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Sample records for active principles present

  1. Adult Learning Principles and Presentation Pearls

    PubMed Central

    Palis, Ana G.; Quiros, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Although lectures are one of the most common methods of knowledge transfer in medicine, their effectiveness has been questioned. Passive formats, lack of relevance and disconnection from the student's needs are some of the arguments supporting this apparent lack of efficacy. However, many authors have suggested that applying adult learning principles (i.e., relevance, congruence with student's needs, interactivity, connection to student's previous knowledge and experience) to this method increases learning by lectures and the effectiveness of lectures. This paper presents recommendations for applying adult learning principles during planning, creation and development of lectures to make them more effective. PMID:24791101

  2. A Filmed Presentation of Ecological Principles. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Gerald G.; Nelson, Gid E.

    Procedures in developing a 66-minute film entitled "Natural Communities of Florida; Physical Factors and Distribution" and presented in this summary report. Production of the film was undertaken in an attempt to provide a more effective means of presenting basic ecological principles to students in introductory, college level biology courses. The…

  3. The Basic Principles and Present Practice of Conductive Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Ildiko

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the origins, principles, and present practice of conductive education (CE), an educational system to rehabilitate people with motor disabilities caused by early damage to the central nervous system. Numerous variants of CE and an increasing demand for CE are noted. International cooperation, quality management, and monitoring…

  4. Computer Technology Can Enhance Presentation of Pharmacological Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffee, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The use of liquid crystal display (LCD) techniques for projection of computer monitor images onto a large screen for classroom viewing is discussed and illustrated with a pharmacology class presentation on drug/neurotransmitter-receptor interactions. The method is seen as a way of bringing a new dynamic to visual instruction. (MSE)

  5. Active magnetoplasmonic ruler (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubritskaya, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Plasmon rulers are an emerging concept in which the strong near-field coupling of plasmon nanoantenna elements is employed to obtain structural information at the nanoscale. Here, we combine nanoplasmonics and nanomagnetism to conceptualize a magnetoplasmonic dimer nanoantenna that would be able to report nanoscale distances while optimizing its own spatial orientation. The latter constitutes an active operation in which a dynamically optimized optical response per measured unit length allows for the measurement of small and large nanoscale distances with about 2 orders of magnitude higher precision than current state-of-the-art plasmon rulers. We further propose a concept to optically measure the nanoscale response to the controlled application of force with a magnetic field.

  6. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  7. Microwave noise field: active radiometry principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polivka, Jiri

    2012-06-01

    Principles of Active Radiometry are presented. Noise radiators are used to generate the low-coherence microwave noise field, and radiometers to evaluate its intensity, polarization and coherence. Several types of noise radiators are described as well as radiometers and antennas. The following applications are introduced: Material evaluation where insertion loss and reflectivity of grainy, irregular and moving objects are preferable. Microwave Coherence Tomography allowing the depth irregularity to be detected in low-loss objects. Near-Field antenna testing, field coherence evaluation, and spatial combining of noise radiators.

  8. Efficient and Effective Change Principles in Active Videogames.

    PubMed

    Straker, Leon M; Fenner, Ashley A; Howie, Erin K; Feltz, Deborah L; Gray, Cindy M; Lu, Amy Shirong; Mueller, Florian Floyd; Simons, Monique; Barnett, Lisa M

    2015-02-01

    Active videogames have the potential to enhance population levels of physical activity but have not been successful in achieving this aim to date. This article considers a range of principles that may be important to the design of effective and efficient active videogames from diverse discipline areas, including behavioral sciences (health behavior change, motor learning, and serious games), business production (marketing and sales), and technology engineering and design (human-computer interaction/ergonomics and flow). Both direct and indirect pathways to impact on population levels of habitual physical activity are proposed, along with the concept of a game use lifecycle. Examples of current active and sedentary electronic games are used to understand how such principles may be applied. Furthermore, limitations of the current usage of theoretical principles are discussed. A suggested list of principles for best practice in active videogame design is proposed along with suggested research ideas to inform practice to enhance physical activity.

  9. Efficient and Effective Change Principles in Active Videogames.

    PubMed

    Straker, Leon M; Fenner, Ashley A; Howie, Erin K; Feltz, Deborah L; Gray, Cindy M; Lu, Amy Shirong; Mueller, Florian Floyd; Simons, Monique; Barnett, Lisa M

    2015-02-01

    Active videogames have the potential to enhance population levels of physical activity but have not been successful in achieving this aim to date. This article considers a range of principles that may be important to the design of effective and efficient active videogames from diverse discipline areas, including behavioral sciences (health behavior change, motor learning, and serious games), business production (marketing and sales), and technology engineering and design (human-computer interaction/ergonomics and flow). Both direct and indirect pathways to impact on population levels of habitual physical activity are proposed, along with the concept of a game use lifecycle. Examples of current active and sedentary electronic games are used to understand how such principles may be applied. Furthermore, limitations of the current usage of theoretical principles are discussed. A suggested list of principles for best practice in active videogame design is proposed along with suggested research ideas to inform practice to enhance physical activity. PMID:26181680

  10. Efficient and Effective Change Principles in Active Videogames

    PubMed Central

    Fenner, Ashley A.; Howie, Erin K.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Gray, Cindy M.; Lu, Amy Shirong; Mueller, Florian “Floyd”; Simons, Monique; Barnett, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Active videogames have the potential to enhance population levels of physical activity but have not been successful in achieving this aim to date. This article considers a range of principles that may be important to the design of effective and efficient active videogames from diverse discipline areas, including behavioral sciences (health behavior change, motor learning, and serious games), business production (marketing and sales), and technology engineering and design (human–computer interaction/ergonomics and flow). Both direct and indirect pathways to impact on population levels of habitual physical activity are proposed, along with the concept of a game use lifecycle. Examples of current active and sedentary electronic games are used to understand how such principles may be applied. Furthermore, limitations of the current usage of theoretical principles are discussed. A suggested list of principles for best practice in active videogame design is proposed along with suggested research ideas to inform practice to enhance physical activity. PMID:26181680

  11. A Classroom Activity To Demonstrate the Principle of Negative Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, David; Simmons, Sharanne

    This paper describes a classroom activity to demonstrate to undergraduate psychology students studying learning principles the principle of negative reinforcement. The students (n=25) were either enrolled in an introductory psychology course at a business college or the students (n=21) were enrolled in an educational psychology course at a state…

  12. Present principles of workers' health care organization in Poland and directions of future changes.

    PubMed

    Dawydzik, L; Izycki, J; Kopias, J

    1993-01-01

    The present-day legal regulations on workers' health care are far from satisfactory. The work on the modification of the occupational health service has been carried out for the last two years although the preparatory activities started much earlier. In May 1991, under the initiative of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Lodz, the bill on the Labor Code has been amended so that it would regulate the employer's responsibilities with respect to providing health care for workers and to participating in respective costs. These activities have overrun the more general ones pertaining to the reform of the national health service in Poland. Under conditions of the growing free market economy the previously operated organizational system of health care for workers has become out-of-date and needs immediate modification to adjust it to the new economic situation. Evidently, the trends and rate of the policy in this respect have been considerably influenced by the more general activities to make Poland associated with the European Community and hence to develop an occupational health care system which would take into consideration the principles of the Charter of Social Rights of the EEC as well as of the ILO Conventions.

  13. The cardio-active principle in spleen

    PubMed Central

    Cobbin, L. B.; Thorp, R. H.

    1959-01-01

    A substance has been demonstrated in acetone extracts of freeze-dried spleen which had cardiotonic properties on isolated papillary muscles from the cat and perfused hearts of the cat and guinea-pig. This activity of the extract could not be explained by the presence of choline, acetylcholine, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, adrenaline or noradrenaline. PMID:13810785

  14. Anti-diabetic activity of active fractions of Stereospermum tetragonum DC and isolation of active principles

    PubMed Central

    Bino Kingsley, Renjit; Mishra, Manisha; Brindha, Pemaiah; Subramoniam, Appian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify the active principles, determine the anti-diabetes activity of fraction of Stereospermum tetragonum root. Materials and Methods The efficacy was evaluated in streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic rats and the anti-hyperglycemic activity was studied by glucose tolerance test. The major active compounds were isolated by solvent fractionation and chromatographic techniques and characterized with spectral data. Results The active fraction of S. tetragonum showed presence of anti-diabetes mellitus activity in type-2 diabetic rats. It did not significantly influence insulin release from cultured islets. Two active principles (active at 2 mg/kg dose) were isolated and characterized with spectral data. One of them was identified as an iridoid type glycoside and the other one was a lapachol like compound (derivative of naphthoquinone). Conclusions Two active principles from the anti-diabetes fraction of S. tetragonum root were isolated and identified as an iridoid glycoside and a naphthoquinone derivative. PMID:24023445

  15. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present, coherently and comprehensively, the wealth of available but scattered information on the principles and applications of active nondestructive analysis (ANDA). Chapters are devoted to the following: background and overview; interactions of neutrons with matter; interactions of ..gamma..-rays with matter; neutron production and sources; ..gamma..-ray production and sources; effects of neutron and ..gamma..-ray transport in bulk media; signatures of neutron- and photon-induced fissions; neutron and photon detection systems and electronics; representative ANDA systems; and instrument analysis, calibration, and measurement control for ANDA. Each chapter has an introductory section describing the relationship of the topic of that chapter to ANDA. Each chapter ends with a section that summarizes the main results and conclusions of the chapter, and a reference list.

  16. The Didactic Principles and Their Applications in the Didactic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marius-Costel, Esi

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation and reevaluation of the fundamental didactic principles suppose the acceptance at the level of an instructive-educative activity of a new educational paradigm. Thus, its understanding implies an assumption at a conceptual-theoretical level of some approaches where the didactic aspects find their usefulness by relating to value…

  17. The Aether and Heinrich Hertz's The Principles of Mechanics Presented in a New Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph F.

    The luminiferous aether played an important role in the careers of one of the greatest of nineteenth-century physicists, Heinrich Hertz (1857-1894). This paper demonstrates from Hertz's own writings the maturing of his interest in the aether during the years 1885-1894 until he finally considered the nature of the aether the most important problem remaining to be solved by physicists. This conviction, joined to his desire to reduce all physics to mechanics, eventually led Hertz to devote the last three years of his life (1891-1894) to his The Principles of Mechanics Presented in a New Form, a work he intended as preparatory to an all-out attack on the nature and functions of an aether. The reason why, after Hertz's premature death in 1894, physicists gradually lost interest in both his Mechanics and in the aether are discussed.

  18. Antitumor properties and modulation of antioxidant enzymes' activity by Aloe vera leaf active principles isolated via supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    El-Shemy, H A; Aboul-Soud, M A M; Nassr-Allah, A A; Aboul-Enein, K M; Kabash, A; Yagi, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential anticancer properties and modulatory effect of selected Aloe vera (A. vera) active principles on antioxidant enzyme activities. Thus, three anthraquinones (Namely: aloesin, aloe-emodin and barbaloin) were extracted from A. vera leaves by supercritical fluid extraction and subsequently purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, the N-terminal octapeptide derived from verectin, a biologically active 14 kDa glycoprotein present in A. vera, was also tested. In vivo, active principles exhibited significant prolongation of the life span of tumor-transplanted animals in the following order: barbaloin> octapeptide> aloesin > aloe-emodin. A. vera active principles exhibited significant inhibition on Ehrlich ascite carcinoma cell (EACC) number, when compared to positive control group, in the following order: barbaloin> aloe-emodin > octapeptide > aloesin. Moreover, in trypan blue cell viability assay, active principles showed a significant concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphocytes leukemia (ALL) cancerous cells. Furthermore, in MTT cell viability test, aloe-emodin was found to be active against two human colon cancer cell lines (i.e. DLD-1 and HT2), with IC(50) values of 8.94 and 10.78 microM, respectively. Treatments of human AML leukemic cells with active principles (100 microg ml(-1)) resulted in varying intensities of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, hallmark of cells undergoing apoptosis, in the following order: aloe-emodin> aloesin> barbaloin> octapeptide. Intererstingly, treatment of EACC tumors with active principles resulted in a significant elevation activity of key antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GST, tGPx, and LDH). Our data suggest that the tested A. vera compounds may exert their chemo-preventive effect through modulating antioxidant and detoxification enzyme activity levels, as they are one of the indicators of tumorigenesis. These

  19. Auxin Activity: Past, present, and Future1

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Tara A.; Strader, Lucia C.

    2016-01-01

    Long before its chemical identity was known, the phytohormone auxin was postulated to regulate plant growth. In the late 1800s, Sachs hypothesized that plant growth regulators, present in small amounts, move differentially throughout the plant to regulate growth. Concurrently, Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin were discovering that light and gravity were perceived by the tips of shoots and roots and that the stimulus was transmitted to other tissues, which underwent a growth response. These ideas were improved upon by Boysen-Jensen and Paál and were later developed into the Cholodny–Went hypothesis that tropisms were caused by the asymmetric distribution of a growth-promoting substance. These observations led to many efforts to identify this elusive growth-promoting substance, which we now know as auxin. In this review of auxin field advances over the past century, we start with a seminal paper by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider titled “The relative activities of different auxins” from the American Journal of Botany, in which they compare the growth altering properties of several auxinic compounds. From this point, we explore the modern molecular understanding of auxin—including its biosynthesis, transport, and perception. Finally, we end this review with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions in the auxin field. Over the past 100 yr, much of our progress in understanding auxin biology has relied on the steady and collective advance of the field of auxin researchers; we expect that the next 100 yr of auxin research will likewise make many exciting advances. PMID:25667071

  20. Auxin activity: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Enders, Tara A; Strader, Lucia C

    2015-02-01

    Long before its chemical identity was known, the phytohormone auxin was postulated to regulate plant growth. In the late 1800s, Sachs hypothesized that plant growth regulators, present in small amounts, move differentially throughout the plant to regulate growth. Concurrently, Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin were discovering that light and gravity were perceived by the tips of shoots and roots and that the stimulus was transmitted to other tissues, which underwent a growth response. These ideas were improved upon by Boysen-Jensen and Paál and were later developed into the Cholodny-Went hypothesis that tropisms were caused by the asymmetric distribution of a growth-promoting substance. These observations led to many efforts to identify this elusive growth-promoting substance, which we now know as auxin. In this review of auxin field advances over the past century, we start with a seminal paper by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider titled "The relative activities of different auxins" from the American Journal of Botany, in which they compare the growth altering properties of several auxinic compounds. From this point, we explore the modern molecular understanding of auxin-including its biosynthesis, transport, and perception. Finally, we end this review with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions in the auxin field. Over the past 100 yr, much of our progress in understanding auxin biology has relied on the steady and collective advance of the field of auxin researchers; we expect that the next 100 yr of auxin research will likewise make many exciting advances.

  1. Re-Presenting the Library Collections: A Story of Principles, Pathways and Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kattau, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Macquarie University Library's planning for a new library coincided with a major renewal of the university's curriculum and research activity. This provided a significant opportunity to re-think the presentation of the library collections in the new environment. This article describes how strategic alignment with university goals and the framework…

  2. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  3. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  4. Physics Textbooks Presentation of the Energy-Conservation Principle in Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, M.; Ramos, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how energy-conservation principle is exposed in hydrodynamics chapters of university physics textbooks. Ten physics textbooks analyzed show considerable deficiencies in the use of energy concepts related to uncompressible fluid dynamics. The following problems have been extensively found: The pressure…

  5. Silicosis: a disease with an active present.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Cristina; Prieto, Amador; García, Laura; Quero, Aida; González, Susana; Casan, Pere

    2010-02-01

    Silicosis, an interstitial lung disease caused by the inhalation of crystalline silica powder, despite being one of the oldest occupational diseases, continues being a cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. The World Health Organisation and the International Labour Organisation (OMS/ILO), aware of the current problem, have designed the World Programme for the Elimination of Silicosis, which includes the identification of occupational groups at risk amongst its actions. We present 3 cases of silicosis in young workers in the construction sector, with exposure to high concentrations of silica due to handling artificial silica conglomerates. The main interest of this observation lies in the identification of new risk sources, in the need to draw attention to the dangers involved in its use without prevention measures, and in the importance of the occupational history to avoid under-diagnosis. PMID:19818543

  6. Carbohydrate-active enzymes exemplify entropic principles in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kartal, Önder; Mahlow, Sebastian; Skupin, Alexander; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Glycans comprise ubiquitous and essential biopolymers, which usually occur as highly diverse mixtures. The myriad different structures are generated by a limited number of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), which are unusual in that they catalyze multiple reactions by being relatively unspecific with respect to substrate size. Existing experimental and theoretical descriptions of CAZyme-mediated reaction systems neither comprehensively explain observed action patterns nor suggest biological functions of polydisperse pools in metabolism. Here, we overcome these limitations with a novel theoretical description of this important class of biological systems in which the mixing entropy of polydisperse pools emerges as an important system variable. In vitro assays of three CAZymes essential for central carbon metabolism confirm the power of our approach to predict equilibrium distributions and non-equilibrium dynamics. A computational study of the turnover of the soluble heteroglycan pool exemplifies how entropy-driven reactions establish a metabolic buffer in vivo that attenuates fluctuations in carbohydrate availability. We argue that this interplay between energy- and entropy-driven processes represents an important regulatory design principle of metabolic systems. PMID:22027553

  7. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  8. Demonstration of the invariance principle for active sonar.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M; Rouseff, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    Active sonar systems can provide good target detection potential but are limited in shallow water environments by the high level of reverberation produced by the interaction between the acoustic signal and the ocean bottom. The nature of the reverberation is highly variable and depends critically on the ocean and seabed properties, which are typically poorly known. This has motivated interest in techniques that are invariant to the environment. In passive sonar, a scalar parameter termed the waveguide invariant, has been introduced to describe the slope of striations observed in lofargrams. In this work, an invariant for active sonar is introduced. This active invariant is shown to be present in the time-frequency structure observed in sonar data from the Malta Plateau, and the structure agrees with results produced from normal mode simulations. The application of this feature in active tracking algorithms is discussed.

  9. Evaluation of Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Brazilian Plants and Identification of the Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Niero, Rivaldo; Bolda Mariano, Luisa Nathália; Gomes do Nascimento, Fabiana; Vicente Farias, Ingrid; Gazoni, Vanessa Fátima; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Giménez, Alberto; Gutierrez-Yapu, David; Salamanca, Efrain; Malheiros, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds from some selected Brazilian medicinal plants against strains of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and L. brasiliensis in vitro. The cell viability was determined, comparing the results with reference standards. The dichloromethane fractions of the roots, stems, and leaves of Allamanda schottii showed IC50 values between 14.0 and 2.0 μg/mL. Plumericin was the main active compound, with IC50 of 0.3 and 0.04 μg/mL against the two species of Leishmania analyzed. The hexane extract of Eugenia umbelliflora fruits showed IC50 of 14.3 and 5.7 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. The methanolic extracts of the seeds of Garcinia achachairu and guttiferone A presented IC50 values of 35.9 and 10.4 μg/mL, against L. amazonensis, respectively. The ethanolic extracts of the stem barks of Rapanea ferruginea and the isolated compound, myrsinoic acid B, presented activity against L. brasiliensis with IC50 of 24.1 and 6.1 μg/mL. Chloroform fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium exhibited IC50 of 33.8 and 20.5 μg/mL, and cilistol A was the main active principle, with IC50 of 6.6 and 3.1 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. It is concluded that the analyzed plants are promising as new and effective antiparasitic agents. PMID:23840252

  10. The Medical Interaction Laboratory--Multidiscipline Approach for Presentation of Principles of Physiology and Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Jack W.; Sims, Michael H.

    1979-01-01

    An interdisciplinary physiology and pharmacology course presented by the Medical Interaction Laboratory at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine provides interaction among faculty, conserves faculty time and animal expense, and presents a coordinated laboratory experience. (BH)

  11. On the neglect of causality principles in solar activity - climate relations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Many research papers have claimed to demonstrate close relations between solar activity and the terrestrial climate. In most cases the relations have been based on comparisons between time series of solar activity parameters, for instance sunspot numbers, and climate parameters, for instance terrestrial temperatures. However, many of the reported close relations are based on skilfully manipulated data and neglect of basic causality principles. For cause-effect relations to be reliably established, the cause must obviously happen prior to the effects. Thus it is problematic to use, for instance, running averages of parameters if the result depends too much on posterior elements of the causative time series or precursory elements of the effects. Even more neglected are the causality principles for cause-effect relations with a strongly varying source function. Damping of source variations by smoothing data handling introduces additional implied delays, which should be considered in the judgement of apparent correlations between processed time series of cause and effect parameters. The presentation will discuss examples of frequently quoted solar activity-climate relations (e.g., by Reid, Friis-Christensen, and Svensmark), which violate basic causality principles.

  12. Principles of design of active and removable appliances.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, A W; Wright, G Z

    1978-10-01

    Removable orthodontic appliances, perhaps more than any other form of mechanical therapy for the movement of teeth, are applicable to general practice. Far too frequently, however, the clinician limits his appliance design to a selective number of appliances with which he is conversant and attempts to modify any one of them to fit a specific situation. This article suggests a different approach. A specific appliance has not been recommended for a specific situation. Instead, the principles of removable appliance design have been elaborated upon according to an established plan. Adherence to the principles should enhance the clinician's ability to provide a more effective and efficient service for his young patients.

