Science.gov

Sample records for active primary mirror

  1. The W. M. Keck Telescope segmented primary mirror active control system

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, R.C.; Arthur, A.A.; Andreae, S.; Biocca, A.; Cohen, R.W.; Fuertes, J.M.; Franck, J.; Gabor, G.; Llacer, J.; Mast, T.; Meng, J.; Merrick, T.; Minor, R.; Nelson, J.; Orayani, M.; Salz, P.; Schaefer, B.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-07-01

    The ten meter diameter primary mirror of the W. M. Keck Telescope is a mosaic of thirty-six hexagonal mirrors. An active control system stabilizes the primary mirror. The active control system uses 168 measurements of the relative positions of adjacent mirror segments and 3 measurements of the primary mirror position in the telescope structure to control the 108 degrees of freedom needed to stabilize the figure and position of the primary mirror. The components of the active control system are relative position sensors, electronics, computers, actuators that position the mirrors, and software. The software algorithms control the primary mirror, perform star image stacking, emulate the segments, store and fit calibration data, and locate hardware defects. We give an overview of the active control system, its functional requirements and test measurements. 12 refs.

  2. Active control of a 30 m ring interferometric telescope primary mirror.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yichun; Liu, Zhong; Jin, Zhenyu; Xu, Jun; Lin, Jing

    2009-02-01

    The active control of a primary mirror for a ring aperture segmented telescope is different from that of a full aperture segmented telescope. Two active maintenance proposals for the ring telescope designed from the segmented patterns are outlined. We present a preliminary calculation of noise propagation and analysis of primary mirror mode characteristics for each proposal. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of the primary mirror corresponding to each maintenance method at several typical working wavelengths are also simulated. PMID:19183591

  3. Active optics correction forces for the VST 2.6m primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.; Marty, L.

    2006-06-01

    In active optics systems obviously a fundamental role is played be the choice of polynomials to describe the primary mirror deformations. The well known Zernike polynomials are widely used because of their immediate interpretation in terms of optical aberrations. Nevertheless in an active optics correction system context, the choice of the so called "minimum energy modes" as the polynomials to represent the mechanical deformations is best justified by their derivation from mechanical properties. This is the approach followed for the 2.6m primary mirror of the VST telescope, to be hosted on top of the Cerro Paranal ESO observatory. The calibration forces to compensate a given amount of each aberration mode are computed and discussed.

  4. Space active optics: in situ compensation of lightweight primary mirrors' deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-12-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness conditions and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in a specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption are considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. Then the concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis, allowing to optimize the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end, the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  5. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55-m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  6. Active Optics for a Segmented Primary Mirror on a Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article investigates the active optical control of segments in the primary mirror to correct for wavefront errors in the Deep-Space Optical Receiver Antenna (DSORA). Although an exact assessment of improvement in signal blur radius cannot be made until a more detailed preliminary structural design is completed, analytical tools are identified for a time when such designs become available. A brief survey of appropriate sensing approaches is given. Since the choice of control algorithm and architecture depends on the particular sensing system used, typical control systems, estimated complexities, and the type of equipment required are discussed. Once specific sensor and actuator systems are chosen, the overall control system can be optimized using methods identified in the literature.

  7. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  8. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  9. Active control of primary mirror of an orbiting telescope with thermal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. L.; Youngblood, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a study of the feasibility of an active method of surface error control using thermal elements are presented. It is shown that the control effort of the thermal elements is sufficient for the purpose, and that such benefits as low cost, low weight, and high reliability may be achieved in conjunction with a significant reduction in the mirror surface error figure.

  10. Design and simulation of the active support system for a 1.2m meniscus primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige; Li, Xiaojin; Wang, Hongqiao; Liu, Rong

    2015-07-01

    Thin meniscus primary mirrors with active support have been used successfully in many large telescopes, and also draw attention of many optical fabricators. Because the active support system can correct the low order figure errors, such as astigmatism, coma, trefoil 3rd astigmatism, the optical fabricators can just focus on to remove high order figure errors. This will shorten the fabrication time. In this paper, we present an active support system for a 1.2m meniscus parabolic primary mirror. It contains 37 axial push-pull force supports, 3 axial fixed points, and 4 lateral restraints. Some basic performance of the active support system is analyzed and the figure error correction capability is also studied based on Zernike modes.

  11. The design of an active support control system for a thin 1.2m primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Li, Xiaojin; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Hongqiao

    2014-09-01

    Active support system is a low-frequency wavefront error correction system, which is often used to correct the mirror deformation resulting from gravity, temperature, wind load, manufacture, installation and other factors. In addition, the active support technology can improve the efficiency of grinding and polishing by adjusting the surface shape in the process of manufacturing large mirrors. This article describes the design of an active support control system for a thin 1.2m primary mirror. The support system consists of 37 axial pneumatic actuators. And in order to change the shape of thin primary mirror we need to precisely control the 37 pneumatic actuators. These 37 pneumatic actuators are divided into six regions. Each region is designed with a control circuit board to realize force closed-loop control for the pneumatic actuators, and all control panels are connected to the PC by CAN bus. The control panels have to support: receive commands from the host PC; control the actuators; periodically return result of control. The whole control system is composed by hardware and control algorithm and communication program.

  12. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction a nd ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror. Keywords: precision deployment, hinge joint, latch joint, deployable structures, fabrication, space telescopes, optical instruments, microdynamics.

  13. Active control of primary mirror of an orbiting telescope with thermal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. L.; Youngblood, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    The generalization is presented that was made to model a layered structure of a kind that represents a light-weighted mirror. This theory is presented along with the strategy for error suppression. The results of a variety of error-suppression studies are also presented. The computer programs for all parts of this study are included.

  14. Solar optical telescope primary mirror controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Liu, D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a technique to control the articulated primary mirror (APM) of the solar optical telescope (SOT) is discussed. Program results indicate that a single, all digital controller has sufficient capability to totally handle the computational requirements for control of the SOT APM.

  15. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Material Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee D.; Russell, Kevin; Texter, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) conducted a phase down select process via the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) project to assess the Technology Readiness Level of various candidate mirror materials. This process culminated in the selection of Beryllium as the JWST primary mirror material. This paper outlines the mirror evaluation process, defines the selection criteria and summarizes the candidate mirror's performances.

  16. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a gradient approach and an additional deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2015-09-01

    High development cost is a challenge for space telescopes and imaging satellites. One of the primary reasons for this high cost is the development of the primary mirror, which must meet diffraction limit surface figure requirements. Recent efforts to develop lower cost, lightweight, replicable primary mirrors include development of silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors and carbon fiber mirrors. The silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors at the Naval Postgraduate School do not meet the surface quality required for an optical telescope due to high spatial frequency residual surface errors. A technique under investigation at the Naval Postgraduate School is to correct the residual surface figure error using a deformable mirror in the optical path. We present a closed loop feedback gradient controller to actively control a SMT active segment and an additional deformable mirror to reduce residual wavefront error. The simulations and experimental results show that the gradient controller reduces the residual wavefront error more than an integral controller.

  17. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Agocs, Tibor; Challita, Zalpha; Jasko, Attila; Kroes, Gabby; Banyai, Evelin; Miller, Chris; Taylor, William; Schnetler, Hermine; Venema, Lars

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a demonstrator freeform active mirror for future astronomical instruments both on Earth and in space. It consists of a system overview and progress in various areas of technology in the building blocks of the mirror: an extreme freeform thin face sheet, an active array, design tools and the metrology and control of the system. The demonstrator aims to investigate the applicability of the technique in high end astronomical systems, also for space and cryogenically.

  18. Large Telescope Segmented Primary Mirror Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rud, Mayer

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a broadband (white light) point source, located at the telescope Cassegrain focus, which generates a cone of light limited by the hole in the secondary mirror (SM). It propagates to the aspheric null-mirror, which is optimized to make all the reflected rays to be normal to the primary mirror (PM) upon reflection. PM retro-reflects the rays back through the system for wavefront analysis. The point source and the wavefront analysis subsystems are all located behind the PM. The PM phasing is absolute (white light) and does not involve the SM. A relatively small, aspheric null-mirror located near the PM center of curvature has been designed to deliver the high level of optical wavefront correction. The phasing of the segments is absolute due to the use of a broadband source. The segmented PM is optically aligned independently and separately from the SM alignment. The separation of the PM segments alignment from the PM to the SM, and other telescope optics alignments, may be a significant advantage, eliminating the errors coupling. The point source of this concept is fully cooperative, unlike a star or laser-generated guide-star, providing the necessary brightness for the optimal S/N ratio, the spectral content, and the stable on-axis position. This concept can be implemented in the lab for the PM initial alignment, or made to be a permanent feature of the space-based or groundbased telescope.

  19. Thermal analysis of a 4m honeycomb telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Xian, Hao

    2012-09-01

    Thermal characteristics of a 4m class honeycomb telescope primary mirror are presented. A 3 dimensional finite elements model of the primary mirror with the varying ambient air temperature as the boundary conditions is used for the numerical simulations. Every night's air temperature profile has been detected in 2009 in Gaomeigu observatory site. Four typical nights' air temperature profiles in different seasons are chose as the boundary conditions in finite element simulation. Temperature difference between primary mirror's optical surface and ambient air is studied, as well as the axial temperature difference inner the mirror blank and radial temperature difference on the optical surface. Primary mirror seeing phenomenon results from the temperature difference between primary mirror's optical surface and the ambient air is discussed. Thermal deformations due to temperature gradient of the primary mirror are analyzed by the finite element model. Axial thermal deformations on the optical surface are discussed in detail. Thermal deformation would induce the optical surface of primary mirror to distort from the normal shape, and lead to large observation image quality degradation. Primary mirror seeing with the turbulence near the optical surface would introduce wavefront aberration and deteriorate the final observation image. In order to reduce mirror seeing and thermal deformation, it is necessary to design a thermal control system for primary mirror. The thermal and structural analysis result will be valuable in designing primary mirror's thermal control system.

  20. Using an active primary surface to correct for low-order manufacturing errors in secondary mirrors of large reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Medellin, German; Lovell, Amy J.; Enriquez, Rogerio; Smith, David R.

    2004-09-01

    In the fabrication of high-performance, low-cost secondary reflectors for radio telescopes, it is a significant challenge to avoid introduction of low-order surface errors such as astigmatism or coma. This arises primarily because low-order surface errors are easily induced by support structure placement or simple thermal variations in the manufacturing process. It is, of course, possible to bring these errors to within the required tolerance, but if an active primary reflector is present, it may be possible to relax the requirements on the secondary and perhaps lower its cost. In this paper, we take the Large Millimeter-wave Telescope (LMT/GTM) as an example system. We model the effects of correcting a deformed sub-reflector by using the existing segmented active primary. The sub-reflector deformation patterns employed are low-order (e.g., astigmatism or coma), but are allowed significant excursions from the nominal surface figure. For each case, we demonstrate the best theoretical performance, using the active primary to correct for the errors. Additionally, to determine whether such an approach would be practical, we also demonstrate the likely performance improvement that could be achieved using brief measurements on an astronomical source. In this approach, we introduce varying amounts of known low-order deformation patterns into the active primary and seek the combination that results in the maximum signal. Finally, we compare this result to the theoretical maximum and make recommendations on the practical utility of the approach.

  1. LUTE primary mirror materials and design study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthven, Greg

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) Primary Mirror Materials and Design Study is to investigate the feasibility of the LUTE telescope primary mirror. A systematic approach to accomplish this key goal was taken by first understanding the optical, thermal, and structural requirements and then deriving the critical primary mirror-level requirements for ground testing, launch, and lunar operations. After summarizing the results in those requirements which drove the selection of material and the design for the primary mirror are discussed. Most important of these are the optical design which was assumed to be the MSFC baseline (i.e. 3 mirror optical system), telescope wavefront error (WFE) allocations, the telescope weight budget, and the LUTE operational temperature ranges. Mechanical load levels, reflectance and microroughness issues, and options for the LUTE metering structure were discussed and an outline for the LUTE telescope sub-system design specification was initiated. The primary mirror analysis and results are presented. The six material substrate candidates are discussed and four distinct mirror geometries which are considered are shown. With these materials and configurations together with varying the location of the mirror support points, a total of 42 possible primary mirror designs resulted. The polishability of each substrate candidate was investigated and a usage history of 0.5 meter and larger precision cryogenic mirrors (the operational low end LUTE temperature of 60 K is the reason we feel a survey of cryogenic mirrors is appropriate) that were flown or tested are presented.

  2. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  3. The 100 cm solar telescope primary mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The manufacturing impact of primary mirror configuration on the performance of a 100 cm aperture solar telescope was studied. Three primary mirror configurations were considered: solid, standard lightweight, and mushroom. All of these are of low expansion material. Specifically, the study consisted of evaluating the mirrors with regard to: manufacturing metrology, manufacturing risk factors and ultimate quality assessment. As a result of this evaluation, a performance comparison of the configurations was made, and a recommendation of mirror configuration is the final output. These evaluations, comparisons and recommendations are discussed in detail. Other investigations were completed and are documented in the appendices.

  4. Rigid ultralight primary mirror segments for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2000-10-01

    The development of ultra-light fibrous substrate mirrors allows serious contemplation of large multi-mirror space telescopes using rigid segments. Mirrors made of silica and alumina fibers have a small coefficient of thermal expansion and a density competitive with inflatable structures. Furthermore, they are without the imagery problems caused by non parabolic figures, gaseous expansion and contraction, tidal distortion of large gas filled structures, leaks, and long lived transient mirror perturbations caused by intentional pointing and tracking movements, micrometeor and space debris impacts, and mechanical vibrations. Fibrous substrate primary mirrors also have logistical advantages, since segments can be fabricated in orbit from small amounts of dense raw materials. One space shuttle flight, lifting about half its payload capacity, is adequate to transport all the material necessary to fabricate substrates for a one hundred meter telescope whose primary mirror consists of 12,086 hexagonal segments, each having a diameter of 1 meter and an area of 0.6495 square meters.

  5. Primary mirror alignment and assembly for a multispectral space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Chang, Chen-Peng; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Huang, Po-Hsuan; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Chin, Chi-Chieh; Pan, Hsu-Pin; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-10-01

    For a currently developing multispectral space Cassegrain telescope, the primary mirror with 450 mm clear aperture is made of Zerodur and lightweighted at a ratio about 50 % to meet both thermal and mass requirement. For this mirror, it is critical to reduce the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect, bonding process and the deformation from the mounting to the main structure of the telescope (main plate). In this article, the primary mirror alignment, MGSE, assembly process and the optical performance test for the primary mirror assembly are presented. The mechanical shim is the interface between the iso-static mount and main plate. It is used to compensate the manufacture errors of components and differences of local co-planarity errors to prevent the stress while iso-static mount (ISM) is screwed to main plate. After primary mirror assembly, an optical performance test method called bench test with novel algorithm is used to analyze the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect and the deformation from the mounting or supporter. In an effort to achieve the requirement for the tolerance in primary mirror assembly, the astigmatism caused from the gravity and deformation by the mounting force could be less than P-V 0.02λ at 633 nm. The consequence of these demonstrations indicates that the designed mechanical ground supported equipment (MGSE) for the alignment and assembly processes meet the critical requirements for primary mirror assembly of the telescope.

  6. Primary mirror segment assembly integration and alignment for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Mallette, Mark; Fischer, David; Coon, Matthew; Amon, John; Kuipers, Les; Spina, John

    2010-08-01

    The Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat. The 18-segment primary mirror (PM) presents unique and challenging assembly, integration and alignment verification requirements. Each mirror segment is mechanically integrated with the Primary Mirror Backplane Support Structure (PMBSS) using compound angle shims to compensate for global alignment and local co-planarity errors. The processes used to determine the mechanical shim prescription, primary mirror alignment and integration, and placement verification are discussed. In an effort to reduce process uncertainty and program risk, the JWST program recently conducted a PMSA Integration Demonstration at ITT. Through this activity, full scale demonstrations of the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and critical integration processes were successfully completed. The results of these demonstrations indicate that the equipment, processes, and procedures developed by ITT meet the critical requirements for PMSA placement.

  7. Design of infrared astronomical satellite /IRAS/ primary mirror mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreibman, M.; Young, P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an operational mount to rigidly secure the primary mirror to its baseplate without the introduction of figure error always proves to be a major task on diffraction limited optical systems. A summary of the design of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) primary mirror mount is given. The mirror was designed to be alligned and tested at room temperature and operated in a zero 'g' field at temperatures of 2K. To minimize overstressing, a stiffness requirement of greater than 150 Hz was required for cold launch and room temperature vibration acceptance testing. Additional isolation was required to minimize strains, introduced via the mounting base, due to thermal and mechanical distortions.

  8. LSST primary/tertiary mirror thermal control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Douglas R.

    2010-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) primary/tertiary monolithic mirror will be fabricated as a single cast borosilicate substrate that requires an extensive thermal control system. The relatively large coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of borosilicate glass requires the thermal system maintain differences throughout the mirror to below 0.1C. The thermal control system is also required to take full advantage of the relatively thin glass sections for good tracking of ambient temperatures. A modified version of the thermal control system utilized on the Magellan telescope primary mirror will provide adequate cooling. This type of system supplies coolant to multiple on-board blowers in the mirror cell. Each blower contains a fan and a heat exchanger supplying conditioned and mildly pressurized air to the mirror cell. The mirror cell then acts as an air plenum which distributes the air through individual nozzles to each honeycomb cell of the mirror. Unlike previous systems, each LSST blower assembly will incorporate individual air temperature and air flow control systems. Since air can be more accurately heated than cooled, the air will be initially slightly overcooled and then reheated electrically to match the ambient air temperature. Based on thermal sensors in the mirror, the optimum cooling air flow rate to balance mirror thermal distortion and mirror seeing will be determined and enforced by the variable speed fans on the blower assemblies. To further equalize the cooling throughout the mirror, the coolant flow system has also been designed to provide inherently equal coolant flow to each blower assembly.

  9. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Edward F.; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  10. Primary adaptive mirrors for ELTs: a report on preliminary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Armando; Del Vecchio, Ciro; Salinari, Piero; Brusa, Guido; Lardiere, Olivier; Gallieni, Daniele; Biasi, Roberto; Mantegazza, Paolo

    2004-07-01

    At the moment the best bet to obtain an extremely high actuator density for extremely large pupils seems to be that of extending the current adaptive secondary mirror technology to segmented "adaptive primaries." The main components of a segment of an adaptive primary mirror are beng studied in order to determine all the parameters able to statically keep the mechanical response within the optical specifications and to dynamically provide the stiffness and damping features needed by the adaptive optics control system. Both static and dynamical requirements depend critically on actuator geometry and structure, mirror shape and thickness, and implementation of the control system. The mechanical response has been numerically evaluated in terms of deformation under gravity, mirror influence functions and actuator layout, including their interface to the shell.

  11. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  12. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  13. Edgewise connectivity: an approach to improving segmented primary mirror performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh-Range, Jessica; Arnold, William R.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    As future astrophysics missions require space telescopes with greater sensitivity and angular resolution, the corresponding increase in the primary mirror diameter presents numerous challenges. Since fairing restrictions limit the maximum diameter of monolithic and deployable segmented mirrors that can be launched, there is a need for on-orbit assembly methods that decouple the mirror diameter from the choice of launch vehicle. In addition, larger mirrors are more susceptible to vibrations and are typically so lightly damped that vibrations could persist for some time if uncontrolled. To address these challenges, we present a segmented mirror architecture in which the segments are connected edgewise by mechanisms analogous to damped springs. These mechanisms can be damped springs, flux-pinning mechanisms, virtual mechanisms, or any other device with the same basic behavior. Using a parametric finite-element model, we show that for low to intermediate stiffnesses, the stiffness and damping contributions from the mechanisms improve both the natural frequency and disturbance response of the segmented mirror. At higher stiffnesses, the mechanisms structurally connect the segments, leading to a segmented mirror that performs comparably to a monolith-or better, depending on the mechanism damping-with the modular design enabling on-orbit assembly and scalability.

  14. Dynamic analysis and design of the SIRTF primary mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Ralph M.; Vukobratovich, Daniel; Pollard, L. Wayne

    1987-01-01

    The criteria and considerations for the design of the support system for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) primary mirror are presented. A flexural-gimbal-baseplate design for the 0.5 m primary mirror was developed. Preliminary studies have indicated that this design may be further improved by replacing the flexures by a post-gimbal system wherein the gimbal design accomodates both the cryogenic cool down effects, the dynamic launch loads, and manufacturing tolerance effects. Additionally, a prestressed baseplate concept had evolved and was presented for the full scale 1.0 m mirror. However, preliminary design studies indicate that this concept will not be required, and the post-gimbal-baseplate design similar to the 0.5 m alternate support system will meet the cryogenic cool down, dynamic launch load criteria, and manufacturing tolerance effects.

  15. Do Mirror Glasses Have the Same Effect on Brain Activity as a Mirror Box? Evidence from a Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study with Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Milde, Christopher; Rance, Mariela; Kirsch, Pinar; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Foell, Jens; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Since its original proposal, mirror therapy has been established as a successful neurorehabilitative intervention in several neurological disorders to recover motor function or to relieve pain. Mirror therapy seems to operate by reactivating the contralesional representation of the non-mirrored limb in primary motor- and somatosensory cortex. However, mirror boxes have some limitations which prompted the use of additional mirror visual feedback devices. The present study evaluated the utility of mirror glasses compared to a mirror box. We also tested the hypothesis that increased interhemispheric communication between the motor hand areas is the mechanism by which mirror visual feedback recruits the representation of the non-mirrored limb. Therefore, mirror illusion capacity and brain activations were measured in a within-subject design during both mirror visual feedback conditions in counterbalanced order with 20 healthy subjects inside a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Furthermore, we analyzed task-dependent functional connectivity between motor hand representations using psychophysiological interaction analysis during both mirror tasks. Neither the subjective quality of mirror illusions nor the patterns of functional brain activation differed between the mirror tasks. The sensorimotor representation of the non-mirrored hand was recruited in both mirror tasks. However, a significant increase in interhemispheric connectivity between the hand areas was only observed in the mirror glasses condition, suggesting different mechanisms for the recruitment of the representation of the non-mirrored hand in the two mirror tasks. We conclude that the mirror glasses might be a promising alternative to the mirror box, as they induce similar patterns of brain activation. Moreover, the mirror glasses can be easy applied in therapy and research. We want to emphasize that the neuronal mechanisms for the recruitment of the affected limb representation might differ depending on

  16. Displacement sensors for the primary mirror of the W. M. Keck Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, R.H.; Arthur, A.A.; Gabor, G.; Jackson, H.G.; Jared, R.C.; Mast, T.S.; Schaefer, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    The Primary Mirror of the Keck Observatory Telescope is made up of an array of 36 hexagonal mirror segments under active control. The measurement of the relative orientations of the mirror segments is fundamental to their control. The mechanical and electronic design of the sensors used to measure these relative positions is described along with the performance of the sensors under a variety of tests. In use, the sensors will measure relative positions with a resolution of a few nanometers. This resolution and the low noise, drift and thermal sensitivity of the sensors are adequate to stabilize the primary mirror figure to the precision required for optical and infrared astronomy. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Minimizing actuator-induced errors in active space telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew W.; Miller, David W.

    2010-07-01

    The trend in future space telescopes points toward increased primary mirror diameter, which improves resolution and sensitivity. However, given the constraints on mass and volume deliverable to orbit by current launch vehicles, creative design solutions are needed to enable increased mirror size while keeping mass and volume within acceptable limits. Lightweight, segmented, rib-stiffened, actively controlled primary mirrors have emerged as a potential solution. Embedded surface-parallel actuators can be used to change the mirror prescription onorbit, lowering mirror mass overall by enabling lighter substrate materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) and relaxing manufacturing constraints. However, the discrete nature of the actuators causes high spatial frequency residual errors when commanding low-order prescription changes. A parameterized finite element model is used to simulate actuator-induced residual error and investigate design solutions that mitigate this error source. Judicious specification of mirror substrate geometry and actuator length is shown to reduce actuator-induced residual while keeping areal density constant. Specifically, a sinusoidally-varying rib shaping function is found to increase actuator influence functions and decrease residual. Likewise, longer actuators are found to offer reduced residual. Other options for geometric shaping are discussed, such as rib-to-facesheet blending and the use of two dimensional patch actuators.

  18. A Research on the Primary Mirror Manipulator of Large Segmented-mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, H.

    2012-09-01

    Since Galileo firstly used the telescope to observe the sky 400 years ago, the aperture of the telescope has become larger and larger to observe the deeper universe, and the segmented-mirror telescope is becoming more and more popular with increasing aperture. In the early 21st century, a series of segmented-mirror telescopes have been constructed including the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) of China. LAMOST is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope, and the dimension of the primary mirror is about 6.7 m× 6 m, which is composed of 37 hexagonal sub-mirrors. However, a problem about the mirror installation appears with the increasing aperture. If there are hundreds of sub-mirrors in the telescope, it is a challenging job to mount and dismount them to the truss. This problem is discussed in this paper and a manipulator for the primary mirror of LAMOST is designed to perform the mount and dismount work. In chapter 1, all the segmented-mirror telescopes in the world are introduced and how the sub-mirrors of these telescopes are installed has been investigated. After comparing with the serial and the parallel robot, a serial robot manipulator proposal, which has several redundant degrees of freedom (DOFs), has been chosen from a series of design proposals. In chapter 2, the theoretical analysis has been carried out on the basis of the design proposal, which includes the forward kinematics and the inverse kinematics. Firstly the D-H coordinate is built according to the structure of the manipulator, so it is possible to obtain the end-effector position and orientation from the individual joint motion thanks to the forward kinematics. Because of the redundant DOFs of the manipulator, the inverse kinematics solution can be a very trick task, and the result may not be only, therefore a kind of simulation is carried out to get the numerical solution using ADAMS (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical System). In the dynamics analysis the

  19. Distributed control system for active mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Williams, Mark R.; Castro, Javier; Cruz, A.; Gonzalez, Juan C.; Mack, Brian; Martin, Carlos; Pescador, German; Sanchez, Vicente; Sosa, Nicolas A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the IAC (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaries, Spain) proposal of a distributed control system intended for the active support of a 8 m mirror. The system incorporates a large number of compact `smart' force actuators, six force definers, and a mirror support computer (MSC) for interfacing with the telescope control system and for general housekeeping. We propose the use of a network for the interconnection of the actuators, definers and the MSC, which will minimize the physical complexity of the interface between the mirror support system and the MSC. The force actuator control electronics are described in detail, as is the system software architecture of the actuator and the MSC. As the network is a key point for the system, we also detail the evaluation of three candidates, before electing the CAN bus.

  20. Deflectometry measurement of Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Run; Su, Peng; Burge, James H.

    2015-08-01

    SCOTS (Software Configurable Optical Test System) is a high-precision slope measurement technique based on deflectometry. It utilizes a well-calibrated commercial LCD screen and a diffraction-limited camera to provide high dynamic range, non-contact and full-field metrology of reflective/refractive optics of high accuracy but low cost. Recently, we applied this metrology method on the fabrication of the primary mirror of Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), which is a 4.2 meter off-axis parabolic segment with more than 8 mm peak-to-valley aspheric departure. Sophisticated calibrations and compensations including camera mapping, screen nonlinearity and screen shape deformation are performed to achieve high accuracy measurement results. By measuring the mirror at different orientations, non-symmetrical systematic errors are eliminated. The metrology system also includes dual cameras that provide self- verification test. The measurement results are being used to guide the fabrication process.

  1. Mirror placement optimization for the multi-segmented James Webb Space Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porpora, D.; Wachs, J.; Barto, A.; Knight, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Primary Mirror (PM) of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of 18 segment assemblies that are aligned on-orbit using hexapod actuators to function as a single monolithic optic. The individual segment assemblies are polished into one of three different prescriptions. Each segment of a given prescription may be placed in one of six different locations for that prescription, resulting in tens of millions of possible placement combinations of the 18 segments on the backplane of the telescope. A method is proposed to optimize the placement based on minimizing the known alignment offsets of as-built mirrors in combination with the predicted shifts of each attachment point on the telescope backplane due to material creep, cool down shifts, launch shifts, and gravity release. The optimization routine can be configured to allow for minimization of errors in any of the six rigid-body degrees of freedom and can further reduce selection options based on defined hardware constraints. Such a routine can be utilized to minimize initial misalignments of the PM on-orbit, reducing the need to exercise mirror actuators to achieve an aligned state. The end result is reduced commissioning time and increased probability of success of the mission.

  2. Design and analysis of large spaceborne light-weighted primary mirror and its support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Jin, Guang; Yang, Hong-bo

    2007-12-01

    With the development of the resolution of spaceborne remote sensor, the diameter of the primary mirror of spaceborne telescope becomes larger and larger. The distortion of primary mirror which is influenced by the mirror material, structure, self-weight, support system and temperature environment affects optical image quality finally. In this paper, an on-axis TMA high-resolution Cassegrain optical payload with a primary mirror whose diameter is φ 650mm was designed and the effects of the influence factors of the distortion acts on the on-axis TMA optical system primary mirror had been analyzed by means of Finite Element Analysis. During work, the technology of the primary mirror design had been summarized and general consideration of the primary mirror design technology also had been described at the same time. Considering the telescope manufacture and work station, a reasonable and optimal structure of the primary mirror sub-assembly is taken finally. In the end, the distortion of the primary mirror during its fabrication station and work station had been analyzed by integrated Finite Element Analysis Method. The results implicated the synthesis profile error (P-V value) for the primary mirror is less than λ/10 and all the indexes of the primary mirror satisfy the requirements of the optical system.

  3. Space Adaptation of Active Mirror Segment Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Gregory H.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three year effort by Blue Line Engineering Co. to advance the state of segmented mirror systems in several separate but related areas. The initial set of tasks were designed to address the issues of system level architecture, digital processing system, cluster level support structures, and advanced mirror fabrication concepts. Later in the project new tasks were added to provide support to the existing segmented mirror testbed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the form of upgrades to the 36 subaperture wavefront sensor. Still later, tasks were added to build and install a new system processor based on the results of the new system architecture. The project was successful in achieving a number of important results. These include the following most notable accomplishments: 1) The creation of a new modular digital processing system that is extremely capable and may be applied to a wide range of segmented mirror systems as well as many classes of Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control systems such as active structures or industrial automation. 2) A new graphical user interface was created for operation of segmented mirror systems. 3) The development of a high bit rate serial data loop that permits bi-directional flow of data to and from as many as 39 segments daisy-chained to form a single cluster of segments. 4) Upgrade of the 36 subaperture Hartmann type Wave Front Sensor (WFS) of the Phased Array Mirror, Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) testbed at MSFC resulting in a 40 to 5OX improvement in SNR which in turn enabled NASA personnel to achieve many significant strides in improved closed-loop system operation in 1998. 5) A new system level processor was built and delivered to MSFC for use with the PAMELA testbed. This new system featured a new graphical user interface to replace the obsolete and non-supported menu system originally delivered with the PAMELA system. The hardware featured Blue Line's new stackable

  4. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  5. Active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirror and ultra thin mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xaingqun; Gao, Bilie; Li, Xinnan

    2006-02-01

    Some results on active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirrors and ultra thin mirrors, which have been developed in recent years in Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS, are presented in this paper. There are two polishing methods developed for the large aperture ultra thin mirrors with two different trial mirrors respectively. One is a hexagonal mirror with diagonal size of 1100mm, and thickness of 25mm by no-separate support method specially for polish the sub-mirror of Schmidt corrector of LAMOST, which is a national large scientific project of China. Another is a circular mirror with 1035mm in diameter and 26mm in thickness by active support method. The active stressed polishing technology developed for large aperture aspherical mirror with fast f ratio, and a paraboloidal mirror with a diameter of 910mm and an f ratio 2 as was successfully polished. The computer controlled polishing is also different from the normal way in the system. Some complicated aspects were added. The results showed the final surface accuracy of all these trial mirrors is better than expected requirements for normal application in astronomical telescopes.

  6. Mirror illusion reduces motor cortical inhibition in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during forceful unilateral muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Zult, Tjerk; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-04-01

    Forceful, unilateral contractions modulate corticomotor paths targeting the resting, contralateral hand. However, it is unknown whether mirror-viewing of a slowly moving but forcefully contracting hand would additionally affect these paths. Here we examined corticospinal excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the right-ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy young adults under no-mirror and mirror conditions at rest and during right wrist flexion at 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the no-mirror conditions neither hand was visible, whereas in the mirror conditions participants looked at the right hand's reflection in the mirror. Corticospinal excitability increased during contractions in the left flexor carpi radialis (FCR) (contraction 0.41 mV vs. rest 0.21 mV) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) (contraction 0.56 mV vs. rest 0.39 mV), but there was no mirror effect (FCR: P = 0.743, ηp (2) = 0.005; ECR: P = 0.712, ηp (2) = 0.005). However, mirror-viewing of the contracting and moving wrist attenuated SICI relative to test pulse in the left FCR by ∼9% compared with the other conditions (P < 0.05, d ≥ 0.62). Electromyographic activity in the resting left hand prior to stimulation was not affected by the mirror (FCR: P = 0.255, ηp (2) = 0.049; ECR: P = 0.343, ηp (2) = 0.035) but increased twofold during contractions. Thus viewing the moving hand in the mirror and not just the mirror image of the nonmoving hand seems to affect motor cortical inhibitory networks in the M1 associated with the mirror image. Future studies should determine whether the use of a mirror could increase interlimb transfer produced by cross-education, especially in patient groups with unilateral orthopedic and neurological conditions. PMID:25632077

  7. Mirror illusion reduces motor cortical inhibition in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during forceful unilateral muscle contractions

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Forceful, unilateral contractions modulate corticomotor paths targeting the resting, contralateral hand. However, it is unknown whether mirror-viewing of a slowly moving but forcefully contracting hand would additionally affect these paths. Here we examined corticospinal excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the right-ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy young adults under no-mirror and mirror conditions at rest and during right wrist flexion at 60% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the no-mirror conditions neither hand was visible, whereas in the mirror conditions participants looked at the right hand's reflection in the mirror. Corticospinal excitability increased during contractions in the left flexor carpi radialis (FCR) (contraction 0.41 mV vs. rest 0.21 mV) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) (contraction 0.56 mV vs. rest 0.39 mV), but there was no mirror effect (FCR: P = 0.743, ηp2 = 0.005; ECR: P = 0.712, ηp2 = 0.005). However, mirror-viewing of the contracting and moving wrist attenuated SICI relative to test pulse in the left FCR by ∼9% compared with the other conditions (P < 0.05, d ≥ 0.62). Electromyographic activity in the resting left hand prior to stimulation was not affected by the mirror (FCR: P = 0.255, ηp2 = 0.049; ECR: P = 0.343, ηp2 = 0.035) but increased twofold during contractions. Thus viewing the moving hand in the mirror and not just the mirror image of the nonmoving hand seems to affect motor cortical inhibitory networks in the M1 associated with the mirror image. Future studies should determine whether the use of a mirror could increase interlimb transfer produced by cross-education, especially in patient groups with unilateral orthopedic and neurological conditions. PMID:25632077

  8. Control System Modeling for the Thirty Meter Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacMynowski, Douglas G.; Thompson, Peter M.; Shelton, J. Chris; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Colavita, M. Mark; Sirota, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope primary mirror is composed of 492 segments that are controlled to high precision in the presence of wind and vibration disturbances, despite the interaction with structural dynamics. The higher bandwidth and larger number of segments compared with the Keck telescopes requires greater attention to modeling to ensure success. We focus here on the development and validation of a suite of quasi-static and dynamic modeling tools required to support the design process, including robustness verification, performance estimation, and requirements flowdown. Models are used to predict the dynamic response due to wind and vibration disturbances, estimate achievable bandwidth in the presence of control-structure-interaction (CSI) and uncertainty in the interaction matrix, and simulate and analyze control algorithms and strategies, e.g. for control of focus-mode, and sensor calibration. Representative results illustrate TMT performance scaling with parameters, but the emphasis is on the modeling framework itself.

  9. Selecting the electromagnetic actuator of the ELT primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Ciro; Marignetti, Fabrizio; Riccardi, Armando; Scarano, Maurizio; Cancelliere, Piergiacomo

    2006-06-01

    The segmented, adaptive primary mirror of the ELT is the most delicate optical component of the telescope. Its full-adaptive operational modes require an high bandwidth actuation system, able to provide large and precise stroke motions. As the core component of the actuation system hardware, the electromagnetic device has to be accurately designed. This paper depicts the preliminary electromagnetic study of the actuator. After a discussion of the chosen concept, the design process and the computational approach are illustrated. The goal of the study is the definition of the basic geometrical and physical parameters which allow the minimization of the power dissipated to deliver the proper actuation force, in order to reduce the local overheating in the telescope optical path.

  10. Mirror neuron activation is associated with facial emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Peter G; Johnston, Patrick J; Herring, Sally E; Hoy, Kate E; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2008-09-01

    Theoretical accounts suggest that mirror neurons play a crucial role in social cognition. The current study used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the association between mirror neuron activation and facial emotion processing, a fundamental aspect of social cognition, among healthy adults (n=20). Facial emotion processing of static (but not dynamic) images correlated significantly with an enhanced motor response, proposed to reflect mirror neuron activation. These correlations did not appear to reflect general facial processing or pattern recognition, and provide support to current theoretical accounts linking the mirror neuron system to aspects of social cognition. We discuss the mechanism by which mirror neurons might facilitate facial emotion recognition. PMID:18554670

  11. Design and analysis of supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror on a space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Chai, Wenyi; Feng, Liangjie; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xuewu

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical stability is a significant segment for an on-axis space telescope to assure its assembly accuracy as well as the image quality in the rigorous space environment, supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror as a main structure of the on-axis space telescope must be designed reasonably to meet the mission requirements of the space telescope. Meanwhile, in view of the limitation of the satellite launching cost, it is necessary to reduce the weight and power compensation during the supporting structure design based on the satisfaction of telescope performance. Two types of supporting structure for a space telescope are designed, one is three-tripod structure which has three tripods located on the optical bench to support the secondary mirror assemblies and keep the distance between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror, the other is barrel supporting structure which includes a tube and a secondary mirror support with four spider struts. To compare the mechanical performance and launching cost of the two kinds of supporting structure, both structural and thermal analysis model are established. The analysis results indicates that the three-tripod support is lighter, has better mechanical performance and needs less power compensation than the barrel support.

  12. Surface control techniques for the segmented primary mirror in the large lunar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleckler, Anthony D.; Pflibsen, Kent P.; Ulich, B. L.; Smith, Duane D.

    1991-01-01

    The large lunar telescope is a proposed moon-based telescope which incorporates a sixteen-meter segmented primary mirror. An error budget is developed for the active control system of the primary mirror. A control methodology for the primary mirror is then described which utilizes piston sensors for measuring the relative piston error between adjacent segments as well as a separate sensor which measures the tilt of each segment with respect to the pointing direction of the telescope. A trade study is conducted in which the following types of tilt sensors are examined to determine their applicability to this program: stellar wavefront sensors, such as a Hartmann-Shack or a shearing interferometer; holographic optical elements; interferometers; scanning systems; and some nonoptical systems which electronically measure the relative tilt between adjacent segments. In addition, two independent methods of quantitatively verifying the performance of the telescope using either a phase retrieval algorithm or an image sharpening technique, both of which are based on the quality of a stellar image, are presented.

  13. Design of the primary mirror segment support system for the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaller, Lluis; Marrero, Juan; Castro, Javier; Morante, Esteban; Ronquillo, Mariano; Hernández, Elvio

    2008-07-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) is a 42-m class optical telescope with a segmented primary mirror composed of 984 segments which is currently being studied by ESO (European Southern Observatory). The segment support system combines a series of mechanical whiffletrees for the axial support, a central diaphragm for lateral support and a torsional constrainer. These elements are fixed to a common moving frame which is actively moved by means of three actuators in piston and tip-tilt in order to keep the whole primary mirror in phase. The moving frame is fixed to the segments subcells, which properly attach the segments to the cell structure, by means of special flexures, allowing large axial alignment capability combined with high lateral stiffness. This paper describes the development of the support system for the primary mirror segments of the E-ELT, which has been specified for a high stiffness and eigenfrequencies, 60Hz for axial modes and 40Hz for lateral ones.

  14. Optimization analysis of primary mirror in large aperture telescope based on workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengsen; Wang, Guomin

    2015-10-01

    With the diameter increasing for large aperture telescope primary mirror, the gravity caused by the increased of surface size will directly affect the quality of optical imaging, the adjustment of large aperture primary mirror will be frequent according to the requirement of observation. As the angle and the azimuth's transformation of primary mirror influences the surface shape accuracy immediately, the rational design of the primary mirror supporting structure is of crucial importance. Now the general method is to use ANSYS APDL programming, which is inconvenient and complex to fit for the different components, the calculation require much time and the analysis is lack of efficient. Taking the diameter of 1.12 m telescope primary mirror as the research objection, the paper combine the actual design parameters of SONG telescope, respectively using ANSYS WORKBENCH to employ the primary mirror axial and lateral support model in finite element method, the optimal solution is obtained by optimization design and the change rule of mirror surface deformation under inclined condition is studied. The optimization results according with the requirements of the primary mirror comprehensive error proves that the optimization analysis method is available and applicable.

  15. Space active optics: performance of a deformable mirror for in-situ wave-front correction in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hourtoule, Claire; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lopez, Céline; Devilliers, Christophe; Liotard, Arnaud; Chazallet, Frederic

    2012-09-01

    MADRAS (Mirror Active, Deformable and Regulated for Applications in Space) project aims at demonstrating the interest of Active Optics for space applications. We present the prototype of a 24 actuators, 100 mm diameter deformable mirror to be included in a space telescope's pupil relay to compensate for large lightweight primary mirror deformation. The mirror design has been optimized with Finite Element Analysis and its experimental performance characterized in representative conditions. The developed deformable mirror provides an efficient wave-front correction with a limited number of actuators and a design fitting space requirements.

  16. Primary mirror and mount technology for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, Ramsey K.; Chang, L. S.; Mansfield, J. A.; Howard, Steven D.

    1989-01-01

    Candidate technologies for a lightweight primary mirror for the SOFIA telescope are evaluated for both mirror blank fabrication and polishing. Two leading candidates for the type mirror blank are considered: the frit-bonded, structured form, and the thin meniscus form. The feasible mirror is required to be very lightweight with an areal density of approximately 100 kg/sq m, have an f/ratio near 1.0, and have surface quality that permits imaging in the visible as well as the infrared. Also considered are the results of a study conducted to assess the feasibility of designing a suitable mounting system for the primary mirror. The requirements for the mount design are given both in terms of the environmental conditions and the expected optical performance. PATRAN and NASTRAN programs are used to model mirror and mounting. The sandwich-type mirror made of ultra low expansion silica with square cells in the core, is modeled using equivalent solid elements for the core. The design study produces primary mirror surface deflections in 1g as a function of mirror elevation angles. The surface is analyzed using an optical analysis program, FRINGE, to give a prediction of the mirror optical performance. Results from this analysis are included.

  17. Final acceptance testing of the LSST monolithic primary/tertiary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuell, Michael T.; Burge, James H.; Cuerden, Brian; Gressler, William; Martin, Hubert M.; West, Steven C.; Zhao, Chunyu

    2014-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a three-mirror wide-field survey telescope with the primary and tertiary mirrors on one monolithic substrate1. This substrate is made of Ohara E6 borosilicate glass in a honeycomb sandwich, spin cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab at The University of Arizona2. Each surface is aspheric, with the specification in terms of conic constant error, maximum active bending forces and finally a structure function specification on the residual errors3. There are high-order deformation terms, but with no tolerance, any error is considered as a surface error and is included in the structure function. The radii of curvature are very different, requiring two independent test stations, each with instantaneous phase-shifting interferometers with null correctors. The primary null corrector is a standard two-element Offner null lens. The tertiary null corrector is a phase-etched computer-generated hologram (CGH). This paper details the two optical systems and their tolerances, showing that the uncertainty in measuring the figure is a small fraction of the structure function specification. Additional metrology includes the radii of curvature, optical axis locations, and relative surface tilts. The methods for measuring these will also be described along with their tolerances.

