as a proxy for chlorine activation cannot replace a detailed model calculation, and polar ozone loss is influenced by other factors apart from the initial chlorine activation. However, TACL provides a more accurate description of the temperature conditions necessary for chlorine activation and ozone loss in the polar stratosphere than TNAT.

  11. [Protection for noise-induced hearing loss using active hearing protection systems].

    PubMed

    Matschke, R G; Lehnert, H; Veit, I; Andresen, U

    1991-11-01

    Though noise induced hearing loss is no longer the most frequent occupational disease in the Federal Republic of Germany, the environmental pollution by the product "noise" in our technical and industrialized world has not been reduced. On the contrary, the situation is worsened by the rising influence of leisure noise. To avoid occupational hearing loss, the "Noise Injury Prevention Code" issued by the insurers would demand wearing personal ear protection, e.g. ear plugs, if ambient noise levels are above 85 dB(A). But there are working places in which such equipment would have precisely the adverse effect, because one of the reasons for possible damage to hearing is radio communication. In military aircraft cockpits for example noise exposure measurements showed ambient noise levels above 90 dB(A) during regular flight service nearly all the time. To be able to understand radio traffic in spite of the noisy environment, the headphone volume must be raised above the noise of the engines. The use of ear plugs can only be of limited value. Whereas pilots with normal hearing show only little impairment of speech intelligibility, those with noise-induced hearing losses show substantial impairment that varies in proportion to their hearing loss. Communication abilities may be drastically reduced which may compromise the reliability of radio traffic. To avoid compromising air security one has to demand a noise protection system which allows to reduce ambient noise levels without disturbing speech intelligibility in the inevitable radio communication. Nowadays active noise cancelling (ANC) systems by electronic compensation in different ways provide effective protection against noise induced hearing loss.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1755896

  12. Loss, adaptation and new directions: The impact of arm morbidity on leisure activities following breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roanne; Hack, Thomas F; Quinlan, Elizabeth; Tatemichi, Sue; Towers, Anna; Kwan, Winkle; Miedema, Baukje; Tilley, Andrea; Hamoline, Rita; Morrison, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    The impact of arm morbidity on leisure and quality of life is an understudied area in cancer survivorship. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively describe the impact of breast cancer-related arm morbidity on leisure participation in Canadian women. A grounded theory approach was used to generate thematic categories and a model. Drawing on participants from a larger cohort study (n = 740), 40 women with arm morbidity symptoms were purposively sampled and interviewed. Three themes emerged: a sense of loss, adapting participation, and new directions. Women with arm morbidity may experience an abrupt loss of previously enjoyed leisure activities and engage in a process of adapting to discover new meanings and directions. Comprehensive, person-centred cancer survivorship programs may assist with adaptation to arm morbidity. PMID:26642494

  13. Mitochondria related peptide MOTS-c suppresses ovariectomy-induced bone loss via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Wei; Lu, Gan; Xin, Sha; Huanyu, Lu; Yinghao, Jiang; Xiaoying, Lei; Chengming, Xu; Banjun, Ruan; Li, Wang; Zifan, Lu

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic targeting bone loss has been the focus of the study in osteoporosis. The present study is intended to evaluate whether MOTS-c, a novel mitochondria related 16 aa peptide, can protect mice from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. After ovary removal, the mice were injected with MOTS-c at a dose of 5 mg/kg once a day for 12 weeks. Our results showed that MOTS-c treatment significantly alleviated bone loss, as determined by micro-CT examination. Mechanistically, we found that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclast differentiation was remarkably inhibited by MOTS-c. Moreover, MOTS-c increased phosphorylated AMPK levels, and compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, could partially abrogate the effects of the MOTS-c on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, our findings provide evidence that MOTS-c may exert as an inhibitor of osteoporosis via AMPK dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27237975

  14. Maternal disturbance in activated sphingolipid metabolism causes pregnancy loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Li, Cuiling; Olivera, Ana; Bielawski, Jacek; Bielawska, Alicja; Deng, Chu-Xia; Proia, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Uterine decidualization, a process that occurs in response to embryo implantation, is critical for embryonic survival and thus is a key event for successful pregnancy. Here we show that the sphingolipid metabolic pathway is highly activated in the deciduum during pregnancy and disturbance of the pathway by disruption of sphingosine kinase (Sphk) genes causes defective decidualization with severely compromised uterine blood vessels, leading to early pregnancy loss. Sphk-deficient female mice (Sphk1–/–Sphk2+/–) exhibited both an enormous accumulation of dihydrosphingosine and sphingosine and a reduction in phosphatidylethanolamine levels in pregnant uteri. These mice also revealed increased cell death in decidual cells, decreased cell proliferation in undifferentiated stromal cells, and massive breakage of decidual blood vessels, leading to uterine hemorrhage and early embryonic lethality. Thus, sphingolipid metabolism regulates proper uterine decidualization and blood vessel stability. Our findings also suggest that disturbance in sphingolipid metabolism may be considered as a cause of pregnancy loss in humans. PMID:17885683

  15. MHD activity and energy loss during beta saturation and collapse at high beta poloidal in PBX

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Sesnic, S.; Bol, K.; Chance, M.; Fishman, H.; Fonck, R.; Gammel, G.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.

    1987-10-01

    High-..beta.. experiments, in medium to high-q tokamak plasmas, exhibit a temporal ..beta.. saturation and collapse. This behavior has been attributed to ballooning, ideal kink, or tearing modes. In PBX, a unique diagnostic capability allowed studies of the relation between MHD and energy loss for neutral-beam-heated (<6 MW), mildly indented (10 to 15%), nearly steady I/sub p/ discharges that approached the Troyon-Gruber limit. Under these conditions, correlations between MHD activity and energy losses have shown that the latter can be almost fully accounted for by various long wavelength MHD instabilities and that there is no need to invoke high-n ballooning modes in PBX. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; Yamada, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a wooden stick to chew during the experimental period. Quantitative micro-computed tomography, histologic analysis, and biochemical markers were used to evaluate the bone response. The stress/chewing group exhibited significantly attenuated stress-induced increases in serum corticosterone levels, suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption, and decreased trabecular bone mass in the vertebrae and distal femurs, compared with mice in the stress group. Active mastication during exposure to chronic stress alleviated chronic stress-induced bone density loss in B6 mice. Active mastication during chronic psychologic stress may thus be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat chronic stress-related osteopenia. PMID:26664256

  17. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammation and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Family Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Witarama, Tuff; Caudill, Marissa; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbance and short sleep duration are associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and certain cancers. This study was undertaken to test the effects of experimental sleep loss on spontaneous cellular inflammation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family proteins, which together promote an inflammatory microenvironment. In 24 healthy adults (16 females; 8 males), spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF in monocytes and spontaneous intranuclear expression of activated STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocyte-, and lymphocyte populations were measured in the morning after uninterrupted baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (PSD, sleep period from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), and recovery sleep. Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly greater after PSD (P<0.02) and after recovery sleep (P<0.01). Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of activated STAT 1 and STAT 5 was significantly greater after recovery sleep (P<0.007P<0.02, respectively) but not STAT 3 (P=0.09). No changes in STAT1, STAT3, or STAT5 were found in lymphocyte populations. Sleep loss induces activation of spontaneous cellular innate immunity and of STAT family proteins, which together map the dynamics of sleep loss on the molecular signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory and other immune responses. Treatments that target short sleep duration have the potential to constrain inflammation and reduce the risk for inflammatory disorders and some cancers in humans. PMID:25451613

  18. Not a Hearing Loss, a Deaf Gain: Power, Self-Naming, and the Deaf Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David James

    2013-01-01

    Self-naming has long stood as the primary assertion of power for disenfranchised communities in the western world. While person first language (e.g. "person who is deaf") has been the preferred language of disability and disability services for the last 20 years, members of the Deaf community have asserted their cultural capital, and…

  19. Neurophysiological assessment of sympathetic cardiovascular activity after loss of postganglionic neurons in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Matthew R; Liu, Chang-Ning; Okerberg, Carlin V; Opsahl, Alan C; Bobrowski, Walter F; Somps, Chris J

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the degree of sympathetic postganglionic neuronal loss required to impair cardiovascular-related sympathetic activity. To produce neuronal loss separate groups of rats were treated daily with guanethidine for either 5days or 11days, followed by a recovery period. Sympathetic activity was measured by renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Stereology of thoracic (T13) ganglia was performed to determine neuronal loss. Despite loss of more than two thirds of neurons in T13 ganglia in both treated groups no effect on resting blood pressure (BP) or heart rate (HR) was detected. Basal RSNA in rats treated for 5days (0.61±0.10μV∗s) and 11days (0.37±0.08μV∗s) was significantly less than vehicle-treated rats (0.99±0.13μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA by baroreceptor unloading were significantly lower in 5-day (1.09±0.19μV∗s) and 11-day treated rats (0.59±0.11μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (1.82±0.19μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA to chemoreceptor stimulation were significantly lower in 5-day treated rats (1.54±0.25μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (2.69±0.23μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA in 11-day treated rats were significantly lower (0.75±0.15μV∗s, p<0.05) compared with both vehicle-treated and 5-day treated rats. A positive correlation of neurons to sympathetic responsiveness but not basal activity was detected. These data suggest that diminished capacity for reflex sympathetic responsiveness rather than basal activity alone must be assessed for complete detection of neurophysiological cardiovascular impairment. PMID:27085835

  20. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Onar, Omer C; Miller, John M; Tang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  1. Altered Cingulate and Insular Cortex Activation During Risk-Taking in Methamphetamine Dependence: Losses Lose Impact

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Joshua L.; Stewart, Jennifer L.; May, April C.; Ball, Tali M.; Wittmann, Marc; Tapert, Susan F.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine if methamphetamine-dependent (MD) individuals exhibit behavioral or neural processing differences in risk-taking relative to healthy comparison participants (CTL). Design This was a cross-sectional study comparing two groups’ behavior on a risk-taking task and neural processing as assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Settings The study was conducted in an inpatient treatment center and a research fMRI facility in the United States. Participants Sixty-eight recently abstinent MD individuals recruited from a treatment program and forty CTL recruited from the community completed the study. Measurements The study assessed risk-taking behavior (overall and post-loss) using the Risky Gains Task (RGT), sensation-seeking, impulsivity and blood-oxygenation level dependent activation in the brain during the decision phase of the RGT. Findings Relative to CTL, MD displayed decreased activation in the bilateral rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and greater activation in the left insula across risky and safe decisions (p<.05). Right mid insula activation among CTL did not vary between risky and safe decisions, but among MD it was higher during risky relative to safe decisions (p<.05). Among MD, lower activation in the right rostral ACC (r=−.39, p<.01) and higher activation in the right mid insula (r=.35, p<.01) during risky decisions were linked to a higher likelihood of choosing a risky option following a loss. Conclusions Methamphetamine-dependent individuals show disrupted risk-related processing in both anterior cingulate and insula, brain areas that have been implicated in cognitive control and interoceptive processing. Attenuated neural processing of risky options may lead to risk-taking despite experiencing negative consequences. PMID:24033715

  2. Allocation of extracellular enzymatic activity in relation to litter composition, N deposition, and mass loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinsabaugh, R. L.; Carreiro, M.M.; Repert, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Decomposition of plant material is a complex process that requires interaction among a diversity of microorganisms whose presence and activity is subject to regulation by a wide range of environmental factors. Analysis of extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) provides a way to relate the functional organization of microdecomposer communities to environmental variables. In this study, we examined EEA in relation to litter composition and nitrogen deposition. Mesh bags containing senescent leaves of Quercus borealis (red oak), Acer rubrum (red maple) and Cornus florida (flowering dogwood) were placed on forest floor plots in southeastern New York. One-third of the plots were sprayed monthly with distilled water. The other plots were sprayed monthly with NH4NO3 solution at dose rates equivalent to 2 or 8 g N m-2 y-1. Mass loss, litter composition, fungal mass, and the activities of eight enzymes were measured on 13 dates for each litter type. Dogwood was followed for one year, maple for two, oak for three, For each litter type and treatment, enzymatic turnover activities were calculated from regressions of LN (%mass remaining) vs. cumulative activity. The decomposition of dogwood litter was more efficient than that of maple and oak. Maple litter had the lowest fungal mass and required the most enzymatic work to decompose, even though its mass loss rate was twice that of oak. Across litter types, N amendment reduced apparent enzymatic efficiencies and shifted EEA away from N acquisition and toward P acquisition, and away from polyphenol oxidation and toward polysaccharide hydrolysis. The effect of these shifts on decomposition rate varied with litter composition: dogwood was stimulated, oak was inhibited and maple showed mixed effects. The results show that relatively small shifts in the activity of one or two critical enzymes can significantly alter decomposition rates.

  3. "Kicking Up Some Dust": An Experimental Investigation Relating Lunar Dust Erosive Wear to Solar Power Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mpagazehe, Jeremiah N.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    2013-01-01

    The exhaust from retrograde rockets fired by spacecraft landing on the Moon can accelerate lunar dust particles to high velocities. Information obtained from NASA's Apollo 12 mission confirmed that these high-speed dust particles can erode nearby structures. This erosive wear damage can affect the performance of optical components such as solar concentrators. Solar concentrators are objects which collect sunlight over large areas and focus the light into smaller areas for purposes such as heating and energy production. In this work, laboratory-scale solar concentrators were constructed and subjected to erosive wear by the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant. The concentrators were focused on a photovoltaic cell and the degradation in electrical power due to the erosive wear was measured. It was observed that even moderate exposure to erosive wear from lunar dust simulant resulted in a 40 percent reduction in power production from the solar concentrators.

  4. Heat treatment results in a loss of transgene-encoded activities in several tobacco lines.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, K; Dröge-Laser, W; Köhne, S; Broer, I

    1997-01-01

    Heat treatment (37 degrees C) of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants led to a reversible reduction or complete loss of transgene-encoded activities in about 40% of 10 independent transformants carrying the luciferase-coding region fused to the 355 cauliflower mosaic virus or the soybean small subunit promoter and the nopaline synthase promoter driving the neomycin phosphotransferase gene, whereas the other lines had temperature-tolerant activities. Temperature sensitivity or tolerance of transgene-encoded activities was heritable. In some of the lines, temperature sensitivity of the transgene-encoded activities depended on the stage of development, occurring in either seedlings (40% luciferase and 50% neomycin phosphotransferase) or adult plants (both 40%). The phenomenon did not correlate with copy numbers or the homo- or hemizygous state of the transgenes. In lines harboring a temperature-sensitive luciferase activity, reduction of bioluminescence was observed after 2 to 3 h at 37 degrees C. Activity was regained after 2 h of subsequent cultivation at 25 degrees C. Irrespective of the reaction to the heat treatment, the level of luciferase RNA was slightly increased at 37 degrees C. Only in lines showing temperature sensitivity of transgene-encoded activities was the amount of luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase strongly reduced. In sterile culture, heat treatment for 15 d did not cause visible damage or changes in plant morphology. In all plants tested a slight induction of the heat-shock response was observed at 37 degrees C. PMID:9390430

  5. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strašík, I.; Mustafin, E.; Pavlovič, M.

    2010-07-01

    The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1) a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2) a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200MeV/u up to 1GeV/u.

  6. Impurity transport and radiated power loss estimates in NSTX using 2-d USXR arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael; Vero, Robert; Roquemore, Lane; Johnson, David; Kaita, Robert

    2000-10-01

    Large area, low capacitance, absolute photodiodes have been installed in the three ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) arrays operational on NSTX, for the beginning of the high power operation phase. In addition to bandpass filtered measurements in the USXR range, the absolute diodes enable total radiated power measurements and improve the accuracy of the absolute emissivity estimates. The position of the viewing chords with respect to the NSTX vacuum vessel has been measured using a laser pointing technique and the vignetting of the top array by in-vessel structures calibrated using an in-vessel extended light source. The Granetz-Cormack algorithm with Bessel radial functions is used to derive emissivity maps from the measured brightness profiles. The plasma emission in the spectral ranges defined by the bandpass filters on each array (0.3 μm Ti, 10 μm, 100 μm and 500 μm Be) is modeled using impurity line emission data computed with the HULLAC atomic physics package coupled to a 1-d impurity transport code. The evolution of the USXR emissivity, radiated power, and estimated impurity and plasma profiles during MHD phenomena like the Internal Reconnection Event and sawteeth, as well as emission data for ohmic, auxiliary heated and coaxial helicity injection discharges are presented.

  7. Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R.

    2010-07-15

    In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

  8. The Bi-IGBT: a low losses power structure by IGBT parallel association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramel, C.; DeMaglie, R.; Austin, P.; Sanchez, J. L.; LeGal, J.; Imbernon, E.; Laur, J. P.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Millan, J.; Rebollo, J.

    2008-05-01

    A low losses IGBT structure, the Bi-IGBT, made up by the parallel association of a slow and a fast IGBT is presented in this work. The structure has been simulated using Saber® tools including the IGBT physical models and compared with experimental results. Fabricated Bi-IGBT devices and the two constitutive IGBTs have been extensively characterized showing a good agreement with simulated electrical performances. It is also shown that the proposed Bi-IGBT combines the advantages of a low on-state voltage drop and a short current tail, providing a 30% reduction of the current tail. Finally, a simplified driver solution is proposed and analyzed by simulation.

  9. Transport ac loss in a rectangular thin strip with power-law E (J) relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Du-Xing; Fan, Yu; Fang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Transport ac losses of a rectangular thin strip obeying relation E /Ec =(J /Jc) n with a fixed critical current Ic and n = 5, 10, 20, 30 , and 40 are accurately computed at a fixed frequency f as functions of the current amplitude Im . The results may be interpolated and scaled to those at any values of Ic, f , and 5 ⩽ n ⩽ 40 . Normalized in the same way as that in Norris' analytical formula derived from the critical-state model and converting f to a critical frequency fc , the modeling results may be better compared with the Norris formula and experimental data. A complete set of calculated modeling data are given with necessary formulas to be easily used by experimentalists in any particular case.

  10. X-ray induced stellar mass loss near active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark; Shull, J. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The effects of UV and X-ray radiation on stars in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are critically evaluated. Mass loss rates in X-ray-induced winds are evaluated for realistic red giant models, and the effects of the ablation of stellar envelopes by radiation pressure are considered. The importance of X-ray-induced mass loss in the standard quasar model is evaluated and whether it can provide a source of accretion fuel or emission-line clouds is discussed. It is concluded that thermal winds driven by X-ray heating are a minor total supply of mass to AGN, but that thermal plus line-driven winds and stellar ablation may increase the mass loss and improve the chances for supplying a fraction of the necessary mass supply to the central object. It is speculated that when steady winds are inefficient, complex time-dependent processes due to X-ray energy injection deep into a stellar atmosphere could still release significant mass from stars.

  11. TDP-43 loss of function increases TFEB activity and blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qin; Wang, Hongfeng; Hao, Zongbing; Fu, Cheng; Hu, Qingsong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Chen, Dong; Han, Junhai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by selective loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as a major component of disease pathogenesis in ALS, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the fact that TDP-43 is a multi-functional protein involved in RNA processing and a large number of TDP-43 RNA targets have been discovered, the initial toxic effect and the pathogenic mechanism underlying TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration remain elusive. In this study, we found that loss of TDP-43 strongly induced a nuclear translocation of TFEB, the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, through targeting the mTORC1 key component raptor. This regulation in turn enhanced global gene expressions in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and increased autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis. However, loss of TDP-43 also impaired the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes through dynactin 1 downregulation, leading to accumulation of immature autophagic vesicles and overwhelmed ALP function. Importantly, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin treatment aggravated the neurodegenerative phenotype in a TDP-43-depleted Drosophila model, whereas activation of mTORC1 signaling by PA treatment ameliorated the neurodegenerative phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that impaired mTORC1 signaling and influenced ALP may contribute to TDP-43-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:26702100

  12. Vitamin K catabolite inhibition of ovariectomy-induced bone loss: Structure–activity relationship considerations

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Robin J.; Oguz, Cenk; Emery, Roger; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Hodges, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Scope The potential benefit of vitamin K as a therapeutic in osteoporosis is controversial and the vitamin K regimen being used clinically (45 mg/day) employs doses that are many times higher than required to ensure maximal gamma-carboxylation of the vitamin K-dependent bone proteins. We therefore tested the hypothesis that vitamin K catabolites, 5-carbon (CAN5C) and 7-carbon carboxylic acid (CAN7C) aliphatic side-chain derivatives of the naphthoquinone moiety exert an osteotrophic role consistent with the treatment of osteoporosis. Methods and results Osteoblast-like MG63 cell cultures were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and the levels of interleukin-6, an osteoclastogenic cytokine, measured with and without catabolites; low concentrations of CAN7C significantly inhibited interleukin-6 release, but CAN5C did not. In models of bone loss induced by ovariectomy or sciatic neurectomy in C57BL/6 mice, we found that the rarer CAN7C catabolite markedly restricted ovariectomy-induced bone loss and possibly limited sciatic neurectomy-induced bone loss. CAN7C activity depends on a free carboxylic acid and its particular side-chain structure. Conclusion These in vivo data indicate for the first time that the clinical utility of vitamin K for osteoporosis may reside in an unusual catabolite. PMID:25044634

  13. Time-Based Physical Activity Interventions for Weight Loss: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakicic, John M.; Rickman, Amy D.; Lang, Wei; Davis, Kelliann K.; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Neiberg, Rebecca; Marcus, Marsha D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether enhancing standard behavior weight loss interventions (SBWP) with additional strategies at the initiation of the intervention (ADOPT) or providing the additional strategies at predetermined times over the intervention period (MAINTAIN) enhances 18 month weight loss. Methods This was a clinical trial with participants (n=195; age= 43.2±8.6 yrs; BMI= 33.0±3.4 kg/m2) randomized to SBWP, ADOPT, or MAINTAIN. All were prescribed an energy restricted diet and physical activity, with group intervention sessions delivered over 18 months. ADOPT received additional phone contact (months 1–3), supervised exercise (months 1–6), and behavior campaigns (months 4–9). MAINTAIN received additional phone contact (months 4–6), supervised exercise (months 7–12), and behavior campaigns (months 13–18). Results There was a significant Group X Time interaction for weight loss (p=0.0032). SBWP lost 9.3±0.9, 7.8±1.1, and 5.9±1.2 kg at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. ADOPT lost 8.9±0.9, 7.6±1.2, and 5.8±1.2 kg, and MAINTAIN lost 9.7±0.9, 11.0±1.2, and 9.0±1.2 kg at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. The Group X Time interaction for SBWP vs. MAINTAIN (p=0.0033) and ADOPT vs. MAINTAIN (p=0.0075) was significant. There was a significant Group X Time interaction for change in fitness (p=0.0060). The Group X Time interaction for MAINTAIN vs. ADOPT (p=0.0018) was significant with a trend for MAINTAIN vs. SBWP (p=0.0525). Conclusions MAINTAIN improved 18-month weight loss compared to SBWP and ADOPT, with statistical trends that MAINTAIN resulted in greater improvements in fitness. These results suggest that time-based strategies emphasizing physical activity conferred greater benefits when delivered later and over the full course of intervention. This provides valuable information for the implementation of time-based strategies to improve long-term weight loss and fitness in overweight and obese adults. PMID:25160843

  14. Induced magnetization and power loss for a periodically driven system of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with randomly oriented easy axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. I.; Lyutyy, T. V.; Pedchenko, B. O.; Hryshko, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of an elliptically polarized magnetic field on a system of noninteracting, single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles characterized by a uniform distribution of easy axis directions. Our main goal is to determine the average magnetization of this system and the power loss in it. In order to calculate these quantities analytically, we develop a general perturbation theory for the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and find its steady-state solution for small magnetic field amplitudes. On this basis, we derive the second-order expressions for the average magnetization and power loss, investigate their dependence on the magnetic field frequency, and analyze the role of subharmonic resonances resulting from the nonlinear nature of the LLG equation. For arbitrary amplitudes, the frequency dependence of these quantities is obtained from the numerical solution of this equation. The impact of transitions between different regimes of regular and chaotic dynamics of magnetization, which can be induced in nanoparticles by changing the magnetic field frequency, is examined in detail.

  15. Experimental and analytical study of loss-of-flow transients in EBR-II occurring at decay power levels

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.; Planchon, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    A series of eight loss-of-flow (LOF) tests have been conducted in EBR-II to study the transition between forced and natural convective flows following a variety of loss-of-primary-pumping power conditions from decay heat levels. Comparisons of measurements and pretest/posttest predictions were made on a selected test. Good agreements between measurements and predictions was found prior to and just after the flow reaching its minimum, but the agreement is not as good after that point. The temperatures are consistent with the flow response and the assumed decay power. The measured results indicate that the flows of driver and the instrumented subassemblies are too much in the analytical model in the natural convective region. Although a parametric study on secondary flow, turbulent-laminar flow transition, heat transfer ability of the intermediate heat exchange at low flow and flow mixing in the primary tank has been performed to determine their effects on the flow, the cause of the discrepancy at very low flow level is still unknown.

  16. Power Subsystem for Extravehicular Activities for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has the responsibility to develop the next generation space suit power subsystem to support the Vision for Space Exploration. Various technology challenges exist in achieving extended duration missions as envisioned for future lunar and Mars mission scenarios. This paper presents an overview of ongoing development efforts undertaken at the Glenn Research Center in support of power subsystem development for future extravehicular activity systems.

  17. A high power active circulator using GaN MMIC power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liming, Gu; Wenquan, Che; Huang, Fan-Hsiu; Chiu, Hsien-Chin

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a 2.4 GHz hybrid integrated active circulator consisting of three power amplifiers and three PCB-based Wilkinson power dividers. The power amplifiers were designed and fabricated in a standard 0.35-μm AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology, and combined with three traditional power dividers on FR4 using bonding wires. Due to the isolation of power dividers, the isolation between three ports is achieved; meanwhile, due to the unidirectional characteristics of the power amplifiers, the nonreciprocal transfer characteristic of the circulator is realized. The measured insertion gain of the proposed active circulator is about 2-2.7 dB at the center frequency of 2.4 GHz, the isolation between three ports is better than 20 dB over 1.2-3.4 GHz, and the output power of the designed active circulator achieves up to 20.1-21.2 dBm at the center frequency.

  18. Pedunculopontine cell loss and protein aggregation direct microglia activation in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Elson, Joanna L; Yates, Abi; Pienaar, Ilse S

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported a loss of cholinergic neurons within the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) in rats that had been intra-nigrally lesioned with the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin, with levels of neuronal loss corresponding to that seen in the post-mortem pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Here we reveal lower expression values of the acetylcholine synthesising enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, within the remaining PPTg cholinergic neurons of lesioned rats compared to sham controls. We further characterise this animal model entailing dopaminergic- and non-dopaminergic neurodegeneration by reporting on stereological counts of non-cholinergic neurons, to determine whether the toxin is neuro-type specific. Cell counts between lesioned and sham-lesioned rats were analysed in terms of the topological distribution pattern across the rostro-caudal extent of the PPTg. The study also reports somatic hypotrophy in the remaining non-cholinergic neurons, particularly on the side closest to the nigral lesion. The cytotoxicity affecting the PPTg in this rat model of PD involves overexpression and accumulation of alpha-synuclein (αSYN), affecting cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons as well as microglia on the lesioned hemispheric side. We ascertained that microglia within the PPTg become fully activated due to the extensive neuronal damage and neuronal death resulting from a lactacystin nigral lesion, displaying a distinct rostro-caudal distribution profile which correlates with PPTg neuronal loss, with the added implication that lactacystin-induced αSYN aggregation might trigger neuronophagia for promoting PPTg cell loss. The data provide critical insights into the mechanisms underlying the lactacystin rat model of PD, for studying the PPTg in health and when modelling neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25989851

  19. Optimal active power dispatch by network flow approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.F. ); Soares, S.; Ohishi, T. )

    1988-11-01

    In this paper the optimal active power dispatch problem is formulated as a nonlinear capacitated network flow problem with additional linear constraints. Transmission flow limits and both Kirchhoff's laws are taken into account. The problem is solved by a Generalized Upper Bounding technique that takes advantage of the network flow structure of the problem. The new approach has potential applications on power systems problems such as economic dispatch, load supplying capability, minimum load shedding, and generation-transmission reliability. The paper also reviews the use of transportation models for power system analysis. A detailed illustrative example is presented.

  20. Gamma power is phase-locked to posterior alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Daria; Hermes, Dora; Jensen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations in various frequency bands have been reported in numerous studies in both humans and animals. While it is obvious that these oscillations play an important role in cognitive processing, it remains unclear how oscillations in various frequency bands interact. In this study we have investigated phase to power locking in MEG activity of healthy human subjects at rest with their eyes closed. To examine cross-frequency coupling, we have computed coherence between the time course of the power in a given frequency band and the signal itself within every channel. The time-course of the power was calculated using a sliding tapered time window followed by a Fourier transform. Our findings show that high-frequency gamma power (30-70 Hz) is phase-locked to alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) in the ongoing MEG signals. The topography of the coupling was similar to the topography of the alpha power and was strongest over occipital areas. Interestingly, gamma activity per se was not evident in the power spectra and only became detectable when studied in relation to the alpha phase. Intracranial data from an epileptic subject confirmed these findings albeit there was slowing in both the alpha and gamma band. A tentative explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system is inhibited during most of the alpha cycle whereas a burst of gamma activity at a specific alpha phase (e.g. at troughs) reflects a window of excitability. PMID:19098986

  1. Design of power-plant installations pressure-loss characteristics of duct components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, John R

    1944-01-01

    A correlation of what are believed to be the most reliable data available on duct components of aircraft power-plant installations is presented. The information is given in a convenient form and is offered as an aid in designing duct systems and, subject to certain qualifications, as a guide in estimating their performance. The design and performance data include those for straight ducts; simple bends of square, circular, and elliptical cross sections; compound bends; diverging and converging bends; vaned bends; diffusers; branch ducts; internal inlets; and an angular placement of heat exchangers. Examples are included to illustrate methods of applying these data in analyzing duct systems. (author)

  2. Loss of TINCR expression promotes proliferation, metastasis through activating EpCAM cleavage in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe-ying; Chang, Ya-ya; Zheng, Lin; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Yu-han; Zhang, Wen-juan; Li, Xue-nong

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in kinds of human diseases, including colorectal cancer (CRC). TINCR, a 3.7 kb long non coding RNA, was associated with cell differentiation in keratinocyte and gastric cancer cells. However, little is known about the role of TINCR in regulation CRC progression. Here, we showed that lncRNA TINCR was associated with CRC proliferation and metastasis. TINCR was statistically downregulated in CRC tissues and metastatic CRC cell lines compared with their counterparts. TINCR was reversely correlated with CRC progression and promoted tumor cells growth, metastasis in vivo and in vitro. While overexpression of TINCR had opposite effect. In addition, we also found that TINCR specifically bound to EpCAM through RNA IP and RNA pull down assays. Loss of TINCR promoted hydrolysis of EpCAM and then released EpICD, subsequently, activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Further studies shown that c-Myc repressed the expression of TINCR through repressing sp1 transcriptive activity, which established a positive feedback loop controlling c-Myc and TINCR expression. These findings elucidate that loss of TINCR expression promotes proliferation and metastasis in CRC and it could be considered as a potential cancer suppressor gene. PMID:27009809

  3. Impingement losses of white perch at Hudson River power plants: magnitude and biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the impact of impingement at power plants on the Hudson River white perch population was made. It was estimated that impingement reduces the abundance of each white perch year class by at least 10% and probably by 15-20% or more after 2-3 years of vulnerability to power plants. Effects of impingement on average year-class abundance of white perch could not be detected from a time series of abundance indices derived from impingement data. Even if a reliable index were developed, natural fluctuations in year-class strength are great enough that a short-term monitoring program would be inadequate for detecting even a large reduction in average year-class strength. A multipopulation analysis was performed using simple food chain and food web models. The results suggest that any long-term decline in white perch abundance caused by impingement should be accompanied by an increase in the biomass of adult white perch relative to young-of-the-year. It was concluded that (1) at present, assessments of population-level impact of impingement should focus on short-term effects, (2) research is needed to develop a reliable index of year-class strength for use in long-term monitoring programs, (3) identification and quantification of natural environmental factors influencing year-class strength are needed to improve the ability to predict and detect changes in abundance, and (4) it would be useful in designing monitoring programs to focus on detecting patterns of change among populations and age groups rather than solely on declines in abundance of individual populations. 24 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  4. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  5. RSS-Based Method for Sensor Localization with Unknown Transmit Power and Uncertainty in Path Loss Exponent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiyan; Liu, Peng; Lin, Wei; Gui, Guan

    2016-01-01

    The localization of a sensor in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has now gained considerable attention. Since the transmit power and path loss exponent (PLE) are two critical parameters in the received signal strength (RSS) localization technique, many RSS-based location methods, considering the case that both the transmit power and PLE are unknown, have been proposed in the literature. However, these methods require a search process, and cannot give a closed-form solution to sensor localization. In this paper, a novel RSS localization method with a closed-form solution based on a two-step weighted least squares estimator is proposed for the case with the unknown transmit power and uncertainty in PLE. Furthermore, the complete performance analysis of the proposed method is given in the paper. Both the theoretical variance and Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) are derived. The relationships between the deterministic CRLB and the proposed stochastic CRLB are presented. The paper also proves that the proposed method can reach the stochastic CRLB. PMID:27618055

  6. High-temperature optically activated GaAs power switching for aircraft digital electronic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berak, J. M.; Grantham, D. H.; Swindal, J. L.; Black, J. F.; Allen, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Gallium arsenide high-temperature devices were fabricated and assembled into an optically activated pulse-width-modulated power control for a torque motor typical of the kinds used in jet engine actuators. A bipolar heterojunction phototransistor with gallium aluminum arsenide emitter/window, a gallium arsenide junction field-effect power transistor and a gallium arsenide transient protection diode were designed and fabricated. A high-temperature fiber optic/phototransistor coupling scheme was implemented. The devices assembled into the demonstrator were successfully tested at 250 C, proving the feasibility of actuator-located switching of control power using optical signals transmitted by fibers. Assessments of the efficiency and technical merits were made for extension of this high-temperature technology to local conversion of optical power to electrical power and its control at levels useful for driving actuators. Optical power sources included in the comparisons were an infrared light-emitting diode, an injection laser diode, tungsten-halogen lamps and arc lamps. Optical-to-electrical power conversion was limited to photovoltaics located at the actuator. Impedance matching of the photovoltaic array to the load was considered over the full temperature range, -55 C to 260 C. Loss of photovoltaic efficiency at higher temperatures was taken into account. Serious losses in efficiency are: (1) in the optical source and the cooling which they may require in the assumed 125 C ambient, (2) in the decreased conversion efficiency of the gallium arsenide photovoltaic at 260 C, and (3) in impedance matching. Practical systems require improvements in these areas.