  13. Salvia officinalis for hot flushes: towards determination of mechanism of activity and active principles.

    PubMed

    Rahte, Sinikka; Evans, Richard; Eugster, Philippe J; Marcourt, Laurence; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2013-06-01

    Herbal medicinal products are commonly used in alternative treatment of menopausal hot flushes. In a recent clinical study, Salvia officinalis tincture was found to reduce hot flush frequency and intensity. The aim of the current study was the investigation of the mechanism(s) responsible for the anti-hot flush activity of S. officinalis and determination of its active principle(s). The 66% ethanolic tincture, as well as the n-hexane, CHCl₃, and aqueous ethanolic subextracts obtained from the tincture were studied in vitro for two of the most relevant activities, estrogenicity and selective serotonin reuptake inhibition. Because of an increased risk of menopausal women to suffer from Alzheimer's disease, an in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay was also employed. No activity was observed in the selective serotonin reuptake inhibition or the acetylcholinesterase inhibition assays at the highest test concentrations. The tincture showed no estrogenic effects whereas the aqueous ethanolic subextract exhibited estrogenicity in the ERLUX assay with an EC₅₀ value of 64 µg/mL. Estrogenic activity-guided fractionation of the aqueous ethanolic subextract by a combination of reverse-phase vacuum liquid chromatography and gel chromatography identified luteolin-7-O-glucuronide (EC₅₀ 129 µg/mL) as the active component of the vacuum liquid chromatography fraction 4 (EC₅₀ 69 µg/mL). Luteolin-7-O-glucoside was identified as the putative estrogenic principle of the most potent minor fraction (7.6.7.6, EC₅₀ 0.7 µg/mL) obtained from the initial vacuum liquid chromatography fraction 7 (EC₅₀ 3 µg/mL). This study suggests the involvement of common and ubiquitous estrogenic flavonoids in the anti-hot flush effect of Salvia officinalis, a safe and commonly used herbal medicinal product during the menopause.

  14. The Operating Principle of a Fully Solid State Active Magnetic Regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative refrigeration technology, magnetocaloric refrigeration has the potential to be safer, quieter, more efficient, and more environmentally friendly than the conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology. Most of the reported active magnetic regenerator (AMR) systems that operate based on the magnetocaloric effect use heat transfer fluid to exchange heat, which results in complicated mechanical subsystems and components such as rotating valves and hydraulic pumps. This paper presents an operating principle of a fully solid state AMR, in which an alternative mechanism for heat transfer between the AMR and the heat source/sink is proposed. The operating principle of the fully solid state AMR is based on moving rods/sheets (e.g. copper, brass, iron or aluminum), which are employed to replace the heat transfer fluid. Such fully solid state AMR would provide a significantly higher heat transfer rate than a conventional AMR because the conductivity of moving solid rods/plates is high and it enables the increase in the machine operating frequency hence the cooling capacity. The details of operating principle are presented and discussed here. One of the key enabling features for this technology is the contact between the moving rods/sheets and magnetocaloric material, and heat exchange mechanism at the heat source/sink. This paper provides an overview of the design for a fully solid state magnetocaloric refrigeration system along with guidelines for their optimal design.

  15. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  16. Using Active Learning Strategies to Present Bloodborne Pathogen Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Leslie; Weaver, Mary G.

    2003-01-01

    Every year, school nurses have the responsibility for developing and presenting a bloodborne pathogen presentation to the education and clerical staff of their buildings. Although the information is similar from year to year, the manner in which the information is presented can be altered. Teachers are using active learning strategies in a variety…

  17. Pharmaceutical gel analysis by NIR spectroscopy. Determination of the active principle and low concentration of preservatives.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; Alcalá, M; Bautista, M

    2008-04-23

    Near infrared spectroscopy has proved highly suitable for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations. However, its limited sensitivity can severely restrict its scope of application. In this work, we determine the active principle and two preservatives in a pharmaceutical preparation available as a hydrogel. The matrix of the pharmaceutical preparation exhibits strong absorption in the NIR spectral region; also, the two preservatives (parabens) are very similar in chemical and spectral terms, and present at low concentrations in the pharmaceutical. These complications make it rather difficult to accurately quantify the active principle and the preservatives, which can only be accomplished by using an effective design in order to prepare the samples to be included in the calibration set and select the optimum spectral range for measuring each analyte. The evaporation of solvents during the measurement process produces increasing errors related with sample's air exposition; the introductions of new samples with a wider range of the volatile components correct this effect. An ANOVA of the predictions obtained with the new models shows that correct the error due to evaporation. The proposed method was validated for the analytical control of the studied preparation.

  18. Principles of antibody-mediated TNF receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Wajant, H

    2015-01-01

    From the beginning of research on receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), agonistic antibodies have been used to stimulate TNFRSF receptors in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, CD95, one of the first cloned TNFRSF receptors, was solely identified as the target of cell death-inducing antibodies. Early on, it became evident from in vitro studies that valency and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding of antibodies targeting TNFRSF receptors can be of crucial relevance for agonistic activity. TNFRSF receptor-specific antibodies of the IgM subclass and secondary cross-linked or aggregation prone dimeric antibodies typically display superior agonistic activity compared with dimeric antibodies. Likewise, anchoring of antibodies to cell surface-expressed FcγRs potentiate their ability to trigger TNFRSF receptor signaling. However, only recently has the relevance of oligomerization and FcγR binding for the in vivo activity of antibody-induced TNFRSF receptor activation been straightforwardly demonstrated in vivo. This review discusses the crucial role of oligomerization and/or FcγR binding for antibody-mediated TNFRSF receptor stimulation in light of current models of TNFRSF receptor activation and especially the overwhelming relevance of these issues for the rational development of therapeutic TNFRSF receptor-targeting antibodies. PMID:26292758

  19. Major Pesticides Are More Toxic to Human Cells Than Their Declared Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides are used throughout the world as mixtures called formulations. They contain adjuvants, which are often kept confidential and are called inerts by the manufacturing companies, plus a declared active principle, which is usually tested alone. We tested the toxicity of 9 pesticides, comparing active principles and their formulations, on three human cell lines (HepG2, HEK293, and JEG3). Glyphosate, isoproturon, fluroxypyr, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole, and prochloraz constitute, respectively, the active principles of 3 major herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 3 fungicides. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. Fungicides were the most toxic from concentrations 300–600 times lower than agricultural dilutions, followed by herbicides and then insecticides, with very similar profiles in all cell types. Despite its relatively benign reputation, Roundup was among the most toxic herbicides and insecticides tested. Most importantly, 8 formulations out of 9 were up to one thousand times more toxic than their active principles. Our results challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake for pesticides because this norm is calculated from the toxicity of the active principle alone. Chronic tests on pesticides may not reflect relevant environmental exposures if only one ingredient of these mixtures is tested alone. PMID:24719846

  20. Oncogenic and tumor-promoting Spermatophytes and Pteridophytes and their active principles.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, N R; Bingel, A S; Fong, H H; Saleh, A A; Christenson, G M; Saufferer, S M

    1976-08-01

    A survey and discussion are presented of plants classified as Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta, extracts of which have been shown to be oncogenic or tumor-promoting in animals. The active oncogenic and tumor-promoting principles, where known, have been identified. They represent tannins; pyrrolizidine, indole, tropolone, quinoline, purine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids; nitroso compounds; triterpene glycosides; lignans; isoflavans; allyl benzenoids; simple (nu-pyrenes; and carbocyclic hydroxy acids. A total of 28 compounds of known structure have been identified as oncogens and several phorbol esters as tumor-promoters. Plants known to contain any of the 28 oncogens (excluding shikimic acid and caffeine) have been tabulated; they represent at least 454 species, 110 genera, and 34 families of Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta.

  1. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., the registrant's present activities, such as the number of wells in the process of being drilled... files the document as reasonably possible. (c) Include only those wells in the process of being drilled... ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Disclosure by Registrants Engaged in Oil...

  2. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds Present in Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds. PMID:20386648

  3. Ascaridole as a pharmacologically active principle of "Paico," a medicinal Peruvian plant.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, E; Umeyama, K; Saito, Y; Yamazaki, M; Satake, M

    1993-07-01

    "Paico," Chenopodium ambrosioides L., is a traditional Peruvian medicine which is considered to be nervine, antirheumatic, anthelmintic, etc. An attempt was made to isolate the component having sedative and/or analgesic properties from "Paico" and "Aritasou" (the Japanese name for C. ambrosioides). Ascaridole was identified as the active principle in both materials.

  4. Ascaridole as a pharmacologically active principle of "Paico," a medicinal Peruvian plant.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, E; Umeyama, K; Saito, Y; Yamazaki, M; Satake, M

    1993-07-01

    "Paico," Chenopodium ambrosioides L., is a traditional Peruvian medicine which is considered to be nervine, antirheumatic, anthelmintic, etc. An attempt was made to isolate the component having sedative and/or analgesic properties from "Paico" and "Aritasou" (the Japanese name for C. ambrosioides). Ascaridole was identified as the active principle in both materials. PMID:8374999

  5. Scaffolded Active Learning: Nine Pedagogical Principles for Building a Modern Veterinary Curriculum.

    PubMed

    May, Stephen A; Silva-Fletcher, Ayona

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary discipline experts unfamiliar with the broader educational literature can find the adoption of an evidence-based approach to curriculum development challenging. However, greater societal and professional demands for achieving and verifying Day One knowledge and skills, together with continued progress in information generation and technology, make it all the more important that the defined period for initial professional training be well used. This article presents and discusses nine pedagogical principles that have been used in modern curricular development in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States: (1) outcomes-based curriculum design; (2) valid and reliable assessments; (3) active learning; (4) integrated knowledge for action; (5) tightly controlled core curriculum; (6) "just-in-time" rather than "just-in-case" knowledge; (7) vertical integration, the spiral curriculum, and sequential skills development; (8) learning skills support; and (9) bridges from classroom to workplace. Crucial to effective educational progress is active learning that embraces the skills required by the modern professional, made possible by tight control of curricular content. In this information age, professionals' ability to source information on a "just-in-time" basis to support high quality reasoning and decision making is far more important than the memorization of large bodies of increasingly redundant information on a "just-in-case" basis. It is important that those with responsibility for veterinary curriculum design ensure that their programs fully equip the modern veterinary professional for confident entry into the variety of roles in which society needs their skills. PMID:26421513

  6. Scaffolded Active Learning: Nine Pedagogical Principles for Building a Modern Veterinary Curriculum.

    PubMed

    May, Stephen A; Silva-Fletcher, Ayona

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary discipline experts unfamiliar with the broader educational literature can find the adoption of an evidence-based approach to curriculum development challenging. However, greater societal and professional demands for achieving and verifying Day One knowledge and skills, together with continued progress in information generation and technology, make it all the more important that the defined period for initial professional training be well used. This article presents and discusses nine pedagogical principles that have been used in modern curricular development in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States: (1) outcomes-based curriculum design; (2) valid and reliable assessments; (3) active learning; (4) integrated knowledge for action; (5) tightly controlled core curriculum; (6) "just-in-time" rather than "just-in-case" knowledge; (7) vertical integration, the spiral curriculum, and sequential skills development; (8) learning skills support; and (9) bridges from classroom to workplace. Crucial to effective educational progress is active learning that embraces the skills required by the modern professional, made possible by tight control of curricular content. In this information age, professionals' ability to source information on a "just-in-time" basis to support high quality reasoning and decision making is far more important than the memorization of large bodies of increasingly redundant information on a "just-in-case" basis. It is important that those with responsibility for veterinary curriculum design ensure that their programs fully equip the modern veterinary professional for confident entry into the variety of roles in which society needs their skills.

  7. Estimation of specific activity of 177Lu by 'saturation assay' principle using DOTA as ligand.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ambikalmajan M R; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Das, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium-177 is a widely used therapeutic radionuclide in targeted therapy and it is important to know its specific activity at the time of radiopharmaceutical preparation, especially for radiolabeling peptides. However, there are no direct methods for the experimental determination of the specific activity which can be readily applied in a hospital radiopharmacy. A new technique based on the 'saturation assay' principle using DOTA as the binding agent for the estimation of specific activity of (177)Lu is reported. The studies demonstrate the proof of principle of this new assay technique. The method is general and can be modified and applied for the estimation of specific activity of other metallic radionuclides by using DOTA or other suitable chelating agents.

  8. [The holographic principle of the systemic organization of vital activity processes].

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    1997-01-01

    Holographic properties of vital activities are considered. The holographic properties are shown to reveal itselves in functional systems of different levels of organization. Separate elements from different functional systems reflect the condition of final useful results in their rhythmical activities. The interaction of leading motivation and reinforcement proceeds according to holographic principle. Holographic homology is revealed in systemic interactions of individuals with environments and in systemic populations' organizations with environment.

  9. Ethoxylated adjuvants of glyphosate-based herbicides are active principles of human cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, R; Bernay, B; Séralini, G-E

    2013-11-16

    Pesticides are always used in formulations as mixtures of an active principle with adjuvants. Glyphosate, the active ingredient of the major pesticide in the world, is an herbicide supposed to be specific on plant metabolism. Its adjuvants are generally considered as inert diluents. Since side effects for all these compounds have been claimed, we studied potential active principles for toxicity on human cells for 9 glyphosate-based formulations. For this we detailed their compositions and toxicities, and as controls we used a major adjuvant (the polyethoxylated tallowamine POE-15), glyphosate alone, and a total formulation without glyphosate. This was performed after 24h exposures on hepatic (HepG2), embryonic (HEK293) and placental (JEG3) cell lines. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. The compositions in adjuvants were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Here we demonstrate that all formulations are more toxic than glyphosate, and we separated experimentally three groups of formulations differentially toxic according to their concentrations in ethoxylated adjuvants. Among them, POE-15 clearly appears to be the most toxic principle against human cells, even if others are not excluded. It begins to be active with negative dose-dependent effects on cellular respiration and membrane integrity between 1 and 3ppm, at environmental/occupational doses. We demonstrate in addition that POE-15 induces necrosis when its first micellization process occurs, by contrast to glyphosate which is known to promote endocrine disrupting effects after entering cells. Altogether, these results challenge the establishment of guidance values such as the acceptable daily intake of glyphosate, when these are mostly based on a long term in vivo test of glyphosate alone. Since pesticides are always used with adjuvants that could change their toxicity, the necessity to assess their whole formulations as mixtures becomes obvious. This challenges

  10. Ethoxylated adjuvants of glyphosate-based herbicides are active principles of human cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, R; Bernay, B; Séralini, G-E

    2013-11-16

    Pesticides are always used in formulations as mixtures of an active principle with adjuvants. Glyphosate, the active ingredient of the major pesticide in the world, is an herbicide supposed to be specific on plant metabolism. Its adjuvants are generally considered as inert diluents. Since side effects for all these compounds have been claimed, we studied potential active principles for toxicity on human cells for 9 glyphosate-based formulations. For this we detailed their compositions and toxicities, and as controls we used a major adjuvant (the polyethoxylated tallowamine POE-15), glyphosate alone, and a total formulation without glyphosate. This was performed after 24h exposures on hepatic (HepG2), embryonic (HEK293) and placental (JEG3) cell lines. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. The compositions in adjuvants were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Here we demonstrate that all formulations are more toxic than glyphosate, and we separated experimentally three groups of formulations differentially toxic according to their concentrations in ethoxylated adjuvants. Among them, POE-15 clearly appears to be the most toxic principle against human cells, even if others are not excluded. It begins to be active with negative dose-dependent effects on cellular respiration and membrane integrity between 1 and 3ppm, at environmental/occupational doses. We demonstrate in addition that POE-15 induces necrosis when its first micellization process occurs, by contrast to glyphosate which is known to promote endocrine disrupting effects after entering cells. Altogether, these results challenge the establishment of guidance values such as the acceptable daily intake of glyphosate, when these are mostly based on a long term in vivo test of glyphosate alone. Since pesticides are always used with adjuvants that could change their toxicity, the necessity to assess their whole formulations as mixtures becomes obvious. This challenges

  11. Taiwan's cooperative space activities at present and in future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Wing-Huen

    2004-01-01

    Taiwan is developing a long-term space program which is entering its next 15 years of planning cycle. Since its establishment in 1992, the National Space Program Office has played a key role in introducing satellite technology and space experiments into Taiwan. In parallel, basic research in space science and remote-sensing observations are being promoted in different institutions. A combination of these efforts has earned Taiwan a compact but effective space program capable of mounting satellite missions and advanced study in various disciplines of space science. The satellite data receiving and data processing facilities are particularly valuable in addressing issues related to environmental protection, natural hazards and economic planning. At the present time, Taiwan's international cooperative space activities are still very limited in scope but there is a wide ranging of possibilities which could be pursued together with other developing nations in space research under the auspice of COSPAR.

  12. Euphorbium: modern research on its active principle, resiniferatoxin, revives an ancient medicine.

    PubMed

    Appendino, G; Szallasi, A

    1997-01-01

    Resiniferatoxin, an ultrapotent capsaicin analog present in the latex of Euphorbia resinifera, interacts at a specific membrane recognition site (referred to as the vanilloid receptor), expressed by primary sensory neurons mediating pain perception as well as neurogenic inflammation. Desensitization to resiniferatoxin is a promising approach to mitigate neuropathic pain and other pathological conditions in which sensory neuropeptides released from capsaicin-sensitive neurons play a crucial role. Clinical trials to evaluate the potential of topical resiniferatoxin treatment to relieve pain associated with diabetic polyneuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia are in progress. Though resiniferatoxin was isolated only two decades ago, the dried latex of Euphorbia resinifera, called Euphorbium, has been in medicinal use since the time of recorded history. This review highlights the most important events in the history of this ancient medicine, from the first written record of the therapeutic potential of Euphorbium (at the time of the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus) to the identification of its active principle as resiniferatoxin in 1975. A brief overview of the enormous contribution of resiniferatoxin to our current understanding of the anatomical localization, function, and pharmacology of vanilloid receptors is provided. Lastly, the mechanisms are summarized by which capsaicin and resiniferatoxin, despite sharing receptors, may have dissimilar biological actions.

  13. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  14. Present Day Activity of South Polar Gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, J.; Reiss, D.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Here we report on clearly identified seasonal changes of gullies observed within the last two martian years (MY) on slopes of a south polar pit, which is located in a filled crater (diameter ~54 km) north of Sisyphi Cavi at ~68.5°S and ~1.5°E. Using new high-resolution imaging (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, HiRISE), temperature (Thermal Emission Spectrometer, TES) and spectral data (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, CRISM; Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité, OMEGA), we analyzed the exact timing of changes of gullies and detect the possible medium (CO2, H2O or dry) and mechanism which initiate present day gully activity. Two locations in the study region with clear modifications of gullies were identified in MY 29 between LS 226° and LS 247° and between LS 209° and LS 247°. In MY 30 changes occur in both locations between LS 218° and LS 249°. Modifications are the formation of a new small apron and new deposits within the channel, both associated with the deposition of dark material. Erosion in gully alcoves or channels was not observed. TES data show temperatures between ~180 and ~240 K within the period of gully modifications. Maximum temperatures in the region rise up to ~285 K between LS ~270° and ~310°. Spectral data show a CO2-cover of the study region until LS 227°. CO2-ice free surface are spectrally observed for the first time at LS 249°. H2O was not spectrally detected in the study region and a mixture of CO2 and H2O as presented in [1] cannot be clearly detected. Unfortunately, there are no spectral data available between LS 227° and 249°. Modifications of gullies imply seasonal volatile activity. The activity can be narrowed down to occur between LS 226° and 247° at mean temperatures between ~180 and ~240 K. This is in the range of temperatures where CO2 sublimates back into the atmosphere. Based on the temperature range, the most likely candidate for the observed new

  15. Photovoltaic Reliability Group activities in USA and Brazil (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Cruz, Leila R. O.

    2015-09-01

    Recently prices of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been reduced considerably and may continue to be reduced making them attractive. If these systems provide electricity over the stipulated warranty period, it would be possible attain socket parity within the next few years. Current photovoltaic module qualifications tests help in minimizing infant mortality but do not guarantee useful lifetime over the warranty period. The PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) is trying to formulate accelerated tests that will be useful towards achieving the ultimate goal of assuring useful lifetime over the warranty period as well as to assure manufacturing quality. Unfortunately, assuring the manufacturing quality may require 24/7 presence. Alternatively, collecting data on the performance of fielded systems would assist in assuring manufacturing quality. Here PV systems installed by home-owners and small businesses can constitute as an important untapped source of data. The volunteer group, PV - Reliable, Safe and Sustainable Quality! (PVRessQ!) is providing valuable service to small PV system owners. Photovoltaic Reliability Group (PVRG) is initiating activities in USA and Brazil to assist home owners and small businesses in monitoring photovoltaic (PV) module performance and enforcing warranty. It will work in collaboration with small PV system owners, consumer protection agencies. Brazil is endowed with excellent solar irradiance making it attractive for installation of PV systems. Participating owners of small PV systems would instruct inverter manufacturers to copy the daily e-mails to PVRG and as necessary, will authorize the PVRG to carry out review of PV systems. The presentation will consist of overall activities of PVRG in USA and Brazil.