  18. Experiment and modal analysis on the primary mirror structure of Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhiping; Yang, Shimo; Hu, Qiqian

    2006-06-01

    Primary mirror with Φ 1m and f 3.5m is the most important optical part in Space Solar Telescope (SST), which is designed to make observations of transient and steady state solar hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic processes and is being researched and manufactured by National Astronomical Observatories. The primary mirror structure(PMS), a crucial linker for the optical and other subsystems, includes primary mirror and its supporting frame. Therefore, this part must satisfy the optical sufficient strength, stiffness, and thermal stability requirements under the space environment and in the launching process. In this paper the primary mirror structure and its connection are described. The scheme of modal analysis and experiment is built, according to the specific dynamic requirements of the primary mirror structure in Space Solar Telescope. The dynamic response on the primary mirror structure is analyzed with MSC.NASTRAN software. Comparing these results with mode parameters obtained from modal experiment analysis. Modal experiment uses freely hanging primary mirror structure, simple input multi-output, and modal parameter identification through CADA-X software. Both results provide evidences to develop this satellite design.

  19. Position actuators of the 6.5-m borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglietta, Luciano; Callahan, Shawn

    1996-11-01

    In order to collect as much information as possible from the universe, the latest generation of astronomical telescopes have exceptionally large diameter primary mirrors. This dramatic increase in mirror diameter, and corresponding increase in weight, has placed ever increasing demands on the technical performance of the mirror support system. In this paper the authors discuss the mechanical design, fabrication, and testing of the six servo controlled position-actuators that mechanically link the 6.5 m honeycomb mirror to six rigidly reinforced locations in the multiple mirror telescope conversion mirror cell. During telescope operation, these adjustable length actuators assure that the natural frequency of the mirror does not degrade the optical performance of the telescope. Flexures are provided on each end of the actuators to minimize any moments applied to the attachment of the actuator to the mirror. These actuators provide a precise measurement of the external forces applied to the mirror, such as wind loads, for the control of the pneumatic force system that supports the weight of the mirror. The total length of each actuator can be measured to sub-micron resolution upon request. Each actuator has a reliable fail-safe system that limits the compressive and tensile forces that can be applied to the mirror. The position-actuators meet all of the above technical specifications in both tension and compression.

  20. Hyperbola-parabola primary mirror in Cassegrain optical antenna to improve transmission efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Lu; Yang, HuaJun; Jiang, Ping; Mao, Shengqian; Caiyang, Weinan

    2015-08-20

    An optical model with a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror added in the Cassegrain optical antenna, which can effectively improve the transmission efficiency, is proposed in this paper. The optimum parameters of a hyperbola-parabola primary mirror and a secondary mirror for the optical antenna system have been designed and analyzed in detail. The parabola-hyperbola primary structure optical antenna is obtained to improve the transmission efficiency of 10.60% in theory, and the simulation efficiency changed 9.359%. For different deflection angles to the receiving antenna with the emit antenna, the coupling efficiency curve of the optical antenna has been obtained. PMID:26368746

  1. Alignment and assembly process for primary mirror subsystem of a spaceborne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Chang, Chen-Peng; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Chi-Chieh; Pan, Hsu-Pin; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a multispectral spaceborne Cassegrain telescope was developed. The telescope was equipped with a primary mirror with a 450-mm clear aperture composed of Zerodur and lightweighted at a ratio of approximately 50% to meet both thermal and mass requirements. Reducing the astigmatism was critical for this mirror. The astigmatism is caused by gravity effects, the bonding process, and deformation from mounting the main structure of the telescope (main plate). This article presents the primary mirror alignment, mechanical ground-supported equipment (MGSE), assembly process, and optical performance test used to assemble the primary mirror. A mechanical compensated shim is used as the interface between the bipod flexure and main plate. The shim was used to compensate for manufacturer errors found in components and differences between local coplanarity errors to prevent stress while the bipod flexure was screwed to the main plate. After primary mirror assembly, an optical performance test method called a bench test with an algorithm was used to analyze the astigmatism caused by the gravity effect and deformation from the mounting or supporter. The tolerance conditions for the primary mirror assembly require the astigmatism caused by gravity and mounting force deformation to be less than P-V 0.02 λ at 632.8 nm. The results demonstrated that the designed MGSE used in the alignment and assembly processes met the critical requirements for the primary mirror assembly of the telescope.

  2. Active array design for FAME: Freeform Active Mirror Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskó, Attila; Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Agócs, Tibor; Venema, Lars; Hugot, Emmanuel; Schnetler, Hermine; Bányai, Evelin

    2014-07-01

    In this paper a status report is given on the development of the FAME (Freeform Active Mirror Experiment) active array. Further information regarding this project can be found in the paper by Venema et al. (this conference). Freeform optics provide the opportunity to drastically reduce the complexity of the future optical instruments. In order to produce these non-axisymmetric freeform optics with up to 1 mm deviation from the best fit sphere, it is necessary to come up with new design and manufacturing methods. The way we would like to create novel freeform optics is by fine tuning a preformed high surface-quality thin mirror using an array which is actively controlled by actuators. In the following we introduce the tools deployed to create and assess the individual designs. The result is an active array having optimal number and lay-out of actuators.

  3. Topology optimization-based lightweight primary mirror design of a large-aperture space telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shutian; Hu, Rui; Li, Quhao; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Zhigang; Kang, Renke

    2014-12-10

    For the large-aperture space telescope, the lightweight primary mirror design with a high-quality optical surface is a critical and challenging issue. This work presents a topology optimization-based design procedure for a lightweight primary mirror and a new mirror configuration of a large-aperture space telescope is obtained through the presented design procedure. Inspired by the topology optimization method considering cast constraints, an optimization model for the configuration design of the mirror back is proposed, through which the distribution and the heights of the stiffeners on the mirror back can be optimized simultaneously. For the purpose of minimizing the optical surface deviation due to self-weight and polishing pressure loadings, the objective function is selected as to maximize the mirror structural stiffness, which can be achieved by minimizing the structural compliance. The total mass of the primary mirror is assigned as the constraint. In the application example, results of the optimized design topology for two kinds of mass constraints are presented. Executing the design procedure for specific requirements and postprocessing the topology obtained of the structure, a new mirror configuration with tree-like stiffeners and a multiple-arch back in double directions is proposed. A verification model is constructed to evaluate the design results and the finite element method is used to calculate the displacement of the mirror surface. Then the RMS deviation can be obtained after fitting the deformed surface by Zernike polynomials. The proposed mirror is compared with two classical mirrors in the optical performance, and the comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the new mirror configuration. PMID:25608076

  4. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  5. Analysis of the dynamics of thin primary mirrors for large astronomical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Mccann, M.

    1973-01-01

    The NASTRAN structural analysis program was used to investigate the dynamic properties of thin primary mirrors suitable for use in large orbiting astronomical telescopes. An analysis is included of the mode shapes and modal frequencies for several thin, homogeneous, isotropic mirrors. Typical cases include two different mirror diameters, two different diameter-to-thickness ratios, and both a mirror without and a mirror with a central hole that is 22 percent of the mirror diameter. The finite-element structural model is evaluated by comparing the NASTRAN generated results with theoretical values for a simply supported, flat, circular mirror. The same model is then used for evaluating the spherical mirrors. The mode shapes and frequencies of a 0.762-meter-diameter mirror with a 60-to-1 diameter-to-thickness ratio and a three-point rigid kinematic (not overconstrained) mount are calculated and plotted for comparison with results obtained previously from the SAMIS structural analysis program for this same mirror. A static analysis is also shown for comparison with experimentally obtained influence coefficients.

  6. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of mirror segment, which has a mass of -100 kg. A stepper motor driving a differential satellite roller screw was designed to meet these demanding requirements. Initial testing showed that the actuator is capable of sub-micron repeatability over the entire 6-mm range, and was limited by 100-200 nm measurement noise levels present in the facility. Further testing must be accomplished in an isolated facility with a measurement noise floor of <5 nm. Such a facility should be ready for use at GSFC in the early summer of 2006, and will be used to better characterize this actuator.

  7. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: primary mirror characterization by deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo

    2015-09-01

    In 2014 the ASTRI Collaboration, led by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, has constructed an end-to-end prototype of a dual-mirror imaging air Cherenkov telescope, proposed for the small size class of telescopes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, has been installed at the observing station located at Serra La Nave (Italy). In this project the Brera Astronomical Observatory was responsible for the production and the testing of the primary mirror. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope's primary mirror has an aperture of ~ 4 m, a polynomial design, and consists of 18 individual hexagonal facets. These characteristics require the production and testing of panels with a typical size of ~1 m vertex-to-vertex and with an aspheric component of up to several millimetres. The mirror segments were produced assembling a sandwich of thin glass foils bent at room temperature to reach the desired shape. For the characterization of the mirrors we developed an ad-hoc deflectometry facility that works as an inverse Ronchi test in combination with a ray-tracing code. In this contribution we report the results of the deflectometric measurements performed on the primary mirror segments of the ASTRI SST-2M dual mirror telescope. The expected point spread function and the contributions to the degradation of the image quality are studied.

  8. Illusion-related brain activations: a new virtual reality mirror box system for use during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Diers, Martin; Kamping, Sandra; Kirsch, Pinar; Rance, Mariela; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Foell, Jens; Trojan, Joerg; Fuchs, Xaver; Bach, Felix; Maaß, Heiko; Cakmak, Hüseyin; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-12

    Extended viewing of movements of one's intact limb in a mirror as well as motor imagery have been shown to decrease pain in persons with phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome and to increase the movement ability in hemiparesis following stroke. In addition, mirrored movements differentially activate sensorimotor cortex in amputees with and without phantom limb pain. However, using a so-called mirror box has technical limitations, some of which can be overcome by virtual reality applications. We developed a virtual reality mirror box application and evaluated its comparability to a classical mirror box setup. We applied both paradigms to 20 healthy controls and analyzed vividness and authenticity of the illusion as well as brain activation patterns. In both conditions, subjects reported similar intensities for the sensation that movements of the virtual left hand felt as if they were executed by their own left hand. We found activation in the primary sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the actual movement, with stronger activation for the virtual reality 'mirror box' compared to the classical mirror box condition, as well as activation in the primary sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the mirrored/virtual movement. We conclude that a virtual reality application of the mirror box is viable and that it might be useful for future research. PMID:25446453

  9. Active mirror alignment control system for the MACE telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulgod, S. V.; Pious, Lizy; Chadda, V. K.; Kaul, S. R.; Yadav, K. K.; Koul, R.

    2002-03-01

    The conceptual design of an active mirror contol system for the MACE telescope, being set up by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Mt. Abu, is described. Preliminary results obtained from recent laboratory trials are also described.

  10. Study of bonding positions of isostatic mounts on a lightweight primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, M. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The bonding positions of three isostatic mounts on the primary mirror of a Cassegrain telescope under self-weight loading have both been studied in the paper. Finite element method and Zernike polynomial fitting are complementarily applied to the ZERODUR® primary mirror with a pre-designed lightweight configuration on the back. Eight bonding positions of isostatic mounts with respect to the center of gravity of the mirror have been chosen to investigate the mirror surface deforms as well as the induced optical aberrations. It is found that astigmatism becomes remarkably higher than other optical aberrations under self-weight loading. The optimum bonding position with the least astigmatism value has also been obtained.

  11. The effects of thermal gradients on the Mars Observer Camera primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applewhite, Roger W.; Telkamp, Arthur R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the effect of thermal gradients on the optical performance of the primary mirror of Mars Observer Camera (MOC), which will be launched on the Mars Observer spacecraft in September 1992. It was found that mild temperature gradients can have a large effect on the mirror surface figure, even for relatively low coefficient-of-thermal-expansion materials. However, in the case of the MOC primary mirror, it was found that the radius of curvature (ROC) of the reflective surface of the mirror changed in a nearly linear fashion with the radial temperature gradient, with little additional aberration. A solid-state ROC controller using the thermal gradient effect was implemented and verified.

  12. Minimizing high spatial frequency residual error in active space telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Thomas L.; Smith, Matthew W.; Cohan, Lucy E.; Miller, David W.

    2009-08-01

    The trend in future space telescopes is towards larger apertures, which provide increased sensitivity and improved angular resolution. Lightweight, segmented, rib-stiffened, actively controlled primary mirrors are an enabling technology, permitting large aperture telescopes to meet the mass and volume restrictions imposed by launch vehicles. Such mirrors, however, are limited in the extent to which their discrete surface-parallel electrostrictive actuators can command global prescription changes. Inevitably some amount of high spatial frequency residual error is added to the wavefront due to the discrete nature of the actuators. A parameterized finite element mirror model is used to simulate this phenomenon and determine designs that mitigate high spatial frequency residual errors in the mirror surface figure. Two predominant residual components are considered: dimpling induced by embedded actuators and print-through induced by facesheet polishing. A gradient descent algorithm is combined with the parameterized mirror model to allow rapid trade space navigation and optimization of the mirror design, yielding advanced design heuristics formulated in terms of minimum machinable rib thickness. These relationships produce mirrors that satisfy manufacturing constraints and minimize uncorrectable high spatial frequency error.

  13. Mirror actively deformed and regulated for applications in space: design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Hourtoule, Claire; Singer, Christian; Devilliers, Christophe; Lopez, Céline; Chazallet, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    The need for both high quality images and lightweight structures is one of the main drivers in space telescope design. An efficient wavefront control system will become mandatory in future large observatories, retaining performance while relaxing specifications in the global system's stability. We present the mirror actively deformed and regulated for applications in space project, which aims to demonstrate the applicability of active optics for future space instrumentation. It has led to the development of a 24-actuator, 90-mm-diameter active mirror, able to compensate for large lightweight primary mirror deformations in the telescope's exit pupil. The correcting system has been designed for expected wavefront errors from 3-m-class lightweight primary mirrors, while also taking into account constraints for space use. Finite element analysis allowed an optimization of the system in order to achieve a precision of correction better than 10 nm rms. A dedicated testbed has been designed to fully characterize the integrated system performance in representative operating conditions. It is composed of: a telescope simulator, an active correction loop, a point spread function imager, and a Fizeau interferometer. All conducted tests demonstrated the correcting mirror performance and has improved this technology maturity to a TRL4.

  14. Capacitive edge sensor design for SELENE segmented primary mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.M.; Kaiser, W.J.; Kenny, T.; VanZandt, T.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce a proof-of-concept demonstration of an edge sensor for the Space Laser Energy (SELENE) program. The operational specifications are: (1) {+-}200 {mu}m fall range in the z; (2) 10 nm resolution in z; (3) 100 {mu}m {+-} 5 {mu}m gap width between segments; (4) sign information; and (5) 30 kHz bandwidth where z is the direction normal to the reflective surface of the mirror segment. Fabrication cost constraints also require that the edge sensor is affordable, easy to align, and integrable with segment materials. The small dimension of each hexagonal segment (3 cm from flat to flat, 1 cm thick) also requires that the sensor is small.

  15. Production of primary mirror segments for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, H. M.; Allen, R. G.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Davison, W. B.; Johns, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Lutz, R. D.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Su, P.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.; Zhou, P.

    2014-07-01

    Segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope is well underway, with the off-axis Segment 1 completed, off-axis Segments 2 and 3 already cast, and mold construction in progress for the casting of Segment 4, the center segment. All equipment and techniques required for segment fabrication and testing have been demonstrated in the manufacture of Segment 1. The equipment includes a 28 m test tower that incorporates four independent measurements of the segment's figure and geometry. The interferometric test uses a large asymmetric null corrector with three elements including a 3.75 m spherical mirror and a computer-generated hologram. For independent verification of the large-scale segment shape, we use a scanning pentaprism test that exploits the natural geometry of the telescope to focus collimated light to a point. The Software Configurable Optical Test System, loosely based on the Hartmann test, measures slope errors to submicroradian accuracy at high resolution over the full aperture. An enhanced laser tracker system guides the figuring through grinding and initial polishing. All measurements agree within the expected uncertainties, including three independent measurements of radius of curvature that agree within 0.3 mm. Segment 1 was polished using a 1.2 m stressed lap for smoothing and large-scale figuring, and a set of smaller passive rigid-conformal laps on an orbital polisher for deterministic small-scale figuring. For the remaining segments, the Mirror Lab is building a smaller, orbital stressed lap to combine the smoothing capability with deterministic figuring.

  16. NASTRAN analysis for a sequence of cellular primary mirrors of the 8 meter class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, F. B.; Chang, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    In examining the local flexure of large, rib structure-stiffened borosilicate glass primary mirrors for telescopes, FEMs employing fine meshes for accurate model representation have yielded useful results concerning such mirrors' unique problems. A number of the proposed mirror support methods are noted to exhibit an unexpected and troublesome amount of deflection near the outer edge during self-weight loading. The iterative application of finite element analyses is presently combined with a small amount of rib redesign at each iteration to yield improved flexure characteristics. The flexure of individual ribs near the mirror's edge suggests that a more direct loading of the outermost support points should be striven for; more material would then be placed in direct compression. A casting should be sufficiently oversized to obviate edge flexure problems.

  17. Mirror with a variable amplitude - phase reflectance. 2. Modelling of a laser resonator with an active output mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Kiiko, V V; Kislov, V I; Ofitserov, Evgenii N

    2011-03-31

    We present the operator model of the laser resonator with an active output mirror based on the Fabry - Perot interferometer with nonflat (spherical and aspherical) mirrors and an adjustable gap. The results of numerical simulation of a microchip laser with a thermal lens and an active output interferometer-based mirror are given. It is shown that the use of an active interferometer as the output cavity mirror allows one to control the number of transverse modes of laser radiation and its power; in this case, the beam divergence can be reduced by a factor of 1.5 - 2.5. (laser resonators)

  18. Primary Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Ruth, Comp.

    Designed for the primary grades, the guidance activities in this document cover thirty-three topical areas: capabilities, changes, cooperation, criticism, differences, family, feelings, free time, friends, following directions, handicaps, honesty, improving environment, kindness, patience, paying attention, problem solving, rejection,…

  19. Research on the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingxu

    2007-12-01

    Large-aperture telescope can be used in surveying battlefield, researching landform, searching object, real-time monitoring, imaging, detecting and identifying spatial targets and so on. A large-aperture telescope for achieving high resolution power is designed to monitor spatial target and image in real time. Real-time monitoring plays an important role in military conflicts. The orbit parameter of object, quantity, geometrical shape parameter and so on can be obtained by detect spatial target. With the development of optical technology, people require larger aperture in optics-electronic (O-E) system. By increasing optical aperture, the ability of collecting light and resolution power in the system can be enhanced. But the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope will be a very difficult problem. With the increase of primary mirror aperture, the weight of the primary mirror will become larger than before. The root mean square (rms) of the primary mirror is affected by many factors, such as deadweight, deformation of heat, environment and so on. Due to the primary mirror of telescope is an important component of telescope system. By reducing the weight of primary mirror, precision of the system is ensured. During the designing phase, one can consider the supporting project of the primary mirror synthetically and analyze it roundly according to technical requirement of optical system and the effect factors. The final structural design can be reasonable. In an astronomical telescope, the surface of reflector is an important part for collecting dark radiation of celestial bodies. Its surface shape will have an effect on collecting efficiency of telescope radiant energy directly. So the rms must be very high. Optical system of large aperture, small wavelength and small focus can receive maximal light intensity. For ground-based optical astronomical telescope, the design proposed in the paper can satisfy the requirement of the possible

  20. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  1. Structural evaluation of candidate designs for the large space telescope primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.; Grin, R.; Furey, M.; Hamilton, J.

    1975-01-01

    Structural performance analyses were conducted on two candidate designs (Itek and Perkin-Elmer designs) for the large space telescope three-meter mirror. The mirror designs and the finite-element models used in the analyses evaluation are described. The results of the structural analyses for several different types of loading are presented in tabular and graphic forms. Several additional analyses are also reported: the evaluation of a mirror design concept proposed by the Boeing Co., a study of the global effects of local cell plate deflections, and an investigation of the fracture mechanics problems likely to occur with Cervit and ULE. Flexibility matrices were obtained for the Itek and Perkin-Elmer mirrors to be used in active figure control studies. Summary, conclusions, and recommendations are included.

  2. Design and analysis of isostatic mounts on a spaceborne lightweight primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, M. Y.

    2013-09-01

    The paper is aimed at obtaining the optimum isostatic mount configuration for a ZERODUR® primary mirror with a predesigned lightweight configuration on the back for a space Cassegrain telescope. The finite element analysis and Zernike polynomial fitting based on the Taguchi method are applied to the whole optimization process. Under the integrated optomechanical analysis, three isostatic mounts are bonded to the center of gravity of the mirror. Geometrical control factors and levels have been selected to minimize the optical aberrations under self-weight loading. The optimum isostatic mount with the least induced astigmatism value is finally attained under the Taguchi method.

  3. Low scatter and surface figure histories of the Space Infrared Experiment (SIRE) primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M. D. M.; Wirick, M. P.

    Data has been accumulated over a four year period documenting the total integrated scatter (TIS), bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), and surface figure for the primary mirrors of the Space Infrared Experiment (SIRE). The scatter data shows that degradation of an order of magnitude in TIS can be expected to occur in roughly 19 months at a Los Angeles laboratory climate, when using present storage techniques. The surface figure of the mirrors is shown to have little or no degradation with aging (less than or equal to 1/4-wave HeNe), but to have high dependency upon proper mounting and installation procedures. Cleaning and storage techniques are also presented.

  4. Active optics control of VST telescope secondary mirror.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    In telescopes based on active optics, defocus and coma are usually compensated for by secondary mirror movements. They are performed at the Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) with a hexapod--a parallel robot with six degrees of freedom positioning capability. We describe the application of the two-mirror telescope theory to the VST case and the solutions adopted for the hexapod control. We present the results of performance and reliability tests performed both in the laboratory and at the telescope. PMID:20517391

  5. A Novel Axial Foldable Mechanism for a Segmented Primary Mirror of Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesiya, Dignesh; Srinivas, Arra; Shukla, Piyush

    2015-09-01

    Future space missions will have larger telescopes in order to look deeper into space while improvising on spatial resolution. The primary mirrors for these telescopes will be so large that using a monolithic mirror will be nearly impossible because of the difficulties associated with its fabrication, transportation, and installation on a launch vehicle. The feasibility of launching these huge mirrors is limited because of their small launch fairing diameter. The aerodynamic shape of the fairing requires a small diameter, but the height of the launch vehicle, which is available for designers to utilize, is larger than the fairing diameter. This paper presents the development of an axial deployment mechanism based on the screw jack principle. The mechanism was designed and developed, and a prototype was constructed in order to demonstrate a lab model.

  6. Primary Mirror Figure Maintenance of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope using the Segment Alignment Maintenance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Hall, Drew; Howard, Ricky; Ly, William; Weir, John; Montgomery, Edward; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMs) was installed on McDonald Observatory's Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) in August 2001. The SAMs became fully operational in October 2001. The SAMs uses a system of 480 inductive edge sensors to correct misalignments of the HET's 91 primary mirror segments when the segments are perturbed from their aligned reference positions. A special observer estimated and corrects for the global radius of curvature (GroC) mode, a mode unobservable by the edge sensors. The SAMs edge sensor system and (GroC) estimator are able to maintain HET's primary figure for much longer durations than previously had been observed. Telescope image quality has improved, and the amount of overhead time required from primary mirror alignment has been reduced. This paper gives a functional description of the SAMs control system and presents performance verification data. This paper also describes how the SAMs has improved the operational efficiency of the HET.

  7. The optical performance test of lightweight primary mirror of space Cassegrain telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Ming-Ying; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2013-09-01

    The Remote sensing instrument ( RSI ) under developing is a Cassegrain telescope with clear aperture of 450 mm. In order to meet specifications for thermal distortion, self-weight deformation of the mirror and weight budget of the system, the primary mirror has been lightweighted at the ratio about 50 % with hexagon cell structures from a Zerodur blank. For this mid-large lightweight mirror, the optical performance test is challenging during both the manufacture and assembly phases. While in the optical measurement, there are some unexpected errors caused erroneous judgments for the mirror induced by the external force or environmental deviation. For example, it's difficult to specify the measured astigmatism caused from the form error after polishing or surface deformation by the external force from the supporter or mechanical mount. In this paper, the optical performance test called bench test to get the absolute measurement result for the lightweight mirror is presented. After measurement, a novel algorithm is adopted to analyze the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect and form error from manufacture and the deformation from the mounting or supporter. Also, the measurements with different supporter compared with vertical and horizontal setup are compared in the end of this article.

  8. Mirrored, imagined and executed movements differentially activate sensorimotor cortex in amputees with and without phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Diers, Martin; Christmann, Christoph; Koeppe, Caroline; Ruf, Matthias; Flor, Herta

    2010-05-01

    Extended viewing of movements of the intact hand in a mirror as well as motor imagery has been shown to decrease pain in phantom pain patients. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural correlates of mirrored, imagined and executed hand movements in 14 upper extremity amputees - 7 with phantom limb pain (PLP) and 7 without phantom limb pain (non-PLP) and 9 healthy controls (HC). Executed movement activated the contralateral sensorimotor area in all three groups but ipsilateral cortex was only activated in the non-PLP and HC group. Mirrored movements activated the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the hand seen in the mirror in the non-PLP and the HC but not in the PLP. Imagined movement activated the supplementary motor area in all groups and the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex in the non-PLP and HC but not in the PLP. Mirror- and movement-related activation in the bilateral sensorimotor cortex in the mirror movement condition and activation in the sensorimotor cortex ipsilateral to the moved hand in the executed movement condition were significantly negatively correlated with the magnitude of phantom limb pain in the amputee group. Further research must identify the causal mechanisms related to mirror treatment, imagined movements or movements of the other hand and associated changes in pain perception. PMID:20359825

  9. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  10. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment: manufacturing process development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Venema, Lars; Schnetler, Hermine; Ferrari, Marc; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Extreme freeform mirrors couple a non-axisymmetrical shape and an extreme asphericity, i.e. more than one millimeter of deviation from the best fit sphere. In astronomical instrumentation, such a large asphericity allows compact instruments, using less optical components. However, the lack of freeform mirrors manufacturing facilities is a real issue. We present the concept and development of an innovative manufacturing process based on plasticity forming which allow imprinting permanent deformations on mirrors, following a pre-defined mold. The aim of this activity, pursued in the frame of the OPTICON-FAME (Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment) project, is to demonstrate the suitability of this method for VIS/NIR/MIR applications. The process developed can operate on thin and flat polished initial substrates. Three study cases have been highlighted by FEA (Finite Element Analysis) and the real tests associated were performed on thin substrates in AISI420b stainless steel with 100 mm optical diameter. A comparison between FEA and tests is performed to study the evolution of the mechanical behaviour and the optical quality. The opto-mechanical results will allow a fine tuning of FEA parameters to optimize the residual form errors obtained through this process to converge toward an innovative and recurrent process.

  11. [Primary prevention: physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schuler, G

    2004-01-01

    Traditional risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and being overweight have received considerable attention in recent years, whereas physical activity as a preventive strategy does not enjoy the same public attention. In recent years the level of physical activity has decreased dramatically in children and adolescents in favor of time spent on the internet and in front of the TV. If this trend is allowed to develop along the same direction, a sharp increase in cardiovascular disease can be anticipated. The protective action of physical activity on the cardiovascular system has been well documented in large numbers of patients, and the basic physiological mechanisms have been elucidated. Metabolic changes comprise loss of weight, reduction in triglyceride and LDL levels, as well as an increase in HDL. Insulin sensitivity is enhanced in all tissues postponing the manifestation of diabetes mellitus. Shear forces created by physical activity induce ecNOS within the endothelial lining of the arteries. This enzyme is responsible for controlling vasomotion through the elaboration of NO which causes vasodilation in the smooth muscle within the vessel wall. Utilization of preformed collateral vessels has been postulated repeatedly; so far, however, it only could be documented in animals, not in humans. Nearly all studies concerned with primary prevention have shown a significant negative correlation between energy expenditure during exercise and cardiovascular mortality, even light and moderate exercise will result in a lower incidence. In order to eliminate a sedentary life style in children and adolescents, adequate programs should be initiated in all schools; they should aim for 60 min of physical activity on a daily basis. PMID:15021990

  12. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  13. An updated T-series thermocouple measurement system for high-accuracy temperature measurements of the MMT primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Gibson, J. D.

    2012-09-01

    Starting in 2009, MMTO began design and installation of a new set of electronics to measure a set of radiallydistributed type T thermocouples installed after the primary mirror polishing was completed. These thermocouples are arranged in both single measurement points and as thermopiles for differential temperature sensing. Since the goal of the primary mirror temperature control system is to minimize mirror seeing and mirror figure errors induced by temperature variation across the primary mirror, it depends on excellent accuracy from the temperature sensing system. The new electronics encompass on-board cold-junction compensation, real-time ITS-90 curve fitting, and Ethernet connectivity to the data servers running in the MMTO software infrastructure. We describe the hardware design, system wiring, and software used in this system.

  14. Investigation of Primary Mirror Segment's Residual Errors for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl; Angeli, George; MacMynowski, Doug; Sigrist, Norbert; Troy, Mitchell; Williams, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The primary mirror segment aberrations after shape corrections with warping harness have been identified as the single largest error term in the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) image quality error budget. In order to better understand the likely errors and how they will impact the telescope performance we have performed detailed simulations. We first generated unwarped primary mirror segment surface shapes that met TMT specifications. Then we used the predicted warping harness influence functions and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor model to determine estimates for the 492 corrected segment surfaces that make up the TMT primary mirror. Surface and control parameters, as well as the number of subapertures were varied to explore the parameter space. The corrected segment shapes were then passed to an optical TMT model built using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) ray-trace simulator. The generated exit pupil wavefront error maps provided RMS wavefront error and image-plane characteristics like the Normalized Point Source Sensitivity (PSSN). The results have been used to optimize the segment shape correction and wavefront sensor designs as well as provide input to the TMT systems engineering error budgets.

  15. SALT segmented primary mirror: laboratory test results for FOGALE inductive edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, John; Gajjar, Hitesh; Buous, Sébastien; Buckley, David; Gillingham, Peter

    2010-07-01

    At the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), in collaboration with FOGALE Nanotech, we have been testing the recently-developed new generation inductive edge sensors. The Fogale inductive sensor is one technology being evaluated as a possible replacement for the now defunct capacitance-based edge sensing system. We present the results of exhaustive environmental testing of two variants of the inductive sensor. In addition to the environmental testing including RH and temperature cycles, the sensor was tested for sensitivity to dust and metals. We also consider long-term sensor stability, as well as that of the electronics and of the glue used to bond the sensor to its supporting structure. A prototype design for an adjustable mount is presented which will allow for in-plane gap and shear variations present in the primary mirror configuration without adversely disturbing the figure of the individual mirror segments or the measurement accuracy.

  16. Analysis investigation of supporting and restraint conditions on the surface deformation of a collimator primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Yen; You, Zhen-Ting; Huang, Bo-Kai; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2015-09-01

    For meeting the requirements of the high-precision telescopes, the design of collimator is essential. The diameter of the collimator should be larger than that of the target for the using of alignment. Special supporting structures are demanded to reduce the deformation of gravity and to control the surface deformation induced by the mounting force when inspecting large-aperture primary mirrors. By using finite element analysis, a ZERODUR® mirror of a diameter of 620 mm will be analyzed to obtain the deformation induced by the supporting structures. Zernike polynomials will also be adopted to fit the optical surface and separate corresponding aberrations. Through the studies under different boundary conditions and supporting positions of the inner ring, it is concluded that the optical performance will be excellent under a strong enough supporter.

  17. The center of curvature optical assembly for the JWST primary mirror cryogenic optical test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Merle, Cormic; Dey, Tom; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Wick, Eric; Peer, Aaron

    2010-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, allreflective, three-mirror anastigmat. The 18-segment primary mirror (PM) presents unique and challenging assembly, integration, alignment and testing requirements. A full aperture center of curvature optical test is performed in cryogenic vacuum conditions at the integrated observatory level to verify PM performance requirements. The Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA), designed and being built by ITT satisfies the requirements for this test. The CoCOA contains a multi wave interferometer, patented reflective null lens, actuation for alignment, full in situ calibration capability, coarse and fine alignment sensing systems, as well as a system for monitoring changes in the PM to CoCOA distance. This paper will introduce the systems level architecture and optical layout of the CoCOA and its main subsystems.

  18. A method on lightweight for the primary mirror of large space-based telescope based on neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Shuqing; Tan, Fanjiao; Zhi, Xiyang; Chu, Yongqiang; Lv, Hongdi; Zhen, Rongkai

    2014-11-01

    With the aperture of telescope becoming larger, the mass of primary mirror and other relevant structures will become heavier as well. Therefore, lighting weight for large space-based telescope is necessary. This paper purposed a method based on Neural Network aims to build a math model for primary mirror of large space-based telescope, which can reduce weight of the telescope and smaller mirror deformation caused by gravity release effectively. In the meantime, it can also improve stiffness of structure and reduce thermal strain caused by on orbit temperature variation effectively. The model describes the relationship between the structure of primary mirror of large space-based telescope and corresponding deformation, and describes the optical performance of mirror by using Zernike Polynomial. To optimize the structure of primary mirror lightweight, we take the deformation of mirror and its optical performance into consideration. To apply the structures parameters and its corresponding deformations to Neural Network training, we use the combination samples of different mirror lightweight structure parameters and corresponding deformation which caused by gravity release and thermal condition. Finally, by taking advantage of the Neural Network model to optimize the primary mirror lightweight of 1-meter rectangle space-based telescope, which can make the RMS 0.024λ (λ=632.8nm)and areal density under 15kg/m2. This method combines existing results and numerical simulation to establish numerical model based on Neural Network method. Research results can be applied to same processes of designing, analyzing, and processing of large space-based telescope directly.

  19. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  20. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  1. Mirror neuron activation in children with developmental coordination disorder: A functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jess E; Licari, Melissa K; Billington, Jac; Chen, Yihui; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa; Werner, Julie; Winsor, Anne M; Bynevelt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal cortical areas that may contribute to the movement difficulties seen in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Specifically, we hypothesized that there may be a deficit in the mirror neuron system (MNS), a neural system that responds to both performed and observed actions. Using functional MRI, 14 boys with DCD (x=10.08 years ± 1.31, range=7.83-11.58 years) and 12 typically developing controls (x=10.10 years ± 1.15, range=8.33-12.00 years) were scanned observing, executing and imitating a finger sequencing task using their right hand. Cortical activations of mirror neuron regions, including posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), ventral premotor cortex, anterior inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal sulcus were examined. Children with DCD had decreased cortical activation mirror neuron related regions, including the precentral gyrus and IFG, as well as in the posterior cingulate and precuneus complex when observing the sequencing task. Region of interest analysis revealed lower activation in the pars opercularis, a primary MNS region, during imitation in the DCD group compared to controls. These findings provide some preliminary evidence to support a possible MNS dysfunction in children with DCD. PMID:26523778

  2. Toward high-dynamic active mirrors for LGS refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Vives, Sébastien; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Cuby, Jean Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    In the frame of the E-ELT-EAGLE instrument phase A studies, we designed a convex VCM able to compensate for the focus variation on the Laser Guide Star (LGS) wavefront sensor, due to the elevation of the telescope and the fixed sodium layer altitude. We present an original optical design including this active convex mirror, providing a large sag variation on a spherical surface with a 120mm clear aperture, with an optical quality better than lambda/5 RMS up to 820μm of sag and better than lambda/4 RMS up to 1000μm of sag. Finite element analysis (FEA) allowed an optimisation of the mirror's variable thickness distribution to compensate for geometrical and material non linearity. Preliminary study of the pre-stressing has also been performed by FEA, showing that a permanent deformation remains after removal of the loads. Results and comparison with the FEA are presented in the article of F.Madec et al (AS10-7736-119, this conference), with an emphasis on the system approach.

  3. Simple system of aberration correction for very large spherical primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, David A.

    2000-10-01

    Several large telescopes are now being proposed that would benefit from the cost reduction due to the use of spherical primary mirror. However, structural cost constraints require compact formats that tend to impose very high speeds, e.g. f/1.5, which renders difficult the correction of the resulting very large spherical aberration. A technique is described here in which a spherical concentric Cassegrain-like primary-secondary combination is followed by a simple catadioptric focal modifier. The spherical primary is 9m diameter, f/1.5, and the final focus is f/5 with a sub-arcsecond resolution over a 5 arcminute angular field for a passband of 480-850nm. Primary- secondary separation is only 11m and central obscuration is only 11% of pupil area. The two relatively small corrector components provide the functions of concentric meniscus and zonal corrector plate and are made from the same single glass- BK7 is the example given, but silica or any other preferred glass is possible. The relatively small zonal corrector is the only aspheric surface in the entire system. A related system is described elsewhere in which a 30 arcminute angular field can be achieved with a similar resolution, but with more complex glass requirements. However, supply of such exotic glasses may be difficult in large diameters, and the system presented here may find a place in some specialized applications.

  4. Strain gauge ambiguity sensor for segmented mirror active optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, C. L.; Howe, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system is described to measure alignment between interfacing edges of mirror segments positioned to form a segmented mirror surface. It serves as a gauge having a bending beam with four piezoresistive elements coupled across the interfaces of the edges of adjacent mirror segments. The bending beam has a first position corresponding to alignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments, and it is bendable from the first position in a direction and to a degree dependent upon the relative misalignment between the edges of adjacent mirror segments to correspondingly vary the resistance of the strain guage. A source of power and an amplifier are connected in circuit with the strain gauge whereby the output of the amplifier varies according to the misalignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments.

  5. The center of curvature optical assembly for the JWST primary mirror cryogenic optical test: optical verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Merle, Cormic; Dey, Tom; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Wick, Eric; Peer, Aaron

    2010-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, allreflective, three-mirror anastigmat. The 18-segment primary mirror (PM) presents unique and challenging assembly, integration, alignment and testing requirements. A full aperture center of curvature optical test is performed in cryogenic vacuum conditions at the integrated observatory level to verify PM performance requirements. The Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA), designed and being built by ITT satisfies the requirements for this test. The CoCOA contains a multi wave interferometer, patented reflective null lens, actuation for alignment, full in situ calibration capability, coarse and fine alignment sensing systems, as well as a system for monitoring changes in the PM to CoCOA distance. Two wave front calibration tests are utilized to verify the low and Mid/High spatial frequencies, overcoming the limitations of the standard null/hologram configuration in its ability to resolve mid and high spatial frequencies. This paper will introduce the systems level architecture and optical test layout for the CoCOA.

  6. Active edge control in the precessions polishing process for manufacturing large mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Wei; Walker, David; Yu, Gouyo

    2014-09-01

    The segmentation of the primary mirror is the only promising solution for building the next generation of ground telescopes. However, manufacturing segmented mirrors presents its own challenges. The edge mis-figure impacts directly on the telescope's scientific output. The `Edge effect' significantly dominates the polishing precision. Therefore, the edge control is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues in the segment production that needs to be addressed urgently. This paper reports an active edge control technique for the mirror segments fabrication using the Precession's polishing technique. The strategy in this technique requires that the large spot be selected on the bulk area for fast polishing, and the small spot is used for edge figuring. This can be performed by tool lift and optimizing the dell time to compensate for non-uniform material removal at the edge zone. This requires accurate and stable edge tool influence functions. To obtain the full tool influence function at the edge, we have demonstrated in previous work a novel hybrid-measurement method which uses both simultaneous phase interferometry and profilometry. In this paper, the edge effect under `Bonnet tool' polishing is investigated. The pressure distribution is analyzed by means of finite element analysis (FEA). According to the `Preston' equation, the shape of the edge tool influence functions is predicted. With this help, the multiple process parameters at the edge zone are optimized. This is demonstrated on a 200mm crosscorners hexagonal part with a result of PV less than 200nm for entire surface.

  7. Estimation of the on-orbit distortion of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA II) primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generie, Pamela; Hayden, William L.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes the analyses performed to estimate the on-orbit distortion of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA II) primary mirror. MOLA II is one of five scientific instruments that will be flown on the Mars Global Surveyor. The MOLA II instrument will map the surface profile of Mars for a full Marian year to a resolution of 2 meters vertical and 160 meters horizontal. The MOLA II telescope is an f/6 Cassegrain telescope with a 0.85 milliradian (mrad) field of view. The telescope is made entirely of Brush Wellman S200F vacuum hot pressed beryllium. The primary mirror diameter is 508 mm with a base radius of curvature of 711.2 mm. This mirror is plated first with electroless nickel and then with electrolytic gold. The purpose of these analyses was (1) to estimate the on-orbit distortion of the large primary mirror due to thermal loading, interface stresses, and gravity release and (2) to calculate the expected damage to the mirror surface due to micrometeroid impacts. A detailed NASA structural analysis program finite element model was used as a tool for evaluating the mirror performance. The results of the analyses indicate that a stability error of 2.4 microns peak-to-valley and 0.6 microns root mean square is expected for the on-orbit distortion of the primary mirror surface. The estimated surface damage due to micrometeoroids is 0.03 cm2, which is 0.002 percent of the total surface area. Both of these results are within mission acceptance parameters.

  8. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05). For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47), whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  9. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I.; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05). For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47), whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  10. Design, fabrication and testing of active carbon shell mirrors for space telescope applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, John; Laslandes, Marie; Pellegrino, Sergio; Redding, David; Bradford, Samuel Case; Wallace, James Kent; Barbee, Troy

    2014-07-01

    A novel active mirror concept based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials is presented. A nanolaminate facesheet, active piezoelectric layer and printed electronics are implemented in order to provide the reflective surface, actuation capabilities and electrical wiring for the mirror. Mirrors of this design are extremely thin (500-850 µm), lightweight (~ 2 kg/m2) and have large actuation capabilities (~ 100 µm peak- to-valley deformation per channel). Replication techniques along with simple bonding/transferring processes are implemented eliminating the need for grinding and polishing steps. An outline of the overall design, component materials and fabrication processes is presented. A method to size the active layer for a given mirror design, along with simulation predictions on the correction capabilities of the mirror are also outlined. A custom metrology system used to capture the highly deformable nature of the mirrors is demonstrated along with preliminary prototype measurements.

  11. Activity-Dependent Neurorehabilitation Beyond Physical Trainings: "Mental Exercise" Through Mirror Neuron Activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Chen, Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Rocha, Nuno; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; de Sá, Alberto Souza; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The activity dependent brain repair mechanism has been widely adopted in many types of neurorehabilitation. The activity leads to target specific and non-specific beneficial effects in different brain regions, such as the releasing of neurotrophic factors, modulation of the cytokines and generation of new neurons in adult hood. However physical exercise program clinically are limited to some of the patients with preserved motor functions; while many patients suffered from paralysis cannot make such efforts. Here the authors proposed the employment of mirror neurons system in promoting brain rehabilitation by "observation based stimulation". Mirror neuron system has been considered as an important basis for action understanding and learning by mimicking others. During the action observation, mirror neuron system mediated the direct activation of the same group of motor neurons that are responsible for the observed action. The effect is clear, direct, specific and evolutionarily conserved. Moreover, recent evidences hinted for the beneficial effects on stroke patients after mirror neuron system activation therapy. Finally some music-relevant therapies were proposed to be related with mirror neuron system. PMID:26556068

  12. Metrology requirements for the serial production of ELT primary mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Paul C. T.; Gray, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The manufacture of the next generation of large astronomical telescopes, the extremely large telescopes (ELT), requires the rapid manufacture of greater than 500 1.44m hexagonal segments for the primary mirror of each telescope. Both leading projects, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), have set highly demanding technical requirements for each fabricated segment. These technical requirements, when combined with the anticipated construction schedule for each telescope, suggest that more than one optical fabricator will be involved in the delivery of the primary mirror segments in order to meet the project schedule. For one supplier, the technical specification is challenging and requires highly consistent control of metrology in close coordination with the polishing technologies used in order to optimize production rates. For production using multiple suppliers, however the supply chain is structured, consistent control of metrology along the supply chain will be required. This requires a broader pattern of independent verification than is the case of a single supplier. This paper outlines the metrology requirements for a single supplier throughout all stages of the fabrication process. We identify and outline those areas where metrology accuracy and duration have a significant impact on production efficiency. We use the challenging ESO E-ELT technical specification as an example of our treatment, including actual process data. We further develop this model for the case of a supply chain consisting of multiple suppliers. Here, we emphasize the need to control metrology throughout the supply chain in order to optimize net production efficiency.