  7. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  8. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27) are subject to tachyphylaxis in rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). This study examined whether this tachyphylaxis is due to the loss of vasodilator potency of cAMP generated by activation of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptors. Five successive treatments with PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline-treated rats that were not subject to tachyphylaxis. The first injection of PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) in L-NAME (50 micromol/kg iv)-treated rats produced vasodilator responses of similar magnitude to those in saline-treated rats, whereas four subsequent injections produced progressively and markedly smaller responses. The hemodynamic effects of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP; 5-15 micromol/kg iv) were similar in L-NAME-treated rats and in L-NAME-treated rats that had received the five injections of PACAP-27. In addition, five injections of 8-CPT-cAMP (10 micromol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline- and L-NAME-treated rats that were not subject to the development of tachyphylaxis. These results suggest that a loss of biological potency of cAMP is not responsible for tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 in L-NAME-treated rats. This tachyphylaxis may be due to the inability of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptor to activate adenylate cyclase.

  9. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J.; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K.; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun−/− mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of

  10. Differential modulation of activity related to the anticipation of monetary gains and losses across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Janine; Bandurski, Pia; Sommer, Tobias

    2013-11-01

    Estradiol and progesterone interact with the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems that are involved in the processing of rewards. On the systems level, these hormones modulate responses to stimulants as well as neuronal activity related to the anticipation of monetary gains. As different mechanisms might underlie the processing of gains and losses, the current study aims to investigate whether neural correlates of gain and loss anticipation are differentially modulated by menstrual cycle phases. Therefore, young, naturally cycling women were examined by means of functional neuroimaging during performing a modified version of the 'Monetary Incentive Delay' task in the early follicular and in the luteal menstrual cycle phase. During the low hormone early follicular phase, the anticipation of high vs. low gains and losses was associated with activity in a largely overlapping network of brain areas. However, high hormone levels in the luteal phase affected brain activity in these areas differentially during the anticipation of high vs. low gains and losses. In particular, the orbitofrontal cortex showed a reduced sensitivity to gain magnitude, whereas the ventral striatum and the anterior cingulate showed a reduced sensitivity to loss magnitude. In summary, the high amount of progesterone and estradiol in the luteal phase decreased activity related to the anticipation of monetary gains and losses in different brain areas, suggesting that hormones modulate different processes during the anticipation of gain and loss magnitude. PMID:23981052

  11. Retinal Structures and Visual Cortex Activity are Impaired Prior to Clinical Vision Loss in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Matthew C; Conner, Ian P; Teng, Cindy Y; Lawrence, Jesse D; Safiullah, Zaid; Wang, Bo; Bilonick, Richard A; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and its pathogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we measured the structure, metabolism and function of the visual system by optical coherence tomography and multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging in healthy subjects and glaucoma patients with different degrees of vision loss. We found that inner retinal layer thinning, optic nerve cupping and reduced visual cortex activity occurred before patients showed visual field impairment. The primary visual cortex also exhibited more severe functional deficits than higher-order visual brain areas in glaucoma. Within the visual cortex, choline metabolism was perturbed along with increasing disease severity in the eye, optic radiation and visual field. In summary, this study showed evidence that glaucoma deterioration is already present in the eye and the brain before substantial vision loss can be detected clinically using current testing methods. In addition, cortical cholinergic abnormalities are involved during trans-neuronal degeneration and can be detected non-invasively in glaucoma. The current results can be of impact for identifying early glaucoma mechanisms, detecting and monitoring pathophysiological events and eye-brain-behavior relationships, and guiding vision preservation strategies in the visual system, which may help reduce the burden of this irreversible but preventable neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27510406

  12. Retinal Structures and Visual Cortex Activity are Impaired Prior to Clinical Vision Loss in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Matthew C.; Conner, Ian P.; Teng, Cindy Y.; Lawrence, Jesse D.; Safiullah, Zaid; Wang, Bo; Bilonick, Richard A.; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Chan, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and its pathogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we measured the structure, metabolism and function of the visual system by optical coherence tomography and multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging in healthy subjects and glaucoma patients with different degrees of vision loss. We found that inner retinal layer thinning, optic nerve cupping and reduced visual cortex activity occurred before patients showed visual field impairment. The primary visual cortex also exhibited more severe functional deficits than higher-order visual brain areas in glaucoma. Within the visual cortex, choline metabolism was perturbed along with increasing disease severity in the eye, optic radiation and visual field. In summary, this study showed evidence that glaucoma deterioration is already present in the eye and the brain before substantial vision loss can be detected clinically using current testing methods. In addition, cortical cholinergic abnormalities are involved during trans-neuronal degeneration and can be detected non-invasively in glaucoma. The current results can be of impact for identifying early glaucoma mechanisms, detecting and monitoring pathophysiological events and eye-brain-behavior relationships, and guiding vision preservation strategies in the visual system, which may help reduce the burden of this irreversible but preventable neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27510406

  13. Dose to man from a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.; Greenly, G.D.

    1981-02-01

    At the request of the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we used our computer codes, MATHEW and ADPIC, to assess the environmental impact of a loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant, about 40 kilometres southeast of Sacramento, California. Meteorological input was selected so that the effluent released by the accident would be transported over the Sacramento metropolitan area. With the release rates provided by the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we calculated the largest total dose for a 24-hour release as 70 rem about one kilometre northwest of the reactor. The largest total dose in the Sacramento metropolitan area is 780 millirem. Both doses are from iodine-131, via the forage-cow-milk pathway to an infant's thyroid. The largest dose near the nuclear plant can be minimized by replacing contaminated milk and by giving the cows dry feed. To our knowledge, there are no milk cows within the Sacramento metropolitan area.

  14. Device Design of Diamond Schottky-pn Diode for Low-Loss Power Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Toshiharu; Kato, Hiromitsu; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Ogura, Masahiko; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2012-09-01

    The device parameters of a novel diamond diode, namely, a Schottky-pn diode (SPND), are analyzed to realize a fast switching time, a low on-resistance, and a high blocking voltage simultaneously. The SPND is composed of an n-type active layer sandwiched between a highly doped p+-type layer and a Schottky metal. The key structure is the fully depleted n-type layer. From the simulations of the energy band diagram based on the key structure of the SPND using Poisson's equations, it is concluded that the low donor density in the n-type layer and the high acceptor density in the p+-type layer are key points for the high-performance SPND.

  15. Changes in physical activity during a weight loss intervention and follow-up: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, N R; Williams, K; Shrestha, R; Ahern, A L; Holzapfel, C; Hauner, H; Jebb, S A; Caterson, I D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Physical activity is an important component in weight loss treatment and weight maintenance. We evaluated the physical activity component of two weight loss programmes, either standard care (SC) as defined by national guidelines, or a commercial programme (CP; Weight Watchers) over the period of weight loss and follow-up. 772 adults (mean body mass index: 31.4 ± 2.6 kg m−2) were recruited by primary care practices in Australia, the United Kingdom, and Germany, and randomly assigned to 12 months SC, or the CP. They were then followed up at 24 months. Change in physical activity levels were assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)-short form, and pedometer recordings. Both groups reported increases in physical activity using the IPAQ from baseline to 12 months and 24 months (within groups P < 0.0001) and in pedometer steps from baseline to 12 months only (within groups P < 0.0001). Differences between groups with both methods of assessment were not significant. There was a significant difference in weight loss between the groups at 12 months favouring the CP group; however, this statistical difference was not maintained at 24 months. In conclusion, despite similar increases in reported activity, there were significant differences in weight loss and regain between groups. Therefore, greater weight loss seen with the CP is unlikely to be due to increases in physical activity. Trends in pedometer steps mirrored changes in weight over time more closely than the IPAQ; however, both assessment tools have limitations. Better activity assessment measures are needed to more accurately gauge changes in physical activity during weight loss interventions. PMID:25826767

  16. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-14

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution. PMID:26790821

  17. Complement activation and choriocapillaris loss in early AMD: Implications for pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S.Scott; Sohn, Elliott H.; Chirco, Kathleen R.; Drack, Arlene V.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common and devastating disease that can result in severe visual dysfunction. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in identifying genetic variants that contribute to AMD, many of which lie in genes involved in the complement cascade. In this review we discuss the significance of complement activation in AMD, particularly with respect to the formation of the membrane attack complex in the aging choriocapillaris. We review the clinical, histological and biochemical data that indicate that vascular loss in the choroid occurs very early in the pathogenesis of AMD, and discuss the potential impact of vascular dropout on the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the photoreceptor cells. Finally, we present a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of early AMD and consider the implications of this model on the development of new therapies. PMID:25486088

  18. Qualification of active mechanical components for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Mollerus, F.J.

    1983-11-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has undertaken a study of active safety related mechanical components in domestic nuclear plants to determine what qualification information exists and to establish a plan for qualification of those components. Active safety related mechanical components are those which undergo mechanical motion to perform a safety function. The overall objective of the study is to recommend appropriate methods and realistic criteria for the environmental, seismic and dynamic qualification of active mechanical components. This paper presents the results of progress in this project through May 1983.

  19. Rhabdomyolysis-Associated Mutations in Human LPIN1 Lead to Loss of Phosphatidic Acid Phosphohydrolase Activity.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, George G; Collier, Sara L; Chen, Zhouji; Eaton, James M; Connolly, Anne M; Bucelli, Robert C; Pestronk, Alan; Harris, Thurl E; Finck, Brian N

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an acute syndrome due to extensive injury of skeletal muscle. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis is often caused by inborn errors in intermediary metabolism, and recent work has suggested that mutations in the human gene encoding lipin 1 (LPIN1) may be a common cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children. Lipin 1 dephosphorylates phosphatidic acid to form diacylglycerol (phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase; PAP) and acts as a transcriptional regulatory protein to control metabolic gene expression. Herein, a 3-year-old boy with severe recurrent rhabdomyolysis was determined to be a compound heterozygote for a novel c.1904T>C (p.Leu635Pro) substitution and a previously reported genomic deletion of exons 18-19 (E766-S838_del) in LPIN1. Western blotting with patient muscle biopsy lysates demonstrated a marked reduction in lipin 1 protein, while immunohistochemical staining for lipin 1 showed abnormal subcellular localization. We cloned cDNAs to express recombinant lipin 1 proteins harboring pathogenic mutations and showed that the E766-S838_del allele was not expressed at the RNA or protein level. Lipin 1 p.Leu635Pro was expressed, but the protein was less stable, was aggregated in the cytosol, and was targeted for proteosomal degradation. Another pathogenic single amino acid substitution, lipin 1 p.Arg725His, was well expressed and retained its transcriptional regulatory function. However, both p.Leu635Pro and p.Arg725His proteins were found to be deficient in PAP activity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated a loss of catalysis rather than diminished substrate binding. These data suggest that loss of lipin 1-mediated PAP activity may be involved in the pathogenesis of rhabdomyolysis in lipin 1 deficiency. PMID:25967228

  20. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  1. Respiratory water loss in relation to activity in fullterm infants on their first day after birth.

    PubMed

    Riesenfeld, T; Hammarlund, K; Sedin, G

    1987-11-01

    Respiratory water loss (RWL), oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured in ten fullterm infants on their first day after birth, using an open flow-through system with a mass spectrometer, specially equipped with a water channel, for analysis of gas concentrations. Measurements were made both with the infant asleep and during different levels of motor activity. The ambient temperature was maintained at approximately 32.5 degrees C and the ambient relative humidity at 50%. RWL increased from 4.2 +/- 0.7 (SD) mg/kg min when the infant was asleep to 6.3 +/- 1.0 mg/kg min when he or she was awake but calm; with increasing activity there was a further increase in RWL. The oxygen consumption increased from 5.4 +/- 0.9 (SD) ml/kg min during sleep to 6.9 +/- 0.8 (SD) ml/kg min when awake, and also increased further with increasing activity. PMID:3425306

  2. Hif1α is required for osteoclast activation and bone loss in male osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tando, Toshimi; Sato, Yuiko; Miyamoto, Kana; Morita, Mayu; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Oike, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    The number of osteoporosis patients is increasing not only in women but in men. Male osteoporosis occurs due to aging or androgen depletion therapies, leading to fractures. However, molecular mechanisms underlying male osteoporosis remain unidentified. Here, we show that hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) is required for development of testosterone deficiency-induced male osteoporosis. We found that in mice Hif1α protein accumulates in osteoclasts following orchidectomy (ORX) in vivo. In vitro, Hif1α protein accumulated in osteoclasts cultured in hypoxic conditions, but Hif1α protein rather than mRNA levels were suppressed by testosterone treatment, even in hypoxia. Administration of a Hif1α inhibitor to ORX mice abrogated testosterone deficiency-induced osteoclast activation and bone loss but did not alter osteoclast activities or bone phenotypes in sham-operated, testosterone-sufficient animals. We conclude that Hif1α protein accumulation due to testosterone-deficiency promotes development of male osteoporosis. Thus Hif1α protein could be targeted to inhibit pathologically-activated osteoclasts under testosterone-deficient conditions to treat male osteoporosis patients. PMID:26792721

  3. Swimming Activity Prevents the Unloading Induced Loss of Bone Mass, Architecture, and Strength in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Falcai, Maurício J.; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; de Sousa Neto, Manoel Damião; Volpon, Jose B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether swimming activity associated with a three-week period of hypoactivity could prevent the deleterious effects of disuse on the tibias of tail-suspended rats. Forty Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (HS) permanently hindlimb suspension rats; (HS + Swim) rats submitted to unloading interrupted by swimming exercise; (HS + WB) hindlimb suspension rats with interruption for regular weight bearing for the same length of time as the HS+Swim rats; (Control) control rats that were allowed regular cage activities; and (Control + Swim) control rats that underwent swimming exercise. At the end of the experiment, bone mineral density, bone strength, and trabecular quantification were analyzed. The hindlimb-suspended rats exhibited bone quality loss (significant decrease in BMD, bone strength, and deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone architecture; decrease in BV/TV, TbN, TbTh, ConnD, CtV, and CtTh; and increase in TbSp) when compared to control rats. In contrast, trained rats showed a significant increase of 43% in bone mass, 29% in bone strength, 58% in trabecular thickness, 85% in bone volume, 27% in trabeculae number, and 30% in cortical volume, when compared to the hindlimb-suspended rats. We conclude that swimming activity not only ameliorates but also fully prevents the deleterious effects on bone quality in osteopenic rats. PMID:26090414

  4. Energetic ion losses caused by magnetohydrodynamic activity resonant and non-resonant with energetic ions in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kunihiro; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Spong, Donald A.; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; the LHD Experiment Group

    2014-09-01

    Experiments to reveal energetic ion dynamics associated with magnetohydrodynamic activity are ongoing in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Interactions between beam-driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic ions have been investigated. Energetic ion losses induced by beam-driven burst TAEs have been observed using a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in neutral beam-heated high β plasmas. The loss flux of co-going beam ions increases as the TAE amplitude increases. In addition to this, the expulsion of beam ions associated with edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been also recognized in LHD. The SLIP has indicated that beam ions having co-going and barely co-going orbits are affected by ELMs. The relation between ELM amplitude and ELM-induced loss has a dispersed structure. To understand the energetic ion loss process, a numerical simulation based on an orbit-following model, DELTA5D, that incorporates magnetic fluctuations is performed. The calculation result shows that energetic ions confined in the interior region are lost due to TAE instability, with a diffusive process characterizing their loss. For the ELM, energetic ions existing near the confinement/loss boundary are lost through a convective process. We found that the ELM-induced loss flux measured by SLIP changes with the ELM phase. This relation between the ELM amplitude and measured ELM-induced loss results in a more dispersed loss structure.

  5. Large active retrodirective arrays for solar power satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1978-01-01

    An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam toward the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces the RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the 'conjugate' of that received by the element. Application of the ARA to the solar power satellite concept has been proposed. A method of providing a reference phase is described, called 'central phasing', which eliminates the need for a rigid structure ordinarily needed in order to realize accurate retrodirectivity.

  6. Modeling operator actions during a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, L.S.; Ortiz, M.G.

    1991-12-31

    A small break loss-of-accident (SBLOCA) in a typical Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) nuclear power plant was modeled using RELAP5/MOD3. This work was performed as part of the United States Regulatory Commission`s (USNRC) Code, Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) study. The break was initiated by severing one high pressure injection (HPI) line at the cold leg. Thus, the small break was further aggravated by reduced HPI flow. Comparisons between scoping runs with minimal operator action, and full operator action, clearly showed that the operator plays a key role in recovering the plant. Operator actions were modeled based on the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) and the Technical Bases Document for the EOPs. The sequence of operator actions modeled here is only one of several possibilities. Different sequences of operator actions are possible for a given accident because of the subjective decisions the operator must make when determining the status of the plant, hence, which branch of the EOP to follow. To assess the credibility of the modeled operator actions, these actions and results of the simulated accident scenario were presented to operator examiners who are familiar with B&W nuclear power plants. They agreed that, in general, the modeled operator actions conform to the requirements set forth in the EOPs and are therefore plausible. This paper presents the method for modeling the operator actions and discusses the simulated accident scenario from the viewpoint of operator actions.

  7. Analysis of bypass activation of C3 by endotoxic LPS and loss of this potency

    PubMed Central

    Dierich, M. P.; Bitter-Suermann, D.; König, W.; Hadding, U.; Galanos, C.; Rietschel, E. T.

    1973-01-01

    Endotoxic lipopolysaccharides prepared from Salmonella minnesota smooth form (LPS-S) and rough form, R 595 (LPS-R) activate C3 in guinea-pig serum as is demonstrated by C3 kinetics and generation of anaphylatoxic activity. The activation depends on the presence of certain serum factors, one of which is the protein (SF) interacting with the cobra venom factor, on the presence of Mg++, the temperature and on dose of LPS applied. This turnover of C3 is terminated at 37° within 2 minutes (LPS-R) to 12 minutes (LPS-S) and then reaches a plateau. The amount of C3 consumption, i.e. the level of the plateau, is typical for given concentrations of LPS-S and LPS-R (intermediate plateau). Above a certain LPS-concentration additional LPS does not induce further C3 turnover (maximal plateau). While the `maximal plateau' may be explained by a limitation of the factors needed for the LPS dependent consumption of C3, the `intermediate plateau' and the termination of the action on C3 are not well understood. It is hypothesized that coating of the LPS molecule by serum protein, e.g. albumin, inactivates LPS-S and LPS-R with regard to their action on C3. C3 and C5 in normal serum concentrations appear not to be involved. It is suggested that an additional mechanism for termination of LPS action is a rapid loss of activity of LPS-induced intermediates. ImagesFIG. 8 PMID:4122408

  8. Nucleus and Mass Loss from Active Asteroid 313P/Gibbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, David; Li, Jing; Agarwal, Jessica; Weaver, Harold; Mutchler, Max; Larson, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope observations of active asteroid 313P/Gibbs (formerly P/2014 S4) taken over the five month interval from 2014 October to 2015 March. This object has been recurrently active near perihelion (at 2.4 AU) in two different orbits, a property that is naturally explained by the sublimation of near surface ice but which is difficult to reconcile with other activity mechanisms. We find that the mass loss peaks near 1 kg s-1 in October and then declines over the subsequent months by about a factor of five, at nearly constant heliocentric distance. This decrease is too large to be caused by the change in heliocentric distance during the period of observation. However, it is consistent with sublimation from an ice patch shadowed by local topography, for example in a pit like those observed on the nucleus of short-period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While no unique interpretation is possible, a simple self shadowing model shows that sublimation from a pit with a depth to diameter ratio near 1/2 matches the observed rate of decline of the activity, while deeper and shallower pits do not. We estimate the nucleus radius to be 700 ± 100 m (geometric albedo 0.05 assumed). Measurements of the spatial distribution of the dust were obtained from different viewing geometries. They show that dust was ejected continuously not impulsively, that the effective particle size is large, ˜50 μm, and that the ejection speed is ˜2.5 m s-1. The total dust mass ejected is ˜107 kg, corresponding to ˜10-5 of the nucleus mass. The observations are consistent with partially shadowed sublimation from ˜104 m2 of ice, corresponding to ˜0.2% of the nucleus surface. For ice to survive in 313P for billion-year timescales requires that the duty cycle for sublimation be ≲10-3.

  9. Altered Regional and Circuit Resting-State Activity Associated with Unilateral Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fu; Wang, Zhenmin; Ge, Jianqiao; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Zhixian; Gao, Jia-Hong; Yang, Yihong; Fan, Jin; Zou, Qihong; Liu, Pinan

    2014-01-01

    The deprivation of sensory input after hearing damage results in functional reorganization of the brain including cross-modal plasticity in the sensory cortex and changes in cognitive processing. However, it remains unclear whether partial deprivation from unilateral auditory loss (UHL) would similarly affect the neural circuitry of cognitive processes in addition to the functional organization of sensory cortex. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate intrinsic activity in 34 participants with UHL from acoustic neuroma in comparison with 22 matched normal controls. In sensory regions, we found decreased regional homogeneity (ReHo) in the bilateral calcarine cortices in UHL. However, there was an increase of ReHo in the right anterior insular cortex (rAI), the key node of cognitive control network (CCN) and multimodal sensory integration, as well as in the left parahippocampal cortex (lPHC), a key node in the default mode network (DMN). Moreover, seed-based resting–state functional connectivity analysis showed an enhanced relationship between rAI and several key regions of the DMN. Meanwhile, lPHC showed more negative relationship with components in the CCN and greater positive relationship in the DMN. Such reorganizations of functional connectivity within the DMN and between the DMN and CCN were confirmed by a graph theory analysis. These results suggest that unilateral sensory input damage not only alters the activity of the sensory areas but also reshapes the regional and circuit functional organization of the cognitive control network. PMID:24788317

  10. APOE genotype alters glial activation and loss of synaptic markers in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuangui; Nwabuisi-Heath, Evelyn; Dumanis, Sonya B.; Tai, Leon; Yu, Chunjiang; Rebeck, G. William; Jo LaDu, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The E4 allele of the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), and affects clinical outcomes of chronic and acute brain damages. The mechanisms by which apoE affect diverse diseases and disorders may involve modulation of the glial response to various types of brain damages. We examined glial activation in a mouse model where each of the human APOE alleles are expressed under the endogenous mouse APOE promoter, as well as in APOE knock-out mice. APOE4 mice displayed increased glial activation in response to intracerebroventricular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared to APOE2 and APOE3 mice by several measures. There were higher levels of microglia/macrophage, astrocytes, and invading T-cells after LPS injection in APOE4 mice. APOE4 mice also displayed greater and more prolonged increases of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) than APOE2 and APOE3 mice. We found that APOE4 mice had greater synaptic protein loss after LPS injection, as measured by three different markers: PSD-95, Drebin, and synaptophysin. In all assays, APOE knock-out mice responded similar to APOE4 mice, suggesting that the apoE4 protein may lack anti-inflammatory characteristics of apoE2 and apoE3. Together, these findings demonstrate that APOE4 predisposes to inflammation, which could contribute to its association with Alzheimer's disease and other disorders. PMID:22228589

  11. FUV Spectra of Evolved Late-K and M Stars: Mass Loss Revisited and Stellar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report for the FUSE Cycle 1 program A100: FUV Spectra of Evolved Late-K and M Stars: Mass Loss revisited and Stellar Activity. Targets alpha TrA (K3 II) and gamma Cru (M3 III) were originally assigned 25 ksec each, to be observed in the medium aperture. Once the in-flight performance and telescope alignment problems were known, the observations were reprogrammed to optimized the scientific return of the program. Alpha TrA was scheduled for 25 ksec observations in both the medium and large apertures. The principle aim of this program was to measure the stellar FUV line and continuum emission, in order to estimate the photoionization radiation field and to determine the level of stellar activity through the fluxes in the collisionally excited high temperature diagnostics: C III 977Angstroms and O VI 1032,1038Angstrom doublet. The medium aperture observations were obtained successfully while the large aperture observations were thought by Johns Hopkins University (JHU)to be lost to satellite problems. There was insufficient signal-to- noise in the medium aperture short wavelength Sic channels to do quantitative science.

  12. Foraging Activity Pattern Is Shaped by Water Loss Rates in a Diurnal Desert Rodent.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ofir; Dayan, Tamar; Porter, Warren P; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2016-08-01

    Although animals fine-tune their activity to avoid excess heat, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of such behaviors. As the global climate changes, such understanding is particularly important for projecting shifts in the activity patterns of populations and communities. We studied how foraging decisions vary with biotic and abiotic pressures. By tracking the foraging behavior of diurnal desert spiny mice in their natural habitat and estimating the energy and water costs and benefits of foraging, we asked how risk management and thermoregulatory requirements affect foraging decisions. We found that water requirements had the strongest effect on the observed foraging decisions. In their arid environment, mice often lose water while foraging for seeds and cease foraging even at high energetic returns when water loss is high. Mice also foraged more often when energy expenditure was high and for longer times under high seed densities and low predation risks. Gaining insight into both energy and water balance will be crucial to understanding the forces exerted by changing climatic conditions on animal energetics, behavior, and ecology. PMID:27420785

  13. Rainfall and human activity impacts on soil losses and rill erosion in vineyards (Ruwer Valley, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo Comino, J.; Brings, C.; Lassu, T.; Iserloh, T.; Senciales, J. M.; Martínez Murillo, J. F.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Seeger, M.; Ries, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Vineyards are one of the most German conditioned eco-geomorphological systems by human activity. Precisely, the vineyards of the Ruwer Valley (Germany) is characterized by high soil erosion rates and rill problems on steep slopes (between 23-26°) caused by the increasingly frequent heavy rainfall events, what is sometimes enhanced by incorrect land use managements. Soil tillage before and after vintage, application of vine training systems and anthropic rills generated by wheel tracks and footsteps are observed along these cultivated area. The objective of this paper is to determine and to quantify the hydrological and erosive phenomena in two chosen vineyards, during diverse seasons and under different management conditions (before, during and after vintage). For this purpose, a combined methodology was applied. Investigating climatic, pedological, geomorphological and botanic-marks variables was suggested on the two experimental plot in the village of Waldrach (Trier, region of Rhineland-Palatinate). First, high infiltration rates (near 100%) and subsurface flow was detected by rainfall simulations performed at different times of the year. The second method to investigate the geomorphological response of slope inclination, two 10 m and one 30 m long rills were measured using geometrical channel cross-section index, depth and width. The highest variations (lateral and frontal movements) were noted before and during vintage, when footsteps occurred in a concentrated short time. Finally, two maps were generated of soil loss, indicated by the botanic marks on the graft union of the vines. As results 62.5 t-1 ha-1 yr-1 soil loss rate was registered (one year) on the experimental plots of the new vineyards, while 4.3 t-1 ha-1 yr-1 on the old one.

  14. Rainfall and human activity impacts on soil losses and rill erosion in vineyards (Ruwer Valley, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo Comino, J.; Brings, C.; Lassu, T.; Iserloh, T.; Senciales, J. M.; Martínez Murillo, J. F.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Seeger, M.; Ries, J. B.

    2015-07-01

    Vineyards are one of the eco-geomorphological systems most conditioned by human activity in Germany. The vineyards of the Ruwer Valley (Germany) are characterized by high soil erosion rates and rill problems on steep slopes (between 23 and 26°) caused by the increasingly frequent heavy rainfall events as well as deterioration due to incorrect land use managements. The objective of this paper is to determine and to quantify the hydrological and erosive phenomena in one vineyard in Germany during different seasons and under different management conditions (before, during and after vintage). For this purpose, a combined methodology was applied. Climatic (rainfall depth distributions and return periods), pedological (soil analysis and classification), geomorphological (sediment movements and rills evolution) and biological (botanic marks on the vines) variables were used on the two experimental plots in the village of Waldrach (Trier, region of Rhineland-Palatinate). The results showed high infiltration rates (near 100 %) and subsurface flow which were detected by rainfall simulations performed at different times of the year (between September and December). The highest variations of the monitored rills (lateral and frontal movements) were noted before and during vintage, when footsteps occurred concentrated during a short period of time (between September and October). Finally, two maps of soil loss were generated, indicated by botanic marks on the graft union of the vines. 62.5 t ha-1 yr-1 soil loss was registered in the experimental plots of the new vineyards (2 years), while 3.4 t ha-1 yr-1 was recorded in the old one (35 years).

  15. Developments in Power efficient dissociation of CO2 using non-equilibrium plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sanden, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Sustainable energy generation by means of, either photovoltaic conversion, concentrated solar power or wind, will certainly form a significant part of the energy mix in 2025. The intermittency as well as the temporal variation and the regional spread of this energy source, however, requires a means to store and transport energy on a large scale. In this presentation the means of storage will be addressed of sustainable energy transformed into fuels and the prominent role plasma science and technology can play in this great challenge. The storage of sustainable energy in these so called solar fuels, e.g. hydrocarbons and alcohols, by means of artificial photosynthesis from the feedstock CO2 and H2O, will enable a CO2 neutral power generation infrastructure, which is close to the present infrastructure based on fossil fuels. The challenge will be to achieve power efficient dissociation of CO2 or H2O or both, after which traditional chemical conversion (Fisher-Tropsch, Sabatier, etc.) towards fuels can take place. A promising route is the dissociation or activation of CO2 by means of plasma, possible combined with catalysis. Taking advantage of non-equilibrium plasma conditions to reach optimal energy efficiency we have started a solar fuels program at the beginning of 2012 focusing on CO2 plasma dissociation into CO and O2. The plasma is generated in a low loss microwave cavity with microwave powers up to 10 kW using a supersonic expansion to quench the plasma and prevent vibrational-translational relaxation losses. New ideas on the design of the facility and results on power efficient conversion (more then 50%) of large CO2 flows (up to 75 standard liter per minute with 11% conversion) at low gas temperatures will be presented.