  16. A. A. Ukhtomskii's dominance principle of brain activity in the perception of electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, Yu. A.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary instruction of the subject plays an important role in the perception of weak electromagnetic fields acting on the hand. Active attention to a potential effect amplifies a brain state that can be called caution dominance and arises spontaneously with a “placebo” or an electromagnetic field. The radar principle of brain operation is discussed among the physiological mechanisms through which electromagnetic fields act on an organism.

  17. A. A. Ukhtomskii`s dominance principle of brain activity in the perception of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodov, Yu.A.

    1994-07-01

    Preliminary instruction of the subject plays an important role in the perception of weak electromagnetic fields acting on the hand. Active attention to a potential effect amplifies a brain state that can be called caution dominance and arises spontaneously with a {open_quotes}placebo{close_quotes} or an electromagnetic field. The radar principle of brain operation is discussed among the physiological mechanisms through which electromagnetic fields act on an organism.

  18. In vivo anthelmintic activity of Carex baccans and its active principle resveratrol against Hymenolepis diminuta.

    PubMed

    Giri, Bikash Ranjan; Bharti, Ravi Rao; Roy, Bishnupada

    2015-02-01

    Anthelmintic resistance against most of the commercial drugs is a great threat to humans as well as the veterinary live stocks. Hence, new treatment strategies to control helminth infections are essential at this hour. Carex baccans Nees has been traditionally used by Jaintia tribes in Northeast India to get rid of intestinal worm infections. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate in vivo cestocidal activity of root tuber extract of C. baccans and its active component resveratrol against the zoonotic cestode Hymenolepis diminuta in the experimental model rat. The cestocidal activity was determined by monitoring the eggs per gram (EPG) counts in faeces of different treated groups. The result showed that the highest dose of the plant extract (50 mg/kg) and resveratrol (4.564 mg/kg body weight) has significant anthelmintic efficacy against H. diminuta. Crude extract of the plant as well as resveratrol reduced EPG count (56.012 and 46.049 %) and also resulted in decreased worm burden by 44.287 and 31.034 %, respectively. The efficacy of the crude extract and resveratrol can be compared to the reference drug praziquantel. The results exhibits considerable cestocidal potential of root tuber crude extract of C. baccans and resveratrol and justify its folklore use.

  19. Principles for microscale separations based on redox-active surfactants and electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Rosslee, C A; Abbott, N L

    2001-10-15

    We report principles for microscale separations based on selective solubilization and deposition of sparingly water-soluble compounds by an aqueous solution of a redox-active surfactant. The surfactant, (11-ferrocenylundecyl)trimethylammonium bromide, undergoes a reversible change in micellization upon oxidation or reduction. This change in aggregation is exploited in a general scheme in which micelles of reduced surfactant are formed and then put in contact with a mixture of hydrophobic compounds leading to selective solubilization of the compounds. The micelles are then electrochemically disrupted, leading to the selective deposition of their contents. We measured the selectivity of the solubilization and deposition processes using mixtures of two model drug-like compounds, o-tolueneazo-beta-naphthol (I) and 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (II). By repeatedly solubilizing and depositing a mixture that initially contained equal mole fractions of each compound, we demonstrate formation of a product that contains 98.4% of I after six cycles. Because the aggregation states of redox-active surfactants are easily controlled within simple microfabricated structures, including structures that define small stationary volumes (e.g., wells of a microtiter plate) or flowing volumes of liquids (e.g., microfabricated channels), we believe these principles may be useful for the purification or analysis of compounds in microscale chemical process systems. When used for purification, these principles provide separation of surfactant and product.

  20. Scale-free brain activity: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    He, Biyu J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity observed at many spatiotemporal scales exhibits a 1/f-like power spectrum, including neuronal membrane potentials, neural field potentials, noninvasive electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. A 1/f-like power spectrum is indicative of arrhythmic brain activity that does not contain a predominant temporal scale (hence, “scale-free”). This characteristic of scale-free brain activity distinguishes it from brain oscillations. While scale-free brain activity and brain oscillations coexist, our understanding of the former remains very limited. Recent research has shed light on the spatiotemporal organization, functional significance and potential generative mechanisms of scale-free brain activity, as well as its developmental and clinical relevance. A deeper understanding of this prevalent brain signal should provide new insights and analytical tools for cognitive neuroscience. PMID:24788139

  1. Scale-free brain activity: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    He, Biyu J

    2014-09-01

    Brain activity observed at many spatiotemporal scales exhibits a 1/f-like power spectrum, including neuronal membrane potentials, neural field potentials, noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals. A 1/f-like power spectrum is indicative of arrhythmic brain activity that does not contain a predominant temporal scale (hence, 'scale-free'). This characteristic of scale-free brain activity distinguishes it from brain oscillations. Although scale-free brain activity and brain oscillations coexist, our understanding of the former remains limited. Recent research has shed light on the spatiotemporal organization, functional significance, and potential generative mechanisms of scale-free brain activity, as well as its developmental and clinical relevance. A deeper understanding of this prevalent brain signal should provide new insights into, and analytical tools for, cognitive neuroscience.

  2. Sangay volcano, Ecuador: structural development, present activity and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzier, Michel; Robin, Claude; Samaniego, Pablo; Hall, Minard L.; Cotten, Jo; Mothes, Patricia; Arnaud, Nicolas

    1999-05-01

    Sangay (5230 m), the southernmost active volcano of the Andean Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ), sits ˜130 km above a >32-Ma-old slab, close to a major tear that separates two distinct subducting oceanic crusts. Southwards, Quaternary volcanism is absent along a 1600-km-long segment of the Andes. Three successive edifices of decreasing volume have formed the Sangay volcanic complex during the last 500 ka. Two former cones (Sangay I and II) have been largely destroyed by sector collapses that resulted in large debris avalanches that flowed out upon the Amazon plain. Sangay III, being constructed within the last avalanche amphitheater, has been active at least since 14 ka BP. Only the largest eruptions with unusually high Plinian columns are likely to represent a major hazard for the inhabited areas located 30 to 100 km west of the volcano. However, given the volcano's relief and unbuttressed eastern side, a future collapse must be considered, that would seriously affect an area of present-day colonization in the Amazon plain, ˜30 km east of the summit. Andesites greatly predominate at Sangay, there being few dacites and basalts. In order to explain the unusual characteristics of the Sangay suite—highest content of incompatible elements (except Y and HREE) of any NVZ suite, low Y and HREE values in the andesites and dacites, and high Nb/La of the only basalt found—a preliminary five-step model is proposed: (1) an enriched mantle (in comparison with an MORB source), or maybe a variably enriched mantle, at the site of the Sangay, prior to Quaternary volcanism; (2) metasomatism of this mantle by important volumes of slab-derived fluids enriched in soluble incompatible elements, due to the subduction of major oceanic fracture zones; (3) partial melting of this metasomatized mantle and generation of primitive basaltic melts with Nb/La values typical of the NVZ, which are parental to the entire Sangay suite but apparently never reach the surface and subordinate

  3. A Cu-amyloid β complex activating Fenton chemistry in Alzheimer's disease: Learning with multiple first-principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Amyloid β peptides form complexes with copper, both in vitro and in vivo, relatively soluble in water as oligomers and active as catalysts for oxidation of organic substrates by hydrogen peroxide, a species always present in cells and in their aerobic environment. All these species are present in the synapse, thus making a connection between the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the oxidative damages by reactive oxygen species in neurons, when pathological dishomeostasis of amyloid peptides and metal ions occur. In order to understand the structural features of these toxic complexes, we built several models of Cu-Aβ peptides in monomeric and dimeric forms and we found, performing multiple first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, that Cu-induced dimers are more active than monomers in converting hydrogen peroxide into aggressive hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Fractions of aqueous and methanolic extracts from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) present platelet antiaggregant activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduado J; Astudillo, Luis A; Gutiérrez, Margarita I; Contreras, Samuel O; Bustamante, Luis O; Rubio, Pia I; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Alarcón, Marcelo A; Fuentes, Jaime A; González, Daniel E; Palomo, Iván F

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Its prevention emphasizes three aspects: not smoking, physical activity and a healthy diet. Recently, we screened the antithrombotic activity of a selected group of fruits and vegetables. Among them, tomato showed an important effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the platelet antiaggregatory activity of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). For this, we obtained aqueous and methanolic tomato extracts and evaluated the effect of pH (2 and 10) and temperature (22, 60 and 100°C) on this activity. Furthermore, in order to isolate the antiaggregant principle, we separated tomato extracts into several fractions (A-D) by size exclusion chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the platelet antiaggregating activity ex vivo in Wistar rats. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of tomato treated at 22, 60 and 100°C and pH 2 and 10 still inhibited platelet aggregation (in vitro). Moreover, it was noted that one of the fractions (fraction C), from both aqueous and methanolic extracts, presented the highest activity (∼70% inhibition of platelet aggregation) and concentration dependently inhibited platelet aggregation significantly compared with control (P < 0.05). These fractions did not contain lycopene but presented two peaks of absorption, at 210 and 261 nm, compatible with the presence of nucleosides. In rats treated with tomato macerates, a mild platelet antiaggregating effect ex vivo was observed. Further studies are required to identify the molecules with platelet antiaggregating activity and antiplatelet mechanisms of action. PMID:22185934

  5. Reverse engineering and verification of gene networks: principles, assumptions, and limitations of present methods and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Balling, Rudi; Zeng, An-Ping

    2009-11-01

    Reverse engineering of gene networks aims at revealing the structure of the gene regulation network in a biological system by reasoning backward directly from experimental data. Many methods have recently been proposed for reverse engineering of gene networks by using gene transcript expression data measured by microarray. Whereas the potentials of the methods have been well demonstrated, the assumptions and limitations behind them are often not clearly stated or not well understood. In this review, we first briefly explain the principles of the major methods, identify the assumptions behind them and pinpoint the limitations and possible pitfalls in applying them to real biological questions. With regard to applications, we then discuss challenges in the experimental verification of gene networks generated from reverse engineering methods. We further propose an optimal experimental design for allocating sampling schedule and possible strategies for reducing the limitations of some of the current reverse engineering methods. Finally, we examine the perspectives for the development of reverse engineering and urge the need to move from revealing network structure to the dynamics of biological systems.

  6. Supporting Teachers in Designing CSCL Activities: A Case Study of Principle-Based Pedagogical Patterns in Networked Second Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Yun; Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the identification and use of principle-based pedagogical patterns to help teachers to translate design principles into actionable teaching activities, and to scaffold student learning with sufficient flexibility and creativity. A set of pedagogical patterns for networked Second language (L2) learning, categorized and…

  7. Enhanced diffusion, chemotaxis, and pumping by active enzymes: progress toward an organizing principle of molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2014-12-23

    Active enzymes diffuse more rapidly than inactive enzymes. This phenomenon may be due to catalysis-driven conformational changes that result in "swimming" through the aqueous solution. Recent additional work has demonstrated that active enzymes can undergo chemotaxis toward regions of high substrate concentration, whereas inactive enzymes do not, and, further, that active enzymes immobilized at surfaces can directionally pump liquids. In this Perspective, I will discuss these phenomena in light of Purcell's work on directed motion at low Reynold's number and in the context of microscopic reversibility. The conclusions suggest that a deep understanding of catalytically driven enhanced diffusion of enzymes and related phenomena can lead toward a general organizing principle for the design, characterization, and operation of molecular machines.

  8. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  9. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dwight J; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual's VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity, and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change-detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); and similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM.

  10. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dwight J; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual's VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity, and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change-detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); and similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM. PMID:26018644

  11. Activities at Fermilab related to collider present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderre, G. P.; Holt, J.

    1992-11-01

    The long-range Fermilab program requires fully capitalizing on the world's highest energy accelerator, the Tevatron, throughout the decade of the 90's. The program calls for increasing the collider luminosity with each successive run until peak luminosities of ≳5×1031 cm-2 s-1 and integrated luminosities of ≳100 pb-1 per run are achieved, effectively doubling the mass range accessible for discovery. If the quark lies at the upper range of the mass of the Tevatron, then increasing the energy of the collider operation could prove to be a crucial factor in the future program as well. In order to achieve these goals, we present a highly challenging upgrade of the present accelerator complex, called Fermilab III. In order to increase this performance level by a factor of 50, many changes are needed. Such a plan, of necessity, has modifications in almost all areas of the accelerator as the present system is reasonably optimized. (AIP)

  12. Present and Future Activities on Neutron Imaging in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglione, Aureliano; Blostein, Jerónimo; Cantargi, Florencia; Marín, Julio; Baruj, Alberto; Meyer, Gabriel; Santisteban, Javier; Sánchez, Fernando

    We present here a short review of the main work which has been done in the latest years in neutron imaging in Argentina, and the future plans for the development of this technique in the country, mainly focused in the design of a new neutron imaging instrument to be installed in the future research reactor RA10. We present here the results of the implementation of the technique in samples belonging to the Argentinean cultural heritage and experiments related with hydrogen storage. At the same time, the Argentinean RA10 project for the design and construction of a 30 MW multipurpose research reactor is rapidly progressing. It started to be designed by the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the technology company INVAP SE, both from Argentina, in June 2010. The construction will start in the beginning of 2015 in the Ezeiza Atomic Center, at 36 km from Buenos Aires City, and is expected to be finished by 2020. One of the main aims of the project is to offer to the Argentinean scientific and technology system new capabilities based on neutron techniques. We present here the conceptual design of a neutron imaging facility which will use one of the cold neutron beams, and will be installed in the reactor hall. Preliminary simulation results show that at the farthest detection position, at about 17 m from the cold source, a uniform neutron beam on a detection screen with an intensity of about 108 n/cm2/s is expected.

  13. The Non-Discrimination Principle and American Higher Education: Judicial Failure to Recognize the Present Effects of Past Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that any approach to the issue of access to higher education in the United Kingdom not view the approach of the United States in the recent University of Michigan cases as providing appropriate guidance. It is the author's assertion that the United States Supreme Court has failed to recognize the present effects of a long…

  14. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  15. Principle Component Analysis of Birkeland Currents Determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principle Component Analysis is performed on northern and southern hemisphere Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). PCA identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The region 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly-reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns. Other interhemispheric differences are discussed.

  16. [Ethical and legal principles for the activities of bioprospection in relation to human beings and the human genome].

    PubMed

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2012-01-01

    During recent decades, bioprospecting has become an important field of research, which looks for development alternatives, entry into global (environmental) markets, and the subsequent obtention of benefits under sustainable development principles. However, there is still so much to discuss regarding the social and environmental impacts produced by this activity, as well as its main limitations. To this end, the Forum/round-table discussion, entitled "Bioprospección, Etica y Sociedad" was organised to take place on 28 March 2012 at the National University of Colombia. Its main objective was to enrich our knowledge on bioprospecting considering the ethical considerations that involve society. The presentation given by Professor ROMEO CASABONA, regarding the connection between bioprospecting and the human genome deserves special attention and is presented below.

  17. Principled Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John; Swaffield, Sue; Frost, David

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the "Carpe Vitam: Leadership for Learning" project, accounting for its provenance and purposes, before focusing on the principles for practice that constitute an important part of the project's legacy. These principles framed the dialogic process that was a dominant feature of the project and are presented,…

  18. BNL Activities in Advanced Neutron Source Development: Past and Present

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Ludewig, H.; Montanez, P.; Todosow, M.; Smith, G.C.; Larese, J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In this report we discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  19. BNL ACTIVITIES IN ADVANCED NEUTRON SOURCE DEVELOPMENT: PAST AND PRESENT

    SciTech Connect

    HASTINGS,J.B.; LUDEWIG,H.; MONTANEZ,P.; TODOSOW,M.; SMITH,G.C.; LARESE,J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In the sections below the authors discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  20. Present status of some technological activities supporting the MOLCARE project

    SciTech Connect

    Torazza, A.; Rocchini, G.; Scagliotti, M.

    1996-12-31

    The development of MCFC stack technology is carried out at Ansaldo Ricerche in the framework of the MOLCARE project, a cooperation with Spanish companies under a partial UE funding, while a specific research program concerning the physico-chemical characterization of materials is performed jointly by CISE and ENEL. The project includes the development, the construction and the testing of a full scale 100 kW prototype, the assessment of stack technology on subscale stacks, the mathematical modelling of the MCFC based plants and the basic researches. The aim of the basic researches, carried out on single cells, is to improve the effectiveness and durability of both the active and the hardware materials. The Ansaldo stack technology is based on external manifolding. The full scale 100 kW prototype will be integrated with the sensible heat reformer and other ancillary equipments according to the {open_quote}Compact Unit (CU){close_quotes} concept. These technical choices stress requirements for manifold gasket configuration. electrolyte migration control, {Delta}p management and porous component compaction.

  1. Forecasting the Peak of the Present Solar Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Rabab; Marzouk, Beshir

    2016-07-01

    Solar forecasting of the level of sun Activity is very important subject for all space programs. Most predictions are based on the physical conditions prevailing at or before the solar cycle minimum preceding the maximum in question. Our aim is to predict the maximum peak of cycle 24 using precursor techniques in particular those using spotless event, geomagnetic aa min. index and solar flux F10.7. Also prediction of exact date of the maximum (Tr) is taken in consideration. A study of variation over previous spotless event for cycles 7-23 and that for even cycles (8-22) are carried out for the prediction. Linear correlation between RM and spotless event around the preceding minimum gives RM24t = 101.9with rise time Tr = 4.5 Y. For the even cycles RM24e = 108.3 with rise time Tr = 3.9 Y. Based on the average aa min. index for the year of sunspot minimum cycles (13 - 23), we estimate the expected amplitude for cycle 24 to be RMaa = 116.5 for both the total and even cycles. Application of the data of solar flux F10.7 which cover only cycles (19-23) was taken in consideration and gives predicted maximum amplitude R24 10.7 = 146, which are over estimation. Our result indicating a somewhat weaker cycle 24 as compared to cycles 21-23.

  2. Determination of antioxidant activity of spices and their active principles by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alberto; Ruiz Montoya, Mercedes; Arteaga, Jesús F; Rodríguez Mellado, Jose M

    2014-01-22

    The anodic oxidation of mercury in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to determine the antioxidant (AO) character of radical scavengers. Hydroperoxide radical is formed at the potentials of the oxidation peak on mercury electrodes, such radical reacting with the antioxidants in different extension. The parameter C10 (antioxidant concentration at which the peak area decreases by 10%) is used to measure the scavenging activity of the individual antioxidants. To establish the scavenging activity of antioxidant mixtures as a whole, the parameter, μ10 as the reverse of V10, V10 being the volume necessary to decrease the peak area in DPV by 10%, was selected. Higher μ10 values correspond to higher scavenging activity. The studies have been extended to aqueous extracts of some species. The results may be useful in explaining the effect of spices in vitro and in vivo studies.

  3. Present-day aeolian activity in Herschel Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, Marco; Silvestro, Simone; Vaz, David A.; Michaels, Timothy; Bourke, Mary C.; Komatsu, Goro; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    In this report, we show evidence for ripple and dune migration in Herschel Crater on Mars. We estimate an average dune migration of 0.8 m and a minimum ripple migration of 1.1 m in a time span of 3.7 Earth-years. These dunes and ripples are mainly shaped by prevailing winds coming from the north, however we also report the presence of secondary winds which elongate the barchans' horns. Such a complex wind scenario is likely caused by the influence of winds blowing off the western crater rim as suggested by the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS), an atmospheric mesoscale model. A multi-directional wind regime at the local scale is also supported by the observed bimodal distribution of the ripple trends. For the first time, a survey integrating the assessment of dune and ripple migration is presented, showing how dune topography can influence the migration patterns of ripples and how underlying topography appears to control the rates of dune migration.

  4. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells. PMID:16216483

  5. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells.

  6. Three-year-olds obey the sample size principle of induction: the influence of evidence presentation and sample size disparity on young children's generalizations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Chris A

    2014-07-01

    Three experiments with 81 3-year-olds (M=3.62years) examined the conditions that enable young children to use the sample size principle (SSP) of induction-the inductive rule that facilitates generalizations from large rather than small samples of evidence. In Experiment 1, children exhibited the SSP when exemplars were presented sequentially but not when exemplars were presented simultaneously. Results from Experiment 3 suggest that the advantage of sequential presentation is not due to the additional time to process the available input from the two samples but instead may be linked to better memory for specific individuals in the large sample. In addition, findings from Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that adherence to the SSP is mediated by the disparity between presented samples. Overall, these results reveal that the SSP appears early in development and is guided by basic cognitive processes triggered during the acquisition of input.

  7. Retrospect and prospect of active principles from Chinese herbs in the treatment of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Huang, Lu-qi; Tang, Xi-can; Zhang, Hai-yan

    2010-01-01

    With an ageing population, dementia has become one of the world's primary health challenges. However, existing remedies offer limited benefits with certain side effects, which has prompted researchers to seek complementary and alternative therapies. China has long been known for abundant usage of various herbs. Some of these herbal decoctions are effective in stimulating blood circulation, supplementing vital energy and resisting aging, the lack of which are believed to underlie dementia. These herbs are regarded as new and promising sources of potential anti-dementia drugs. With the rapid evolution of life science and technology, numerous active components have been identified that are highly potent and multi-targeted with low toxicity, and therefore meet the requirements for dementia therapy. This review updates the research progress of Chinese herbs in the treatment of dementia, focusing on their effective principles. PMID:20523337

  8. Enhanced photoelectrochemical activity for Cu and Ti doped hematite: The first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, X. Y.; Qin, G. W.; Li, S.; Ren, Y. P.; Pei, W. L.; Zuo, L.; Wen, X. H.