  13. Brain Activation Associated with Practiced Left Hand Mirror Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushnir, T.; Arzouan, Y.; Karni, A.; Manor, D.

    2013-01-01

    Mirror writing occurs in healthy children, in various pathologies and occasionally in healthy adults. There are only scant experimental data on the underlying brain processes. Eight, right-handed, healthy young adults were scanned (BOLD-fMRI) before and after practicing left-hand mirror-writing (lh-MW) over seven sessions. They wrote dictated…

  14. JWST Mirror Technology Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Mirror technology is a critical enabling capability for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST requires a Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) that can survive launch, deploy and align itself to form a 25 square meter collecting area 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror with a 131 nm rms wavefront error at temperatures less than 50K and provide stable optical performance. At the inception of JWST in 1996, such a capability did not exist. A highly successful technology development program was initiated including the Sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD) and Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) projects. These projects along with flight program activities have matured and demonstrated mirror technology for JWST. Directly traceable prototypes or flight hardware has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment. This paper summarizes that technology development effort.

  15. A space imaging concept based on a 4m structured spun-cast borosilicate monolithic primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, S. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Bauman, S.; Cuerden, B.; Granger, Z.; Olbert, B. H.

    2010-07-01

    Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) tasked The University of Arizona Steward Observatory (UASO) to conduct an engineering study to examine the feasibility of creating a 4m space telescope based on mature borosilicate technology developed at the UASO for ground-based telescopes. UASO has completed this study and concluded that existing launch vehicles can deliver a 4m monolithic telescope system to a 500 km circular orbit and provide reliable imagery at NIIRS 7-8. An analysis of such an imager based on a lightweight, high-performance, structured 4m primary mirror cast from borosilicate glass is described. The relatively high CTE of this glass is used to advantage by maintaining mirror shape quality with a thermal figuring method. Placed in a 290 K thermal shroud (similar to the Hubble Space Telescope), the orbit averaged figure surface error is 6nm rms when earth-looking. Space-looking optical performance shows that a similar thermal conditioning scheme combined with a 270 K shroud achieves primary mirror distortion of 10 nm rms surface. Analysis shows that a 3-point bipod mount will provide launch survivability with ample margin. The primary mirror naturally maintains its shape at 1g allowing excellent end-to-end pre-launch testing with e.g. the LOTIS 6.5m Collimator. The telescope includes simple systems to measure and correct mirror shape and alignment errors incorporating technologies already proven on the LOTIS Collimator. We have sketched a notional earth-looking 4m telescope concept combined with a wide field TMA concept into a DELTA IV or ATLAS 552 EELV fairing. We have combined an initial analysis of launch and space performance of a special light-weighted honeycomb borosilicate mirror (areal density 95 kg/m2) with public domain information on the existing launch vehicles.

  16. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  17. Assessing human mirror activity with EEG mu rhythm: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nathan A; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Yoo, Kathryn H; Bowman, Lindsay C; Cannon, Erin N; Vanderwert, Ross E; Ferrari, Pier F; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-03-01

    A fundamental issue in cognitive neuroscience is how the brain encodes others' actions and intentions. In recent years, a potential advance in our knowledge on this issue is the discovery of mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the nonhuman primate. These neurons fire to both execution and observation of specific types of actions. Researchers use this evidence to fuel investigations of a human mirror system, suggesting a common neural code for perceptual and motor processes. Among the methods used for inferring mirror system activity in humans are changes in a particular frequency band in the electroencephalogram (EEG) called the mu rhythm. Mu frequency appears to decrease in amplitude (reflecting cortical activity) during both action execution and action observation. The current meta-analysis reviewed 85 studies (1,707 participants) of mu that infer human mirror system activity. Results demonstrated significant effect sizes for mu during execution (Cohen's d = 0.46, N = 701) as well as observation of action (Cohen's d = 0.31, N = 1,508), confirming a mirroring property in the EEG. A number of moderators were examined to determine the specificity of these effects. We frame these meta-analytic findings within the current discussion about the development and functions of a human mirror system, and conclude that changes in EEG mu activity provide a valid means for the study of human neural mirroring. Suggestions for improving the experimental and methodological approaches in using mu to study the human mirror system are offered. PMID:26689088

  18. Mirror therapy in a patient with a fractured wrist and no active wrist extension.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric L; Hu, Jeong

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient in whom mirror therapy, training moving both hands while watching the reflection of the present or good hand in a parasaggital mirror - a method used for phantom limb and stroke patients - was extremely useful after a fractured wrist with good passive, but no active, extension. PMID:18335358

  19. Anastigmatic three-mirror telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D. G. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A three-mirror telescope for extraterrestrial observations is described. An ellipsoidal primary mirror, a hyperbolic secondary mirror, and an ellipsoidal tertiary mirror, produce an image in a conveniently located finite plane for viewing.

  20. Active X-ray mirror development at UCL: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Yao, Jun; Brooks, David; Thompson, Samantha; Willingale, Richard; Feldman, Charlotte; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-12-01

    The Smart X-ray Optics project is a UK based consortium consisting of several institutions to investigate the application of active/adaptive optics upon both small and large scale grazing incidence x-ray optics. The work done at University College London (UCL) focuses on the application of piezoelectric materials to large scale optics in order to actively deform the mirror's surface. These optics are geared towards the next generation of x-ray telescopes and it is hoped that the project will be able to achieve a resolution greater than that currently available by Chandra (0.5"). One of the aims of the consortium is to produce a working prototype. The initial design is based on a thin nickel ellipsoid segment with an x-ray reflective coating, on the back of which will be bonded a series of piezoelectric actuators. Investigation into the specification of the design of an active x-ray optic prototype and suitable support test structure has been undertaken. The dimensions and constraints upon the prototype, and the manufacturing process to produce a nickel shell are discussed. Finite element analysis (FEA) of the physical characteristics of piezoelectric materials has shown the ability to deform the nickel surface to correct for errors of several microns. FEA has also been utilised in the specification of the prototype's support structure to ensure that gravitational sag upon the optic is kept to a minimum. Laboratory experiments have tested a series of materials, different actuators and bonding methods, which could then be applied to the prototype.

  1. Exploring associations between gaze patterns and putative human mirror neuron system activity.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Peter H; Gurvich, Caroline; Fielding, Joanne; Enticott, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    The human mirror neuron system (MNS) is hypothesized to be crucial to social cognition. Given that key MNS-input regions such as the superior temporal sulcus are involved in biological motion processing, and mirror neuron activity in monkeys has been shown to vary with visual attention, aberrant MNS function may be partly attributable to atypical visual input. To examine the relationship between gaze pattern and interpersonal motor resonance (IMR; an index of putative MNS activity), healthy right-handed participants aged 18-40 (n = 26) viewed videos of transitive grasping actions or static hands, whilst the left primary motor cortex received transcranial magnetic stimulation. Motor-evoked potentials recorded in contralateral hand muscles were used to determine IMR. Participants also underwent eyetracking analysis to assess gaze patterns whilst viewing the same videos. No relationship was observed between predictive gaze and IMR. However, IMR was positively associated with fixation counts in areas of biological motion in the videos, and negatively associated with object areas. These findings are discussed with reference to visual influences on the MNS, and the possibility that MNS atypicalities might be influenced by visual processes such as aberrant gaze pattern. PMID:26236215

  2. Active optics and the axisymmetric case: MINITRUST wide-field three-reflection telescopes with mirrors aspherized from tulip and vase forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulie, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires larger size telescopes. Compared to the catadioptric Schmidt, the optical properties of a three mirror telescope provides significant advantages. (1) The flat field design is anastigmatic at any wavelength, (2) the system is extremely compact -- four times shorter than a Schmidt -- and, (3) compared to a Schmidt with refractive corrector -- requiring the polishing of three optical surfaces --, the presently proposed Modified-Rumsey design uses all of eight available free parameters of a flat fielded anastigmatic three mirror telescope for mirrors generated by active optics methods. Compared to a Rumsey design, these parameters include the additional slope continuity condition at the primary-tertiary link for in-situ stressing and aspherization from a common sphere. Then, active optics allows the polishing of only two spherical surfaces: the combined primary-tertiary mirror and the secondary mirror. All mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. This compact system is of interest for space and ground-based astronomy and allows to built larger wide-field telescopes such as demonstrated by the design and construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° FOV, consisting of an in-situ stressed double vase form primary-tertiary and of a stress polished tulip form secondary. Optical tests of these telescopes, showing diffraction limited images, are presented.

  3. Advancement of the segment support system for the Thirty Meter Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Eric C.; Baffes, Curtis; Mast, Terry; Nelson, Jerry; Platt, Benjamin; Ponchione, R. J.; Ponslet, Eric; Setoodeh, Shahriar; Sirota, Mark; Stephens, Vince; Stepp, Larry; Tubb, Alan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents refinements to the design of the TMT primary mirror segment passive-support system that are effective in reducing gravity print-through and thermal distortion effects. First, a novel analytical method is presented for tuning the axial and lateral support systems in a manner that results in improved optical performance when subject to varying gravity fields. The method utilizes counterweights attached to the whiffletrees to cancel astigmatic and comatic errors normally resulting when the lateral support system resists transverse loads induced by gravity. Secondly, several central diaphragm designs are presented and analyzed to assess lateral-gravity and thermal distortion performance: 1) a simple flat diaphragm, 2) a stress-relieving diaphragm having a slotted outer rim and a circumferential convolution near the outside diameter, and 3) a flat diaphragm having a slotted outer rim. The latter design is chosen based on results from analytical studies which show it to have better overall optical performance in the presence of gravity and thermal environments.

  4. Active optics experiments. II - Measurement of mirror deformation by holographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Noboru; Mikami, Izumi; Miyawaki, Keizou; Sasaki, Aki; Tabata, Masao

    An active optics experiment was performed to study the feasibility of using an active correction system for the Japanese National Large Telescope (Wilson, 1986). A thin mirror was deformed with an active support mechanism and the mirror surface was measured by a holographic method. The experiment is performed for several cases of excess force distributions assigned at the supporting points. The results show good agreement with predictions from FEM analysis.

  5. The primary culture of mirror carp snout and caudal fin tissues and the isolation of Koi herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingxiang; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xia; Li, Xingwei; Lv, Wenliang; Zhang, Dongming

    2013-10-01

    The explosive Koi herpesvirus (KHV) epidemic has caused the deaths of a large number of carp and carp variants and has produced serious economic losses. The mirror carp (Cyprinus carpio var. specularis) exhibits strong environmental adaptability and its primary cells can be used to isolate KHV. This study utilized the tissue explant method to systematically investigate primary cell culture conditions for mirror carp snout and caudal fin tissues. We demonstrated that cells from these two tissue types had strong adaptability, and when cultured in Medium 199 (M199) containing 20% serum at 26 to 30°C, the cells from the snout and caudal fin tissues exhibited the fastest egress and proliferation. Inoculation of these two cell types with KHV-infected fish kidney tissues produced typical cytopathic effects; additionally, identification by electron microscopy, and PCR indicated that KHV could be isolated from both cell types. PMID:23893087

  6. JWST Lightweight Mirror TRL-6 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Mirror technology for a Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) is a system of components: reflective coating; polished optical surface; mirror substrate; actuators, mechanisms and flexures; and reaction structure. The functional purpose of a PMSA is to survive launch, deploy and align itself to form a 25 square meter collecting area 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror with a 131 nm rms wavefront error at temperatures less than 50K and provide stable optical performance for the anticipated thermal environment. At the inception of JWST in 1996, such a capability was at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. A highly successful technology development program was initiated including the Sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD) and Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) projects. These projects along with flight program activities have matured mirror technology for JWST to TRL-6. A directly traceable prototype (and in some cases the flight hardware itself) has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment.

  7. The VST secondary mirror support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.; Molfese, C.; Caputi, O.; Ferragina, L.; Marty, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Gallieni, D.; Fumi, P.; Anaclerio, E.; Lazzarini, P.; De Paris, G.

    2008-07-01

    The VST telescope is equipped with an active optics system based on a wavefront sensor, a set of axial actuators to change the primary mirror shape and a secondary mirror positioner stage. The secondary mirror positioning capability allows the correction of defocus and coma optical aberrations, mainly caused by incorrect relative positions of the optics. The secondary mirror positioner is a 6-6 Stewart platform (also called "hexapod"). It is a parallel robot with a mobile platform moved by 6 linear actuators acting simultaneously. This paper describes the secondary mirror support system and the current status of the work.

  8. Active Mirror Predictive and Requirements Verification Software (AMP-ReVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    This software is designed to predict large active mirror performance at various stages in the fabrication lifecycle of the mirror. It was developed for 1-meter class powered mirrors for astronomical purposes, but is extensible to other geometries. The package accepts finite element model (FEM) inputs and laboratory measured data for large optical-quality mirrors with active figure control. It computes phenomenological contributions to the surface figure error using several built-in optimization techniques. These phenomena include stresses induced in the mirror by the manufacturing process and the support structure, the test procedure, high spatial frequency errors introduced by the polishing process, and other process-dependent deleterious effects due to light-weighting of the mirror. Then, depending on the maturity of the mirror, it either predicts the best surface figure error that the mirror will attain, or it verifies that the requirements for the error sources have been met once the best surface figure error has been measured. The unique feature of this software is that it ties together physical phenomenology with wavefront sensing and control techniques and various optimization methods including convex optimization, Kalman filtering, and quadratic programming to both generate predictive models and to do requirements verification. This software combines three distinct disciplines: wavefront control, predictive models based on FEM, and requirements verification using measured data in a robust, reusable code that is applicable to any large optics for ground and space telescopes. The software also includes state-of-the-art wavefront control algorithms that allow closed-loop performance to be computed. It allows for quantitative trade studies to be performed for optical systems engineering, including computing the best surface figure error under various testing and operating conditions. After the mirror manufacturing process and testing have been completed, the

  9. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  10. Optimization study on the primary mirror lightweighting of a remote sensing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Yen; Huang, Bo-Kai; You, Zhen-Ting; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Remote sensing instrument (RSI) is used to take images for ground surface observation, which will be exposed to high vacuum, high temperature difference, gravity, 15 g-force and random vibration conditions and other harsh environments during operation. While designing a RSI optical system, not only the optical quality but also the strength of mechanical structure we should be considered. As a result, an optimization method is adopted to solve this engineering problem. In the study, a ZERODUR® mirror with a diameter of 466 mm has been chosen as the model and the optimization has been executed by combining the computer-aided design, finite element analysis, and parameter optimization software. The optimization is aimed to obtain the most lightweight mirror with maintaining structural rigidity and good optical quality. Finally, the optimum optical mirror with a lightweight ratio of 0.55 is attained successfully.

  11. Active feedback stabilization of flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri; Fruchtman, Amnon; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2013-10-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical probes, digital signal processor, and needle electrodes. The total response time of the system is 5 μs, which is considerably faster than the typical flute growth time. Simulation and a dynamic model of the plasma's response to the needle actuators were tested against cyclic bias experiments. The plasma density is increased by the stabilization by a factor of two and is limited by other decay processes.

  12. Density increase due to active feedback in mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Omri; Be'Ery, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Mirror machines are one of the schemes for future fusion systems. Its main drawbacks are the flute instability and being open ended which results in plasma losses. A feedback system is used to stabilize the flute instability in a table top mirror machine with a continuous plasma source and RF heating. Under certain source density and temperature conditions, although the plasma was stabilized, plasma density increase was not measured. After decreasing the source density and increasing the temperature, Plasma density increase was achieved. It is theorized that these results are due to transition of the plasma main loss mechanism from collision dominated to instability dominated. In the former, the main density loss is through diffusion and In the latter, it is through flute instability which drives the plasma to the edge of the vacuum chamber. Future research directions are discussed for a planned machine which should achieve higher temperatures and better diagnostic capabilities. The research will focus on magnetic actuators and passive RF stabilization.

  13. Active optics: variable curvature mirrors for ELT laser guide star refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Vivès, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The future generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will require a complex combination of technologies for adaptive optics (AO) systems assisted by laser guide stars (LGS). In this context, the distance from the LGS spot to the telescope pupil ranges from about 80 to 200 km, depending on the Sodium layer altitude and the elevation of the telescope. This variation leads to a defocusing effect on the LGS wave-front sensor which needs to be compensated. We propose an active mirror able to compensate for this variation, based on an original optical design including this active optics component. This LGS Variable Curvature Mirror (LGS-VCM) is a 120 mm spherical active mirror able to achieve 820 μm deflection sag with an optical quality better than 150 nm RMS, allowing the radius of curvature variation from F/12 to F/2. Based on elasticity theory, the deformation of the metallic mirror is provided by an air pressure applied on a thin meniscus with a variable thickness distribution. In this article, we detail the analytical development leading to the specific geometry of the active component, the results of finite element analysis and the expected performances in terms of surface error versus the range of refocalisation. Three prototypes have been manufactured to compare the real behavior of the mirror and the simulations data. Results obtained on the prototypes are detailed, showing that the deformation of the VCM is very close to the simulation, and leads to a realistic active concept.

  14. A technique for designing active control systems for astronomical telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.; Creedon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of designing a control system to achieve and maintain the required surface accuracy of the primary mirror of a large space telescope was considered. Control over the mirror surface is obtained through the application of a corrective force distribution by actuators located on the rear surface of the mirror. The design procedure is an extension of a modal control technique developed for distributed parameter plants with known eigenfunctions to include plants whose eigenfunctions must be approximated by numerical techniques. Instructions are given for constructing the mathematical model of the system, and a design procedure is developed for use with typical numerical data in selecting the number and location of the actuators. Examples of actuator patterns and their effect on various errors are given.

  15. Effect of a mirror-like illusion on activation in the precuneus assessed with functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnert, Jan; Brunetti, Maddalena; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Mirror therapy is a therapy to treat patients with pain syndromes or hemiparesis after stroke. However, the underlying neurophysiologic mechanisms are not clearly understood. In order to determine the effect of a mirror-like illusion (MIR) on brain activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, 20 healthy right-handed subjects were examined. A MIR was induced by a digital horizontal inversion of the subjects' filmed hand. Optodes were placed on the primary motor cortex (M1) and the occipito-parietal cortex (precuneus, PC). Regions of interest (ROI) were defined a priori based on previous results of similar studies and confirmed by the analysis of effect sizes. Analysis of variance of the ROI signal revealed a dissociated pattern: at the PC, the MIR caused a significant inversion of a hemispheric lateralization opposite to the perceived hand, independent of the moving hand. In contrast, activity in M1 showed lateralization opposite to the moving hand, but revealed no mirror effect. These findings extend our understanding on interhemispheric rivalry and indicate that a MIR is integrated into visuomotor coordination similar to normal view, irrespective of the hand that is actually performing the task.

  16. Common-pull, multiple-push, vacuum-activated telescope mirror cell.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Salas, Luis; Luna, Esteban; Araiza-Durán, José A

    2014-11-20

    A new concept for push-pull active optics is presented, where the push-force is provided by means of individual airbag type actuators and a common force in the form of a vacuum is applied to the entire back of the mirror. The vacuum provides the pull-component of the system, in addition to gravity. Vacuum is controlled as a function of the zenithal angle, providing correction for the axial component of the mirror's weight. In this way, the push actuators are only responsible for correcting mirror deformations, as well as for supporting the axial mirror weight at the zenith, allowing for a uniform, full dynamic-range behavior of the system along the telescope's pointing range. This can result in the ability to perform corrections of up to a few microns for low-order aberrations. This mirror support concept was simulated using a finite element model and was tested experimentally at the 2.12 m San Pedro Mártir telescope. Advantages such as stress-free attachments, lighter weight, large actuator area, lower system complexity, and lower required mirror-cell stiffness could make this a method to consider for future large telescopes. PMID:25607876

  17. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  18. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  19. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Gérard R; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey-and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces-the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5-2 degrees field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images. PMID:16353802

  20. Design of a rapidly cooled cryogenic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Ron; Hsu, Ike

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the design, analysis, and testing of a rapidly cooled beryllium cryogenic mirror, which is the primary mirror in the four-element optical system for the Long Wavelength Infrared Advanced Technology Seeker. The mirror is shown to meet the requirement of five minutes for cooling to cryogenic operating temperature; it also maintains its optical figure and vacuum integrity and meets the nuclear specification. Results of a detailed thermal analysis on the mirror showed that, using nitrogen gas at 80 K as coolant, the front face of the mirror can be cooled from an initial temperature of 300 K to less than 90 K within five minutes. In a vacuum chamber, using liquid nitrogen as coolant, the mirror can be cooled to 80 K within 1.5 min. The mirror is well thermally insulated, so that it can be maintained at less than its operating temperature for a long time without active cooling.

  1. High-repetition-rate Cr:Nd:GSGG active-mirror amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J H; Smith, D L; Lee, J C; Jacobs, S D; Smith, D J; Lambropoulos, J C; Shoup Iii, M J

    1987-12-01

    We have designed, constructed, and operated a 3.8-cm clear-aperture Cr:Nd:GSGG active-mirror amplifier. We believe this to be the first active mirror that uses a crystalline host and the largest-aperture Cr:Nd:GSGG amplifier yet reported. We have measured a small-signal gain of 1.6. The wave front has been measured and found to be less than three waves of defocus at repetition rates of up to 10 Hz. Surface displacements were measured and compared with theory. Depolarization was less than 2.5% at maximum power at any location in the clear aperture. PMID:19741940

  2. Manufacturing an active X-ray mirror prototype in thin glass.

    PubMed

    Spiga, D; Barbera, M; Collura, A; Basso, S; Candia, R; Civitani, M; Di Bella, M S; Di Cicca, G; Lo Cicero, U; Lullo, G; Pelliciari, C; Riva, M; Salmaso, B; Sciortino, L; Varisco, S

    2016-01-01

    Adjustable mirrors equipped with piezo actuators are commonly used at synchrotron and free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines, in order to optimize their focusing properties and sometimes to shape the intensity distribution of the focal spot with the desired profile. Unlike them, X-ray mirrors for astronomy are much thinner in order to enable nesting and reduce the areal mass, and the application of piezo actuators acting normally to the surface appears much more difficult. There remains the possibility to correct the deformations using thin patches that exert a tangential strain on the rear side of the mirror: some research groups are already at work on this approach. The technique reported here relies on actively integrating thin glass foils with commercial piezoceramic patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays, while the tension signals are carried by electrodes on the back of the mirror, obtained by photolithography. Finally, the shape detection and the consequent voltage signal to be provided to the piezoelectric array will be determined by X-ray illumination in an intra-focal setup at the XACT facility. In this work, the manufacturing steps for obtaining a first active mirror prototype are described. PMID:26698046

  3. Career Education Activities: Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Constance, Comp.; And Others

    Different aspects of life can be experienced by a child in a learning environment offered by a teacher. Such experiences will better prepare the student for the future in his dealings with other people and situations. The book offers detailed suggestions for various ways in which the teacher can introduce to the student in the primary grades…

  4. Manufacturing and testing a thin glass mirror shell with piezoelectric active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Basso, S.; Candia, R.; Civitani, M.; Di Bella, M.; Di Cicca, G.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Riva, M.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.; Varisco, S.

    2015-09-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or silicon in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optical modules based on thin slumped glass foils are being developed at various institutes, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. On the other hand, this offers the opportunity to actively correct the residual deformation: a viable possibility to improve the mirror figure is the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors, and several groups are already at work on this approach. The concept we are developing consists of actively integrating thin glass foils with piezoelectric patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays. The actuators are commercial components, while the tension signals are carried by a printed circuit obtained by photolithography, and the driving electronic is a multi-channel low power consumption voltage supply developed inhouse. Finally, the shape detection and the consequent voltage signal to be provided to the piezoelectric array are determined in X-rays, in intra-focal setup at the XACT facility at INAF/OAPA. In this work, we describe the manufacturing steps to obtain a first active mirror prototype and the very first test performed in X-rays.

  5. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  6. Development of lightweight mirror elements for the Euro50 mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Romeo, Robert C.; Shaffer, Joseph J.; Chen, Peter C.

    2004-07-01

    .5 kHz frequency piezoelectric actuators have a displacement of approximately one μm per volt, 82 times greater than conventional piezoelectric actuators, and a throw of +/-30 μm or more. Compliant faceplates can be adaptive as well as active. Calculations indicate that for actuator spacings of about 4 cm the effective mirror stiffness equals that of a solid Zerodur mirror with a conventional 6:1 diameter to thickness ratio. The effect of gravitational sag for composite mirrors is calculated to be negligible. They are thus a good choice for the secondary mirror for the Euro50 as well as for the primary or secondary mirrors for other giant telescopes.

  7. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned, Active Mirror Telescope Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The Active Mirror Telescope (AMT) task adopted the Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  8. Total-reflection active-mirror laser with cryogenic Yb:YAG ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Takeshita, Kenji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Saiki, Taku; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujita, Masayuki; Ishii, Shinya

    2009-11-01

    An efficient high-power laser operation has been demonstrated by using a cryogenic Yb:YAG composite ceramic with a total-reflection active-mirror arrangement. The composite ceramic, which had no high-reflection coating and was cooled with liquid nitrogen directly, showed four-level operation even at 67 kW/cm(3) of high pump density. A 273 W cw output power was obtained with 65% optical efficiency and 72% slope efficiency. PMID:19881620

  9. Mirror Technology Roadmap for NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2011-01-01

    There are several possible approaches to designing exoplanet missions: (1) Coronagraphs (2) Interferometers (3) Starshades Wavefront sensing and control is the central concern, not mirror size (1) Starlight suppression with deformable mirrors (2) Thermal and structural stability (3) Metrology for sensing and control Diffraction-limited optical primary mirrors 4-m or larger are needed to detect Earthlike planets (1) Surface figure similar to HST required (2) Smaller primary mirrors can be used with aggressive coronagraph designs, but the stability tolerances become the driving concern (3) Stability tolerances of coronagraphs are greatly reduced when larger primaries are used in conjunction with 8th-order masks Long term vision for large telescope development includes space-based segmented-mirror telescopes using actively-controlled glass segments or silicon carbide hybrid-mirror designs

  10. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  11. Health Activities for Primary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This manual targets new and second-year Peace Corps volunteers, presenting health lessons and activities for primary school students in Thailand. Each section of the manual outlines basic technical information about the topic, contains several detailed lesson plans, and lists quick activities that can be carried out at schools. Songs and recipes…

  12. The removal, mechanical handling and installation procedures for re-aluminising the UKIRT 3.8m primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Operational procedures for observatory personnel involved in removing, handling, or installing the mirror of the United Kingdom infrared telescope are outlined. The ordering, location, etc. of chemicals, cleaning materials, safety clothing, equipment, etc. within the observatory are covered. Preparation of the telescope, pickup truck, etc., are detailed. The importance of transporting mirror trolley, mirror boxes, gases, etc., to desired location in advance of their being required is stressed. Six to eight people are required to carry out the operations.

  13. Design of the Apache-Point Observatory 3.5-METER Telescope - Part Two - Deformation Analysis of the Primary Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, W. A.; Mannery, E. J.; Radochia, J.; Gillett, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have calculated the deflection of the surface of a 3.5 meter diameter borosilicate mirror using the finite element method. The mirror is a 0.46 m thick honeycomb structure with 25 mm thick face plates and 13 mm ribs. The cell spacing is 0.192 m and is regular except near the inner and outer perimeters. Axial support for the mirror will be provided by 48 air pistons. The effects of thickness variations in fabrication of the mirror are presented and are small for the magnitudes of the variations expected. Several thermal load cases are described.

  14. Changes in cortical activation during mirror reading before and after training: an fMRI study of procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Kassubek, J; Schmidtke, K; Kimmig, H; Lücking, C H; Greenlee, M W

    2001-01-01

    The neural correlates of procedural learning were studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and the mirror reading paradigm. The aim of the study was to investigate a presumed learning-related change of activation in cortical areas that are involved in the performance of a nonmotor skill. Changes in cortical blood oxygenation contrast were recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they alternatively read visually presented single mirror script words and normal script words. Responses in naive subjects were compared to those acquired after training of mirror script reading. The acquisition volume included the motor and premotor cortex, the parietal lobe and the occipital lobe including its inferior aspects. Striate and extrastriate visual areas, associative parietal cortex and the premotor cortex were bilaterally active during normal and mirror script reading. Significantly stronger activation during mirror reading was seen in BA7 and 40 (parietal associative cortex) and in BA6 (corresponding to the frontal eye fields). Simultaneous eye movement recordings indicated that activation in BA6 was related to processing components other than saccade frequency. After training, BA6 and BA7 exhibited a decrease of activation during mirror reading that significantly exceeded nonspecific changes observed in the normal script control condition. The present findings confirm the hypothesis of practice-related decrease of activation in task-related cortical areas during nonmotor procedural learning. PMID:11167046

  15. Discrete control of linear distributed systems with application to the deformable primary mirror of a large orbiting telescope. Ph.D. Thesis - Rhode Island Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a detailed study of the discrete control of linear distributed systems with specific application to the design of a practical controller for a plant representative of a telescope primary mirror for an orbiting astronomical observatory. The problem of controlling the distributed plant is treated by employing modal techniques to represent variations in the optical figure. Distortion of the mirror surface, which arises primarily from thermal gradients, is countered by actuators working against a backing structure to apply a corrective force distribution to the controlled surface. Each displacement actuator is in series with a spring attached to the mirror by means of a pad intentionally introduced to restrict the excitation of high-order modes. Control is exerted over a finite number of the most significant modes.

  16. Energy Activities for the Primary Classroom. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Blue, Comp.

    An energy education program at the primary level should help students to understand the nature and importance of energy, consider different energy sources, learn about energy conservation, prepare for energy related careers, and become energy conscious in other career fields. The activities charts, readings, and experiments provided in this…

  17. Zig-zag active-mirror laser with cryogenic Yb3+:YAG/YAG composite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Saiki, Taku; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujita, Masayuki; Takeshita, Kenji; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-01-31

    We report on a novel amplifier configuration concept for a 10 kW laser system using a zig-zag optical path based on a cryogenic Yb:YAG Total-Reflection Active-Mirror (TRAM) laser. The laser material is a compact composite ceramic, in which three Yb:YAG TRAMs are combined in series to increase the output power. Output powers of up to 214 W with a slope efficiency of 63% have been demonstrated for CW operation, even at a quite low pump intensity of less than 170 W/cm2. Further scaling could achieve output powers of more than 10 kW. PMID:21369064

  18. Thermal analysis on grad-doped active-mirror Yb:YAG ceramic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Jiang, Benxue

    2015-11-01

    Heat conduction, temperature distribution, thermal stress, and thermally induced refractive index of a diode-pumped active-mirror grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser are analyzed and compared to a uniform-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser. It is found that a rationally designed grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic has a smaller temperature gradient than a uniform-doped Yb:YAG ceramic with the same absorption pump power, which results in higher output energy in the grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  19. Active-mirror-laser-amplifier thermal management with tunable helium pressure at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lucianetti, Antonio; Albach, Daniel; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-20

    We illustrate the benefits of a thin, low pressure helium cell for efficient and safe heat removal in cryogenically-cooled active mirror laser amplifiers operating in the [100 J-1 kJ]/[1-10 Hz] range. A homogeneous gain medium temperature distribution averaging 160 K is obtained with a sub-mm helium-filled gap between the gain medium and a copper plate at 77 K. A significant degree of flexibility for tuning the temperature in the amplifier can be achieved by varying the pressure of the helium gas in the 10(2) to 10(5) Pa range. PMID:21716519

  20. The Case for Aggressive Segmentation of the Primary Mirror of the Next Generation Space Telescope and Future ORIGINS Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Zelders, Glenn W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Optical performance variations are considered from several factors including the gap between regular hexagonal mirror segments, the relative ability of segments of different size to be manufactured with low wavefront error, and expected mirror deformations. Additionally a weight variation function will be driven by recently postulated relationships which can be expressed so as to determine thickness of the mirror segment to satisfy: (1) polishing pressures (2) 1-g sage deflection, and (3) thermal induced stress as well as ancillary masses including actuators, wiring, and electronics. The result will be to survey the trade space of segment number and size for a range of apertures from 4 to 20 meters.

  1. Design of a prototype position actuator for the primary mirror segments of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, A.; Morante, E.; Viera, T.; Núñez, M.; Reyes, M.

    2010-07-01

    European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) based in 984 primary mirror segments achieving required optical performance; they must position relatively to adjacent segments with relative nanometer accuracy. CESA designed M1 Position Actuators (PACT) to comply with demanding performance requirements of EELT. Three PACT are located under each segment controlling three out of the plane degrees of freedom (tip, tilt, piston). To achieve a high linear accuracy in long operational displacements, PACT uses two stages in series. First stage based on Voice Coil Actuator (VCA) to achieve high accuracies in very short travel ranges, while second stage based on Brushless DC Motor (BLDC) provides large stroke ranges and allows positioning the first stage closer to the demanded position. A BLDC motor is used achieving a continuous smoothly movement compared to sudden jumps of a stepper. A gear box attached to the motor allows a high reduction of power consumption and provides a great challenge for sizing. PACT space envelope was reduced by means of two flat springs fixed to VCA. Its main characteristic is a low linear axial stiffness. To achieve best performance for PACT, sensors have been included in both stages. A rotary encoder is included in BLDC stage to close position/velocity control loop. An incremental optical encoder measures PACT travel range with relative nanometer accuracy and used to close the position loop of the whole actuator movement. For this purpose, four different optical sensors with different gratings will be evaluated. Control strategy show different internal closed loops that work together to achieve required performance.

  2. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-curvature Optical Metrology System During Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius-of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse & fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment & phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development & spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software & procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate & efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  3. Using Mu Rhythm Desynchronization to Measure Mirror Neuron Activity in Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nystrom, Par; Ljunghammar, Therese; Rosander, Kerstin; von Hofsten, Claes

    2011-01-01

    The Mirror Neuron System hypothesis stating that observed actions are projected onto the observer's own action system assigns an important role to development, because only actions mastered by the observer can be mirrored. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether there is evidence of a functioning mirror neuron system (MNS) in…

  4. Exploring primary care activities in ACT teams.

    PubMed

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Williams, Nancy A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Katon, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    People with serious mental illness often receive inadequate primary and preventive care services. Federal healthcare reform endorses team-based care that provides high quality primary and preventive care to at risk populations. Assertive community treatment (ACT) teams offer a proven, standardized treatment approach effective in improving mental health outcomes for the seriously mentally ill. Much is known about the effectiveness of ACT teams in improving mental health outcomes, but the degree to which medical care needs are addressed is not established. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which ACT teams address the physical health of the population they serve. ACT team leaders were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey to explore attitudes and activities involving the primary care needs of their clients. Information was collected regarding the use of health screening tools, physical health assessments, provision of medical care and collaboration with primary care systems. Data was analyzed from 127 team leaders across the country, of which 55 completed the entire survey. Nearly every ACT team leader believed ACT teams have a role in identifying and managing the medical co-morbidities of their clientele. ACT teams report participation in many primary care activities. ACT teams are providing a substantial amount of primary and preventive services to their population. The survey suggests standardization of physical health identification, management or referral processes within ACT teams may result in improved quality of medical care. ACT teams are in a unique position to improve physical health care by virtue of having medically trained staff and frequent, close contact with their clients. PMID:24337472

  5. Mirroring activity in the brain and movement determinant in the Rorschach test.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Piero; Giromini, Luciano; Parolin, Laura; Pineda, Jaime A; Viglione, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    Human movement (M) responses to the Rorschach are related to cognitive sophistication, creativity, and empathy. Recent studies also link Ms to EEG-mu suppression, an index of mirroring activity in the brain. In this article, we further investigate the link between Ms and mu suppression by testing some clinical interpretative distinctions. Previously collected EEG data recorded during the administration of the Rorschach were reanalyzed. We hypothesized that (a) among several responses investigated, only M would be associated with mu suppression, and (b) Ms with active movement, ordinary form quality, or whole human figures would be most strongly associated with mu suppression. Hypothesis 1 was fully confirmed, thus supporting that the traditional interpretation of M has a neurobiological foundation. Hypothesis 2 was partially confirmed; that is, active Ms were associated with mu suppression more strongly than passive Ms (p < .05), but no other significant differences emerged. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:23495976

  6. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26180297

  7. Position sensors for segmented mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozière, Didier; Buous, Sébastien; Courteville, Alain

    2004-09-01

    There are currently several projects for giant telescopes with segmented mirrors under way. These future telescopes will have their primary mirror made of several thousand segments. The main advantage of segmentation is that it enables the active control of the whole mirror, so as to suppress the deformations of the support structure due to the wind, gravity, thermal inhomogeneities etc. ..., thus getting the best possible stigmatism. However, providing active control of segmented mirrors requires numerous accurate edges sensors. It is acknowledged that capacitance-based technology nowadays offers the best metrological performances-to-cost ratio. As the leader in capacitive technology, FOGALE nanotech offers an original concept which reduces the cost of instrumentation, sensors and electronics, while keeping a very high level of performances with a manufacturing process completely industrialised. We present here the sensors developed for the Segment Alignment Measurement System (SAMS) of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). This patented solution represents an important improvement in terms of cost, to market the Position Sensors for Segmented Mirrors of ELTs, whilst maintaining a very high performance level. We present here the concept, the laboratory qualification, and the first trials on the 7 central segments of SALT. The laboratory results are good, and we are now working on the on-site implementation to improve the immunity of the sensors to environment.

  8. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  9. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  10. JWST Mirror Installation

    NASA Video Gallery

    The first six of 18 hexagonal shaped segments that will form NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s primary mirror for space observations were readied this week to begin final cryogenic testing at...

  11. Activation of mirror-neuron system by erotic video clips predicts degree of induced erection: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Mouras, H; Stoléru, S; Moulier, V; Pélégrini-Issac, M; Rouxel, R; Grandjean, B; Glutron, D; Bittoun, J

    2008-09-01

    Although visually-induced erection is a common occurrence in human male behaviour, the cerebral underpinnings of this response are not well-known. We hypothesized that the magnitude of induced erection would be linearly correlated with the activation of the mirror-neuron system in response to sexually explicit films. When presented with sexual video clips, eight out of ten healthy subjects had an erectile response demonstrated through volumetric penile plethysmography. The level of activation of the left frontal operculum and of the inferior parietal lobules, areas which contain mirror neurons, predicted the magnitude of the erectile response. These results suggest that the response of the mirror-neuron system may not only code for the motor correlates of observed actions, but also for autonomic correlates of these actions. PMID:18598769

  12. The role of shared neural activations, mirror neurons, and morality in empathy--a critical comment.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Claus; Majdandžić, Jasminka

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the phenomenon of empathy has received widespread attention by the field of social neuroscience. This has provided fresh insights for theoretical models of empathy, and substantially influenced the academic and public conceptions about this complex social skill. The present paper highlights three key issues which are often linked to empathy, but which at the same time might obscure our understanding of it. These issues are: (1) shared neural activations and whether these can be interpreted as evidence for simulation accounts of empathy; (2) the causal link of empathy to our presumed mirror neuron system; and (3) the question whether increasing empathy will result in better moral decisions and behaviors. The aim of our review is to provide the basis for critically evaluating our current understanding of empathy, and its public reception, and to inspire new research directions. PMID:25455743

  13. Extremely aspheric mirrors: prototype development of an innovative manufacturing process based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Le Merrer, Joël.; Le Mignant, David; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of focal-plane astronomical instruments requires technological breakthroughs to reduce their system complexity while increasing their scientific performances. Applied to the optical systems, recent studies show that the use of freeform reflective optics allows competitive compact systems with less optical components. In this context, our challenge is to supply an active freeform mirror system, using a combination of different active optics techniques. The optical shape will be provided during the fabrication using the mechanical property of metals to plasticize and will be coupled with a specific actuator system to compensate for the residual form errors, during the instrument operation phase. We present in this article the development of an innovative manufacturing process based on cold hydro-forming method, with the aim to adapt it for VIS/NIR requirements in terms of optical surface quality. It can operate on thin and flat polished initial substrates. The realization of a first prototype for a 100 mm optical diameter mirror is in progress, to compare the mechanical behaviours obtained by tests and by Finite Element Analysis (FEA), for different materials. Then, the formed samples will be characterized optically. The opto-mechanical results will allow a fine tuning of FEA parameters to optimize the residual form errors obtained through this process. It concerns the microstructure considerations, the springback effects and the work hardening evolutions of the samples, depending on the initial substrate properties and the boundary conditions applied. Modeling and tests have started with axi-symmetric spherical and aspherical shapes and will continue with highly aspherics and freeforms.

  14. Modulations of mirroring activity by desire for social connection and relevance of movement.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Oriana R; Sharer, Elizabeth A; Bargh, John A; Pineda, Jaime A

    2014-11-01

    Mirroring neurons fire both when an individual moves and observes another move in kind. This simulation of others' movements is thought to effortlessly and ubiquitously support empathetic connection and social understanding. However, at times this could be maladaptive. How could a boxer mirror a losing opponent's expressions of fatigue, feeling his weariness, precisely when strength is required? Clearly, the boxer must emotionally disconnect from his opponent and those expressions of fatigue must become irrelevant and not mirrored. But, movements that inform of his opponent's intentions to deliver an incoming blow are quite relevant and still should require mirroring. We tested these dimensions of emotional connectedness and relevance of movement in an electroencephalography experiment, where participants' desires to socially connect with a confederate were manipulated. Before manipulation, all participants mirrored the confederate's purely kinematic (a hand opening and closing) and goal-directed (a hand opening and closing around a token that the participant desired) hand movements. After manipulation, unfairly treated subjects ceased to mirror the purely kinematic movements but continued to mirror goal-relevant movements. Those treated fairly continued to mirror all movements. The results suggest that social mirroring can be adaptive in order to meet the demands of a varied social environment. PMID:24194581

  15. Virtual Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90 degrees to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena…

  16. Modeling and structural analysis of honeycomb structure mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yeping

    2012-09-01

    In development of large-scale astronomical telescopes, some promising new technology and method such as honeycomb structure mirrors and silicon carbide mirrors are applied for primary mirrors. Especially in space telescopes, the mirror lightweight design is becoming the key technology and honeycomb structure mirrors are normally required more and more to reduce the cost and increase the feasibility of the telescopes system. In this paper, a parameter FEA model of a two meters honeycomb structure mirror has been built, by using the engineering analysis software ANSYS. Through this model, the structural analysis, thermal deformation analysis and the simulation active correction of low-order frequency aberration by the finite element method have been presented.

  17. Prediction of primary somatosensory neuron activity during active tactile exploration

    PubMed Central

    Campagner, Dario; Evans, Mathew Hywel; Bale, Michael Ross; Erskine, Andrew; Petersen, Rasmus Strange

    2016-01-01

    Primary sensory neurons form the interface between world and brain. Their function is well-understood during passive stimulation but, under natural behaving conditions, sense organs are under active, motor control. In an attempt to predict primary neuron firing under natural conditions of sensorimotor integration, we recorded from primary mechanosensory neurons of awake, head-fixed mice as they explored a pole with their whiskers, and simultaneously measured both whisker motion and forces with high-speed videography. Using Generalised Linear Models, we found that primary neuron responses were poorly predicted by whisker angle, but well-predicted by rotational forces acting on the whisker: both during touch and free-air whisker motion. These results are in apparent contrast to previous studies of passive stimulation, but could be reconciled by differences in the kinematics-force relationship between active and passive conditions. Thus, simple statistical models can predict rich neural activity elicited by natural, exploratory behaviour involving active movement of sense organs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10696.001 PMID:26880559

  18. Active deformation and engineering analysis of CFRP mirror of various lay-up sequences within quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunmei; Yu, Xia; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A regularization stiffness coefficient method was verified further to optimize lay-up sequences of quasi-isotropic laminates for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite mirrors. Firstly, the deformation due to gravity of 1G and temperature difference of 20-100°C and the modal were analyzed by finite element method (FEM). Secondly, the influence of angle error of ply stacking on quasi-isotropic of bending stiffness was evaluated. Finally, an active support system of 49 actuators in circular arrangement is designed for a 500mm CFRP mirror, and its goal is to deform the spherical CFRP mirror to a parabolic. Therefore, the response functions of the actuators were gotten, and the surface form errors and stresses were calculated and analyzed. The results show that the CFRP mirrors designed by the method have a better symmetrical bending deformation under gravity and thermal load and a higher fundamental frequency, and the larger n the better symmetry (for π/n quasi-isotropic laminates); the method reduces the sensitivity to misalignment of ply orientation for symmetric bending, and the mirror's maximum von Mises stress and maximum shear stress are less compared to those laminates not optimized in lay-up sequence.