  16. Activation of Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptors Inhibits HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein gp120-Induced Synapse Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jung; Shin, Angela H.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system is associated with dendritic and synaptic damage that correlates with cognitive decline in patients with HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). HAD is due in part to the release of viral proteins from infected cells. Because cannabinoids modulate neurotoxic and inflammatory processes, we investigated their effects on changes in synaptic connections induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120. Morphology and synapses between cultured hippocampal neurons were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 fused to green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP). Twenty-four-hour treatment with gp120 IIIB decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 37 ± 4%. The decrease was concentration-dependent (EC50 = 153 ± 50 pM). Synapse loss preceded cell death as defined by retention of DsRed2 fluorescence gp120 activated CXCR4 on microglia to evoke interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. Pharmacological studies determined that sequential activation of CXCR4, the IL-1β receptor, and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor was required. Expression of alternative reading frame polypeptide, which inhibits the ubiquitin ligase murine double minute 2, protected synapses, implicating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Cannabimimetic drugs are of particular relevance to HAD because of their clinical and illicit use in patients with AIDS. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate salt] (Win55,212-2) inhibited gp120-induced IL-1β production and synapse in a manner reversed by a cannabinoid type 2 receptor antagonist. In contrast, Win55,212-2 did not inhibit synapse loss elicited by exposure to the HIV-1 protein Tat. These results indicate that cannabinoids prevent the impairment of network function produced by gp120 and, thus, might have therapeutic potential in HAD. PMID:21670103

  17. Loss of Keratinocytic RXRα Combined with Activated CDK4 or oncogenic NRAS Generates UVB-induced Melanomas via Loss of p53 and PTEN in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Chagani, Sharmeen; Hyter, Stephen; Sherman, Anna M.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Liang, Xiaobo; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind formation of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is crucial for improved diagnosis and treatment. One key is to better understand the cross-talk between epidermal keratinocytes and pigment-producing melanocytes. Here, using a bigenic mouse model system combining mutant oncogenic NRASQ61K (constitutively active RAS) or mutant activated CDK4R24C/R24C (prevents binding of CDK4 by kinase inhibitor p16INK4A) with an epidermis-specific knockout of the nuclear retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRαep−/−) results in increased melanoma formation after chronic ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation compared to control mice with functional RXRα. Melanomas from both groups of bigenic RXRαep−/− mice are larger in size with higher proliferative capacity, and exhibit enhanced angiogenic properties and increased expression of malignant melanoma markers. Analysis of tumor adjacent normal skin from these mice revealed altered expression of several biomarkers indicative of enhanced melanoma susceptibility, including reduced expression of tumor suppressor p53 and loss of PTEN, with concomitant increase in activated AKT. Loss of epidermal RXRα in combination with UVB significantly enhances invasion of melanocytic cells to draining lymph nodes in bigenic mice expressing oncogenic NRASQ61K compared to controls with functional RXRα. These results suggest a crucial role of keratinocytic RXRα to suppress formation of UVB-induced melanomas and their progression to malignant cancers in the context of driver mutations such as activated CDK4R24C/R24C or oncogenic NRASQ61K. PMID:25189354

  18. A rare variant in human fibroblast activation protein associated with ER stress, loss of enzymatic function and loss of cell surface localisation.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Brenna; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Wang, Xin Maggie; Chen, Yiqian; Kotan, L Damla; Nadvi, Naveed A; Herdem, Mustafa; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Allen, John D; Yu, Denise M T; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Gorrell, Mark D

    2014-07-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a focus of interest as a potential cancer therapy target. This membrane bound protease possesses the unique catalytic activity of hydrolysis of the post-proline bond two or more residues from the N-terminus of substrates. FAP is highly expressed in activated fibroblastic cells in tumours, arthritis and fibrosis. A rare, novel, human polymorphism, C1088T, encoding Ser363 to Leu, occurring in the sixth blade of the β propeller domain, was identified in a family. Both in primary human fibroblasts and in Ser363LeuFAP transfected cells, we showed that this single substitution ablates FAP dimerisation and causes loss of enzyme activity. Ser363LeuFAP was detectable only in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in contrast to the distribution of wild-type FAP on the cell surface. The variant FAP showed decreased conformational antibody binding, consistent with an altered tertiary structure. Ser363LeuFAP expression was associated with upregulation of the ER chaperone BiP/GRP78, ER stress sensor ATF6, and the ER stress response target phospho-eIF2α, all indicators of ER stress. Proteasomal inhibition resulted in accumulation of Ser363LeuFAP, indicating the involvement of ER associated degradation (ERAD). Neither CHOP expression nor apoptosis was elevated, so ERAD is probably important for protecting Ser363LeuFAP expressing cells. These data on the first loss of function human FAP gene variant indicates that although the protein is vulnerable to an amino acid substitution in the β-propeller domain, inactive, unfolded FAP can be tolerated by cells. PMID:24717288

  19. Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P.

    2011-05-23

    To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

  20. Intermittent dust mass loss from activated asteroid P/2013 P5 (PANSTARRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, F.; Pozuelos, F.

    2014-02-01

    We present observations and models of the dust environment of activated asteroid P/2013 P5 (PANSTARRS). The object displayed a complex morphology during the observations, with the presence of multiple tails. We combined our own observations, all made with instrumentation attached to the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias on La Palma, with previously published Hubble Space Telescope images to build a model aimed at fitting all the observations. Altogether, the data cover a full three month period of observations which can be explained by intermittent dust loss. The most plausible scenario is that of an asteroid rotating with the spinning axis oriented perpendicular to the orbit plane and losing mass from the equatorial region, consistent with rotational break-up. Assuming that the ejection velocity of the particles (v ∼ 0.02-0.05 m s{sup –1}) corresponds to the escape velocity, the object diameter is constrained to ∼30-130 m for bulk densities 3000-1000 kg m{sup –3}.

  1. Ganser-like Syndrome After Loss of Psychic Self-activation Syndrome: Psychogenic or Organic?

    PubMed Central

    Kaphan, Elsa; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Royère, Marie L.; Guedj, Eric; Pelletier, Jean; Ali Chérif, André

    2014-01-01

    Very few data are available on the long-term changes in the cognitive abilities of patients with loss of psychic self-activation syndrome (LPSAS). Here, we present a 25-year follow-up study on a case of LPSAS resulting from bilateral pallidal lesions caused by carbon monoxide intoxication. Typical signs of LPSAS were observed, showing no changes in severity, but Ganser syndrome (GS) gradually developed and worsened during the follow-up period. GS is generally assumed to be a psychogenic syndrome, but an organic etiology has been suspected by the authors of several case reports. Here, atypical features of GS plead against the independence of GS and LPSAS. DaTSCAN and brain 18FDG-PET were performed. Since left hippocampal hypometabolism has been previously described in patients with functional amnesia, it is possible that long periods of mental inactivity may have psychological consequences, but the atypical features of GS also suggest that an organic mechanism may be involved. PMID:25280796

  2. EZH2-mediated loss of miR-622 determines CXCR4 activation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiou; Liu, Yidong; Liu, Weisi; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2015-01-01

    The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) exerts a variety of functions at different steps of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression. The molecular mechanisms and therapeutic value of CXCR4 in the development of HCC remain undefined. Here we show that aberrant CXCR4 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and aggressive characteristics of HCC. Suppression of CXCR4 activity via CXCR4 knockdown, AMD3100 or neutralizing antibody administration inhibits hepatoma cell tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. CXCR4 overexpression displays the opposite effects. Using Mir library screening we identify miR-622 as a regulator of CXCR4. Further studies show that miR-622 directly target the 3′ untranslated region of CXCR4 and is transcriptionally repressed by EZH2-induced H3K27 trimethylation and promoter methylation. EZH2/miR-622 promotes tumorigenesis through CXCR4. EZH2-mediated loss of miR-622 is found to correlate with CXCR4 overexpression and unfavourable prognosis in HCC patients. This study establishes EZH2/miR-622/CXCR4 as a potential adverse prognostic factor and therapeutic target for HCC patients. PMID:26404566

  3. High power VCSEL device with periodic gain active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Y. Q., II; Qin, L.; Sun, Y. F.; Li, T.; Cui, J. J.; Peng, B.; Liu, G. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, L. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2007-11-01

    High power vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with large aperture have been fabricated through improving passivation, lateral oxidation and heat dissipation techniques. Different from conventional three quantum well structure, a periodic gain active region with nine quantum wells was incorporated into the VCSEL structure, with which high efficiency and high power operation were expected. The nine quantum wells were divided into three groups with each of them located at the antinodes of the cavity to enhance the coupling between the optical field and the gain region. Large aperture and bottom-emitting configuration was used to improve the beam quality and the heat dissipation. A maximum output power of 1.4W was demonstrated at CW operation for a 400μm-diameter device. The lasing wavelength shifted to 995.5nm with a FWHM of 2nm at a current of 4.8A due to the internal heating and the absence of active water cooling. A ring-shape farfield pattern was induced by the non-homogeneous lateral current distribution in large diameter device. The light intensity at the center of the ring increased with increasing current. A symmetric round light spot at the center and single transverse mode operation with a divergence angle of 16° were observed with current beyond 4.8A.

  4. Gastrointestinal hypomotility with loss of enteric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: active immunization model in mice

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Haselkorn, Keegan E.; Fryer, James P.; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Xiao, Yingxian; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility (AGID) is a limited form of dysautonomia. The only proven effector to date is IgG specific for ganglionic nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors containing α3 subunits (α3*-nAChR). Rabbits immunized with recombinant α3-polypeptide produce α3*-nAChR autoantibodies, and profound AGID ensues. Human and rabbit α3*-nAChR-specific-IgGs induce transient hypomotility when injected into mice. Here we describe success and problems encountered inducing gastrointestinal hypomotility in mice by active immunization. Methods We repeatedly injected young adult mice of seven different strains susceptible to autoimmunity (spontaneous diabetes or neural antigen immunization-induced myasthenia gravis or encephalomyelitis) with: i) α3-polypeptide, intradermally, or ii) live α3*-nAChR-expressing xenogeneic cells, intraperitoneally. We measured serum α3*-nAChR-IgG twice monthly, and terminally assessed blue dye gastrointestinal transit, total small intestinal α3*-nAChR content (radiochemically) and myenteric plexus neuron numbers (immunohistochemically, ileal-jejunal whole-mount preparations). Key Results Standard cutaneous inoculation with α3-polypeptide was minimally immunogenic, regardless of dose. Intraperitoneally-injected live cells were potently immunogenic. Self-reactive α3*-nAChR-IgG was induced only by rodent immunogen; small intestinal transit slowing and enteric α3*-nAChR loss required high serum levels. Ganglionic neurons were not lost. Conclusions & Inferences AGID is inducible in mice by active immunization. Accompanying enteric α3*-nAChR reduction without neuronal death is consistent with an IgG-mediated rather than T cell-mediated pathogenesis, as is improvement of symptoms in patients receiving antibody-depleting therapies. PMID:23072523

  5. Influences of Bi 2O 3 additive on the microstructure, permeability, and power loss characteristics of Ni-Zn ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Tang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Jia, Lijun; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2009-10-01

    Nickel-zinc ferrite materials containing different Bi 2O 3 concentrations have been prepared by the conventional ceramic technique. Micrographs have clearly revealed that the Bi 2O 3 additive promoted grain growth. When the Bi 2O 3 content reached 0.15 wt%, a dual microstructure with both small grains (<5 μm) and some extremely large grains (>50 μm) appeared. With higher Bi 2O 3 content, the samples exhibited a very large average grain size of more than 30 μm. The initial permeability gradually decreased with increasing Bi 2O 3 content. When the Bi 2O 3 content exceeded 0.15 wt%, the permeability gradually decreased with frequency due to the low-frequency resonance induced by the large grain size. Neither the sintering density nor the saturation magnetization was obviously influenced by the Bi 2O 3 content or microstructure of the samples. However, power loss (Pcv) characteristics were evidently influenced. At low flux density, the sample with 0.10 wt% Bi 2O 3, which was characterized by an average grain size of 3-4 μm and few closed pores, displayed the lowest Pcv, irrespective of frequency. When the flux density was equal to or greater than the critical value of 40 mT, the sample with 0.20 wt% Bi 2O 3, which had the largest average grain size, displayed the lowest Pcv.

  6. Evaluation of impingement losses of white perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Station and other Hudson River power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, W.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Kirk, B.L.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report evaluates two independent lines of evidence concerning impingement losses of white perch at the power plants on the Hudson River. Based on regression analyses of impingement rate as an index of year-class strength versus year over the period 1972 through 1977, it is concluded that there is little evidence of a statistically significant downward trend. However, an analysis of minimum detectable differences in impingement rates indicates that a long time series of year-class strength would be required to detect even substantial reductions (e.g., 50%). Second, based on our estimates of percent reduction in year-class strength due to impingement (> 20% for the 1974 year class and >15% for the 1975 year class), it is concluded that the level of impingement impact is not acceptable a priori from the point of view of managing the white perch population. Our methodologies and results are compared with those of the utilities, and the bases for the substantial differences in estimate of impingement are discussed. Appendices are included on survival of impinged white perch, impingement rate as an index of population abundance, and ability to detect decreases in population abundance. 57 refs., 29 tabs.

  7. Erbin loss promotes cancer cell proliferation through feedback activation of Akt-Skp2-p27 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hao; Song, Yuhua; Wu, Yan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Yuanfang; Qian, Lu

    2015-07-31

    Erbin localizes at the basolateral membrane to regulate cell junctions and polarity in epithelial cells. Dysregulation of Erbin has been implicated in tumorigenesis, and yet it is still unclear if and how disrupted Erbin regulates the biological behavior of cancer cells. We report here that depletion of Erbin leads to cancer cell excessive proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Erbin deficiency accelerates S-phase entry by down-regulating CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 via two independent mechanisms. Mechanistically, Erbin loss promotes p27 degradation by enhancing E3 ligase Skp2 activity though augmenting Akt signaling. Interestingly, we also show that Erbin is an unstable protein when the Akt-Skp2 signaling is aberrantly activated, which can be specifically destructed by SCF-Skp2 ligase. Erbin loss facilitates cell proliferation and migration in Skp2-dependent manner. Thus, our finding illustrates a novel negative feedback loop between Erbin and Akt-Skp2 signaling. It suggests disrupted Erbin links polarity loss, hyperproliferation and tumorigenesis. - Highlights: • Erbin loss leads to cancer cell excessive proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Erbin loss accelerates cell cycle though down-regulating p21 and p27 expression. • Erbin is a novel negative modulator of Akt1-Skp2-p27 signaling pathway. • Our study suggests that Erbin loss contributes to Skp2 oncogenic function.

  8. Paralleling power MOSFETs in their active region: Extended range of passively forced current sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple passive circuit that improves current balance in parallelled power MOSFETs that are not precisely matched and that are operated in their active region from a common gate drive are exhibited. A nonlinear circuit consisting of diodes and resistors generates the differential gate potential required to correct for unbalance while maintaining low losses over a range of current. Also application of a thin tape wound magnetic core to effect dynamic current balance is reviewed, and a simple theory is presented showing that for operation in the active region the branch currents tend to revert to their normal unbalanced values even if the core is not driven into saturation. Results of several comparative experiments are given.

  9. The loss of independence in activities of daily living: the role of low normal cognitive function in elderly nuns.

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, P A; Snowdon, D A; Schmitt, F A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study investigated the role of low normal cognitive function in the subsequent loss of independence in activities of daily living. METHODS. Of the 678 elderly nuns who-completed cognitive and physical function assessments in 1992/93, 575 were reassessed in 1993/94. Mini-Mental State Examination scores were divided into three categories and related to loss of independence in six activities of daily living. RESULTS. Participants with low normal cognitive function at first assessment had twice the risk of losing independence in three activities of daily living by second assessment relative to those with high normal cognitive function. This relationship was largely due to a progression from low normal cognitive function at first assessment to impaired cognitive function at second assessment and was associated with an elevated risk of losing independence in the six activities. CONCLUSIONS. Progression from low normal to impaired cognitive function was associated with loss of independence in activities of daily living. Thus low normal cognitive function could be viewed as an early warning of impending cognitive impairment and loss of physical function. PMID:8561244

  10. Harmonic and power factor correction by means of active line conditioners with adaptive estimation control

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of power electronic devices in recent years, the amount of harmonic current injected into power systems is on the increase causing undesirable voltage waveform distortion. A new type of versatile Active Power Line Conditioner able to supply a DC load while generating useful harmonics which help reduce the voltage distortion at the connected bus was designed, built and analyzed. The optimum design was obtained by means of an economic study that considers the power loss, the cost of an RFI filter and the effect of the switching rate. An adaptive methodology, requiring only knowledge of the bus voltage distortion, was developed and applied to adjust the amplitudes and phase angles of the injected harmonic currents. This novel approach is based on reducing the voltage Total Harmonic Distortion by minimizing the individual harmonic voltages in an error signal using a gradient method. Through successive adjustments, the difference between the actual bus voltage and the desired bus voltage is minimized. The proposed method can be successfully applied in low and medium voltage networks with multiple nonlinear loads scattered among linear loads.

  11. Activation analysis of the PULSAR-II fusion power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The PULSAR-II pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes a blanket made of the vanadium alloy, V-5Cr-5Ti, and cooled with liquid lithium. The shield is made of a mixture of the low activation austenitic steel (Tenelon) and vanadium. The blanket is assumed to be replaced every 5.6 full power years (FPY) and the shield is assumed to stay in place for 30 FPY. The activity induced in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is higher than the activity induced in the shield after 30 FPY. At shutdown, the blanket and shield activities are 2678 MCi and 1747 MCi, respectively. One year after shutdown the shield activity drops to 18 MCi compared to 84 MCi for the blanket. The total decay heat generated in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is 34.7 MW and drops to 17.6 MW within an hour. At shutdown, 25.3 MW of decay heat are generated in the shield, dropping to only 0.1 MW within the first year. One week after shutdown, the values of the integrated decay heat are 1770 GJ for the blanket and 469 GJ for the shield. The radwaste classification of the reactor structure is evaluated according to both the NRC 10CFR61 and Fetter waste disposal concentration limits. After 5.6 years of irradiation, the blanket will only qualify for Class C low level waste. After 30 years of operation, the shield will also qualify for disposal as Class C waste. Only remote maintenance will be allowed inside the containment building.

  12. Resonance in fast-wave amplitude in the periphery of cylindrical plasmas and application to edge losses of wave heating power in tokamaks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J. C.; Bertelli, N.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Heating magnetically confined plasmas using waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies typically requires coupling these waves over a steep density gradient. Furthermore, this process has produced an unexpected and deleterious phenomenon on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX): a prompt loss of wave power along magnetic field lines in front of the antenna to the divertor. Understanding this loss may be key to achieving effective heating and expanding the operational space of NSTX-Upgrade. Here, we propose that a new type of mode, which conducts a significant fraction of the total wave power in the low-density peripheral plasma, is drivingmore » these losses. We demonstrate the existence of such modes, which are distinct from surface modes and coaxial modes, in a cylindrical cold-plasma model when a half wavelength structure fits into the region outside the core plasma. The latter condition generalizes the previous hypothesis regarding the occurence of the edge losses and may explain why full-wave simulations predict these losses in some cases but not others. If valid, this condition implies that outer gap control is a potential strategy for mitigating the losses in NSTX-Upgrade in addition to raising the magnetic field or influencing the edge density.« less

  13. Resonance in fast-wave amplitude in the periphery of cylindrical plasmas and application to edge losses of wave heating power in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Hosea, J. C.; Bertelli, N.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Heating magnetically confined plasmas using waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies typically requires coupling these waves over a steep density gradient. This process has produced an unexpected and deleterious phenomenon on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX): a prompt loss of wave power along magnetic field lines in front of the antenna to the divertor. Understanding this loss may be key to achieving effective heating and expanding the operational space of NSTX-Upgrade. Here, we propose that a new type of mode, which conducts a significant fraction of the total wave power in the low-density peripheral plasma, is driving these losses. We demonstrate the existence of such modes, which are distinct from surface modes and coaxial modes, in a cylindrical cold-plasma model when a half wavelength structure fits into the region outside the core plasma. The latter condition generalizes the previous hypothesis regarding the occurrence of the edge losses and may explain why full-wave simulations predict these losses in some cases but not others. If valid, this condition implies that outer gap control is a potential strategy for mitigating the losses in NSTX-Upgrade in addition to raising the magnetic field or influencing the edge density.

  14. Experimental results using active control of traveling wave power flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Active structural control experiments conducted on a 24-ft pinned-free beam derived feedback compensators on the basis of a traveling-wave approach. A compensator is thus obtained which eliminates resonant behavior by absorbing all impinging power. A causal solution is derived for this noncausal compensator which mimics its behavior in a given frequency range, using the Wiener-Hopf. This optimal Wiener-Hopf compensator's structure-damping performance is found to exceed any obtainable by means of rate feedback. Performance limitations encompassed the discovery of frequencies above which the sensor and actuator were no longer dual and an inadvertent coupling of the control hardware to unmodeled structure torsion modes.

  15. Observational signatures of galactic winds powered by active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nims, Jesse; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2015-03-01

    We predict the observational signatures of galaxy scale outflows powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Most of the emission is produced by the forward shock driven into the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) rather than by the reverse shock. AGN-powered galactic winds with energetics suggested by phenomenological feedback arguments should produce spatially extended ˜1-10 keV X-ray emission ˜ 1041-44 erg s- 1, significantly in excess of the spatially extended X-ray emission associated with normal star-forming galaxies. The presence of such emission is a direct test of whether AGN outflows significantly interact with the ISM of their host galaxy. We further show that even radio-quiet quasars should have a radio luminosity comparable to or in excess of the far-infrared-radio correlation of normal star-forming galaxies. This radio emission directly constrains the total kinetic energy flux in AGN-powered galactic winds. Radio emission from AGN wind shocks can also explain the recently highlighted correlations between radio luminosity and the kinematics of AGN narrow-line regions in radio-quiet quasars.

  16. Daily energy expenditure and physical activity measured in Parkinson's disease patients with and without weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss, which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated resting energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REF) and physical activit...

  17. Psychological Factors Associated with Weight Loss in Obese and Severely Obese Women in a Behavioral Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Whitaker, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    The behavioral processes of weight reduction are poorly understood, and responses to treatments based primarily on caloric restriction have been unfavorable. A theory-based path derived from proposed relations of physical activity, changes in psychological factors, and weight loss was separately tested with women with Class I and Class II obesity…

  18. Metal clad active fibres for power scaling and thermal management at kW power levels.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jae M O; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Haub, John

    2016-08-01

    We present a new approach to high power fibre laser design, consisting of a polymer-free all-glass optical fibre waveguide directly overclad with a high thermal conductivity metal coating. This metal clad active fibre allows a significant reduction in thermal resistance between the active fibre and the laser heat-sink as well as a significant increase in the operating temperature range. In this paper we show the results of a detailed thermal analysis of both polymer and metal coated active fibres under thermal loads typical of kW fibre laser systems. Through several different experiments we present the first demonstration of a cladding pumped aluminium-coated fibre laser and the first demonstration of efficient operation of a cladding-pumped fibre laser at temperatures of greater than 400 °C. Finally, we highlight the versatility of this approach through operation of a passively (radiatively) cooled ytterbium fibre laser head at an output power of 405 W in a compact and ultralight package weighing less than 100 g. PMID:27505822

  19. Weight-Loss Induced Changes in Physical Activity and Activity Energy Expenditure in Overweight and Obese Subjects before and after Energy Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Alberto G.; Soenen, Stijn; Goris, Annelies H. C.; Westerterp, Klaas R.

    2013-01-01

    Activity energy expenditure (AEE) is the component of daily energy expenditure that is mainly influenced by the amount of physical activity (PA) and by the weight of the body displaced. This study aimed at analyzing the effect of weight loss on PA and AEE. The body weight and PA of 66 overweight and obese subjects were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of 67% energy restriction. PA was measured using a tri-axial accelerometer for movement registration (Tracmor) and quantified in activity counts. Tracmor recordings were also processed using a classification algorithm to recognize 6 common activity types engaged in during the day. A doubly-labeled water validated equation based on Tracmor output was used to estimate AEE. After weight loss, body weight decreased by 13±4%, daily activity counts augmented by 9% (95% CI: +2%, +15%), and this increase was weakly associated with the decrease in body weight (R2 = 7%; P<0.05). After weight loss subjects were significantly (P<0.05) less sedentary (–26 min/d), and increased the time spent walking (+11 min/d) and bicycling (+4 min/d). However, AEE decreased by 0.6±0.4 MJ/d after weight loss. On average, a 2-hour/day reduction of sedentary time by increasing ambulatory and generic activities was required to restore baseline levels of AEE. In conclusion, after weight loss PA increased but the related metabolic demand did not offset the reduction in AEE due to the lower body weight. Promoting physical activity according to the extent of weight loss might increase successfulness of weight maintenance. PMID:23555733

  20. Low-power MOEMS components for active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Yan, Dong; Madison, Seth; Xu, Bai

    2004-01-01

    The eventual, widespread insertion of Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) into the marketplace rests fundamentally on the ability to produce viable components that maximize optical performance while minimizing power consumption and size. In addition, the incorporation of optical reconfigurability into custom MOEMS devices offers an extra degree of freedom not possible with conventional components. Active control of surface topology allows for one component to perform multiple functions thus reducing cost and complexity. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program at the University at Albany Institute for Materials" (UAIM) NanoFab 200 with several examples described to illustrate component and system development. In particular, among the MOEMS research portfolio at UAIM, the development of selected MOEMS-based, active optics will be discussed. This active control of diffraction and reflection forms the basis for the utility of such devices. Leveraging the extensive research expertise on the patented MEMS Compound Grating (MCG), emphasis will be placed on the extension of the approach to novel designs, materials and fabrication methods to yield low power, high performance prototypes. The main focus of this paper is on the development of a polymer version (including sacrificial layer, in some designs) of the MCG which allows for ease of fabrication and a reduced electrostatic actuation voltage. Following a system design effort, several generations of the component were fabricated to optimize the process flow. Component metrology, electromechanical characterization and initial results of optical tests will be reported. A second example presented is the design and prototype fabrication of a spring micrograting using a customized SOI process. This highly flexible component builds on the MCG concept and yields an order of magnitude reduction in actuation voltage. These examples will be presented against a backdrop of the broad UAIM

  1. Changes in neuronal activity and gene expression in guinea-pig auditory brainstem after unilateral partial hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Mulders, W H A M; Rodger, J; Robertson, D

    2009-03-31

    Spontaneous neural hyperactivity in the central auditory pathway is often associated with deafness, the most common form of which is partial hearing loss. We quantified both peripheral hearing loss and spontaneous activity in single neurons of the contralateral inferior colliculus in a guinea-pig model 1 week after a unilateral partial deafness induced by cochlear mechanical lesion. We also measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in the same animals using quantitative real-time PCR. Spontaneous hyperactivity was most marked in the frequency region of the peripheral hearing loss. Expression of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), GABA-A receptor subunit alpha-1 (GABRA1), and potassium channel subfamily K member 15 (KCNK15) was decreased ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus and bilaterally in the inferior colliculus. A member of RAB family of small GTPase (RAB3A) was decreased in both ipsilateral cochlear nucleus and contralateral inferior colliculus. RAB3 GTPase activating protein subunit 1 (RAB3GAP1) and glycine receptor subunit alpha-1 (GLRA1) were reduced ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus only. These results suggest that a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmission and an increase in membrane excitability may contribute to elevated neuronal spontaneous activity in the auditory brainstem following unilateral partial hearing loss. PMID:19356697

  2. Social Cognitive Changes Following Weight Loss and Physical Activity Interventions in Obese, Older Adults in Poor Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Brawley, Lawrence; Gaukstern, Jill E.; Ambrosius, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The study objectives were to determine (a) the effects of group-mediated cognitive–behavioral interventions on change in performance self-efficacy, satisfaction with function, and with appearance among older, overweight/obese adults in poor cardiovascular health and (b) whether self-efficacy mediated change in 400-m walk time. Methods This translational, randomized controlled trial of physical activity and weight loss was conducted within community Cooperative Extension Centers. Participants were randomized to three intervention arms: Physical Activity, Weight Loss+ Physical Activity, or a Successful Aging education control. Results Across 18 months, the Weight Loss+Physical Activity intervention demonstrated greater improvements in self-efficacy, satisfaction with function, and appearance versus other trial arms. Physical Activity intervention participants also experienced significant improvements in self-efficacy and satisfaction with function versus those in Successful Aging. Self-efficacy mediated 400-m walk time at 18 months. Conclusions Both group-mediated cognitive–behavioral interventions yielded desirable improvements in social cognitions and preserved mobility improvements post-intervention. PMID:22773225

  3. High-power diode lasers with an aluminium-free active region at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, N.; Hassiaoui, I.; Calligaro, M.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.; Borruel, L.; García-Tijero, J.-M.; Esquivias, I.; Sukecki, S.; Larkins, E. C.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed high-power lasers, which are based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The laser structure has very low internal losses of 0.5 cm-1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, and a high internal quantum efficiency of 86%. Based on these good results, we have realised narrow-aperture, index-guided tapered lasers which deliver 1 W CW with and M2 beam quality factor of 3.0 using both the 1/e2 and standard-deviation methods. We have also fabricated index-guided tapered lasers with a Clarinet shape, which deliver 0.65 W CW with an M2 beam quality factor of less than 1.5 at 1/e2, and less than 2.5 using the standard deviation method.

  4. Changes in Eating, Physical Activity, and Related Behaviors in a Primary-Care-Based Weight Loss Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Volger, Sheri; Wadden, Thomas A.; Sarwer, David B.; Moore, Reneé H.; Chittams, Jesse; Diewald, Lisa; Panigrahi, Eva; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Schmitz, Kathryn; Vetter, Marion L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in eating behaviors and physical activity, as well as predictors of weight loss success, in obese adults who participated in a 2-year behavioral weight loss intervention conducted in a primary care setting. Design A longitudinal, randomized-controlled, multi-site trial. Subjects 390 obese (body mass index, 30 to 50 kg/m2) adults, ≥21 yr, in the Philadelphia region. Methods Participants were assigned to one of three interventions 1) Usual Care [Quarterly primary care provider (PCP) visits that included education on diet and exercise]; 2) Brief Lifestyle Counseling [quarterly PCP visits plus monthly Lifestyle Counseling (LC) sessions about behavioral weight control]; or 3) Enhanced Brief LC (the previous intervention with a choice of meal replacements or weight loss medication). Results At month 24, participants in both Brief LC and Enhanced Brief LC reported significantly greater improvements in mean (±SE) dietary restraint than those in Usual Care (4.4±0.5, 4.8±0.5, and 2.8±0.5, respectively; both ps≤0.016). The percentage of calories from fat, along with fruit and vegetable consumption, did not differ significantly among the three groups. The Brief LC and Enhanced Brief LC groups both reported significantly greater energy expenditure (kcal/week) at month 24 than Usual Care (+593.4±175.9, +415.4±179.6, and −70.4±185.5, respectively; both ps≤0.037). The strongest predictor of weight loss at month 6 (partial R2=33.4%, p<0.0001) and at month 24 (partial R2=19.3%, p<0.001) was food records completed during the first 6 months. Participants who achieved a 5% weight loss at month 6 had 4.7 times greater odds of maintaining a 5% weight loss at month 24. Conclusions A behavioral weight loss intervention delivered in a primary care setting can result in significant weight loss, with corresponding improvements in eating restraint and energy expenditure. Moreover, completion of food records, along with weight loss at month 6, is a

  5. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  6. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  7. Ascent to Altitude as a Weight Loss Method: The Good and Bad of Hypoxia Inducible Factor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Biff F.; Clegg, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Given the epidemic of obesity worldwide there is a need for more novel and effective weight loss methods. Altitude is well known to be associated with weight loss and has actually been used as a method of weight reduction in obese subjects. This review demonstrates the critical role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in bringing about the reduction in appetite and increase in energy expenditure characteristic of hypobaric hypoxia Design and methods A MEDLINE search of English language articles through February 2013 identified publications associating altitude or hypobaric hypoxia with key words to include hypoxia inducible factor, weight loss, appetite, basal metabolic rate, leptin, cellular energetics, and obesity. The data from these articles were synthesized to formulate a unique and novel mechanism by which HIF activation leads to alterations in appetite, basal metabolic rate, and reductions in body adiposity. Results A synthesis of previously published literature revealed mechanisms by which altitude induces activation of HIF, thereby suggesting this transcription factor regulates changes in cellular metabolism/energetics, activation of the central nervous system, as well as peripheral pathways leading to reductions in food intake and increases in energy expenditure. Conclusions Here we present a unifying hypothesis suggesting that activation of HIF under conditions of altitude potentially leads to metabolic benefits that are dose dependent, gender and genetic specific, and results in adverse effects if the exposure is extreme. PMID:23625659

  8. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  9. Ripple current loss measurement with DC bias condition for high temperature superconducting power cable using calorimetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, A. R.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.; Sim, K. D.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, S. J.; Cho, J. W.; Won, Y. J.