    2011-03-14

    To improve photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity of hematite, the modification of energy band by doping 3d transition metal ions Cu and Ti into {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied via the first-principles calculations with density function theory (DFT)+U method. The results show that the band gap of hematite is {approx}2.1 eV and n-type dopant Ti improves the electric conductivity, confirmed by recent experiments. The p-type dopant Cu enhances the utilization ratio of solar energy, shifts both valance, and conduction band edges to a higher energy level, satisfying hydrogen production in the visible light driven PEC water splitting without voltage bias.

  9. Increasing physical activity levels in primary school physical education: The SHARP Principles Model

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Emma; Woodfield, Lorayne A.; Nevill, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year teaching intervention to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during primary school physical education (PE). Methods: A quasi-experimental, non-equivalent group design involving four classes from two primary schools in the West Midlands, UK. In March 2014 schools were selected through purposive sampling to match schools in terms of size and demographics (baseline, n = 111: post-intervention, n = 95); data were collected from children in school years 3 and 4 (aged 7 to 9 years). The intervention involved developing teacher effectiveness through the SHARP Principles Model which was grounded in the Self Determination Theory (SDT), the Social Ecological Model (SEM) and three key ingredients from the Behaviour Change Taxonomy (BCT). MVPA was assessed at baseline and four weeks post-intervention using the System for Observing Fitness and Instruction Time (SOFIT). Four individual teacher interviews were conducted with the intervention school, to explore teachers' perceptions of the intervention. Results: A two-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) indicated large interaction effect sizes for time spent in MVPA (F(1, 27) = 11.07, p = 0.003, ηp2 = .316) and vigorous activity (VPA) (F = (1,27) = 8.557, p = .007, ηp2 = .263). PA in the intervention school increased significantly whereas in the control school MVPA remained relatively constant and VPA decreased. The qualitative findings revealed two main emergent themes: a paradigm shift and teacher's developing pedagogy. Conclusions: The intervention was effective in increasing MVPA in PE. Recommendations based on this evaluation would be for the SHARP Principles Model to be replicated and evaluated on a wider scale across a variety of contexts. PMID:26844179

  10. Synthesis of analogues of gingerol and shogaol, the active pungent principles from the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale and evaluation of their anti-platelet aggregation effects.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hung-Cheng; Chern, Ching-Yuh; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Wu, You-Cheng; Chan, Yu-Yi; Liao, Yu-Ren; Teng, Che-Ming; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at discovering novel biologically active compounds based on the skeletons of gingerol and shogaol, the pungent principles from the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale. Therefore, eight groups of analogues were synthesized and examined for their inhibitory activities of platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid, collagen, platelet activating factor, and thrombin. Among the tested compounds, [6]-paradol (5b) exhibited the most significant anti-platelet aggregation activity. It was the most potent candidate, which could be used in further investigation to explore new drug leads.

  11. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  12. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  13. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity.

  14. Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients: Prediction of Physical-Chemical Properties from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzano, Loredana

    2013-03-01

    Polymorphism in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) plays a crucial role both for medical and intellectual property concerns but despite ongoing efforts, experimental and computational investigations of the existence and the physical-chemical properties of the same compound in different forms is still an open question.While comparison between computed and experimental values for properties derived from differences between states is often promising (such as bulk modulus), results are disappointing for absolute values (such as density). Quantum mechanical computational methods describe the systems at 0K, experimentally properties are often evaluated at room temperature. Therefore it is not surprising that results determined from first principles dramatically differ from those obtained experimentally. By applying a quantum mechanical periodic approach that takes into account long range London dispersion forces fitted for solid materials, and by imposing different cell volumes corresponding to different thermodynamic conditions, we show how results from calculations at 0K (structures, vibrational spectra, elastic constants) may be compared to experimental values at higher temperatures, helping to foster a stronger linkage between computational and experimental work on systems such as APIs. Where experimental results are not available, our work represents an innovative approach in addressing the properties of APIs. Our results can also serve as foundation for the developing of new force fields to be adopted within a multi-scale computational approach.

  15. Data-Based Active Learning in the Principles of Macroeconomics Course: A Mock FOMC Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Cathleen

    2006-01-01

    The author presents an active-learning exercise for the introductory macroeconomics class in which students participate in a mock Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting. Preparation involves data gathering and writing both a research report and a policy recommendation. An FOMC meeting is simulated in which students give their policy…

  16. Electrostatic Positioning System for a free fall test at drop tower Bremen and an overview of tests for the Weak Equivalence Principle in past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondag, Andrea; Dittus, Hansjörg

    2016-08-01

    The Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) is at the basis of General Relativity - the best theory for gravitation today. It has been and still is tested with different methods and accuracies. In this paper an overview of tests of the Weak Equivalence Principle done in the past, developed in the present and planned for the future is given. The best result up to now is derived from the data of torsion balance experiments by Schlamminger et al. (2008). An intuitive test of the WEP consists of the comparison of the accelerations of two free falling test masses of different composition. This has been carried through by Kuroda & Mio (1989, 1990) with the up to date most precise result for this setup. There is still more potential in this method, especially with a longer free fall time and sensors with a higher resolution. Providing a free fall time of 4.74 s (9.3 s using the catapult) the drop tower of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) at the University of Bremen is a perfect facility for further improvements. In 2001 a free fall experiment with high sensitive SQUID (Superconductive QUantum Interference Device) sensors tested the WEP with an accuracy of 10-7 (Nietzsche, 2001). For optimal conditions one could reach an accuracy of 10-13 with this setup (Vodel et al., 2001). A description of this experiment and its results is given in the next part of this paper. For the free fall of macroscopic test masses it is important to start with precisely defined starting conditions concerning the positions and velocities of the test masses. An Electrostatic Positioning System (EPS) has been developed to this purpose. It is described in the last part of this paper.

  17. LC-MS Guided Isolation of Bioactive Principles from Iris hookeriana and Bioevaluation of Isolates for Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities.

    PubMed

    Dar, B A; Lone, S H; Shah, W A; Bhat, K A

    2016-08-01

    The genus Iris is diverse both in the abundance of secondary metabolities as well as the biological activities. The rhizomes of Iris hookeriana exhibit significant anthelminthic activity against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. Although Iris hookeriana has been a subject of the study of so many phytochemical studies, yet we report some constituents for the first time from this plant using a different isolation approach. This manuscript presents the isolation, antimicrobial and antioxidant evaluation of bioactive principles from Iris hookeriana. LC-MS guided isolation technique was applied for the separation of target constituents. The isolates were characterised by spectral techniques and subjected to antioxidant evaluation by DPPH assay. Four compounds; resveratrol, resveratroloside, junipeginin C and isorhamnetin-3-O-neohesperidoside were isolated for the first time along with 3 known compounds viz piceid, irigenin and iridin from I. hookeriana using this approach. The antioxidant activity screening of the isolates revealed that all the 4 constituents isolated for the first time, have strong antioxidant potential with IC50 of 14.0 µg/ml (resveratroloside), 19.7 µg/ml (junipeginen C), 12.8 µg/ml (resveratrol) and 19.8 µg/ml (isorhamnetin-3-O-neohesperodoside). So it can be safely concluded that LC-MS guided isolation of chemical compounds from Iris hookeriana has furnished 4 antioxidant constituents. Thus Iris hookeriana can act as as a good source of wonder molecule resveratrol and its 2 glycosides, resveratrolside and piceid which upon hydrolysis can be converted into the parent drug resveratrol. PMID:27281447

  18. First-principles study of carbon impurities in CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2}, present in non-vacuum synthesis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bekaert, J. Saniz, R.; Partoens, B.; Lamoen, D.

    2015-01-07

    A first-principles study of the structural and electronic properties of carbon impurities in CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} is presented. Carbon is present in organic molecules in the precursor solutions used in non-vacuum growth methods for CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} based photovoltaic cells. These growth methods make more efficient use of material, time, and energy than traditional vacuum methods. The formation energies of several carbon impurities are calculated using the hybrid HSE06 functional. C{sub Cu} acts as a shallow donor, C{sub In} and interstitial C yield deep donor levels in CuInSe{sub 2}, while in CuGaSe{sub 2} C{sub Ga} and interstitial C act as deep amphoteric defects. So, these defects reduce the majority carrier (hole) concentration in p-type CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} by compensating the acceptor levels. The deep defects are likely to act as recombination centers for the photogenerated charge carriers and are thus detrimental for the performance of the photovoltaic cells. On the other hand, the formation energies of the carbon impurities are high, even under C-rich growth conditions. Thus, few C impurities will form in CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, the deposition of the precursor solution in non-vacuum growth methods presents conditions far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this case, our calculations show that C impurities formed in non-equilibrium tend to segregate from CuInSe{sub 2} and CuGaSe{sub 2} by approaching thermodynamic equilibrium, e.g., via thorough annealing.

  19. Protection of ornamental gold fish Carassius auratus against Aeromonas hydrophila by treating Ixora coccinea active principles.

    PubMed

    Anusha, Paulraj; Thangaviji, Vijayaragavan; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-02-01

    Herbals such as Ixora coccinea, Daemia extensa and Tridax procumbens were selected to screen in vitro antibacterial and immunostimulant activity against the freshwater fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila using different organic polar and non-polar solvents. Initial screening results revealed that, ethyl acetate extracts and its purified fraction of I. coccinea was able to suppress the A. hydrophila strains at more than 15 mm of zone of inhibition and positive immunostimulant activity. The purified active fraction, which eluted from H40: EA60 mobile phase was structurally characterized by GC-MS analysis. Two compounds such as Diethyl Phthalate (1,2-Benzene dicarboxylic acid, monobutyl ester) and Dibutyl Phthalate were characterized using NIST database search. In order to study the in vivo immunostimulant influence of the compounds, the crude extracts (ICE) and purified fractions (ICF) were incorporated to the artificial diets at the concentration of 400 mg kg⁻¹ and fed to the ornamental gold fish Carassius auratus for 30 days. After termination of feeding experiment, they were challenged with highly virulent A. hydrophila AHV-1 which was isolated from infected gold fish and studied the survival, specific bacterial load reduction, serum biochemistry, haematology, immunology and histological parameters. The control diet fed fishes succumbed to death within five days at 100% mortality whereas ICE and ICF fed groups survived 60 and 80% respectively after 10 days. The diets also helped to decrease the Aeromonas load after challenge and significantly (P ≤ 0.01) improved the serum albumin, globulin and protein. The diets also helped to increase the RBC and haemoglobin level significantly (P ≤ 0.05) from the control group. Surprisingly the immunological parameters like phagocytic activity, serum bactericidal activity and lysozyme activity were significantly increased (P ≤ 0.001) in the experimental diets. Macrophages and erythrocytes were abundantly expressed in the

  20. How to Present Evidence-Based Usability Design Principles Dedicated to Medication-Related Alerting Systems to Designers and Evaluators? Results from a Workshop.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Monkman, Helen; Villumsen, Sidsel; Kaufman, David; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Medication alerting system use errors and lack of adoption are often attributed to usability issues. Previous work has used evidence from the literature to reveal usability principles specific to medication alerting systems and identify potential consequences of violating these principles. The current study sought to explore how best to convey these principles to designers and evaluators of these systems to facilitate their work. To this aim, a workshop with 19 participants was used to generate ideas and opinions on how to deliver these topic-specific design principles in a way that would be most helpful for them. Participants generated ideas for how (e.g., a collaborative, continuously updated forum) and what (e.g., illustrations, checklists, evidence sources and strength, consequences of violations) information is most useful to disseminate usability principles for medication alerting systems. Participants, especially designers, expressed desire to use these principles in practice and avoid previously documented mistakes and therefore make design and evaluation of these systems more effective and efficient. Those insights are discussed in terms of feasibility and logistical challenges to developing the proposed documentation). To move this work forward, a more collaborative approach of Human Factors specialists in medical informatics is necessary. PMID:27577456

  1. Ocimum sanctum essential oil and its active principles exert their antifungal activity by disrupting ergosterol biosynthesis and membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Akhtar, Feroz; Yousuf, Snowber; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2010-12-01

    The increasing incidence of drug-resistant pathogens and host toxicity of existing antifungals attracts attention toward the efficacy of natural products as antifungals in mucocutaneous infections and combinational therapies. The composition and antifungal activity of the essential oil obtained from Ocimum sanctum (OSEO) was studied. On GC-MS analysis, OSEO showed a high content of methyl chavicol (44.63%) and linalool (21.84%). Antifungal activity of OSEO and its two main constituents was determined against sixty clinical and five standard laboratory isolates of Candida. OSEO, methyl chavicol and linalool showed inhibitory activity toward all tested strains. The mechanism of their fungicidal action was assessed by studying their effect on the plasma membrane using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and determination of the levels of ergosterol, a fungal-specific sterol. Propidium iodide rapidly penetrated a majority of yeast cells when they were treated with OSEO concentrations just above MIC, implying that fungicidal activity resulted from extensive lesions of the plasma membrane. OSEO and its components also caused a considerable reduction in the amount of ergosterol. The present study indicates that OSEO, methyl chavicol and linalool have significant antifungal activity against Candida, including azole-resistant strains, advocating further investigation for clinical applications in the treatment of fungal infections. PMID:20868749

  2. Physical Activity and Pregnancy: Past and Present Evidence and Future Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons Downs, Danielle; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Evenson, Kelly R.; Leiferman, Jenn; Yeo, SeonAe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this review, we provide researchers and practitioners with an overview of the physical activity and pregnancy literature to promote prenatal physical activity, improve measurement, further elucidate the role of activity in reducing maternal health complications, and inform future research. Method: We examined past and present physical…

  3. Investigation into the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of Moringa stenopetala: identification of the active principles.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-03-01

    The fresh leaves of Moringa stenopetala (family, Moringaceae) are commonly eaten as cabbage while dried leaves are used as nutritional supplement and for treating a variety of disease conditions including diabetes. The present investigation into the therapeutic potential of the leaves and seeds of the plant revealed no inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme up to the concentration of 200 μg/mL but the leaves extract displayed potent DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging effect (IC50, 59.5 ± 4.1 μg/mL). An activity directed fractionation and isolation procedure resulted in the identification of the major antioxidant compound as rutin and minor active component, neochlorogenic acid. Both the crude extract (0.8-200 μg/mL) and rutin (0.8-200 μM) but not neochlorogenic acid displayed a concentration-dependent protection of human pancreatic β-cells (1.4E7 cells) from oxidant-induced cell death. The identification of these compounds along with their potential role in the nutritional and medicinal significance of the plant is discussed. PMID:25924532

  4. Investigation into the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of Moringa stenopetala: identification of the active principles.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-03-01

    The fresh leaves of Moringa stenopetala (family, Moringaceae) are commonly eaten as cabbage while dried leaves are used as nutritional supplement and for treating a variety of disease conditions including diabetes. The present investigation into the therapeutic potential of the leaves and seeds of the plant revealed no inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme up to the concentration of 200 μg/mL but the leaves extract displayed potent DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging effect (IC50, 59.5 ± 4.1 μg/mL). An activity directed fractionation and isolation procedure resulted in the identification of the major antioxidant compound as rutin and minor active component, neochlorogenic acid. Both the crude extract (0.8-200 μg/mL) and rutin (0.8-200 μM) but not neochlorogenic acid displayed a concentration-dependent protection of human pancreatic β-cells (1.4E7 cells) from oxidant-induced cell death. The identification of these compounds along with their potential role in the nutritional and medicinal significance of the plant is discussed.

  5. Principles of project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of project management as practiced by NASA management personnel are presented. These principles are given as ground rules and guidelines to be used in the performance of research, development, construction or operational assignments.

  6. The effect of fast and slow motor unit activation on whole-muscle mechanical performance: the size principle may not pose a mechanical paradox

    PubMed Central

    Holt, N. C.; Wakeling, J. M.; Biewener, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The output of skeletal muscle can be varied by selectively recruiting different motor units. However, our knowledge of muscle function is largely derived from muscle in which all motor units are activated. This discrepancy may limit our understanding of in vivo muscle function. Hence, this study aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle with different motor unit activation. We determined the isometric properties and isotonic force–velocity relationship of rat plantaris muscles in situ with all of the muscle active, 30% of the muscle containing predominately slower motor units active or 20% of the muscle containing predominately faster motor units active. There was a significant effect of active motor unit type on isometric force rise time (p < 0.001) and the force–velocity relationship (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, force rise time was longer and maximum shortening velocity higher when all motor units were active than when either fast or slow motor units were selectively activated. We propose this is due to the greater relative effects of factors such as series compliance and muscle resistance to shortening during sub-maximal contractions. The findings presented here suggest that recruitment according to the size principle, where slow motor units are activated first and faster ones recruited as demand increases, may not pose a mechanical paradox, as has been previously suggested. PMID:24695429

  7. Summaries of "You Do It" Activities Presented at the 1978 SASTA Conference in the Riverland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Terry

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes "you do it" activities presented at the 1978 South Australian Science Teachers Association Conference. Topics include microscope use and maintenance, chemical slide cells, chemical models, sound waves, microwaves, astronomy, plant keys, reading geological maps, and natural dye processes. (DS)

  8. Four Practical Principles for Enhancing Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyak, Patrick C.; Von Gunten, Heather; Autenrieth, David; Gillis, Carolyn; Mastre-O'Farrell, Julie; Irvine-McDermott, Elizabeth; Baumann, James F.; Blachowicz, Camille L. Z.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents four practical principles that lead to enhanced word-meaning instruction in the elementary grades. The authors, a collaborative team of researchers and classroom teachers, identified and developed these principles and related instructional activities during a three-year vocabulary instruction research project. The principles…

  9. A postmenopause-like model of ovariectomized Wistar rats to identify active principles of Erythrina lysistemon (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Mvondo, M A; Njamen, D; Fomum, S Tanee; Wandji, J; Vollmer, Günter

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether the two major compounds of Erythrina lysistemon are active principles accounting for Erythrina estrogenic effects, we used a postmenopause-like model of ovariectomized Wistar rats to evaluate their effects on some menopausal problems. Ovariectomized rats were orally treated either with compound 1 or compound 2 at 1 and 10 mg/kg BW for 28 days. Estradiol valerate served as the reference substance. As results, compounds 1 and 2 displayed estrogen-like effects on the uterus and the vagina, and reduced atherogenic risks by decreasing the two assessed atherogenic parameters, the total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio and the atherogenic index of plasma.