  19. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  20. Low temperature diode pumped active mirror Yb3+:YAG disk laser amplifier studies.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Samuel; Gonçalvès-Novo, Thierry; Millet, François; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2016-06-13

    An experimental study of a static helium gas gap heat switch concept for laser amplification is presented. High single pass gains with large co-sintered ceramic Yb:YAG disks are recorded in the 80-200K temperature range on a diode pumped active mirror amplifier. PMID:27410286

  1. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  2. Dynamic performance of MEMS deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Christian C.; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Active optics can facilitate two-photon microscopic imaging deep in tissue. We are investigating fast focus control mirrors used in concert with an aberration correction mirror to control the axial position of focus and system aberrations dynamically during scanning. With an adaptive training step, sample-induced aberrations may be compensated as well. If sufficiently fast and precise, active optics may be able to compensate under-corrected imaging optics as well as sample aberrations to maintain diffraction-limited performance throughout the field of view. Toward this end we have measured a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element deformable mirror, and a Revibro Optics electrostatic 4-zone focus control mirror to characterize dynamic performance. Tests for the Multi-DM included both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes. For the step response we measured 10%-90% rise times for the target Zernike amplitude, and wavefront rms error settling times. Frequency sweeps identified the 3dB bandwidth of the mirror when attempting to follow a sinusoidal amplitude trajectory for a specific Zernike mode. For five tested Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism and trefoil) we find error settling times for mode amplitudes up to 400nm to be less than 52 us, and 3 dB frequencies range from 6.5 kHz to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with error settling time of 80 μs for a large 3 um defocus step, and settling time of only 18 μs for a 400nm spherical aberration step. These response speeds are sufficient for intra-scan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  3. Imaging performance of elliptical-boundary varifocal mirrors in active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, Sarah Jane

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems deformable-membrane mirrors provide a means of focus control and attendant spherical aberration correction for miniaturized imaging systems. The technology has greatly advanced in the last decade, thereby extending their focal range capabilities. This dissertation describes a novel SU-8 2002 silicon-on-insulator wafer deformable mirror. A 4.000 mm x 5.657 mm mirror for 45o incident light rays achieves 22 mum stroke or 65 diopters, limited by snapdown. The mirrors show excellent optical quality while flat. Most have peak-to-valley difference of less than 150 nm and root-mean-square less than 25 nm. The process proves simple, only requiring a silicon-on-insulator wafer, SU-8 2002, and a metal layer. Xenon difluoride etches the silicon to release the mirrors. Greater than 90% of the devices survive fabrication and release. While current literature includes several aberration analyses on static mirrors, analyses that incorporate the dynamic nature of these mirrors do not exist. Optical designers may have a choice between deformable mirrors and other types of varifocal mirrors or lenses. Furthermore, a dynamic mirror at an incidence angle other than normal may be desired due to space limitations or for higher throughput (normal incidence requires a beam splitter). This dissertation presents an analysis based on the characteristic function of the system. It provides 2nd and 3rd order aberration coefficients in terms of dynamic focus range and base ray incidence angle. These afford an understanding of the significance of different types of aberrations. Root-mean-square and Strehl calculations provide insight into overall imaging performance for various conditions. I present general guidelines for maximum incidence angle and field of fiew that provide near diffraction-limited performance. Experimental verification of the MEMS mirrors at 5o and 45o incidence angles validates the analytical results. A Blu-ray optical pick-up imaging

  4. Development of Nanolaminate Thin Shell Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    2002-12-01

    The space science community has identified a need for ultra-light weight, large aperture optical systems that are capable of producing high-resolution images of low contrast. Current mirror technologies are limited due either to not being scalable to larger sizes at reasonable masses, or to lack of surface finish, dimensional stability in a space environment or long fabrication times. This paper will discuss the development of thin-shell, nano-laminate mirror substrates that are capable of being electro-actively figured. This technology has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of space based optics by allowing replication of ultra-lightweight primary mirrors from a master precision tool. Precision master tools have been shown to be used multiple times with repeatable surface quality results with less than one week fabrication times for the primary optical mirror substrate. Current development has developed a series of 0.25 and 0.5 meter spherical nanolaminate mirrors that are less than 0.5 kg/m2 areal density before electroactive components are mounted, and a target of less than 2.0 kg/m with control elements. This paper will provide an overview of nanolaminate materials for optical mirrors, modeling of their behavior under figure control and experiments conducted to validate precision control.

  5. Active control of a large deformable mirror for future E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasmi, R.; Le Bihan, D.; Dournaux, J. L.; Sinquin, J. C.; Jagourel, P.

    2010-07-01

    Increasing dimensions of ground based telescopes and adaptive optics needs for these instruments require wide deformable mirrors with a high number of actuators to compensate the effects of the atmospheric turbulence on the wave fronts. The new dimensions and characteristics of these deformable mirrors lead to the apparition of structural vibrations, which may reduce the rejection band width of the adaptive optics control loop. The aim of this paper is the study of the dynamic behavior of a 1-meter prototype of E-ELT's deformable mirror in order to identify its eigenmodes and to propose some ways to control its vibrations. We first present the first eigenmodes of the structure determined by both finite element analysis and experimental modal analysis. Then we present the frequency response of the prototype to a tilt excitation to estimate the effects of its vibrations on the adaptive optics loop. Finally we suggest a method to control the dynamics of the deformable mirror.

  6. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.; Bender, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for "X" and "Y" tilts of the mirror only. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time.

  7. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  8. Comparing mirror neuron system activity between sporadic and familial cases of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayantanava; Nizamie, S Haque; Goyal, Nishant; Tikka, Sai Krishna; Kavoor, Anjana Rao

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogenous disorder, and has often been subtyped on the basis of family history of psychotic disorders. Compared to those without, a positive family history is associated with an earlier age of onset, greater structural brain abnormalities and poorer clinical course. Given recent emphasis on mirror neuron system (MNS) in attempting to explain psychopathology in schizophrenia; present analysis tried to tease out differences in MNS functioning between these two groups. With ethical approval, 10 consenting right-handed patients with schizophrenia (ICD-10-DCR; M=8; Drug-naïve=2) were recruited and divided into two groups of five each (M=4, F=1): those with (age 29.40±5.85 years, duration of illness 50.80±30.84 months) and without (age 29.60±5.77 years, duration of illness 43.20±43.76 months) family history of schizophrenic illness (group difference p>0.05). MNS activity was assessed using event-related desynchronization of EEG Mu waves in response to biological motion on 192-channel EEG Neurofax EEG-1100K. On comparison, while patients had significantly lower mu suppression compared to controls (p<0.001); two schizophrenia groups did not differ between themselves, neither on MNS activity nor on psychopathology (p>0.05). Present study replicates finding of a dysfunctional MNS in schizophrenia patients, and represents a preliminary attempt at comparing two groups of symptomatic schizophrenia patients. In both these groups, MNS dysfunctions were comparable, and commensurate with respect to psychopathology. Thus, MNS dysfunction in schizophrenia might either be inherited or acquired. However, this abnormality forms a common base, and ultimate vulnerability marker, for development of psychopathology during active disease states. PMID:27208448

  9. Rapid Maturation of Edge Sensor Technology and Potential Application in Large Space Telescopes with Segmented Primary Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the history and results of the last two year's efforts to transition inductive edge sensor technology from Technology Readiness Level 2 to Technology Readiness Level 6. Both technical and programmatic challenges were overcome in the design, fabrication, test, and installation of over a thousand sensors making up the Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMs) for the 91 segment, 9.2-meter. Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET). The integration of these sensors with the control system will be discussed along with serendipitous leverage they provided for both initialization alignment and operational maintenance. The experience gained important insights into the fundamental motion mechanics of large segmented mirrors, the relative importance of the variance sources of misalignment errors, the efficient conduct of a program to mature the technology to the higher levels. Unanticipated factors required the team to develop new implementation strategies for the edge sensor information which enabled major segmented mirror controller design simplifications. The resulting increase in the science efficiency of HET will be shown. Finally, the on-going effort to complete the maturation of inductive edge sensor by delivering space qualified versions for future IR (infrared radiation) space telescopes.

  10. Chiral mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-06-01

    Mirrors are used in telescopes, microscopes, photo cameras, lasers, satellite dishes, and everywhere else, where redirection of electromagnetic radiation is required making them arguably the most important optical component. While conventional isotropic mirrors will reflect linear polarizations without change, the handedness of circularly polarized waves is reversed upon reflection. Here, we demonstrate a type of mirror reflecting one circular polarization without changing its handedness, while absorbing the other. The polarization-preserving mirror consists of a planar metasurface with a subwavelength pattern that cannot be superimposed with its mirror image without being lifted out of its plane, and a conventional mirror spaced by a fraction of the wavelength from the metasurface. Such mirrors enable circularly polarized lasers and Fabry-Pérot cavities with enhanced tunability, gyroscopic applications, polarization-sensitive detectors of electromagnetic waves, and can be used to enhance spectroscopies of chiral media.

  11. Micromachined mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, Robert Alan

    This dissertation discusses the fundamental limits of scanning mirror design, focusing on the limitations due to the interaction between mechanical properties (mirror flatness and dynamic deformation), and optical properties (beam divergence and optical resolution). The performance criteria for both resonant-scanning mirrors and steady-state, beam-positioning mirrors are related to the mirror geometries, desired optical resolution, material properties, and mechanical resonant frequencies. The optical resolution of the scanning mirror is linearly dependent on the mirror length, so longer mirrors should provide higher-resolution scanners. However, when undergoing an angular acceleration mirrors exhibit dynamic deformation, which is shown to be proportional to the fifth power of the length. Two different implementations of MEMS scanning mirrors are presented: polysilicon surface-micromachined mirrors and a new design we call the Staggered Torsional Electrostatic Combdrive (STEC) micromirror. The surface-micromachined mirrors are shown to be capable of reliable operation, but they have significant performance limitations caused by the limited thickness obtainable with the LPCVD-polysilicon structures. Calculations show that surface-micromachined mirrors of thickness 1.5 mum and diameter 550 mum are only capable of scanning +/-10 degrees at 251 Hz while retaining diffraction-limited optical performance. The STEC micromirrors, designed to overcome the limitations of the surface-micromachined mirrors, are capable of much higher-speed scanning (up to 61 kHz) without performance-limiting dynamic deformation of the mirror surface. The STEC micromirror fabrication process is extended to create Tensile Optical Surface (TOS) micromirrors---mirrors with thick silicon rib support structures and thin membranes that provide the reflective surface. An application of scanning mirrors is presented: a raster-scanning video display. This demonstration uses two surface

  12. Electroencephalogram evidence for the activation of human mirror neuron system during the observation of intransitive shadow and line drawing actions☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huaping; Sun, Yaoru; Wang, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that hand shadows may activate the motor cortex associated with the mirror neuron system in human brain. However, there is no evidence of activity of the human mirror neuron system during the observation of intransitive movements by shadows and line drawings of hands. This study examined the suppression of electroencephalography mu waves (8–13 Hz) induced by observation of stimuli in 18 healthy students. Three stimuli were used: real hand actions, hand shadow actions and actions made by line drawings of hands. The results showed significant desynchronization of the mu rhythm (“mu suppression”) across the sensorimotor cortex (recorded at C3, Cz and C4), the frontal cortex (recorded at F3, Fz and F4) and the central and right posterior parietal cortex (recorded at Pz and P4) under all three conditions. Our experimental findings suggest that the observation of “impoverished hand actions”, such as intransitive movements of shadows and line drawings of hands, is able to activate widespread cortical areas related to the putative human mirror neuron system. PMID:25206595

  13. Mirrored patterns of lateralized neuronal activation reflect old and new memories in the avian auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Olson, Elizabeth M; Maeda, Rie K; Gobes, Sharon M H

    2016-08-25

    In monolingual humans, language-related brain activation shows a distinct lateralized pattern, in which the left hemisphere is often dominant. Studies are not as conclusive regarding the localization of the underlying neural substrate for language in sequential language learners. Lateralization of the neural substrate for first and second language depends on a number of factors including proficiency and early experience with each language. Similar to humans learning speech, songbirds learn their vocalizations from a conspecific tutor early in development. Here, we show mirrored patterns of lateralization in the avian analog of the mammalian auditory cortex (the caudomedial nidopallium [NCM]) in sequentially tutored zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata​) in response to their first tutor song, learned early in development, and their second tutor song, learned later in development. The greater the retention of song from their first tutor, the more right-dominant the birds were when exposed to that song; the more birds learned from their second tutor, the more left-dominant they were when exposed to that song. Thus, the avian auditory cortex may preserve lateralized neuronal traces of old and new tutor song memories, which are dependent on proficiency of song learning. There is striking resemblance in humans: early-formed language representations are maintained in the brain even if exposure to that language is discontinued. The switching of hemispheric dominance related to the acquisition of early auditory memories and subsequent encoding of more recent memories may be an evolutionary adaptation in vocal learners necessary for the behavioral flexibility to acquire novel vocalizations, such as a second language. PMID:27288718

  14. Perception of hand movement by mirror reflection evokes brain activation in the motor cortex contralateral to a non-moving hand.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ranjan; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated whether perception of hand movement via mirror reflection evokes activation in the motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the non-moving hand (the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand). Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from 14 participants while they performed unimanual extension-flexion hand movements in direct view and mirror view conditions. We measured the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) as a marker of M1 activation in both conditions. Both the direct and mirror view conditions produced LRPs, with the mirror view conditions revealing clear activation in M1 contralateral to the non-moving hand (ipsilateral to the moving hand) during both flexion and extension phases. This unambiguous demonstration of M1 activation in association with a non-moving hand (which is visually-perceived as moving), suggests that perception of movement can directly lead to M1 activation. PMID:27187247

  15. The secondary mirror concept for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Cayrel, Marc; Bonnet, Henri; Ciattaglia, Emanuela; Esselborn, Michael; Koch, Franz; Kurlandczyk, Herve; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Rakich, Andrew; Sedghi, Babak

    2014-07-01

    The E-ELT is an active and adaptive 39-m telescope, with an anastigmat optical solution (5 mirrors including two flats), currently being developed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The convex 4-metre-class secondary mirror (M2) is a thin Zerodur meniscus passively supported by an 18 point axial whiffletree. A warping harness system allows to correct low order deformations of the M2 Mirror. Laterally the mirror is supported on 12 points along the periphery by pneumatic jacks. Due to its high optical sensitivity and the telescope gravity deflections, the M2 unit needs to allow repositioning the mirror during observation. Considering its exposed position 30m above the primary, the M2 unit has to provide good wind rejection. The M2 concept is described and major performance characteristics are presented.

  16. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.; Bender, D.A.

    1994-10-04

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for ''X'' and ''Y'' tilts of the mirror only is disclosed. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time. 4 figs.

  17. Promoting Physical Activity in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Joel; Lindsay, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Douglas M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The principle barriers preventing health care professionals from promoting physical activity include an incomplete understanding of the evidence linking physical activity and health, difficulty in translating research findings into a feasible and efficacious clinical intervention, resistance to adopting a preventive orientation, and concerns about the risks of physical activity. Low level activities likely provide benefit with little risk. PMID:21229089

  18. Tuning of temporo-occipital activity by frontal oscillations during virtual mirror exposure causes erroneous self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Serino, Andrea; Sforza, Anna Laura; Kanayama, Noriaki; van Elk, Michiel; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Self-face recognition, a hallmark of self-awareness, depends on 'off-line' stored information about one's face and 'on-line' multisensory-motor face-related cues. The brain mechanisms of how on-line sensory-motor processes affect off-line neural self-face representations are unknown. This study used 3D virtual reality to create a 'virtual mirror' in which participants saw an avatar's face moving synchronously with their own face movements. Electroencephalographic (EEG) analysis during virtual mirror exposure revealed mu oscillations in sensory-motor cortex signalling on-line congruency between the avatar's and participants' movements. After such exposure and compatible with a change in their off-line self-face representation, participants were more prone to recognize the avatar's face as their own, and this was also reflected in the activation of face-specific regions in the inferotemporal cortex. Further EEG analysis showed that the on-line sensory-motor effects during virtual mirror exposure caused these off-line visual effects, revealing the brain mechanisms that maintain a coherent self-representation, despite our continuously changing appearance. PMID:26215485

  19. Fault mirrors of seismically active faults: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Song, S.; Suppe, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many faults are decorated with naturally polished and glossy surfaces named fault mirrors (FMs) formed during slips. The characterization of FMs is of paramount importance to investigate physico-chemical processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during earthquakes. Here we present detailed microstructural and mineralogical observations of the FMs from borehole cores of seismically active faults. The borehole cores were recovered from 600 to 800 m depth located in the hanging wall of the Hsiaotungshi fault in Taiwan which ruptured during 1935 Mw7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of FMs show that two distinct textural domains, fault gouge and coated materials (nanograins, melt patchs, and graphite), were cut by a well-defined boundary. Melt patches and graphite, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and SEM-EDS analysis, were found to be distributed heterogeneously on the slip surfaces. On the basis of the current kinematic cross section of the Hsiaotungshi fault, all the FMs were exhumed less than 5 km, where ambient temperatures are less than 150°C. It seems that the amorphous materials on the FMs were generated by seismic slips. The sintering nanograins coating the slip surfaces was also suggested to be produced at high slip rates from both natural observation and recent rock deformation experiments. In addition, graphite could be produced by seismic slips and lubricate the fault based on the rock deformation experiments. Our observation suggests that the FMs were composed of several indicators of coseismic events (melt patches, sintering nanograins, and graphite) corresponding to small thermal perturbation generated by seismic slips. Although the contribution of these coseismic indicators on frictional behavior remains largely unknown, it suggests that multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms such as flash heating, powder lubrication and graphitization may be involved during

  20. Magic Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  1. Slumped mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteancu, Mircea; Dragan, Dorin; Dragan, Olivier; Miron, Andrei; Stanescu, Octavian

    2008-02-01

    The authors discusse the construction of slumped mirrors, their fabrication and testing (polishing and lapping). An important topic of the discussion is thermal fabrication of mirrors by using of matrixes. One of the authors of the entry is combining astronomy and aquariums construction.

  2. Einstein's Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  3. Interfering with the neural activity of mirror-related frontal areas impairs mentalistic inferences.

    PubMed

    Herbet, Guillaume; Lafargue, Gilles; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Bonnetblanc, François; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-07-01

    According to recently proposed interactive dual-process theories, mentalizing abilities emerge from the coherent interaction between two physically distinct neural systems: (1) the mirror network, coding for the low-level embodied representations involved in pre-reflective sociocognitive processes and (2) the mentalizing network per se, which codes for higher level representations subtending the reflective attribution of psychological states. However, although the latest studies have shown that the core areas forming these two neurocognitive systems do indeed maintain effective connectivity during mentalizing, it is unclear whether an intact mirror system (and, more specifically, its anterior node, namely the posterior inferior frontal cortex) is a prerequisite for accurate mentalistic inferences. Intraoperative brain mapping via direct electrical stimulation offers a unique opportunity to address this issue. Electrical stimulation of the brain creates a "virtual" lesion, which provides functional information on well-defined parts of the cerebral cortex. In the present study, five patients were mapped in real time while they performed a mentalizing task. We found six responsive sites: four in the lateral part of the right pars opercularis and two in the dorsal part of the right pars triangularis. On the subcortical level, two additional sites were located within the white matter connectivity of the pars opercularis. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the right inferior frontal cortex and its underlying axonal connectivity have a key role in mentalizing. Specifically, our findings support the hypothesis whereby transient, functional disruption of the mirror network influences higher order mentalistic inferences. PMID:24802379

  4. Final design of the Large Binocular Telescope M1 mirror cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglietta, Luciano; Gray, Peter M.; Gallieni, Walter W.; del Vecchio, Ciro

    1997-03-01

    The mirror-cells of the LBT (large binocular telescope) 8.4 m honeycomb borosilicate primary mirrors have to meet various requirements in addition to providing support to the mirrors and to the Gregorian instrumentation. The mirror-cells are directly connected to the main telescope structure and have a structural function themselves in order to supply a very high stiffness boundary to the position actuators (hardpoints) of the primary mirrors. The cells also must guarantee an overall strength to make up the bottom part of the vacuum shell, whose top part is the bell-jar for the mirror aluminizing. Each mirror cell has to hold several components inside: 160 pneumatic actuators for the active optics of the mirror, the thermal control system and its 252 air ejectors, and 6 position actuators. A further requirement for the mirror cell design is also to provide access for the maintenance of all the above sub-systems. In this report we summarize the main mirror-cells functions, their final design and briefly describe how we met all the specifications.

  5. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Thermal Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is being done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in preparation for the next large aperture UVOIR space observatory. A key science mission of that observatory is the detection and characterization of 'Earth-like' exoplanets. Direct exoplanet observation requires a telescope to see a planet which will be 10(exp -10) times dimmer than its host star. To accomplish this using an internal coronagraph requires a telescope with an ultra-stable wavefront error (WFE). This paper investigates parametric relationships between primary mirror physical parameters and thermal WFE stability. Candidate mirrors are designed as a mesh and placed into a thermal analysis model to determine the temperature distribution in the mirror when it is placed inside of an actively controlled cylindrical shroud at Lagrange point 2. Thermal strains resulting from the temperature distribution are found and an estimation of WFE is found to characterize the effect that thermal inputs have on the optical quality of the mirror. This process is repeated for several mirror material properties, material types, and mirror designs to determine how to design a mirror for thermal stability.

  6. Mirror, Mirror on the Wall...?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaster, Gail

    1979-01-01

    The study determined the value of using a mirror for speech teaching by recording manner, place, voicing, and blend errors produced by 27 hearing-impaired children (5-13 years old) while imitating consonant-vowel syllables under three conditions (audition alone, audition plus direct vision, and audition plus vision using a mirror). (Author)

  7. Enhancing the mirror illusion with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jax, Steven A; Rosa-Leyra, Diana L; Coslett, H Branch

    2015-05-01

    Visual feedback has a strong impact on upper-extremity movement production. One compelling example of this phenomena is the mirror illusion (MI), which has been used as a treatment for post-stroke movement deficits (mirror therapy). Previous research indicates that the MI increases primary motor cortex excitability, and this change in excitability is strongly correlated with the mirror's effects on behavioral performance of neurologically-intact controls. Based on evidence that primary motor cortex excitability can also be increased using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), we tested whether bilateral tDCS to the primary motor cortices (anode right-cathode left and anode left-cathode right) would modify the MI. We measured the MI using a previously-developed task in which participants make reaching movements with the unseen arm behind a mirror while viewing the reflection of the other arm. When an offset in the positions of the two limbs relative to the mirror is introduced, reaching errors of the unseen arm are biased by the reflected arm's position. We found that active tDCS in the anode right-cathode left montage increased the magnitude of the MI relative to sham tDCS and anode left-cathode right tDCS. We take these data as a promising indication that tDCS could improve the effect of mirror therapy in patients with hemiparesis. PMID:25796410

  8. Activity Based Astronomy for Primary Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginns, Ian

    Print materials in astronomy such as books, journals, charts, and posters are typically the sources of information for teachers and children about the moon, the sun, lunar and solar eclipses, planetary sizes, distances of planets from the sun, planetary atmospheres, and so on. This paper describes and analyzes a number of activities designed to…

  9. Active feedback stabilization of multimode flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.; Fisher, A.

    2014-07-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical sensors, a digital signal processor and charge-injecting electrodes. The use of multiple sensors and actuators enable the feedback to simultaneously stabilize two modes of the fast-growing, slowly rotating flute instability. Step function response and magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy indicate a smooth frequency response and an inherent delayed response of the plasma drift due to the sheath resistivity. The measured feedback power is very small relative to the heating power of the plasma.

  10. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1987-11-10

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors. 5 figs.

  11. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1986-03-21

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors.

  12. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    A mirror mount (10) is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror (28) while keeping the location of a point (56) on the surface of the mirror (28) fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount (10). Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders (30,32) that are bearing (52) mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell (42) that is air bearing (72,74) mounted to move between a clamp (60) and an upper pedestal bearing (44). The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell (42) lie upon the point (56). Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror (28) by a pair of pitch paddles (34) and a pair of roll paddles (36) that are independently and separately moved by control rods (76,80) driven by motors (78,82).

  13. Fused silica mirror development for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An advanced design, lightweight, fuse-quartz mirror of sandwich construction was evaluated for optical figure performance at cryogenic temperatures. A low temperature shroud was constructed with an integral mirror mount and interface to a cryostat for use in a vacuum chamber. The mirror was tested to 13 K. Cryogenic distortion of the mirror was measured interferometrically. Separate interferometry of the chamber window during the test permitted subtraction of the small window distortions from the data. Results indicate that the imaging performance of helium cooled, infrared telescopes will be improved using this type of mirror without correction of cryogenic distortion of the primary mirror.

  14. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  15. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  16. Influence functions of a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L

    1997-04-01

    Thin shallow spherical shell theory is used to derive the general influence function, owing to uniform and/or discrete (actuators) loads, for a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror of uniform thickness with a central hole and supported at discrete points. Small elastic deformations are considered. No symmetry on the load distribution constrains the model. Explicit analytical expressions of the set of equations are given for calculating the influence functions. Results agree with the finite element analysis (FEA) to within 1%. When the FEA requires megabytes of RAM memory, the analytical method needs only kilobytes and typically runs 30 times faster. This is a crucial advantage for the iterative optimization of mirror supports such as large passive or active meniscus-shaped primary mirror supports or Cassegrain/Gregorian adaptive secondary actuator configurations. References are given on estimating the shear effects (thick mirror), the thickness variation effect, and the influence of the size of the support pads. PMID:18253168

  17. JWST Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial Design Studies leading to JWST, Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes required to achieve the science goals of imaging the earliest galaxies and proto-galaxies after the big bang. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996. Achieving the desired science objectives required a never before demonstrated space telescope capability, one with an 8 meter class primary mirror that is diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operating in deep space at temperatures well below 70K. Beryllium was identified in the NASA "Yardstick" design as the preferred material because of its ability to provide stable optical performance in the anticipated thermal environment as well as its excellent specific stiffness. Because of launch vehicle constraints, two very significant architectural constraints were placed upon the telescope: segmentation and areal density. Each of these directly resulted in specific technology capability requirements. First, because the maximum launch vehicle payload fairing diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. Second, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density specification of 20 kilograms per square meter.

  18. Science Activities That Work: Perceptions of Primary School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, Ken

    2002-06-01

    Many primary school teachers in Australia tend to be reluctant to teach science, partly because they are not confident in science and have limited science background knowledge. However, quite a number of primary school teachers still manage to teach some science. When they plan to teach science, many of them use the term science activities that work. Such activities seem to be related to science pedagogical content knowledge for some primary teachers. In order to better understand what the term activities that work means, twenty teachers from several schools were interviewed and asked what they understood by this expression. Themes that emerged suggest that activities that work are hands on, are interesting and motivating for the children, have a clear outcome or result, are manageable in the classroom, use equipment that is readily available, and are preferably used in a context where science is integrated into themes. Implications for curriculum and for preservice teacher education are considered.

  19. Mirror Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Under a NASA contract, MI-CVD developed a process for producing bulk silicon carbide by means of a chemical vapor deposition process. The technology allows growth of a high purity material with superior mechanical/thermal properties and high polishability - ideal for mirror applications. The company employed the technology to develop three research mirrors for NASA Langley and is now marketing it as CVD SILICON CARBIDE. Its advantages include light weight, thermal stability and high reflectivity. The material has nuclear research facility applications and is of interest to industrial users of high power lasers.

  20. An Active Heater Control Concept to Meet IXO Type Mirror Module Thermal-Structural Distortion Requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flight mirror assemblies (FMAs) of large telescopes, such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), have very stringent thermal-structural distortion requirements. The spatial temperature gradient requirement within a FMA could be as small as 0.05 C. Con ventionally, heaters and thermistors are attached to the stray light baffle (SLB), and centralized heater controllers (i.e., heater controller boards located in a large electronics box) are used. Due to the large number of heater harnesses, accommodating and routing them is extremely difficult. The total harness length/mass is very large. This innovation uses a thermally conductive pre-collimator to accommodate heaters and a distributed heater controller approach. It minimizes the harness length and mass, and reduces the problem of routing and accommodating them. Heaters and thermistors are attached to a short (4.67 cm) aluminum portion of the pre-collimator, which is thermally coupled to the SLB. Heaters, which have a very small heater power density, and thermistors are attached to the exterior of all the mirror module walls. The major portion (23.4 cm) of the pre-collimator for the middle and outer modules is made of thin, non-conductive material. It minimizes the view factors from the FMA and heated portion of the precollimator to space. It also minimizes heat conduction from one end of the FMA to the other. Small and multi-channel heater controllers, which have adjustable set points and internal redundancy, are used. They are mounted to the mechanical support structure members adjacent to each module. The IXO FMA, which is 3.3 m in diameter, is an example of a large telescope. If the heater controller boards are centralized, routing and accommodating heater harnesses is extremely difficult. This innovation has the following advantages. It minimizes the length/mass of the heater harness between the heater controllers and heater circuits. It reduces the problem of routing and accommodating the harness on the

  1. Active control of adaptive optics system in a large segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, M.; Agrawal, B. N.

    2014-02-01

    For a large adaptive optics system such as a large segmented mirror telescope (SMT), it is often difficult, although not impossible, to directly apply common multi-input multi-output (MIMO) controller design methods due to the computational burden imposed by the large dimension of the system model. In this article, a practical controller design method is proposed which significantly reduces the system dimension for a system where the dimension required to represent the dynamics of the plant is much smaller than the dimension of the full plant model. The proposed method decouples the dynamic and static parts of the plant model by a modal decomposition technique to separately design a controller for each part. Two controllers are then combined using the so-called sensitivity decoupling method so that the resulting feedback loop becomes the superposition of the two individual feedback loops of the dynamic and static parts. A MIMO controller was designed by the proposed method using the H ∞ loop-shaping technique for an SMT model to be compared with other controllers proposed in the literature. Frequency-domain analysis and time-domain simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed controller.

  2. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  3. Research study to determine critical optical/mechanical properties of materials considered for selection as substrates for the primary mirror on a large telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slomba, A. F.; Goggin, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the stability of a specific low expansion glass-ceramic material relative to its use as a large, lightweight mirror substrate for diffraction-limited spaceborne optical applications. These evaluations were made on a segment (0.44 meter diameter by 0.31 meter thick) of a 2 to 3 meter diameter mirror blank. The dimensional stability of this mirror was measured interferometrically before and after lightweighting, as a function of rough machining, etching, thermal environment, and support configuration. A special computer analysis program was used to plot the coefficients corresponding to aberrations with sixfold symmetry (caused by the mirror's self-weight deflection on a three point support). The objective was to enhance the test sensitivity. Results indicate that any such effects due to self-weight deflection are of the order of 0.015 lambda rms. The rms and peak-to-peak figure changes associated with each processing operation are summarized.

  4. Conicoid Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castano, Diego J.; Hawkins, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The first-order equation relating object and image location for a mirror of arbitrary conic-sectional shape is derived. It is also shown that the parabolic reflecting surface is the only one free of aberration and only in the limiting case of distant sources. (Contains 3 figures.)

  5. Mirror Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of making a mirror support comprising a composite, the composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes, wherein at least two of the plurality of carbon nanotubes are bonded to each other through a bridging moiety bound to each of the two carbon nanotubes, and a laminate comprising the composite.

  6. [Phantom limb pain syndrome: therapeutic approach using mirror therapy in a Geriatric Department].

    PubMed

    González García, Paloma; Manzano Hernández, M Pilar; Muñoz Tomás, M Teresa; Martín Hernández, Carlos; Forcano García, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of mirror visual feedback was initially introduced to alleviate phantom pain by restoring motor function through plastic changes in the human primary motor cortex. It is a promising novel technique that gives a new perspective to neurological rehabilitation. Using this therapy, the mirror neuron system is activated and decrease the activity of those systems that perceive protopathic pain, making somatosensory cortex reorganization possible. This paper reports the results of the mirror therapy in three patients with phantom limb pain after recent lower limb amputation, showing its analgesic effects and its benefits as a comprehensive rehabilitation instrument for lower limb amputee geriatric patients. PMID:23498652

  7. Kodak AMSD Mirror Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary; Dahl, Roger; Barrett, David; Bottom, John; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror System Demonstration Program is developing minor technology for the next generation optical systems. Many of these systems will require extremely lightweight and stable optics due to the overall size of the primary mirror. These segmented, deployable systems require new technology that AMSD is developing. The on-going AMSD program is a critical enabler for Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) which will start in 2002. The status of Kodak's AMSD mirror and future plans will be discussed with respect to the NGST program.

  8. TRL-6 Qualification of JWST Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-01-01

    Since 1996, all key mirror technology for a JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA), as defined directly from the JWST Level 1 Science Requirements, have been developed and matured from a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3 to 6. This has occurred as the result of a highly successful technology development program including sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD), Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD), and JWST flight mirror fabrication. Directly traceable prototypes (and in some cases the flight hardware itself) has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment.

  9. Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim; Rose, M. Annette

    1998-01-01

    Students use tables of anthropometric data, their own measurements, underlying principles of physics, and math to solve a problem. The problem is to determine the height of a wall mirror, and where to mount it, so that 90% of the clientele can view their entire length without stretching or bending. (Author)

  10. Paranal Receives New Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    A 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror, a vital part of the world's newest and fastest survey telescope, VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) has been delivered to its new mountaintop home at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The mirror will now be coupled with a small camera for initial testing prior to installing the main camera in June. Full scientific operations are due to start early next year. VISTA will form part of ESO's Very Large Telescope facility. ESO PR Photo 10d/08 ESO PR Photo 10d/08 The VISTA Mirror The mirror arrived over the Easter weekend at the Paranal Observatory where the telescope is being assembled at an altitude of 2518m, in Chile's Atacama Desert. VISTA Project Manager Alistair McPherson from STFC's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC) accompanied the mirror on its journey to Chile: "This is a major milestone for the VISTA project. The precious mirror was loaded on to a plane in a special cradle that used tennis balls to cushion it from impact for its arduous journey across three continents. " "The mirror had a difficult four-day journey, by air and by road. It arrived in perfect condition and now that it has been coated, we will install the mirror in the telescope with a small test camera for about four weeks testing. We plan to install the main camera in June," said the Project Scientist on VISTA, Will Sutherland of Queen Mary, University of London, UK. The VISTA 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror is the most strongly curved large mirror ever polished to such a precise and exacting surface accuracy - deviations from a perfect surface of less than 1/3000th of the thickness of a human hair. On arrival at Cerro Paranal it was safely craned into the telescope dome where it was washed and coated with a thin layer of protected silver in the facility's coating plant. Silver is the best metal for the purpose since it reflects over 98% of near-infrared light, better than the more commonly used aluminium. To date, the reflectivity

  11. Smart materials optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional or `smart' composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation as well. Moreover, since the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and 3D printing. The technology therefore holds promise for development of a new generation of lightweight, compact `smart' telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  12. Commercial Activities in Primary Schools: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Gary

    2007-01-01

    The commercialisation of schools is a controversial issue, but very little is known about the actual situation in UK schools. The aim of this study was to investigate, with particular reference to health education and health promotion, commercial activities and their regulation in primary schools in the Yorkshire and Humber region of the UK. A…

  13. Primary cilia and Gli3 activity regulate cerebral cortical size

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra L.; Wilson, John P.; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Baolin; McConnell, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    During neural development, patterning, neurogenesis and overall growth are highly regulated and coordinated between different brain regions. Here, we show that primary cilia and the regulation of Gli activity, are necessary for the normal expansion of the cerebral cortex. We show that loss of Kif3a, an important functional component of primary cilia, leads to the degeneration of primary cilia, marked overgrowth of the cortex, and altered cell cycle kinetics within cortical progenitors. The G1 phase of the cell cycle is shortened through a mechanism likely involving reduced Gli3 activity and a resulting increase in expression of cyclin D1 and Fgf15. The defects in Gli3 activity alone are sufficient to accelerate cell cycle kinetics and cause the molecular changes seen in brains that lack cilia. Finally, we show that levels of full-length and repressor Gli3 proteins are tightly regulated during normal development and correlate with changes in expression of two known Shh-target genes, CyclinD1 and Fgf15, and with the normal lengthening of the cell cycle during corticogenesis. These data suggest that Gli3 activity is regulated through the primary cilium to control cell cycle length in the cortex and thus determine cortical size. PMID:21976438

  14. Compulsory "Foreign Language Activities" in Japanese Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashimoto, Kayoko

    2011-01-01

    From 2011, the new curriculum for introducing English to Japanese primary schools will be fully implemented in the form of "foreign language activities". This innovation forms part of the government's plan to cultivate "Japanese with English abilities", a development based on the awareness, particularly in the business sector, that equipping…

  15. Active Classroom Participation in a Group Scribbles Primary Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenli; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2011-01-01

    A key stimulus of learning efficacy for students in the classroom is active participation and engagement in the learning process. This study examines the nature of teacher-student and student-student discourse when leveraged by an interactive technology--Group Scribbles (GS) in a Primary 5 Science classroom in Singapore which supports rapid…

  16. Talking Points: Discussion Activities in the Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    "Talking Points: Discussion Activities in the Primary Classroom" encourages and supports classroom discussion on a range of topics, enabling children to develop the important life-skill of effective group communication. Children who can explain their own ideas and take account of the points of view and reasons of others are in the process of…

  17. Status on NGST Mirror Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David

    2000-01-01

    The NGST primary mirror is anticipated to be a segmented deployable optic with segment size being in the range of 1 - 3 m depending on the details of the architecture. The secondary mirror will likely be a monolith similar in size to one of the primary mirror segments. Over the past 4 years the NGST program has initiated and implemented an aggressive lightweight cryogenic mirror technology program. The program was designed to challenge and excite the optical community in reaching a new standard in production of lightweight optics. The goal was to develop optics at less than 15 kg/sq m, operational at approx. 40 K and meeting the overall NGST observatory requirement for diffraction limited performance at 2 microns. In order to meet the NGST needs, technology efforts were initiated to investigate and develop mirrors in a variety of materials, which held promise for the program. The basic technology approaches have initially targeted the production of large mirrors in the 1.2 - 2.0 m diameter range (or side-to-side distance in the case of hexagonal optics). Although this size may not be the final size of an NGST primary mirror segment, it was felt that a 1.2 - 2.0 m optic would be of sufficient size to understand the mirror material and fabrication processes which drive the cost and schedule of mirror production. The ultimate goals of the technology program are both to demonstrate mirrors meeting, the NGST performance requirements, and to establish cost and schedule credibility for producing and implementing the mirrors for the NGST flight system. Establishing cost and schedule credibility is essential to NGST which is a cost capped mission, with past program experience demonstrating that the optics will be a large portion of the total cost of the program. The first two years of the program were dedicated to understanding; the various applicable materials, funding those materials to various levels of maturity and implementing the first large mirror procurement, the

  18. Mirror monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2014-12-02

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing a mirror electron monochromator (MirrorChrom) attachment to new and retrofitted electron microscopes (EMs) for improving the energy resolution of the EM from the characteristic range of 0.2-0.5 eV to the range of 10-50 meV. This improvement will enhance the characterization of materials by imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the monochromator will refine the energy spectra characterizing materials, as obtained from transmission EMs [TEMs] fitted with electron spectrometers, and it will increase the spatial resolution of the images of materials taken with scanning EMs (SEMs) operated at low voltages. EOI’s MirrorChrom technology utilizes a magnetic prism to simultaneously deflect the electron beam off the axis of the microscope column by 90° and disperse the electrons in proportional to their energies into a module with an electron mirror and a knife-edge. The knife-edge cuts off the tails of the energy distribution to reduce the energy spread of the electrons that are reflected, and subsequently deflected, back into the microscope column. The knife-edge is less prone to contamination, and thereby charging, than the conventional slits used in existing monochromators, which improves the reliability and stability of the module. The overall design of the MirrorChrom exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in order to maintain the beam brightness – a parameter that impacts how well the electron beam can be focused downstream onto a sample. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate monochromator architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between energy resolution and beam current to achieve the optimum design for three particular applications with market potential: increasing the spatial resolution of low voltage SEMs, increasing the energy resolution of low voltage TEMs (beam energy of 5-20 keV), and increasing the energy resolution of conventional TEMs (beam

  19. Mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    The physics of VUV and x-ray reflection is reviewed. The main functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are stated briefly and include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image of the source, focusing, and collimation. Methods of fabrication of optical surfaces are described. Types of imperfections are discussed, including, aberrations, surface figure inaccuracy, roughness, and degradation due to use. Calculation of the photon beam thermal load, including computer modelling, is considered. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  20. High Precision Metrology on the Ultra-Lightweight W 50.8 cm f/1.25 Parabolic SHARPI Primary Mirror using a CGH Null Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott

    2004-01-01

    For potential use on the SHARPI mission, Eastman Kodak has delivered a 50.8cm CA f/1.25 ultra-lightweight UV parabolic mirror with a surface figure error requirement of 6nm RMS. We address the challenges involved in verifying and mapping the surface error of this large lightweight mirror to +/-3nm using a diffractive CGH null lens. Of main concern is removal of large systematic errors resulting from surface deflections of the mirror due to gravity as well as smaller contributions from system misalignment and reference optic errors. We present our efforts to characterize these errors and remove their wavefront error contribution in post-processing as well as minimizing the uncertainty these calculations introduce. Data from Kodak and preliminary measurements from NASA Goddard will be included.

  1. Software for Alignment of Segments of a Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Drew P.; Howard, Richard T.; Ly, William C.; Rakoczy, John M.; Weir, John M.

    2006-01-01

    The Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMS) software is designed to maintain the overall focus and figure of the large segmented primary mirror of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. This software reads measurements made by sensors attached to the segments of the primary mirror and from these measurements computes optimal control values to send to actuators that move the mirror segments.

  2. 15 meter multiple mirror telescope design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Woolf, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    Taking as a starting point the existing Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT), a concept for a larger and more advanced instrument has been developed. It makes use of four 7.5-m diameter paraboloidal glass primaries of the honeycomb sandwich type being developed by the University of Arizona. These are mounted quite close together in a square configuration, with their axes coaligned. Separate optical configurations are provided, for optical and infrared applications. To minimze telescope emissivity in the thermal infrared at the combined focus, all the beam combining and streering optics that follow the tertiary mirrors are enclosed in a large central dewar and cooled with liquid nitrogen. The diffraction-limited resolution at the combined focus of 0.11 arcsec at 10 micrometers wavelength is equivalent to that of a 20.5 meter filled aperture. Diffraction-limited resolution should be routinely achievable at 10 and 20 micrometers, if active correction of large-scale wavefront errors is implemented.

  3. Stressed mirror polishing: finite element simulation of mirror blank deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Lu, Lihong

    2014-08-01

    The theoretical principle of Stressed Mirror Polishing (SMP) is introduced, including the representation method of elastic deformation, the formulations of discrete bending moment and shearing force. A Finite Element Analysis (FEA) simulation model of has been set up by ANSYS software. The warping facility in this model is consisted of 36 aluminum alloy arms equally distribute on the ambit of mirror blank. Two forces are applied on each arm to provide bending moment and shearing force. Taking type 82 segment of Thirty Meters Telescope (TMT) primary mirror for example, a FEA simulation of mirror blank deformation has been performed. Simulation result shows that, the deformation error is 33μm PV. The theoretical deformation PV value is 205μm and the simulation deformation PV value is 172μm, converging rate reaches to 0.84 in a single warping cycle. After three or four warping cycles, the residue error may converge into 1μm.