    2010-11-01

    The authors calculated the loss of the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) model cable using Norris ellipse formula, and measured the loss of the model cable experimentally. Two kinds of measuring method are used. One is the electrical method, and the other is the calorimetric method. The electrical method can be used only in AC condition. But the calorimetric method can be used in both AC and DC bias conditions. In order to propose an effective measuring approach for Ripple Dependent Loss (RDL) under DC bias condition using the calorimetric method, Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO) wires were used for the HTS model cable, and the SUS tapes were used as a heating tape to make the same pattern of the temperature profiles as in the electrical method without the transport current. The temperature-loss relations were obtained by the electrical method, and then applied to the calorimetric method by which the RDL under DC bias condition was well estimated.

  10. Increased activity of osteocyte autophagy in ovariectomized rats and its correlation with oxidative stress status and bone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuehua Zheng, Xinfeng Li, Bo Jiang, Shengdan Jiang, Leisheng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Examine autophagy level in the proximal tibia of ovariectomized rats. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with oxidative stress status. - Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to investigate ovariectomy on autophagy level in the bone and to examine whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss and oxidative stress status. Methods: 36 female Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (Sham), and ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated either with vehicle or 17-β-estradiol. At the end of the six-week treatment, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone micro-architecture in proximal tibias were assessed by micro-CT. Serum 17β-estradiol (E2) level were measured. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity in proximal tibia was also determined. The osteocyte autophagy in proximal tibias was detected respectively by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescent histochemistry (IH), realtime-PCR and Western blot. In addition, the spearman correlation between bone mass, oxidative stress status, serum E2 and autophagy were analyzed. Results: Ovariectomy increased Atg5, LC3, and Beclin1 mRNA and proteins expressions while decreased p62 expression. Ovariectomy also declined the activities of T-AOC, CAT, and SOD. Treatment with E2 prevented the reduction in bone mass as well as restored the autophagy level. Furthermore, LC3-II expression was inversely correlated with T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities. A significant inverse correlation between LC3-II expression and BV/TV, Tb.N, BMD in proximal tibias was found. Conclusions: Ovariectomy induced oxidative stress, autophagy and bone loss. Autophagy of osteocyte was inversely correlated with oxidative stress status and bone loss.

  11. Stepping towards prevention of bone loss after stroke: a systematic review of the skeletal effects of physical activity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Borschmann, Karen; Pang, Marco Y C; Bernhardt, Julie; Iuliano-Burns, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Bone loss after stroke is pronounced, and contributes to increased fracture risk. People who fracture after stroke experience reduced mobility and increased mortality. Physical activity can maintain or improve bone mineral density and structure in healthy older adults, likely reducing fracture risk. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the skeletal effects of physical activity in adults affected by stroke. A search of electronic databases was undertaken. Selection criteria of trials were • prospective and controlled • physical activity-based intervention • participants with history of stroke, and • bone-related outcome measures. Effect sizes were calculated for outcomes of paretic and nonparetic limbs. Three of 349 identified records met the inclusion criteria. Small effect sizes were found in favor of physical activity in adults with chronic stroke (n=95, 40% female, average age 63·8 years, more than one-year poststroke). Patients in intervention groups had significantly higher changes in femoral neck bone mineral density, tibial cortical thickness and trabecular bone mineral content of the paretic limb, compared with controls (P<0·05). It is not known whether these benefits reduced fracture risk. There are limited studies investigating the skeletal effect of physical activity for adults poststroke. Given the increased risk of, and poor outcomes following a fracture after stroke, randomized trials are warranted to investigate the benefits of physical activity on bone, after stroke. Interventions are likely to be beneficial if implemented soon after stroke, when bone loss appears to be rapid and pronounced. PMID:21967614

  12. Final report on fiscal year 1992 activities for the environmental monitors line-loss study

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.

    1993-12-09

    The work performed on this Environmental Monitors Line-Loss Study has been performed under Contract Numbers MLW-SVV-073750 and MFH-SVV-207554. Work on the task was initiated mid-December 1991, and this report documents and summarizes the work performed through January 18, 1993. The sections included in this report summarize the work performed on the Environmental Monitors Line-Loss Study. The sections included in this report are arranged to reflect individual sub-tasks and include: descriptions of measurement systems and procedures used to obtain cascade impactor samples and laser spectrometer measurements from multiple stacks and locations; information on data acquisition, analyses, assessment, and software; discussion of the analyses and measurement results from the cascade impactor and laser spectrometer systems and software used; discussion on the development of general test methods and procedures for line-loss determinations; an overall summary and specific conclusions that can be made with regard to efforts performed on this task during FY 1992 and FY 1993. Supporting information for these sections is included in this report as appendices.

  13. The relative importance of respiratory water loss in scorpions is correlated with species habitat type and activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Scorpions exhibit some of the lowest recorded water loss rates compared with those of other terrestrial arthropods of similar body size. Evaporative water loss (EWL) includes cuticular transpiration and respiratory water loss (RWL) from gas exchange surfaces, that is, book lung lamellae. Estimated fractions of cuticular and respiratory losses currently available from the literature show considerable variation, at least partly as a result of differences in methodology. This study reports RWL rates and their relative importance in scorpions from two families (Buthidae and Scorpionidae), including both xeric and mesic species (or subspecies). Two of the included Buthidae were surface-dwelling species, and another inhabits empty burrows of other terrestrial arthropods. This experimental design enabled correlating RWL importance with scorpion phylogeny, habitat type, and/or homing behavior. Buthidae species exhibited significantly lower EWL rates compared with those of Scorpionidae, whereas effects of habitat type and homing behavior were not significant. Resting RWL rates were not significantly affected by scorpion phylogeny, but rates for the xeric species (totaling ~10% of EWL rates at 30°C) were significantly lower compared with those of mesic species. These lower RWL values were correlated with significantly lower H(2)O/CO(2) emission rates in xeric species. The experimental setup and ~24-h duration of each individual recording allowed estimating the effect of interspecific variation in activity on RWL proportions. The high respiratory losses in active hydrated Scorpio maurus fuscus, totaling 30% of EWL, suggest that behavioral discretion in this species is a more likely mechanism for body water conservation under stressful conditions when compared with the responses of other studied species. PMID:21133796

  14. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  15. 26 CFR 1.469-2T - Passive activity loss (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... insurance companies; (D) Income or gain derived in the ordinary course of an activity of trading or dealing... securities. Example 4. C is a partner in a partnership that is engaged in an activity of trading or...

  16. HUBBLE CAPTURES AN EXTRAORDINARY AND POWERFUL ACTIVE GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Resembling a swirling witch's cauldron of glowing vapors, the black hole-powered core of a nearby active galaxy appears in this colorful NASA Hubble Space Telescope image. The galaxy lies 13 million light-years away in the southern constellation Circinus. This galaxy is designated a type 2 Seyfert, a class of mostly spiral galaxies that have compact centers and are believed to contain massive black holes. Seyfert galaxies are themselves part of a larger class of objects called Active Galactic Nuclei or AGN. AGN have the ability to remove gas from the centers of their galaxies by blowing it out into space at phenomenal speeds. Astronomers studying the Circinus galaxy are seeing evidence of a powerful AGN at the center of this galaxy as well. Much of the gas in the disk of the Circinus spiral is concentrated in two specific rings -- a larger one of diameter 1,300 light-years, which has already been observed by ground-based telescopes, and a previously unseen ring of diameter 260 light-years. In the Hubble image, the smaller inner ring is located on the inside of the green disk. The larger outer ring extends off the image and is in the plane of the galaxy's disk. Both rings are home to large amounts of gas and dust as well as areas of major 'starburst' activity, where new stars are rapidly forming on timescales of 40 - 150 million years, much shorter than the age of the entire galaxy. At the center of the starburst rings is the Seyfert nucleus, the believed signature of a supermassive black hole that is accreting surrounding gas and dust. The black hole and its accretion disk are expelling gas out of the galaxy's disk and into its halo (the region above and below the disk). The detailed structure of this gas is seen as magenta-colored streamers extending towards the top of the image. In the center of the galaxy and within the inner starburst ring is a V-shaped structure of gas. The structure appears whitish-pink in this composite image, made up of four filters. Two

  17. Location, Timing, and Social Structure Patterns Related to Physical Activity Participation in Weight Loss Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Jennifer L.; Trevarthen, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Less than half of the adults in the United States meet national guidelines for physical activity. Physical activity programs can induce short-term improvements in physical activity. To develop effective interventions, researchers and practitioners should consider the timing, location, and social structure patterns of participants. Using a pretest,…

  18. Structural insights into the loss of catalytic competence in pectate lyase activity at low pH.

    PubMed

    Ali, Salyha; Søndergaard, Chresten R; Teixeira, Susana; Pickersgill, Richard W

    2015-10-24

    Pectate lyase, a family 1 polysaccharide lyase, catalyses cleavage of the α-1,4 linkage of the polysaccharide homogalacturonan via an anti β-elimination reaction. In the Michaelis complex two calcium ions bind between the C6 carboxylate of the d-galacturonate residue and enzyme aspartates at the active centre (+1 subsite), they withdraw electrons acidifying the C5 proton facilitating its abstraction by the catalytic arginine. Here we show that activity is lost at low pH because protonation of aspartates results in the loss of the two catalytic calcium-ions causing a profound failure to correctly organise the Michaelis complex. PMID:26420545

  19. Geometrical effect on the measurement of stopping power: Angle-dependent energy loss of 5 MeV protons in Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwari, R.; Shiomi-Tsuda, N.; Sakamoto, N.; Ogawa, H.

    1990-03-01

    The geometrical effect on the measurement of stopping power - the angle-dependent energy loss of 5 MeV protons in Au - has been measured using a very homogeneous Au target. The inhomogeneity of the target thickness has been investigated by electron microscopy and by comparing the observed straggling of the energy loss with the predictions of the straggling theories. The inhomogeneity of the target thickness was estimated to be at most 3.27% of the average thickness. The effect of the target inhomogeneity on the angular dependence of the energy loss has been investigated by calculating the average target thickness as a function of the emergence angle. After subtracting the effect of the target inhomogeneity, the energy loss increases about 1.55% as the emergence angle increases from 0.64° to 3.82°. We conclude that this increase of the energy loss as a function of the emergence angle is a manifestation of an impact parameter dependence of electronic stopping.

  20. Solar activity and economic fundamentals: Evidence from 12 geographically disparate power grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Kevin F.; St. Cyr, O. C.

    2008-10-01

    This study uses local (ground-based) magnetometer data as a proxy for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) to address whether there is a space weather/electricity market relationship in 12 geographically disparate power grids: Eirgrid, the power grid that serves the Republic of Ireland; Scottish and Southern Electricity, the power grid that served northern Scotland until April 2005; Scottish Power, the power grid that served southern Scotland until April 2005; the power grid that serves the Czech Republic; E.ON Netz, the transmission system operator in central Germany; the power grid in England and Wales; the power grid in New Zealand; the power grid that serves the vast proportion of the population in Australia; ISO New England, the power grid that serves New England; PJM, a power grid that over the sample period served all or parts of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia; NYISO, the power grid that serves New York State; and the power grid in the Netherlands. This study tests the hypothesis that GIC levels (proxied by the time variation of local magnetic field measurements (dH/dt)) and electricity grid conditions are related using Pearson's chi-squared statistic. The metrics of power grid conditions include measures of electricity market imbalances, energy losses, congestion costs, and actions by system operators to restore grid stability. The results of the analysis indicate that real-time market conditions in these power grids are statistically related with the GIC proxy.

  1. Ataxia and hypogonadism caused by the loss of ubiquitin ligase activity of the U box protein CHIP.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-He; Schisler, Jonathan C; Rubel, Carrie E; Tan, Song; Song, Bo; McDonough, Holly; Xu, Lei; Portbury, Andrea L; Mao, Cheng-Yuan; True, Cadence; Wang, Rui-Hao; Wang, Qing-Zhi; Sun, Shi-Lei; Seminara, Stephanie B; Patterson, Cam; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2014-02-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a rare Mendelian neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia and hypogonadism. Recently, it was suggested that disordered ubiquitination underlies GHS though the discovery of exome mutations in the E3 ligase RNF216 and deubiquitinase OTUD4. We performed exome sequencing in a family with two of three siblings afflicted with ataxia and hypogonadism and identified a homozygous mutation in STUB1 (NM_005861) c.737C→T, p.Thr246Met, a gene that encodes the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein). CHIP plays a central role in regulating protein quality control, in part through its ability to function as an E3 ligase. Loss of CHIP function has long been associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in several genetic mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders; however, a role for CHIP in human neurological disease has yet to be identified. Introduction of the Thr246Met mutation into CHIP results in a loss of ubiquitin ligase activity measured directly using recombinant proteins as well as in cell culture models. Loss of CHIP function in mice resulted in behavioral and reproductive impairments that mimic human ataxia and hypogonadism. We conclude that GHS can be caused by a loss-of-function mutation in CHIP. Our findings further highlight the role of disordered ubiquitination and protein quality control in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease and demonstrate the utility of combining whole-exome sequencing with molecular analyses and animal models to define causal disease polymorphisms. PMID:24113144

  2. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  3. Late-onset MNGIE due to partial loss of thymidine phosphorylase activity.

    PubMed

    Martí, Ramon; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Buchman, Alan; Hirano, Ikuo; Tadesse, Saba; van Kuilenburg, André B P; van Gennip, Albert H; Poorthuis, Ben J H M; Hirano, Michio

    2005-10-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). All MNGIE patients have had severe loss of TP function and prominent plasma accumulations of the TP substrates thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd). Here, we report for the first time to our knowledge three MNGIE patients with later onset, milder phenotype, and less severe TP dysfunction, compared with typical MNGIE patients. This report demonstrates a direct relationship between the biochemical defects and clinical phenotypes in MNGIE and supports the notion that reduction of dThd and dUrd accumulation or TP replacement could be useful therapy for MNGIE. PMID:16178026

  4. Recurrent Loss of NFE2L2 Exon 2 Is a Mechanism for Nrf2 Pathway Activation in Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Leonard D; Lee, James; Gnad, Florian; Klijn, Christiaan; Schaub, Annalisa; Reeder, Jens; Daemen, Anneleen; Bakalarski, Corey E; Holcomb, Thomas; Shames, David S; Hartmaier, Ryan J; Chmielecki, Juliann; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gentleman, Robert; Stokoe, David

    2016-09-01

    The Nrf2 pathway is frequently activated in human cancers through mutations in Nrf2 or its negative regulator KEAP1. Using a cell-line-derived gene signature for Nrf2 pathway activation, we found that some tumors show high Nrf2 activity in the absence of known mutations in the pathway. An analysis of splice variants in oncogenes revealed that such tumors express abnormal transcript variants from the NFE2L2 gene (encoding Nrf2) that lack exon 2, or exons 2 and 3, and encode Nrf2 protein isoforms missing the KEAP1 interaction domain. The Nrf2 alterations result in the loss of interaction with KEAP1, Nrf2 stabilization, induction of a Nrf2 transcriptional response, and Nrf2 pathway dependence. In all analyzed cases, transcript variants were the result of heterozygous genomic microdeletions. Thus, we identify an alternative mechanism for Nrf2 pathway activation in human tumors and elucidate its functional consequences. PMID:27568559

  5. Powerful Low-Frequency Vibrators for Active Seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.S.; Chichinin, I.S.; Korneev, V.A.

    2003-12-01

    In the past two decades, active seismology studies in Russia have made use of powerful (40- and 100-ton) low-frequency vibrators. These sources create a force amplitude of up to 100 tons and function in the 1.5 3, 3 6, and 5 10 Hz frequency bands. The mobile versions of the vibrator have a force amplitude of 40 tons and a 6 12 Hz frequency band. Recording distances for the 100-ton vibrator are as large as 350 km, enabling the refracted waves to penetrate down to 50 km depths. Vibrator operation sessions are highly repeatable, having distinct summer or winter spectral patterns. A long profile of seismic records allows estimation of fault zone depths using changes in recorded spectra. Other applications include deep seismic profiling, seismic hazard mapping, structural testing, stress-induced anisotropy studies, seismic station calibration, and large-structure integrity testing. The theoretical description of the low-frequency vibrator is given in the appendices, which contain numerical examples.

  6. Catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide by external power activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, C.; Prince, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    The catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide and air in a planar stagnation-point flow over a platinum foil with external power is studied in this paper. The reduced heterogeneous kinetics are modelled with the dissociative adsorption of the molecular oxygen and the non-dissociative adsorption of CO, together with a surface reaction of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type and the desorption reaction of the adsorbed product, CO 2(s). The resulting governing equations have been numerically integrated and the whole S-shaped response curve has been obtained as a function of the mixture initial concentration. The critical conditions for the catalytic ignition and extinction are deduced using high activation energy asymptotics of the desorption kinetics of the most efficient adsorbed reactant, CO(s). We obtained a very good agreement between the numerical and asymptotic results for the ignition and extinction conditions. In general, the ignition process can be well modelled without reactant consumption, while extinction occurs in the partial diffusion-controlled regime, with a finite non-zero concentration of carbon monoxide close to the plate.

  7. Brainstem node for loss of consciousness due to GABA(A) receptor-active anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Minert, Anne; Devor, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    The molecular agents that induce loss of consciousness during anesthesia are classically believed to act by binding to cognate transmembrane receptors widely distributed in the CNS and critically suppressing local processing and network connectivity. However, previous work has shown that microinjection of anesthetics into a localized region of the brainstem mesopontine tegmentum (MPTA) rapidly and reversibly induces anesthesia in the absence of global spread. This implies that functional extinction is determined by neural pathways rather than vascular distribution of the anesthetic agent. But does clinical (systemic-induced) anesthesia employ MPTA-linked circuitry? Here we show that cell-selective lesioning of the MPTA in rats does not, in itself, induce anesthesia or coma. However, it increases the systemic dose of pentobarbital required to induce anesthesia, in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. Such lesions also affect emergence, extending the duration of anesthesia. Off-target and sham lesions were ineffective. Combined with the prior microinjection data, we conclude that drug delivery to the MPTA is sufficient to induce loss-of-consciousness and that neurons in this locus are necessary for anesthetic induction at clinically relevant doses. Together, the results support an architecture for anesthesia with the MPTA serving as a key node in an endogenous network of dedicated pathways that switch between wake and unconsciousness. As such, the MPTA might also play a role in syncope, concussion and sleep. PMID:26436687

  8. Loss of vascular fibrinolytic activity following irradiation of the liver - an aspect of late radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, B.W.; Bicher, H.I.; Johnson, R.J.

    1983-09-01

    The vascular fibrinolytic activity, known to originate from the endothelium, was studied histochemically by fibrinolysis autography in liver samples from beagles exposed to radiation treatment. Eighteen to thirty months prior to sacrifice, six dogs received x irradiation (4600 rad in 5 weeks) and three dogs received x irradiation plus aspirin (1 g/kg). Two dogs served as untreated controls. Control livers showed extensive fibrinolytic activity related to large and small vascular structures. The vascular fibrinolytic activity had been lost from all vessels except the major portal branches in five irradiated livers and was severaly diminished in three. One irradiated liver appeared to possess normal fibrinolytic activity.

  9. Membrane permeability and the loss of germination factor from Neurospora crassa at low water activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Horowitz, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    Neurospora crassa conidia incubating in buffer at low water activities release a germination-essential component as well as 260-nm absorbing and ninhydrin-positive materials, regardless of whether an electrolyte or nonelectrolyte is used to reduce water activity. Chloroform and antibiotics known to increase cell-membrane permeability have a similar effect. This suggests that membrane damage occurs in media of low water activity and that an increase in permeability is responsible for the release of cellular components. The damage caused in media of low water activity is nonlethal in most cases, and the conidia recover when transferred to nutrient medium.

  10. Windage Power Loss in Gas Foil Bearings and the Rotor-Stator Clearance of High Speed Generators Operating in High Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) and Closed Supercritical Cycle (CSC) engines are prime candidates to convert heat from a reactor into electric power for robotic space exploration and habitation. These engine concepts incorporate a permanent magnet starter/generator mounted on the engine shaft along with the requisite turbomachinery. Successful completion of the long-duration missions currently anticipated for these engines will require designs that adequately address all losses within the machine. The preliminary thermal management concept for these engine types is to use the cycle working fluid to provide the required cooling. In addition to providing cooling, the working fluid will also serve as the bearing lubricant. Additional requirements, due to the unique application of these microturbines, are zero contamination of the working fluid and entirely maintenance-free operation for many years. Losses in the gas foil bearings and within the rotor-stator gap of the generator become increasingly important as both rotational speed and mean operating pressure are increased. This paper presents the results of an experimental study, which obtained direct torque measurements on gas foil bearings and generator rotor-stator gaps. Test conditions for these measurements included rotational speeds up to 42,000 revolutions per minute, pressures up to 45 atmospheres, and test gases of nitrogen, helium, and carbon dioxide. These conditions provided a maximum test Taylor number of nearly one million. The results show an exponential rise in power loss as mean operating density is increased for both the gas foil bearing and generator windage. These typical "secondary" losses can become larger than the total system output power if conventional design paradigms are followed. A nondimensional analysis is presented to extend the experimental results into the CSC range for the generator windage.

  11. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 code using loss of offsite power transient data of KNU (Korea Nuclear Unit) No. 1 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Bud-Dong; Kim, Hho-Jung . Korea Nuclear Safety Center); Lee, Young-Jin )

    1990-04-01

    This report presents a code assessment study based on a real plant transient that occurred on June 9, 1981 at the KNU {number sign}1 (Korea Nuclear Unit Number 1). KNU {number sign}1 is a two-loop Westinghouse PWR plant of 587 Mwe. The loss of offsite power transient occurred at the 77.5% reactor power with 0.5%/hr power ramp. The real plant data were collected from available on-line plant records and computer diagnostics. The transient was simulated by RELAP5/MOD2/36.05 and the results were compared with the plant data to assess the code weaknesses and strengths. Some nodalization studies were performed to contribute to developing a guideline for PWR nodalization for the transient analysis. 5 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Premature Sperm Activation and Defective Spermatogenesis Caused by Loss of spe-46 Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Wei-Siang; Nasri, Ubaydah; Elmatari, Daniel; Rothman, Jason; LaMunyon, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    Given limited resources for motility, sperm cell activation must be precisely timed to ensure the greatest likelihood of fertilization. Like those of most species, the sperm of C. elegans become active only after encountering an external signaling molecule. Activation coincides with spermiogenesis, the final step in spermatogenesis, when the spherical spermatid undergoes wholesale reorganization to produce a pseudopod. Here, we describe a gene involved in sperm activation, spe-46. This gene was identified in a suppressor screen of spe-27(it132ts), a sperm-expressed gene whose product functions in the transduction of the spermatid activation signal. While spe-27(it132ts) worms are sterile at 25°C, the spe-46(hc197)I; spe-27(it132ts)IV double mutants regain partial fertility. Single nucleotide polymorphism mapping, whole genome sequencing, and transformation rescue were employed to identify the spe-46 coding sequence. It encodes a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains but with no other predicted functional domains or homology outside of nematodes. Expression is limited to spermatogenic tissue, and a transcriptional GFP fusion shows expression corresponds with the onset of the pachytene stage of meiosis. The spe-46(hc197) mutation bypasses the need for the activation signal; mutant sperm activate prematurely without an activation signal in males, and mutant males are sterile. In an otherwise wild-type genome, the spe-46(hc197) mutation induces a sperm defective phenotype. In addition to premature activation, spe-46(hc197) sperm exhibit numerous defects including aneuploidy, vacuolization, protruding spikes, and precocious fusion of membranous organelles. Hemizygous worms [spe-46(hc197)/mnDf111] are effectively sterile. Thus, spe-46 appears to be involved in the regulation of spermatid activation during spermiogenesis, with the null phenotype being an absence of functional sperm and hypomorphic phenotypes being premature spermatid activation and numerous

  13. PINK1 loss-of-function mutations affect mitochondrial complex I activity via NdufA10 ubiquinone uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Morais, Vanessa A; Haddad, Dominik; Craessaerts, Katleen; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Swerts, Jef; Vilain, Sven; Aerts, Liesbeth; Overbergh, Lut; Grünewald, Anne; Seibler, Philip; Klein, Christine; Gevaert, Kris; Verstreken, Patrik; De Strooper, Bart

    2014-04-11

    Under resting conditions, Pink1 knockout cells and cells derived from patients with PINK1 mutations display a loss of mitochondrial complex I reductive activity, causing a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Analyzing the phosphoproteome of complex I in liver and brain from Pink1(-/-) mice, we found specific loss of phosphorylation of serine-250 in complex I subunit NdufA10. Phosphorylation of serine-250 was needed for ubiquinone reduction by complex I. Phosphomimetic NdufA10 reversed Pink1 deficits in mouse knockout cells and rescued mitochondrial depolarization and synaptic transmission defects in pink(B9)-null mutant Drosophila. Complex I deficits and adenosine triphosphate synthesis were also rescued in cells derived from PINK1 patients. Thus, this evolutionary conserved pathway may contribute to the pathogenic cascade that eventually leads to Parkinson's disease in patients with PINK1 mutations. PMID:24652937

  14. Activation of SIRT3 by the NAD⁺ precursor nicotinamide riboside protects from noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin D; Maqsood, Sadia; Huang, Jing-Yi; Pan, Yong; Harkcom, William; Li, Wei; Sauve, Anthony; Verdin, Eric; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-12-01

    Intense noise exposure causes hearing loss by inducing degeneration of spiral ganglia neurites that innervate cochlear hair cells. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) exhibits axon-protective effects in cultured neurons; however, its ability to block degeneration in vivo has been difficult to establish due to its poor cell permeability and serum instability. Here, we describe a strategy to increase cochlear NAD(+) levels in mice by administering nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described NAD(+) precursor. We find that administration of NR, even after noise exposure, prevents noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and spiral ganglia neurite degeneration. These effects are mediated by the NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT3, since SIRT3-overexpressing mice are resistant to NIHL and SIRT3 deletion abrogates the protective effects of NR and expression of NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes. These findings reveal that administration of NR activates a NAD(+)-SIRT3 pathway that reduces neurite degeneration caused by noise exposure. PMID:25470550

  15. Loss of desmocollin-2 confers a tumorigenic phenotype to colonic epithelial cells through activation of Akt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kolegraff, Keli; Nava, Porfirio; Helms, My N.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2011-01-01

    Desmocollin-2 (Dsc2) and desmoglein-2 (Dsg2) are transmembrane cell adhesion proteins of desmosomes. Reduced expression of Dsc2 has been reported in colorectal carcinomas, suggesting that Dsc2 may play a role in the development and/or progression of colorectal cancer. However, no studies have examined the mechanistic contribution of Dsc2 deficiency to tumorigenesis. Here we report that loss of Dsc2 promotes cell proliferation and enables tumor growth in vivo through the activation of Akt/β-catenin signaling. Inhibition of Akt prevented the increase in β-catenin–dependent transcription and proliferation following Dsc2 knockdown and attenuated the in vivo growth of Dsc2-deficient cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence that loss of Dsc2 contributes to the growth of colorectal cancer cells and highlight a novel mechanism by which the desmosomal cadherins regulate β-catenin signaling. PMID:21325624

  16. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Hearing Loss What is Hearing Loss? Hearing loss is a common problem caused by ... sec Click to watch this video Types of Hearing Loss Hearing loss comes in many forms. It can ...

  17. Mobile Phone Apps to Promote Weight Loss and Increase Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferré-Grau, Carme; Montaña-Carreras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no meta-analysis to date has assessed the efficacy of mobile phone apps to promote weight loss and increase physical activity. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies to compare the efficacy of mobile phone apps compared with other approaches to promote weight loss and increase physical activity. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies identified by a search of PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus from their inception through to August 2015. Two members of the study team (EG-F, GF-M) independently screened studies for inclusion criteria and extracted data. We included all controlled studies that assessed a mobile phone app intervention with weight-related health measures (ie, body weight, body mass index, or waist circumference) or physical activity outcomes. Net change estimates comparing the intervention group with the control group were pooled across studies using random-effects models. Results We included 12 articles in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Compared with the control group, use of a mobile phone app was associated with significant changes in body weight (kg) and body mass index (kg/m2) of -1.04 kg (95% CI -1.75 to -0.34; I2 = 41%) and -0.43 kg/m2 (95% CI -0.74 to -0.13; I2 = 50%), respectively. Moreover, a nonsignificant difference in physical activity was observed between the two groups (standardized mean difference 0.40, 95% CI -0.07 to 0.87; I2 = 93%). These findings were remarkably robust in the sensitivity analysis. No publication bias was shown. Conclusions Evidence from this study shows that mobile phone app-based interventions may be useful tools for weight loss. PMID:26554314

  18. Power budget considerations for optically activated conventional sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexing

    1991-02-01

    Optically powered conventional instrumentation with optical fiber links that combine the advantages of a familiar technology and of fiber optics is described. A number of examples are given of the development of pneumatic pressure sensors and actuators with reduced power consumption that are operated by optical power and incorporated with fiber-optic links. Their performance and power budget are discussed. They are particularly applicable to transmissions through regions having high EM interference, high EM pulses, and explosive, radiative, or corrosive hazards, such as in nuclear power plants, process plants, aircraft, or spacecraft. These low-optical-power transmission and operation characteristics will help to meet safety requirements and to reduce the system cost.

  19. Compilation of Trade Studies for the Constellation Program Extravehicular Activity Spacesuit Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    2009-01-01

    This compilation of trade studies performed from 2005 to 2006 addressed a number of power system design issues for the Constellation Program Extravehicular Activity Spacesuit. Spacesuits were required for spacewalks and in-space activities as well as lunar and Mars surface operations. The trades documented here considered whether solar power was feasible for spacesuits, whether spacesuit power generation should be a distributed or a centralized function, whether self-powered in-space spacesuits were better than umbilically powered ones, and whether the suit power system should be recharged in place or replaced.