  10. β-Asarone, an active principle of Acorus calamus rhizome, inhibits morphogenesis, biofilm formation and ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Sandeep B; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2013-01-15

    Anti-Candida potential of Acorus calamus rhizome and its active principle, β-asarone, was evaluated against the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans. β-Asarone exhibited promising growth inhibitory activity at 0.5mg/ml and it was fungicidal at 8 mg/ml. Time dependant kill curve assay showed that MFC of β-asarone was highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within 120 min of exposure. β-Asarone caused significant inhibition of C. albicans morphogenesis and biofilm development at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Our data indicate that the growth inhibitory activity of β-asarone might be through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Hemolytic assay showed that β-asarone is non-toxic, even at concentrations approaching MIC value. Our results suggest that β-asarone may be safe as a topical antifungal agent. PMID:23123225

  11. Re-Mediating Classroom Activity with a Non-Linear, Multi-Display Presentation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bligh, Brett; Coyle, Do

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to evaluate the use of a novel, multi-screen, non-linear presentation tool. The Thunder tool allows presenters to manipulate and annotate multiple digital slides and to concurrently display a selection of juxtaposed resources across a wall-sized projection area. Conventional, single screen presentation…

  12. "JCE" Classroom Activity #108. Using Archimedes' Principle to Explain Floating and Sinking Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In this activity, students (working alone or in groups) measure the mass of several soda cans (diet and regular soda) along with the mass of water that each can displaces. The students are then asked to compare these two mass values for the sinking cans and for the floating cans. The purpose of this activity is for students to determine that the…

  13. An Assessment of Patient Navigator Activities in Breast Cancer Patient Navigation Programs Using a Nine-Principle Framework

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Christine M; Clark, Jack A; Battaglia, Tracy A; Freund, Karen M; Parker, Victoria A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine how closely a published model of navigation reflects the practice of navigation in breast cancer patient navigation programs. Data Source Observational field notes describing patient navigator activities collected from 10 purposefully sampled, foundation-funded breast cancer navigation programs in 2008–2009. Study Design An exploratory study evaluated a model framework for patient navigation published by Harold Freeman by using an a priori coding scheme based on model domains. Data Collection Field notes were compiled and coded. Inductive codes were added during analysis to characterize activities not included in the original model. Principal Findings Programs were consistent with individual-level principles representing tasks focused on individual patients. There was variation with respect to program-level principles that related to program organization and structure. Program characteristics such as the use of volunteer or clinical navigators were identified as contributors to patterns of model concordance. Conclusions This research provides a framework for defining the navigator role as focused on eliminating barriers through the provision of individual-level interventions. The diversity observed at the program level in these programs was a reflection of implementation according to target population. Further guidance may be required to assist patient navigation programs to define and tailor goals and measurement to community needs. PMID:24820445

  14. Determination of the active principles of Catha Edulis: quali-quantitative analysis of cathinone, cathine, and phenylpropanolamine.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Veniero; Arnoldi, Sebastiano; Colombo, Maria Laura; Dell'Acqua, Lucia; Guerrini, Katia; Roda, Gabriella

    2012-04-10

    In the last years, all the vegetable material supposed to belong to the Catha Edulis species, seized at the Malpensa and Orio al Serio airports, were analyzed in our laboratory on behalf of the Tribunals of Busto Arsizio and Bergamo, respectively. After a preliminary botanic examination, the quali-quantitative determination of the active principles cathinone, cathine and phenylpropanolamine (PPA) was carried out by means of GC/MS and GC/FID techniques, which meet the requirements of the forensic analyses. We developed a fast, effective and reliable derivatization procedure which allowed to simultaneously detect cathine and PPA, whose discrimination is mandatory since PPA is not a psychoactive agent. Cathine was distributed in the various parts of the plant (leaves and stems) and its quantity ranged from 0.03% to 0.17% of the weight of the vegetable material; PPA was not detected in the twigs and its quantity in the leaves ranged from 0.07% to 0.16%. The quantitative determination of cathinone was carried out directly on the methanol solution after maceration of the vegetable material, its quantity ranging from 0.02% to 0.10%. No significant difference in the content of the two active principles was found between the fresh and the dried material. PMID:22024653

  15. Bernoulli's Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2004-01-01

    Some teachers have difficulty understanding Bernoulli's principle particularly when the principle is applied to the aerodynamic lift. Some teachers favor using Newton's laws instead of Bernoulli's principle to explain the physics behind lift. Some also consider Bernoulli's principle too difficult to explain to students and avoid teaching it…

  16. Using catalytic atom maps to predict the catalytic functions present in enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-09-18

    Catalytic atom maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the "crowdedness" of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å rmsd of the CAM with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these CAMs were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase rmsd to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  17. Using Catalytic Atom Maps to Predict the Catalytic Functions Present in Enzyme Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic Atom Maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the “crowdedness” of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å RMSD of the Catalytic Atom Map with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these Catalytic Atom Maps were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase RMSD to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  18. Quantitative (13)C Solid-State NMR Spectra by Multiple-Contact Cross-polarization for Drug Delivery: From Active Principles to Excipients and Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Fadila; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution, we present an analysis of the main parameters influencing the efficiency of the (1)H → (13)C multiple-contact cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in the context of solid pharmaceutical materials. Using the optimum experimental conditions, quantitative (13)C NMR spectra are then obtained for porous metal-organic frameworks (potential drug carriers) and for components present in drug formulations (active principle ingredient and excipients, amorphous or crystalline). Finally, we show that mixtures of components can also be quantified with this method and, hence, that it represents an ideal tool for quantification of pharmaceutical formulations by (13)C cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning NMR in the industry as it is robust and easy to set up, much faster than direct (13)C polarization and is efficient for samples at natural abundance. PMID:27372550

  19. Searching for active binary rutile oxide catalyst for water splitting from first principles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Fang, Ya-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2012-12-28

    Water electrolysis is an important route to large-scale hydrogen production using renewable energy, in which the oxygen evolution reaction (OER: 2H(2)O → O(2) + 4H(+) + 4e(-)) causes the largest energy loss in traditional electrocatalysts involving Ru-Ir mixed oxides. Following our previous mechanistic studies on the OER on RuO(2)(110) (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 18214), this work aims to provide further insight into the key parameters relevant to the activity of OER catalysts by investigating a group of rutile-type binary metal oxides, including RuNiO(2), RuCoO(2), RuRhO(2), RuIrO(2) and OsIrO(2). Two key aspects are focused on, namely the surface O coverage at the relevant potential conditions and the kinetics of H(2)O activation on the O-covered surfaces. The O coverage for all the oxides investigated here is found to be 1 ML at the concerned potential (1.23 V) with all the exposed metal cations being covered by terminal O atoms. The calculated free energy barrier for the H(2)O dissociation on the O covered surfaces varies significantly on different surfaces. The highest OER activity occurs at RuCoO(2) and RuNiO(2) oxides with a predicted activity about 500 times higher than pure RuO(2). On these oxides, the surface bridging O near the terminal O atom has a high activity for accepting the H during H(2)O splitting. It is concluded that while the differential adsorption energy of the terminal O atom influences the OER activity to the largest extent, the OER activity can still be tuned by modifying the electronic structure of surface bridging O.

  20. Cellular Telephones Measure Activity and Lifespace in Community-Dwelling Adults: Proof of Principle

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Ana Katrin; Witbrodt, Bradley C.; Hoarty, Carrie A.; Carlson, Richard H.; Goulding, Evan H.; Potter, Jane F.; Bonasera, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe a system that uses off-the-shelf sensor and telecommunication technologies to continuously measure individual lifespace and activity levels in a novel way. DESIGN Proof of concept involving three field trials of 30, 30, and 21 days. SETTING Omaha, Nebraska, metropolitan and surrounding rural region. PARTICIPANTS Three participants (48-year-old man, 33-year-old woman, and 27-year-old male), none with any functional limitations. MEASUREMENTS Cellular telephones were used to detect in-home position and in-community location and to measure physical activity. Within the home, cellular telephones and Bluetooth transmitters (beacons) were used to locate participants at room-level resolution. Outside the home, the same cellular telephones and global positioning system (GPS) technology were used to locate participants at a community-level resolution. Physical activity was simultaneously measured using the cellular telephone accelerometer. RESULTS This approach had face validity to measure activity and lifespace. More importantly, this system could measure the spatial and temporal organization of these metrics. For example, an individual’s lifespace was automatically calculated across multiple time intervals. Behavioral time budgets showing how people allocate time to specific regions within the home were also automatically generated. CONCLUSION Mobile monitoring shows much promise as an easily deployed system to quantify activity and lifespace, important indicators of function, in community-dwelling adults. PMID:21288235

  1. Evaluation of the biological activities of crude extracts from patagonian prosopis seeds and some of their active principles.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, M; Kraus, W; Balzaretti, V

    2003-01-01

    Extracts of different polarities from three species and three varieties of the genera Prosopis: P. alpataco, P. denudans var. denudans, P. denudans var. patagonica, and P. denudans var. stenocarpa, were screened in order to evaluate their antibacterial, antifungal, antifeedant, antihelminthic, molluscicidal and toxic activities. The extractions of the plant materials were carried out successively with petroleum ether, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. All petroleum ether extracts showed antibacterial activity. The dichloromethane extract of P. alpataco showed antibacterial and antifungal activities. Methanol and aqueous extracts of P. denudans var. denudans and P. denudans var. patagonica showed antifungal activities and a slight response to the toxicity test. Fatty acids and a group of pentacyclic triterpenes were identified as responsible for antibacterial activities in some of the active extracts.

  2. Pomegranate juice and prostate cancer: importance of the characterisation of the active principle.

    PubMed

    Chrubasik-Hausmann, Sigrun; Vlachojannis, Christian; Zimmermann, Benno

    2014-11-01

    Two exploratory clinical studies investigating proprietary pomegranate products showed a trend of effectiveness in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. A recent clinical study did not support these results. We therefore analysed a lot of the marketed pomegranate blend for co-active pomegranate compounds. The high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to detect punicalagin, ellagic acid and anthocyanins. Total polyphenoles were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method using gallic acid as reference. The results show that the co-active compounds in the daily dose of the pomegranate blend were far below those previously tested and that the photometric assessment is not reliable for the standardisation of study medications. Not pomegranate but the low amount of co-active compounds in the proprietary pomegranate blend was responsible for its clinical ineffectiveness.

  3. Developing Constructivist Early Childhood Curriculum: Practical Principles and Activities. Early Childhood Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVries, Rheta; Zan, Betty; Hildebrandt, Carolyn; Edmiaston, Rebecca; Sales, Christina

    This book provides a constructivist interpretation of developmentally appropriate preschool and kindergarten curriculum, incorporating descriptions of how activities are transformed over time and how children's reasoning is transformed, and placing the interpretation in the context of the play-oriented approach advocated by the National…

  4. Transforming Principles into Practice: Using Cognitive Active Learning Strategies in the High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swiderski, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    High school teachers who engage students through active learning in their classrooms can more fully understand this instructional practice by examining the theories and strategies underlying the cognitive perspective of educational psychology, which addresses the development of knowledge in the individual mind. Two theoretical explanations,…

  5. Library Services in Transition: A Presentation of Current Activities at the Royal Institute of Technology Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Stephan, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 15 essays, reports, and notes written by staff members of the Royal Institute of Technology Library (RITL) addresses various aspects of modern librarianship, and outlines some of the RITL contributions to the field. Designed to present a composite picture of the various activities of RITL since about mid-1973, these essays…

  6. Who Will Present It during the Broadcast? A Case Study at a Daily Activity Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichenberg, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The present study is an investigation of a daily activity centre (DA). The overall aim was to build a grounded theory that could explain why this particular DA deviated from the norms of Swedish group homes and DAs described in previous studies. These studies have suggested that the staff stuck to old routines, such as letting the participants…

  7. Bubble Festival: Presenting Bubble Activities in a Learning Station Format. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Jacqueline; Willard, Carolyn

    This learning station guide adapts the Bubble Festival, an all-school event, for individual classrooms. It presents students with a variety of different challenges at learning stations set up around the classroom. The activities are student-centered and involve open-ended investigations. Also included are ways to extend students' experiences at…

  8. Erythema annulare centrifugum as presenting sign of activation of breast cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Topal, Yunus; Sargan, Aytul; Duman, Hatice; Gungor, Sule; Goncu, Ozgur Emek Kocaturk; Ozekinci, Selver

    2015-01-01

    Erythema annulare centrifugum is a figurate erythema of unknown etiology. It has been associated with many different entities, including infections, food allergy, drug reactions and malignant neoplasms. Herein, we report a case of erythema annulare centrifugum as presenting sign of activation of breastcancer. PMID:26734884

  9. Erythema annulare centrifugum as presenting sign of activation of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Topal, Yunus; Sargan, Aytul; Duman, Hatice; Gungor, Sule; Goncu, Ozgur Emek Kocaturk; Ozekinci, Selver

    2015-01-01

    Erythema annulare centrifugum is a figurate erythema of unknown etiology. It has been associated with many different entities, including infections, food allergy, drug reactions and malignant neoplasms. Herein, we report a case of erythema annulare centrifugum as presenting sign of activation of breastcancer.

  10. Stimulation of hormone-responsive adenylate cyclase activity by a factor present in the cell cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S; Crawford, A; Amirrasooli, H; Johnson, S; Pollock, A; Ollis, C; Tomlinson, S

    1980-01-01

    1. Homogenates of whole tissues were shown to contain both intracellular and extracellular factors that affected particulate adenylate cyclase activity in vitro. Factors present in the extracellular fluids produced an inhibition of basal, hormone- and fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity but factors present in the cell cytosol increased hormone-stimulated activity with relatively little effect on basal or fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity. 2. The existence of this cytosol factor or factors was investigated using freshly isolated human platelets, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, and cultured cells derived from rat osteogenic sarcoma, rat calvaria, mouse melanoma, pig aortic endothelium, human articular cartilage chondrocytes and human bronchial carcinoma (BEN) cells. 3. The stimulation of the hormone response by the cytosol factor ranged from 60 to 890% depending on the tissue of origin of the adenylate cyclase. 4. In each case the behaviour of the factor was similar to the action of GTP on that particular adenylate cyclase preparation. 5. No evidence of tissue or species specificity was found, as cytosols stimulated adenylate cyclase from their own and unrelated tissues to the same degree. 6. In the human platelet, the inclusion of the cytosol in the assay of adenylate cyclase increased the rate of enzyme activity in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E1 without affecting the amount of prostaglandin E1 required for half-maximal stimulation or the characteristics of enzyme activation by prostaglandin E. PMID:7396869

  11. Janus particles as artificial antigen-presenting cells for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Jia, Yilong; Gao, Yuan; Sanchez, Lucero; Anthony, Stephen M; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the multifunctionality of Janus particles can be exploited for in vitro T cell activation. We engineer bifunctional Janus particles on which the spatial distribution of two ligands, anti-CD3 and fibronectin, mimics the "bull's eye" protein pattern formed in the membrane junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. Different levels of T cell activation can be achieved by simply switching the spatial distribution of the two ligands on the surfaces of the "bull's eye" particles. We find that the ligand pattern also affects clustering of intracellular proteins. This study demonstrates that anisotropic particles, such as Janus particles, can be developed as artificial antigen-presenting cells for modulating T cell activation. PMID:25343426

  12. Understanding the adsorption behavior of surface active molecules on ZnO nanostructures by experimental and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Satvinder; Singh, Janpreet; Saini, G S S; Mehta, D S; Singh, Gurinder; Tripathi, S K; Kaura, Aman

    2015-11-11

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures with different morphologies are prepared in the presence of surface active molecules such as sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), Tween 80 and Triton X-100 by a chemical method. The experimental and first principles methods are employed to understand the microscopic origin of the asymmetric growth mechanism of ZnO in the presence of various surface active molecules. Effect of increase in the amount of surface active molecules and temperature is studied on the growth morphology of ZnO. An innovative method is developed to synthesize ZnO nanowires (NWs) in the presence of SDS. Spherical nanoparticles (NPs) to spherical clusters are obtained in the presence of Triton X-100 and Tween 80. These results are then supported by first principles calculations. The adsorption of the -OH functional group on both polar and nonpolar surfaces of ZnO is modelled by using density functional theory (DFT). The calculated binding energy (BE) is almost equivalent on both the surfaces with no preference on any particular surface. The calculated value of BE shows that the -OH group is physio-adsorbed on both the surfaces. This results in the spherical morphology of nanoparticles prepared in the presence of Tween 80. Bader charge analysis shows that the charge transfer mainly takes place on top two layers of the ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface. The absence of high values of electron localization function (ELF) reflects the lack of covalent bonding between the -OH group and the ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface. PMID:26510134

  13. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  14. Brain activation to briefly presented emotional words: effects of stimulus awareness.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marius; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    It is unknown to what extent briefly presented emotional words can be processed without awareness. By means of two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, using either a block or an event-related design, we investigated brain activation to very briefly presented threat related and neutral words during two backward masking conditions (with and without gap between target and mask). In both experiments, emotional words were perceived during the supraliminal "with gap" condition, but they were not recognized during the subliminal "without gap" condition, as indicated by signal detection theory analysis. Imaging results of both experiments showed increased activation of the amygdala, the medial prefrontal cortex and language-processing cortical areas to negative versus neutral words during supraliminal but not subliminal conditions. These results suggest that even very briefly presented emotional words are capable of triggering increased cortical and subcortical processing; however, only when awareness of these stimuli is given. PMID:25324170

  15. Behavior Change Techniques Present in Wearable Activity Trackers: A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Kathryn; Li, Melissa; Giangregorio, Lora; Burns, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Wearable activity trackers are promising as interventions that offer guidance and support for increasing physical activity and health-focused tracking. Most adults do not meet their recommended daily activity guidelines, and wearable fitness trackers are increasingly cited as having great potential to improve the physical activity levels of adults. Objective The objective of this study was to use the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (CALO-RE) taxonomy to examine if the design of wearable activity trackers incorporates behavior change techniques (BCTs). A secondary objective was to critically analyze whether the BCTs present relate to known drivers of behavior change, such as self-efficacy, with the intention of extending applicability to older adults in addition to the overall population. Methods Wearing each device for a period of 1 week, two independent raters used CALO-RE taxonomy to code the BCTs of the seven wearable activity trackers available in Canada as of March 2014. These included Fitbit Flex, Misfit Shine, Withings Pulse, Jawbone UP24, Spark Activity Tracker by SparkPeople, Nike+ FuelBand SE, and Polar Loop. We calculated interrater reliability using Cohen's kappa. Results The average number of BCTs identified was 16.3/40. Withings Pulse had the highest number of BCTs and Misfit Shine had the lowest. Most techniques centered around self-monitoring and self-regulation, all of which have been associated with improved physical activity in older adults. Techniques related to planning and providing instructions were scarce. Conclusions Overall, wearable activity trackers contain several BCTs that have been shown to increase physical activity in older adults. Although more research and development must be done to fully understand the potential of wearables as health interventions, the current wearable trackers offer significant potential with regard to BCTs relevant to uptake by all populations, including older adults. PMID:27122452

  16. Oxygen plasma etching of graphene: A first-principles dynamical inspection of the reaction mechanisms and related activation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi; Dept. of Applied Physics Team; Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Strasbourg (IPCMS) Collaboration; Department Of Materials Engineering Science Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plasma etching is a crucial step in the fabrication of electronic circuits and has recently received a renovated interest in view of the realization of carbon-based nanodevices. In an attempt at unraveling the atomic-scale details and to provide guidelines for the control of the etching processes mechanisms, we inspected the possible reaction pathways via reactive first principles simulations. These processes involve breaking and formation of several chemical bonds and are characterized by different free-energy barriers. Free-energy sampling techniques (metadynamics and blue moon), used to enhance the standard Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, provide us a detailed microscopic picture of the etching of graphene surfaces and a comprehensive scenario of the activation barriers involved in the various steps. MEXT, Japan - contract N. 22104005

  17. The Self-Presentation Motives for Physical Activity Questionnaire: Instrument Development and Preliminary Construct Validity Evidence.

    PubMed

    Howle, Timothy C; Dimmock, James A; Whipp, Peter R; Jackson, Ben

    2015-06-01

    With the aim of advancing the literature on impression management in physical activity settings, we developed a theoretically derived 2 by 2 instrument that was designed to measure different types of context-specific self-presentation motives. Following item generation and expert review (Study 1), the instrument was completed by 206 group exercise class attendees (Study 2) and 463 high school physical education students (Study 3). Our analyses supported the intended factor structure (i.e., reflecting acquisitive-agentic, acquisitive-communal, protective-agentic, and protective-communal motives). We found some support for construct validity, and the self-presentation motives were associated with variables of theoretical and applied interest (e.g., impression motivation and construction, social anxiety, social and achievement goals, efficacy beliefs, engagement). Taken together, the results indicate that the Self-presentation Motives for Physical Activity Questionnaire (SMPAQ) may be useful for measuring various types of self-presentation motives in physical activity settings. PMID:26265337

  18. Healthcare Financial Management Association, Principles and Practices Board. Statement no. 15: Valuation and financial statement presentation of charity service and bad debts by institutional healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    Principles and Practices Board (P&P Board) Statement No. 2, issued in 1978, provided a basis for differentiating between charity service and bad debts. The statement acknowledged that, while the differentiation was helpful, the financial accounting and reporting of charity service and bad debts were the same. In 1990, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) published (after review and approval by the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the Governmental Accounting Standards Board) an extensive revision of the guide titled "Audits of Providers of Health Care Services." The revised guide substantially changed the reporting of bad debts and eliminated charity service from revenue. Disclosure of the entity's policy for providing charity service and the level of charity service provided is required by the revised guide. The P&P Board decided that a substantive revision of its Statement No. 2 was required to bring it into conformity with the revised guide and to provide direction on implementation of the revised guide's requirements. This statement supersedes Statement No. 2 and deals with the same issues, including bad debts. PMID:10145753

  19. The irrationality of the present use of the osmole gap: applicable physical chemistry principles and recommendations to improve the validity of current practices.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yoshikata; Purssell, Roy A; Lynd, Larry D

    2004-01-01

    The present clinical use of serum osmometry is erroneous in two respects. The first, and the most important, is the incorrect assumption that serum behaves as a dilute 'ideal' solution and that the osmotic activity of a substance depends solely on the number of solute particles. The amount of variance from ideal behaviour of serum containing an exogenous substance is expressed by the osmotic coefficient (phi). We have calculated the osmotic coefficient for serum containing ethanol (alcohol) and recommend that the osmotic coefficient for serum containing other low molecular weight substances such as methanol (methyl alcohol), isopropyl alcohol and ethylene glycol also be calculated. This is necessary for the accurate calculation of the contribution of these substances to the serum osmolality.Secondly, the practice of subtracting the calculated serum molarity from measured serum osmolality is not valid since it represents a mathematically improper expression. The units of these two terms are different. The 'osmole gap' (OG) is typically viewed as the difference between serum osmolality determined by an osmometer and the estimated total molarity of solute in serum by directly measuring the concentration of several substances and then substituting them into a published formula. Some authors call this sum the calculated or estimated osmolarity but, because the concentrations are measured directly and not with an osmometer, the calculated term represents molarity. The units of osmolality are mmol/kg of H2O and the units of molarity are mmol/L. Therefore, the practice of subtracting calculated serum molarity from measured serum osmolality is not mathematically sound and is an oversimplification for ease of application. This mathematical transgression necessarily adds an error to the incorrectly calculated OG. Despite this, the OG is commonly used in clinical medicine. Serum osmolality can be converted to molarity provided the weight percentage and the density of the

  20. Antibacterial activity of extracts from plants of central Argentina--isolation of an active principle from Achyrocline satureioides.