  4. ATLAST ULE mirror segment performance analytical predictions based on thermally induced distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhower, Michael J.; Cohen, Lester M.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Matthews, Gary W.; Nissen, Joel A.; Park, Sang C.; Peabody, Hume L.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for a 9.2 m aperture space-borne observatory operating across the UV/Optical/NIR spectra. The primary mirror for ATLAST is a segmented architecture with pico-meter class wavefront stability. Due to its extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expansion, a leading candidate for the primary mirror substrate is Corning's ULE® titania-silicate glass. The ATLAST ULE® mirror substrates will be maintained at `room temperature' during on orbit flight operations minimizing the need for compensation of mirror deformation between the manufacturing temperature and the operational temperatures. This approach requires active thermal management to maintain operational temperature while on orbit. Furthermore, the active thermal control must be sufficiently stable to prevent time-varying thermally induced distortions in the mirror substrates. This paper describes a conceptual thermal management system for the ATLAST 9.2 m segmented mirror architecture that maintains the wavefront stability to less than 10 pico-meters/10 minutes RMS. Thermal and finite element models, analytical techniques, accuracies involved in solving the mirror figure errors, and early findings from the thermal and thermal-distortion analyses are presented.

  5. Dynamical activities of primary somatosensory cortices studied by magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Kuniharu

    2009-11-01

    A blind identification method of transfer functions in feedback systems is introduced for examination of dynamical activities of cortices by magnetoencephalography study. Somatosensory activities are examined in 5 Hz periodical median nerve stimulus. In the present paper, we will try two careful preprocessing procedures for the identification method to obtain impulse responses between primary somatosensory cortices. Time series data of the somatosensory evoked field are obtained by using a blind source separation of the T/k type (fractional) decorrelation method. Time series data of current dipoles of primary somatosensory cortices are transformed from the time series data of the somatosensory evoked field by the inverse problem. Fluctuations of current dipoles of them are obtained after elimination of deterministic periodical evoked waveforms. An identification method based on feedback system theory is used for estimation of transfer functions in a feedback model from obtained fluctuations of currents dipoles of primary somatosensory cortices. Dynamical activities between them are presented by Bode diagrams of transfer functions and their impulse responses: the time delay of about 30 ms via corpus callosum is found in the impulse response of identified transfer function.

  6. Mirror system activity for action and language is embedded in the integration of dorsal and ventral pathways.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    We develop the view that the involvement of mirror neurons in embodied experience grounds brain structures that underlie language, but that many other brain regions are involved. We stress the cooperation between the dorsal and ventral streams in praxis and language. Both have perceptual and motor schemas but the perceptual schemas in the dorsal path are affordances linked to specific motor schemas for detailed motor control, whereas the ventral path supports planning and decision making. This frames the hypothesis that the mirror system for words evolved from the mirror system for actions to support words-as-phonological-actions, with semantics provided by the linkage to neural systems supporting perceptual and motor schemas. We stress the importance of computational models which can be linked to the parametric analysis of data and conceptual analysis of these models to support new patterns of understanding of the data. In the domain of praxis, we assess the FARS model of the canonical system for grasping, the MNS models for the mirror system for grasping, and the Augmented Competitive Queuing model that extends the control of action to the opportunistic scheduling of action sequences and also offers a new hypothesis on the role of mirror neurons in self action. Turning to language, we use Construction Grammar as our linguistic framework to get beyond single words to phrases and sentences, and initiate analysis of what brain functions must complement mirror systems to support this functionality. PMID:19942271

  7. Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byberg, Alicia; Russell, J. Kevin; Kaukler, Donna; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper will report risk issues associated with designing, manufacturing, and testing the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD). The Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) will be developed as a lightweight primary mirror system that can be produced at a low cost and with a short manufacturing schedule. This technology will add to the knowledge base for selection for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), Space Based Laser (SBL), Research Laboratory mission (AFRL), and other government agency programs.

  8. Chinese "Magic" Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinson, Derek B.

    1992-01-01

    Chinese "magic" mirrors are made from bronze with the front side a mirror and the reverse side a molded image. When light is reflected from the mirror,the image on the reverse side appears. Discusses reflections of conventional mirrors, possible explanations for the magic mirror phenomenon, and applications of the phenomenon to semiconductor…

  9. CNS activation and regional connectivity during pantomime observation: No engagement of the mirror neuron system for deaf signers

    PubMed Central

    Emmorey, Karen; Xu, Jiang; Gannon, Patrick; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Braun, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Deaf signers have extensive experience using their hands to communicate. Using fMRI, we examined the neural systems engaged during the perception of manual communication in 14 deaf signers and 14 hearing non-signers. Participants passively viewed blocked video clips of pantomimes (e.g., peeling an imaginary banana) and action verbs in American Sign Language (ASL) that were rated as meaningless by non-signers (e.g., TO-DANCE). In contrast to visual fixation, pantomimes strongly activated fronto-parietal regions (the mirror neuron system, MNS) in hearing non-signers, but only bilateral middle temporal regions in deaf signers. When contrasted with ASL verbs, pantomimes selectively engaged inferior and superior parietal regions in hearing non-signers, but right superior temporal cortex in deaf signers. The perception of ASL verbs recruited similar regions as pantomimes for deaf signers, with some evidence of greater involvement of left inferior frontal gyrus for ASL verbs. Functional connectivity analyses with left hemisphere seed voxels (ventral premotor, inferior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus) revealed robust connectivity with the MNS for the hearing non-signers. Deaf signers exhibited functional connectivity with the right hemisphere that was not observed for the hearing group for the fusiform gyrus seed voxel. We suggest that life-long experience with manual communication, and/or auditory deprivation, may alter regional connectivity and brain activation when viewing pantomimes. We conclude that the lack of activation within the MNS for deaf signers does not support an account of human communication that depends upon automatic sensorimotor resonance between perception and action. PMID:19679192

  10. Active mirror amplifiers for HiPER kiloJoule beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteloup, J.-C.; Lucianetti, A.

    2013-11-01

    A major challenge the HiPER [1] project is facing is to derive laser architectures satisfying simultaneously all HiPER requirements; among them, high wall-plug efficiency (15 to 20%) and repetition rate (around 10 Hz) are the most challenging constraints. Several groups over the world are actively pursuing research in the field of High average power Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) [2]. We propose a comprehensive solution for a 1 kJ DPSSL beamline as the unit brick of a 12 beams bundle.

  11. Mirror-Image Organometallic Osmium Arene Iminopyridine Halido Complexes Exhibit Similar Potent Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Soni, Rina; Romero, María J; Pizarro, Ana M; Salassa, Luca; Clarkson, Guy J; Hearn, Jessica M; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Four chiral OsII arene anticancer complexes have been isolated by fractional crystallization. The two iodido complexes, (SOs,SC)-[Os(η6-p-cym)(ImpyMe)I]PF6 (complex 2, (S)-ImpyMe: N-(2-pyridylmethylene)-(S)-1-phenylethylamine) and (ROs,RC)-[Os(η6-p-cym)(ImpyMe)I]PF6 (complex 4, (R)-ImpyMe: N-(2-pyridylmethylene)-(R)-1-phenylethylamine), showed higher anticancer activity (lower IC50 values) towards A2780 human ovarian cancer cells than cisplatin and were more active than the two chlorido derivatives, (SOs,SC)-[Os(η6-p-cym)(ImpyMe)Cl]PF6, 1, and (ROs,RC)-[Os(η6-p-cym)(ImpyMe)Cl]PF6, 3. The two iodido complexes were evaluated in the National Cancer Institute 60-cell-line screen, by using the COMPARE algorithm. This showed that the two potent iodido complexes, 2 (NSC: D-758116/1) and 4 (NSC: D-758118/1), share surprisingly similar cancer cell selectivity patterns with the anti-microtubule drug, vinblastine sulfate. However, no direct effect on tubulin polymerization was found for 2 and 4, an observation that appears to indicate a novel mechanism of action. In addition, complexes 2 and 4 demonstrated potential as transfer-hydrogenation catalysts for imine reduction. PMID:24114923

  12. Calculation of a mirror asymmetric effect in electron scattering from chiral targets. [in optically active medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, A.; Van House, J.; Hegstrom, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamical calculation is presented of the helicity induced in an initially unpolarized electron beam after elastic scattering from an optically active medium, a process analogous to the circular polarization induced in unpolarized light following Rayleigh scattering from chiral targets. The calculation is based on the bound helical electron model of a chiral molecule, according to which the major contribution to the helicity is provided by the perturbation of the electron bound state by the spin-orbit interaction of the bound electrons moving in the electric field of the molecular core. The net helicity acquired is found to depend directly on a molecular asymmetry factor and the square of the atomic number of the heaviest atom in an asymmetric environment. For the case of carbon, the induced helicity is on the order of 0.00001, which would account for its lack of observation in a recent experiment. Results may have implications for the origin of optical activity in biological molecules by the differential ionization of D and L isomers by beta-decay electrons.

  13. The Multiple Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. M.; Ulich, B. L.; Shannon, R. R.; Carleton, N. P.; Geary, J. C.; Latham, D. W.; Angel, J. R. P.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Low, F. J.; Weymann, R. J.

    The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT), located on top of Mount Hopkins (2600 m) in Arizona, consists of six main telescope systems, each of which is a classical Cassegrain with a 1.8 m diameter parabolic primary with focal ratio f/2.7, and a hyperbolic secondary producing a final f/31.6 for each of the individual telescopes. The most significant departures of the MMT from conventional optical telescope technology are (1) the use of light-weight 'egg-crate' mirrors, which reduced the telescope weight, (2) the use of an alt-azimuth mount, which simplifies the gravitational effects on the structure, (3) the use of a ball-bearing support rather than hydrostatic bearings, resulting in cost savings and less maintenance, (4) the use of spur gear drives rather than worm gears, and (5) the use of multiple coaligned light collectors rather than a single monolithic mirror. Early multiple objective telescopes are discussed, and the early history of the MMT project is given. The design and performance of the telescope are explained, and MMT instrumentation (spectrograph, optical design, detector, infrared photometer, SAO CCD camera) is given. Astronomical research with the telescope is discussed, along with plans for future multiple objective telescopes.

  14. Active control of the Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yichun; Yang, Dehua; Jin, Zhenyu; Liu, Zhong; Qin, Wei

    2014-07-01

    The Chinese Giant Solar Telescope (CGST) is the next generation solar telescope of China with diameter of 8 meter. The unique feature of CGST is that its primary is a ring, which facilitates the polarization detection and thermal control. In its present design and development phase, two primary mirror patterns are considered. For one thing, the primary mirror is expected to construct with mosaic mirror with 24 trapezoidal (or petal) segments, for another thing, a monolithic mirror is also a candidate for its primary mirror. Both of them depend on active control technique to maintain the optical quality of the ring mirror. As a solar telescope, the working conditions of the CGST are quite different from those of the stellar telescopes. To avoid the image deterioration due to the mirror seeing and dome seeing, especially in the case of the concentration of flux in a solar telescope, large aperture solar projects prefer to adopt open telescopes and open domes. In this circumstance, higher wind loads act on the primary mirror directly, which will cause position errors and figure errors of the primary with matters worse than those of the current 10-meter stellar telescopes with dome protect. Therefore, it gives new challenges to the active control capability, telescope structure design, and wind shielding design. In this paper, the study progress of active control of CGST for its mosaic and monolithic mirror are presented, and the wind effects on such two primary mirrors are also investigated.

  15. Fabricating the LSST Mirrors: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, Jacques; Gressler, W.; Neill, D.; Hileman, E.; LSST Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The LSST uses a modified Paul-Baker 3-mirror optical design with 8.4-m primary, 3.4-m secondary and 5-m tertiary mirrors feeding a 3 element refractive corrector to produce a 3.5-degree diameter field of view over a 64-cm flat focal surface in 6 spectral bands with excellent image quality. The proximity of the primary and tertiary surfaces enables fabrication of both mirrors from a single substrate. This unique design, referred to as the M1M3 monolith, offers significant advantages in the reduction of degrees of freedom during operational alignment and improved structural stiffness for the otherwise annular primary surface. The convex secondary will be the largest of its kind. As with all large optical elements, both of the LSST mirrors have long procurement times. In order to meet the LSST's first light schedule for the fall of 2014 we have started the fabrication process on both mirrors using private funding. The M1M3 monolith is being fabricated at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab using their structured borosilicate spin casting technology. The M1M3 was successfully cast over the summer of 2008. The mold refractory cleanout process and detailed inspections are underway in preparation for back side processing. The casting includes special design features to enable the mirror to operate under the increased loads caused by the high accelerations needed by the LSST. The secondary mirror substrate is being made using Corning's Ultra Low Expansion (ULE) process, resulting in an annular meniscus mirror 100mm thick and a 1.8m diameter central hole. Glass selection for the secondary mirror has begun and the substrate will be fused late in 2008. Both mirrors are on schedule and their early start has substantially reduced risk within the LSST project. Topics: LSST Optics Mirrors

  16. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizer

    PubMed Central

    Miot, Jennyfer; Remusat, Laurent; Duprat, Elodie; Gonzalez, Adriana; Pont, Sylvain; Poinsot, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is, however, thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had, however, never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate) encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidence of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasmic encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a survival strategy in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern environmental samples. PMID

  17. Coupled Activation of Primary Sensory Neurons Contributes to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Shin; Anderson, Michael; Park, Kyoungsook; Zheng, Qin; Agarwal, Amit; Gong, Catherine; Saijilafu; Young, LeAnne; He, Shaoqiu; LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Zhou, Fengquan; Bergles, Dwight; Hanani, Menachem; Guan, Yun; Spray, David C; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    Primary sensory neurons in the DRG play an essential role in initiating pain by detecting painful stimuli in the periphery. Tissue injury can sensitize DRG neurons, causing heightened pain sensitivity, often leading to chronic pain. Despite the functional importance, how DRG neurons function at a population level is unclear due to the lack of suitable tools. Here we developed an imaging technique that allowed us to simultaneously monitor the activities of >1,600 neurons/DRG in live mice and discovered a striking neuronal coupling phenomenon that adjacent neurons tend to activate together following tissue injury. This coupled activation occurs among various neurons and is mediated by an injury-induced upregulation of gap junctions in glial cells surrounding DRG neurons. Blocking gap junctions attenuated neuronal coupling and mechanical hyperalgesia. Therefore, neuronal coupling represents a new form of neuronal plasticity in the DRG and contributes to pain hypersensitivity by "hijacking" neighboring neurons through gap junctions. PMID:27568517

  18. Selective reinforcement of a 2m-class lightweight mirror for horizontal beam optical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besuner, R. W.; Chow, K. P.; Kendrick, S. E.; Streetman, S.

    2008-07-01

    Optical testing of large mirrors for space telescopes can be challenging and complex. Demanding optical requirements necessitate both precise mirror figure and accurate prediction of zero gravity shape. Mass and packaging constraints require mirrors to be lightweighted and optically fast. Reliability and low mass imply simple mounting schemes, with basic kinematic mounts preferable to active figure control or whiffle trees. Ground testing should introduce as little uncertainty as possible, ideally employing flight mounts without offloaders. Testing mirrors with their optical axes horizontal can result in less distortion than in the vertical orientation, though distortion will increase with mirror speed. Finite element modeling and optimization tools help specify selective reinforcement of the mirror structure to minimize wavefront errors in a one gravity test, while staying within mass budgets and meeting other requirements. While low distortions are necessary, an important additional criterion is that designs are tolerant to imperfect positioning of the mounts relative to the neutral surface of the mirror substrate. In this paper, we explore selective reinforcement of a 2-meter class, f/1.25 primary mirror for the proposed SNAP space telescope. We specify designs optimized for various mount radial locations both with and without backup mount locations. Reinforced designs are predicted to have surface distortions in the horizontal beam test low enough to perform optical testing on the ground, on flight mounts, and without offloaders. Importantly, the required accuracy of mount locations is on the order of millimeters rather than tenths of millimeters.

  19. ZERODUR for lightweight secondary/tertiary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morian, Hans F.; Mackh, Reiner

    1998-08-01

    ZERODUR, the glass ceramic, with CTE values near zero, has excellent performance up to 8.2 m primary mirrors as well as for lightweight (LW) mirrors for Secondaries and Tertiaries. The high homogeneity of major properties of ZERODUR is an important prerequisite for the LW production and application. The production of CNC grinding and subsequent lightening via acid etching for additional weight reduction will be discussed. Results of Secondary and Tertiary LW mirrors for advanced technology telescopes like 8 m, 6.5 m and 3.5 m telescopes will be addressed. This paper presents also some examples of space based satellites with LW Zerodur mirrors in use since several years.

  20. Novel unimorph adaptive mirrors for astronomy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a new type of unimorph deformable mirror for the correction of low-order Zernike modes. The mirror features a clear aperture of 50 mm combined with large peak-to-valley amplitudes of up to 35 μm. Newly developed fabrication processes allow the use of prefabricated, coated, super-polished glass substrates. The mirror's unique features suggest the use in several astronomical applications like the compensation of atmospheric aberrations seen by laser beacons and the use in woofer-tweeter systems. Additionally, the design enables an efficient correction of the inevitable wave-front error imposed by the floppy structure of primary mirrors in future large space telescopes. We have modeled the mirror by using analytical as well as finite element models. We will present design, key features and manufacturing steps of the deformable mirror.

  1. Upgrading physical activity counselling in primary care in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Renée; van der Weegen, Sanne; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Tange, Huibert; van der Weijden, Trudy; de Witte, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The systematic development of a counselling protocol in primary care combined with a monitoring and feedback tool to support chronically ill patients to achieve a more active lifestyle. An iterative user-centred design method was used to develop a counselling protocol: the Self-management Support Programme (SSP). The needs and preferences of future users of this protocol were identified by analysing the literature, through qualitative research, and by consulting an expert panel. The counselling protocol is based on the Five A's model. Practice nurses apply motivational interviewing, risk communication and goal setting to support self-management of patients in planning how to achieve a more active lifestyle. The protocol consists of a limited number of behaviour change consultations intertwined with interaction with and responses from the It's LiFe! monitoring and feedback tool. This tool provides feedback on patients' physical activity levels via an app on their smartphone. A summary of these levels is automatically sent to the general practice so that practice nurses can respond to this information. A SSP to stimulate physical activity was defined based on user requirements of care providers and patients, followed by a review by a panel of experts. By following this user-centred approach, the organization of care was carefully taken into account, which has led to a practical and affordable protocol for physical activity counselling combined with mobile technology. PMID:25539787

  2. Mirror System Activity for Action and Language Is Embedded in the Integration of Dorsal and Ventral Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbib, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop the view that the involvement of mirror neurons in embodied experience grounds brain structures that underlie language, but that many other brain regions are involved. We stress the cooperation between the dorsal and ventral streams in praxis and language. Both have perceptual and motor schemas but the perceptual schemas in the dorsal…

  3. Testing large telescope mirrors in the optical shop by an autocollimation method with multiple pendulum flat mirrors.

    PubMed

    Ningsheng, H

    1980-08-15

    Design and a compensation technique are presented to enable slope error measurements to be made via use of a pendulum having a small flat mirror mounted on the lower end. A multiplicity of such pendulum mirrors can act as a substitute for a full diameter flat for testing large astronomical primary and secondary mirrors. PMID:20234490

  4. Floating mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, D.E.

    1989-01-03

    This patent describes a floating mirror mount for a mirror of a laser is described consisting of: a mirror having a front surface and a back surface, a keeper encircling the mirror and having a peripheral flange engaging the front surface of the mirror when the mirror is not installed in a laser, a retainer positioned rearwardly of the back surface of the mirror and connected to the keeper and having a spring seating surface, spring means engageable with the spring seating surface of the retainer for exerting a resilient biasing force on the mirror, and fastening means for connecting the retainer to the mirror positioning structure of the laser on installation of the mirror mount in the laser.

  5. Mirror seeing control of large infrared solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying; Li, Xinnan; Meng, Xiaohui; Ni, Houkun

    2010-07-01

    To obtain high resolution infrared image, both low photon efficiency and long wavelength of infrared light requires enough large aperture telescope, but large aperture vacuum windows can hardly achieve high optical quality, so open structure becomes the only viable choice for large infrared solar telescope. In addition to the effects of atmospheric turbulence, open solar telescopes suffer from the heating of the optics by sunlight, especially primary mirror heating. These factors cause the image to shiver and become blurred, and increase infrared observing noise. Since blowing air across the front surface of the primary mirror doesn't have the necessary heat transfer coefficient to remove the absorbed heat load, it must be cooled down to maintained at a temperature between 0K and 2K below ambient air temperature to reduce the effects of turbulence. This paper will introduce some cooling methods and simulation results of primary mirror in large infrared solar telescope. On the other hand, mirror material with nice thermal conductivity can reduce the temperature difference between mirror surface and air, and mirror surface polishing at infrared wavelength can be comparatively easier than at visible wavelength, so it is possible to select low cost metal mirror as primary mirror of infrared solar telescope. To analyze the technical feasibility of metal mirror serving as primary mirror, this paper also give some polishing results of aluminum mirror with electroless nickel coating.

  6. [Physical activity in basic and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Kałka, Dariusz; Pilecki, Witold; Adamus, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    On account of the frequency of appearing and character of atherosclerosis cardiac vascular disease, one of the most crucial elements of effective fight against it is preparation of complex preventive programs including as vast number of population as possible. Consequently, Benjamin and Smitch suggested attaching the notion of basic prevention to the standard division into primary and secondary one. The basic prevention, carrying out in the general population, should concern genetic predisposition, psychosocial factors, keeping up proper body weight, healthy eating and physical activity. Especially high hopes are connected with high efficiency, simplicity and low money-consumption of preventive activities associated with physical activity modification, which has a crucial influence on reducing negative impact of atherosclerosis hazard. The results of numerous scientific research, carried out in many countries and on various, large groups, proved undoubtedly that at the healthy adult people of both sex the systematic physical activity of moderate intensification plays an essential part in preventing CVD and decreasing the death risk because of that reason as well. Moreover, systematic physical exercises show many other health-oriented actions, thanks to which they have an influence on decreasing premature and total death rate. The risk of incidence of civilization-related diseases such as diabetes type II, hypertension, obesity, osteoporosis, tumors (of large intestine, breast, prostatic gland) and depression has decreased significantly. Unequivocally positive influence has been proved at many observations dedicated to health recreational physical activity and physical activity connected with professional work based on aerobe effort. The positive effects have been also observed at children population and senior population which is more and more numerous and the most at risk. The beneficial action of physical activity is connected with direct effect on organism

  7. Neutron activation analysis: A primary method of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Robert R.; Bode, Peter; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), based on the comparator method, has the potential to fulfill the requirements of a primary ratio method as defined in 1998 by the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière — Métrologie en Chimie (CCQM, Consultative Committee on Amount of Substance — Metrology in Chemistry). This thesis is evidenced in this paper in three chapters by: demonstration that the method is fully physically and chemically understood; that a measurement equation can be written down in which the values of all parameters have dimensions in SI units and thus having the potential for metrological traceability to these units; that all contributions to uncertainty of measurement can be quantitatively evaluated, underpinning the metrological traceability; and that the performance of NAA in CCQM key-comparisons of trace elements in complex matrices between 2000 and 2007 is similar to the performance of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS), which had been formerly designated by the CCQM as a primary ratio method.

  8. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  9. Actuator usage and fault tolerance of the James Webb Space Telescope optical element mirror actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barto, A.; Acton, D. S.; Finley, P.; Gallagher, B.; Hardy, B.; Knight, J. S.; Lightsey, P.

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) telescope's secondary mirror and eighteen primary mirror segments are each actively controlled in rigid body position via six hexapod actuators. The mirrors are stowed to the mirror support structure to survive the launch environment and then must be deployed 12.5 mm to reach the nominally deployed position before the Wavefront Sensing & Control (WFS&C) alignment and phasing process begins. The actuation system is electrically, but not mechanically redundant. Therefore, with the large number of hexapod actuators, the fault tolerance of the OTE architecture and WFS&C alignment process has been carefully considered. The details of the fault tolerance will be discussed, including motor life budgeting, failure signatures, and motor life.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of filling materials used in primary teeth pulpotomy.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Hévelin Couto; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Neves, Ana Thereza Sabóia; Fontes, Rodrigo Gusmão; da Silva, Priscila Vieira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of pulp capping materials used in primary teeth (formocresol [FC], zinc oxide and eugenol cement [ZOE], ZOE mixed with FC [ZOEFC], mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] and calcium hydroxide [CH]) against cariogenic bacteria. The agar plate diffusion test was used for the cultures, including saline solution as a negative control. A base layer of 15 mL of brain heart infusion agar was inoculated with 300 mL of each inoculum. Twelve wells were made and completely filled with one of the testing materials for each bacteria strain. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Zones of microbial inhibition and material diffusion were measured and photographed. The results obtained were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Respectively, the medium zones of bacteria inhibition of FC, ZOE, ZOEFC, MTA and CH against Streptococcus mutans growth were 28.5, 15.2, 20.8, 9.3 and 11.6; against Lactobacillus acidophilus growth were 28.7, 14.8, 15.3, 15.2 and 20.0, and against Actinomyces viscosus growth were 13.6, 13.5, 14.7, 10.0 and 13.6. We might confirmed the high antibacterial activity of FC solution, especially against S. mutans and L. acidophilus, as wells as, the low inhibitory effect of MTA cement on the cariogenic bacteria studied. PMID:25954072

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Filling Materials Used in Primary Teeth Pulpotomy

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Hévelin Couto; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Neves, Ana Thereza Sabóia; Fontes, Rodrigo Gusmão; da Silva, Priscila Vieira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of pulp capping materials used in primary teeth (formocresol [FC], zinc oxide and eugenol cement [ZOE], ZOE mixed with FC [ZOEFC], mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] and calcium hydroxide [CH]) against cariogenic bacteria. The agar plate diffusion test was used for the cultures, including saline solution as a negative control. A base layer of 15 mL of brain heart infusion agar was inoculated with 300 mL of each inoculum. Twelve wells were made and completely filled with one of the testing materials for each bacteria strain. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Zones of microbial inhibition and material diffusion were measured and photographed. The results obtained were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney non-parametric tests. Respectively, the medium zones of bacteria inhibition of FC, ZOE, ZOEFC, MTA and CH against Streptococcus mutans growth were 28.5, 15.2, 20.8, 9.3 and 11.6; against Lactobacillus acidophilus growth were 28.7, 14.8, 15.3, 15.2 and 20.0, and against Actinomyces viscosus growth were 13.6, 13.5, 14.7, 10.0 and 13.6. We might confirmed the high antibacterial activity of FC solution, especially against S. mutans and L. acidophilus, as wells as, the low inhibitory effect of MTA cement on the cariogenic bacteria studied. PMID:25954072

  12. Relay mirror experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, David L.

    1996-04-01

    Originating out of a SDIO-funded, Phase 1 study effort, two ground systems and an orbiting EO payload/spacecraft were the primary equipment for the RME. The RME was originally conceived to be a shuttle deployed experiment. Shortly after program start, the Challenger disaster occurred, with the promise of extensive delays. A completely new space segment was to be designed incorporating a free-flying spacecraft. During the midphase of the program, a variety of launch vehicles were envisioned to replace the shuttle, requiring the BASD team to design accommodations for Delta, Atlas, and Titan, with a Delta launch being the final solution. The ground systems tracked the spacecraft and illuminated it with green and blue beacon lasers. The Payload Experiment Package (PEP) housed the bisection tracker, a key innovation central to the experiment. The bisection tracker acquired both beacons and controlled steerable mirrors to accomplish fine tracking of the two cooperative beacons. In the process, the relay mirror was precisely positioned to enable a successful relay of a third infrared laser between the two ground sites via the orbiting spacecraft. Many of the key technologies employed in the PEP were originally developed for Ball laser communications research and development programs and other laser pointing efforts. The WAVE sensor package, built by ATA and integrated by Ball, measured the vibrations of the optical base structure on which it was mounted. These spacecraft vibration data are critical to the accurate pointing of space laser communication terminals.

  13. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: quantitative estimation of the dependence of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves on the active-medium gain

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, Evgenii A

    2012-05-31

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator (with a perimeter of 20 cm) we have calculated, on the basis of the previously developed [see Bondarenko E.A. Quantum Electron., 41, 824 (2011)] model, the dependence of the parameters of the synchronisation zone of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves on the active-medium gain. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data for gyroscopes with three-mirror resonators.

  14. Physical Activity of Malaysian Primary School Children: Comparison by Sociodemographic Variables and Activity Domains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jyh Eiin; Parikh, Panam; Poh, Bee Koon; Deurenberg, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This study describes the physical activity of primary school children according to sociodemographic characteristics and activity domains. Using the Malaysian South East Asian Nutrition Surveys data, 1702 children aged 7 to 12 years were included in the analysis. Physical activity was reported as a total score and categorized into low, medium, and high levels based on Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children. Higher overall activity scores were found in boys, younger age, non-Chinese ethnicity, and normal body mass index category. Sex, age, and ethnicity differences were found in structured or organized, physical education, and outside-of-school domain scores. Transport-related scores differed by age group, ethnicity, household income, and residential areas but not among the three physical activity levels. Participation of girls, Chinese, and older children were low in overall and almost all activity domains. Sociodemographic characteristics are important factors to consider in increasing the different domains of physical activity among Malaysian children. PMID:27257293

  15. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1995-03-21

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis. 7 figures.

  16. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis.

  17. Discharge Chamber Primary Electron Modeling Activities in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steuber, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Designing discharge chambers for ion thrusters involves many geometric configuration decisions. Various decisions will impact discharge chamber performance with respect to propellant utilization efficiency, ion production costs, and grid lifetime. These hardware design decisions can benefit from the assistance of computational modeling. Computational modeling for discharge chambers has been limited to two-dimensional codes that leveraged symmetry for interpretation into three-dimensional analysis. This paper presents model development activities towards a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation to aid discharge chamber design decisions. Specifically, of the many geometric configuration decisions toward attainment of a worthy discharge chamber, this paper focuses on addressing magnetic circuit considerations with a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation as a tool. With this tool, candidate discharge chamber magnetic circuit designs can be analyzed computationally to gain insight into factors that may influence discharge chamber performance such as: primary electron loss width in magnetic cusps, cathode tip position with respect to the low magnetic field volume, definition of a low magnetic field region, and maintenance of a low magnetic field region across the grid span. Corroborating experimental data will be obtained from mockup hardware tests. Initially, simulated candidate magnetic circuit designs will resemble previous successful thruster designs. To provide opportunity to improve beyond previous performance benchmarks, off-design modifications will be simulated and experimentally tested.

  18. Recurrent epimutations activate gene body promoters in primary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Raman P; Zhang, Bo; Bell, Robert J A; Johnson, Brett E; Olshen, Adam B; Sundaram, Vasavi; Li, Daofeng; Graham, Ashley E; Diaz, Aaron; Fouse, Shaun D; Smirnov, Ivan; Song, Jun; Paris, Pamela L; Wang, Ting; Costello, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant DNA hypomethylation may play an important role in the growth rate of glioblastoma (GBM), but the functional impact on transcription remains poorly understood. We assayed the GBM methylome with MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, adjusting for copy number differences, in a small set of non-glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (non-G-CIMP) primary tumors. Recurrent hypomethylated loci were enriched within a region of chromosome 5p15 that is specified as a cancer amplicon and also encompasses TERT, encoding telomerase reverse transcriptase, which plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Overall, 76 gene body promoters were recurrently hypomethylated, including TERT and the oncogenes GLI3 and TP73. Recurring hypomethylation also affected previously unannotated alternative promoters, and luciferase reporter assays for three of four of these promoters confirmed strong promoter activity in GBM cells. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) ChIP-seq on tissue from the GBMs uncovered peaks that coincide precisely with tumor-specific decrease of DNA methylation at 200 loci, 133 of which are in gene bodies. Detailed investigation of TP73 and TERT gene body hypomethylation demonstrated increased expression of corresponding alternate transcripts, which in TP73 encodes a truncated p73 protein with oncogenic function and in TERT encodes a putative reverse transcriptase-null protein. Our findings suggest that recurring gene body promoter hypomethylation events, along with histone H3K4 trimethylation, alter the transcriptional landscape of GBM through the activation of a limited number of normally silenced promoters within gene bodies, in at least one case leading to expression of an oncogenic protein. PMID:24709822

  19. Topological Mirror Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Kane, C. L.; Mele, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the existence of topological superconductors (SCs) protected by mirror and time-reversal symmetries. D-dimensional (D=1, 2, 3) crystalline SCs are characterized by 2D-1 independent integer topological invariants, which take the form of mirror Berry phases. These invariants determine the distribution of Majorana modes on a mirror symmetric boundary. The parity of total mirror Berry phase is the Z2 index of a class DIII SC, implying that a DIII topological SC with a mirror line must also be a topological mirror SC but not vice versa and that a DIII SC with a mirror plane is always time-reversal trivial but can be mirror topological. We introduce representative models and suggest experimental signatures in feasible systems. Advances in quantum computing, the case for nodal SCs, the case for class D, and topological SCs protected by rotational symmetries are pointed out.

  20. Light, Color, and Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiburzi, Brian; Tamborino, Laurie; Parker, Gordon A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students can use flashlights, mirrors, and colored paper to discover scientific principles regarding optics. Addresses the concepts of angles of incidence and reflection, colored vs. white light, and mirror images. (WRM)

  1. Teaching Students to Read the Primary Literature Using POGIL Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read, interpret, and evaluate articles in the primary literature are important skills that science majors will use in graduate school and professional life. Because of this, it is important that students are not only exposed to the primary literature in undergraduate education, but also taught how to read and interpret these…

  2. Afocal correctors for paraboloidal mirrors.

    PubMed

    Wynne, C G

    1967-07-01

    A new form of field corrector for astronomical telescopes with paraboloidal primary mirrors is described. It consists of four separated spherical surfaced lenses and gives improved aberration correction. The method of designing is described, and the adaptability of the design to telescopes of different characteristics is discussed. Numerical data and details of performance are given for a specific design for the Palomar Observatory 200-in. (5.08-m) telescope. PMID:20062169

  3. Attractive characteristics of mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. F.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1994-12-01

    A summary of the attractive characteristics of mirror devices is presented. Recent progress in development of axisymmetric mirror devices is described. Potentialities of mirrors as a basis for D(3)He fusion power generators and high-flux neutron sources for fusion material tests are discussed.

  4. Indium Second-Surface Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Second-surface mirrors are formed by vapor deposition of indium onto glass. Mirrors have reflectances comparable to those of ordinary silver or aluminized mirrors and are expected to show superior corrosion resistance. Mirrors may be used in solar concentrators.

  5. LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity

    DOEpatents

    Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

    2014-04-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

  6. A comparison of performance of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Richard, Ralph M.; Hileman, Edward A.

    1990-01-01

    Four lightweight solid contoured back mirror shapes (a double arch, a single arch, a modified single arch, and a double concave mirror) and a cellular sandwich lightweight meniscus mirror, have been considered for the primary mirror of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A parametric design study using these shapes for the SIRTF 40 inch primary mirror with a focal ratio f/2 is presented. Evaluations of the optical performance and fundamental frequency analyses are performed to compare relative merits of each mirror configuration. Included in these are structural, optical, and frequency analyses for (1) different back contour shapes, (2) different number and location of the support points, and (3) two gravity orientations (ZENITH and HORIZON positions). The finite element program NASTRAN is used to obtain the structural deflections of the optical surface. For wavefront error analysis, FRINGE and PCFRINGE programs are used to evaluate the optical performance. A scaling law relating the optical and structural performance for various mirror contoured back shapes is developed.

  7. Reduced Mirror Neuron Activity in Schizophrenia and Its Association With Theory of Mind Deficits: Evidence From a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Basavaraju, Rakshathi; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Background: The “mirror-neuron system” has been proposed to be a neurophysiological substrate for social cognition (SC) ability. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms to compare putative mirror neuron activity (MNA) in 3 groups: antipsychotic-naive, medicated schizophrenia patients, and healthy comparison subjects. We also explored the association between MNA and SC ability in patients. Methods: Fifty-four consenting right-handed schizophrenia patients (33 antipsychotic naive) and 45 matched healthy comparison subjects completed a TMS experiment to assess putative premotor MNA. We used 4 TMS paradigms of eliciting motor-evoked potentials (MEP) in the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. These were applied while the subjects observed a goal-directed action involving the FDI (actual action and its video) and a static image. The difference in the amplitude of the MEP while they observed the static image and the action provided a measure of MNA. Subjects also underwent SC assessments (theory of mind [ToM], emotion processing, and social perception). Results: Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant group × occasion interaction effect in 3 TMS paradigms, indicating deficient motor facilitation during action observation relative to rest state in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients as compared with the other two groups. Among patients, there were significant direct correlations between measures of MNA and ToM performance. Conclusions: Antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients have poorer MNA than medicated patients and healthy controls. Measures of putative MNA had significant and consistent associations with ToM abilities. These findings suggest a possibility of deficient mirror neuron system underlying SC deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:24214933

  8. First mirrors for diagnostic systems of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Costley, A.; Donné, A. J. H.; SWG on First Mirrors of the ITPA Topical Group on Diagnostics

    2007-08-01

    The majority of optical diagnostics presently foreseen for ITER will implement in-vessel metallic mirrors as plasma-viewing components. Mirrors are used for the observation of the plasma radiation in a very wide wavelength range: from about 1 nm up to a few mm. In the hostile ITER environment, mirrors are subject to erosion, deposition, particle implantation and other adverse effects which will change their optical properties, affecting the entire performance of the respective diagnostic systems. The Specialists Working Group (SWG) on first mirrors was established under the wings of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) Topical Group (TG) on Diagnostics to coordinate and guide the investigations on diagnostic mirrors towards the development of optimal, robust and durable solutions for ITER diagnostic systems. The results of tests of various ITER-candidate mirror materials, performed in Tore-Supra, TEXTOR, DIII-D, TCV, T-10, TRIAM-1M and LHD under various plasma conditions, as well as an overview of laboratory investigations of mirror performance and mirror cleaning techniques are presented in the paper. The current tasks in the R&D of diagnostic mirrors will be addressed.

  9. Corticomotor excitability changes during mirrored or asynergistic wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Charles T; Danna-dos-Santos, Alessander; Peters, Christina; Moore, Marlesa

    2015-03-15

    The current study used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the right primary motor cortex (M1) during bimanual contractions to examine facilitatory and inhibitory influences on the contralateral, target extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) during changes in the task demands of the ipsilateral (task) ECR. The bimanual contractions were either mirrored (isometric wrist extension bilaterally) or more difficult asynergistic (asymmetric [wrist extension paired with wrist radial deviation]) contractions. TMS-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and cortical silent periods (CSPs) were recorded during the execution of visually guided ramp and hold tasks. It was of interest to determine whether or not asynergistic contractions, representing a more difficult bimanual coordination task, resulted in differing patterns of activation and inhibition than mirrored movements. Asynergistic contractions were found to have differing effects on the target ECR than mirrored contractions. Foremost among these differences were the presence of enhanced inhibitory mechanisms. During asynergistic bimanual contractions the MEPs of the target ECR did not increase to the same degree and cortical silent period durations were longer. Findings indicate that bimanual mirrored and asynergistic contractions result in differing patterns of corticomotor excitability. PMID:25529184

  10. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  11. Large thin adaptive x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Thompson, Samantha; Brooks, David; Yao, Jun; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the progress made in a proof of concept study and recent results of a research program into large active x-ray mirrors that is part of the UK Smart X-ray Optics project. The ultimate aim is to apply the techniques of active/adaptive optics to the next generation of nested shell astronomical X-ray space telescopes. A variety of deformable mirror technologies are currently available, the most promising of which for active X-ray mirrors are probably unimorph and bimorph piezoelectric mirrors. In this type of mirror one or more sheets of piezoelectric material are bonded to or coated with a passive reflective layer. On the back or between the piezoceramic layer/layers are series of electrodes. Application of an electric field causes the piezoelectric material to undergo local deformation thus changing the mirror shape. Starting in 2005 a proof of concept active mirror research program has been undertaken. This work included modelling and development of actively controlled thin shell mirrors. Finite element models of piezo-electric actuated mirrors have been developed and verified against experimental test systems. This has included the modelling and test of piezo-electric hexagonal unimorph segments. Various actuator types and low shrinkage conductive bonding methods have been investigated and laboratory tests of the use of piezo-electric actuators to adjust the form of an XMM-Newton space telescope engineering model mirror shell have been conducted and show that movement of the optics at the required level is achievable. Promising technological approaches have been identified including moulded piezo-ceramics and piezo-electrics fibre bundles.

  12. The thin mirror deformation and stress distribution analysis based on different influence functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongqiao; Fan, Bin; Wu, Yongqian; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Rong

    2014-08-01

    The active support technique can be applied in the fabrication of large thin meniscus mirror. It can reduce the grinding and polishing difficulty for thin mirror. Compare between two kinds of influence function, we correct the Zernike 5th, 6th, 10th and 11th mode deformation. The low-order Zernike modes which are prone to appearing during large primary mirror processing are revised with active support technology. Influence functions are expressed with Z coordinate value and Zernike coefficient of surface shape. This paper reports that respectively adopting different influence functions to solve correction forces and the correction forces compensates specific Zernike modes of mirror deformation. After comparing the PV and RMS values of amendatory residual of surface shape, we analyze the effect of different correction forces to the biggest stress on the underside of the primary mirror. We compare the two methods based on the PV and RMS values of the residual error and the Max-stress. Gain a conclusion that correction forces obtained from Z coordinate value of surface shape is superior to the one obtained from the Zernike coefficient of surface shape.

  13. One-Wave Optical Phase Conjugation Mirror by Actively Coupling Arbitrary Light Fields into a Single-Mode Reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Junsung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-10-01

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomenon made possible by the wave property of light. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical phase conjugation mirror using a spatial light modulator. An adaptable single-mode filter is created, and a phase-conjugate beam is then prepared by reverse propagation through this filter. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing high power throughput in the time-reversed wave, which has not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence. PMID:26550723

  14. Mirror Neurons through the Lens of Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Pier F.; Tramacere, Antonella; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Iriki, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    The consensus view in mirror neuron research is that mirror neurons comprise a uniform, stable execution-observation matching system. In this article, we argue that, in light of recent evidence, this is, at best, an incomplete and oversimplified view of mirror neurons, whose activity is actually quite variable and more plastic than previously theorized. We propose an epigenetic account for understanding developmental changes in sensorimotor systems, including variations in mirror neuron activity. Although extant associative and genetic accounts fail to consider the complexity of genetic and non-genetic interactions, we propose a new Evo-Devo perspective, which predicts that environmental differences early in development, or through sensorimotor training, should produce variations in mirror neuron response patterns, tuning them to the social environment. PMID:23953747

  15. Mirror activity in the human brain while observing hand movements: a comparison between EEG desynchronization in the mu-range and previous fMRI results.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anat; Bentin, Shlomo

    2009-07-28

    Mu (mu) rhythms are EEG oscillations between 8-13 Hz distinguished from alpha by having more anterior distribution and being desynchronized by motor rather than visual activity. Evidence accumulating during the last decade suggests that the desynchronization of mu rhythms (mu suppression) might be also a manifestation of a human Mirror Neuron System (MNS). To further explore this hypothesis we used a paradigm that, in a previous fMRI study, successfully activated this putative MNS in humans. Our direct goal was to provide further support for a link between modulation of mu rhythms and the MNS, by finding parallels between the reported patterns of fMRI activations and patterns of mu suppression. The EEG power in the mu range has been recorded while participants passively observed either a left or a right hand, reaching to and grasping objects, and compared it with that recorded while participants observed the movement of a ball, and while observing static grasping scenes or still objects. Mirroring fMRI results (Shmuelof, L., Zohary, E., 2005. Dissociation between ventral and dorsal fMRI activation during object and action recognition. Neuron 47, 457-470), mu suppression was larger in the hemisphere contra-lateral to the moving hand and larger when the hands grasped different objects in different ways than when the movement was repetitive. No suppression was found while participants observed still objects but mu suppression was also found while seeing static grasping postures. These data are discussed in light of similar parallels between modulations of alpha waves and fMRI while recording EEG in the magnet. The present data support a link between mu suppression and a human MNS. PMID:19500557

  16. Active stochastic stress fluctuations in the cell cytoskeleton stir the cell and activate primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Fakhri, Nikta; Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Wessel, Alok D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2015-03-01

    Cells are active systems with molecular force generation that drives complex dynamics at the supramolecular scale. Much of cellular dynamics is driven by myosin motors interacting with the actin cytoskeleton. We discovered active random ``stirring'' driven by cytoplasmic myosin as an intermediate mode of transport, different from both thermal diffusion and directed motor activity. We found a further manifestation of cytoskeletal dynamics in the active motion patterns of primary cilia generated by epithelial cells. These cilia were thought to be immotile due to the absence of dynein motors, but it turns out that their anchoring deeper inside the cell in combination with the strongly fluctuating cortex results in clearly measurable non-equilibrium fluctuations.