  20. Loss of tumor suppressor Merlin results in aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Bailey, Sarah K.; Metge, Brandon J.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the tumor suppressor Merlin is compromised in nervous system malignancies due to genomic aberrations. We demonstrated for the first time, that in breast cancer, Merlin protein expression is lost due to proteasome-mediated elimination. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer revealed characteristically reduced Merlin expression. Importantly, we identified a functional role for Merlin in impeding breast tumor xenograft growth and reducing invasive characteristics. We sought to determine a possible mechanism by which Merlin accomplishes this reduction in malignant activity. We observed that breast and pancreatic cancer cells with loss of Merlin show an aberrant increase in the activity of β-catenin concomitant with nuclear localization of β-catenin. We discovered that Merlin physically interacts with β-catenin, alters the sub-cellular localization of β-catenin, and significantly reduces the protein levels of β-catenin by targeting it for degradation through the upregulation of Axin1. Consequently, restoration of Merlin inhibited β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. We also present evidence that loss of Merlin sensitizes tumor cells to inhibition by compounds that target β-catenin-mediated activity. Thus, this study provides compelling evidence that Merlin reduces the malignant activity of pancreatic and breast cancer, in part by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Given the potent role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in breast and pancreatic cancer and the flurry of activity to test β-catenin inhibitors in the clinic, our findings are opportune and provide evidence for Merlin in restraining aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26908451

  1. JNK activity in somatic stem cells causes loss of tissue homeostasis in the aging Drosophila gut

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoît; Hochmuth, Christine E.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Metazoans employ cytoprotective and regenerative strategies to maintain tissue homeostasis. Understanding the coordination of these strategies is critical to develop accurate models for aging and associated diseases. Here we show that cytoprotective Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling influences regeneration in the Drosophila gut by directing proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Interestingly, this function of JNK contributes to the loss of tissue homeostasis in old and stressed intestines by promoting the accumulation of mis-differentiated ISC daughter cells. Ectopic Delta/Notch signaling in these cells causes their abnormal differentiation, but also limits JNK-induced proliferation. Protective JNK signaling, and control of cell proliferation and differentiation by Delta/Notch signaling thus have to be carefully balanced to ensure tissue homeostasis. Our findings suggest that this balance is lost in old animals, increasing the potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID:18940735

  2. From sunlight in space to 60 Hz on earth - The losses along the way. [satellite solar power transmission efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    The space-to-ground links for the Solar Power Satellite System are discussed in terms of worst, best, and nominal efficiency used in the development of the preliminary design. An uncertainty analysis of this design illustrates the effect of link efficiency on SPS size and mass. It is shown that a solar power satellite can deliver power to a ground-based utility for 4 to 5 cents per kWh, depending on the efficiency of the solar cells available in 1987. The overall efficiency of converting sunlight in space to electric power delivered to utilities ranged from 3.83% for the worst combination of efficiencies to 9.5% for the best, with a nominal efficiency of 7.12%.

  3. Economic evaluation of losses to electric power utilities caused by ash fouling. Final technical report, November 1, 1979-April 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, F.R.; Persnger, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Problems with convection ash fouling and wall slagging were considerable during our study. The Dakota lignites posed the greatest problems, particularly with fouling. The subbituminous coals had considerable problems, related mostly with wall slagging. The Texas lignites had few problems, and those were only associated with wall slagging. The generation losses were as follows: The Dakota lignite burning stations averaged an overall availability of 87.13%. Convection fouling outages were responsible for 57.75% of this outage time for a decrease in availability of 7.43%. Fouling was responsible for curtailment losses of 317,649 Mwh or 8.25% of the remaining available generation. Slagging was responsible for losses of 2732 megawatt hours or .07% of the remaining available generation. Total ash related losses amounted to 16.08% of the total available generation. The subbituminous burning stations averaged an overall availability of 78.36%. Total ash related losses amounted to 1.54% of the total available generation. The Texas lignite burning stations averaged an overall availability of 80.63%. No ash related outage losses occurred. Slagging curtailments accounted 0.08% of the total available generation. Costs due to ash fouling and slagging related curtailments are a tremendous sum. Seven power stations were studied for a six month period to assess costs. The total cost directly attributable to ash slagging and fouling condition was $20,638,113. Recommendations for reducing the problems involve soot blowers, control of furnace gas exit temperature, water blowers and more conservative boiler design.

  4. Stopping powers and energy loss straggling for (0.9-3.4) MeV protons in a kapton polyimide thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damache, S.; Djaroum, S.; Ouichaoui, S.; Amari, L.; Moussa, D.

    2016-09-01

    The energy loss and energy loss straggling widths have been measured in transmission for Ep ≈ (0.9-3.4) MeV protons traversing a thin kapton polyimide foil. In a prior step, the thickness and non-uniformity of the target foil were carefully investigated. The overall relative uncertainties in the stopping power and energy loss straggling variance data amount, respectively, to less than 2% and 8%. The S(E) experimental data show to be in excellent agreement with available previous ones and with those compiled in the ICRU-49 report. They are fully consistent with the predictions of Sigmund-Schinner's binary collision theory of electronic stopping over the whole proton energy range explored. An average deviation of ∼2.5% relative to values calculated by the SRIM-2008 code, likely due to effects of valence electrons involving the Csbnd H, Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds, is however observed at low proton velocities. The measured energy loss straggling data, which are unique to our knowledge, are found to be in good agreement with values derived by the classical Bohr formula for Ep ≳ 1300 keV but they significantly exceed Bohr's collisional energy loss straggling at lower proton velocities where target electrons can no longer be considered as free. They also show to be consistent with the predictions of the Bethe-Livingston and Sigmund-Schinner theories over the low proton velocity region (Ep < 1300 keV). However, they are significantly overestimated by these theories over the intermediate and high proton velocity regions, which may be due to bunching effect by inner shell electrons of the polymer target. Besides, our energy loss straggling data are in better overall consistency with the Yang, O'Connor and Wang empirical formula for Ep > 1300 keV, while deviations above the latter amounting up to ∼18% are observed at lower proton velocities.

  5. Design of an integrated thermoelectric generator power converter for ultra-low power and low voltage body energy harvesters aimed at ExG active electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataei, Milad; Robert, Christian; Boegli, Alexis; Farine, Pierre-André

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a detailed design procedure for an efficient thermal body energy harvesting integrated power converter. The procedure is based on the examination of power loss and power transfer in a converter for a self-powered medical device. The efficiency limit for the system is derived and the converter is optimized for the worst case scenario. All optimum system parameters are calculated respecting the transducer constraints and the application form factor. Circuit blocks including pulse generators are implemented based on the system specifications and optimized converter working frequency. At this working condition, it has been demonstrated that the wide area capacitor of the voltage doubler, which provides high voltage switch gating, can be eliminated at the expense of wider switches. With this method, measurements show that 54% efficiency is achieved for just a 20 mV transducer output voltage and 30% of the chip area is saved. The entire electronic board can fit in one EEG or ECG electrode, and the electronic system can convert the electrode to an active electrode.

  6. Ultra-broadband and low-loss 3  dB optical power splitter based on adiabatic tapered silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Gao, Shitao; Wang, Ke; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-05-01

    A broadband, low-loss and polarization-insensitive 3 dB optical power splitter based on adiabatic tapered silicon waveguides is proposed and investigated. 3D-FDTD simulation results show that the splitter achieves an output transmission efficiency of nearly 50% over an ultra-broad wavelength range from 1200 to 1700 nm. The device is fabricated, and experimental results show that the splitter exhibits a low excess loss of <0.19  dB for the TE polarization and <0.14  dB for the TM polarization over the entire measured wavelength range from 1530 to 1600 nm, while having an adiabatic taper length of only 5 μm. In addition, the measured power uniformity of the cascaded 1×8 splitter is only 0.47 dB, and 0.17 dB for the TE and TM polarizations, respectively. With the advantages of low loss, broad bandwidth, and compact size, the proposed splitter is a promising element for large-scale silicon integrated photonic circuits. PMID:27128072

  7. 26 CFR 1.469-2T - Passive activity loss (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... entity owns an interest on the applicable valuation date. (B) Ratable portion—(1) Dispositions on which... interest in such activity for its fair market value on the applicable valuation date; by (ii) The sum...

  8. Modeling of power and energy transduction of embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bin; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a systematic investigation of power and energy transduction in piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) for structural health monitoring (SHM). After a literature review of the state of the art, the paper develops a simplified pitch-catch model of power and energy transduction of PWAS attached to structure. The model assumptions include: (a) 1-D axial and flexural wave propagation; (b) ideal bonding (pin-force) connection between PWAS and structure; (c) ideal excitation source at the transmitter PWAS and fully-resistive external load at the receiver PWAS. Frequency response functions are developed for voltage, current, complex power, active power, etc. First, we examined PWAS transmitter and determined the active power, reactive power, power rating of electrical requirement under harmonic voltage excitation. It was found that the reactive power is dominant and defines the power requirement for power supply / amplifier for PWAS applications. The electrical and mechanical power analysis at the PWAS structure interface indicates all the active electrical power provides the mechanical power at the interface. This provides the power and energy for the axial and flexural waves power and energy that propagate into the structure. The sum of forward and backward wave power equals the mechanical power PWAS applied to the structure. The parametric study of PWAS transmitter size shows the proper size and excitation frequency selection based on the tuning effects. Second, we studied the PWAS receiver structural interface acoustic and electrical energy transduction. The parametric study of receiver size, receiver impedance and external electrical load gives the PWAS design guideline for PWAS sensing and power harvesting applications. Finally we considered the power flow for a complete pitch-catch setup. In pitch-catch mode, the power flows from electrical source into piezoelectric power at the transmitter; the piezoelectric conduction converts the electrical

  9. Loss of H2 histamine receptor activity in rabbit aorta after maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, J.E.; Mokler, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The activity of H1 and H2 histaminergic receptors was studied in aortic strips taken from young (6 weeks) and mature (7-8 months) rabbits. H1-mediated contractile activity was similar in both age groups, but H2 receptor relaxant activity was greatly diminished in mature rabbits. H2 receptor activity was evaluated with two experimental approaches: its modifying effect on blockade of H1 receptors by diphenhydramine (DPN), and its capacity to directly relax precontracted strips. Schild plot evaluation of DPN blockade revealed that the slope of the plot was below 1.0 in strips from young rabbits (0.77), but not in strips from mature rabbits (0.94). Propranolol pretreatment did not increase the Schild plot slope (0.66) of young aortic strips, but metiamide pretreatment did (0.92). Metiamide treatment did not further in crease slope of mature strips (0.95). When the slopes of the plots were near 1.0, as in the mature and metiamide-treated mature and young strips, the pA2 of DPN was very close (7.51, 7.70, and 7.65). Lost H2 receptor activity in maturity was confirmed by relaxing norepinephrine-precontracted strips with histamine or dimaprit. Histamine-induced relaxation of precontracted strips was slightly diminished in mature strips, while the relaxing activity of dimaprit was greatly reduced in mature tissue. The same strips relaxed vigorously when exposed to nitroglycerin or NaNO2, demonstrating that the strips were capable of relaxing. Therefore, it appears that H2 receptor activity in rabbit aorta is greatly diminished as the animal matures.

  10. Stat3 activation links a C/EBPδ to myostatin pathway to stimulate loss of muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Pan, Jenny; Dong, Yanjun; Tweardy, David J; Dong, Yanlan; Garibotto, Giacomo; Mitch, William E

    2013-09-01

    Catabolic conditions like chronic kidney disease (CKD) cause loss of muscle mass by unclear mechanisms. In muscle biopsies from CKD patients, we found activated Stat3 (p-Stat3) and hypothesized that p-Stat3 initiates muscle wasting. We created mice with muscle-specific knockout (KO) that prevents activation of Stat3. In these mice, losses of body and muscle weights were suppressed in models with CKD or acute diabetes. A small-molecule that inhibits Stat3 activation produced similar responses, suggesting a potential for translation strategies. Using CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) KO mice and C2C12 myotubes with knockdown of C/EBPδ or myostatin, we determined that p-Stat3 initiates muscle wasting via C/EBPδ, stimulating myostatin, a negative muscle growth regulator. C/EBPδ KO also improved survival of CKD mice. We verified that p-Stat3, C/EBPδ, and myostatin were increased in muscles of CKD patients. The pathway from p-Stat3 to C/EBPδ to myostatin and muscle wasting could identify therapeutic targets that prevent muscle wasting. PMID:24011072

  11. Loss of Frataxin induces iron toxicity, sphingolipid synthesis, and Pdk1/Mef2 activation, leading to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuchuan; Lin, Guang; Haelterman, Nele A; Ho, Tammy Szu-Yu; Li, Tongchao; Li, Zhihong; Duraine, Lita; Graham, Brett H; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Rasband, Matthew N; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Frataxin (FXN) cause Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), a recessive neurodegenerative disorder. Previous studies have proposed that loss of FXN causes mitochondrial dysfunction, which triggers elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leads to the demise of neurons. Here we describe a ROS independent mechanism that contributes to neurodegeneration in fly FXN mutants. We show that loss of frataxin homolog (fh) in Drosophila leads to iron toxicity, which in turn induces sphingolipid synthesis and ectopically activates 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 (Pdk1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (Mef2). Dampening iron toxicity, inhibiting sphingolipid synthesis by Myriocin, or reducing Pdk1 or Mef2 levels, all effectively suppress neurodegeneration in fh mutants. Moreover, increasing dihydrosphingosine activates Mef2 activity through PDK1 in mammalian neuronal cell line suggesting that the mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved. Our results indicate that an iron/sphingolipid/Pdk1/Mef2 pathway may play a role in FRDA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16043.001 PMID:27343351

  12. The Role of MAC1 in Diesel Exhaust Particle-induced Microglial Activation and Loss of Dopaminergic Neuron Function

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Shannon; Taetzsch, Thomas; Lull, Melinda E.; Johnson, Jo Anne; McGraw, Constance; Block, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing reports support that air pollution causes neuroinflammation and is linked to central nervous system (CNS) disease/damage. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of urban air pollution, which has been linked to microglial activation and Parkinson’s disease-like pathology. To begin to address how DEP may exert CNS effects, microglia and neuron-glia cultures were treated with either nanometer-sized DEP (<0.22 µM; 50µg/mL), ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 50µg/ml), or DEP extracts (eDEP; from 50 µg/ml DEP) and the effect of microglial activation and dopaminergic (DA) neuron function was assessed. All three treatments showed enhanced amoeboid microglia morphology, increased H2O2 production, and decreased DA uptake. Mechanistic inquiry revealed that the scavenger receptor inhibitor fucoidan blocked DEP internalization in microglia, but failed to alter DEP-induced H2O2 production in microglia. However, pretreatment with the MAC1/CD11b inhibitor antibody blocked microglial H2O2 production in response to DEP. MAC1−/− mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures were protected from DEP-induced loss of DA neuron function, as measured by DA uptake. These findings support that DEP may activate microglia through multiple mechanisms, where scavenger receptors regulate internalization of DEP and the MAC1 receptor is mandatory for both DEP-induced microglial H2O2 production and loss of DA neuron function. PMID:23470120

  13. Instantaneous Active and Nonactive Power Control of Distributed Energy Resources with Current Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Li, Huijuan; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Kueck, John D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract -- Distributed energy resources (DER) with a power electronics inverter interface can provide both active power and nonactive power simultaneously and independently. A decoupled control algorithm of active power and nonactive power is developed based on the instantaneous active power and nonactive power theory. A current limiter is combined to the control algorithm, and it ensures that the inverter is not overloaded. During the normal system operation, the active power has higher priority over the nonactive power so that the energy from a DER can be fully transferred to the grid. Within the inverter s capability, nonactive power is provided to the grid as required. With this control algorithm, the inverter s capabilities are taken full advantage at all times, both in terms of functionality as well as making use of its full KVA rating. Through the algorithm, the inverter s active power and nonactive power are controlled directly, simultaneously, and independently. Several experimental results fully demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this new control algorithm. As evidenced by the fast dynamic response that results, a DER system with the control algorithm can provide full services to the grid in both steady state and during transient events.

  14. Out of control!? How loss of self-control influences prosocial behavior: the role of power and moral values.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Anne; van Dijke, Marius; Van Hiel, Alain; De Cremer, David

    2015-01-01

    Lack of self-control has been suggested to facilitate norm-transgressing behaviors because of the operation of automatic selfish impulses. Previous research, however, has shown that people having a high moral identity may not show such selfish impulses when their self-control resources are depleted. In the present research, we extended this effect to prosocial behavior. Moreover, we investigated the role of power in the interaction between moral identity and self-control depletion. More specifically, we expected that power facilitates the externalization of internal states, which implies that for people who feel powerful, rather than powerless, depletion decreases prosocial behavior especially for those low in moral identity. A laboratory experiment and a multisource field study supported our predictions. The present finding that the interaction between self-control depletion and moral identity is contingent upon people's level of power suggests that power may enable people to refrain from helping behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that if organizations want to improve prosocial behaviors, it may be effective to situationally induce moral values in their employees. PMID:26024380

  15. Out of Control!? How Loss of Self-Control Influences Prosocial Behavior: The Role of Power and Moral Values

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Anne; van Dijke, Marius; Van Hiel, Alain; De Cremer, David

    2015-01-01

    Lack of self-control has been suggested to facilitate norm-transgressing behaviors because of the operation of automatic selfish impulses. Previous research, however, has shown that people having a high moral identity may not show such selfish impulses when their self-control resources are depleted. In the present research, we extended this effect to prosocial behavior. Moreover, we investigated the role of power in the interaction between moral identity and self-control depletion. More specifically, we expected that power facilitates the externalization of internal states, which implies that for people who feel powerful, rather than powerless, depletion decreases prosocial behavior especially for those low in moral identity. A laboratory experiment and a multisource field study supported our predictions. The present finding that the interaction between self-control depletion and moral identity is contingent upon people’s level of power suggests that power may enable people to refrain from helping behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that if organizations want to improve prosocial behaviors, it may be effective to situationally induce moral values in their employees. PMID:26024380

  16. Neural pathways associated with loss of consciousness caused by intracerebral microinjection of GABA A-active anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, I; Zalkind, V; Lu, J; Hopkins, D A; Saper, C B; Devor, M

    2007-03-01

    Anesthesia, slow-wave sleep, syncope, concussion and reversible coma are behavioral states characterized by loss of consciousness, slow-wave cortical electroencephalogram, and motor and sensory suppression. We identified a focal area in the rat brainstem, the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA), at which microinjection of pentobarbital and other GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R) agonists reversibly induced an anesthesia-like state. This effect was attenuated by local pre-treatment with the GABA(A)-R antagonist bicuculline. Using neuroanatomical tracing we identified four pathways ascending from the MPTA that are positioned to mediate electroencephalographic synchronization and loss of consciousness: (i) projections to the intralaminar thalamic nuclei that, in turn, project to the cortex; (ii) projections to several pontomesencephalic, diencephalic and basal forebrain nuclei that project cortically and are considered parts of an ascending "arousal system"; (iii) a projection to other parts of the subcortical forebrain, including the septal area, hypothalamus, zona incerta and striato-pallidal system, that may indirectly affect cortical arousal and hippocampal theta rhythm; and (iv) modest projections directly to the frontal cortex. Several of these areas have prominent reciprocal projections back to the MPTA, notably the zona incerta, lateral hypothalamus and frontal cortex. We hypothesize that barbiturate anesthetics and related agents microinjected into the MPTA enhance the inhibitory response of local GABA(A)-R-bearing neurons to endogenous GABA released at baseline during wakefulness. This modulates activity in one or more of the identified ascending neural pathways, ultimately leading to loss of consciousness. PMID:17425568

  17. Nanoscale Concentration Quantification of Pharmaceutical Actives in Amorphous Polymer Matrices by Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ricarte, Ralm G; Lodge, Timothy P; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrated the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to evaluate the composition of phenytoin:hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) spin-coated solid dispersions (SDs). To overcome the inability of bright-field and high-angle annular dark-field TEM imaging to distinguish between glassy drug and polymer, we used the π-π* transition peak in the EELS spectrum to detect phenytoin within the HPMCAS matrix of the SD. The concentration of phenytoin within SDs of 10, 25, and 50 wt % drug loading was quantified by a multiple least-squares analysis. Evaluating the concentration of 50 different regions in each SD, we determined that phenytoin and HPMCAS are intimately mixed at a length scale of 200 nm, even for drug loadings up to 50 wt %. At length scales below 100 nm, the variance of the measured phenytoin concentration increases; we speculate that this increase is due to statistical fluctuations in local concentration and chemical changes induced by electron irradiation. We also performed EELS analysis of an annealed 25 wt % phenytoin SD and showed that the technique can resolve concentration differences between regions that are less than 50 nm apart. Our findings indicate that EELS is a useful tool for quantifying, with high accuracy and sub-100 nm spatial resolution, the composition of many pharmaceutical and soft matter systems. PMID:27419264

  18. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  19. Loss of survival factors and activation of inflammatory cascades in brain sympathetic centers in type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Caballero, Sergio; Adamson, Samuel; Cole, Louise; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration have been observed in the brain in type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, little is known about the mediators of these effects. In T1D mice with 12- and 35-wk duration of diabetes we examined two mechanisms of neurodegeneration, loss of the neuroprotective factors insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and changes in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression in the brain, and compared the response to age-matched controls. Furthermore, levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (CD39), and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) were utilized to assess inflammatory changes in astrocytes, microglia, and blood vessels. In the diabetic hypothalamus (HYPO), we observed 20% reduction in neuronal soma diameter (P < 0.05) and reduced neuronal expression of IGFBP-3 (−32%, P < 0.05) and IGF-I (−15%, P < 0.05) compared with controls at 35 wk. In diabetic HYPO, MMP-2 expression was increased in astrocytes (46%, P < 0.01), and IDO+ cell density rose by (62%, P < 0.05). CD39 expression dropped by 30% (P < 0.05) in microglia and blood vessels. With 10 wk of systemic treatment using minocycline, an anti-inflammatory agent that crosses the blood-brain barrier, MMP-2, IDO, and CD39 levels normalized (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that increased IDO and early loss of CD39+ protective cells lead to activation of inflammation in sympathetic centers of the CNS. As a downstream effect, the loss of the neuronal survival factors IGFBP-3 and IGF-I and the neurotoxic products of the kynurenine pathway contribute to the loss of neuronal density observed in the HYPO in T1D. PMID:25714673

  20. Loss of survival factors and activation of inflammatory cascades in brain sympathetic centers in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Caballero, Sergio; Adamson, Samuel; Cole, Louise; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Grant, Maria B

    2015-04-15

    Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration have been observed in the brain in type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, little is known about the mediators of these effects. In T1D mice with 12- and 35-wk duration of diabetes we examined two mechanisms of neurodegeneration, loss of the neuroprotective factors insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and changes in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression in the brain, and compared the response to age-matched controls. Furthermore, levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (CD39), and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) were utilized to assess inflammatory changes in astrocytes, microglia, and blood vessels. In the diabetic hypothalamus (HYPO), we observed 20% reduction in neuronal soma diameter (P<0.05) and reduced neuronal expression of IGFBP-3 (-32%, P<0.05) and IGF-I (-15%, P<0.05) compared with controls at 35 wk. In diabetic HYPO, MMP-2 expression was increased in astrocytes (46%, P<0.01), and IDO⁺ cell density rose by (62%, P<0.05). CD39 expression dropped by 30% (P<0.05) in microglia and blood vessels. With 10 wk of systemic treatment using minocycline, an anti-inflammatory agent that crosses the blood-brain barrier, MMP-2, IDO, and CD39 levels normalized (P<0.05). Our results suggest that increased IDO and early loss of CD39⁺ protective cells lead to activation of inflammation in sympathetic centers of the CNS. As a downstream effect, the loss of the neuronal survival factors IGFBP-3 and IGF-I and the neurotoxic products of the kynurenine pathway contribute to the loss of neuronal density observed in the HYPO in T1D. PMID:25714673

  1. 26 CFR 1.469-2T - Passive activity loss (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-month period ending on the date of the sale. Example 3. C sells a personal computer for $8,000. During the 12-month period ending on the date of the sale, 70 percent of C's use of the computer was in a... activity (including the personal computer) was $200,000. Under these facts, the computer was...

  2. Evaluating the Workload of On-Call Psychiatry Residents: Which Activities Are Associated with Sleep Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Brian K.; Cooke, Erinn O.; Sharfstein, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the workload inventory of on-call psychiatry residents and to evaluate which activities were associated with reductions in on-call sleep. Method: A prospective cohort study was conducted, following 20 psychiatry residents at a 231-bed psychiatry hospital, from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.…

  3. Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q Deficiency through Loss of Unorthodox Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Stefely, Jonathan A; Licitra, Floriana; Laredj, Leila; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Kemmerer, Zachary A; Grangeray, Anais; Jaeg-Ehret, Tiphaine; Minogue, Catherine E; Ulbrich, Arne; Hutchins, Paul D; Wilkerson, Emily M; Ruan, Zheng; Aydin, Deniz; Hebert, Alexander S; Guo, Xiao; Freiberger, Elyse C; Reutenauer, Laurence; Jochem, Adam; Chergova, Maya; Johnson, Isabel E; Lohman, Danielle C; Rush, Matthew J P; Kwiecien, Nicholas W; Singh, Pankaj K; Schlagowski, Anna I; Floyd, Brendan J; Forsman, Ulrika; Sindelar, Pavel J; Westphall, Michael S; Pierrel, Fabien; Zoll, Joffrey; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Kannan, Natarajan; Bingman, Craig A; Coon, Joshua J; Isope, Philippe; Puccio, Hélène; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    The UbiB protein kinase-like (PKL) family is widespread, comprising one-quarter of microbial PKLs and five human homologs, yet its biochemical activities remain obscure. COQ8A (ADCK3) is a mammalian UbiB protein associated with ubiquinone (CoQ) biosynthesis and an ataxia (ARCA2) through unclear means. We show that mice lacking COQ8A develop a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia linked to Purkinje cell dysfunction and mild exercise intolerance, recapitulating ARCA2. Interspecies biochemical analyses show that COQ8A and yeast Coq8p specifically stabilize a CoQ biosynthesis complex through unorthodox PKL functions. Although COQ8 was predicted to be a protein kinase, we demonstrate that it lacks canonical protein kinase activity in trans. Instead, COQ8 has ATPase activity and interacts with lipid CoQ intermediates, functions that are likely conserved across all domains of life. Collectively, our results lend insight into the molecular activities of the ancient UbiB family and elucidate the biochemical underpinnings of a human disease. PMID:27499294

  4. PACAP27 prevents Parkinson-like neuronal loss and motor deficits but not microglia activation induced by prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Machlovi, Saima Ishaq; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a major risk factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Alternative approaches are needed to treat inflammation, as anti-inflammatory drugs such as NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can produce devastating side effects, including heart attack and stroke. New therapeutic strategies that target factors downstream of COX-2, such as prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2), hold tremendous promise because they will not alter the homeostatic balance offered by COX-2 derived prostanoids. In the current studies, we report that repeated microinfusion of PGJ2 into the substantia nigra of non-transgenic mice, induces three stages of pathology that mimic the slow-onset cellular and behavioral pathology of PD: mild (one injection) when only motor deficits are detectable, intermediate (two injections) when neuronal and motor deficits as well as microglia activation are detectable, and severe (four injections) when dopaminergic neuronal loss is massive accompanied by microglia activation and motor deficits. Microglia activation was evaluated in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with [(11)C](R)PK11195 to provide a regional estimation of brain inflammation. PACAP27 reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss and motor deficits induced by PGJ2, without preventing microglia activation. The latter could be problematic in that persistent microglia activation can exert long-term deleterious effects on neurons and behavior. In conclusion, this PGJ2-induced mouse model that mimics in part chronic inflammation, exhibits slow-onset PD-like pathology and is optimal for testing diagnostic tools such as PET, as well as therapies designed to target the integrated signaling across neurons and microglia, to fully benefit patients with PD. PMID:24970746

  5. PACAP27 prevents Parkinson-like neuronal loss and motor deficits but not microglia activation induced by prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Machlovi, Saima Ishaq; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a major risk factor in Parkinson disease (PD). Alternative approaches are needed to treat inflammation, as anti-inflammatory drugs such as NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can produce devastating side effects, including heart attack and stroke. New therapeutic strategies that target factors downstream of COX-2, such as prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2), hold tremendous promise because they will not alter the homeostatic balance offered by COX-2 derived prostanoids. In the current studies, we report that repeated microinfusion of PGJ2 into the substantia nigra of non-transgenic mice, induces three stages of pathology that mimic the slow-onset cellular and behavioral pathology of PD: mild (one injection) when only motor deficits are detectable, intermediate (two injections) when neuronal and motor deficits as well as microglia activation are detectable, and severe (four injections) when dopaminergic neuronal loss is massive accompanied by microglia activation and motor deficits. Microglia activation was evaluated in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with [11C](R)PK11195 to provide a regional estimation of brain inflammation. PACAP27 reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss and motor deficits induced by PGJ2, without preventing microglia activation. The latter could be problematic in that persistent microglia activation can exert long-term deleterious effects on neurons and behavior. In conclusion, this PGJ2-induced mouse model that mimics in part chronic inflammation, exhibits slow-onset PD-like pathology and is optimal for testing diagnostic tools such as PET, as well as therapies designed to target the integrated signaling across neurons and microglia, to fully benefit patients with PD. PMID:24970746

  6. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Onar, Omer C; Tang, Lixin; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Campbell, Steven L; Miller , John M.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  7. Electron power loss in the (100) n channel of a Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. II. Intersubband phonon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krowne, Clifford M.

    1983-05-01

    A simple matrix element is used to approximate electron-acoustic phonon scattering between different electron subbands i in the n channel of a (100) surface silicon MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) device. This matrix element is used to determine the form of the electron power loss Pij in a i→j intersubband transition. P10 is calculated for TL =4.2 °K lattice temperature and electron temperatures Te between 4.4 °K and 18 °K when the electron inversion density Ninv =(3.76-10.0)×1011 cm-2 and an acceptor density NA =1014/cm3, and compared to Fang and Fowler's experimental data (which is put into the form of an experimental power loss Pexp). This is justified since the total power loss P due to intrasubband scattering as well as other Pij terms besides P10 is small. It is found that good to excellent fits between P10 and Pexp occur by adjusting the separation Δɛ10 between the lowest two circular subband edges. Δɛ10 is between 5.2 and 9.4 meV, and the electron-phonon deformation coupling constant D≊3.5 eV. The values of Δɛ10 obtained in such a manner roughly agree with Stern's theoretical self-consistent results. P10 is very sensitive to both Δɛ10 and to the effective mass for motion parallel to the surface m1 with the results implying that m1≊0.19m0 (m0=free electron rest mass). If one wants to find the contribution of intersubband scattering to P at higher TL, the formalism should still be applicable, although the approach could be much more complicated due to the addition of new Pij terms coming from both higher subbands and new scattering agents such as optical modes.

  8. S-Nitrosylation activates Cdk5 and contributes to synaptic spine loss induced by β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jing; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Cao, Gang; Holland, Emily A.; McKercher, Scott R.; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    The activity of Cdk5 and its regulatory subunit p35 is thought to be important in both normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. Increased Cdk5 activity, via proteolytic cleavage of p35 to a p25 fragment by the calcium-activated protease calpain or by phosphorylation at Cdk5(Tyr15), can contribute to neurotoxicity. Nonetheless, our knowledge of regulation of Cdk5 activity in disease states is still emerging. Here we demonstrate that Cdk5 is activated by S-nitrosylation or reaction of nitric oxide (NO)-related species with the thiol groups of cysteine residues 83 and 157, to form SNO-Cdk5. We then show that S-nitrosylation of Cdk5 contributes to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide-induced dendritic spine loss. Furthermore, we observed significant levels of SNO-Cdk5 in postmortem Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but not in normal human brains. These findings suggest that S-nitrosylation of Cdk5 is an aberrant regulatory mechanism of enzyme activity that may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:21844361

  9. Loss of Power in Logistic, Ordinal Logistic, and Probit Regression When an Outcome Variable Is Coarsely Categorized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Aaron B.; West, Stephen G.; Aiken, Leona S.

    2006-01-01

    Variables that have been coarsely categorized into a small number of ordered categories are often modeled as outcome variables in psychological research. The authors employ a Monte Carlo study to investigate the effects of this coarse categorization of dependent variables on power to detect true effects using three classes of regression models:…

  10. Low-loss 1.3-microm GaInNAs saturable Bragg reflector for high-power picosecond neodymium lasers.

    PubMed

    Sun, H D; Valentine, G J; Macaluso, R; Calvez, S; Burns, D; Dawson, M D; Jouhti, T; Pessa, M

    2002-12-01

    A novel low-loss, single-step-growth 1.3-microm GaInNAs saturable Bragg reflector mode-locking element has been developed. Combined radial thickness and postgrowth annealing control have permitted a tuning range of 46 nm for passive mode locking to be demonstrated from one wafer. With this structure, stabilized mode locking was obtained from quasi-cw diode-pumped Nd:YLF and Nd:YALO lasers operating at 1314 and 1342 nm, respectively, with average on-time output powers of as much as 20 W and pulse durations as low as 22 ps. PMID:18033462

  11. Impaired voluntary neuromuscular activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Age-related alterations of neuromuscular activation may contribute to deficits in muscle power and mobility function. This study assesses whether impaired activation of the agonist quadriceps and antagonist hamstrings, including amplitude- and velocity-dependent characteristics of activa...