    PubMed

    Joray, Mariana B; del Rollán, María R; Ruiz, Gustavo M; Palacios, Sara M; Carpinella, María C

    2011-01-01

    The great increase in bacterial infections is fueling interest in the search for antibacterial products of plant origin. Extracts obtained from 51 native and naturalized plants from central Argentina were therefore evaluated for their IN VITRO inhibitory activity on pathogenic bacteria with the aim of selecting the most active ones as new sources of effective antibiotics. The susceptibility of reference and clinical strains of Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, and Staphylococcus aureus was determined. Extracts from Achyrocline satureioides, Flourensia oolepis, Lepechinia floribunda, and Lithrea molleoides were the most potent, with MIC and MBC values ranging from 0.006 to 2 and 0.012 to 10 mg/mL, respectively, on both gram-positive and negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity-guided isolation of A. satureioides ethanol extract showed 23-methyl-6-O-desmethylauricepyrone (1) to be the most active compound. This compound showed inhibitory effects against gram-positive bacteria with MIC and MBC values of 0.002 and 0.008 mg/mL, respectively, while on gram-negative strains, the MIC and MBC were 0.062-0.250 and 0.062-0.500 mg/mL, respectively. The strong antibacterial activity shown by the four plant extracts or the compound isolated from A. satureioides suggests that they could become part of the arsenal of antibacterial drugs currently used.

  1. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  2. Label free detection of optogenetically stimulated cellular activity by low coherence interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Batabyal, Subrata; Dave, Digant P.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Detecting cellular activity in sub-millisecond timescale and micrometer resolution without using invasive means has been a long standing goal in the study of cellular networks. Here, we have employed phase sensitive low coherence interferometry for detecting optogenetically stimulated activity of cells. Nanoscale changes in optical path length (due to change in refractive index and changes in cell thickness) occur when cells are activated, which we aim to detect by phase sensitive low coherence interferometry. A low coherence interferometry and patch-clamp electrophysiology systems were integrated with an inverted fluorescence microscope. Blue laser beam was coupled to the electrophysiology-interferometric detection system for optogenetic stimulation. The phase-sensitive measurements were carried out on Channelrhodopsin-2 sensitized cells (identified by YFP fluorescence) as well as control cells in reflection mode for different intensities and exposures of optogenetic stimulation beam. This method offers good temporal and spatial resolution without using exogenous labeling. Results of studies on all optical stimulation and detection of cellular activity will be presented. Interpretation of the optical activity signals will be discussed in context with changes in cell physiology during stimulation. We will also discuss the potential sources of various artifacts in optical/electrical detection of cellular activity during optical stimulation.

  3. Tales from the Dark Side: Teacher Professional Development , Support , Activities, Student Research & Presentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    In a partnership last Spring with Arizona Public Service, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) created the 'Dark-Skies Energy Education Program: Energy Awareness for a Sustainable Future'. In this program, experienced science and technology education specialists from NOAO led 2 one-day professional development workshops for thirteen 6th grade teachers on dark skies and energy education. The workshops focused on three foundational, scaffolding activities and a final student research project. This in turn culminated in a Family Science Night where students presented their projects. In between these events, our NOAO team provided support for teachers through real-time video conferencing using FaceTime. In addition to the professional development, each teacher received a kit full of resource materials to perform the activities and research project. The kit was at no cost to the teacher, school, or district. Each kit contained the latest version of a tablet, which was used to facilitate communication and support for the teachers, as well as provide all the program's written teaching materials. The activities are in accordance with state, Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. Our NOAO instructors gave firsthand experiences on how best to use these materials in a classroom or public setting. They also discussed opportunities on how they can incorporate, adapt and expand upon the activities and research projects in the classroom. Evaluation reports from the program's independent evaluator showed that the students enjoyed learning from the three foundational activities and research projects. The project presentations by the Yuma students were outstanding in their creativity, level of effort, and scientific accuracy. To summarize the evaluations, significant changes in knowledge and attitude were made with the teachers and students (from one-on-one interviews and surveys), but behavioral changes (albeit only over a semester) seemed minimal. The AGU

  4. Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Ppc-1, Active Principle of the Cellular Slime Mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum.

    PubMed

    Azelmat, Jabrane; Fiorito, Serena; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The diisopentenyloxy quinolobactin derivative 3-methylbut-2-enyl-4-methoxy-8-[(3-methylbut-2-enyl)oxy] quinoline-2-carboxylate, also named as Ppc-1, has been initially isolated from the fruiting bodies of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum. Given that few data are available in the literature concerning the biological properties of this compound, this study was undertaken to evaluate its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Ppc-1 exerted antibacterial activity on the Gram negative periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, while it had no such effect on the other bacterial species tested. The antibacterial activity of Ppc-1 appeared to result from its ability to permeate the cell membrane. Using the U937-3xκB-LUC human monocytic cell line, Ppc-1 was found to dose-dependently inhibit the lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation, a signaling pathway that has been associated with inflammatory mediator secretion. In conclusion, Ppc-1, by exhibiting a dual mode of action including antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities, may represent a promising targeted therapeutic agent for periodontal diseases.

  5. Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Ppc-1, Active Principle of the Cellular Slime Mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum.

    PubMed

    Azelmat, Jabrane; Fiorito, Serena; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The diisopentenyloxy quinolobactin derivative 3-methylbut-2-enyl-4-methoxy-8-[(3-methylbut-2-enyl)oxy] quinoline-2-carboxylate, also named as Ppc-1, has been initially isolated from the fruiting bodies of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum. Given that few data are available in the literature concerning the biological properties of this compound, this study was undertaken to evaluate its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Ppc-1 exerted antibacterial activity on the Gram negative periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, while it had no such effect on the other bacterial species tested. The antibacterial activity of Ppc-1 appeared to result from its ability to permeate the cell membrane. Using the U937-3xκB-LUC human monocytic cell line, Ppc-1 was found to dose-dependently inhibit the lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation, a signaling pathway that has been associated with inflammatory mediator secretion. In conclusion, Ppc-1, by exhibiting a dual mode of action including antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities, may represent a promising targeted therapeutic agent for periodontal diseases. PMID:25925558

  6. QSAR prediction of estrogen activity for a large set of diverse chemicals under the guidance of OECD principles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2006-11-01

    A large number of environmental chemicals, known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, are suspected of disrupting endocrine functions by mimicking or antagonizing natural hormones, and such chemicals may pose a serious threat to the health of humans and wildlife. They are thought to act through a variety of mechanisms, mainly estrogen-receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. However, it is practically impossible to perform thorough toxicological tests on all potential xenoestrogens, and thus, the quantitative structure--activity relationship (QSAR) provides a promising method for the estimation of a compound's estrogenic activity. Here, QSAR models of the estrogen receptor binding affinity of a large data set of heterogeneous chemicals have been built using theoretical molecular descriptors, giving full consideration to the new OECD principles in regulation for QSAR acceptability, during model construction and assessment. An unambiguous multiple linear regression (MLR) algorithm was used to build the models, and model predictive ability was validated by both internal and external validation. The applicability domain was checked by the leverage approach to verify prediction reliability. The results obtained using several validation paths indicate that the proposed QSAR model is robust and satisfactory, and can provide a feasible and practical tool for the rapid screening of the estrogen activity of organic compounds.

  7. Glycyrrhetinic acid, the active principle of licorice, can reduce the thickness of subcutaneous thigh fat through topical application.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Francini-Pesenti, Francesco; Battagin, Giuliana; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Fiore, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    Cortisol is involved in the distribution and deposition of fat, and its action is regulated by the activity of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Glycyrrhetinic acid, the active principle of licorice root, blocks 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, thus reducing the availability of cortisol at the level of adipocytes. We evaluated the effect of topical application of a cream containing glycyrrhetinic acid in the thickness of fat at the level of the thigh. Eighteen healthy women (age range 20-33 years) with normal BMI were randomly allocated to treatment, at the level of the dominant thigh, with a cream containing 2.5% glycyrrhetinic acid (n=9) or with a placebo cream containing the excipients alone (n=9). Before and after 1 month of treatment both the circumference and the thickness of the superficial fat layer of the thighs (by ultrasound analysis) were measured. The circumference and the thickness of the superficial fat layer were significantly reduced in comparison to the controlateral untreated thigh and to control subjects treated with the placebo cream. No changes were observed in blood pressure, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone or cortisol. The effect of glycyrrhetinic acid on the thickness of subcutaneous fat was likely related to a block of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 at the level of fat cells; therefore, glycyrrhetinic acid could be effectively used in the reduction of unwanted local fat accumulation. PMID:15894038

  8. Quantum dot based enzyme activity sensors present deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Brown, Carl W.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-03-01

    Nanosensors employing quantum dots (QDs) and enzyme substrates with fluorescent moieties offer tremendous promise for disease surveillance/diagnostics and as high-throughput co-factor assays. Advantages of QDs over other nanoscaffolds include their small size and inherent photochemical properties such as size tunable fluorescence, ease in attaching functional moieties, and resistance to photobleaching. These properties make QDs excellent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) donors; well-suited for rapid, optical measurement applications. We report enzyme sensors designed with a single FRET donor, the QD donor acting as a scaffold to multiple substrates or acceptors. The QD-sensor follows the concrete activity of the enzyme, as compared to the most common methodologies that quantify the enzyme amount or its mRNA precursor. As the sensor reports on the enzyme activity in real-time we can actively follow the kinetics of the enzyme. Though classic Michaelis-Menten (MM) parameters can be obtained to describe the activity. In the course of these experiments deviations, both decreasing and increasing the kinetics, from the common MM model were observed upon close examinations. From these observations additional experiments were undertaken to understand the varying mechanisms. Different enzymes can present different deviations depending on the chosen target, e.g. trypsin appears to present a positive hopping mechanism while collagenase demonstrates a QD caused reversible inhibition.

  9. Identification and compatibility of the major active principles in some new natural origin antiseptics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, G. S.; Zlatković, S.; Nikolić, N.

    2009-09-01

    The newly established instrumentation of HPLC/DAD, FTIR, and NMR techniques have been applied for simultaneous identification and physicochemical compatibility determination of the potential major antiseptic constituents ( Hypericum perforatum L. and Usnea barbata extracts) which can be present in some new origin pharmaceutical preparation. Based on the obtained results the conclusion is that a simultaneous use of the analyzed constituents in production of some new preparations with antiseptic properties is possible. The chromatographic separation of antiseptic mixture was performed on a RP-HPLC C18 column. For the NMR detection, the analytes eluted from LC column were trapped and hereafter transported into the NMR flow-cell. The NMR and FTIR techniques allowed the characterization of the major constituent of Hypericum perforatum L., mainly hypericin, as well as of Usnea barbata, mainly usnic acid.

  10. Xanthoangelol and 4-Hydroxyderricin Are the Major Active Principles of the Inhibitory Activities against Monoamine Oxidases on Angelica keiskei K

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Ho; Son, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Gun Hee; Hwang, Keum Hee

    2013-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) have been widely used as antidepressants. Recently, there has been renewed interest in MAO inhibitors. The activity-guided fractionation of extracts from Angelica keiskei Koidzumi (A. keiskei K.) led to the isolation of two prenylated chalcones, xanthoangelol and 4-hydroxyderricin and a flavonoid, cynaroside. These three isolated compounds are the major active ingredients of A. keiskei K. to inhibit the MAOs and DBH activities. Xanthoangelol is a nonselective MAO inhibitor, and a potent dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitor. IC50 values of xanthoangelol to MAO-A and MAO-B were calculated to be 43.4 μM, and 43.9 μM. These values were very similar to iproniazid, which is a nonselective MAO inhibitor used as a drug against depression. The IC50 values of iproniazid were 37 μM, and 42.5 μM in our parallel examination. Moreover, IC50 value of xanthoangelol to DBH was calculated 0.52 μM. 4-Hydroxyderricin is a potent selective MAO-B inhibitor and also mildly inhibits DBH activity. The IC50 value of 4-hydroxyderricin to MAO-B was calculated to be 3.43 μM and this value was higher than that of deprenyl (0.046 μM) used as a positive control for selective MAO-B inhibitor in our test. Cynaroside is a most potent DBH inhibitor. The IC50 value of cynaroside to DBH was calculated at 0.0410 μM. Results of this study suggest that the two prenylated chalcones, xanthoangelol and 4-hydroxyderricin isolated from A. keiskei K., are expected for potent candidates for development of combined antidepressant drug. A. keiskei K. will be an excellent new bio-functional food material that has the combined antidepressant effect. PMID:24265870

  11. Xanthoangelol and 4-Hydroxyderricin Are the Major Active Principles of the Inhibitory Activities against Monoamine Oxidases on Angelica keiskei K.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Ho; Son, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Gun Hee; Hwang, Keum Hee

    2013-05-30

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) have been widely used as antidepressants. Recently, there has been renewed interest in MAO inhibitors. The activity-guided fractionation of extracts from Angelica keiskei Koidzumi (A. keiskei K.) led to the isolation of two prenylated chalcones, xanthoangelol and 4-hydroxyderricin and a flavonoid, cynaroside. These three isolated compounds are the major active ingredients of A. keiskei K. to inhibit the MAOs and DBH activities. Xanthoangelol is a nonselective MAO inhibitor, and a potent dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitor. IC50 values of xanthoangelol to MAO-A and MAO-B were calculated to be 43.4 μM, and 43.9 μM. These values were very similar to iproniazid, which is a nonselective MAO inhibitor used as a drug against depression. The IC50 values of iproniazid were 37 μM, and 42.5 μM in our parallel examination. Moreover, IC50 value of xanthoangelol to DBH was calculated 0.52 μM. 4-Hydroxyderricin is a potent selective MAO-B inhibitor and also mildly inhibits DBH activity. The IC50 value of 4-hydroxyderricin to MAO-B was calculated to be 3.43 μM and this value was higher than that of deprenyl (0.046 μM) used as a positive control for selective MAO-B inhibitor in our test. Cynaroside is a most potent DBH inhibitor. The IC50 value of cynaroside to DBH was calculated at 0.0410 μM. Results of this study suggest that the two prenylated chalcones, xanthoangelol and 4-hydroxyderricin isolated from A. keiskei K., are expected for potent candidates for development of combined antidepressant drug. A. keiskei K. will be an excellent new bio-functional food material that has the combined antidepressant effect.

  12. Xanthoangelol and 4-Hydroxyderricin Are the Major Active Principles of the Inhibitory Activities against Monoamine Oxidases on Angelica keiskei K.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Ho; Son, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Gun Hee; Hwang, Keum Hee

    2013-05-30

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) have been widely used as antidepressants. Recently, there has been renewed interest in MAO inhibitors. The activity-guided fractionation of extracts from Angelica keiskei Koidzumi (A. keiskei K.) led to the isolation of two prenylated chalcones, xanthoangelol and 4-hydroxyderricin and a flavonoid, cynaroside. These three isolated compounds are the major active ingredients of A. keiskei K. to inhibit the MAOs and DBH activities. Xanthoangelol is a nonselective MAO inhibitor, and a potent dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitor. IC50 values of xanthoangelol to MAO-A and MAO-B were calculated to be 43.4 μM, and 43.9 μM. These values were very similar to iproniazid, which is a nonselective MAO inhibitor used as a drug against depression. The IC50 values of iproniazid were 37 μM, and 42.5 μM in our parallel examination. Moreover, IC50 value of xanthoangelol to DBH was calculated 0.52 μM. 4-Hydroxyderricin is a potent selective MAO-B inhibitor and also mildly inhibits DBH activity. The IC50 value of 4-hydroxyderricin to MAO-B was calculated to be 3.43 μM and this value was higher than that of deprenyl (0.046 μM) used as a positive control for selective MAO-B inhibitor in our test. Cynaroside is a most potent DBH inhibitor. The IC50 value of cynaroside to DBH was calculated at 0.0410 μM. Results of this study suggest that the two prenylated chalcones, xanthoangelol and 4-hydroxyderricin isolated from A. keiskei K., are expected for potent candidates for development of combined antidepressant drug. A. keiskei K. will be an excellent new bio-functional food material that has the combined antidepressant effect. PMID:24265870

  13. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  14. In vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of hydro-ethanolic extract and isolated active principles from Aristeguietia glutinosa and mechanism of action studies.

    PubMed

    Varela, Javier; Serna, Elva; Torres, Susana; Yaluff, Gloria; de Bilbao, Ninfa I Vera; Miño, Patricio; Chiriboga, Ximena; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The currently available treatments for Chagas disease show limited therapeutic potential and are associated with serious side effects. Attempting to find alternative drugs isolated from Nature as agents against Trypanosoma cruzi has been our goal. Recently, we have demonstrated the in vitro anti-T. cruzi activities of two secondary metabolites isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa (Lam.), (family Asteraceae). These active principles displayed poor hemolytic activity, low toxicity against murine macrophages, and absence of mutagenicity. Herein, proof of concept in vivo studies of the whole hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa and of the most active component isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract, i.e., (+)-15-hydroxy-7-labden-17-al, was done in a murine acute model of Chagas disease. Both treatments caused a decrease in the animals' parasitemia. Metabolomic mechanism of action studies were done by 1H-NMR, both on the extract and on the active compounds, examining the effects of the metabolites both on membrane sterol biosynthesis and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, whereby we found that one of the metabolites inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenases and the other inhibited the biosynthesis of parasite membrane sterols. The results are interesting in the context of popular use of plants for the treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:24959677

  15. Antifungal, Antileishmanial, and Cytotoxicity Activities of Various Extracts of Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae) and Its Active Principle Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Ayatollahi Mousavi, Seyyed Amin; Sepahvand, Asghar; Sharififar, Fariba; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Gorohi, Fatemeh; Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Jahanbakhsh, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro antidermatophytic activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis, and Microsporum gypseum was studied by disk diffusion test and assessment of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using CLSI broth macrodilution method (M38-A2). Moreover, antileishmanial and cytotoxicity activity of B. vulgaris and berberine against promastigotes of Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica were evaluated by colorimetric MTT assay. The findings indicated that the various extracts of B. vulgaris particularly berberine showed high potential antidermatophytic against pathogenic dermatophytes tested with MIC values varying from 0.125 to >4 mg/mL. The results revealed that B. vulgaris extracts as well as berberine were effective in inhibiting L. major and L. tropica promastigotes growth in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values varying from 2.1 to 26.6 μg/mL. Moreover, it could be observed that berberine as compared with B. vulgaris exhibited more cytotoxicity against murine macrophages with CC50 (cytotoxicity concentration for 50% of cells) values varying from 27.3 to 362.6 μg/mL. Results of this investigation were the first step in the search for new antidermatophytic and antileishmanial drugs. However, further works are required to evaluate exact effect of these extracts in animal models as well as volunteer human subjects. PMID:24977052

  16. Dried extracts of Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae) present antioxidant and photoprotective activities in vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Guimarães, Amanda Leite; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Silva Morais, Amanda Caroline; da Cruz Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant and photoprotective activities of dried extracts from the leaves of Encholirium spectabile were investigated. It was also evaluated the total phenolic and flavonoid contents by the Folin–Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by using of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene–linoleic acid bleaching and compared with ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used as reference compounds. The photoprotective effect was evaluated by the spectrophotometric method. The most significant total phenolic and flavonoid contents was of 188.50 ± 27.50 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g and 129.70 ± 4.59 mg of catechin equivalent/g, respectively, for chloroform fraction (Es-CHCl3). The Es-CHCl3 also presented the best antioxidant activity (IC50 25.35 ± 4.35 μg/ml) for DPPH scavenging. The ethanol extract (Es-EtOH), Es-CHCl3 and the fraction ethyl acetate (Es-AcOEt) showed characteristic absorption bands in regions UVB and UVA in a concentration-dependent manner. Es-CHCl3 presented the highest sun protection factor SPF (8.89 ± 2.11). It shows the possibility to use this extract as sunscreen in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:24396251

  17. Direct method of three-dimensional imaging using the multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2016-05-10

    The tomography executed with mono-wavelength active imaging systems uses the recording of several images to restore a three-dimensional (3D) scene. Thus, in order to show the depth in the scene, a different color is attributed to each recorded image. Therefore, the 3D restoration depends on the video frame rate of the camera. By using a multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging system, it is possible to restore the 3D scene directly in a single image at the moment of recording with a video camera. Each emitted light pulse with a different wavelength corresponds to a visualized zone at a different distance in the scene. The camera shutter opens just once during the emission of light pulses with the different wavelengths. Thus, the restoration can be executed in real time with regard to the video frame rate of the camera. From an analytical model and from a graphical approach, we demonstrated the feasibility of this new method of 3D restoration. The non-overlapping conditions between two consecutive visualized zones are analyzed. The experimental test results confirm these different conditions and validate the theoretical principle to directly restore the 3D scene in a color image with a multiple-wavelength laser source, an RGB filter, and a triggerable intensified camera. PMID:27168293

  18. In Vitro Inhibitory Effect of Clove Essential Oil and Its Two Active Principles on Tooth Decalcification by Apple Juice

    PubMed Central

    Marya, Charu M.; Satija, Gunjan; J., Avinash; Nagpal, Ruchi; Kapoor, Rohtash; Ahmad, Aijaz

    2012-01-01

    The dental erosion or decalcification of enamel is a significant clinical problem. Apple acidic beverages are thought to increase the potential for dental erosion. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of clove essential oil (CEO) and its active principles on tooth decalcification of apple juices. On GC-MS analysis, CEO showed a high content of eugenol (58.29%) and eugenyl acetate (19.10%). Teeth specimens were randomly divided into 5 treatment groups: control, CEO, eugenol, eugenyl-acetate, and fluoride. The specimens were exposed for 24 h and were analyzed for calcium contents using Inductively Coupled Plasma with Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Data were analyzed using student t-test (P < 0.05). CEO, eugenol, and eugenyl-acetate significantly decreased the decalcification of tooth by the apple juice to only 17, 24, and 21 mgL−1, respectively. Hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes was studied to exclude the possibility of further associated cytotoxicity. It was observed that the CEO and its two lead molecules inhibit the decalcification and/or promote the remineralization caused by the apple juices. The effect of the test compounds appears to be distinct like that of fluoride treatment. CEO may, therefore, serve to be a promising adjunct to fluoride in the treatment of root caries during minimally invasive therapy. PMID:22997520

  19. In vitro inhibitory effect of clove essential oil and its two active principles on tooth decalcification by apple juice.