  17. Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This contract and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and demonstration of a different technology for construction of lightweight mirrors. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities; Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (less than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or quaternary mirror into a quasi-continuous surface with individual subapertures phased so that near diffraction limited imaging in the visible wavelength region is achieved. Continuous compensation of optical wavefront due to perturbations caused by imperfections, natural disturbances, and equipment induced vibrations/deflections to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance in the visible wavelength region. Demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating such systems with reduced mass and cost compared to past approaches. While the SSD could not be expected to satisfy all of the above capabilities, the intent was to start identifying and understanding new technologies that might be applicable to these goals.

  18. Children's Economic Activities and Primary School Attendance in Rural Guatemala.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol A. M.

    To investigate whether low school attendance rates in Guatemala (about 35% of primary school aged children do not attend) are due primarily to the need for children in low income families to contribute to family income or child care and other housekeeping tasks, time use data were collected in 4 rural villages from mothers of 369 children, aged…

  19. LOXT mirror design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Antrim, W.; Boyd, D.; Giacconi, R.; Sinnamon, G.; Stille, F.

    1972-01-01

    The final report for the large orbiting X-ray telescope (LOXT) high resolution mirror design study is presented. The following tasks were performed: (1) Generation of a reference and alternate preliminary design for the LOXT high resolution mirror assembly, which will meet the LOXT scientific requirements, and are within the present state of the art of materials and fabrication techniques. (2) Measurement, in X-rays, of the scattering properties of a variety of optical flats, embodying materials, coatings, and polishing techniques which might be applicable to the flight configuration LOXT high resolution mirror. (3) Preparation of a procurement specification for a paraboloid test mirror of the size of the innermost paraboloid of the high resolution mirror assembly, including the design requirements for the reference design evolved from this preliminary design study. The results of the engineering and scientific analysis and the conclusions drawn are presented. The procurement specification for the test mirror is included.

  20. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  1. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, H.; Monchocé, S.; Kahaly, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Martin, Ph.; Quéré, F.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase. PMID:24614748

  2. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, H; Monchocé, S; Kahaly, S; Bonnaud, G; Martin, Ph; Quéré, F

    2014-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase. PMID:24614748

  3. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Druggable Mutations in Primary Tumors, Metastatic Tissue, Circulating Tumor Cells, and Cell-Free Circulating DNA in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: The MIRROR Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Picornell, Antoni C; Alvarez, Enrique L; Martin, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the driver mutations in an individual metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patient is critical to selecting effective targeted therapies. Currently, it is believed that the limited efficacy of many targeted drugs may be due to the expansion of drug resistant clones with different genotypes that were already present in the primary tumor. Identifying the genomic alterations of these clones, and introducing combined or sequential targeted drug regimens, could lead to a significant increase in the efficacy of currently available targeted therapies. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess the concordance/discordance of mutations between the primary tumor and metastatic tissue in MBC patients. Secondary objectives include comparing the genomic profiles of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating free DNA (cfDNA) from peripheral blood with those of the primary tumor and metastatic tissue for each patient, evaluating these mutations in the signaling pathways that are relevant to the disease, and testing the feasibility of introducing liquid biopsy as a translational laboratory tool in clinical practice. Methods The multicenter, transversal, observational MIRROR study is currently ongoing in three participating hospitals. All consecutive patients with MBC confirmed by radiologic findings will be screened for eligibility, either at first relapse or if tumor regrowth occurs while on treatment for metastatic disease. Results Patient recruitment is currently ongoing. To date, 41 patients have a complete set of tissue samples available (plasma, CTCs, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumor and metastatic tumor). However, none of these samples have undergone nucleic acids extraction or targeted deep sequencing. Conclusions The results of this study may have a significant influence on the practical management of patients with MBC, and may provide clues to clinicians that lead towards a better stratification of patients

  4. Flying the "Active School Flag": Physical Activity Promotion through Self-Evaluation in Primary Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chroinin, Deirdre Ni; Murtagh, Elaine; Bowles, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Primary schools are key sites where children can be active, advance their knowledge and understanding of how to participate in physical activity (PA) and develop an appreciation of its importance in their lives. This study explored the role of schools in promoting PA asking: how do primary schools approach the promotion of whole-school PA? Data…

  5. Actuated Hybrid Mirrors for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Ealey, Mark; Redding, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new, large, ultra-lightweight, replicated, actively controlled mirrors, for use in space telescopes. These mirrors utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. Called Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AHMs), they use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. They enable an Active Optics space telescope architecture that uses periodic image-based wavefront sensing and control to assure diffraction-limited performance, while relaxing optical system fabrication, integration and test requirements. The proposed International Space Station Observatory seeks to demonstrate this architecture in space.

  6. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  7. Physical Education Activities Book for the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Arthur S.

    The guide is divided into 10 chapters, the first on general program organization, the rest on specific activities. The nine activities are as follows: posture; calisthenics; active recreational games; stunts, tumbling, and apparatus skills; track and field events; team sports; fundamental and creative or interpretive rhythms; dramatized rhythms;…

  8. NASA CONNECT: Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe' is the last of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe', students will learn how algebra is used to explore the universe.

  9. Coating considerations for mirrors of CPV devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schmauder, Torsten; Sauer, Peter; Ickes, Gerd

    2014-09-26

    One of the different optical concepts for concentrator devices is to place a focussing primary mirror behind a transparent front plate. In addition (also in case of Fresnel-diffractive main optics), further 'secondary' reflectors may be used further along the beam path. Such mirrors are usually implemented as coating stacks of a highly reflective metal - usually silver - and protective layers. The protective layers are preferably designed as reflection enhancing interference stack. The design of such protective layer stacks yields two difficulties, which are addressed in this paper: (a) vacuum coating of three-dimensional parts will result in a thickness distribution and the optical design of the stack should thus be tolerant to layer thickness variations, and (b) different places of the mirror will have different angle-of-incidence of the sunlight under operating conditions. As result, the layer stack has a different design at different places of the mirror.

  10. Lightweight deformable mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Keith

    This thesis presents a concept for ultra-lightweight deformable mirrors based on a thin substrate of optical surface quality coated with continuous active piezopolymer layers that provide modes of actuation and shape correction. This concept eliminates any kind of stiff backing structure for the mirror surface and exploits micro-fabrication technologies to provide a tight integration of the active materials into the mirror structure, to avoid actuator print-through effects. Proof-of-concept, 10-cm-diameter mirrors with a low areal density of about 0.5 kg/m2 have been designed, built and tested to measure their shape-correction performance and verify the models used for design. The low cost manufacturing scheme uses replication techniques, and strives for minimizing residual stresses that deviate the optical figure from the master mandrel. It does not require precision tolerancing, is lightweight, and is therefore potentially scalable to larger diameters for use in large, modular space telescopes. Other potential applications for such a laminate could include ground-based mirrors for solar energy collection, adaptive optics for atmospheric turbulence, laser communications, and other shape control applications. The immediate application for these mirrors is for the Autonomous Assembly and Reconfiguration of a Space Telescope (AAReST) mission, which is a university mission under development by Caltech, the University of Surrey, and JPL. The design concept, fabrication methodology, material behaviors and measurements, mirror modeling, mounting and control electronics design, shape control experiments, predictive performance analysis, and remaining challenges are presented herein. The experiments have validated numerical models of the mirror, and the mirror models have been used within a model of the telescope in order to predict the optical performance. A demonstration of this mirror concept, along with other new telescope technologies, is planned to take place during

  11. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  12. Two well-corrected four-mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been conducted of a configuration resembling that of a Cassegrain telescope with two nested mirrors in the plane of the primary and two nested mirrors in the plane of the secondary. The focal plane was located in the plane of the first and the third mirror. The four surfaces available in the device for corrections made it possible to correct for third-order spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and distortion.

  13. Two-mirror, three-reflection telescopes as candidates for sky surveys in ground and space applications. The MINITRUST: an active optics warping telescope for wide-field astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Roberto F.; La Padula, Cesare D.; Vignato, Agostino; Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Dohlen, Kjetil

    2002-12-01

    A concept based on a two-mirror, three-reflection telescope has been investigated. Its anastigmatism and flat fielded properties, the compactness and optical performances over 2-2.5 arc deg field of view, make this optical system of high interest for the development of much larger telescopes than with Schmidt designs. The 2MTRT concept is a potential candidate for sky surveys with 2-3 meter class telescopes and particularily well adapted for UV space surveys. Preliminary developments have been carried out with the construction of a 30-cm prototype on Amoretti's design, providing encouraging results. At present, a 45-cm 2MTRT prototype has been realized for ground based sky survey of NEOs, based on active optics (MINITRUST), in order to overcome the difficulty of obtaining three aspherical surfaces. The primary and tertiary lie on the same double vase substrate, and have a rest profile. The hyperbolization is carried out in situ by air depressure. The secondary, in a tulip form substrate, has been hyperbolized by elastic relaxation. The project is planned for operation in 2003.

  14. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  15. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and a device for simultaneously locking the post assembly and the key assembly in a fixed position.

  16. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1983-11-04

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and means for simultaneously locking said post assembly and said key assembly in a fixed position.

  17. Bronze rainbow hologram mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P.

    2006-02-01

    This project draws on holographic embossing techniques, ancient artistic conventions of bronze mirror design and modelling and casting processes to accomplish portraiture of reflection. Laser scanning, 3D computer graphics and holographic imaging are employed to enable a permanent 3D static holographic image to appear integrated with the real-time moving reflection of a viewer's face in a polished bronze disc. The disc and the figure which holds it (caryatid) are cast in bronze from a lost wax model, a technique which has been used for millennia to make personal mirrors. The Caryatid form of bronze mirror which went through many permutations in ancient Egyptian, Greece and Rome shows a plethora of expressive figure poses ranging from sleek nudes to highly embellished multifigure arrangements. The prototype of this series was made for Australian choreographer Graeme Murphy, Artistic Director of the Sydney Dance Company. Each subsequent mirror will be unique in figure and holographic imagery as arranged between artist and subject. Conceptually this project references both the modern experience of viewing mirrors retrieved from ancient tombs, which due to deterioration of the surface no longer reflect, and the functioning of Chinese Magic mirrors, which have the ability to project a predetermined image. Inspired by the metaphorical potential of these mirrors, which do not reflect the immediate reality of the viewer, this bronze hologram mirror series enables each viewer to reflect upon himself or herself observing simultaneously the holographic image and their own partially obliterated reflection.

  18. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Senthil N.; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C.; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  19. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Arun, Senthil N; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L; Bollag, Wendy B

    2013-03-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  20. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  1. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  2. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  3. Retrofitting conventional primary clarifiers to activated primary clarifiers to enhance nutrient removal and energy conservation in WWTPs in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-wei; Zhang, Tian-zhu; Chen, Ji-ning; Hu, Zhi-rong

    2011-01-01

    Biological nutrient removal requires sufficient carbon source. Meanwhile, the removal of organic matter in wastewater requires energy consumption in the aeration tank. Carbon source for nutrient removal in most wastewater treatment plants with conventional primary clarifier (CPC) is generally insufficient in China. In order to increase carbon source and to save energy, a part of the CPC may be retrofitted as an activated primary clarifier (APC). In this paper, a pilot scale experiment was conducted to examine the performance of primary sludge fermentation and its effect on nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Results show that the primary sludge fermentation in APC has produced a similar VFA/TP ratio but a higher BOD5/TN ratio compared with those in the CPC effluent, and the TN concentrations in the secondary effluent are at 8.0, 10.8, and 17.4 mg/L, while TP is at 0.45, 1.10, and 2.28 mg/L when the pilot test system was fed with (1) the APC effluent, (2) 50% from the APC effluent and 50% from the CPC effluent, and (3) the CPC effluent, respectively. Results also indicate that the BOD5/TN ratio is a more sensitive factor than the VFA/TP ratio for nutrient removal and energy conservation for the APC fermentation. PMID:21508549

  4. Robots, Bulldozers, and Other Map Activities for the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Sandra F.

    1984-01-01

    Described are activities which will increase fluency in the use of north, south, east, west, up, and down; reinforce the proper positioning of the cardinal directions on a map grid; relate map symbols to familiar surface features; give practice in identifying map symbols; and provide an opportunity to construct maps. (RM)

  5. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning: Current Practices in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bergh, Linda; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most powerful tools, which teachers can use to enhance student learning. It appears dif?cult for teachers to give qualitatively good feedback, especially during active learning. In this context, teachers should provide facilitative feedback that is focused on the development of meta-cognition and social learning.…

  6. On the construction of a 2-metre mirror blank for the universal reflecting telescope in Tautenburg (German Title: Über die Fertigung eines 2-Meter-Spiegelträgers für das Universal-Spiegelteleskop in Tautenburg )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lödel, Wolfgang

    The astronomers' desire to penetrate deeper into space transforms into a demand for larger telescopes. The primary mirror constitutes the main part of a reflecting telescope, and it determines all subsequent activities. Already in the 1930s activities existed in the Schott company to manufacture mirror blanks up to diameters of 2 metres, which could not be pursued because of political constraints. This ambitious goal was again picked up a few years after the war. At a time when the procurement of raw materials was extremely difficult, the glass workers of Schott in Jena attacked this large project. After some failures, a good mirror blank could be delivered to the Carl Zeiss Company in 1951 for further processing and for the construction of the first 2-metre reflecting telescope. From 1960 to 1986, this mirror made from optical glass ZK7 served its purpose at the Karl Schwarzschild Observatory in Tautenburg. lt was then replaced by a zero expansion glass ceramics mirror.

  7. Impact of Some Environmental Education Outdoor Activities on Nigerian Primary School Pupils' Environmental Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajiboye, Josiah O.; Olatundun, Sunday Adekojo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of outdoor educational activities on pupils' knowledge of some environmental issues and problems. A pretest, posttest, control group, quasi-experimental design was adopted for the study. Four hundred and eighty primary 5 pupils from 12 randomly selected primary schools in Ibadan, Nigeria, constituted the subjects…

  8. Taking Active Learning into the Primary School: A Matter of New Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Christine; Ellis, Jennifer; Martlew, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the extension of active learning pedagogical practices familiar in preschool settings to the first class of primary school. Policy and practice guidance in the UK is advocating the benefits of experiential learning as a way of engaging young children as they move into primary school but for teachers this means a move to new…

  9. Look Around You. A Primary Student Activity Book Introducing Basic Environmental Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Sharon

    This activity book, designed for student use, introduces environmental concepts to the primary student. The basic concept around which the guide is developed is the idea that the environment contains many interdependent things. Water, wind, clouds, non-living objects, plants, animals, and pollution are dealt with as part of the primary student's…

  10. Space Mirror Alignment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical alignment mirror mechanism (AMM) has been developed with angular positioning accuracy of +/-0.2 arcsec. This requires the mirror s linear positioning actuators to have positioning resolutions of +/-112 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are 0.1 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy, which translates into linear positioning resolutions at the actuator of 50 nm. The mechanism consists of a structure with sets of cross-directional flexures that enable the mirror s tip and tilt motion, a mirror with its kinematic mount, and two linear actuators. An actuator comprises a brushless DC motor, a linear ball screw, and a piezoelectric brake that holds the mirror s position while the unit is unpowered. An interferometric linear position sensor senses the actuator s position. The AMMs were developed for an Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) optical bench, which is part of an interferometer development. Custom electronics were also developed to accommodate the presence of multiple AMMs within the ABC and provide a compact, all-in-one solution to power and control the AMMs.

  11. Mirror plasma apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma.

  12. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  13. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  14. NIF small mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T

    1999-07-01

    A number of small mirror mounts have been identified that meet the stringent stability, wave front, and cleanliness standards of the NIF. These requirements are similar to those required in other performance critical optical design applications. Future design teams would conserve time and effort if recognized standards were established for mirror mount design and performance characteristics. Standards for stability, physical features, wave front distortion, and cleanliness would simplify the qualification process considerably. At this point such standards are not difficult to define, as the technical support work has been performed repeatedly by mirror mount consumers and suppliers.

  15. Controllable Mirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A deformable Mirror Device (DMD) is a type of spatial light modulator in which mirrors fabricated monolithically on a silicon chip are deformed, or tilted, under electronic control to change the direction of light that falls upon the mirror. NASA and Texas Instruments (TI) have worked to develop this technology, which has subsequently been commercialized by TI. Initial application is the DMD 2000 Travel Information Printer for high speed, high volume printing of airline tickets and boarding passes. Other possible applications range from real-time object tracking to advanced industrial machine vision systems.

  16. Evaluation of control laws and actuator locations for control systems applicable to deformable astronomical telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the major difficulties associated with large orbiting astronomical telescopes are the cost of manufacturing the primary mirror to precise tolerances and the maintaining of diffraction-limited tolerances while in orbit. One successfully demonstrated approach for minimizing these problem areas is the technique of actively deforming the primary mirror by applying discrete forces to the rear of the mirror. A modal control technique, as applied to active optics, has previously been developed and analyzed. The modal control technique represents the plant to be controlled in terms of its eigenvalues and eigenfunctions which are estimated via numerical approximation techniques. The report includes an extension of previous work using the modal control technique and also describes an optimal feedback controller. The equations for both control laws are developed in state-space differential form and include such considerations as stability, controllability, and observability. These equations are general and allow the incorporation of various mode-analyzer designs; two design approaches are presented. The report also includes a technique for placing actuator and sensor locations at points on the mirror based upon the flexibility matrix of the uncontrolled or unobserved modes of the structure. The locations selected by this technique are used in the computer runs which are described. The results are based upon three different initial error distributions, two mode-analyzer designs, and both the modal and optimal control laws.

  17. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  18. Support Technique of Giant Sector-Shaped Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shou-Xiong; Wang, Guo-Min

    2008-06-01

    Based on the segment mirror request of a giant telescope, comparing hexagonal segments with sector-shaped segments, the difference is found. The finite element method was used to analyze the sector-segment mirror deformation under the gravity. The principal aim is to optimize the numbers of the support points and the array of the support. Three schemes, models with 18, 24, and 27 points, are compared by calculating the mirror deformation under the gravity. According to the calculation, the model with 27 points is the best one under which the mirror surface deformation is less than 10 nm, which meets the specification. Then, the mirror surface deformation was calculated under the gravity with the optimized axial support and the lateral support in the central diaphragm when the primary mirror points to three different directions: horizontal, vertical and 45°. The calculation results show that all the shape changes in the sector-shaped submirror are less than 10 nm.

  19. Final Results of the Ball AMSD Beryllium Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The 1.4-meter semi-rigid, beryllium Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) mirror completed initial cryogenic testing at Marshall's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) in August of 2003. Results of this testing show the mirror to have very low cryogenic surface deformation and possess exceptional figure stability. Subsequent to this cryogenic testing beryllium was selected as the material of choice for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) multi-segment primary mirror. Therefore, the AMSD mirror was sent back to SSG-Tinsley for additional ambient polishing to JWST requirements. The mirror was successfully polished to less than 22nm rms of low frequency error. Those additional results are presented with comparisons to the JWST requirements.

  20. Eight Stars of Gold--The Story of Alaska's Flag. Primary Grade Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Museum, Juneau.

    This activities booklet focuses on the story of Alaska's flag. The booklet is intended for teachers to use with primary-grade children. Each activity in the booklet contains background information, a summary and time estimate, Alaska state standards, a step-by-step technique for implementing the activity, assessment tips, materials and resource…

  1. Isolation, antimicrobial activities, and primary structures of hamster neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Wójcik, K; Thogersen, I B; Dubin, A

    1996-01-01

    Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) neutrophil granules contain at least four microbicidal peptides belonging to the defensin family. These compounds were purified from granule acid extracts by reverse-phase chromatography and termed HaNP-1 to -4 (hamster neutrophil peptide). HaNP-1 and HaNP-3 revealed the most bactericidal activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.3 to 0.8 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes strains. The HaNP-4 was always isolated in concentrations exceeding about 10 times the concentrations of other hamster peptides, but its antibacterial activity as well as that of HaNP-2 was relatively lower, probably as a result of conserved Arg residue substitutions. Other microorganisms were also tested, and generally, hamster defensins exhibited less potency against gram-negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of hamster defensins showed a high percentage of identity to the sequence of mouse enteric defensins, reaching about 60% identical residues in the case of HaNP-3 and cryptdin 3. PMID:8890190

  2. Structure function analysis of mirror fabrication and support errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvisc, Anastacia M.; Burge, James H.

    2007-09-01

    Telescopes are ultimately limited by atmospheric turbulence, which is commonly characterized by a structure function. The telescope optics will not further degrade the performance if their errors are small compared to the atmospheric effects. Any further improvement to the mirrors is not economical since there is no increased benefit to performance. Typically the telescope specification is written in terms of an image size or encircled energy and is derived from the best seeing that is expected at the site. Ideally, the fabrication and support errors should never exceed atmospheric turbulence at any spatial scale, so it is instructive to look at how these errors affect the structure function of the telescope. The fabrication and support errors are most naturally described by Zernike polynomials or by bending modes for the active mirrors. This paper illustrates an efficient technique for relating this modal analysis to wavefront structure functions. Data is provided for efficient calculation of structure function given coefficients for Zernike annular polynomials. An example of this procedure for the Giant Magellan Telescope primary mirror is described.

  3. Loop laser cavities with self-pumped phase-conjugate mirrors in low-gain active media for phase-locked multichannel laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Gavrilov, A V; Ershkov, M N; Smetanin, Sergei N; Fedin, Aleksandr V; Bel'kov, K A; Boreysho, A S; Lebedev, V F

    2011-03-31

    It is proved that lasers with different loop cavities with self-pumped phase-conjugate mirrors in low-gain active media can operate under injection of external laser radiation and can be used for the development of diode-pumped phase-locked multichannel neodymium laser systems operating both on the fundamental laser transition with the wavelength {lambda} = 1.06 {mu}m and on the transition with {lambda} = 1.34 {mu}m. The phase-conjugate oscillation thresholds in the case of injection of an external signal are determined for a multiloop cavity configuration and an increased number of active elements in the cavity. It is shown that phase-conjugate oscillation can occur even if the single-pass gain of the active element is as low as only {approx}2. Under high-power side diode pumping of a multiloop Nd:YAG laser, single-mode output radiation was achieved at {lambda} = 1.064 {mu}m with a pulse energy up to 0.75 J, a pulse repetition rate up to 25 Hz, an average power up to 18.3 W, and an efficiency up to 20%. In a multiloop Nd:YAG laser with three active elements in the cavity, single-mode radiation at {lambda} = 1.34 {mu}m was obtained with a pulse energy up to 0.96 J, a pulse repetition rate up to 10 Hz, and an average power up to 8.5 W. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  4. Composite Material Mirror Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photograph, the composite material mirror is tested in the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The mirror test conducted was to check the ability to accurately model and predict the cryogenic performance of complex mirror systems, and the characterization of cryogenic dampening properties of beryllium. The JWST, a next generation successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), was named in honor of James W. Webb, NASA's second administrator, who led NASA in the early days of the fledgling Aerospace Agency. Scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle, the JWST will be able to look deeper into the universe than the HST because of the increased light-collecting power of its larger mirror and the extraordinary sensitivity of its instrument to infrared light.

  5. The Athena Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Athena mission (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) requires lightweight X-ray Wolter optics with a high angular resolution and large effective area. For achieving an effective area of 2 m^2 (at 1 keV) and an angular resolution of below 5 arcsec, the Silicon Pore Optics technology was developed by ESA together with a consortium of European industry. Silicon Pore Optics are made of commercial Si wafers using process technology adapted from the semiconductor industry. We present the current design of the Athena mirror concentrating on the technology development status of the Silicon Pore Optics, ranging from the manufacturing of single mirror plates towards complete focusing mirror modules and their integration into the mirror structure.

  6. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  7. Mirror Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mirror Technology Roadmap identifies specific capabilities requiring significant advances in optical fabrication and testing to enable the next generation of large-aperture space telescopes for astronomy and Earth science missions ranging from x-ray to infrared.

  8. Towards a better mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, David

    1987-01-01

    Telesat's Getaway Special competition was designed to promote interest in space among high school students in Canada. The winning entry proposed the manufacture of mirrors in microgravity and to compare the optical properties of these mirrors with similar ones made on Earth. Telesat engineers designed and built the experiment which flew on the Atlantic shuttle on November 27, 1985. This paper outlines the design evolution, its implementation, the manufacture and test of the GAS and the results of the experiment.

  9. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  10. Notes on moving mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Obadia, N.; Parentani, R.

    2001-08-15

    The Davies-Fulling (DF) model describes the scattering of a massless field by a noninertial mirror in two dimensions. In this paper, we generalize this model in two different ways. First, we consider partially reflecting mirrors. We show that the Bogoliubov coefficients relating inertial modes can be expressed in terms of the reflection factor and the transformation from inertial modes to modes at rest with respect to the mirror. In this perspective, the DF model is simply the limiting case when the reflection factor is unity for all frequencies. In the second part, we introduce an alternative model which is based on self-interactions described by an action principle. When the coupling is constant, this model can be solved exactly and gives rise to a partially reflecting mirror. The usefulness of this dynamical model lies in the possibility of switching off the coupling between the mirror and field. This allows us to obtain regularized expressions for the fluxes in situations where they are singular when using the DF model. Two examples are considered. The first concerns the flux induced by the disappearance of the reflection condition, a situation which bears some analogies with the end of the evaporation of a black hole. The second case concerns the flux emitted by a uniformly accelerated mirror.

  11. White-Light Phase-Conjugate Mirrors as Distortion Correctors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald; Smith, W. Scott; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Banerjee, Partha

    2010-01-01

    White-light phase-conjugate mirrors would be incorporated into some optical systems, according to a proposal, as means of correcting for wavefront distortions caused by imperfections in large optical components. The proposal was given impetus by a recent demonstration that white, incoherent light can be made to undergo phase conjugation, whereas previously, only coherent light was known to undergo phase conjugation. This proposal, which is potentially applicable to almost any optical system, was motivated by a need to correct optical aberrations of the primary mirror of the Hubble Space telescope. It is difficult to fabricate large optical components like the Hubble primary mirror and to ensure the high precision typically required of such components. In most cases, despite best efforts, the components as fabricated have small imperfections that introduce optical aberrations that adversely affect imaging quality. Correcting for such aberrations is difficult and costly. The proposed use of white-light phase conjugate mirrors offers a relatively simple and inexpensive solution of the aberration-correction problem. Indeed, it should be possible to simplify the entire approach to making large optical components because there would be no need to fabricate those components with extremely high precision in the first place: A white-light phase-conjugate mirror could correct for all the distortions and aberrations in an optical system. The use of white-light phase-conjugate mirrors would be essential for ensuring high performance in optical systems containing lightweight membrane mirrors, which are highly deformable. As used here, "phase-conjugate mirror" signifies, more specifically, an optical component in which incident light undergoes time-reversal phase conjugation. In practice, a phase-conjugate mirror would typically be implemented by use of a suitably positioned and oriented photorefractive crystal. In the case of a telescope comprising a primary and secondary

  12. The Blob Crashes into the Mirror: Modeling the Exceptional γ-Ray Flaring Activity of 3C 454.3 in 2010 November

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Cavaliere, A.; Striani, E.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-10-01

    3C 454.3 is a prominent flat-spectrum radio quasar that in recent years attracted considerable attention because of its variable high-energy emissions. In this paper, we focus on the exceptional flaring activity of 3C 454.3 that was detected by AGILE and by Fermi-LAT in 2010 November. In the light of the time-varying data ranging from the radio, optical, and X-ray up to GeV γ-ray bands, we discuss a theoretical framework addressing all data in their overall evolution. For two weeks, the source has shown a plateau of enhanced GeV emission preceding a sudden major flare lasting about three days before decaying. The γ-ray flare onset is abrupt (about six hours), and is characterized by a prominent "Compton dominance" with the GeV flux exceeding the pre-flare values by a factor of four to five. During this episode, the optical and X-ray fluxes increased by a factor of around two. Within the standard framework of a jet launched with a Lorentz bulk factor Γ ~ 10 from a central black hole, we explore the yields of two alternatives. Case 1, with high-energy emission originating within the broad line region (BLR); and Case 2, with most of it produced outside at larger distances of a few parsecs. We show that Case 1 has considerable problems in explaining the whole set of multifrequency data. Case 2, instead, leads to a consistent and interesting interpretation based on the enhanced inverse Compton radiation that is produced as the jet crashes onto a mirror cloud positioned at parsec scales. This model explains the γ-ray versus optical/X-ray behavior of 3C 454.3, including the otherwise puzzling phenomena such as the prominent "orphan" optical flare, and the enhanced line emission with no appreciable γ-ray counterpart that preceded the GeV γ-ray flare. It also accounts for the delayed onset of the latter on top of the long plateau. Our modeling of the exceptional 3C 454.3 γ-ray flare shows that while emission inside the canonical BLR is problematic, major and rapid

  13. The blob crashes into the mirror: modeling the exceptional γ-ray flaring activity of 3C 454.3 in 2010 November

    SciTech Connect

    Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-10-01

    3C 454.3 is a prominent flat-spectrum radio quasar that in recent years attracted considerable attention because of its variable high-energy emissions. In this paper, we focus on the exceptional flaring activity of 3C 454.3 that was detected by AGILE and by Fermi-LAT in 2010 November. In the light of the time-varying data ranging from the radio, optical, and X-ray up to GeV γ-ray bands, we discuss a theoretical framework addressing all data in their overall evolution. For two weeks, the source has shown a plateau of enhanced GeV emission preceding a sudden major flare lasting about three days before decaying. The γ-ray flare onset is abrupt (about six hours), and is characterized by a prominent 'Compton dominance' with the GeV flux exceeding the pre-flare values by a factor of four to five. During this episode, the optical and X-ray fluxes increased by a factor of around two. Within the standard framework of a jet launched with a Lorentz bulk factor Γ ∼ 10 from a central black hole, we explore the yields of two alternatives. Case 1, with high-energy emission originating within the broad line region (BLR); and Case 2, with most of it produced outside at larger distances of a few parsecs. We show that Case 1 has considerable problems in explaining the whole set of multifrequency data. Case 2, instead, leads to a consistent and interesting interpretation based on the enhanced inverse Compton radiation that is produced as the jet crashes onto a mirror cloud positioned at parsec scales. This model explains the γ-ray versus optical/X-ray behavior of 3C 454.3, including the otherwise puzzling phenomena such as the prominent 'rphan' optical flare, and the enhanced line emission with no appreciable γ-ray counterpart that preceded the GeV γ-ray flare. It also accounts for the delayed onset of the latter on top of the long plateau. Our modeling of the exceptional 3C 454.3 γ-ray flare shows that while emission inside the canonical BLR is problematic, major and rapid

  14. The Porcine Chloride Channel Calcium-Activated Family Member pCLCA4a Mirrors Lung Expression of the Human hCLCA4

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephanie; Grötzsch, Tanja; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Kobalz, Ursula; Gruber, Achim D.

    2012-01-01

    Pig models of cystic fibrosis (CF) have recently been established that are expected to mimic the human disease closer than mouse models do. The human CLCA (originally named chloride channels, calcium-activated) member hCLCA4 is considered a potential modifier of disease severity in CF, but its murine ortholog, mCLCA6, is not expressed in the mouse lung. Here, we have characterized the genomic structure, protein processing, and tissue expression patterns of the porcine ortholog to hCLCA4, pCLCA4a. The genomic structure and cellular protein processing of pCLCA4a were found to closely mirror those of hCLCA4 and mCLCA6. Similar to human lung, pCLCA4a mRNA was strongly expressed in porcine lungs, and the pCLCA4a protein was immunohistochemically detected on the apical membranes of tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells. This stands in sharp contrast to mouse mCLCA6, which has been detected exclusively in intestinal epithelia but not the murine lung. The results may add to the understanding of species-specific differences in the CF phenotype and support the notion that the CF pig model may be more suitable than murine models to study the role of hCLCA4. PMID:22205680

  15. Preparation of gaseous CRMs from the primary system for (222)Rn activity measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, B J; Kim, B C; Lee, K B; Lee, J M; Park, T S

    2016-03-01

    For disseminating the gaseous radon standard traceable to the KRISS primary system based on the defined solid angle counting method, two kinds of radon CRM (a glass ampule type and a stainless steel cylinder type) were developed. The activity of the CRM was certified by subtracting a residual activity from the measured activity by the primary system. After certification, the ampule CRM was used to calibrate a radon-monitoring instrument and the cylinder CRM to calibrate an HPGe system. We also improved the measurement procedure of the radon primary system. In a typical radon energy spectrum, the radon peak overlaps with the polonium peak. For more reliable and accurate measurement of radon activity, a fitting method was adopted for the evaluation of radon area in the alpha energy spectrum. The result of radon activity evaluated by using the fitting method is in good agreement with that by the previous integration method. PMID:26778761

  16. Temperature compensated sleeve type mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The primary mirror of a large (26-inch diameter aperture) solar telescope was made of glass ceramic and designed with an integral hub on the back of the center of the mirror. This permits heat from the mirror to radiate off its back to a nearby cold plate. To permit mounting without high stresses, the hub was ground down to a smooth cylindrical surface 3.5 inch in diameter. The ground surface was then acid-etched to remove 0.007 inch (on the diameter) by immersion for five minutes in a mixture of four parts 92% sulfuric acid and three parts 50% hydrofluoric acid. The acid etching removes microcracks from the ground Cer-Vit surface. An Invar sleeve was fabricated to fit over the hub with about 0.010 inch radial (0.020 inch diametral) clearance.

  17. Optimal wavefront control for adaptive segmented mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    A ground-based astronomical telescope with a segmented primary mirror will suffer image-degrading wavefront aberrations from at least two sources: (1) atmospheric turbulence and (2) segment misalignment or figure errors of the mirror itself. This paper describes the derivation of a mirror control feedback matrix that assumes the presence of both types of aberration and is optimum in the sense that it minimizes the mean-squared residual wavefront error. Assumptions of the statistical nature of the wavefront measurement errors, atmospheric phase aberrations, and segment misalignment errors are made in the process of derivation. Examples of the degree of correlation are presented for three different types of wavefront measurement data and compared to results of simple corrections.

  18. An adenoviral vector for probing promoter activity in primary immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Pulak; Madan, Rajat; Chougnet, Claire; Divanovic, Senad; Ma, Xiaojing; Wahl, Larry M.; Gajewski, Thomas; Karp, Christopher L.; Hildeman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional analysis of the DNA regulatory regions that control gene expression has largely been performed through transient transfection of promoter–reporter constructs into transformed cells. However, transformed cells are often poor models of primary cells. To directly analyze DNA regulatory regions in primary cells, we generated a novel adenoviral luciferase reporter vector, pShuttle-luciferase-GFP (pSLUG) that contains a promoterless luciferase cassette (with an upstream cloning site) for probing promoter activity, and a GFP expression cassette that allows for the identification of transduced cells. Recombinant adenoviruses generated from this vector can transduce a wide range of primary immune cells with high efficiency, including human macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells; and mouse T cells transgenic for the coxsackie and adenoviral receptor (CAR). In primary T cells, we show inducible nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) activity using a recombinant pSLUG adenovirus containing a consensus NF-AT promoter. We further show inducible IL-12/23 p40 promoter activity in primary macrophages and dendritic cells using a recombinant pSLUG adenovirus containing the proximal human IL-12/23 p40 promoter. The pSLUG system promises to be a powerful tool for the analysis of DNA regulatory regions in diverse types of primary immune cells. PMID:16563424

  19. Physical Activity Patterns and Psychological Correlates of Physical Activity among Singaporean Primary, Secondary, and Junior College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, C. K. John; Koh, K. T.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Liu, W. C.; Chye, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine physical activity patterns and psychological correlates of physical activity among primary, secondary, and junior college students in Singapore. A sample of 3,333 school students aged 10 to 18 years took part in the study. Results showed that the younger students had significantly higher physical…

  20. The Art and Science Connection. Hands-On Activities for Primary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help primary students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  1. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  2. Waterworks Book. An Activity Book about Mississippi's Coastal Resources for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kevin M.

    Coastal resources are highlighted in this activity book for primary school children. Special focus is given to Mississippi's coastal areas, but applications to other geographic areas can be made. Wetland concepts and conditions are developed through a variety of games, puzzles, matching exercises and pictorial explanations. Activities addressing…

  3. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  4. Music Activities in Primary School: Students' Preferences in the Spanish Region of Murcia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente-Nicolás, Gregorio; Mac Ruairc, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the preferences of primary school children in relation to the types of activities that typically take place in music classrooms. For the purposes of this study, these classroom-based music activities have been categorised into five areas: singing, playing instruments, listening, reading and writing music and…

  5. Independent and Small Group Activities for Social Studies in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Barbara; And Others

    A teachers' guide for social studies, this manual stresses geography curriculum and activities for the primary grades. It is suggested that a teacher work with one group while the other children work individually. Children first work independently for a team, and then progress to less structured small group activities. Positive reinforcement by…

  6. Elementary Environmental Learning Packet K-3, Third Revised Edition. [Primary CEL Blocks, Student Activity Cards].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard County School Board, Cocoa, FL.

    This environmental education program consists of two levels: primary and intermediate. The learning materials are activity based and incorporate process and subject area skills with knowledge and concern for the environment. The program is also interdisciplinary including activities and skills from art, language arts, mathematics, music, science,…

  7. Action observation: mirroring across our spontaneous movement tempo

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bisio, Ambra; Perasso, Luisa; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    During action observation (AO), the activity of the “mirror system” is influenced by the viewer’s expertise in the observed action. A question that remains open is whether the temporal aspects of the subjective motor repertoire can influence the “mirror system” activation. PMID:25989029

  8. Potential determinants of efficacy of mirror therapy in stroke patients – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Maddalena; Morkisch, Nadine; Fritzsch, Claire; Mehnert, Jan; Steinbrink, Jens; Niedeggen, Michael; Dohle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mirror therapy (MT) was found to improve motor function after stroke. However, there is high variability between patients regarding motor recovery. Objectives: The following pilot study was designed to identify potential factors determining this variability between patients with severe upper limb paresis, receiving MT. Methods: Eleven sub-acute stroke patients with severe upper limb paresis participated, receiving in-patient rehabilitation. After a set of pre-assessments (including measurement of brain activity at the primary motor cortex and precuneus during the mirror illusion, using near-infrared spectroscopy as described previously), four weeks of MT were applied, followed by a set of post-assessments. Discriminant group analysis for MT responders and non-responders was performed. Results: Six out of eleven patients were defined as responders and five as non-responders on the basis of their functional motor improvement. The initial motor function and the activity shift in both precunei (mirror index) were found to discriminate significantly between responders and non-responders. Conclusions: In line with earlier results, initial motor function was confirmed as crucial determinant of motor recovery. Additionally, activity response to the mirror illusion in both precunei was found to be a candidate for determination of the efficacy of MT. PMID:26409402

  9. Thermal performance of the ATST secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joe; Hansen, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffractionlimited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system (TMS) will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results were discussed. The goal of this study is to establish thermal models by I-DEAS for an adequate thermal environment. These thermal models will be useful for estimating segment thermal responses. Current study assumes a few sample time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment.

  10. Performance evaluations of the ATST secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joseph; Hansen, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffraction-limited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCFRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results are discussed. The goal of this study is to evaluate the optical performances of M2 using thermal models and mechanical models. Thermal responses from the models enable us to manipulate time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment for the design and development of TMS.

  11. Evaluation of microfabricated deformable mirror systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Lee, Max K.; Bright, Victor M.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents recent result for aberration correction and beam steering experiments using polysilicon surface micromachined piston micromirror arrays. Microfabricated deformable mirrors offer a substantial cost reduction for adaptive optic systems. In addition to the reduced mirror cost, microfabricated mirrors typically require low control voltages, thus eliminating high voltage amplifiers. The greatly reduced cost per channel of adaptive optic systems employing microfabricated deformable mirrors promise high order aberration correction at low cost. Arrays of piston micromirrors with 128 active elements were tested. Mirror elements are on a 203 micrometers 12 by 12 square grid. The overall array size is 2.4 mm square. The arrays were fabricated in the commercially available DARPA supported MUMPs surface micromachining foundry process. The cost per mirror array in this prototyping process is less than 200 dollars. Experimental results are presented for a hybrid correcting element comprised of a lenslet array and piston micromirror array, and for a piston micromirror array only. Also presented is a novel digital deflection micromirror which requires no digital to analog converters, further reducing the cost of adaptive optics system.

  12. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  13. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  14. Physics of mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1982-05-01

    In recent years the emphasis in research on the magnetic mirror approach to fusion has been shifted to address what are essentially economically-motivated issues. The introduction of the Tandem Mirror idea solved in principal the problem of low Q (low fusion power gain) of mirror-based fusion systems. In order to optimize the tandem mirror idea from an economic standpoint, some important improvements have been suggested. These improvements include the thermal barrier idea of Baldwin and Logan and the axicell concept of Kesner. These new modifications introduce some special physics considerations. Among these are (1) The MHD stability properties of high energy electron components in the end cells; (2) The optimization of end-cell magnetic field configurations with the objective of minimizing equilibrium parallel currents; (3) The suppression of microstabilities by use of sloshing ion distributions. Following a brief outline of tandem mirror concepts, the above three topics are discussed, with illustrative examples taken from earlier work or from recent design studies.

  15. Innovative Magnetic Mirror Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In the past two decades, while magnetic mirror research in the US was curtailed, several innovations have been proposed and many have been demonstrated in Japan and Russia in the Gamma 10 and GDT experiments. These advances have led to new scientific understanding, means of overcoming previous short comings, and reconsideration of magnetic mirror systems as a modest size material testing neutron source or as a fusion- fission hybrid system. Compared to toroidal systems, the linear geometry of mirror systems has the significant advantages of easing construction, operation and maintenance, but has a less developed data base. The recent innovations include reliance on axi-symmetric mirror coils, suppression of energetic-ion cyclotron-modes with potential confined warm plasma, and sheared ExB flow stabilization of drift waves. To enable increased electron temperature, the magnetic field expansion ratio from the mirror to the end wall is increased beyond the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. This expansion inhibits electron thermal conduction, reduces the incident wall power flux to low levels, and isolates plasma-wall interactions far from the confined plasma.