  12. Biodiversity loss in seagrass meadows due to local invertebrate fisheries and harbour activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Lina Mtwana; Gullström, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Seagrass meadows provide a wide variety of ecosystem services, but their distribution and health are adversely affected by man. In the present study, we examined the influence of coastal exploitation in terms of invertebrate harvesting and harbour activity on invertebrate community composition in subtropical seagrass meadows at Inhaca Island, Mozambique, in the Western Indian Ocean. There was a fivefold higher invertebrate density and biomass, and clearly higher invertebrate species richness, in the protected (control) site compared to the two exploited sites. The causes for the clear differences between protected and exploited sites were probably a result of (1) the directional outtake of large edible or saleable invertebrates (mostly molluscs) and the absence of boat traffic in the harvested site, and (2) harbour activities. Invertebrate community composition in the two exploited sites also differed (although less clear), which was likely due to inherent distinction in type of disturbance. Our findings revealed that protection of seagrass habitat is necessary and that disturbances of different origin might require different forms of management and conservation. Designing protected areas is however a complex process due to competition for use and space with activities such as invertebrate harvesting and harbours.

  13. Loss of ATM kinase activity leads to embryonic lethality in mice.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Pellegrini, Manuela; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Guo, Zhi; Filsuf, Darius; Belkina, Natalya V; You, Zhongsheng; Paull, Tanya T; Sleckman, Barry P; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) mutated (ATM) is a key deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage signaling kinase that regulates DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. The majority of patients with A-T, a cancer-prone neurodegenerative disease, present with null mutations in Atm. To determine whether the functions of ATM are mediated solely by its kinase activity, we generated two mouse models containing single, catalytically inactivating point mutations in Atm. In this paper, we show that, in contrast to Atm-null mice, both D2899A and Q2740P mutations cause early embryonic lethality in mice, without displaying dominant-negative interfering activity. Using conditional deletion, we find that the D2899A mutation in adult mice behaves largely similar to Atm-null cells but shows greater deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) as measured by hypersensitivity to poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibition and increased genomic instability. These results may explain why missense mutations with no detectable kinase activity are rarely found in patients with classical A-T. We propose that ATM kinase-inactive missense mutations, unless otherwise compensated for, interfere with HR during embryogenesis. PMID:22869595

  14. Loss of ceramide synthase 2 activity, necessary for myelin biosynthesis, precedes tau pathology in the cortical pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Couttas, Timothy A; Kain, Nupur; Suchowerska, Alexandra K; Quek, Lake-Ee; Turner, Nigel; Fath, Thomas; Garner, Brett; Don, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    The anatomical progression of neurofibrillary tangle pathology throughout Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis runs inverse to the pattern of developmental myelination, with the disease preferentially affecting thinly myelinated regions. Myelin is comprised 80% of lipids, and the prototypical myelin lipids, galactosylceramide, and sulfatide are critical for neurological function. We observed severe depletion of galactosylceramide and sulfatide in AD brain tissue, which can be traced metabolically to the loss of their biosynthetic precursor, very long chain ceramide. The synthesis of very long chain ceramides is catalyzed by ceramide synthase 2 (CERS2). We demonstrate a significant reduction in CERS2 activity as early as Braak stage I/II in temporal cortex, and Braak stage III/IV in hippocampus and frontal cortex, indicating that loss of myelin-specific ceramide synthase activity precedes neurofibrillary tangle pathology in cortical regions. These findings open a new vista on AD pathogenesis by demonstrating a defect in myelin lipid biosynthesis at the preclinical stages of the disease. We posit that, over time, this defect contributes significantly to myelin deterioration, synaptic dysfunction, and neurological decline. PMID:27255818

  15. Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

    2003-08-20

    The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

  16. Loss of the tumor suppressor Snf5 leads to aberrant activation of the Hedgehog-Gli pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jagani, Zainab; Mora-Blanco, E Lorena; Sansam, Courtney G; McKenna, Elizabeth S; Wilson, Boris; Chen, Dongshu; Klekota, Justin; Tamayo, Pablo; Nguyen, Phuong T L; Tolstorukov, Michael; Park, Peter J; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hsiao, Kathy; Buonamici, Silvia; Pomeroy, Scott L; Mesirov, Jill P; Ruffner, Heinz; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Luchansky, Sarah J; Murtie, Joshua; Kelleher, Joseph F; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R; Roberts, Charles W M; Dorsch, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway can drive tumorigenesis1. To investigate the mechanism by which glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger-1 (GLI1), a crucial effector of Hh signaling2, regulates Hh pathway activation, we searched for GLI1-interacting proteins. We report that the chromatin remodeling protein SNF5 (encoded by SMARCB1, hereafter called SNF5), which is inactivated in human malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs), interacts with GLI1. We show that Snf5 localizes to Gli1-regulated promoters and that loss of Snf5 leads to activation of the Hh-Gli pathway. Conversely, re-expression of SNF5 in MRT cells represses GLI1. Consistent with this, we show the presence of a Hh-Gli–activated gene expression profile in primary MRTs and show that GLI1 drives the growth of SNF5-deficient MRT cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, our studies reveal that SNF5 is a key mediator of Hh signaling and that aberrant activation of GLI1 is a previously undescribed targetable mechanism contributing to the growth of MRT cells. PMID:21076395

  17. Chronic AMPK activation via loss of FLCN induces functional beige adipose tissue through PGC-1α/ERRα.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Audet-Walsh, Étienne; Manteghi, Sanaz; Rosa Dufour, Catherine; Walker, Benjamin; Baba, Masaya; St-Pierre, Julie; Giguère, Vincent; Pause, Arnim

    2016-05-01

    The tumor suppressor folliculin (FLCN) forms a repressor complex with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Given that AMPK is a master regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, we generated an adipose-specific Flcn (Adipoq-FLCN) knockout mouse model to investigate the role of FLCN in energy metabolism. We show that loss of FLCN results in a complete metabolic reprogramming of adipose tissues, resulting in enhanced oxidative metabolism. Adipoq-FLCN knockout mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and are protected from high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Importantly, FLCN ablation leads to chronic hyperactivation of AMPK, which in turns induces and activates two key transcriptional regulators of cellular metabolism, proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα). Together, the AMPK/PGC-1α/ERRα molecular axis positively modulates the expression of metabolic genes to promote mitochondrial biogenesis and activity. In addition, mitochondrial uncoupling proteins as well as other markers of brown fat are up-regulated in both white and brown FLCN-null adipose tissues, underlying the increased resistance of Adipoq-FLCN knockout mice to cold exposure. These findings identify a key role of FLCN as a negative regulator of mitochondrial function and identify a novel molecular pathway involved in the browning of white adipocytes and the activity of brown fat. PMID:27151976

  18. Loss of EZH2 results in precocious mammary gland development and activation of STAT5-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Kang, Keunsoo; Hensel, Tim; Robinson, Gertraud W; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2015-10-15

    Establishment and differentiation of mammary alveoli during pregnancy are controlled by prolactin through the transcription factors STAT5A and STAT5B (STAT5), which also regulate temporal activation of mammary signature genes. This study addressed the question whether the methyltransferase and transcriptional co-activator EZH2 controls the differentiation clock of mammary epithelium. Ablation of Ezh2 from mammary stem cells resulted in precocious differentiation of alveolar epithelium during pregnancy and the activation of mammary-specific STAT5 target genes. This coincided with enhanced occupancy of these loci by STAT5, EZH1 and RNA Pol II. Limited activation of differentiation-specific genes was observed in mammary epithelium lacking both EZH2 and STAT5, suggesting a modulating but not mandatory role for STAT5. Loss of EZH2 did not result in overt changes in genome-wide and gene-specific H3K27me3 profiles, suggesting compensation through enhanced EZH1 recruitment. Differentiated mammary epithelia did not form in the combined absence of EZH1 and EZH2. Transplantation experiments failed to demonstrate a role for EZH2 in the activity of mammary stem and progenitor cells. In summary, while EZH1 and EZH2 serve redundant functions in the establishment of H3K27me3 marks and the formation of mammary alveoli, the presence of EZH2 is required to control progressive differentiation of milk secreting epithelium during pregnancy. PMID:26250110

  19. Spatiotemporal alterations of cortical network activity by selective loss of NOS-expressing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Shlosberg, Dan; Buskila, Yossi; Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Amitai, Yael

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the role of GABAergic neurons in large neuronal networks such as the neocortex forms a particularly complex task as they comprise a highly diverse population. The neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is expressed in the neocortex by specific subsets of GABAergic neurons. These neurons can be identified in live brain slices by the nitric oxide (NO) fluorescent indicator diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA). However, this indicator was found to be highly toxic to the stained neurons. We used this feature to induce acute phototoxic damage to NO-producing neurons in cortical slices, and measured subsequent alterations in parameters of cellular and network activity. Neocortical slices were briefly incubated in DAF-2DA and then illuminated through the 4× objective. Histochemistry for NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nNOS activity, revealed elimination of staining in the illuminated areas following treatment. Whole cell recordings from several neuronal types before, during, and after illumination confirmed the selective damage to non-fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. Treated slices displayed mild disinhibition. The reversal potential of compound synaptic events on pyramidal neurons became more positive, and their decay time constant was elongated, substantiating the removal of an inhibitory conductance. The horizontal decay of local field potentials (LFPs) was significantly reduced at distances of 300-400 μm from the stimulation, but not when inhibition was non-selectively weakened with the GABA(A) blocker picrotoxin. Finally, whereas the depression of LFPs along short trains of 40 Hz stimuli was linearly reduced with distance or initial amplitude in control slices, this ordered relationship was disrupted in DAF-treated slices. These results reveal that NO-producing interneurons in the neocortex convey lateral inhibition to neighboring columns, and shape the spatiotemporal dynamics of the network's activity. PMID:22347168

  20. Activation caused by proton beam losses in Accelerator Production of Tritium LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Eaton, S.L.; Daemen, L.L.; Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-03-01

    A variety of accelerator designs are being considered for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Alamos National Laboratory. Because activation of the structural components of the accelerator is considered a major radiation protection issue, we have developed a computational methodology to estimate quantitatively radionuclide inventories and gamma dose rates resulting from accelerator operation. The work presented here illustrates the use of our computational methodology by focusing on the 20 and 100 MeV sections of the Bridge-Coupled Drift Tube LINAC (BCDTL), and the 100 and 1000 MeV sections of the Coupled Cavity LINAC (CCL).

  1. Motor unit loss is accompanied by decreased peak muscle power in the lower limb of older adults.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Neal B; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Doherty, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between motor unit (MU) properties and the isometric strength and power of two lower limb muscles in healthy young and older adults. Twelve older adults (6 men, mean age, 77 ± 5 years) and twelve young adults (6 men, mean age, 24 ± 3 years) were studied. MU properties of the tibialis anterior (TA) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles were determined electrophysiologically using decomposition-enhanced spike-triggered averaging (DE-STA). Motor unit number estimates (MUNEs) of the TA were significantly reduced (p<0.05) in older adults (102 ± 76) compared to young adults (234 ± 109), primarily as a result of significantly larger surface-detected motor unit potentials (S-MUPs) in older adults (63 ± 29 μV) compared to young adults (27 ± 14 μV). Although VM S-MUP values were larger in older adults (60 ± 31 μV) compared to young (48 ± 42 μV), the difference was not significant. Maximal isometric strength was significantly larger in both the TA and knee extensors of young adults (TA: 0.56 Nm/kg, KE: 2.2 Nm/kg) compared to old (TA: 0.4 Nm/kg, KE: 1.3 Nm/kg). Similar reductions in peak muscle power were observed between young (TA: 33 W, KE: 35 7 W) and old adults (TA: 26 W, KE: 224 W). The greatest deficit between young and old subjects in peak power output occurred at 20% MVC for the TA and 40% MVC for the knee extensors. Results from this study indicate that there are changes in MU properties with age, and that this effect may be greater in the more distal TA muscle. Further, this study demonstrates that muscle power may be a sensitive marker of changes in neuromuscular function with aging. PMID:26190479

  2. ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.; Bentley, C.

    1995-12-01

    This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

  3. ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.; Carlson, G.; Doyon, J.

    1995-08-01

    This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

  4. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  5. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  6. Experimental investigation on the chemical precipitation generation under the loss of coolant accident of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C. H.; Sung, J. J.; Chung, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    The PWR containment buildings are designed to facilitate core cooling in the event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The cooling process requires water discharged from the break and containment spray to be collected in a sump for recirculation. The containment sump contains screens to protect the components of the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and Containment Spray System (CSS) from debris. Since the containment materials may dissolve or corrode when exposed to the reactor coolant and spray solutions, various chemical precipitations can be generated in a post-LOCA environment. These chemical precipitations may become another source of debris loading to be considered in sump screen performance and downstream effects. In this study, new experimental methodology to predict the type and quantity of chemical precipitations has been developed. To generate the plant-specific chemical precipitation in a post-LOCA environment, the plant specific chemical condition of the recirculation sump during post-LOCA is simulated with the experimental reactor for the chemical effect. The plant-specific containment materials are used in the present experiment such as glass fibers, concrete blocks, aluminum specimens, and chemical reagent - boric acid, spray additives or buffering chemicals (sodium hydroxide, Tri-Sodium Phosphate (TSP), or others). The inside temperature of the reactor is controlled to simulate the plant-specific temperature profile of the recirculation sump. The total amount of aluminum released from aluminum specimens is evaluated by ICP-AES analysis to determine the amount of AlOOH and NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8} which induce very adverse effect on the head loss across the sump screens. The amount of these precipitations generated in the present experimental study is compared with the results of WCAP-16530-NP-A. (authors)

  7. TGFβ loss activates ADAMTS-1-mediated EGF-dependent invasion in a model of esophageal cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bras, Grégoire F.; Taylor, Chase; Koumangoye, Rainelli B.; Revetta, Frank; Loomans, Holli A.; Andl, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is essential to epithelial homeostasis and is often inhibited during progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Recently, an important role for TGFβ signaling has been described in the crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating squamous tumor cell invasion in mouse models of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Loss of TGFβ signaling, in either compartment, leads to HNSCC however, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Using organotypic reconstruct cultures (OTC) to model the interaction between epithelial and stromal cells that occur in dysplastic lesions, we show that loss of TGFβ signaling promotes an invasive phenotype in both fibroblast and epithelial compartments. Employing immortalized esophageal keratinocytes established to reproduce common mutations of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, we show that treatment of OTC with inhibitors of TGFβ signaling (A83-01 or SB431542) enhances invasion of epithelial cells into a fibroblast-embedded Matrigel/collagen I matrix. Invasion induced by A83-01 is independent of proliferation but relies on protease activity and expression of ADAMTS-1 and can be altered by matrix density. This invasion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1 and EGFR ligands HB-EGF and TGFα. Altering EGF signaling prevented or induced epithelial cell invasion in this model. Loss of expression of the TGFβ target gene ROBO1 suggested that chemorepulsion may regulate keratinocyte invasion. Taken together, our data show increased invasion through inhibition of TGFβ signaling altered epithelial-fibroblasts interactions, repressing markers of activated fibroblasts, and altering integrin-fibronectin interactions. These results suggest that inhibition of TGFβ signaling modulates an array of pathways that combined promote multiple aspects of tumor invasion. - Highlights: • Chemical inhibition of TGFβ signaling advances collective invasion

  8. Loss of circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity following suprachiasmatic lesions in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Haro, P. J.; Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    In experiments on male and female ambulatory rats, the effect of bilateral suprachiasmatic lesions on deep body temperature and locomotor activity circadian rhythms was investigated. A L/D:12/12 cycle and 23 C ambient temperature were maintained. One-half of the rats received radiofrequency lesions in the suprachiasmic nucleus (SCN) while the second group were sham operated by lowering the radiofrequency electrode to the SCN without producing electrolytic lesions. Four weeks were allowed for recuperation. Autopsies were conducted to make sure that the lesions were restricted to SCN. The results show the complete disappearance of circadian rhythm in the SCN lesioned rats and only a slight diminution for the sham operated rats.

  9. [The prevention of noise inducted hearing loss: the new challenge of active electronic hearing protection].

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carlo; Cociglio, Marco; Nadalin, Juri; Bronuzzi, Fabrizio; Raimondo, Luca; Riva, Giuseppe; Pira, Enrico; Coggiola, Maurizio; Victorians, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Based on today's common hearing aid design and technology, the team of researchers successfully designed a DPI which allows the worker to be "protected" against loudness and in the same time guarantee a good level of communication and perception of the surrounding environment. The design of this new device is very much similar to a standard BTE hearing aid which allows the use of an active DPI very comfortable, robust and easy to use. The research using the prototypes was divided into 3 phases: Phase 1: 24 volunteers coming from non-industry companies did undergo a specific trial protocol. Phase 2: 6 workers coming from a mining company did undergo the same protocol used in Phase 1. Phase 3: The Acoustics Laboratory from the "Energetica" Department of the Polytechnic of Turin (University/Institute) took objective measures for the DPI attenuation figures used in phase 1 and 2. PMID:22073685

  10. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for ‘conventional’ tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime. This article is dedicated to the memory of Cynthia K. Phillips

  11. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  12. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; et al

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSAmore » results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.« less

  13. Full wave simulations of fast wave efficiency and power losses in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas in mid/high harmonic and minority heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Jaeger, E. F.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Berry, L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Green, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Qin, C. M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Zhang, X. J.

    2015-12-17

    Here, several experiments on different machines and in different fast wave (FW) heating regimes, such as hydrogen minority heating and high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), have found strong interaction between radio-frequency (RF) waves and the scrape-off layer (SOL) region. This paper examines the propagation and the power loss in the SOL by using the full wave code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain and a collisional damping parameter is used as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. 2D and 3D AORSA results for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown a strong transition to higher SOL power losses (driven by the RF field) when the FW cut-off is removed from in front of the antenna by increasing the edge density. Here, full wave simulations have been extended for 'conventional' tokamaks with higher aspect ratios, such as the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and EAST devices. DIII-D results in HHFW regime show similar behavior found in NSTX and NSTX-U, consistent with previous DIII-D experimental observations. In contrast, a different behavior has been found for C-Mod and EAST, which operate in the minority heating regime.

  14. Development of the Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit Extravehicular Activity Data Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Craig; Hill, Terry R.; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Rosenbush, David

    2012-01-01

    The Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Data Recorder (SPEEDR) is a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based device designed to collect high-rate EMU Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) data for download at a later time. During EVA, the existing EMU PLSS data downlink capability is one data packet every 2 minutes and is subject to bad packets or loss of signal. Higher-rate PLSS data is generated by the Enhanced Caution and Warning System but is not normally captured or distributed. Access to higher-rate data will increase the capability of EMU anomaly resolution team to pinpoint issues remotely, saving crew time by reducing required call-down Q&A and on-orbit diagnostic activities. With no Space Shuttle flights post Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11), and potentially limited down-mass capability, the ISS crew and ground support personnel will have to be capable of on-orbit operations to maintain, diagnose, repair, and return to service EMU hardware, possibly through 2028. Collecting high-rate EMU PLSS data during both intravehicular activity (IVA) and EVA operations will provide trending analysis for life extension and/or predictive performance. The SPEEDR concept has generated interest as a tool/technology that could be used for other International Space Station subsystems or future exploration-class space suits where hardware reliability/availability is critical and low/variable bandwidth may require store then forward methodology. Preliminary work in FY11 produced a functional prototype consisting of an FPGA evaluation board, custom memory/interface circuit board, and custom software. The SPEEDR concept includes a stand-alone battery that is recharged by a computer Universal Serial Bus (USB) port while data are being downloaded.

  15. Unified active and reactive power modulation of HVDC transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, C. E.; Pohl, R. V.

    1981-11-01

    The power modulation of a high voltage direct current (HVDC) system for stabilization of an ac/dc network was investigated. It was found that simultaneous modulation of both dc current and voltage was more effective than just current modulation by itself, since the dc voltage modulation could be used to minimize the reactive power changes resulting from a change of the dc current. This helps stabilize the ac busbar voltages at the converters, which reduces undesirable load flow changes to voltage dependent ac loads, thus improving the effectiveness of the dc power modulation. This unified modulation control concept was evaluated by means of digital computer studies as well as a special purpose HVDC simulator. Several combined ac/dc power transmission systems were synthesized for testing of different modulation controller concepts. An optimum controller design incorporating a linear quadratic control algorithm with full state feedback was first studied. This provided a basis for comparison of suboptimal controller designs utilizing reduced state feedback and a Kalman filter state reconstruction technique.

  16. Favorite Lesson Plans: Powerful Standards-Based Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilen, William W., Ed.

    This collection of lesson plans helps social studies teachers and teacher educators implement the various national and state standards in their classrooms. The collection illustrates how classroom implementation can be achieved through the application of the powerful teaching and learning principles devised by National Council for the Social…

  17. Loss of UCP2 attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction without altering ROS production and uncoupling activity.

    PubMed

    Kukat, Alexandra; Dogan, Sukru Anil; Edgar, Daniel; Mourier, Arnaud; Jacoby, Christoph; Maiti, Priyanka; Mauer, Jan; Becker, Christina; Senft, Katharina; Wibom, Rolf; Kudin, Alexei P; Hultenby, Kjell; Flögel, Ulrich; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Ricquier, Daniel; Kunz, Wolfram S; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2014-06-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is often accompanied by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we previously showed that an increase in random somatic mtDNA mutations does not result in increased oxidative stress. Normal levels of ROS and oxidative stress could also be a result of an active compensatory mechanism such as a mild increase in proton leak. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was proposed to play such a role in many physiological situations. However, we show that upregulation of UCP2 in mtDNA mutator mice is not associated with altered proton leak kinetics or ROS production, challenging the current view on the role of UCP2 in energy metabolism. Instead, our results argue that high UCP2 levels allow better utilization of fatty acid oxidation resulting in a beneficial effect on mitochondrial function in heart, postponing systemic lactic acidosis and resulting in longer lifespan in these mice. This study proposes a novel mechanism for an adaptive response to mitochondrial cardiomyopathy that links changes in metabolism to amelioration of respiratory chain deficiency and longer lifespan. PMID:24945157

  18. Loss of UCP2 Attenuates Mitochondrial Dysfunction without Altering ROS Production and Uncoupling Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kukat, Alexandra; Dogan, Sukru Anil; Edgar, Daniel; Mourier, Arnaud; Jacoby, Christoph; Maiti, Priyanka; Mauer, Jan; Becker, Christina; Senft, Katharina; Wibom, Rolf; Kudin, Alexei P.; Hultenby, Kjell; Flögel, Ulrich; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Ricquier, Daniel; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is often accompanied by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we previously showed that an increase in random somatic mtDNA mutations does not result in increased oxidative stress. Normal levels of ROS and oxidative stress could also be a result of an active compensatory mechanism such as a mild increase in proton leak. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was proposed to play such a role in many physiological situations. However, we show that upregulation of UCP2 in mtDNA mutator mice is not associated with altered proton leak kinetics or ROS production, challenging the current view on the role of UCP2 in energy metabolism. Instead, our results argue that high UCP2 levels allow better utilization of fatty acid oxidation resulting in a beneficial effect on mitochondrial function in heart, postponing systemic lactic acidosis and resulting in longer lifespan in these mice. This study proposes a novel mechanism for an adaptive response to mitochondrial cardiomyopathy that links changes in metabolism to amelioration of respiratory chain deficiency and longer lifespan. PMID:24945157

  19. Electrolyte loss mechanisms of manually activated silver-zinc cells and batteries. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thaller, L.H.; Juvinall, G.L.

    1996-12-10

    Silver-zinc batteries are used in applications where high energy density and high discharge rates are required. These batteries do not possess excellent cycle life characteristics, but designs are available that are capable of about a hundred charge-discharge cycles. These batteries are mostly used in the primary mode where they are not required to be recharged. Torpedoes, missiles of many different varieties, and all launch vehicles use silver-zinc batteries in sizes ranging from about one ampere-hour (A-h) to 250 A-h. For the launch vehicle applications discussed herein, batteries are assembled (except for the introduction of electrolyte) and carefully stored until they are called up for use. At that time, electrolyte is added as part of the overall activation process prior to installation on the vehicle. Once the cells are filled, reactions take place that can result in small amounts of electrolyte being expelled from them. There have been several recorded instances where electrolyte expulsion has resulted in the rejection of either that particular battery or the entire production lot of batteries that were felt to have a generic problem. An in flight failure of a battery suggested that the problem resulted from the effects of small amounts of electrolyte forming an ionic conduction path inside the battery box. This report covers the results of examining the causes for the different kinds of problems within a cell that can result in the expulsion of small amounts of electrolyte.

  20. Prospective teratology of retinoic acid metabolic blocking agents (RAMBAs) and loss of CYP26 activity.

    PubMed

    McCaffery, P; Simons, C

    2007-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is the transcriptionally active product of vitamin A and induces gene expression via specific receptors at nM concentrations. Essential enzymes that regulate the local levels of atRA are the CYP26 members of the cytochrome P450 family, which catabolize atRA. Compounds that have been designed to inhibit these enzymes are known as Retinoic Acid Metabolic Blocking Agents (RAMBAs). Treatment with these compounds will raise endogenous atRA levels and may be therapeutic for the treatment of diseases that respond to high atRA concentrations, including several types of cancer as well as skin conditions such as psoriasis and acne. This review describes the mechanism of action of the RAMBAs and discusses the potential side effects of these compounds. atRA is highly teratogenic and the potential teratogenicity of the RAMBAs is described by comparison with the abnormalities resulting from null mutation of individual CYP26 genes. The possible effects of RAMBAs on the adult brain are also described that have the potential for harm but, in the right circumstances, may also be beneficial. PMID:17979744

  1. High power, high brightness Al-free active region tapered lasers at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassiaoui, I.; Michel, N.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Calligaro, M.; Krakowski, M.

    2006-04-01

    To achieve high power and high brightness, we have developed tapered diode lasers based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The material structure was grown by MOCVD (Metallorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition). It shows very low internal losses of only 0.5 cm -1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, an excellent internal quantum efficiency of 86%, and a high characteristic temperature T 0 of 171 K. Based on these good results, at first, we have realised index-guided tapered lasers (IG1) with a narrow output width and a narrow taper angle, which deliver 1 W CW, together with an M2 beam quality parameter of 2.9 at 1/e2, and a narrow divergence angle in the slow axis of 5.1° FWHM and 7.5° at 1/e2. We have also fabricated new index-guided tapered lasers with a Clarinet shape, which were recently proposed to achieve high brightness together with a very narrow divergence angle. The Clarinet lasers deliver 0.6W CW, together with an excellent M2 beam quality factor of 1.2 at 1/e2, and a very narrow divergence angle in the slow axis of only 2.5° FWHM, and 3.9° at 1/e2, which is stable with current. These very narrow divergences are very advantageous for the collective coupling of tapered bars into optical fibers. In this work we have also investigated the influence of taper length on the output power and beam quality.

  2. Rpl22 loss impairs the development of B lymphocytes by activating a p53-dependent checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Fahl, Shawn P.; Harris, Bryan; Coffey, Francis; Wiest, David L.

    2014-01-01

    While ribosomal proteins facilitate the ribosome’s core function of translation, emerging evidence suggests that some ribosomal proteins are also capable of performing tissue restricted functions either from within specialized ribosomes or from outside of the ribosome. In particular, we have previously demonstrated that germline ablation of the gene encoding ribosomal protein Rpl22 causes a selective and p53 dependent arrest of αβ T cell progenitors at the β-selection checkpoint. We have now identified a crucial role for Rpl22 during early B cell development. Germline ablation of Rpl22 results in a reduction in the absolute number of B-lineage progenitors in the bone marrow beginning at the pro-B cell stage. Although Rpl22-deficient proB cells are hyporesponsive to IL-7, a key cytokine required for early B cell development, the arrest of B cell development does not result from disrupted IL-7 signaling. Instead, p53 induction appears to be responsible for the developmental defects, as Rpl22-deficiency causes increased expression of p53 and activation of downstream p53 target genes and p53-deficiency rescues the defect in B cell development in Rpl22-deficient mice. Interestingly, the requirement for Rpl22 in the B cell lineage appears to be developmentally restricted, since Rpl22-deficient splenic B cells proliferate normally in response to antigen receptor and toll receptor stimuli and undergo normal class switch recombination. These results indicate that Rpl22 performs a critical, developmentally restricted role in supporting early B cell development by preventing p53-induction. PMID:25416806

  3. Loss of Interleukin-21 Receptor Activation in Hypoxic Endothelial Cells Impairs Perfusion Recovery after Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cunningham, Alexis; Dokun, Ayotunde O; Hazarika, Surovi; Houston, Kevin; Chen, Lingdan; Lye, R. John; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J.; Annex, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical hindlimb ischemia (HLI) in mice has become a valuable preclinical model to study peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We previously identified that the different phenotypical outcomes following HLI across inbred mouse strains is related a region on the short arm of mouse chromosome 7. The gene coding the interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) lies at the peak of association in this region. Approach and Results With quantitative RT-PCR, we found that a mouse strain with a greater ability to up-regulate IL-21R following HLI had better perfusion recovery than a strain with no up-regulation after HLI. Immunofluorescent staining of ischemic hind-limb tissue showed IL-21R expression on endothelial cells (EC) from these C57BL/6 mice. An EC-enriched fraction isolated from ischemic hind-limb muscle showed higher Il-21R levels than an EC-enriched fraction from non-ischemic limbs. In-vitro, human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) showed elevated IL-21R expression after hypoxia and serum starvation. Under these conditions, IL-21 treatment increased cell viability, decreased cell apoptosis, and augmented tube formation. In-vivo, either knockout Il21r or blocking IL-21 signaling by treating with IL-21R-Fc (fusion protein that blocks IL-21 binding to its receptor) in C57BL/6 mice resulted in less perfusion recovery after HLI. Both in-vitro and in-vivo modulation of the IL-21/IL-21R axis under hypoxic conditions resulted in increasedSTAT3 phosphorylation and a subsequent increase in the BCL-2/BAX ratio. Conclusion Our data indicate that IL-21R up-regulation and ligand activation in hypoxic endothelial cells may help perfusion recovery by limiting/preventing apoptosis and/or favoring cell survival and angiogenesis through the STAT3 pathway. PMID:25838422

  4. The impact of materials selection on long-term activation in fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. P.; Forty, C. B. A.; Petti, D. A.; McCarthy, K. A.

    2000-12-01

    Neutron-induced transmutation of materials in a D-T fusion power plant will give rise to the potential for long-term activation. To ensure that the attractive safety and environmental characteristics of fusion power are not degraded, careful design choices are necessary. An aim of optimising power plant design must be to minimise both the level of activation and the total volume of active material that might ultimately be categorised as waste requiring disposal. Materials selection is central to this optimisation. In this paper we assess the influence of materials choices for a power plant on the waste volume and the potential to clear (i.e. remove from regulatory control) and recycle material. Although the use of low activation materials in regions of high neutron flux is an important part of the strategy to minimise the level of activation, different choices may result from a strategy aimed at minimising the volume of active waste.

  5. Cooperative Control of Active Power Filters in Power Systems without Mutual Communication

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tlustý, Josef; Škramlík, Jiří; Švec, Jan; Valouch, Viktor

    2010-01-01

    The procedure for calculating controller parameters of the APFs implemented into a multibus industrial power system for harmonic voltage mitigation is presented. The node-voltage-detection control strategy is applied and the basic controller parameters are found under the condition that the demanded THD factors at the buses where the APFs are placed will be obtained. A cooperative control of several APFs without mutual communication is proposed, simulated, and experimentally verified. By tuning the controller gains without considering the power circuit parameters, all APFs used tend to share harmonic load currents approximately equally regardless of the operation modes of the nonlinear loadsmore » in different parts of the power system.« less

  6. NOX3 NADPH Oxidase Couples Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 to Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-Mediated Inflammation and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 999–1010. PMID:20712533

  7. NOX3 NADPH oxidase couples transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated inflammation and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2011-03-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. PMID:20712533

  8. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Selectivity loss of Pt/CeO{sub 2} PROX catalysts at low CO concentrations: mechanism and active site study.

    SciTech Connect

    Polster, C. S.; Zhang, R.; Cyb, M. T.; Miller, J. T.; Baertsch, C. D.