    PubMed

    Marya, Charu M; Satija, Gunjan; J, Avinash; Nagpal, Ruchi; Kapoor, Rohtash; Ahmad, Aijaz

    2012-01-01

    The dental erosion or decalcification of enamel is a significant clinical problem. Apple acidic beverages are thought to increase the potential for dental erosion. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of clove essential oil (CEO) and its active principles on tooth decalcification of apple juices. On GC-MS analysis, CEO showed a high content of eugenol (58.29%) and eugenyl acetate (19.10%). Teeth specimens were randomly divided into 5 treatment groups: control, CEO, eugenol, eugenyl-acetate, and fluoride. The specimens were exposed for 24 h and were analyzed for calcium contents using Inductively Coupled Plasma with Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Data were analyzed using student t-test (P < 0.05). CEO, eugenol, and eugenyl-acetate significantly decreased the decalcification of tooth by the apple juice to only 17, 24, and 21 mgL(-1), respectively. Hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes was studied to exclude the possibility of further associated cytotoxicity. It was observed that the CEO and its two lead molecules inhibit the decalcification and/or promote the remineralization caused by the apple juices. The effect of the test compounds appears to be distinct like that of fluoride treatment. CEO may, therefore, serve to be a promising adjunct to fluoride in the treatment of root caries during minimally invasive therapy.

  20. First-Principles Quantum Dynamics of Singlet Fission: Coherent versus Thermally Activated Mechanisms Governed by Molecular π Stacking.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroyuki; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene; Olivier, Yoann; Beljonne, David

    2015-09-01

    Singlet excitons in π-stacked molecular crystals can split into two triplet excitons in a process called singlet fission that opens a route to carrier multiplication in photovoltaics. To resolve controversies about the mechanism of singlet fission, we have developed a first principles nonadiabatic quantum dynamical model that reveals the critical role of molecular stacking symmetry and provides a unified picture of coherent versus thermally activated singlet fission mechanisms in different acenes. The slip-stacked equilibrium packing structure of pentacene derivatives is found to enhance ultrafast singlet fission mediated by a coherent superexchange mechanism via higher-lying charge transfer states. By contrast, the electronic couplings for singlet fission strictly vanish at the C(2h) symmetric equilibrium π stacking of rubrene. In this case, singlet fission is driven by excitations of symmetry-breaking intermolecular vibrations, rationalizing the experimentally observed temperature dependence. Design rules for optimal singlet fission materials therefore need to account for the interplay of molecular π-stacking symmetry and phonon-induced coherent or thermally activated mechanisms. PMID:26382701

  1. First-Principles Quantum Dynamics of Singlet Fission: Coherent versus Thermally Activated Mechanisms Governed by Molecular π Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroyuki; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene; Olivier, Yoann; Beljonne, David

    2015-09-01

    Singlet excitons in π -stacked molecular crystals can split into two triplet excitons in a process called singlet fission that opens a route to carrier multiplication in photovoltaics. To resolve controversies about the mechanism of singlet fission, we have developed a first principles nonadiabatic quantum dynamical model that reveals the critical role of molecular stacking symmetry and provides a unified picture of coherent versus thermally activated singlet fission mechanisms in different acenes. The slip-stacked equilibrium packing structure of pentacene derivatives is found to enhance ultrafast singlet fission mediated by a coherent superexchange mechanism via higher-lying charge transfer states. By contrast, the electronic couplings for singlet fission strictly vanish at the C2 h symmetric equilibrium π stacking of rubrene. In this case, singlet fission is driven by excitations of symmetry-breaking intermolecular vibrations, rationalizing the experimentally observed temperature dependence. Design rules for optimal singlet fission materials therefore need to account for the interplay of molecular π -stacking symmetry and phonon-induced coherent or thermally activated mechanisms.

  2. Modeling adsorption rate of organic micropollutants present in landfill leachates onto granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl; Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Méndez-Díaz, José D; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    The overall adsorption rate of single micropollutants present in landfill leachates such as phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two commercial activated carbons was studied. The experimental data obtained were interpreted by using a diffusional model (PVSDM) that considers external mass transport, intraparticle diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. Furthermore, the concentration decay data were interpreted by using kinetics models. Results revealed that PVSDM model satisfactorily fitted the experimental data of adsorption rate on activated carbon. The tortuosity factor of the activated carbons used ranged from 2 to 4. The contribution of pore volume diffusion represented more than 92% of intraparticle diffusion confirming that pore volume diffusion is the controlling mechanism of the overall rate of adsorption and surface diffusion can be neglected. The experimental data were satisfactorily fitted the kinetic models. The second-order kinetic model was better fitted the experimental adsorption data than the first-order model. PMID:22858399

  3. The modality-switch effect: visually and aurally presented prime sentences activate our senses.

    PubMed

    Scerrati, Elisa; Baroni, Giulia; Borghi, Anna M; Galatolo, Renata; Lugli, Luisa; Nicoletti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Verifying different sensory modality properties for concepts results in a processing cost known as the modality-switch effect. It has been argued that this cognitive cost is the result of a perceptual simulation. This paper extends this argument and reports an experiment investigating whether the effect is the result of an activation of sensory information which can also be triggered by perceptual linguistically described stimuli. Participants were first exposed to a prime sentence describing a light or a sound's perceptual property (e.g., "The light is flickering", "The sound is echoing"), then required to perform a property-verification task on a target sentence (e.g., "Butter is yellowish", "Leaves rustle"). The content modalities of the prime and target sentences could be compatible (i.e., in the same modality: e.g., visual-visual) or not (i.e., in different modalities). Crucially, we manipulated the stimuli's presentation modality such that half of the participants was faced with written sentences while the other half was faced with aurally presented sentences. Results show a cost when two different modalities alternate, compared to when the same modality is repeated with both visual and aural stimuli presentations. This result supports the embodied and grounded cognition view which claims that conceptual knowledge is grounded into the perceptual system. Specifically, this evidence suggests that sensory modalities can be pre-activated through the simulation of either read or listened linguistic stimuli describing visual or acoustic perceptual properties.

  4. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  5. [Plasmapheresis for macrophage activation syndrome and multiorgan failure as first presentation of juvenile dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Bustos B, R; Carrasco A, C; Toledo R, C

    2012-07-01

    The use of extracorporeal techniques for the treatment of paediatric diseases has expanded dramatically in the past decade. Plasmapheresis, a technique for exchanging plasma components with albumin or plasma, has been used in some rheumatologic conditions. We report the clinical course of a 7 years old boy with clinical and biological features of macrophage activation syndrome and multiorgan failure, at the time of presentation of severe juvenile dermatomyositis, and non responsive to corticosteroids, cyclosporine and immunoglobulin. After 4 days in the paediatric intensive care unit, plasmapheresis was used as rescue therapy. Repeated therapeutic plasmapheresis was effective for improving the multiorgan failure and laboratory abnormalities. The patient was discharged on the 21st hospital day with good functional condition. Plasmapheresis should be considered as rescue treatment in patients with life threatening macrophage activation syndrome and systemic onset of juvenile dermatomyositis. PMID:22342516

  6. Peptides from cowpea present antioxidant activity, inhibit cholesterol synthesis and its solubilisation into micelles.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marcelo Rodrigues; Soares Freitas, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Corrêa Carlos, Amanda Caroline; Siguemoto, Érica Sayuri; Fontanari, Gustavo Guadagnucci; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-02-01

    In previous studies, it was reported that the protein isolated from the cowpea interferes favourably in lipid metabolism, and reduces cholesterol synthesis. The present study investigated the role of cowpea peptide fractions in the micellar solubilisation of cholesterol, in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) activity, and in the in vitro antioxidant capacity, considering the effects of thermal processing. The protein was isolated from the raw and cooked beans and digested to simulate human digestion. The peptides from the protein isolate of raw bean with molecular mass lower than 3kDa reduced 89% of the HMGCR enzymatic reaction velocity. The cooked cowpeas were more effective in inhibiting the micellar solubility of cholesterol than the raw ones but not the antioxidant activity. This is the first report that cowpea peptides inhibit cholesterol homeostasis in vitro in two distinct routes, and act as an antioxidant.

  7. Deciphering the Long-Term Trend of Atlantic Basin Intense Hurricanes: More Active Versus Less Active During the Present Epoch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    During the interval of 1944-1997, 120 intense hurricanes (i.e., those of category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane damage potential scale) were observed in the Atlantic basin, having an annual frequency of 0-7 events per year, being more active prior to the mid 1960's than thereafter (hence a possible two-state division: more active versus less active), and being preferentially lower during El Nino years as compared to non-El Nino years. Because decadal averages of the frequency of intense hurricanes closely resemble those of average temperature anomalies for northern hemispheric and global standards and of the average temperature at the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland), a proxy for climatic change, it is inferred that the long-term trends of the annual frequency of intense hurricanes and temperature may be statistically related. Indeed, on the basis of 4- and 10-yr moving averages, one finds that there exists strong linear associations between the annual frequency of intense hurricanes in the Atlantic basin and temperature (specially, when temperature slightly leads). Because the long-term leading trends of temperature are now decidedly upward, beginning about the mid 1980's, it is inferred that the long-term consequential trends of the annual frequency of intense hurricanes should now also be upward, having begun near 1990, suggesting that a return to the more active state probably has already occurred. However, because of the anomalous El Nino activity of the early to mid 1990's, the switch from the less active to the more active state essentially went unnoticed (a marked increase in the number of intense hurricanes was not observed until the 1995 and 1996 hurricane seasons, following the end of the anomalous El Nino activity). Presuming that a return to the more active state has, indeed, occurred, one expects the number of seasonal intense hurricanes during the present epoch (continuing through about 2012) to usually be higher than average (i

  8. Video and film analysis with correlation tracking and active result presentation (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowa, Per

    1990-08-01

    Experience with a turnkey analysis system featuring high resolution video input and display, a modular video disc system and a 16 mm cine film scanner with 2600-point resolution, is presented. Tracking is performed with a high-speed correlation process, requiring no special markers. Software packages for evaluating two and three-dimensional results are interactively accessible. Combining the original image sequence with real-time graphic overlays and active drawing of graphic diagrams, provides for an excellent understanding and documentation of the motion sequences.

  9. A comparison of 4 methods of data presentation for lysosomal enzyme activity in gingival crevicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Lamster, I B; Oshrain, R L; Fiorello, L A; Celenti, R S; Gordon, J M

    1988-07-01

    In previous studies, we have emphasized the importance of considering the methods used for analysis of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). This study evaluated 4 different approaches for data presentation of lysosomal enzyme activity in GCF. GCF was collected from patients displaying at least 2 mm of clinical attachment loss at a minimum of 3 sites in the mouth (DA), and patients who did not display clinical attachment loss of 2 mm or more at any site in the mouth (DI), during a 3-month interval following entry into a longitudinal trial. GCF was collected by the timed intrasulcular placement of precut filter paper strips. 16 to 28 individual GCF samples were collected from each patient. The lysosomal enzymes studied were B-glucuronidase (BG) and arylsulfatase. The mean values for the DA and DI groups at baseline and 3 months are reported. The results indicate that when the data is expressed as total enzyme activity (unit activity) per 30-s collection (UA) or UA x GCF volume (microliter) per mm of probing depth, the DA group demonstrated significantly greater mean values than the DI group at baseline and 3 months. In contrast, when the data was expressed as concentration (UA/microliter), or UA per mm of probing depth, differences between the DA and DI groups were observed only at the 3-month evaluation. The difficulty in using concentration when reporting GCF lysosomal enzyme activity is emphsized by comparison of the data from the DA group and the high and low enzyme activity subsets of the DI group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3042812

  10. Analysis of effects of MCB3681, the antibacterially active substance of prodrug MCB3837, on human resident microflora as proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, A; Rashid, M-U; Kapsner, T; Panagiotidis, G; Weintraub, A; Nord, C E

    2015-08-01

    The water-soluble prodrug MCB3837 is rapidly converted to MCB3681, active against Gram-positive bacterial species, after intravenous infusion. The aim of this study was to prove the principle that MCB3681 is efficacious in vivo by demonstrating its effect on the resident microflora or colonizers of the human skin, nose, oropharynx and intestine. MCB3837 was infused at a daily dose of 6 mg/kg for 5 days. MCB3681 was active against clostridia, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus, thus proving the principle that MCB3681 is antibacterially efficacious in vivo without affecting the Gram-negative microflora.

  11. Mauritia flexuosa Presents In Vitro and In Vivo Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Activities.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Pérez, Wilson; Guzmán, Luis; Alarcón, Marcelo; Navarrete, Simón; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    Fruit from the palm Mauritia flexuosa is one of the most important species in Peru, Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia, Bolivia, and Guyana. The present study aimed to investigate the antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities of oil extracted from Mauritia flexuosa. The fatty acid contents were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Oil extract of peel of Mauritia flexuosa was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The oil extract inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and TRAP-6 by a concentration-dependent way (0.1 to 1 mg/mL) without the participation of the adenylyl cyclase pathway and diminished platelet rolling and firm adhesion under flow conditions. Furthermore, the oil extract induced a marked increase in the rolling speed of leukocytes retained on the platelet surface, reflecting a reduction of rolling and less adhesion. At the concentrations used, the oil extract significantly decreased platelet release of sP-selectin, an atherosclerotic-related inflammatory mediator. Oil extract inhibited thrombus growth at the same concentration as that of aspirin, a classical reference drug. Finally, the data presented herein also demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge the protective effect of oil extracted from Mauritia flexuosa on platelet activation and thrombosis formation.

  12. OSCE and Case Presentations As Active Assessments of Dental Student Performance.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang E; Anderson, Nina K; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and case presentation (CP) as forms of active assessment were effective measures of overall didactic knowledge and clinical performance in a predoctoral dental curriculum. This evaluation was conducted by statistical analysis of quality points (QP) awarded for didactic and clinical performance, CP grades, and OSCE scores for 185 students at Harvard School of Dental Medicine who graduated during the period 2010-14. As part of the requirements for graduation, each student takes three OSCEs and presents two patient cases. Data for the study were obtained from the Office of the Registrar. The results showed no direct correlation between QP and CP grades and no correlation between CP grades and OSCE scores. However, there was a correlation between OSCE scores and QP. Students with honors-level scores on any of the three OSCEs received significantly more QP than students who did not receive honors. In addition, students with passing scores on OSCEs 2 and 3 received significantly more QP than students with failing or marginal OSCE scores. Innovative formats of active assessment such as OSCEs and CPs can promote a student-centered learning environment. These data indicated that, within this study population, there was a positive association between OSCE scores and clinical and didactic performance, supporting the value of OSCEs as a means of assessment. PMID:26933109

  13. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  14. Mauritia flexuosa Presents In Vitro and In Vivo Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Pérez, Wilson; Guzmán, Luis; Alarcón, Marcelo; Navarrete, Simón; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    Fruit from the palm Mauritia flexuosa is one of the most important species in Peru, Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia, Bolivia, and Guyana. The present study aimed to investigate the antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities of oil extracted from Mauritia flexuosa. The fatty acid contents were determined by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. Oil extract of peel of Mauritia flexuosa was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The oil extract inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and TRAP-6 by a concentration-dependent way (0.1 to 1 mg/mL) without the participation of the adenylyl cyclase pathway and diminished platelet rolling and firm adhesion under flow conditions. Furthermore, the oil extract induced a marked increase in the rolling speed of leukocytes retained on the platelet surface, reflecting a reduction of rolling and less adhesion. At the concentrations used, the oil extract significantly decreased platelet release of sP-selectin, an atherosclerotic-related inflammatory mediator. Oil extract inhibited thrombus growth at the same concentration as that of aspirin, a classical reference drug. Finally, the data presented herein also demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge the protective effect of oil extracted from Mauritia flexuosa on platelet activation and thrombosis formation. PMID:24454503

  15. Dissociating the past from the present in the activity of place cells.

    PubMed

    de Hoz, Livia; Wood, Emma R

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that declarative memories can be dependent on both an episodic and a semantic memory system. While the semantic system deals with factual information devoid of reference to its acquisition, the episodic system, characterized by mental time travel, deals with the unique past experience in which an event took place. Episodic memory is characteristically hippocampus-dependent. Place cells are recorded from the hippocampus of rodents and their firing reflects many of the key characteristics of episodic memory. For example, they encode information about "what" happens "where," as well as temporal information. However, when these features are expressed during an animal's behavior, the neuronal activity could merely be categorizing the present situation and could therefore reflect semantic memory rather than episodic memory. We propose that mental time travel is the key feature of episodic memory and that it should take a form, in the awake animal, similar to the replay of behavioral patterns of activity that has been observed in hippocampus during sleep. Using tasks designed to evoke episodic memory, one should be able to see memory reactivation of behaviorally relevant sequences of activity in the awake animal while recording from hippocampus and other cortical structures.

  16. Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work developing particle-based acellular, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) has focused exclusively on spherical platforms. To explore the role of shape, we generated ellipsoidal PLGA microparticles with varying aspect ratios (ARs) and synthesized aAPCs from them. The ellipsoidal biomimetic aAPCs with high-AR showed significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo activity above spherical aAPCs with particle volume and antigen content held constant. Confocal imaging indicates that CD8+ T cells preferentially migrate to and are activated by interaction with the long axis of the aAPC. Importantly, enhanced activity of high-AR aAPCs was seen in a mouse melanoma model, with high-AR aAPCs improving melanoma survival compared to non-cognate aAPCs (p = 0.004) and cognate spherical aAPCs (p = 0.05). These findings indicate that particle geometry is a critical design criterion in the generation of aAPCs, and may offer insight into the essential role of geometry in the interaction between CD8+ T cells and biological APCs. PMID:24099710

  17. European Space Agency detector development for space science: present and future activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvet, L.; Bavdaz, M.; Crouzet, P. E.; Nelms, N.; Nowicki-Bringuier, Y. R.; Shortt, B.; Verhoeve, P.

    2014-07-01

    We report on the present and future detector development activities for the European Space Agency Science Programme. The development of European technology in that field is a key mission enabler for the program, which requires TRL6 (ISO scale) by end of the definition phase, so called "mission adoption". This is particularly true for Astronomy and fundamental physics type missions. Current activities are in particular targeting large format and p-channel CCD, NIR and MWIR, LWIR wavelength ranges as well as related ASIC controller. For the longer term future mission plan (so called M4, M5 and L2 missions, M3 being PLATO and L1 JUICE), the extreme ends of the spectrum will be addressed. An overview of the detector status for the Earth Observation program is given in appendix, as most of the technologies are directly applicable to some extent to science missions, in particular for Planetary missions. The specific validation activities in place in the future mission preparation office in support to the space science program will be eventually briefly detailed.

  18. Analysis of Scores on Principles of Adult Learning Scale for Part-Time Faculty and Recommendations for Staff Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conti, Gary J.

    A study assessed the degree to which teachers in the Hidalgo-Starr Adult Education Coop in Texas support and practice the principles in the literature on adult education. During the project, 94 part-time teachers from the Hidalgo-Starr Adult Education Coop completed the Principles of Adult Learning Scale (PALS). (The PALS is a validated 44-item…

  19. Past and present active sedimentation and tectonics in the South Alboran Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acremont, E.; Gorini, C.; El Abbassi, M.; Farran, M.; Leroy, S.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Migeon, S.; Poort, J.; Ammar, A.; Smit, J.; Do Couto, D.; Ercilla, G.; Alonso, B.