  16. Histopathology of the pulp of primary molars with active and arrested dentinal caries.

    PubMed

    Di Nicolo, R; Guedes-Pinto, A C; Carvalho, Y R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the histological appearance of the pulp of human primary molars with active and arrested lesions. The sample consisted of 36 primary molars (18 with active lesions and 18 with arrested lesions) extracted from 35 children between 5 to 9 years of age. The histological diagnosis was classified in normal pulp, transitional stage, partial pulpitis, total pulpitis and total necrosis, and then subdivided in three subgroups: treatable, untreatable and questionable. Results showed that normal pulp or transitional stage (treatable category) was diagnosed in 50% of teeth with arrested lesions, compared to 11.1% of teeth with active lesions. Partial pulpitis (questionable category) was present in 38.8% with arrested lesions compared to 22.2% with active lesions. Total pulpitis and total necrosis (untreatable category) was diagnosed in 11.2% with arrested lesions compared to 66.7% with active lesions. The observed frequencies of histological categories between both groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Histologically, pulp reaction under active and arrested lesions in primary molars revealed the formation of a basophilic calcio-traumatic line at the junction of the primary and reparative dentin, formation of reparative dentin and a regular odontoblastic layer in 60% of the cases. Results indicated that the type of lesion (active or arrested) is a good indicator of the histological status of the pulp. PMID:11314352

  17. An Automatic Washing Machine to Remove Aluminum From Astronomical Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitelli, Valentina

    Cleaning of large astronomical mirrors, before aluminization, required in the past a large amount of manual operations on the surface. With very large mirrors, 8 meter or more, manual operations become time consuming, expensive and often dangerous, both for mirror surface and operators. A fully automated procedure is thus mandatory when handling large mirrors. To this aim we experimented on a small scale (60 cm) an automatic procedure, free from any manual contact with the mirror, capable of removing old aluminum and leaving a clean, wet surface ready for a successful new aluminization. First we manually treated small borosilicate mirrors, obtained from the LBT primary mirror glass batch, with different sequences of chemicals, commonly used to this purpose. These small mirrors were checked with a Wyko interferometer before and after treating, to trace change in roughness of the surface. Quality and stability of the new aluminum deposition after cleaning was also checked. The washing machine prototype is composed by a water proof box on rigid PVC with a moving arm, a pump and a series of tanks containing the used chemicals. All the adopted components can be used with acids and other corrosive fluids. The machine is designed to hold the mirror in vertical position. An arm with 10 cm spaced nozzles moves up and down in front of the mirror spraying the adopted chemicals in a defined sequence. A pump forces the liquid through the circuit. After the washing, the mirror is left, protected from the dust in the washing machine, for about 2 hours to drip the water, then is moved into the vacuum pump to check the final result of aluminizing the cleaned surface. A homogeneous layer of aluminum follows only after a careful cleaning, otherwise a fast oxidize process, or a inhomogeneous aluminum coating appear. Scaling times, fluxes and costs from this experiment to large size mirrors leads to realistic, affordable figures.

  18. Cryogenic mirror analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, S.

    1988-01-01

    Due to extraordinary distances scanned by modern telescopes, optical surfaces in such telescopes must be manufactured to unimaginable standards of perfection of a few thousandths of a centimeter. The detection of imperfections of less than 1/20 of a wavelength of light, for application in the building of the mirror for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, was undertaken. Because the mirror must be kept very cold while in space, another factor comes into effect: cryogenics. The process to test a specific morror under cryogenic conditions is described; including the follow-up analysis accomplished through computer work. To better illustrate the process and analysis, a Pyrex Hex-Core mirror is followed through the process from the laser interferometry in the lab, to computer analysis via a computer program called FRINGE. This analysis via FRINGE is detailed.

  19. Moving mirrors: a high-density EEG study investigating the effect of camera movements on motor cortex activation during action observation.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Katrin; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Guerra, Michele; Gallese, Vittorio

    2014-09-01

    Action execution-perception links (mirror mechanism) have been repeatedly suggested to play crucial roles in social cognition. Remarkably, the designs of most studies exploring this topic so far excluded even the simplest traces of social interaction, such as a movement of the observer toward another individual. This study introduces a new design by investigating the effects of camera movements, possibly simulating the observer's own approaching movement toward the scene. We conducted a combined high-density EEG and behavioral study investigating motor cortex activation during action observation measured by event-related desynchronization and resynchronization (ERD/ERS) of the mu rhythm. Stimuli were videos showing a goal-related hand action filmed while using the camera in four different ways: filming from a fixed position, zooming in on the scene, approaching the scene by means of a dolly, and approaching the scene by means of a steadycam. Results demonstrated a consistently stronger ERD of the mu rhythm for videos that were filmed while approaching the scene with a steadycam. Furthermore, videos in which the zoom was applied reliably demonstrated a stronger rebound. A rating task showed that videos in which the camera approached the scene were felt as more involving and the steadycam was most able to produce a visual experience close to the one of a human approaching the scene. These results suggest that filming technique predicts time course specifics of ERD/ERS during action observation with only videos simulating the natural vision of a walking human observer eliciting a stronger ERD than videos filmed from a fixed position. This demonstrates the utility of ecologically designed studies for exploring social cognition. PMID:24666130

  20. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  1. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  2. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  3. Mirror Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract led to a commercially available instrument used to measure the shape profile of mirror surfaces in scientific instruments. Bauer Associates, Inc.'s Bauer Model 200 Profilometer is based upon a different measurement concept. The local curvature of the mirror's surface is measured at many points, and the collection of data is computer processed to yield the desired shape profile. (Earlier profilometers are based on the principle of interferometry.) The system is accurate and immune to problems like vibration and turbulence. Two profilometers are currently marketed, and a third will soon be commercialized.

  4. Flat Focusing Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y. C.; Kicas, S.; Trull, J.; Peckus, M.; Cojocaru, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Drazdys, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  5. Flat focusing mirror.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y C; Kicas, S; Trull, J; Peckus, M; Cojocaru, C; Vilaseca, R; Drazdys, R; Staliunas, K

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  6. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  7. Telescope mount with azimuth-only primary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. H.

    1968-01-01

    In large aperture telescope primary reflectors, the primary mirror is fixed with respect to the gravity vector to avoid varying gravity deflection problems. The primary reflector does not become distorted in various positions nor in changing positions.

  8. Dual-use bimorph deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, M. S.; Laycock, L. C.; Bagshaw, J. M.; Rowe, D.

    2005-11-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a critical underpinning technology for future optical countermeasures, laser delivery, target illumination and imaging systems. It measures and compensates for optical distortion caused by transmission through the atmosphere, resulting in the ability to deploy smaller lasers and identify targets at greater ranges. AO is also well established in ground based astronomy, and is finding applications in free space optical communications and ophthalmology. One of the key components in an AO system is the wavefront modifier, which acts on the incoming or outgoing beam to counter the effects of the atmosphere. BAE SYSTEMS ATC is developing multi-element Deformable Bimorph Mirrors (DBMs) for such applications. A traditional bimorph deformable mirror uses a set of edge electrodes outside the active area in order to meet the required boundary conditions for the active aperture. This inflicts a significant penalty in terms of bandwidth, which is inversely proportional to the square of the full mirror diameter. We have devised a number of novel mounting arrangements that reduce dead space and thus provide a much improved trade-off between bandwidth and stroke. These schemes include a novel method for providing vertical displacement at the periphery of the aperture, a method for providing a continuous compliant support underneath the bimorph mirror, and a method for providing a three point support underneath the bimorph. In all three cases, there is no requirement for edge electrodes to provide the boundary conditions, resulting in devices of much higher bandwidth. The target is to broaden the use of these types of mirror beyond the current limits of either low order/low bandwidth, to address the high order, high bandwidth systems required by long range, horizontal path applications. This paper will discuss the different mirror designs, and present experimental results for the most recently assembled mirrors.

  9. Hexapod kinematics for secondary mirror aberration control .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.

    This work deals with active correction of the aberrations in a telescope by moving the secondary mirror. A special attention is dedicated to the case of a secondary mirror whose motions are controlled by a 6-6 Stewart Platform (generally called by astronomers simply "hexapod", even if this term is more general). The kinematics of the device is studied. The non trivial forward kinematics problem is solved by an iterative algorithm fitting the necessities of an active optics system and fast enough to be used in a closed loop feedback control.

  10. Quantification of primary versus secondary C-H bond cleavage in alkane activation: Propane on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, W.H.; Sun, Yongkui )

    1991-08-02

    The trapping-mediated dissociative chemisorption of three isotopes of propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CH{sub 3}, CD{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 3}D{sub 8}) has been investigated on the Pt(110)-(1 {times} 2) surface, and both the apparent activation energies and the preexponential factors of the surface reaction rate coefficients have been measured. In addition, the probabilities of primary and secondary C-H bond cleavage for alkane activation on a surface were evaluated. The activation energy for primary C-H bond cleavage was 425 calories per mole greater than that of secondary C-H bond cleavage, and the two true activation energies that embody the single measured activation energy were determined for each of the three isotopes. Secondary C-H bond cleavage is also preferred on entropic grounds, and the magnitude of the effect was quantified.

  11. Lightweight Deployable Mirrors with Tensegrity Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.; Cleve, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    The upper part of Figure 1 shows a small-scale prototype of a developmental class of lightweight, deployable structures that would support panels in precise alignments. In this case, the panel is hexagonal and supports disks that represent segments of a primary mirror of a large telescope. The lower part of Figure 1 shows a complete conceptual structure containing multiple hexagonal panels that hold mirror segments. The structures of this class are of the tensegrity type, which was invented five decades ago by artist Kenneth Snelson. A tensegrity structure consists of momentfree compression members (struts) and tension members (cables). The structures of this particular developmental class are intended primarily as means to erect large segmented primary mirrors of astronomical telescopes or large radio antennas in outer space. Other classes of tensegrity structures could also be designed for terrestrial use as towers, masts, and supports for general structural panels. An important product of the present development effort is the engineering practice of building a lightweight, deployable structure as an assembly of tensegrity modules like the one shown in Figure 2. This module comprises two octahedral tensegrity subunits that are mirror images of each other joined at their plane of mirror symmetry. In this case, the plane of mirror symmetry is both the upper plane of the lower subunit and the lower plane of the upper subunit, and is delineated by the midheight triangle in Figure 2. In the configuration assumed by the module to balance static forces under mild loading, the upper and lower planes of each sub-unit are rotated about 30 , relative to each other, about the long (vertical) axis of the structure. Larger structures can be assembled by joining multiple modules like this one at their sides or ends. When the module is compressed axially (vertically), the first-order effect is an increase in the rotation angle, but by virtue of the mirror arrangement, the net

  12. Redox activity of urban quasi-ultrafine particles from primary and secondary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vishal; Ning, Zhi; Cho, Arthur K.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-12-01

    To characterize the redox activity profiles of atmospheric aerosols from primary (traffic) and secondary photochemical sources, ambient quasi-ultrafine particles were collected near downtown Los Angeles in two different time periods - morning (6:00-9:00 PDT) and afternoon (11:00-14:00 PDT) in the summer of 2008. Detailed chemical analysis of the collected samples, including water-soluble elements, inorganic ions, organic species and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was conducted and redox activity of the samples was measured by two different assays: the dithiothreitol (DTT) and the macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Tracers of secondary photochemical reactions, such as sulfate and organic acids were higher (2.1 ± 0.6 times for sulfate, and up to 3 times for the organic acids) in the afternoon period. WSOC was also elevated by 2.5 ± 0.9 times in the afternoon period due to photo-oxidation of primary particles during atmospheric aging. Redox activity measured by the DTT assay was considerably higher for the samples collected during the afternoon; on the other hand, diurnal trends in the ROS-based activity were not consistent between the morning and afternoon periods. A linear regression between redox activity and various PM chemical constituents showed that the DTT assay was highly correlated with WSOC ( R2 = 0.80), while ROS activity was associated mostly with water soluble transition metals (Vanadium, Nickel and Cadmium; R2 > 0.70). The DTT and ROS assays, which are based on the generation of different oxidizing species by chemical PM constituents, provide important information for elucidating the health risks related to PM exposure from different sources. Thus, both primary and secondary particles possess high redox activity; however, photochemical transformations of primary emissions with atmospheric aging enhance the toxicological potency of primary particles in terms of generating oxidative stress and leading to subsequent damage in cells.

  13. Shape memory composite deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with some of the critical aspects regarding Shape Memory Composite (SMC) design: firstly some technological aspects concerning embedding technique and their efficiency secondarily the lack of useful numerical tools for this peculiar design. It has been taken into account as a possible application a deformable panel which is devoted to act as a substrate for a deformable mirror. The activity has been mainly focused to the study of embedding technologies, activation and authority. In detail it will be presented the "how to" manufacturing of some smart panels with embedded NiTiNol wires in order to show the technology developed for SMC structures. The first part of the work compares non conventional pull-out tests on wires embedded in composites laminates (real condition of application), with standard pull-out in pure epoxy resin blocks. Considering the numerical approach some different modeling techniques to be implemented in commercial codes (ABAQUS) have been investigated. The Turner's thermo-mechanical model has been adopted for the modeling of the benchmark: A spherical panel devoted to work as an active substrate for a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) deformable mirror has been considered as a significant technological demonstrator and possible future application (f=240mm, r.o.c.=1996mm).

  14. Table-top mirror based parallel programmable optical logic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2014-12-01

    Light rays can easily be reflected to different path by mechanical movement of mirrors. Using this basic operational principle we can design parallel programmable optical logic device (PPOLD) by arranging mirrors on a table. The ‘table-top mirror' models of this proposed circuit have been shown here. We can program it to design all the two input 16-Boolean logical expressions from a single design. The design is based on only plane mirrors. No active optical material is used in this design. Not only that the proposed circuit is optically reversible in nature. Moreover this design is very simple in sense. It can be fabricated in MEMS based optical switches.

  15. M-ARIANE (Mirror-assisted Active Readout In A Neutron Environment): an x-ray imaging system for implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility at ignition neutron yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Ayers, J.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Cerjan, C.; Emig, J.; Felker, B.; Glenn, S. M.; Hagmann, C.; Holder, J.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Moody, J.; Piston, K.; Simanovskaia, N.; Walton, C.

    2013-09-01

    X-ray imaging diagnostics instruments will operate in a harsh ionizing radiation background environment during ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This background consists of mostly neutrons and gamma rays produced by inelastic scattering of neutrons. An imaging system, M-ARIANE (Mirror-assisted Active Readout In A Neutron Environment), based on an x-ray framing camera with film, has been designed to operate in such a harsh neutron-induced background environment. Multilayer x-ray mirrors and a shielding enclosure are the key components of this imaging system which is designed to operate at ignition neutron yields of ~1e18 on NIF. Modeling of the neutronand gamma-induced backgrounds along with the signal and noise of the x-ray imaging system is presented that display the effectiveness of this design.

  16. Ontario primary care reform and quality improvement activities: an environmental scan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality improvement is attracting the attention of the primary health care system as a means by which to achieve higher quality patient care. Ontario, Canada has demonstrated leadership in terms of its improvement in healthcare, but the province lacks a structured framework by which it can consistently evaluate its quality improvement initiatives specific to the primary healthcare system. The intent of this research was to complete an environmental scan and capacity map of quality improvement activities being built in and by the primary healthcare sector (QI-PHC) in Ontario as a first step to developing a coordinated and sustainable framework of primary healthcare for the province. Methods Data were collected between January and July 2011 in collaboration with an advisory group of stakeholder representatives and quality improvement leaders in primary health care. Twenty participants were interviewed by telephone, followed by review of relevant websites and documents identified in the interviews. Data were systematically examined using Framework Analysis augmented by Prior’s approach to document analysis in an iterative process. Results The environmental scan identified many activities (n = 43) designed to strategically build QI-PHC capacity, identify promising QI-PHC practices and outcomes, scale up quality improvement-informed primary healthcare practice changes, and make quality improvement a core organizational strategy in health care delivery, which were grouped into clusters. Cluster 1 was composed of initiatives in the form of on-going programs that deliberately incorporated long-term quality improvement capacity building through province-wide reach. Cluster 2 represented activities that were time-limited (research, pilot, or demonstration projects) with the primary aim of research production. The activities of most primary health care practitioners, managers, stakeholder organizations and researchers involved in this scan demonstrated a

  17. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    PubMed

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy. PMID:27583794

  18. Tandem mirror fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.

    1983-12-02

    The tandem mirror program has evolved considerably in the last decade. Of significance is the viable reactor concept embodied in the MARS design. An aggressive experimental program, culminating in the operation of MFTF-B in late 1986, will provide a firm basis for refining the MARS design as necessary for constructing a reactor prototype in the 1990s.

  19. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, William

    2011-01-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge. An alternate explanation is given.

  20. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  1. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  2. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  3. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. PMID:26519833

  4. Observation of Children's Physical Activity Levels in Primary School: Is the School an Ideal Setting for Meeting Government Activity Targets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Michael; Warburton, Peter; Coy, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Given the commitment (and funding) by the British government to promote physical activity among all ages, and despite the inevitable political manipulation of physical education (PE) and school sport, there is now an ideal opportunity to focus on primary schools as a key target group for the future. This study determined the physical activity…

  5. Cosmology with liquid mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogg, David W.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Liquid mirrors provide an exciting means to obtain large optical telescopes for substantially lower costs than conventional technologies. The liquid mirror concept has been demonstrated in the lab with the construction of a diffraction limited 1.5 m mirror. The mirror surface, using liquid mercury, forms a perfect parabolic shape when the mirror cell is rotated at a uniform velocity. A liquid mirror must be able to support a heavy mercury load with minimal flexure and have a fundamental resonant frequency that is as high as possible, to suppress the amplitude of surface waves caused by small vibrations transmitted to the mirror. To minimize the transmission of vibrations to the liquid surface, the entire mirror rests on an air bearing. This necessitates the mirror cell being lightweight, due to the limited load capabilities of the air bearing. The mirror components must also have physical characteristics which minimize the effects of thermal expansion with ambient temperature fluctuations in the observatory. In addition, the 2.7 m mirror construction is designed so that the techniques used may be readily extended to the construction of large mirrors. To attain the goals of a lightweight, rigid mirror, a composite laminant construction was used. The mirror consists of a foam core cut to the desired parabolic shape, with an accuracy of a few mm. An aluminum hub serves as an anchor for the foam and skin, and allows precise centering of the mirror on the air bearing and drive system. Several plys of Kevlar, covered in an epoxy matrix, are then applied to the foam. A final layer of pure epoxy is formed by spin casting. This final layer is parabolic to within a fraction of a mm. An aluminum ring bonded to the circumference of the mirror retains the mercury, and incorporates stainless-steel hard-points for the attachment of balance weights.

  6. Activating Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness for Collaborative Primary Care Visits

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rolin, Stephanie A.; Hendrick, Delia Cimpean; Naslund, John A.; Faber, Marjan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Persons with serious mental illness frequently receive inadequate medical care and are more likely to experience difficulty navigating the health care system compared with the general population. To address this gap in quality, we developed a program of peer co-led collaborative activation training for primary care (CAT-PC) designed to improve “patient activation” and person-centered care in primary care visits for middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness and cardiovascular risk. This report presents pilot study feasibility and participant outcomes for CAT-PC. Method A pre-post pilot evaluation of CAT-PC included N = 17 adults (age ≥ 50) with serious mental illness and cardiovascular health risk conditions, and N = 6 primary care providers. CAT-PC consists of 9 weekly peer co-led patient education and skills training sessions and a 45-min video-based training for primary care providers. Pre-post measures included the Patient Activation Measure (PAM), Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions (PEPPI), Autonomy Preference Index (API) for preferred role in primary care encounters, and Social Skills Performance Assessment (SSPA) role-play test for medical visits. Results All 17 participants attended 5 or more sessions. Post-intervention improvement was found for patient activation and simulated performance of medical visit communication skills. Trends were observed for improved self-efficacy in provider interactions and greater preference for a more collaborative role in decision-making. Conclusions and Implications CAT-PC is a brief, peer co-led education and skills training intervention potentially improving patient activation in primary care encounters and providing an important missing component in emerging models of “patient-centered behavioral health homes” for this high-risk group. PMID:24219769

  7. Children's Physical Activity Levels during Primary School Break Times: A Quantitative and Qualitative Research Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Emma; Woodfield, Lorayne A.; Nevill, Alan A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to assess the diversity of primary school children's physical activity (PA) during outdoor recess. The study was grounded in a mixed method approach, assisting in the identification of multifaceted predictors of children's PA, including insights to social behaviours during break time. Data were obtained from…

  8. Construing Systems of Management among Primary Headteachers: Moving Forward from Work Activity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Norah; Connolly, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A study used a Personal Construct Theory/Repertory Grid approach to examine the work of 12 Welsh primary headteachers. Analysis of thematic work-activity grids suggests principals have a more coherent view of their work (as centered on children and education) than Henry Mintzberg's observational studies portrayed. (Contains 36 references.) (MLH)

  9. Understanding, Evaluating and Assessing What Students Learn from Leadership Activities: Student Research in Woodlea Primary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Student involvement in leadership activities is now common in English schools. It is generally assumed to have beneficial learning outcomes and there is some research which suggests that this is the case. However, there is still work to do to detail these learning outcomes--and to assess them. I present one case in which primary school students…

  10. Glimpses of Science: Multimedia-Enhanced Hands-On Activities for Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatsidimitris, George; Connor, Rick; Ginges, Jacinda; Wolfe, Joe

    2010-01-01

    "Glimpses of Science" is the outcome of collaboration between the University of New South Wales and four primary schools in the Sydney metropolitan region. A prototype kit on the topic of sound was developed and demonstrated by the team. This kit formed the basis for further science activities to be designed and produced in conjunction with the…

  11. Activation of Inaccurate Prior Knowledge Affects Primary-School Students' Metacognitive Judgments and Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Mariette H.; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; van Gog, Tamara; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated whether activation of inaccurate prior knowledge before study contributes to primary-school children's commission errors and overconfidence in these errors when learning new concepts. Findings indicate that inaccurate prior knowledge affects children's learning and calibration. The level of children's judgments of learning…

  12. Primary Grades Teachers' Instructional Decisions during Online Mathematics Professional Development Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polly, Drew; Martin, Christie S.; Wang, Chuang; Lambert, Richard G.; Pugalee, David K.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines primary grades teachers' instructional decisions in their mathematics classroom during their participation in a year-long professional development program on formative assessment. Teachers participated in 40 h of face-to-face workshops followed by 40 h of classroom-embedded activities that were facilitated in an asynchronous…

  13. Effects of Classroom-Based Energizers on Primary Grade Students' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Catherine Goffreda; DiPerna, James Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the effects of classroom-based exercise breaks (Energizers; Mahar, Kenny, Shields, Scales, & Collins, 2006) on students' physical activity levels during the school day. A multiple baseline design across first grade (N = 3) and second grade (N = 3) classrooms was used to examine the effects of the…

  14. An Examination of Current Adapted Physical Activity Provision in Primary and Special Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Disability in Sport Taskforce report examining adapted physical activity (APA) in the Irish context (Department of Education and Science, 1999) found that teachers involved in primary mainstream and specialist settings expressed a grave lack of self-confidence, due to lack of training, in the delivery of APA programmes to children with special…

  15. Applications of MEMS in segmented mirror space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Brij; Kubby, Joel

    2011-03-01

    Development of space telescopes, such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Telescope has been very challenging in terms of cost, schedule, and performance. For several future space missions, larger aperture and lightweight deployable mirrors, in the range of 10-20 meters in diameter with high surface accuracy, are required. In order to achieve lightweight, reduce cost for development and provide performance robustness, actuated hybrid mirror (AHM) technology is under development. The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) recently received a 3-meter diameter space telescope testbed with six segments that uses an AHM technology. This paper will discuss the work performed at NPS on the surface control of the primary mirror using adaptive optics. This paper will also discuss how we can use a MEMS deformable mirror to improve the performance of the NPS segmented mirror telescope. The high-stroke, high-order actuated MEMS deformable mirror will correct the residual alignment and surface errors that are not corrected by the actuators on the mirrors. The mirror will use electrostatic actuation to eliminate the need for power to hold its position and will be capable of open-loop, go-to positioning.

  16. Development of GMT fast steering secondary mirror assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung; Corredor, Andrew; Dribusch, Christoph; Park, Won Hyun; Muller, Gary; Johns, Matt; Hull, Charlie; Kern, Jonathan; Kim, Young-Soo

    2014-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is one of Extremely large telescopes, which is 25m in diameter featured with two Gregorian secondary mirrors, an adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) and a fast-steering secondary mirror (FSM). The FSM is 3.2 m in diameter and built as seven 1.1 m diameter circular segments conjugated 1:1 to the seven 8.4m segments of the primary. The guiding philosophy in the design of the FSM segment mirror is to minimize development and fabrication risks ensuring a set of secondary mirrors are available on schedule for telescope commissioning and early operations in a seeing limited mode. Each FSM segment contains a tip-tilt capability for fine co-alignment of the telescope subapertures and fast guiding to attenuate telescope wind shake and mount control jitter, thus optimizing the seeing limited performance of the telescope. The final design of the FSM mirror and support system configuration was optimized using finite element analyses and optical performance analyses. The optical surface deformations, image qualities, and structure functions for the gravity print-through cases, thermal gradient effects, and dynamic performances were evaluated. The results indicated that the GMT FSM mirror and its support system will favorably meet the optical performance goals for residual surface error and the FSM surface figure accuracy requirement defined by encircled energy (EE80) in the focal plane. The mirror cell assembly analysis indicated an excellent dynamic stiffness which will support the goal of tip-tilt operation.

  17. The market of huge monolithic mirror substrates for optical astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhring, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    Professional astronomical telescopes are complex optical systems at the limit of technical feasibility. Often monolithic primary mirrors and sometimes even secondary mirrors with huge dimensions are used. Prominent examples are the two reflectors of the Large Binocular Telescope and the giant mirrors of VLT, GEMINI, and SUBARU. The performance of such precision optical components significantly depends on the physical parameters and the quality of their substrate materials. Within this paper selection criteria for mirror substrates will be discussed, thereby considering the important technical parameters as well as commercial points and aspects of project management. Qualities and limitations of classical mirror substrate materials like Zerodur, ULE, Sitall, borosilicate glass and Cervit will be evaluated and compared to new substrate materials like silicon carbide and beryllium. The different suppliers and their production processes are presented. In addition large mirrors of existing observatories and of telescopes under construction will be listed, thereby concentrating on mirrors above three meter in diameter. An outlook on material trends and on future astronomical telescopes closes this overview on the market of huge monolithic mirror substrates for optical astronomy.

  18. The Content of Diet and Physical Activity Consultations with Older Adults in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite numerous benefits of consuming a healthy diet and receiving regular physical activity, engagement in these behaviors is suboptimal. Since primary care visits are influential in promoting healthy behaviors, we sought to describe whether and how diet and physical activity are discussed during older adults’ primary care visits. Methods 115 adults ages 65 and older consented to have their routine primary care visits recorded. Audio-recorded visits were transcribed and diet and physical activity content was coded and analyzed. Results Diet and physical activity were discussed in the majority of visits. When these discussions occurred, they lasted an average of a minute and a half. Encouragement and broad discussion of benefits of improved diet and physical activity levels were the common type of exchange. Discussions rarely involved patient behavioral self-assessments, patient questions, or providers’ recommendations. Conclusions The majority of patient visits include discussion of diet and physical activity, but these discussions are often brief and rarely include recommendations. Practice Implications Providers may want to consider ways to expand their lifestyle behavior discussions to increase patient involvement and provide more detailed, actionable recommendations for behavior change. Additionally, given time constraints, a wider array of approaches to lifestyle counseling may be necessary. PMID:24736190

  19. Characteristics of physical activity programs in the Brazilian primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Kokubun, Eduardo; Mieke, Grégore Iven; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Pratt, Michael; Parra, Diana C; Simões, Eduardo; Florindo, Alex A; Bracco, Mario; Cruz, Danielle; Malta, Deborah; Lobelo, Felipe; Hallal, Pedro C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of programs that promote physical activity in the public primary care system by region of Brazil, subject to the presence or absence of multidisciplinary primary care teams (NASF). We conducted a cross sectional and population-based telephone survey of the health unit coordinators from 1,251 health care units. Coordinators were asked about the presence and characteristics of physical activity programs. Four out of ten health units reported having a physical activity intervention program, the most common involving walking groups. Most of the activities were performed in the morning, once or twice a week, and in sessions of 30 minutes or more. Physical education professionals were primarily responsible for directing the activities. Interventions occurred in the health unit itself or in adjacent community spaces. In general, these characteristics were similar between units with or without NASF, but varied substantially across regions. These findings will guide future physical activity policies and programs within primary care in Brazil. PMID:25388318

  20. Development of SiC Mirror for ASTRO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, H.; Onaka, T.; Yamashiro, R.

    2000-12-01

    The development of the light-weight silicon carbide mirrors for the ASTRO-F mission is described in this paper. These mirrors are made of a sandwich-type SiC material, consisting of light porous core and dense CVD (chemical vapor deposition) coat of SiC. The primary mirror has a diameter of 710 mm and weighs only 11 kg. Combined with the secondary mirror of the same type, they form Ritchey-Chretien type telescope (F/6), which is cooled down to 5.8 K. Fabrication of the small-scale test SiC mirror has been successful which shows very little deformation of the figure at liquid-helium temperatures. Another type of the SiC coated mirror has been tested which has the same size as flight model, but of which core is made of graphite. At present, polishing of the flight-model primary mirror is going on. Construction of the flight model telescope system will be finished in 2001.

  1. Deflectometry for optics evaluation: free form segments of polynomial mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pelliciari, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometry is a well-known method for astronomical mirror metrology. This paper describes the method we developed for the characterization of free-form concave mirrors. Our technique is based on the synergy between deflectometry and ray-tracing. The deflectometrical test is performed by illuminating the reflecting surface with a known light pattern in a Ronchi - like configuration and retrieving the slope errors by the observed rays deflection. The ray-tracing code allows us to measure the slopes and to evaluate the mirror optical performance. This technique has two main advantages: it is fast and it is applicable on-site, as an intermediate step in the manufacturing process, preventing that out-of-specification mirrors may proceed towards further production steps. Thus, we obtain a considerable time and cost reduction. As an example, we describe the results obtained measuring the primary mirror segments of the Cherenkov prototypal telescope manufactured by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics in the context of the ASTRI Project. This specific case is challenging because the segmentation of the polynomial primary mirror lead to individual mirrors with deviations from the spherical optical design up to a few millimeters.

  2. Strehl Ratio Meter for Focusing Segmented Mirrors 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivier, Philip D.

    1996-01-01

    Initial focusing segmented mirrors that must be deployed in space, such as the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), provide challenges not faced before in the area of adaptive optics. The devices used to focus the mirror must minimize the power used and unnecessary mechanical movement. The device described in this report requires no movable parts except for the essential actuators required to move the mirror segments. Detail description of the components can be found in Coker, 1996. The primary mirror of the NGST will consist of 9 segments, a central annular segment, surrounded by 8 segments. The entire mirror assembly will be an 8 meter nearly filled circle (with the corners of the segments clipped to allow for storage in an Atlas IIe shroud). As the segments of the primary mirror are deployed to their operational positions, they must be positioned to within small fractions of a wavelength of near infrared light. When focused, the NGST will put most of its collected li-ht into the small region near the center of its focal plane. The ratio of the total light in the diffraction limited spot about the center of the focal plane to the total light in the focal plane. The purpose of this research effort is to design and build a device that will measure Strehl ratio and to use demonstrate that the Strehl ratio can be used to focus a segmented mirror.

  3. EULAR Sjogren's syndrome disease activity index: development of a consensus systemic disease activity index for primary Sjogren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Raphaèle; Ravaud, Philippe; Bowman, Simon; Baron, Gabriel; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Theander, Elke; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Bootsma, Hendrika; Mariette, Xavier; Vitali, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a disease activity index for patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS): the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren’s Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). Methods Thirty-nine SS experts participated in an international collaboration, promoted by EULAR, to develop the ESSDAI. Experts identified 12 organ-specific “domains” contributing to disease activity. For each domain, features of disease activity were classified in 3 or 4 levels according to their severity. Data abstracted from 96 patients with systemic complications of primary SS were used to generate 702 realistic vignettes for which all possible systemic complications were represented. Using the 0–10 physician global assessment (PhGA) scale, each expert scored the disease activity of 5 patient profiles and 20 realistic vignettes. Multiple regression modelling, with PhGA used as the dependent variable, was used to estimate the weight of each domain. Results All 12 domains were significantly associated with disease activity in the multivariate model, domain weights ranged from 1 to 6. The ESSDAI scores varied from 2 to 47 and were significantly correlated with PhGA for both real patient profiles and realistic vignettes (r=0.61 and r=0.58, respectively, p<0.0001). Compared to 57 (59.4%) of the real patient profiles, 468 (66.7%) of the realistic vignettes were considered likely or very likely to be true. Conclusion The ESSDAI is a clinical index designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. Once validated, such a standardized evaluation of primary SS should facilitate clinical research and should be helpful as an outcome measure in clinical trials. PMID:19561361

  4. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  5. MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, S. A.; Hartzell, A. L.; Stewart, J. B.; Bifano, T. G.; Bierden, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of high actuator count, micro-electromechanical (MEMS) deformable mirrors designed for high order wavefront correction in ground and space-based astronomical adaptive optics instruments. The design of these polysilicon, surface-micromachined MEMS deformable mirrors builds on technology that has been used extensively to correct for ocular aberrations in retinal imaging systems and for compensation of atmospheric turbulence in free-space laser communication. These light-weight, low power deformable mirrors have an active aperture of up to 25.2mm consisting of a thin silicon membrane mirror supported by an array of 140 to 4092 electrostatic actuators which exhibit no hysteresis and have sub-nanometer repeatability making them well suited for open-loop control applications such as Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO). The continuous membrane deformable mirrors, coated with a highly reflective metal film, are capable of up to 6μm of stroke, have a surface finish of <10nm RMS with a fill factor of 99.8%. Presented in this paper are device characteristics and performance test results, as well as reliability test data and device lifetime predictions that show that trillions of actuator cycles can be achieved without failures.

  6. Spontaneous neural activity in the primary visual cortex of retinal degenerated rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Ke; Xu, Ping; Ng, Tsz Kin; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang

    2016-06-01

    Retinal degeneration (RD) models have been widely used to study retinal degenerative diseases for a long time. The biological and electrophysiological presentations of changes in the retina during degeneration progress have been well investigated; thus, the present study is aimed at investigating the electrophysiological effects of RD in the primary visual cortex. We extracellularly recorded the spontaneous neural activities in the primary visual cortex of RD rats. The firing rate, interspike interval (ISI) and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity of spontaneous neural activities were subsequently analyzed. When compared to the control group, it was found that the neurons in primary visual cortex of the RD model fired more frequently. In addition, there was a decrease in LZ complexity of spontaneous neural firing in the RD model. These results suggest that the progress of RD may not only affect the retina itself but also the primary visual cortex, which may result in an unbalanced inhibition-excitation system as well as the decreased arising rate of new patterns of spontaneous activities. PMID:27132087

  7. The neuronal correlates of mirror therapy: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on mirror-induced visual illusions of ankle movements.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Qun; Abo Salem, Hassan M; Yao, Yihao; Lou, Jicheng; Huang, Xiaolin

    2016-05-15

    Recovery in stroke is mediated by neural plasticity. Mirror therapy is an effective method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, but the mechanism is still obscure. To identify the neural networks associated with the effect of lower-limbs mirror therapy, we investigated a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of mirror-induced visual illusion of ankle movements. Five healthy controls and five left hemiplegic stroke patients performed tasks related to mirror therapy in the fMRI study. Neural activation was compared in a no-mirror condition and a mirror condition. All subjects in the experiment performed the task of flexing and extending the right ankle. In a mirror condition, movement of the left ankle was simulated by mirror reflection of right ankle movement. Changes in neural activation in response to mirror therapy were assessed both in healthy controls and stroke patients. We found strong activation of the motor cortex bilaterally in healthy controls, as well as significant activation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, the occipital gyrus, and the anterior prefrontal gyrus in stroke patients with respect to the non-mirror condition. We concluded that mirror therapy of ankle movements may induce neural activation of the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex, and that cortical reorganization may be useful for motor rehabilitation in stroke. PMID:26972531

  8. Conjugated bile acids activate the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in primary rodent hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Studer, Elaine; Zhou, Xiqiao; Zhao, Renping; Wang, Yun; Takabe, Kazuaki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Pandak, William M; Dent, Paul; Spiegel, Sarah; Shi, Ruihua; Xu, Weiren; Liu, Xuyuan; Bohdan, Pat; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Huiping; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids have been shown to be important regulatory molecules for cells in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. They can activate various cell signaling pathways including extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) membrane-type bile acid receptor (TGR5/M-BAR). Activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways by conjugated bile acids has been reported to be sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX) and dominant-negative Gα(i) in primary rodent hepatocytes. However, the GPCRs responsible for activation of these pathways have not been identified. Screening GPCRs in the lipid-activated phylogenetic family (expressed in HEK293 cells) identified sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P(2) ) as being activated by taurocholate (TCA). TCA, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), and S1P-induced activation of ERK1/2 and AKT were significantly inhibited by JTE-013, a S1P(2) antagonist, in primary rat hepatocytes. JTE-013 significantly inhibited hepatic ERK1/2 and AKT activation as well as short heterodimeric partner (SHP) mRNA induction by TCA in the chronic bile fistula rat. Knockdown of the expression of S1P(2) by a recombinant lentivirus encoding S1P(2) shRNA markedly inhibited the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT by TCA and S1P in rat primary hepatocytes. Primary hepatocytes prepared from S1P(2) knock out (S1P(2) (-/-) ) mice were significantly blunted in the activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways by TCA. Structural modeling of the S1P receptors indicated that only S1P(2) can accommodate TCA binding. In summary, all these data support the hypothesis that conjugated bile acids activate the ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways primarily through S1P(2) in primary rodent hepatocytes. PMID:21932398

  9. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W.; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  10. Electrical activity-triggered glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from primary murine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, G J; Tolhurst, G; Ramzan, A; Habib, A M; Parker, H E; Gribble, F M; Reimann, F

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) based therapies are now widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Developing our understanding of intestinal GLP-1 release may facilitate the development of new therapeutics aimed at targeting the GLP-1 producing L-cells. This study was undertaken to characterise the electrical activity of primary L-cells and the importance of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels for GLP-1 secretion. Primary murine L-cells were identified and purified using transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent protein driven by the proglucagon promoter. Fluorescent L-cells were identified within primary colonic cultures for patch clamp recordings. GLP-1 secretion was measured from primary colonic cultures. L-cells purified by flow cytometry were used to measure gene expression by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Electrical activity in L-cells was due to large voltage gated sodium currents, inhibition of which by tetrodotoxin reduced both basal and glutamine-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. Voltage gated calcium channels were predominantly of the L-type, Q-type and T-type, by expression analysis, consistent with the finding that GLP-1 release was blocked both by nifedipine and ω-conotoxin MVIIC. We observed large voltage-dependent potassium currents, but only a small chromanol sensitive current that might be attributable to KCNQ1. GLP-1 release from primary L-cells is linked to electrical activity and activation of L-type and Q-type calcium currents. The concept of an electrically excitable L-cell provides a basis for understanding how GLP-1 release may be modulated by nutrient, hormonal and pharmaceutical stimuli. PMID:21224236

  11. Cryogenic silicon carbide mirrors for infrared astronomical telescopes: lessons learnt from AKARI for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Enya, Keigo; Nakagawa, Takao

    2013-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has good thermal conductivity, high stiffness, and a relatively low specific density, all of which are advantageous to the application to telescopes operating at cryogenic temperatures. The first Japanese astronomical infrared space mission AKARI, which was launched in 2006 February and completed the second generation all-sky survey at 6 bands from mid- to far-infrared, employed a 700mm cryogenic telescope made of specially developed SiC. It was a sandwich-type of SiC composed of a lightweight porous core and a dense chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coat to decrease the specific density and facilitate machining for achieving the required surface figure accuracy. Measurements with an interferometer of 160-mm sample mirrors demonstrated that the AKARI mirror SiC had good thermal stability down to cryogenic temperatures (~6K), while the mirror support of the compact design became the primary source of the wave-front errors of the AKARI telescope. Taking the advantage of the heritage of the AKARI telescope development as well as ESA's Herschel telescope, we are planning the next infrared space mission SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) of a 3.2m cooled telescope in participation of ESA using SiC-based materials. In this presentation, we summarize the development of AKARI SiC telescope and present the development activities of the SPICA telescope from the point of view of SiC being as the mirror material for cryogenic space infrared telescopes.

  12. Technologies for the fabrication of the E-ELT mirrors within the T-REX project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, G.; Aliverti, M.; Bianco, A.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pariani, G.; Sironi, G.; Riva, M.; Vecchi, G.; Zerbi, F.

    With its primary mirror with 39 m of diameter, the E-ELT will be the largest optical/near-infrared telescope in the world and will gather 13 times more light than the largest optical telescopes existing today. The different optical sub-systems of E-ELT, including the primary mirror based on hundreds of reflecting tiles assembled together, represent key components for the implementation of the telescopes. A huge amount of aspherical reflecting elements have to be produced with "state of the art" figuring and polishing technologies and measured with proper metrological equipments. In the past couple of years, in the context of the T-REX project, a specific development program was carried out at the Brera Astronomical Observatory-INAF in order to address a numbers of technology aspects related to the fabrication of the E-ELT mirrors. In this paper we give a short overview of the activities that have been carried out. Other papers in this volume report on specific activities that have pursed within such a development program. skip=8pt

  13. Pitchfork and Gprasp2 Target Smoothened to the Primary Cilium for Hedgehog Pathway Activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bomi; Padula, Daniela; Burtscher, Ingo; Landerer, Cedric; Lutter, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Messias, Ana C; Geerlof, Arie; Sattler, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) activates all Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by translocation into the primary cilia (PC), but how this is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Pitchfork (Pifo) and the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2) are essential components of an Hh induced ciliary targeting complex able to regulate Smo translocation to the PC. Depletion of Pifo or Gprasp2 leads to failure of Smo translocation to the PC and lack of Hh target gene activation. Together, our results identify a novel protein complex that is regulated by Hh signaling and required for Smo ciliary trafficking and Hh pathway activation. PMID:26901434

  14. Pitchfork and Gprasp2 Target Smoothened to the Primary Cilium for Hedgehog Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Padula, Daniela; Burtscher, Ingo; Landerer, Cedric; Lutter, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Messias, Ana C.; Geerlof, Arie; Sattler, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) activates all Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by translocation into the primary cilia (PC), but how this is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Pitchfork (Pifo) and the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2) are essential components of an Hh induced ciliary targeting complex able to regulate Smo translocation to the PC. Depletion of Pifo or Gprasp2 leads to failure of Smo translocation to the PC and lack of Hh target gene activation. Together, our results identify a novel protein complex that is regulated by Hh signaling and required for Smo ciliary trafficking and Hh pathway activation. PMID:26901434

  15. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  16. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  17. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  18. Integrative Review of Nurse-Delivered Physical Activity Interventions in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elizabeth A; Cai, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Promotion of physical activity has been a public health priority for decades. The purpose of this integrative review is to examine the effectiveness of nurse-delivered physical activity interventions conducted in primary care settings. Computerized database and ancestry search strategies located distinct intervention trials between 1990 and 2014. Nineteen national and international studies with 7,350 participants were reviewed. The most common intervention was physical activity counseling with supportive or motivational contacts. Few studies utilized exercise training, device-based exercise monitoring, or exercise prescriptions. The most common follow-up durations were 3 to 12 months. Half the studies integrated health behavior theoretical frameworks into the intervention. Almost 80% of the studies reported significant increases in walking, moderate or vigorous physical activity, or overall physical activity in the intervention groups. Interventions successful in increasing physical activity most often utilized tailored techniques such as providing "stage of change"-specific strategies or helping patients set individualized goals. PMID:25903812

  19. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  20. Lightweight Substrates For Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. Kyle

    1991-01-01

    New substrate uses conventional quasi-isotropic fabric laminate with surfacing layer of carbon-fiber paper consisting of randomly oriented chopped carbon fibers. Layered structure of fabric and paper relatively easy to manufacture. When impregnated with carbon, structure rigid and stable. Substrates of this type made quite thin, thus keeping areal weights to minimum. Mirrors of this type made faster, and cost less, than predecessors.