    2010-07-01

    CO and H{sub 2} oxidation were studied over a series of Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts with differing Pt loadings and dispersions. Kinetic rate analysis confirms the presence of dual Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) and Mars and van Krevelen (M-vK) pathways and is used to explain the loss in CO oxidation selectivity at low CO concentrations. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) shows the strong CO coverage dependence on both CO and O{sub 2} concentrations and explains the transition from L-H to M-vK reaction character. Redox site measurements are performed on Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts by anaerobic titrations under conditions where the M-vK pathway dominates the reaction rate. Similar redox site densities per interfacial Pt atom suggest that interfacial Pt-O-Ce sites are responsible for M-vK redox activity.

  10. COUPLING THE SOLAR DYNAMO AND THE CORONA: WIND PROPERTIES, MASS, AND MOMENTUM LOSSES DURING AN ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Rui F.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Grappin, Roland

    2011-08-20

    We study the connections between the Sun's convection zone and the evolution of the solar wind and corona. We let the magnetic fields generated by a 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) axisymmetric kinematic dynamo code (STELEM) evolve in a 2.5D axisymmetric coronal isothermal magnetohydrodynamic code (DIP). The computations cover an 11 year activity cycle. The solar wind's asymptotic velocity varies in latitude and in time in good agreement with the available observations. The magnetic polarity reversal happens at different paces at different coronal heights. Overall the Sun's mass-loss rate, momentum flux, and magnetic braking torque vary considerably throughout the cycle. This cyclic modulation is determined by the latitudinal distribution of the sources of open flux and solar wind and the geometry of the Alfven surface. Wind sources and braking torque application zones also vary accordingly.

  11. Adenovirus 36 Attenuates Weight Loss from Exercise but Improves Glycemic Control by Increasing Mitochondrial Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Michael B.; Park, Sooho; Kim, In-Beom; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 36 (Ad36) as an obesity agent induces adiposity by increasing glucose uptake and promoting chronic inflammation in fat tissues; in contrast, exercise reduces total body fat and inflammation. Our objective was to determine the association between Ad36 and the effects of exercise on inflammation and glycemic control. In the human trials (n = 54), Korean children (aged 12–14 years) exercised for 60 min on three occasions each week for 2 months. We compared the body mass index (BMI) Z-scores before and after exercise. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Ad36 and Ad2 as a control, and these mice exercised for 12 weeks postinfection. After the exercise period, we determined the serum parameters and assessed the presence of inflammation and the mitochondrial function in the organs. Ad36-seropositive children who were subjected to a supervised exercise regimen had high BMI Z-scores whereas Ad36-seronegative children had lower scores. Similarly, Ad36-infected mice were resistant to weight loss and exhibited chronic inflammation of their adipose tissues despite frequent exercise. However, Ad36 combined with exercise reduced the levels of serum glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, and insulin in virus-infected mice. Interestingly, virus infection increased the mitochondrial function in the liver, as demonstrated by the numbers of mitochondria, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and transcription of key mitochondrial genes. Therefore Ad36 counteracts the weight-loss effect of exercise and maintains the chronic inflammatory state, but glycemic control is improved by exercise synergistically because of increased mitochondrial activity in the liver. PMID:25479564

  12. Earthquake related VLF activity and Electron Precipitation as a Major Agent of the Inner Radiation Belt Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C.; Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos; Barlas, Georgios

    2015-04-01

    The radiation belt electron precipitation (RBEP) into the topside ionosphere is a phenomenon which is known for several decades. However, the inner radiation belt source and loss mechanisms have not still well understood, including PBEP. Here we present the results of a systematic study of RBEP observations, as obtained from the satellite DEMETER and the series of POES satellites, in comparison with variation of seismic activity. We found that a type of RBEP bursts lasting for ~1-3 min present special characteristics in the inner region of the inner radiation belt before large (M >~7, or even M>~5) earthquakes (EQs), as for instance: characteristic (a) flux-time profiles, (b) energy spectrum, (c) electron flux temporal evolution, (d) spatial distributions (e) broad band VLF activity, some days before an EQ and (f) stopping a few hours before the EQ occurrence above the epicenter. In this study we present results from both case and statistical studies which provide significant evidence that, among EQs-lightings-Earth based transmitters, strong seismic activity during a substorm makes the main contribution to the long lasting (~1-3 min) RBEP events at middle latitudes.

  13. Viral and host factors induce macrophage activation and loss of Toll Like Receptor tolerance in chronic HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Norkina, Oxana; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Bakis, Gennadiy; Marshall, Christopher; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2007-01-01

    Background&Aims Persistent inflammation contributes to progression of liver damage in chronic HCV (cHCV) infection. Repeated exposure to Toll like receptor (TLR) ligands results in tolerance, a protective mechanism aimed at limiting inflammation. Methods Monocytes/macrophages were repeatedly stimulated via pro-inflammatory cytokine-inducing TLRs and evaluated for activation markers. Results Unlike monocytes (Mo) of controls or patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, the Mo of cHCV patients were hyper-responsive and failed to show homo- or hetero-tolerance to TLR ligands, manifested by elevated TNFα production. Serum levels of IFNγ, endotoxin (TLR4 ligand) and HCV core protein (TLR2 ligand) were elevated in cHCV patients suggesting potential mechanisms for in vivo monocyte pre-activation. Treatment of normal monocytes with IFNγ resulted in loss of tolerance to LPS or HCV core protein. Further, we found increased levels of MyD88-IRAK1 complexes and NFκB activity both in monocytes of cHCV patients and in normal monocytes that lost TLR tolerance after IFNγ+LPS pretreatment. In vitro differentiation of TLR tolerant cHCV monocytes into macrophages restored their capacity to exhibit TLR tolerance to LPS and HCV core protein and this could be reversed by administration of IFNγ. cHCV patients exhibited increased TNFα in the circulation and in the liver. In cHCV livers we found Kupffer cell/macrophage activation indicated by increased CD163 and CD33 expression. Conclusions We identified that host-derived factors (IFNγ and endotoxin) and viral factors (HCV core protein) act in tandem to induce and maintain monocyte/macrophage activation, thus favoring persistent inflammation in patients with cHCV infection. PMID:17916356

  14. A Longitudinal Study of the Impact of Incident Organ Manifestations and Increased Disease Activity on Work Loss among Persons with SLE

    PubMed Central

    Yelin, Edward; Tonner, Chris; Trupin, Laura; Gansky, Stuart A.; Julian, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Yazdany, Jinoos; Kaiser, Rachel; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence of the impact of SLE on employment, but few studies have had sufficient sample size and longitudinal follow-up to estimate the impact of specific manifestations or of increasing disease activity on employment. Methods Data derive from the UCSF Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 1204 persons with SLE sampled between 2002 and 2009. Of the 1204, 484 were working at baseline and had at least one follow-up interview. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate the time between onset of thrombotic, neuropsychiatric, or musculoskeletal manifestations or of increased disease activity and work loss, and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the risk of work loss associated with the onset of specific manifestations, the number of manifestations, and increased activity, with and without adjustment for sociodemographic, employment, and SLE duration. Results By four years of follow-up, 57%, 34%, and 38% of those with thrombotic, musculoskeletal, and neuropsychiatric manifestations, respectively, had stopped working as had 42% of those with increased disease activity. On a bivariable basis, the risk of work loss was significantly higher among persons 55–64, and those with increased disease activity and each kind of manifestation. In multivariable analysis, older age, shorter job tenure, thrombotic and musculoskeletal manifestations, greater number of manifestations, and high levels of activity increased the risk of work loss. Conclusions Incident thrombosis and musculoskeletal manifestations, multiple manifestations, and increased disease activity are associated with the risk of work loss in SLE. PMID:22006458

  15. Selenium status, lipid peroxides concentration, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of power station and rubber factory workers

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, B.A.; Wasowicz, W.; Sklodowska, M.; Gromadzinska, J.

    1987-07-01

    Concentration of selenium in whole blood and plasma, lipid peroxides in plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cell hemolysates and plasma were determined in 49 coal power plant workers and in 50 rubber factory workers. The results were compared with those obtained for 58 nonindustrial controls. Whole blood selenium was significantly lower and plasma lipid peroxides were significantly higher in power plant workers when compared to the nonindustrial group. In the rubber factory workers, whole blood selenium and red blood cells and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly lower than in the control group. Urinary output of selenium was also significantly decreased in rubber factory workers. Slightly elevated lipid peroxides were also observed in that group. It seems reasonable to conclude that the lower blood selenium and decreased urinary output of this element may result from increased loss of selenium with perspiration. No correlation has been observed between selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity and between enzyme activity and lipid peroxides concentration in the industrial group.

  16. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-01-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  17. Frontal predominance of a relative increase in sleep delta and theta EEG activity after sleep loss in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Foy, R.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation (40 h) on topographic and temporal aspects of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during sleep was investigated by all night spectral analysis in six young volunteers. The sleep-deprivation-induced increase of EEG power density in the delta and theta frequencies (1-7 Hz) during nonREM sleep, assessed along the antero-posterior axis (midline: Fz, Cz, Pz, Oz), was significantly larger in the more frontal derivations (Fz, Cz) than in the more parietal derivations (Pz, Oz). This frequency-specific frontal predominance was already present in the first 30 min of recovery sleep, and dissipated in the course of the 8-h sleep episode. The data demonstrate that the enhancement of slow wave EEG activity during sleep following extended wakefulness is most pronounced in frontal cortical areas.

  18. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  19. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  20. Power-gated 32 bit microprocessor with a power controller circuit activated by deep-sleep-mode instruction achieving ultra-low power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Hiroki; Ohsawa, Takashi; Miura, Sadahiko; Honjo, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Hanyu, Takahiro; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    A spintronic-based power-gated micro-processing unit (MPU) is proposed. It includes a power control circuit activated by the newly supported power-off instruction for the deep-sleep mode. These means enable the power-off procedure for the MPU to be executed appropriately. A test chip was designed and fabricated using 90 nm CMOS and an additional 100 nm MTJ process; it was successfully operated. The guideline of the energy reduction effects for this MPU was presented, using the estimation based on the measurement results of the test chip. The result shows that a large operation energy reduction of 1/28 can be achieved when the operation duty is 10%, under the condition of a sufficient number of idle clock cycles.

  1. Operation of the power information center: Performance of secretariat functions and information exchange activities in the advanced power field of the interagency advanced power group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Highlights of activities conducted during the reporting period to facilitate the exchange of technical information among scientists and engineers both within the federal government and within industry are cited. Interagency Advanced Power Group meetings and special efforts, project briefs, and organization development are considered.

  2. Differential loss of natural killer cell activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Wen, Siwan; Duan, Qianglin; Huang, Feifei; Tang, Yu; Liu, Xiaohong; Chai, Yongyan; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the activity of natural killer cells through their inhibitory and activating receptors and quantity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells extracted from patients with acute myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris and the controls. Methods: 100 patients with myocardial infarction, 100 with stable angina, and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. 20 randomly chosen people per group were examined for the whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the gene expressions of all 40 inhibitory and activating natural killer cell receptors. Flow cytometry analysis was applied to all 200 patients to measure the quantity of natural killer cells. Results: In myocardial infarction group, the mRNA expressions of six inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2, KIR3DL3, CD94, NKG2A, KLRB1, KLRG1, and eight activating receptors KIR2DS3, KIR2DS5, NKp30, NTB-A, CRACC, CD2, CD7 and CD96 were significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) compared with both angina patients and the controls. There was no statistical difference in receptor expressions between angina patients and control group. The quantity of natural killer cells was significantly decreased in both infarction and angina patients compared with normal range (P<0.001). Conclusions: The significant mRNAs down-regulation of several receptors in myocardial infarction group and reduction in the quantity of natural killer cells in both myocardial infarction and angina patients showed a quantitative loss and dysfunction of natural killer cells in myocardial infarction patients. PMID:26823790

  3. Synthesis of Bio-Compatible SPION–based Aqueous Ferrofluids and Evaluation of RadioFrequency Power Loss for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bio-compatible magnetic fluids having high saturation magnetization find immense applications in various biomedical fields. Aqueous ferrofluids of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distribution, high shelf life and good stability is realized by controlled chemical co-precipitation process. The crystal structure is verified by X-ray diffraction technique. Particle sizes are evaluated by employing Transmission electron microscopy. Room temperature and low-temperature magnetic measurements were carried out with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device. The fluid exhibits good magnetic response even at very high dilution (6.28 mg/cc). This is an advantage for biomedical applications, since only a small amount of iron is to be metabolised by body organs. Magnetic field induced transmission measurements carried out at photon energy of diode laser (670 nm) exhibited excellent linear dichroism. Based on the structural and magnetic measurements, the power loss for the magnetic nanoparticles under study is evaluated over a range of radiofrequencies. PMID:21076702

  4. Scaling law and general expression for transport ac loss of a rectangular thin strip with power-law E(J) relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Du-Xing; Li, Shuo; Fang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Transport ac loss Q of a superconducting rectangular thin strip obeying a power-law relation E∝Jn as a function of current amplitude Im may be, following Norris, expressed by normalized quantities as q(im). A scaling law is deduced that if Icf, Ic and f being the critical current and frequency, is multiplied by a positive constant C, then im and qm are multiplied by C 1 /(n - 1)and C 2 /(n - 1) , respectively. Based on this scaling law and the well-known Norris formula, the general function of q(im, n, f) is obtained graphically or analytically for any practical purpose, after accurate numerical computations on a set of q(im) at several values of n and a fixed value of f.

  5. Loss of NADH Oxidase Activity in Streptococcus mutans Leads to Rex-Mediated Overcompensation in NAD+ Regeneration by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Faustoferri, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans have determined that this Gram-positive facultative anaerobe mounts robust responses to both acid and oxidative stresses. The water-forming NADH oxidase (Nox; encoded by nox) is thought to be critical for the regeneration of NAD+, for use in glycolysis, and for the reduction of oxygen, thereby preventing the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species. In this study, the free NAD+/NADH ratio in a nox deletion strain (Δnox) was discovered to be remarkably higher than that in the parent strain, UA159, when the strains were grown in continuous culture. This unanticipated result was explained by significantly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh; encoded by ldh) activity and ldh transcription in the Δnox strain, which was mediated in part by the redox-sensing regulator Rex. cDNA microarray analysis of S. mutans cultures exposed to simultaneous acid stress (growth at a low pH) and oxidative stress (generated through the deletion of nox or the addition of exogenous oxygen) revealed a stress response synergistically heightened over that with either stress alone. In the Δnox strain, this elevated stress response included increased glucose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity, which appeared to be due to elevated manL transcription, mediated in part, like elevated ldh transcription, by Rex. While the Δnox strain does possess a membrane composition different from that of the parent strain, it did not appear to have defects in either membrane permeability or ATPase activity. However, the altered transcriptome and metabolome of the Δnox strain were sufficient to impair its ability to compete with commensal peroxigenic oral streptococci during growth under aerobic conditions. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is an oral pathogen whose ability to outcompete commensal oral streptococci is strongly linked to the formation of dental caries. Previous work has demonstrated that the S

  6. 1/f permittivity noise probed uniformly in a film with two level systems: The power law of field saturation and the relationship to loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Kevin; Ramanayaka, Aruna; Sarabi, Bahman; U. of Maryland Team

    Noise from atomic tunneling two-level systems (TSs) limit the performance of various superconducting devices, ranging in application from astronomy to quantum computing. We study superconducting resonators with films containing TS and measure the resulting 1/f frequency noise caused by resonant TS. The resonators are designed such that they apply a uniform ac electric field to the films which allows a direct measurement of permittivity noise in the film as a function the electric field. An intrinsic value of noise is found as well as the power law for ac-field saturation. The temperature dependence of 1/f noise below 200 mK fits to a relationship found previously in high-Q resonators. However, our data lead us to a model different than a previous experimental study; in our work TS phenomena are modeled with frequency diffusion. Our measured noise times the temperature is found to be the same to within error in the different films when normalized to the loss tangent at low temperature, despite dramatically different loss tangents. Following from the general nature of the TS models, we expect the same permittivity noise in many other devices.

  7. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accident for a fast-spectrum lithium-cooled nuclear reactor for space-power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, G. E.; Petrik, E. J.; Kieffer, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    A two-dimensional, transient, heat-transfer analysis was made to determine the temperature response in the core of a conceptual space-power nuclear reactor following a total loss of reactor coolant. With loss of coolant from the reactor, the controlling mode of heat transfer is thermal radiation. In one of the schemes considered for removing decay heat from the core, it was assumed that the 4 pi shield which surrounds the core acts as a constant-temperature sink (temperature, 700 K) for absorption of thermal radiation from the core. Results based on this scheme of heat removal show that melting of fuel in the core is possible only when the emissivity of the heat-radiating surfaces in the core is less than about 0.40. In another scheme for removing the afterheat, the core centerline fuel pin was replaced by a redundant, constant temperature, coolant channel. Based on an emissivity of 0.20 for all material surfaces in the core, the calculated maximum fuel temperature for this scheme of heat removal was 2840 K, or about 90 K less than the melting temperature of the UN fuel.

  8. Synthesis of high intrinsic loss power aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted hydrothermal-reduction route

    SciTech Connect

    Behdadfar, Behshid; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Mozaffari, Morteza

    2012-03-15

    Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The results showed that certain concentrations of citric acid (CA) are required to obtain only magnetic iron oxides with mean particle sizes around 8 nm. CA acts as a modulator and reducing agent in iron oxide formation which controls nanoparticle size. The XRD, magnetic and heating measurements showed that the temperature and time of hydrothermal reaction can affect the magnetic properties of obtained ferrofluids. The synthesized ferrofluids were stable at pH 7. Their mean hydrodynamic size was around 80 nm with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.158. The calculated intrinsic loss power (ILP) was 9.4 nHm{sup 2}/kg. So this clean and cheap route is an efficient way to synthesize high ILP aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. - Graphical abstract: Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction method with citric acid as reductant which is an efficient way to synthesize aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid acted as reducing agent and surfactant in the route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a facile, low energy and environmental friendly route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were monodispersed and stable at pH of 7. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated intrinsic loss power of the synthesized ferrofluids was very high.

  9. Expression of constitutively active FoxO3 in murine forebrain leads to a loss of neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Strassburger, Uta; Schips, Tobias G; Maier, Harald J; Kloiber, Katharina; Mannella, Francesca; Braunstein, Kerstin E; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Ushmorov, Alexey; Liebau, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M; Wirth, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Inactivation of FoxO proteins by phosphorylation is the result of a number of stimuli, including the insulin/IGF pathway. We were interested in the consequence of blunting this pathway by employing transgenic mice with tetracycline-controllable conditional expression of a constitutively active allele of FOXO3 under the control of the forebrain-specific CaMKIIα promoter. Although transgene-expressing mice were viable, brain weight was reduced by 30% in adult animals. Brains showed an isocortex compression with normal cortical layering, and a size reduction in regions known to depend on adult neurogenesis, i.e., the olfactory bulbs and the dentate gyrus. On postnatal activation of the transgene, adult neurogenesis was also severely affected. Investigating the molecular basis of this phenotype, we observed enhanced apoptosis starting from embryonic day E10.5 and a subsequent loss of progenitors in the ventricular/subventricular zones, but not in the isocortex or the striatum of adult mice. The enhanced apoptosis was accompanied by increased expression of PIK3IP1, which we identified as a direct transcriptional target of FOXO3. Transfection of Pik3ip1 into differentiating neural progenitors resulted in a significant reduction of viable cells. We therefore conclude that neural progenitors are particularly vulnerable to FOXO3-induced apoptosis, which is mediated by PIK3IP1, a negative PI3 kinase regulator. PMID:22935140

  10. Altered longevity-assurance activity of p53:p44 in the mouse causes memory loss, neurodegeneration and premature death.

    PubMed

    Pehar, Mariana; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Burns-Cusato, Melissa; Andrzejewski, Matthew E; del Alcazar, Carlos Gil; Burger, Corinna; Scrable, Heidi; Puglielli, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    The longevity-assurance activity of the tumor suppressor p53 depends on the levels of Delta40p53 (p44), a short and naturally occurring isoform of the p53 gene. As such, increased dosage of p44 in the mouse leads to accelerated aging and short lifespan. Here we show that mice homozygous for a transgene encoding p44 (p44(+/+)) display cognitive decline and synaptic impairment early in life. The synaptic deficits are attributed to hyperactivation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling and altered metabolism of the microtubule-binding protein tau. In fact, they were rescued by either Igf1r or Mapt haploinsufficiency. When expressing a human or a 'humanized' form of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), p44(+/+) animals developed a selective degeneration of memory-forming and -retrieving areas of the brain, and died prematurely. Mechanistically, the neurodegeneration was caused by both paraptosis- and autophagy-like cell deaths. These results indicate that altered longevity-assurance activity of p53:p44 causes memory loss and neurodegeneration by affecting IGF-1R signaling. Importantly, Igf1r haploinsufficiency was also able to correct the synaptic deficits of APP(695/swe) mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20409077

  11. Activation of PKA leads to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and loss of tumor-initiating ability.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Diwakar R; Bierie, Brian; Kober, Katharina Isabelle; Thiru, Prathapan; Krall, Jordan A; Zill, Christina; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Tam, Wai Leong; Weinberg, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition enables carcinoma cells to acquire malignancy-associated traits and the properties of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). TICs have emerged in recent years as important targets for cancer therapy, owing to their ability to drive clinical relapse and enable metastasis. Here, we propose a strategy to eliminate mesenchymal TICs by inducing their conversion to more epithelial counterparts that have lost tumor-initiating ability. We report that increases in intracellular levels of the second messenger, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and the subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in mesenchymal human mammary epithelial cells. PKA activation triggers epigenetic reprogramming of TICs by the histone demethylase PHF2, which promotes their differentiation and loss of tumor-initiating ability. This study provides proof-of-principle for inducing an MET as differentiation therapy for TICs and uncovers a role for PKA in enforcing and maintaining the epithelial state. PMID:26941323

  12. Disordered IL-33/ST2 activation in decidualizing stromal cells prolongs uterine receptivity in women with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Salker, Madhuri S; Nautiyal, Jaya; Steel, Jennifer H; Webster, Zoe; Sućurović, Sandra; Nicou, Marilena; Singh, Yogesh; Lucas, Emma S; Murakami, Keisuke; Chan, Yi-Wah; James, Sean; Abdallah, Yazan; Christian, Mark; Croy, B Anne; Mulac-Jericevic, Biserka; Quenby, Siobhan; Brosens, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    Decidualization renders the endometrium transiently receptive to an implanting blastocyst although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) rapidly release IL-33, a key regulator of innate immune responses, upon decidualization. In parallel, differentiating HESCs upregulate the IL-33 transmembrane receptor ST2L and other pro-inflammatory mediators before mounting a profound anti-inflammatory response that includes downregulation of ST2L and increased expression of the soluble decoy receptor sST2. We demonstrate that HESCs secrete factors permissive of embryo implantation in mice only during the pro-inflammatory phase of the decidual process. IL-33 knockdown in undifferentiated HESCs was sufficient to abrogate this pro-inflammatory decidual response. Further, sequential activation of the IL-33/ST2L/sST2 axis was disordered in decidualizing HESCs from women with recurrent pregnancy loss. Signals from these cultures prolonged the implantation window but also caused subsequent pregnancy failure in mice. Thus, Il-33/ST2 activation in HESCS drives an autoinflammatory response that controls the temporal expression of receptivity genes. Failure to constrain this response predisposes to miscarriage by allowing out-of-phase implantation in an unsupportive uterine environment. PMID:23300625

  13. Role of Polymer Architecture on the Activity of Polymer-Protein Conjugates for the Treatment of Accelerated Bone Loss Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Bryan S; Stewart, Jon D; Aguirre, J Ignacio; Holliday, L Shannon; Figg, C Adrian; Messer, Jonathan G; Sumerlin, Brent S

    2015-08-10

    Polymers of similar molecular weights and chemical constitution but varying in their macromolecular architectures were conjugated to osteoprotegerin (OPG) to determine the effect of polymer topology on protein activity in vitro and in vivo. OPG is a protein that inhibits bone resorption by preventing the formation of mature osteoclasts from the osteoclast precursor cell. Accelerated bone loss disorders, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and metastatic bone disease, occur as a result of increased osteoclastogenesis, leading to the severe weakening of the bone. OPG has shown promise as a treatment in bone disorders; however, it is rapidly cleared from circulation through rapid liver uptake, and frequent, high doses of the protein are necessary to achieve a therapeutic benefit. We aimed to improve the effectiveness of OPG by creating OPG-polymer bioconjugates, employing reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization to create well-defined polymers with branching densities varying from linear, loosely branched to densely branched. Polymers with each of these architectures were conjugated to OPG using a "grafting-to" approach, and the bioconjugates were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The OPG-polymer bioconjugates showed retention of activity in vitro against osteoclasts, and each bioconjugate was shown to be nontoxic. Preliminary in vivo studies further supported the nontoxic characteristics of the bioconjugates, and measurement of the bone mineral density in rats 7 days post-treatment via peripheral quantitative computed tomography suggested a slight increase in bone mineral density after administration of the loosely branched OPG-polymer bioconjugate. PMID:26151628

  14. Smart Moves: Powering up the Brain with Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyers, Marcus; Wilson, Donna

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards emphasize higher-order thinking, problem solving, and the creation, retention, and application of knowledge. Achieving these standards creates greater cognitive demands on students. Recent research suggests that active play and regular exercise have a positive effect on brain regions associated with executive…

  15. "Power, Regulation and Physically Active Identities": The Experiences of Rural and Regional Living Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, M.; Mooney, A.; Smyth, J.; Payne, W.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on interpretations of Foucault's techniques of power, we explored the discourses and power relations operative between groups of girls that appeared to influence their participation in Physical Education (PE) and outside of school in sport and physical activity (PA) in rural and regional communities. Interviews and focus groups were…

  16. Machine Shop I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section D--Power Saws and Drilling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains two learning activity packets (LAPs) for the "power saws and drilling machines" instructional area of a Machine Shop I course. The two LAPs cover the following topics: power saws and drill press. Each LAP contains a cover sheet that describes its purpose, an introduction, and the tasks included in the LAP; learning steps…

  17. Neural Activation during Anticipated Peer Evaluation and Laboratory Meal Intake in Overweight Girls with and without Loss of Control Eating

    PubMed Central

    Jarcho, Johanna; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Nelson, Eric E.; Engel, Scott G.; Vannucci, Anna; Field, Sara E.; Romer, Adrienne; Hannallah, Louise; Brady, Sheila M.; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Courville, Amber B.; Pine, Daniel S.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that socially distressing situations lead to anxious states that trigger excessive food consumption. Self-reports support these links, but the neurobiological underpinnings of these relationships remain unclear. We therefore examined brain regions associated with anxiety in relation to LOC eating and energy intake in the laboratory. Twenty-two overweight and obese (BMIz: 1.9±0.4) adolescent (15.8±1.6y) girls with LOC eating (LOC+, n=10) and without LOC eating (LOC−, n=12) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a simulated peer interaction chatroom paradigm. Immediately after the fMRI scan, girls consumed lunch ad libitum from a 10,934-kcal laboratory buffet meal with the instruction to “let yourself go and eat as much as you want.” Pre-specified hypotheses regarding activation of five regions of interest were tested. Analysis of fMRI data revealed a significant group by peer feedback interaction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), such that LOC+ had less activity following peer rejection (vs. acceptance), while LOC− had increased activity (p <.005). Moreover, functional coupling between vmPFC and striatum for peer rejection (vs. acceptance) interacted with LOC status: coupling was positive for LOC+, but negative in LOC− (p <.005). Activity of fusiform face area (FFA) during negative peer feedback from high-value peers also interacted with LOC status (p < .005). A positive association between FFA activation and intake during the meal was observed among only those with LOC eating. In conclusion, overweight and obese girls with LOC eating may be distinguished by a failure to engage regions of prefrontal cortex implicated in emotion regulation in response to social distress. The relationship between FFA activation and food intake supports the notion that heightened sensitivity to incoming interpersonal cues and perturbations in socio-emotional neural circuits

  18. Neural activation during anticipated peer evaluation and laboratory meal intake in overweight girls with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Nelson, Eric E; Engel, Scott G; Vannucci, Anna; Field, Sara E; Romer, Adrienne L; Hannallah, Louise; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew P; Shomaker, Lauren B; Courville, Amber B; Pine, Daniel S; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-03-01

    The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that socially distressing situations lead to anxious states that trigger excessive food consumption. Self-reports support these links, but the neurobiological underpinnings of these relationships remain unclear. We therefore examined brain regions associated with anxiety in relation to LOC eating and energy intake in the laboratory. Twenty-two overweight and obese (BMIz: 1.9±0.4) adolescent (15.8±1.6y) girls with LOC eating (LOC+, n=10) and without LOC eating (LOC-, n=12) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a simulated peer interaction chatroom paradigm. Immediately after the fMRI scan, girls consumed lunch ad libitum from a 10,934-kcal laboratory buffet meal with the instruction to "let yourself go and eat as much as you want." Pre-specified hypotheses regarding activation of five regions of interest were tested. Analysis of fMRI data revealed a significant group by peer feedback interaction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), such that LOC+ had less activity following peer rejection (vs. acceptance), while LOC- had increased activity (p<.005). Moreover, functional coupling between vmPFC and striatum for peer rejection (vs. acceptance) interacted with LOC status: coupling was positive for LOC+, but negative in LOC- (p<.005). Activity of fusiform face area (FFA) during negative peer feedback from high-value peers also interacted with LOC status (p<.005). A positive association between FFA activation and intake during the meal was observed among only those with LOC eating. In conclusion, overweight and obese girls with LOC eating may be distinguished by a failure to engage regions of prefrontal cortex implicated in emotion regulation in response to social distress. The relationship between FFA activation and food intake supports the notion that heightened sensitivity to incoming interpersonal cues and perturbations in socio-emotional neural circuits may lead to

  19. A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Selby, Edward A; Cornelius, Talea; Fehling, Kara B; Kranzler, Amy; Panza, Emily A; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as "emotional instability." The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed. PMID:26379588

  20. A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Edward A.; Cornelius, Talea; Fehling, Kara B.; Kranzler, Amy; Panza, Emily A.; Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Grange, Daniel Le

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as “emotional instability.” The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed. PMID:26379588

  1. 78 FR 8493 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; SoloPower Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Activity; SoloPower Inc. (Thin Film Photovoltaic Solar Panels); Portland, OR SoloPower Inc. (SoloPower) has... January 28, 2013. The SoloPower facility is located within Site 1 of FTZ 45. The facility is used for the production of thin film photovoltaic solar panels. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ activity would...

  2. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Regner, Kevin R.; Nozu, Kandai; Lanier, Stephen M.; Blumer, Joe B.; Avner, Ellis D.; Sweeney, William E.; Park, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular mechanisms underlying renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and tubular repair following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remain poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an unconventional receptor-independent regulator of heterotrimeric G-protein function, influences renal tubular regeneration following IRI. In rat kidneys exposed to IRI, there was a temporal induction in renal AGS3 protein expression that peaked 72 h after reperfusion and corresponded to the repair and recovery phase following ischemic injury. Renal AGS3 expression was localized predominantly to the recovering outer medullary proximal tubular cells and was highly coexpressed with Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Kidneys from mice deficient in the expression of AGS3 exhibited impaired renal tubular recovery 7 d following IRI compared to wild-type AGS3-expressing mice. Mechanistically, genetic knockdown of endogenous AGS3 mRNA and protein in renal tubular epithelial cells reduced cell proliferation in vitro. Similar reductions in renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation were observed following incubation with gallein, a selective inhibitor of Gβγ subunit activity, and lentiviral overexpression of the carboxyl-terminus of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2ct), a scavenger of Gβγ subunits. In summary, these data suggest that AGS3 acts through a novel receptor-independent mechanism to facilitate renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and renal tubular regeneration.—Regner, K. R., Nozu, K., Lanier, S. M., Blumer, J. B., Avner, E. D., Sweeney, Jr., W. E., Park, F. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents. PMID:21343176

  3. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of the active fiber heating under condition of high-power lasing generation.