  1. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  2. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    PubMed

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view. PMID:26832237

  3. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  4. Spontaneous activations follow a common developmental course across primary sensory areas in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Frye, Charles G; MacLean, Jason N

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous propagation of spiking within the local neocortical circuits of mature primary sensory areas is highly nonrandom, engaging specific sets of interconnected and functionally related neurons. These spontaneous activations promise insight into neocortical structure and function, but their properties in the first 2 wk of perinatal development are incompletely characterized. Previously, we have found that there is a minimal numerical sample, on the order of 400 cells, necessary to fully capture mature neocortical circuit dynamics. Therefore we maximized our numerical sample by using two-photon calcium imaging to observe spontaneous activity in populations of up to 1,062 neurons spanning multiple columns and layers in 52 acute coronal slices of mouse neocortex at each day from postnatal day (PND) 3 to PND 15. Slices contained either primary auditory cortex (A1) or somatosensory barrel field (S1BF), which allowed us to compare sensory modalities with markedly different developmental timelines. Between PND 3 and PND 8, populations in both areas exhibited activations of anatomically compact subgroups on the order of dozens of cells. Between PND 9 and PND 13, the spatiotemporal structure of the activity diversified to include spatially distributed activations encompassing hundreds of cells. Sparse activations covering the entire field of view dominated in slices taken on or after PND 14. These and other findings demonstrate that the developmental progression of spontaneous activations from active local modules in the first postnatal week to sparse, intermingled groups of neurons at the beginning of the third postnatal week generalizes across primary sensory areas, consistent with an intrinsic developmental trajectory independent of sensory input. PMID:27146981

  5. Explaining mirror-touch synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-touch synesthesia (MTS) is the conscious experience of tactile sensations induced by seeing someone else touched. This paper considers two different, although not mutually exclusive, theoretical explanations and, in the final section, considers the relation between MTS and other forms of synesthesia and also other kinds of vicarious perception (e.g., contagious yawning). The Threshold Theory explains MTS in terms of hyper-activity within a mirror system for touch and/or pain. This offers a good account for some of the evidence (e.g., from fMRI) but fails to explain the whole pattern (e.g., structural brain differences outside of this system; performance on some tests of social cognition). The Self-Other Theory explains MTS in terms of disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. This can be construed in terms of over-extension of the bodily self in to others, or as difficulties in the control of body-based self-other representations. In this account, MTS is a symptom of a broader cognitive profile. We suggest this meets the criteria for synesthesia, despite the proximal causal mechanisms remaining largely unknown, and that the tendency to localize vicarious sensory experiences distinguishes it from other kinds of seemingly related phenomena (e.g., non-localized affective responses to observing pain). PMID:25893437

  6. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3; Wavefront Aberrations due to Alignment and Figure Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, giving alignment control of the telescope. The tertiary mirror is fixed, however, as well as the location of the science instrumentation. Simulations are performed of various combinations of active alignment corrections of component figure errors, and of primary mirror figure corrections of alignment errors. Single field point and moderate field knowledge is assumed in the corrections. Aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases, and examples presented.

  7. Freeform mirror based optical systems for FAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agócs, Tibor; Kroes, Gabby; Venema, Lars; Hugot, Emmanuel; Schnetler, Hermine; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the design of freeform mirror based optical systems that have the potential to be used in future astronomical instrumentation in the era of extremely large ground based telescopes. Firstly we describe the optical requirements followed by a summary of the optimization methodology used to design the freeform surface. The intention is to create optical architectures, which not only have the numerous advantages of freeform based systems (increased optical performance and/or reduction of mass and volume), but also can be manufactured and tested with today's manufacturing techniques and technologies. The team plans to build a demonstrator based on one of the optical design examples presented in this paper. The demonstrator will be built and tested as part of the OPTICON FP7 Freeform Active Mirror Experiment (FAME) project. A hydroforming technique developed as part of the previous OPTICON FP7 project will be used to produce an accurate, compact and stable freeform mirror. The manufacturing issues normally experienced in the production of freeform mirrors are solved through the hydroforming of thin polished substrates, which then will be supported with an active array structure. The active array will be used to compensate for residual manufacturing errors, thermo-elastic deformation and gravity-induced errors.

  8. Deficient Rab11 activity underlies glucose hypometabolism in primary neurons of Huntington's disease mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xueyi; Valencia, Antonio; McClory, Hollis; Sapp, Ellen; Kegel, Kimberly B.; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary Huntington's disease neurons are impaired in taking up glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rab11 modulates glucose uptake in neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Rab11 activity attenuates the glucose uptake defect in disease neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in Huntington's disease. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Positron emission tomography studies have revealed a decline in glucose metabolism in the brain of patients with HD by a mechanism that has not been established. We examined glucose utilization in embryonic primary cortical neurons of wild-type (WT) and HD knock-in mice, which have 140 CAG repeats inserted in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene (HD{sup 140Q/140Q}). Primary HD{sup 140Q/140Q} cortical neurons took up significantly less glucose than did WT neurons. Expression of permanently inactive and permanently active forms of Rab11 correspondingly altered glucose uptake in WT neurons, suggesting that normal activity of Rab11 is needed for neuronal uptake of glucose. It is known that Rab11 activity is diminished in HD{sup 140Q/140Q} neurons. Expression of dominant active Rab11 to enhance the activity of Rab11 normalized glucose uptake in HD{sup 140Q/140Q} neurons. These results suggest that deficient activity of Rab11 is a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in HD.

  9. Plasminogen-Dependent Matriptase Activation Accelerates Plasmin Generation by Differentiating Primary Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Yin, Shi; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Johnson, Michael D; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-06-01

    Pericellular plasmin generation, an important pathophysiological process, can be initiated and accelerated by the autoactivation of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and subsequent activation of urokinase plasminogen activator. The link between matriptase and plasminogen was initially thought to be one-directional: from matriptase, through plasminogen activator, to plasminogen. However, in the current study, we now show that primary human keratinocytes that are undergoing calcium-induced differentiation can rapidly activate matriptase in response to serum treatment via a mechanism dependent on intracellular calcium, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-based signaling. The serum factor, responsible for the induction of matriptase zymogen activation, was shown to be plasminogen. A sub-pM concentration of plasminogen (but not plasmin) acting at the cell surface is sufficient to induce matriptase activation, suggesting high potency and specificity of the induction. After matriptase zymogen activation, a proportion of active matriptase is shed into extracellular milieu and returns to the cell surface to accelerate plasmin generation. The ability of plasminogen to induce matriptase zymogen activation and the subsequent acceleration of plasmin generation by active matriptase reveals a feed-forward mechanism that allows differentiating human keratinocytes to rapidly and robustly activate pericellular proteolysis. PMID:26872599

  10. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  11. A spectrum of shadowed mirroring.

    PubMed

    Wanamaker, Melissa C

    2012-04-01

    The central focus of this paper is to explore and extend Kohut's theory of maternal mirroring and to place it within the current context of psychoanalytic thinking. Kohut believed a child must experience "positive" mirroring from his or her mother in infancy and beyond to ensure development of a healthy self. Kohut alludes, however, to a possible situation in which the mother's face, metaphorically a mirror, can appear "faceless" to her child. From this I have inferred the concept of what I shall call "shadowed mirroring." Clinical and literary examples show that distorted, "shadowed" mirroring appears on a spectrum, with passive mirroring at one end and hostile (either verbal or nonverbal) mirroring on the other; some individuals experience both. I then consider how "shadowed mirroring," especially hostile mirroring, can be understood within the twin contexts of the overall mother-child relationship and present-day Intersubjective/Relational thinking that is both bidirectional and co-constructed. Shadowed mirroring can lead to severe personality dysfunction along the borderline-narcissistic range, as well as to difficulties in the areas of identity formation, failure of self-cohesiveness, and the blunting of certain humane qualities like empathy. PMID:22489812

  12. Status of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) phase 2 1.5m ULE mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerman, Robert; Matthews, Gary W.; Johnson, Matthew; Ferland, Albert; Stahl, H. P.; Eng, Ron; Effinger, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    The Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. Under a Phase I program, a proof of concept mirror was completed at Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. In 2014, Exelis and NASA started a Phase II program to design and build a 1.5m mirror to demonstrate lateral scalability to a 4m monolithic primary mirror. The current status of the Phase II development program will be provided along with a Phase II program summary.

  13. Asymmetry in primary auditory cortex activity in tinnitus patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Geven, L I; de Kleine, E; Willemsen, A T M; van Dijk, P

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus is a bothersome phantom sound percept and its neural correlates are not yet disentangled. Previously published papers, using [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), have suggested an increased metabolism in the left primary auditory cortex in tinnitus patients. This unilateral hyperactivity has been used as a target in localized treatments such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The purpose of the current study was to test whether left-sided hyperactivity in the auditory cortex is specific to tinnitus or is a general characteristic of the auditory system unrelated to tinnitus. Therefore, FDG-PET was used to measure brain metabolism in 20 tinnitus patients and to compare their results to those in 19 control subjects without tinnitus. In contrast to our expectation, there was no hyperactivity associated with tinnitus. Nevertheless, the activity in the left primary auditory cortex was higher than in the right primary auditory cortex, but this asymmetry was present in both tinnitus patients and control subjects. In contrast, the lateralization in secondary auditory cortex was opposite, with higher activation in the right hemisphere. These data show that hemisphere asymmetries in the metabolic resting activity of the auditory cortex are present, but these are not associated with tinnitus and are a normal characteristic of the normal brain. PMID:24161276

  14. Toll-like receptor 4-related immunostimulatory polysaccharides: Primary structure, activity relationships, and possible interaction models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorui; Qi, Chunhui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Wenxia; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2016-09-20

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is an important polysaccharide receptor; however, the relationships between the structures and biological activities of TLR4 and polysaccharides remain unknown. Many recent findings have revealed the primary structure of TLR4/MD-2-related polysaccharides, and several three-dimensional structure models of polysaccharide-binding proteins have been reported; and these models provide insights into the mechanisms through which polysaccharides interact with TLR4. In this review, we first discuss the origins of polysaccharides related to TLR4, including polysaccharides from higher plants, fungi, bacteria, algae, and animals. We then briefly describe the glucosidic bond types of TLR4-related heteroglycans and homoglycans and describe the typical molecular weights of TLR4-related polysaccharides. The primary structures and activity relationships of polysaccharides with TLR4/MD-2 are also discussed. Finally, based on the existing interaction models of LPS with TLR4/MD-2 and linear polysaccharides with proteins, we provide insights into the possible interaction models of polysaccharide ligands with TLR4/MD-2. To our knowledge, this review is the first to summarize the primary structures and activity relationships of TLR4-related polysaccharides and the possible mechanisms of interaction for TLR4 and TLR4-related polysaccharides. PMID:27261743

  15. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Hodgin, Katie L.; Graham, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one’s personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI) would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body size distorting mirrors would impact the stair–elevator decision. One hundred sixty-seven students (51% male) enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their “transportation choices” at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants’ choice of floor-climbing method (stairs or elevator) was recorded, and they were administered an Internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror [odds ratios (OR) = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14–0.96], males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13–0.85), those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0

  16. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students.

    PubMed

    Hodgin, Katie L; Graham, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one's personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI) would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body size distorting mirrors would impact the stair-elevator decision. One hundred sixty-seven students (51% male) enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their "transportation choices" at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants' choice of floor-climbing method (stairs or elevator) was recorded, and they were administered an Internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror [odds ratios (OR) = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.96], males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13-0.85), those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.99), those

  17. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of primary motor cortex activity produced by ventral tegmental area stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kunori, Nobuo; Kajiwara, Riichi; Takashima, Ichiro

    2014-06-25

    The primary motor cortex (M1) receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through the mesocortical dopamine pathway. However, few studies have focused on changes in M1 neuronal activity caused by VTA activation. To address this issue, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of M1 activity induced by single-pulse stimulation of VTA in anesthetized rats. VSD imaging showed that brief electrical stimulation of unilateral VTA elicited a short-latency excitatory-inhibitory sequence of neuronal activity not only in the ipsilateral but also in the contralateral M1. The contralateral M1 response was not affected by pharmacological blockade of ipsilateral M1 activity, but it was completely abolished by corpus callosum transection. Although the VTA-evoked neuronal activity extended throughout the entire M1, we found the most prominent activity in the forelimb area of M1. The 6-OHDA-lesioned VTA failed to evoke M1 activity. Furthermore, both excitatory and inhibitory intact VTA-induced activity was entirely extinguished by blocking glutamate receptors in the target M1. When intracortical microstimulation of M1 was paired with VTA stimulation, the evoked forelimb muscle activity was facilitated or inhibited, depending on the interval between the two stimuli. These findings suggest that VTA neurons directly modulate the excitability of M1 neurons via fast glutamate signaling and, consequently, may control the last cortical stage of motor command processing. PMID:24966388

  18. Characterization of biotransformation enzyme activities in primary rat proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, G J; de Groene, E M; Maas, R F; Commandeur, J N; Fink-Gremmels, J

    2001-04-16

    The proximal tubule is a frequent target for nephrotoxic compounds due to it's ability to transport and accumulate xenobiotics and their metabolites, as well as by the presence of an organ-selective set of biotransformation enzymes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the activities of different biotransformation enzymes during primary culturing of rat proximal tubular cells (PT cells). Specific marker substrates for determining cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activity of primary cultured PT cells include 7-ethoxyresorufin (CYP1A1), caffeine (CYP1A), testosterone (CY2B/C, CYP3A), tolbutamide (CYP2C) and dextromethorphan (CYP2D1). Activities of the CYP450 isoenzymes decreased considerably during culture with the greatest loss in activity within 24 h of culture. In addition, expression of CYP450 apoprotein, including CYP1A, CYP2C, CYP2D, CYP2E and CYP4A, was detected in microsomes from freshly isolated PT cells by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. CYP2B and CYP3A apoprotein could not be detected. Activity of the phase II biotransformation enzymes GST, GGT, beta-lyase and UGT was determined with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, L-glutamic acid gamma-(7-amido-4-methyl-coumarin), S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine and 1-naphthol, respectively, as marker substrates. Activity of the phase II enzymes remained more stable and, in contrast to CYP450 activity, significant activity was still expressed after 1 week of PT cell culture. Thus, despite the obvious advantages of PT cells as an in-vitro model for studies of biotransformation mediated toxicity, the strong time dependency of especially phase I and, to a lesser extent, phase II biotransformation activities confers limitations to their application. PMID:11311212

  19. Prototype Development of the GMT Fast Steering Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Soo; Koh, J.; Jung, H.; Jung, H.; Cho, M. K.; Park, W.; Yang, H.; Kim, H.; Lee, K.; Ahn, H.; Park, B.

    2013-06-01

    A Fast Steering Mirror (FSM) is going to be produced as a secondary mirror of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). FSM is 3.2 m in diameter and the focal ratio is 0.65. It is composed of seven circular segments which match with the primary mirror segments. Each segment contains a light-weighted mirror whose diameter is 1.1 m. It also contains tip-tilt actuators which would compensate wind effect and structure jitter. An FSM prototype (FSMP) has been developed, which consists of a full-size off-axis mirror segment and a tip-tilt test-bed. The main purpose of the FSMP development is to achieve key technologies, such as fabrication of highly aspheric off-axis mirror and tip-tilt actuation. The development has been conducted by a consortium of five institutions in Korea and USA, and led by Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute. The mirror was light-weighted and grinding of the front surface was finished. Polishing is in progress with computer generated hologram tests. The tip-tilt test-bed has been manufactured and assembled. Frequency tests are being performed and optical tilt set-up is arranged for visual demonstration. In this paper, we present progress of the prototype development, and future works.

  20. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Nathalie R.; van Helden, Suzanne F.; Anthony, Eloise C.; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I.; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  1. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Nathalie R; van Helden, Suzanne F; Anthony, Eloise C; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  2. Proteome signatures of inflammatory activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Haudek-Prinz, Verena J.; Klepeisz, Philip; Slany, Astrid; Griss, Johannes; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Paulitschke, Verena; Mitulovic, Goran; Stöckl, Johannes; Gerner, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Proteome profiling is the method of choice to identify marker proteins whose expression may be characteristic for certain diseases. The formation of such marker proteins results from disease-related pathophysiologic processes. In healthy individuals, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) circulate in a quiescent cell state monitoring potential immune-relevant events, but have the competence to respond quickly and efficiently in an inflammatory manner to any invasion of potential pathogens. Activation of these cells is most plausibly accompanied by characteristic proteome alterations. Therefore we investigated untreated and inflammatory activated primary human PBMCs by proteome profiling using a ‘top down’ 2D-PAGE approach in addition to a ‘bottom up’ LC–MS/MS-based shotgun approach. Furthermore, we purified primary human T-cells and monocytes and activated them separately. Comparative analysis allowed us to characterize a robust proteome signature including NAMPT and PAI2 which indicates the activation of PBMCs. The T-cell specific inflammation signature included IRF-4, GBP1and the previously uncharacterized translation product of GBP5; the corresponding monocyte signature included PDCD5, IL1RN and IL1B. The involvement of inflammatory activated PBMCs in certain diseases as well as the responsiveness of these cells to anti-inflammatory drugs may be evaluated by quantification of these marker proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22813876

  3. The role of students' activities in Indonesian realistic mathematics education in primary schools of Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubainur, Cut Morina; Veloo, Arsaythamby; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to explore the implementation of the Indonesian Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI) in Aceh primary schools, Indonesia. This study investigates the students' mathematics activities involved in the implementation of PMRI and for this purpose; students' mathematics activities in the classroom were observed. Students were observed three times within five weeks during mathematics class, based on PMRI. A total of 25 year five students from a public school participated in this study. Observation check list was used in this study based on ten items. The observation conducted was based on two different time periods which were 105 minutes for group A and 70 minutes for group B. The observation was conducted every 5 minutes. The results show that PMRI is being practised in Aceh, but not completely. This study shows that mathematics activities for those who were taught using PMRI are higher than for those using the traditional approach. Overall, the findings showed that the number of student activities undertaken in PMRI achieved 90.56%. The higher percentage of activities suggests that the Aceh Education Office expands the implementation of PMRI in all primary schools so that learning of mathematics is more effective. This indirectly increases the mathematics achievement of students in Aceh to a higher level on par with Indonesia's national achievement.

  4. Modelling the activity of 129I in the primary coolant of a CANDU reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Brent J.; Husain, Aamir

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical treatment has been developed to describe the activity levels of 129I as a function of time in the primary heat transport system during constant power operation and for a reactor shutdown situation. The model accounts for a release of fission-product iodine from defective fuel rods and tramp uranium contamination on in-core surfaces. The physical transport constants of the model are derived from a coolant activity analysis of the short-lived radioiodine species. An estimate of 3×10 -9 has been determined for the coolant activity ratio of 129I/ 131I in a CANDU Nuclear Generating Station (NGS), which is in reasonable agreement with that observed in the primary coolant and for plant test resin columns from pressurized and boiling water reactor plants. The model has been further applied to a CANDU NGS, by fitting it to the observed short-lived iodine and long-lived cesium data, to yield a coolant activity ratio of ˜2×10 -8 for 129I/ 137Cs. This ratio can be used to estimate the levels of 129I in reactor waste based on a measurement of the activity of 137Cs.

  5. Protective effect of resveratrol against caspase 3 activation in primary mouse fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ulakcsai, Zsófia; Bagaméry, Fruzsina; Vincze, István; Szökő, Éva; Tábi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Aim To study the effect of resveratrol on survival and caspase 3 activation in non-transformed cells after serum deprivation. Methods Apoptosis was induced by serum deprivation in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Caspase 3 activation and lactate dehydrogenase release were assayed as cell viability measure by using their fluorogenic substrates. The involvement of PI3K, ERK, JNK, p38, and SIRT1 signaling pathways was also examined. Results Serum deprivation of primary fibroblasts induced significant activation of caspase 3 within 3 hours and reduced cell viability after 24 hours. Resveratrol dose-dependently prevented caspase activation and improved cell viability with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 66.3 ± 13.81 µM. It also reduced the already up-regulated caspase 3 activity when it was added to the cell culture medium after 3 hour serum deprivation, suggesting its rescue effect. Among the major signaling pathways, p38 kinase was critical for the protective effect of resveratrol which was abolished completely in the presence of p38 inhibitor. Conclusion Resveratrol showed protective effect against cell death in a rather high dose. Involvement of p38 kinase in this effect suggests the role of mild stress in its cytoprotective action. Furthermore due to its rescue effect, resveratrol may be used not only for prevention, but also treatment of age-related degenerative diseases, but in the higher dose than consumed in conventional diet. PMID:25891866

  6. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  7. Mirror Lake: Past, present and future: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the hydrological and biogeochemical characteristics of Mirror Lake and the changes that resulted from air-land-water interactions and human activities. Since the formation of Mirror Lake, both the watershed and the lake have undergone many changes, such as vegetation development and basin filling. These changes are ongoing, and Mirror Lake is continuing along an aging pathway and ultimately, it will fill with sediment and no longer be a lake. The chapter also identifies major factors that affected the hydrology and biogeochemistry of Mirror Lake: acid rain, atmospheric deposition of lead and other heavy metals, increased human settlement around the lake, the construction of an interstate highway through the watershed of the Northeast Tributary, the construction of an access road through the West and Northeast watersheds to the lake, and climate change. The chapter also offers future recommendations for management and protection of Mirror Lake.

  8. Astaxanthin prevents and reverses the activation of mouse primary hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Bae, Minkyung; Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Young-Ki; Koo, Sung I; Lee, Ji-Young

    2016-03-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a critical step that leads to the development of liver fibrosis. We showed that astaxanthin (ASTX), a xanthophyll carotenoid, displays antifibrogenic effects in LX-2 cells, a human HSC cell line. In this study, we further determined the effect of ASTX on HSC activation and inactivation using primary HSCs from C57BL/6J mice. Quiescent and activated HSCs were incubated with ASTX (25μM) at different stages of activation. ASTX prevented the activation of quiescent HSCs, as evidenced by the presence of intracellular lipid droplets and reduction of α-smooth muscle actin, an HSC activation marker. Also, ASTX reverted activated HSCs to a quiescent phenotype with the reappearance of lipid droplets with a concomitant increase in lecithin retinol acyltransferase mRNA. Cellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species was significantly reduced by ASTX, which was attributable to a decrease in NADPH oxidase 2 expression. The antifibrogenic effect of ASTX was independent of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 as it was observed in HSCs from wild-type and Nrf2(-/-) mice. In conclusion, ASTX inhibits HSC activation and reverts activated HSCs to a quiescent state. Further investigation is warranted to determine if ASTX effectively prevents the development of liver fibrosis. PMID:26895661

  9. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  10. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, P F; Irving, S G; Kelly, K; Siebenlist, U

    1989-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action. Images PMID:2498643

  11. WWER Expert System for Fuel Failure Analysis Using Data on Primary Coolant Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, V.V.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Sorokin, A.A.; Khromov, A.G.; Kanukova, V.D.; Apollonova, O.V.; Ugryumov, A.V.

    2007-07-01

    The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in detail. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

  12. The Ca2+-activated Cl- channel ANO1/TMEM16A regulates primary ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruppersburg, Chelsey Chandler; Hartzell, H Criss

    2014-06-01

    Many cells possess a single, nonmotile, primary cilium highly enriched in receptors and sensory transduction machinery that plays crucial roles in cellular morphogenesis. Although sensory transduction requires ion channels, relatively little is known about ion channels in the primary cilium (with the exception of TRPP2). Here we show that the Ca(2+)-activated Cl ((-)) channel anoctamin-1 (ANO1/TMEM16A) is located in the primary cilium and that blocking its channel function pharmacologically or knocking it down with short hairpin RNA interferes with ciliogenesis. Before ciliogenesis, the channel becomes organized into a torus-shaped structure ("the nimbus") enriched in proteins required for ciliogenesis, including the small GTPases Cdc42 and Arl13b and the exocyst complex component Sec6. The nimbus excludes F-actin and coincides with a ring of acetylated microtubules. The nimbus appears to form before, or independent of, apical docking of the mother centriole. Our data support a model in which the nimbus provides a scaffold for staging of ciliary components for assembly very early in ciliogenesis and chloride transport by ANO1/TMEM16A is required for the genesis or maintenance of primary cilia. PMID:24694595

  13. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  14. SXI Prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the work performed from June 1993 to January 1995. The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule.

  15. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  16. A mirror to analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    2000-12-01

    Three books written by psychiatrists for a lay audience are examined. Two are novels, and the third is a psychiatrist's account of the years of his psychiatric residency training. In all three books psychoanalysts are portrayed in negative roles, as arrogant, cold, uncaring, and even venal. The reasons why psychiatrists would portray analysis in this light are examined, and some ways in which psychoanalysts will need to re-examine their role in education and in their relationships with psychiatric colleagues in order to counteract this negative "mirror" are suggested. PMID:11143896

  17. Poco Graphite Mirror Metrology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently a lightweight mirror technology was tested at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optic Manufacturing Technology Center (MSFC, SOMTC). The mirror is a Poco Graphite CVD Si clad SiC substrate. It was tested for cryogenic (cryo) survivability to 20deg Kelvin in SOMTC's X-ray Calibration and Cryogenic Test Facility. The surface figure of the mirror was measured before and after cry0 cycling. The test technique and results are discussed.

  18. LDR segmented mirror technology assessment study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krim, M.; Russo, J.

    1983-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, NASA plans to orbit a giant telescope, whose aperture may be as great as 30 meters, for infrared and sub-millimeter astronomy. Its primary mirror will be deployed or assembled in orbit from a mosaic of possibly hundreds of mirror segments. Each segment must be shaped to precise curvature tolerances so that diffraction-limited performance will be achieved at 30 micron (nominal operating wavelength). All panels must lie within 1 micron on a theoretical surface described by the optical precipitation of the telescope's primary mirror. To attain diffraction-limited performance, the issues of alignment and/or position sensing, position control of micron tolerances, and structural, thermal, and mechanical considerations for stowing, deploying, and erecting the reflector must be resolved. Radius of curvature precision influences panel size, shape, material, and type of construction. Two superior material choices emerged: fused quartz (sufficiently homogeneous with respect to thermal expansivity to permit a thin shell substrate to be drape molded between graphite dies to a precise enough off-axis asphere for optical finishing on the as-received a segment) and a Pyrex or Duran (less expensive than quartz and formable at lower temperatures). The optimal reflector panel size is between 1-1/2 and 2 meters. Making one, two-meter mirror every two weeks requires new approaches to manufacturing off-axis parabolic or aspheric segments (drape molding on precision dies and subsequent finishing on a nonrotationally symmetric dependent machine). Proof-of-concept developmental programs were identified to prove the feasibility of the materials and manufacturing ideas.

  19. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): III. Wavefront aberrations due to alignment and figure compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients [1-2]. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (i.e. the primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This architecture effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, and the tertiary mirror is fixed. Simulations are performed of various combinations of alignment and figure errors corrected by the primary and secondary mirrors. Single field point knowledge is assumed in the corrections, and aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases.

  20. Study on the Stressed Mirror Polishing with a Continuous Polishing Machine for Large Aperture Off-axis Aspheric Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-nan; Zhang, Hai-ying; Cui, Xiang-qun; Jiang, Zi-bo; Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xing-tao; Ni, Hou-kun

    2012-10-01

    A special stressed annular polishing technique is proposed to mill the off-axis aspheric sub-mirrors of a large segmented mirror with an annular polishing machine. Based on the basic principle of stressed annular polishing technique, a set of special stressing mechanisms are designed to convert milling the aspheric surfaces of sub-mirrors with different off-axis distances into milling the spherical surfaces with identical radii of curvature, so that they can be pol- ished simultaneously on a continuous polishing machine. It took about contin- uous 40 hours to polish a scaled-down mirror of the planning Chinese Future Giant Telescope (CFGT) using this technique. This mirror has the 330 mm di- ameter, 3.6 m off-axis distance, and the 21.6 m radius of curvature, and its max- imum asphericity is 16 micron. The experiment shows that this method has a high effciency, suits batch manufacturing, especially the batch manufacturing of aspheric sub-mirrors of the segmented primary mirror of an extremely large aperture telescope.

  1. Scanning mirror for infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. H.; Bernstein, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    A high resolution, long life angle-encoded scanning mirror, built for application in an infrared attitude sensor, is described. The mirror uses a Moire' fringe type optical encoder and unique torsion bar suspension together with a magnetic drive to meet stringent operational and environmental requirements at a minimum weight and with minimum power consumption. Details of the specifications, design, and construction are presented with an analysis of the mirror suspension that allows accurate prediction of performance. The emphasis is on mechanical design considerations, and brief discussions are included on the encoder and magnetic drive to provide a complete view of the mirror system and its capabilities.

  2. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, Bill

    2000-10-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies without requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma ``b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  3. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies with out requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma "b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  4. A technique for the optical analysis of deformed telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, John F.

    1986-01-01

    The NASTRAN-ACCOS V programs' interface merges structural and optical analysis capabilities in order to characterize the performance of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Solar Optical Telescope primary mirror, which has a large diameter/thickness ratio. The first step in the optical analysis is to use NASTRAN's FEM to model the primary mirror, simulating any distortions due to gravitation, thermal gradients, and coefficient of thermal expansion nonuniformities. NASTRAN outputs are then converted into an ACCOS V-acceptable form; ACCOS V generates the deformed optical surface on the basis of these inputs, and imaging qualities can be determined.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted MRI Reflects Proliferative Activity in Primary CNS Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jonas; Gawlitza, Matthias; Frydrychowicz, Clara; Müller, Wolf; Preuss, Matthias; Bure, Lionel; Quäschling, Ulf; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate if apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values within primary central nervous system lymphoma correlate with cellularity and proliferative activity in corresponding histological samples. Materials and Methods Echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images obtained from 21 patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma were reviewed retrospectively. Regions of interest were drawn on ADC maps corresponding to the contrast enhancing parts of the tumors. Biopsies from all 21 patients were histologically analyzed. Nuclei count, total nuclei area and average nuclei area were measured. The proliferation index was estimated as Ki-67 positive nuclei divided by total number of nuclei. Correlations of ADC values and histopathologic parameters were determined statistically. Results Ki-67 staining revealed a statistically significant correlation with ADCmin (r = -0.454, p = 0.038), ADCmean (r = -0.546, p = 0.010) and ADCmax (r = -0.515, p = 0.017). Furthermore, ADCmean correlated in a statistically significant manner with total nucleic area (r = -0.500, p = 0.021). Conclusion Low ADCmin, ADCmean and ADCmax values reflect a high proliferative activity of primary cental nervous system lymphoma. Low ADCmean values—in concordance with several previously published studies—indicate an increased cellularity within the tumor. PMID:27571268

  6. Measuring a Precise Ultra-Lightweight Spaceflight Mirror on Earth: The Analysis of the SHARPI PM Mirror Figure Data during Mirror Processing at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott; Content, David; Rabin, Douglas; Wallace, Thomas; Wake, Shane

    2007-01-01

    The SHARPI (Solar High Angular Resolution Photometric Imager) primary mirror is a 5kg, 0.5m paraboloid, diffraction limited at FUV wavelengths when placed in a 0-G environment. The ULE sandwich honeycomb mirror and the attached mount pads were delivered by ITT (then Kodak) in 2003 to NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). At GSFC, we accepted, coated, mounted, and vibration tested this mirror in preparation for flight on the PICTURES (Planet Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment) mission. At each step, the integrated analysis of interferometer data and FEA models was essential to quantify the 0-G mirror figure. This task required separating nanometer sized variations from hundreds of nanometers of gravity induced distortion. The ability to isolate such features allowed in-situ monitoring of mirror figure, diagnosis of perturbations, and remediation of process errors. In this paper, we describe the technical approach used to achieve these measurements and overcome the various difficulties maintaining UV diffraction-limited performance with this aggressively lightweighted mirror.

  7. Selective activation of a putative reinforcement signal conditions cued interval timing in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Hang; Coleman, Jason E.; Davoudi, Heydar; Zhang, Kechen; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary As a consequence of conditioning visual cues with delayed reward, cue-evoked neural activity that predicts the time of expected future reward emerges in the primary visual cortex (V1). We hypothesized that this reward timing activity is engendered by a reinforcement signal conveying reward acquisition to V1. In lieu of behavioral conditioning, we assessed in vivo whether selective activation of either basal forebrain (BF) or cholinergic innervation is sufficient to condition cued interval timing activity. Substituting for actual reward, optogenetic activation of BF or cholinergic input within V1 at fixed delays following visual stimulation entrains neural responses that mimic behaviorally-conditioned reward timing activity. Optogenetically-conditioned neural responses express cue-evoked temporal intervals that correspond to the conditioning intervals, are bidirectionally modifiable, display experience-dependent refinement, and exhibit a scale invariance to the encoded delay. Our results demonstrate that the activation of BF or cholinergic input within V1is sufficient to encode cued interval timing activity, and indicate that V1 itself is a substrate for associative learning that may inform the timing of visually-cued behaviors. PMID:26004763

  8. [Basic guidelines for detecting sedentarism and recommendations for physical activity in primary care].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Salgado, Juan José; Delgado-Martín, José Luis; Blanco-Iglesias, Orlando; Aldecoa-Landesa, Susana

    2015-03-01

    The detection of physical inactivity in adults, using simple and useful tools is primary objective in both public health and in clinical settings, since this risk factor is one of the major causes of non-communicable disease in the world, and is very prevalent in developed societies such as in Spain. Two validated instruments are described that are simple and useful for detecting and/or monitoring physical inactivity in adults: (i)the international physical activity questionnaire in its short version, and (ii)the pedometer to measure the number of steps taken in a day. Increased levels of physical activity are important for the primary prevention of some chronic diseases (coronary heart disease, type2 diabetes, osteoporosis, colon cancer) and to improve the quality of life. Medical personnel must determine the motivation level and the availability of patients and their families to change their behavior towards physical activity. Moderate-intensity physical activities have hardly any contraindications and the risks are few. PMID:25443767

  9. Efficacy of Mirror Therapy Containing Functional Tasks in Poststroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of mirror therapy containing functional tasks on upper extremity function and activities of daily living in patients with subacute stroke. Methods The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: the mirror therapy group (30 patients) and the sham therapy group (30 patients). The mirror therapy group underwent a mirror therapy program together with conventional therapy for 20 minutes per day on 5 days per week for 4 weeks. The control group received a sham conventional therapy program under the same schedule as the mirror therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment (FMA), Brunnstrom motor recovery stage, and Modified Barthel Index (MBI) were evaluated 4 weeks after the treatment. Results The upper extremity function on the affected side and ability to perform daily life activities after the intervention were significantly improved in both groups. After 4 weeks of intervention, improvements in the FMA (p=0.027) and MBI (p=0.041) were significantly greater in the mirror therapy group than the sham therapy group. Conclusion In this study, we found that the mirror therapy containing functional task was effective in terms of improving the upper extremity functions and activities of daily living in patients with subacute stroke. PMID:27606269

  10. Finite Element Modeling of a Semi-Rigid Hybrid Mirror and a Highly Actuated Membrane Mirror as Candidates for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Larry; Jacobson, Dave; Mosier, Gary; Nein, Max; Page, Timothy; Redding, Dave; Sutherlin, Steve; Wilkerson, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Advanced space telescopes, which will eventually replace the Hubble Space Telescope (HTS), will have apertures of 8 - 20 n. Primary mirrors of these dimensions will have to be foldable to fit into the space launcher. By necessity these mirrors will be extremely light weight and flexible and the historical approaches to mirror designs, where the mirror is made as rigid as possible to maintain figure and to serve as the anchor for the entire telescope, cannot be applied any longer. New design concepts and verifications will depend entirely on analytical methods to predict optical performance. Finite element modeling of the structural and thermal behavior of such mirrors is becoming the tool for advanced space mirror designs. This paper discusses some of the preliminary tasks and study results, which are currently the basis for the design studies of the Next Generation Space Telescope.

  11. Progress in the Fabrication and Testing of Telescope Mirrors for The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Charles W.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Keski-Kuha, R.; McKay, A.; Chaney, D.; Gallagher, B.; Ha, K.

    2012-01-01

    The telescope of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an f/20, three mirror anastigmat design, passively cooled (40K) in an L2 orbit. The design provides diffraction limited performance (Strehl ≥ 0.8) at λ=2μm. To fit within the launch vehicle envelope (Arianne V), the 6.6 meter primary mirror and the secondary mirror support structure are folded for launch, then deployed and aligned in space. The primary mirror is composed of 18 individual, 1.3 meter (flat:flat) hexagonal segments, each adjustable in seven degrees of freedom (six rigid body + radius of curvature) provided by a set of high precision actuators. The actuated secondary mirror ( 0.74m) is similarly positioned in six degrees of rigid body motion. The .70x.51m, fixed tertiary and 0.17m, flat fine steering mirror complete the telescope mirror complement. The telescope is supported by a composite structure optimized for performance at cryogenic temperatures. All telescope mirrors are made of Be with substantial lightweighting (21kg for each 1.3M primary segment). Additional Be mounting and supporting structure for the high precision ( 10nm steps) actuators are attached to the primary segments and secondary mirror. All mirrors undergo a process of thermal stabilization to reduce stress. An extensive series of interferometric measurements guide each step of the polishing process. Final polishing must account for any deformation between the ambient temperature of polishing and the cryogenic, operational temperature. This is accomplished by producing highly precise, cryo deformation target maps of each surface which are incorporated into the final polishing cycle. All flight mirrors have now completed polishing, coating with protected Au and final cryo testing, and the telescope is on track to meet all system requirements. We here review the measured performance of the component mirrors and the predicted performance of the flight telescope.

  12. Deployable telescope having a thin-film mirror and metering structure

    DOEpatents

    Krumel, Leslie J.; Martin, Jeffrey W.

    2010-08-24

    A deployable thin-film mirror telescope comprises a base structure and a metering structure. The base structure houses a thin-film mirror, which can be rolled for stowage and unrolled for deployment. The metering structure is coupled to the base structure and can be folded for stowage and unfolded for deployment. In the deployed state, the unrolled thin-film mirror forms a primary minor for the telescope and the unfolded metering structure positions a secondary minor for the telescope.

  13. A new activated primary tank developed for recovering carbon source and its application.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Xianbao; Zhang, Qionghua; Wang, Xiaochang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A novel activated primary tank process (APT) was developed for recovering carbon source by fermentation and elutriation of primary sludge. The effects of solids retention time (SRT), elutriation intensity (G) and return sludge ratio (RSR) on this recovery were evaluated in a pilot scale reactor. Results indicated that SRT significantly influenced carbon source recovery, and mechanical elutriation could promote soluble COD (SCOD) and VFA yields. The optimal conditions of APT were SRT=5d, G=152s(-1) and RSR=10%, SCOD and VFA production were 57.0mg/L and 21.7mg/L. Particulate organic matter in sludge was converted into SCOD and VFAs as fermentative bacteria were significantly enriched in APT. Moreover, the APT process was applied in a wastewater treatment plant to solve the problem of insufficient carbon source. The outcomes demonstrated that influent SCOD of biological tank increased by 31.1%, which improved the efficiency of removing nitrogen and phosphorus. PMID:26562688

  14. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  15. Mirror development for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Doro, M.; Brun, P.; Canestrari, R.; Chadwick, P.; Font, L.; Ghigo, M.; Lorenz, E.; Mariotti, M.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Pareschi, G.; Peyaud, B.; Seweryn, K.

    2009-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), currently in its early design phase, is a proposed new project for groundbased gamma-ray astronomy with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. CTA is planned to consist of several tens of large Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) with a combined reflective surface of up to 10,000 m2. The challenge for the future CTA array is to develop lightweight and cost efficient mirrors with high production rates, good longterm durability and adequate optical properties. The technologies currently under investigation comprise different methods of carbon fibre/epoxy based substrates, sandwich concepts with cold-slumped surfaces made of thin float glass and different structural materials like aluminum honeycomb, glass foam or PU foam inside, and aluminum sandwich structures with either diamond milled surfaces or reflective foils. The current status of the mirror development for CTA will be summarized together with investigations on the improvement of the reflective surfaces and their protection against degradation.

  16. "Mirror-Image" Errors without Mirror-Image Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barroso, Felix; Braine, Lila Ghent

    1974-01-01

    Young children matching the orientation of (a) identical realistic figures that could form mirror images of each other, or (b) nonidentical realistic figures that could not form mirror images, produced the same pattern of errors. The explanation proposed is a strategy of matching analogous parts of the two figures. (Author/SDH)

  17. Analysis and Fabrication of Paraboloidal CFRP Sandwich Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tayo Steve

    The low areal weight requirements of telescopes in aerospace applications has driven the study on composite mirrors for several years. For example, the primary parabolic mirror in a balloon-borne, Cassegrain telescope required an optical quality better than 30 microns in figure RMS error. A parametric study on composite sandwich mirrors was conducted by using finite element analysis as well as optical analysis. The factors covered the cell sizes, core materials, core thicknesses, face layups, and support configurations. Based on theoretical calculations, many high quality spherical composite sandwich mirrors were generated by using a non-heat curing process. The CFRP faces and Nomex core were chosen as the baseline materials for mirror fabrication due to their high strength and low weight. The proposed replication method applied an interface layer between face and surface coat to eliminate print -through problems. Many important goals have been realized in those mirror samples with optical laser interferometer testing. These include the figure RMS error less than 2 microns and the surface RMS error less than 0.05 micron. The areal weights of the mirror samples are less than 7 kg/m ^2. The thermal stability of these mirrors was observed from the optical results with thermal cycling tests. The proposed 2-meter parabolic composite sandwich mirror, with an areal weight of less than 10 kg/m ^2, would consist of either (0/90/45/ -45) _{rm S} layup faces with an optimal 3^{' '} core or (QC) layup faces with a total core thickness of 5 inches. Both a ring support around the equator and the 18-point Hindle-type support would lead to the best optical quality under both self weight and thermal loading.

  18. Mirror profile optimization for nano-focusing KB mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lin; Baker, Robert; Barrett, Ray; Cloetens, Peter; Dabin, Yves

    2010-06-23

    A KB focusing mirror width profile has been optimized to achieve nano-focusing for the nano-imaging end-station ID22NI at the ESRF. The complete mirror and flexure bender assembly has been modeled in 3D with finite element analysis using ANSYS. Bender stiffness, anticlastic effects and geometrical non-linear effects have been considered. Various points have been studied: anisotropy and crystal orientation, stress in the mirror and bender, actuator resolution and the mirror-bender adhesive bonding... Extremely high performance of the mirror is expected with residual slope error smaller than 0.6 {mu}rad, peak-to-valley, compared to the bent slope of 3000 {mu}rad.

  19. Displacement of primary sensorimotor cortex activation after subcortical stroke: a longitudinal PET study with clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Calautti, Cinzia; Leroy, Francois; Guincestre, Jean-Yves; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2003-08-01

    Five patients with left striatocapsular infarction were studied twice with PET during auditory-cued right thumb-index tapping, around 2 months after stroke and again around 8 months after stroke. At PET1 and PET2, the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor (SM1) activation peak Talairach coordinates were compared to those from seven aged-matched healthy controls. At PET1, there was a significant posterior displacement of SM1 activation peak, which confirms a previous report and may represent unmasking/disinhibition of motor representations. Over time, there was no significant change in the coordinates, and no significant correlation between coordinate changes from PET1 to PET2 and concomitant motor recovery. The implications of posterior displacement of SM1 activation peak for recovery therefore remain elusive. PMID:12948719

  20. Physical activity referrals in Swedish primary health care – prescriber and patient characteristics, reasons for prescriptions, and prescribed activities

    PubMed Central

    Leijon, ME; Bendtsen, P; Nilsen, P; Ekberg, K; Ståhle, A

    2008-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, practitioners in primary health care (PHC) settings in many countries have issued written prescriptions to patients to promote increased physical activity or exercise. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse a comprehensive physical activity referral (PAR) scheme implemented in a routine PHC setting in Östergötland County. The study examines characteristics of the PARs recipients and referral practitioners, identifies reasons why practitioners opted to use PARs with their clients, and discusses prescribed activities and prescriptions in relation to PHC registries. Methods Prospective prescription data were obtained for 90% of the primary health care centres in Östergötland County, Sweden, in 2004 and 2005. The study population consisted of patients who were issued PARs after they were deemed likely to benefit from increased physical activity, as assessed by PHC staff. Results During the two-year period, a total of 6,300 patients received PARs. Two-thirds of the patients were female and half of the patients were 45–64 years. Half of the patients (50.8%) who received PARs were recommended a home-based activity, such as walking. One third (33%) of the patients issued PARs were totally inactive, reporting no days of physical activity that lasted for 30 minutes, and 29% stated that they reached this level 1–2 days per week. The number of PARs prescribed per year in relation to the number of unique individuals that visited primary health care during one year was 1.4% in 2004 and 1.2% in 2005. Two-thirds of the combined prescriptions were issued by physicians (38%) and nurses (31%). Physiotherapists and behavioural scientists issued the highest relative number of prescriptions. The most common reasons for issuing PARs were musculoskeletal disorders (39.1%) and overweight (35.4%), followed by high blood pressure (23.3%) and diabetes (23.2%). Conclusion Östergötland County's PAR scheme reached a relatively high proportion