    PubMed

    Ryabushkin, O A; Shaidullin, R I; Zaytsev, I A

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for the precise temperature measurement of active fibers in high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers is introduced. This method allows the determination of active fiber longitudinal temperature distribution at different optical pump powers. PMID:25927761

  4. Implementation of FFT Algorithm using DSP TMS320F28335 for Shunt Active Power Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pinkal Jashvantbhai; Patel, Rajesh M.; Patel, Vinod

    2016-07-01

    This work presents simulation, analysis and experimental verification of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm for shunt active power filter based on three-level inverter. Different types of filters can be used for elimination of harmonics in the power system. In this work, FFT algorithm for reference current generation is discussed. FFT control algorithm is verified using PSIM simulation results with DLL block and C-code. Simulation results are compared with experimental results for FFT algorithm using DSP TMS320F28335 for shunt active power filter application.

  5. Quasi-optical solid-state power combining for millimeter-wave active seeker applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halladay, R. H.; Terrill, S. D.; Bowling, D. R.; Gagnon, D. R.

    1992-05-01

    Consideration is given to quasi-optical power combining techniques, state-of-the-art demonstrated performance, and system issues as they apply to endoatmospheric homing seeker insertion. Quasi-optical power combining is based on combining microwave and millimeter-wave solid-state device power in space through the use of antennas and lenses. It is concluded that quasi-optical power combining meets the severe electrical requirements and packaging constraints of active MMW seekers for endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missiles. The approach provides the possibility of wafer-scale integration of major components for low cost production and offers high reliability. Critical issues include thermal loading and system integration, which must be resolved before the quasi-optical power combining technology will be applied to an active MMW seeker.

  6. Quasi-optical solid-state power combining for millimeter-wave active seeker applications

    SciTech Connect

    Halladay, R.H.; Terrill, S.D.; Bowling, D.R.; Gagnon, D.R. U.S. Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA )

    1992-05-01

    Consideration is given to quasi-optical power combining techniques, state-of-the-art demonstrated performance, and system issues as they apply to endoatmospheric homing seeker insertion. Quasi-optical power combining is based on combining microwave and millimeter-wave solid-state device power in space through the use of antennas and lenses. It is concluded that quasi-optical power combining meets the severe electrical requirements and packaging constraints of active MMW seekers for endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missiles. The approach provides the possibility of wafer-scale integration of major components for low cost production and offers high reliability. Critical issues include thermal loading and system integration, which must be resolved before the quasi-optical power combining technology will be applied to an active MMW seeker. 18 refs.

  7. Activation of the prostaglandin system in response to sleep loss in healthy humans: Potential mediator of increased spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Monika; Lee, Erin; Cohen, Daniel; Mullington, Janet M.

    2009-01-01

    Insufficient duration of sleep is a highly prevalent behavioral pattern in society that has been shown to cause an increase in spontaneous pain and sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Prostaglandins (PG), in particular PGE2, are key mediators of inflammation and pain, and we investigated whether PGE2 is a potential mediator in sleep-loss induced changes in nociceptive processing. Twenty-four participants (7 females, age 35. 17.1yrs) stayed for 7 days in the Clinical Research Center. After two baseline days, participants were randomly assigned to either three days of 88 hours of total sleep deprivation (TSD, N=15) or 8 hours of sleep per night (N=9), followed by a night of recovery sleep. Participants rated the intensity of various pain-related symptoms every two hours across waking periods on computerized visual analog scales. PGE2 was measured in 24h-urine collections during baseline and third sleep deprivation day. Spontaneous pain, including headache, muscle pain, stomach pain, generalized body pain, and physical discomfort significantly increased by 5 to 14 units on a 100-unit scale during TSD, compared to the sleep condition. Urinary PGE2 metabolite significantly increased by about 30% in TSD over sleep condition. TSD-induced increase in spontaneous pain, in particular headache and muscle pain, was significantly correlated with increase in PGE2 metabolite. Activation of the PGE2 system appears to be a potential mediator of increased spontaneous pain in response to insufficient sleep. PMID:19560866

  8. Loss of VHL promotes progerin expression, leading to impaired p14/ARF function and suppression of p53 activity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youn-Sang; Lee, Su-Jin; Lee, Sun-Hye; Chung, Ji-Yun; Jung, Youn Jin; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Ha, Nam-Chul; Park, Bum-Joon

    2013-07-15

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are frequently occurring genitourinary malignancies in the aged population. A morphological characteristic of RCCs is an irregular nuclear shape, which is used to index cancer grades. Other features of RCCs include the genetic inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau gene, VHL, and p53 genetic-independent inactivation. An aberrant nuclear shape or p53 suppression has not yet been demonstrated. We examined the effect of progerin (an altered splicing product of the LMNA gene linked to Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome; HGPS) on the nuclear deformation of RCCs in comparison to that of HGPS cells. In this study, we showed that progerin was suppressed by pVHL and was responsible for nuclear irregularities as well as p53 inactivation. Thus, progerin suppression can ameliorate nuclear abnormalities and reactivate p53 in response to genotoxic addition. Furthermore, we found that progerin was a target of pVHL E3 ligase and suppressed p53 activity by p14/ARF inhibition. Our findings indicate that the elevated expression of progerin in RCCs results from the loss of pVHL and leads to p53 inactivation through p14/ARF suppression. Interestingly, we showed that progerin was expressed in human leukemia and primary cell lines, raising the possibility that the expression of this LMNA variant may be a common event in age-related cancer progression. PMID:24067370

  9. Loss of TET2 in hematopoietic cells leads to DNA hypermethylation of active enhancers and induction of leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kasper D; Jia, Guangshuai; Johansen, Jens V; Pedersen, Marianne T; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik O; Porse, Bo T; Bernard, Olivier A; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2015-05-01

    DNA methylation is tightly regulated throughout mammalian development, and altered DNA methylation patterns are a general hallmark of cancer. The methylcytosine dioxygenase TET2 is frequently mutated in hematological disorders, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and has been suggested to protect CG dinucleotide (CpG) islands and promoters from aberrant DNA methylation. In this study, we present a novel Tet2-dependent leukemia mouse model that closely recapitulates gene expression profiles and hallmarks of human AML1-ETO-induced AML. Using this model, we show that the primary effect of Tet2 loss in preleukemic hematopoietic cells is progressive and widespread DNA hypermethylation affecting up to 25% of active enhancer elements. In contrast, CpG island and promoter methylation does not change in a Tet2-dependent manner but increases relative to population doublings. We confirmed this specific enhancer hypermethylation phenotype in human AML patients with TET2 mutations. Analysis of immediate gene expression changes reveals rapid deregulation of a large number of genes implicated in tumorigenesis, including many down-regulated tumor suppressor genes. Hence, we propose that TET2 prevents leukemic transformation by protecting enhancers from aberrant DNA methylation and that it is the combined silencing of several tumor suppressor genes in TET2 mutated hematopoietic cells that contributes to increased stem cell proliferation and leukemogenesis. PMID:25886910

  10. Loss of Androgen-Regulated MicroRNA 1 Activates SRC and Promotes Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Ben; Sheppard-Tillman, Heather; Li, Dongmei; Casey, Orla M.; Fang, Lei; Hynes, Paul G.; Ameri, Amir H.

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is the hallmark of progressive and castration-resistant prostate cancers. MicroRNA 1 (miR-1) levels are decreased in clinical samples of primary prostate cancer and further reduced in metastases. SRC has been implicated as a critical factor in bone metastasis, and here we show that SRC is a direct target of miR-1. In prostate cancer patient samples, miR-1 levels are inversely correlated with SRC expression and a SRC-dependent gene signature. Ectopic miR-1 expression inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and bone metastasis in a xenograft model. In contrast, SRC overexpression was sufficient to reconstitute bone metastasis and ERK signaling in cells expressing high levels of miR-1. Androgen receptor (AR) activity, defined by an AR output signature, is low in a portion of castration-resistant prostate cancer. We show that AR binds to the miR-1-2 regulatory region and regulates miR-1 transcription. Patients with low miR-1 levels displayed correlated low canonical AR gene signatures. Our data support the existence of an AR–miR-1–SRC regulatory network. We propose that loss of miR-1 is one mechanistic link between low canonical AR output and SRC-promoted metastatic phenotypes. PMID:25802280

  11. Loss of TET2 in hematopoietic cells leads to DNA hypermethylation of active enhancers and induction of leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kasper D.; Jia, Guangshuai; Johansen, Jens V.; Pedersen, Marianne T.; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik O.; Porse, Bo T.; Bernard, Olivier A.; Christensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is tightly regulated throughout mammalian development, and altered DNA methylation patterns are a general hallmark of cancer. The methylcytosine dioxygenase TET2 is frequently mutated in hematological disorders, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and has been suggested to protect CG dinucleotide (CpG) islands and promoters from aberrant DNA methylation. In this study, we present a novel Tet2-dependent leukemia mouse model that closely recapitulates gene expression profiles and hallmarks of human AML1-ETO-induced AML. Using this model, we show that the primary effect of Tet2 loss in preleukemic hematopoietic cells is progressive and widespread DNA hypermethylation affecting up to 25% of active enhancer elements. In contrast, CpG island and promoter methylation does not change in a Tet2-dependent manner but increases relative to population doublings. We confirmed this specific enhancer hypermethylation phenotype in human AML patients with TET2 mutations. Analysis of immediate gene expression changes reveals rapid deregulation of a large number of genes implicated in tumorigenesis, including many down-regulated tumor suppressor genes. Hence, we propose that TET2 prevents leukemic transformation by protecting enhancers from aberrant DNA methylation and that it is the combined silencing of several tumor suppressor genes in TET2 mutated hematopoietic cells that contributes to increased stem cell proliferation and leukemogenesis. PMID:25886910

  12. Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook.

    SciTech Connect

    Electrotek Concepts.

    1995-03-01

    Power factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the electrical current is out of phase with the voltage. Reactive power is used by inductive loads (such as, motors, transformers, fluorescent lights, arc welders and induction furnaces) to sustain their magnetic fields. Electric systems with many motors exhibit low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power factor can be improved by the addition of shunt capacitors. Capacitors act in opposition to inductive loads, thereby minimizing the reactive power required to serve them. In raising the power factor, shunt capacitors release energy to the system, reduce system losses, and ultimately decrease power costs. Improving system power factor can reduce reactive and active power losses for both industry and utilities through the addition of shunt capacitors. This Guide Book gives electric utility technical staff, industrial end-users, consultants and BPA employees a step-by-step method for evaluating the cost effectiveness of installing power factor correction capacitors in an industrial plant.

  13. Manufacture of magnetically active fiber-reinforced composites for use in power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etches, Julie; Bond, Ian; Mellor, Phil

    2004-07-01

    A major issue yet to be resolved for embedding sensors, actuators and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in 'smart' structures is that of providing power. Work is ongoing in the field with examples of micro battery technology, use of solar power and micro fuel cells. The work presented here considers a technology to enable the development of integrated power generation and actuation. Magnetic fibre reinforced composite material has been developed which utilises hollow glass fibres filled with active magnetic material. The resulting material maintains structural integrity as well as providing a possible means of electrical power generation from a dynamically loaded structure. The hollow glass fibres were manufactured in-house using a bespoke fibre drawing facility. Hard magnetic powder materials were introduced into the hollow fibre cores to provide an active electromagnetic function. This paper will discuss the manufacture, characterization and optimisation of active magnetic fibre reinforced composite materials.

  14. Planning a Preliminary program for Earthquake Loss Estimation and Emergency Operation by Three-dimensional Structural Model of Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Large scale earthquakes often cause serious economic losses and a lot of deaths. Because the seismic magnitude, the occurring time and the occurring location of earthquakes are still unable to predict now. The pre-disaster risk modeling and post-disaster operation are really important works of reducing earthquake damages. In order to understanding disaster risk of earthquakes, people usually use the technology of Earthquake simulation to build the earthquake scenarios. Therefore, Point source, fault line source and fault plane source are the models which often are used as a seismic source of scenarios. The assessment results made from different models used on risk assessment and emergency operation of earthquakes are well, but the accuracy of the assessment results could still be upgrade. This program invites experts and scholars from Taiwan University, National Central University, and National Cheng Kung University, and tries using historical records of earthquakes, geological data and geophysical data to build underground three-dimensional structure planes of active faults. It is a purpose to replace projection fault planes by underground fault planes as similar true. The analysis accuracy of earthquake prevention efforts can be upgraded by this database. Then these three-dimensional data will be applied to different stages of disaster prevention. For pre-disaster, results of earthquake risk analysis obtained by the three-dimensional data of the fault plane are closer to real damage. For disaster, three-dimensional data of the fault plane can be help to speculate that aftershocks distributed and serious damage area. The program has been used 14 geological profiles to build the three dimensional data of Hsinchu fault and HisnCheng faults in 2015. Other active faults will be completed in 2018 and be actually applied on earthquake disaster prevention.

  15. An embryonic myosin converter domain influences Drosophila indirect flight muscle stretch activation, power generation and flight

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Newhard, Christopher S.; Ramanath, Seemanti; Sheppard, Debra; Swank, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Stretch activation (SA) is critical to the flight ability of insects powered by asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFMs). An essential muscle protein component for SA and power generation is myosin. Which structural domains of myosin are significant for setting SA properties and power generation levels is poorly understood. We made use of the transgenic techniques and unique single muscle myosin heavy chain gene of Drosophila to test the influence of the myosin converter domain on IFM SA and power generation. Replacing the endogenous converter with an embryonic version decreased SA tension and the rate of SA tension generation. The alterations in SA properties and myosin kinetics from the converter exchange caused power generation to drop to 10% of control fiber power when the optimal conditions for control fibers – 1% muscle length (ML) amplitude and 150 Hz oscillation frequency – were applied to fibers expressing the embryonic converter (IFI-EC). Optimizing conditions for IFI-EC fiber power production, by doubling ML amplitude and decreasing oscillation frequency by 60%, improved power output to 60% of optimized control fiber power. IFI-EC flies altered their aerodynamic flight characteristics to better match optimal fiber power generation conditions as wing beat frequency decreased and wing stroke amplitude increased. This enabled flight in spite of the drastic changes to fiber mechanical performance. PMID:24115062

  16. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Electric Power Generation and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Randolph R., Jr., Ed.

    This guide was developed by teachers involved in a workshop on "Electric Power Generation and the Environment." Activity topics are: (1) Energy and the Consumer; (2) Energy and Water Pollution; and (3) Energy and Air Pollution. Within these topics, the activities are classified as awareness level, transitional level, or operational level. Each…

  17. Mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Leo

    1987-01-01

    Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

  18. PTEN loss and chromosome 8 alterations in Gleason grade 3 prostate cancer cores predicts the presence of un-sampled grade 4 tumor: implications for active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Trock, Bruce J; Fedor, Helen; Gurel, Bora; Jenkins, Robert B; Knudsen, B S; Fine, Samson W; Said, Jonathan W; Carter, H Ballentine; Lotan, Tamara L; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-07-01

    Men who enter active surveillance because their biopsy exhibits only Gleason grade 3 (G3) frequently have higher grade tumor missed by biopsy. Thus, biomarkers are needed that, when measured on G3 tissue, can predict the presence of higher grade tumor in the whole prostate. We evaluated whether PTEN loss, chromosome 8q gain (MYC) and/or 8p loss (LPL) measured only on G3 cores is associated with un-sampled G4 tumor. A tissue microarray was constructed of prostatectomy tissue from patients whose prostates exhibited only Gleason score 3+3, only 3+4 or only 4+3 tumor (n=50 per group). Cores sampled only from areas of G3 were evaluated for PTEN loss by immunohistochemistry, and PTEN deletion, LPL/8p loss and MYC/8q gain by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Biomarker results were compared between Gleason score 6 vs 7 tumors using conditional logistic regression. PTEN protein loss, odds ratio=4.99, P=0.033; MYC/8q gain, odds ratio=5.36, P=0.010; and LPL/8p loss, odds ratio=3.96, P=0.003 were significantly more common in G3 cores derived from Gleason 7 vs Gleason 6 tumors. PTEN gene deletion was not statistically significant. Associations were stronger comparing Gleason 4+3 vs 6 than for Gleason 3+4 vs 6. MYC/8q gain, LPL/8p loss and PTEN protein loss measured in G3 tissue microarray cores strongly differentiate whether the core comes from a Gleason 6 or Gleason 7 tumor. If validated to predict upgrading from G3 biopsy to prostatectomy these biomarkers could reduce the likelihood of enrolling high-risk men and facilitate safe patient selection for active surveillance. PMID:27080984

  19. Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-10-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

  20. The effects of bicycle frame geometry on muscle activation and power during a wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Mark D; Hills-Meyer, Patrick; Miller, Michael G; Michael, Timothy J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bicycle seat tube angles (STA) of (72° and 82°) on power production and EMG of the vastus laeralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), semimembranous (SM), biceps femoris (BF) during a Wingate test (WAT). Twelve experienced cyclists performed a WAT at each STA. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to identify differences in muscular activation by STA. EMG variables were normalized to isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Paired t-tests were used to test the effects of STA on: peak power, average power, minimum power and percent power drop. Results indicated BF activation was significantly lower at STA 82° (482.9 ± 166.6 %MVC·s) compared to STA 72° (712.6 ± 265.6 %MVC·s). There were no differences in the power variables between STAs. The primary finding was that increasing the STA from 72° to 82° enabled triathletes' to maintain power production, while significantly reducing the muscular activation of the biceps femoris muscle. Key PointsRoad cyclists claim that bicycle seat tube angles between 72° and 76° are most effective for optimal performance in racing.Triathletes typically use seat tube angles greater than 76°. It is thought that a seat tube angle greater than 76° facilitates a smoother bike to run transition in the triathlon.Increasing the seat tube angle from 72 to 82 enabled triathletes' to maintain power production, while significantly reducing the muscular activation of the biceps femoris muscle.Reduced hamstring muscular activation in the triathlon frame (82 seat tube angle) may serve to reduce hamstring tightness following the bike phase of the triathlon, allowing the runner to use a longer stride length. PMID:24198678

  1. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... may cause hair loss in women. If your hair loss has occurred gradually with advancing age, FOLLICULAR DEGENERATION may be the cause. Post-pregnancy hormone changes usually reverse themselves without any treatment. While follicular degeneration cannot ...

  2. Energy losses in switches

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

    1993-07-01

    The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

  3. Tritium activities in Canada supporting CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.

    2008-07-15

    An overview of the various Canadian tritium research and operational activities supporting the development, refurbishment and operation of CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors is presented. These activities encompass tritium health and safety, tritium in the environment, tritium interaction with materials, and tritium processing, and relate to both supporting R and D advances as well as operational best practices. The collective results of these activities contribute to our goals of improving worker and public safety, and operational efficiency. (authors)

  4. Single Phase Passive Rectification Versus Active Rectification Applied to High Power Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, Walter; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2006-01-01

    Stirling engine converters are being considered as potential candidates for high power energy conversion systems required by future NASA explorations missions. These types of engines typically contain two major moving parts, the displacer and the piston, in which a linear alternator is attached to the piston to produce a single phase sinusoidal waveform at a specific electric frequency. Since all Stirling engines perform at low electrical frequencies (less or equal to 100 Hz), space explorations missions that will employ these engines will be required to use DC power management and distribution (PMAD) system instead of an AC PMAD system to save on space and weight. Therefore, to supply such DC power an AC to DC converter is connected to the Stirling engine. There are two types of AC to DC converters that can be employed, a passive full bridge diode rectifier and an active switching full bridge rectifier. Due to the inherent line inductance of the Stirling Engine-Linear Alternator (SE-LA), their sinusoidal voltage and current will be phase shifted producing a power factor below 1. In order to keep power the factor close to unity, both AC to DC converters topologies will implement power factor correction. This paper discusses these power factor correction methods as well as their impact on overall mass for exploration applications. Simulation results on both AC to DC converters topologies with power factor correction as a function of output power and SE-LA line inductance impedance are presented and compared.

  5. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and angiotensin converting enzyme polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Shakarami, Fatemeh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) defined by two or more failed pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation. Several factors play a role in RPL including thrombophilic conditions which can be influenced by gene polymorphisms. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genes are closely related to fibrinolytic process, embryonic development and pregnancy success. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between RPL and common polymorphisms in ACE and PAI-1 genes. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 100 women with recurrent abortions (at least two) were selected as cases and 100 healthy women with two or more normal term deliveries without a history of abortion as controls. Total genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The status of the PAI-1 4G/5G and ACE (D/I) polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP. Results: Homozygosity for PAI-1 4G polymorphism was seen in 17 cases (17%), and 5 controls (5%) (p=0.006) so patients with homozygote 4G mutation were significantly more prone to RPL in contrast to control group (OR: 4.63, % 95 CI: 1.55-13.84). In addition, 7 patients (7 %), and no one from the control group, were homozygote (I/I) for ACE polymorphism (p=0.034), suggesting no significant associations between ACE D allele or DD genotype and RPL. Conclusion: Considering these results, because 4G/4G polymorphism for PAI-1 gene could be a thrombophilic variant leading to abortion, analysis of this mutation and other susceptibility factors are recommended in patients with RPL. PMID:26644791

  6. Loss of glycine receptors containing the α3 subunit compromises auditory nerve activity, but not outer hair cell function.

    PubMed

    Dlugaiczyk, Julia; Hecker, Dietmar; Neubert, Christian; Buerbank, Stefanie; Campanelli, Dario; Becker, Cord-Michael; Betz, Heinrich; Knipper, Marlies; Rüttiger, Lukas; Schick, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Inhibitory glycine receptors containing the α3 subunit (GlyRα3) regulate sensory information processing in the CNS and retina. In previous work, we demonstrated the presence of postsynaptic GlyRα3 immunoreactivity at efferent synapses of the medial and lateral olivocochlear bundle in the organ of Corti; however, the role of these α3-GlyRs in auditory signalling has remained elusive. The present study analyzes distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of knockout mice with a targeted inactivation of the Glra3 gene (Glra3(-/-)) and their wildtype littermates (Glra3(+/+)) before and seven days after acoustic trauma (AT; 4-16 kHz, 120 dB SPL, 1 h). Before AT, DPOAE thresholds were slightly, but significantly lower, and DPOAE amplitudes were slightly larger in Glra3(-/-) as compared to Glra3(+/+) mice. While click- and f-ABR thresholds were similar in both genotypes before AT, threshold-normalized click-ABR wave I amplitudes were smaller in Glra3(-/-) mice as compared to their wildtype littermates. Following AT, both the decrement of ABR wave I amplitudes and the delay of wave I latencies were more pronounced in Glra3(-/-) than Glra3(+/+) mice. Accordingly, correlation between early click-evoked ABR signals (0-2.5 ms from stimulus onset) before and after AT was significantly reduced for Glra3(-/-) as compared to Glra3(+/+) mice. In summary, these results show that loss of α3-GlyRs compromises suprathreshold auditory nerve activity, but not outer hair cell function. PMID:27208792

  7. In vivo loss of slow potassium channel activity in individuals with benign familial neonatal epilepsy in remission.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Bostock, Hugh; Grinton, Bronwyn; Hanna, Michael G; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Burke, David

    2012-10-01

    Benign familial neonatal epilepsy is a neuronal channelopathy most commonly caused by mutations in KCNQ2, which encodes the K(v)7.2 subunit of the slow K(+) channel. K(v)7.2 is expressed in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Seizures occur in the neonatal period, often in clusters within the first few days of life, and usually remit by 12 months of age. The mechanism of involvement of K(v)7.2 mutations in the process of seizure generation has not been established in vivo. In peripheral axons, K(v)7.2 contributes to the nodal slow K(+) current. The present study aimed to determine whether axonal excitability studies could detect changes in peripheral nerve function related to dysfunction or loss of slow potassium channel activity. Nerve excitability studies were performed on eight adults with KCNQ2 mutations and a history of benign familial neonatal epilepsy, now in remission. Studies detected distinctive changes in peripheral nerve, indicating a reduction in slow K(+) current. Specifically, accommodation to long-lasting depolarizing currents was reduced in mutation carriers by 24% compared with normal controls, and the threshold undershoot after 100 ms depolarizing currents was reduced by 22%. Additional changes in excitability included a reduction in the relative refractory period, an increase in superexcitability and a tendency towards reduced sub-excitability. Modelling of the nerve excitability changes suggested that peripheral nerve hyperexcitability may have been ameliorated by upregulation of other potassium channels. We conclude that subclinical dysfunction of K(v)7.2 in peripheral axons can be reliably detected non-invasively in adulthood. Related alterations in neuronal excitability may contribute to epilepsy associated with KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:23065794

  8. Design and real time implementation of fuzzy switched controller for single phase active power filter.

    PubMed

    Afghoul, Hamza; Krim, Fateh; Chikouche, Djamel; Beddar, Antar

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel fuzzy switched controller (FSC) integrated in direct current control (DCC) algorithm for single phase active power filter (SPAPF). The controller under study consists of conventional PI controller, fractional order PI controller (FO-PI) and fuzzy decision maker (FDM) that switches between them using reduced fuzzy logic control. The proposed controller offers short response time with low damping and deals efficiently with the external disturbances while preserving the robustness properties. To fulfill the requirements of power quality, unity power factor and harmonics limitations in active power filtering an experimental test bench has been built using dSPACE 1104 to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed controller. The obtained results present high performance in steady and transient states. PMID:26233491

  9. The Loss of Lam2 and Npr2-Npr3 Diminishes the Vacuolar Localization of Gtr1-Gtr2 and Disinhibits TORC1 Activity in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Ma, Yan; Nakashima, Akio; Kikkawa, Ushio; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian cells, mTORC1 activity is regulated by Rag GTPases. It is thought that the Ragulator complex and the GATOR (GAP activity towards Rags) complex regulate RagA/B as its GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) and GTPase-activating protein (GAP), respectively. However, the functions of components in these complexes remain elusive. Using fission yeast as a model organism, here we found that the loss of Lam2 (SPBC1778.05c), a homolog of a Ragulator component LAMTOR2, as well as the loss of Gtr1 or Gtr2 phenocopies the loss of Npr2 or Npr3, homologs of GATOR components Nprl2 or Nprl3, respectively. These phenotypes were rescued by TORC1 inhibition using pharmacological or genetic means, and the loss of Lam2, Gtr1, Gtr2, Npr2 or Npr3 disinhibited TORC1 activity under nitrogen depletion, as measured by Rps6 phosphorylation. Consistently, overexpression of GDP-locked Gtr1S20L or GTP-locked Gtr2Q60L, which suppress TORC1 activity in budding yeast, rescued the growth defect of Δgtr1 cells or Δgtr2 cells, respectively, and the loss of Lam2, Npr2 or Npr3 similarly diminished the vacuolar localization and the protein levels of Gtr1 and Gtr2. Furthermore, Lam2 physically interacted with Npr2 and Gtr1. These findings suggest that Lam2 and Npr2-Npr3 function together as a tether for GDP-bound Gtr1 to the vacuolar membrane, thereby suppressing TORC1 activity for multiple cellular functions. PMID:27227887

  10. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  11. An energy harvesting system for passively generating power from human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuan; Cheng, Shuo; Arnold, David P.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a complete, self-contained energy harvesting system composed of a magnetic energy harvester, an input-powered interface circuit and a rechargeable battery. The system converts motion from daily human activities such as walking, jogging, and cycling into usable electrical energy. By using an input-powered interface circuit, the system requires no external power supplies and features zero standby power when the input motion is too small for successful energy reclamation. When attached to a person's ankle during walking, the 100 cm3 system prototype is shown to charge a 3.7 V, 65 mAh lithium-ion polymer battery at an average power of 300 µW. The design and testing of the system under other operating conditions are presented herein.

  12. Activities in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure s performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if is effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided.

  13. Reduction in Power Consumption for Full-Color Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Hiroshi; Hamada, Yuji; Nishimura, Kazuki; Okumoto, Kenji; Saito, Nobuo; Mameno, Kazunobu; Shibata, Kenichi

    2006-09-01

    The active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) is expected to serve as next generation flat panels display with the outstanding features of wide viewing angle, vivid images, and quick response. For practical use of full-color AMOLEDs in mobile devices, it is essential to reduce the power consumption, which is generally higher than that of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). For this aim, a red, green, blue, and white (RGBW) pixel format combined with an RGB color filter array (RGBW format) with a common white emission layer (EML) has been developed. We find that the RGBW format can successfully reduce the power consumption of a full-color AMOLED by nearly half that of a conventionally filtered RGB pixel format. This improved power consumption is almost equal to the power consumption of a same-sized LCD. The RGBW format is a promising technique for the further reduction of the power consumption of a full-color AMOLED.

  14. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-Infected Adolescent Males Contributes to Differential Bone Loss by Sex: Adolescent Trials Network Study 021.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Alexandra; Tobin, Nicole H; Mulligan, Kathleen; Rollie, Adrienne; Li, Fan; Sleasman, John; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that rates of low bone mass are greater in HIV-infected males than females. Of 11 biomarkers assessed by sex and HIV-status, HIV-infected males had increased levels of soluble CD14 which inversely correlated with bone mineral content and bone mineral density measures, suggesting macrophage activation as a possible mechanism of differential bone loss. PMID:26885808

  15. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-15

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information. PMID:27472144

  16. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-01

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  17. On the origin of power-law X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosman, I.; Shaham, J.; Shaviv, G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present analytical model for a power law X-ray continuum production in active galactic nuclei, the dissipation of turbulent energy flux above the accretion disk forms an optically thin transition layer with an inverted temperature gradient. The emitted thermal radiation has a power law spectrum in the 0.1-100 keV range, with a photon energy spectral index gamma of about 0.4-1.0. Thermal X-ray contribution from the layer is 5-10 percent of the total disk luminosity. The gamma value of 0.75 is suggested as a 'natural' power law index for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs.

  18. High magneto-optical activity and low optical losses in metal-dielectric Au/Co/Au-SiO(2) magnetoplasmonic nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Banthí, Juan Carlos; Meneses-Rodríguez, David; García, Fernando; González, María Ujué; García-Martín, Antonio; Cebollada, Alfonso; Armelles, Gaspar

    2012-03-01

    Metal-dielectric Au-Co-SiO(2) magnetoplasmonic nanodisks are found to exhibit large magneto-optical activity and low optical losses. The internal architecture of the nanodisks is such that, in resonant conditions, the electromagnetic field undertakes a particular spatial distribution. This makes it possible to maximize the electromagnetic field at the magneto-optically active layers and minimize it in the other, optically lossy ones. PMID:22213149

  19. Use of recombinant activated factor VII for reduction of perioperative blood loss during elective surgical correction of spine deformity in a Jehovah's Witness. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kącka, Katarzyna; Kącki, Wojciech; Merak, Joanna; Błęka, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Planned surgical procedures at patients who refuse allogenic blood transfusion because of religious convictions are important problem, not only medical but also ethical and juristical. At the study authors report the successful use of activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) for the reduction of perioperative blood loss in four years old child - Jehovah's Witness, who had planned Torode kyphectomy. Applied perioperative management together with preparing to surgery with erythropoietin allowed for reduction of blood loss and avoiding of blood transfusion. Authors state, that appropriate perioperative proceeding makes a possibility of safe surgical procedures also at patients who refuse the transfusion. PMID:21057153

  20. Actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation and Rac1 activity has implications on ROS production, cell migration and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sehar Saleem; Parray, Arif Ali; Mushtaq, Umar; Fazili, Khalid Majid; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) and Rac1 are part of a signaling pathway via the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC). Both SNTA1 and Rac1 proteins are over-expressed in various carcinomas. It is through the DGC signaling pathway that SNTA1 has been shown to act as a link between the extra cellular matrix, the internal cell signaling apparatus and the actin cytoskeleton. SNTA1 is involved in the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton and actin reorganization. Rac1 also controls actin cytoskeletal organization in the cell. In this study, we present the interplay between f-actin, SNTA1 and Rac1. We analyzed the effect of actin depolymerization on SNTA1 tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity using actin depolymerizing drugs, cytochalasin D and latrunculin A. Our results indicate a marked decrease in the tyrosine phosphorylation of SNTA1 upon actin depolymerization. Results suggest that actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation leads to loss of interaction between SNTA1 and Rac1, with a concomitant loss of Rac1 activation. The loss of SNTA1tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity by actin depolymerization results in increased apoptosis, decreased cell migration and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in breast carcinoma cells. Collectively, our results present a possible role of f-actin in the SNTA1-Rac1 signaling pathway and implications of actin depolymerization on cell migration, ROS production and apoptosis. PMID:27048259