    2012-04-01

    Since the Tortonian, the thinned continental crust and the overlying sedimentary cover of the Alboran Sea are submitted to tectonic inversion due to the convergence between Eurasia and Africa. The past and present deformation is significant along the Moroccan margin where the MARLBORO-1 cruise in 2011, acquired 1100 km of mid-resolution seismic reflection along 20 profiles perpendicular and parallel to the margin, off Al Hoceima, to latitude 36°N. The study area located on the Xauen/Tofino banks and the South Alboran ridge off Morocco, shows signs of both past and present strong tectonic deformation, mass-movement deposits (mostly slides and mass flow deposits), and contourites. The lateral and longitudinal evolution of contourites and mass movement deposits and the geometric relationships between those deposits and active tectonic structures have been studied. In the distal margin, contourites and gravitational instabilities are the depositional systems that best record the tectonic signal of the area since at least the Messinian. On the two flanks of the Xauen/Tofino and South Alboran ridge, the sedimentary register affected by growth-faults is mainly composed of contourites. Internal strata pattern, spatial and temporal distribution of thickness and depocenters, and discontinuities help to infer sedimentary processes and their interaction with tectonics. In the southern Alboran Sea where the bathymetry shows abrupt slopes, the recurrent seismic activity seems to be the main factor triggering mass wasting as witnessed by the Mass transport complexes (MTCs). Recent MTCs originate from escarpments on the edge of the contourites. However, in most cases the seismic reflection data show the depositional bodies of numerous slides linked to the activity of growth-faults and thrusts observed on the Xauen and Tofino Bank's north flanks. Tectonic inversion is recorded since the late Miocene with an acceleration of the uplift and compressional activity evidenced during

  20. The modality-switch effect: visually and aurally presented prime sentences activate our senses

    PubMed Central

    Scerrati, Elisa; Baroni, Giulia; Borghi, Anna M.; Galatolo, Renata; Lugli, Luisa; Nicoletti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Verifying different sensory modality properties for concepts results in a processing cost known as the modality-switch effect. It has been argued that this cognitive cost is the result of a perceptual simulation. This paper extends this argument and reports an experiment investigating whether the effect is the result of an activation of sensory information which can also be triggered by perceptual linguistically described stimuli. Participants were first exposed to a prime sentence describing a light or a sound’s perceptual property (e.g., “The light is flickering”, “The sound is echoing”), then required to perform a property-verification task on a target sentence (e.g., “Butter is yellowish”, “Leaves rustle”). The content modalities of the prime and target sentences could be compatible (i.e., in the same modality: e.g., visual–visual) or not (i.e., in different modalities). Crucially, we manipulated the stimuli’s presentation modality such that half of the participants was faced with written sentences while the other half was faced with aurally presented sentences. Results show a cost when two different modalities alternate, compared to when the same modality is repeated with both visual and aural stimuli presentations. This result supports the embodied and grounded cognition view which claims that conceptual knowledge is grounded into the perceptual system. Specifically, this evidence suggests that sensory modalities can be pre-activated through the simulation of either read or listened linguistic stimuli describing visual or acoustic perceptual properties. PMID:26579049

  1. Xenohormetic and anti-aging activity of secoiridoid polyphenols present in extra virgin olive oil

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Joven, Jorge; Aragonès, Gerard; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Borrás-Linares, Isabel; Camps, Jordi; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cufí, Sílvia; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Garcia-Heredia, Anabel; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Herranz-López, María; Jiménez-Sánchez, Cecilia; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Lozano-Sánchez, Jesús; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Martin-Paredero, Vicente; Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Quirantes-Piné, Rosa; Rull, Anna; Tomás-Menor, Laura; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Micol, Vicente; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aging can be viewed as a quasi-programmed phenomenon driven by the overactivation of the nutrient-sensing mTOR gerogene. mTOR-driven aging can be triggered or accelerated by a decline or loss of responsiveness to activation of the energy-sensing protein AMPK, a critical gerosuppressor of mTOR. The occurrence of age-related diseases, therefore, reflects the synergistic interaction between our evolutionary path to sedentarism, which chronically increases a number of mTOR activating gero-promoters (e.g., food, growth factors, cytokines and insulin) and the “defective design” of central metabolic integrators such as mTOR and AMPK. Our laboratories at the Bioactive Food Component Platform in Spain have initiated a systematic approach to molecularly elucidate and clinically explore whether the “xenohormesis hypothesis,” which states that stress-induced synthesis of plant polyphenols and many other phytochemicals provides an environmental chemical signature that upregulates stress-resistance pathways in plant consumers, can be explained in terms of the reactivity of the AMPK/mTOR-axis to so-called xenohormetins. Here, we explore the AMPK/mTOR-xenohormetic nature of complex polyphenols naturally present in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), a pivotal component of the Mediterranean style diet that has been repeatedly associated with a reduction in age-related morbid conditions and longer life expectancy. Using crude EVOO phenolic extracts highly enriched in the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycon and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycon, we show for the first time that (1) the anticancer activity of EVOO secoiridoids is related to the activation of anti-aging/cellular stress-like gene signatures, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response, spermidine and polyamine metabolism, sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) and NRF2 signaling; (2) EVOO secoiridoids activate AMPK and suppress crucial genes involved in the Warburg effect and the self-renewal capacity of

  2. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs. PMID:27083744

  3. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs.

  4. Disaster planning: the past, present, and future concepts and principles of managing a surge of burn injured patients for those involved in hospital facility planning and preparedness.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Holmes, James H; Alson, Roy L; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The 9/11 attacks reframed the narrative regarding disaster medicine. Bypass strategies have been replaced with absorption strategies and are more specifically described as "surge capacity." In the succeeding years, a consensus has coalesced around stratifying the surge capacity into three distinct tiers: conventional, contingency, and crisis surge capacities. For the purpose of this work, these three distinct tiers were adapted specifically to burn surge for disaster planning activities at hospitals where burn centers are not located. A review was conducted involving published plans, other related academic works, and findings from actual disasters as well as modeling. The aim was to create burn-specific definitions for surge capacity for hospitals where a burn center is not located. The three-tier consensus description of surge capacity is delineated in their respective stratifications by what will hereinafter be referred to as the three "S's"; staff, space, and supplies (also referred to as supplies, pharmaceuticals, and equipment). This effort also included the creation of a checklist for nonburn center hospitals to assist in their development of a burn surge plan. Patients with serious burn injuries should always be moved to and managed at burn centers, but during a medical disaster with significant numbers of burn injured patients, there may be impediments to meeting this goal. It may be necessary for burn injured patients to remain for hours in an outlying hospital until being moved to a burn center. This work was aimed at aiding local and regional hospitals in developing an extemporizing measure until their burn injured patients can be moved to and managed at a burn center(s). PMID:23817001

  5. Disaster planning: the past, present, and future concepts and principles of managing a surge of burn injured patients for those involved in hospital facility planning and preparedness.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Holmes, James H; Alson, Roy L; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The 9/11 attacks reframed the narrative regarding disaster medicine. Bypass strategies have been replaced with absorption strategies and are more specifically described as "surge capacity." In the succeeding years, a consensus has coalesced around stratifying the surge capacity into three distinct tiers: conventional, contingency, and crisis surge capacities. For the purpose of this work, these three distinct tiers were adapted specifically to burn surge for disaster planning activities at hospitals where burn centers are not located. A review was conducted involving published plans, other related academic works, and findings from actual disasters as well as modeling. The aim was to create burn-specific definitions for surge capacity for hospitals where a burn center is not located. The three-tier consensus description of surge capacity is delineated in their respective stratifications by what will hereinafter be referred to as the three "S's"; staff, space, and supplies (also referred to as supplies, pharmaceuticals, and equipment). This effort also included the creation of a checklist for nonburn center hospitals to assist in their development of a burn surge plan. Patients with serious burn injuries should always be moved to and managed at burn centers, but during a medical disaster with significant numbers of burn injured patients, there may be impediments to meeting this goal. It may be necessary for burn injured patients to remain for hours in an outlying hospital until being moved to a burn center. This work was aimed at aiding local and regional hospitals in developing an extemporizing measure until their burn injured patients can be moved to and managed at a burn center(s).

  6. Effective Presentation of Metabolic Rate Information for Lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, Michael A.; Gonia, Philip; Lombay-Gonzalez, Jose

    2010-01-01

    During human exploration of the lunar surface, a suited crewmember needs effective and accurate information about consumable levels remaining in their life support system. The information must be presented in a manner that supports real-time consumable monitoring and route planning. Since consumable usage is closely tied to metabolic rate, the lunar suit must estimate metabolic rate from life support sensors, such as oxygen tank pressures, carbon dioxide partial pressure, and cooling water inlet and outlet temperatures. To provide adequate warnings that account for traverse time for a crewmember to return to a safe haven, accurate forecasts of consumable depletion rates are required. The forecasts must be presented to the crewmember in a straightforward, effective manner. In order to evaluate methods for displaying consumable forecasts, a desktop-based simulation of a lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) has been developed for the Constellation lunar suite s life-support system. The program was used to compare the effectiveness of several different data presentation methods.

  7. Buridan's Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamport, Leslie

    2012-08-01

    Buridan's principle asserts that a discrete decision based upon input having a continuous range of values cannot be made within a bounded length of time. It appears to be a fundamental law of nature. Engineers aware of it can design devices so they have an infinitessimal probability of not making a decision quickly enough. Ignorance of the principle could have serious consequences.

  8. Widely available active sites on Ni2P for electrochemical hydrogen evolution--insights from first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin H; Stern, Lucas-Alexandre; Feng, Ligang; Rossmeisl, Jan; Hu, Xile

    2015-04-28

    We present insights into the mechanism and the active site for hydrogen evolution on nickel phosphide (Ni2P). Ni2P was recently discovered to be a very active non-precious hydrogen evolution catalyst. Current literature attributes the activity of Ni2P to a particular site on the (0001) facet. In the present study, using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that several widely available low index crystal facets on Ni2P have better properties for a high catalytic activity. DFT calculations were used to identify moderately bonding nickel bridge sites and nickel hollow sites for hydrogen adsorption and to calculate barriers for the Tafel pathway. The investigated surfaces in this study were the (101̅0), (1̅1̅20), (112̅0), (112̅1) and (0001) facets of the hexagonal Ni2P crystal. In addition to the DFT results, we present experiments on Ni2P nanowires growing along the 〈0001〉 direction, which are shown as efficient hydrogen evolution catalysts. The experimental results add these nanowires to a variety of different morphologies of Ni2P, which are all active for HER. PMID:25812670

  9. Principles of learning.

    PubMed

    Voith, V L

    1986-12-01

    This article discusses some general principles of learning as well as possible constraints and how such principles can apply to horses. A brief review is presented of experiments that were designed to assess learning in horses. The use of behavior modification techniques to treat behavior problems in horses is discussed and several examples of the use of these techniques are provided. PMID:3492241

  10. Fighting the stigma caused by mental disorders: past perspectives, present activities, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    STUART, HEATHER

    2008-01-01

    People who live with mental illnesses are among the most stigmatized groups in society. In 1996, in recognition of the particularly harsh burden caused by the stigma associated with schizophrenia, the WPA initiated a global anti-stigma program, Open-the-Doors. In 2005, a WPA Section on Stigma and Mental Health was created, with a broader mandate to reduce stigma and discrimination caused by mental disabilities in general. In light of these impor-tant developments, and the growing public health interest in stigma reduction, this paper reflects on the past perspectives that have led us to our current position, reviews present activities and accomplishments, and identifies challenges that the Section members will face in their future efforts to reduce the stigma caused by mental disorders. PMID:18836546

  11. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  12. 21st Century Extravehicular Activities: Synergizing Past and Present Training Methods for Future Spacewalking Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Sandra K.; Gast, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Neil Armstrong's understated words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." were spoken from Tranquility Base forty years ago. Even today, those words resonate in the ears of millions, including many who had yet to be born when man first landed on the surface of the moon. By their very nature, and in the the spirit of exploration, extravehicular activities (EVAs) have generated much excitement throughout the history of manned spaceflight. From Ed White's first space walk in June of 1965, to the first steps on the moon in 1969, to the expected completion of the International Space Station (ISS), the ability to exist, live and work in the vacuum of space has stood as a beacon of what is possible. It was NASA's first spacewalk that taught engineers on the ground the valuable lesson that successful spacewalking requires a unique set of learned skills. That lesson sparked extensive efforts to develop and define the training requirements necessary to ensure success. As focus shifted from orbital activities to lunar surface activities, the required skill-set and subsequently the training methods, changed. The requirements duly changed again when NASA left the moon for the last time in 1972 and have continued to evolve through the Skylab, Space Shuttle; and ISS eras. Yet because the visits to the moon were so long ago, NASA's expertise in the realm of extra-terrestrial EVAs has diminished. As manned spaceflight again shifts its focus beyond low earth orbit, EVA success will depend on the ability to synergize the knowledge gained over 40+ years of spacewalking to create a training method that allows a single crewmember to perform equally well, whether performing an EVA on the surface of the Moon, while in the vacuum of space, or heading for a rendezvous with Mars. This paper reviews NASA's past and present EVA training methods and extrapolates techniques from both to construct the basis for future EVA astronaut training.

  13. 21st Century extravehicular activities: Synergizing past and present training methods for future spacewalking success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Sandra K.; Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-10-01

    Neil Armstrong's understated words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" were spoken from Tranquility Base forty years ago. Even today, those words resonate in the ears of millions, including many who had yet to be born when man first landed on the surface of the moon. By their very nature, and in the true spirit of exploration, extravehicular activities (EVAs) have generated much excitement throughout the history of manned spaceflight. From Ed White's first spacewalk in the June of 1965, to the first steps on the moon in 1969, to the expected completion of the International Space Station (ISS), the ability to exist, live and work in the vacuum of space has stood as a beacon of what is possible. It was NASA's first spacewalk that taught engineers on the ground the valuable lesson that successful spacewalking requires a unique set of learned skills. That lesson sparked extensive efforts to develop and define the training requirements necessary to ensure success. As focus shifted from orbital activities to lunar surface activities, the required skill set and subsequently the training methods changed. The requirements duly changed again when NASA left the moon for the last time in 1972 and have continued to evolve through the SkyLab, Space Shuttle, and ISS eras. Yet because the visits to the moon were so long ago, NASA's expertise in the realm of extra-terrestrial EVAs has diminished. As manned spaceflight again shifts its focus beyond low earth orbit, EVA's success will depend on the ability to synergize the knowledge gained over 40+ years of spacewalking to create a training method that allows a single crewmember to perform equally well, whether performing an EVA on the surface of the Moon, while in the vacuum of space, or heading for a rendezvous with Mars. This paper reviews NASA's past and present EVA training methods and extrapolates techniques from both to construct the basis for future EVA astronaut training.

  14. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  15. A summary of present-day gully formation and activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candice; McEwen, Alfred; Dundas, Colin; Byrne, Shane

    2016-07-01

    trends and variations in gully size, morphology, orientation, and location are additionally examined as indications of a seasonal (or other) control, as well as variations with latitude, dune type/size/orientation, or Mars year. This presentation will summarize the results of our monitoring campaigns, and will compare the data that are available about gullies of different morphologies and locations. Our aim is to identify possible similarities (and differences) in gully activity processes across Mars, and to estimate the rates of gully formation and modification processes (as has been done for gullies in the southern mid-latitudes [3]). Such estimates would aid interpretation of the likely ages of observed gullies, which have implications for whether records of past (and potential aqueous) gully formation processes are still observable. [1] Diniega et al. (2010) Geology, 38, 1047-1050. [2] Dundas et al. (2012) Icarus, 220, 124-143. [3] Dundas et al. (2015) Icarus, 251, 244-263. [4] Dundas et al. (2010) GRL, 37, L07202. [5] Vincendon (2015) JGR, 120, 1859-1879. [6] Harrison et al. (2015) Icarus, 252, 236-254. [7] Pilorget & Forget (2016) Nature Geosci. 9, 65-69. [8] Vincendon et al. (2010) JGR, 115, E10001. [9] Horgan & Bell (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L09201. [10] Hansen et al., (2011) Science 331, 575-578. [11] Hansen et al. (2015) Icarus 251, 264-267.

  16. Energy principles in architectural design

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, E.

    1981-01-01

    A foundation of basic information pertaining to design and energy use in buildings is presented with emphasis on principles and concepts rather than applications of particular solution. Energy impacts of landforms and topography, vegetation, wind and ventilation, and sun on planning and designing the site are discused. General design considerations involving passive heating, cooling, and lighting systems are detailed. For the design of active building systems, heating, cooling, lighting, and HVAC systems are described. (MCW)

  17. The Principles of Phototransferred Thermoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Moscovitch, Marko

    2011-05-05

    The principles of phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) are described, and some of the basic theoretical ideas underlying this technique are presented. It is demonstrated that the PTTL efficiency is dependent on the photon energy as well as on the activation energies of the various traps involved in the process. A simple two-traps-one-recombination-center model is capable of predicting a variety of different PTTL behaviors, some already were observed experimentally.

  18. Selective monoamine oxidase B inhibition by an Aphanizomenon flos-aquae extract and by its constitutive active principles phycocyanin and mycosporine-like amino acids.

    PubMed

    Scoglio, Stefano; Benedetti, Yanina; Benvenuti, Francesca; Battistelli, Serafina; Canestrari, Franco; Benedetti, Serena

    2014-06-15

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is a fresh water unicellular blue-green alga that has been traditionally used for over 25 years for its health-enhancing properties. Recent studies have shown the ability of a proprietary AFA extract (Klamin(®)) to improve mood, counteract anxiety, and enhance attention and learning. Aim of this study was to test the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activity of the same AFA extract and of its constituents phycocyanin (AFA-PC) and mycosporine-like aminoacids (AFA-MAAs). All compounds showed a dose-dependent selective inhibition of MAO-B activity as compared to MAO-A. The IC50 values of the AFA extract (concentration 10 mg/ml), AFA-PC and AFA-MAAs were 6.4 μl/ml, 1.33 μM and 1.98 μM, respectively, evidencing a mixed-type of inhibition for the AFA extract (Ki 0.99 μl/ml), a non-competitive inhibition for AFA-PC (Ki 1.06 μM) and a competitive inhibition for AFA-MAAs (Ki 0.585 μM). These results are important to explain the neuromodulating properties of the AFA extract Klamin(®), which is rich in phenylethylamine, a general neuromodulator, that would nevertheless rapidly destroyed by MAO-B enzymes without the inhibitory activity of the synergic active principles AFA-PC and AFA-MAAs. The present investigation thus proposes the extract as potentially relevant in clinical areas such as mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC) mediated activation and expansion of natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Webb, Tonya J

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that display markers characteristic of both natural killer (NK) cells and T cells(1). Unlike classical T cells, NKT cells recognize lipid antigen in the context of CD1 molecules(2). NKT cells express an invariant TCRα chain rearrangement: Vα14Jα18 in mice and Vα24Jα18 in humans, which is associated with Vβ chains of limited diversity(3-6), and are referred to as canonical or invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Similar to conventional T cells, NKT cells develop from CD4-CD8- thymic precursor T cells following the appropriate signaling by CD1d (7). The potential to utilize NKT cells for therapeutic purposes has significantly increased with the ability to stimulate and expand human NKT cells with α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and a variety of cytokines(8). Importantly, these cells retained their original phenotype, secreted cytokines, and displayed cytotoxic function against tumor cell lines. Thus, ex vivo expanded NKT cells remain functional and can be used for adoptive immunotherapy. However, NKT cell based-immunotherapy has been limited by the use of autologous antigen presenting cells and the quantity and quality of these stimulator cells can vary substantially. Monocyte-derived DC from cancer patients have been reported to express reduced levels of costimulatory molecules and produce less inflammatory cytokines(9,10). In fact, murine DC rather than autologous APC have been used to test the function of NKT cells from CML patients(11). However, this system can only be used for in vitro testing since NKT cells cannot be expanded by murine DC and then used for adoptive immunotherapy. Thus, a standardized system that relies on artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (aAPC) could produce the stimulating effects of DC without the pitfalls of allo- or xenogeneic cells(12, 13). Herein, we describe a method for generating CD1d-based aAPC. Since the engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) by CD1d-antigen complexes is

  20. Patient-adapted, specific activation of HIV-1 by customized TAL effectors (TALEs), a proof of principle study.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Rene; Hauber, Ilona; Funk, Nancy; Richter, Annekatrin; Behrens, Martina; Renner, Ivonne; Chemnitz, Jan; Hofmann-Sieber, Helga; Baum, Heidi; van Lunzen, Jan; Boch, Jens; Hauber, Joachim; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2015-12-01

    The major obstacle to cure infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is integrated proviral genomes, which are not eliminated by antiretroviral therapies (ART). Treatment approaches with latency-reversing agents (LRAs) aim at inducing provirus expression to tag latently-infected cells for clearance through viral cytopathic effects or cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses. However, the currently tested LRAs reveal evident drawbacks as gene expression is globally induced and viral outgrowth is insecure. Here, we present transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins as potent tools to activate HIV-1 specifically. The large variety of circulating HIV-1 strains and, accordingly, integrated proviruses was addressed by the programmable DNA-specificity of TALEs. Using customized engineered TALEs, a substantial transcription activation and viral outgrowth was achieved with cells obtained from different HIV-1 patients. Our data suggest that TALEs may be useful tools in future strategies aimed at removing HIV-1 reservoirs. PMID:26474371

  1. Glutamate-activated chloride channels: Unique fipronil targets present in insects but not in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Narahashi, Toshio; Zhao, Xilong; Ikeda, Tomoko; Salgado, Vincent L.; Yeh, Jay Z.

    2009-01-01

    Selectivity to insects over mammals is one of the important characteristics for a chemical to become a useful insecticide. Fipronil was found to block cockroach GABA receptors more potently than rat GABAA receptors. Furthermore, glutamate-activated chloride channels (GluCls), which are present in cockroaches but not in mammals, were very sensitive to the blocking action of fipronil. The IC50s of fipronil block were 30 nM in cockroach GABA receptors and 1600 nM in rat GABAA receptors. Moreover, GluCls of cockroach neurons had low IC50s for fipronil. Two types of glutamate-induced chloride current were obswerved: desensitizing and non-desensitizing, with fipronil IC50s of 800 and 10 nM, respectively. We have developed methods to separately record these two types of GluCls. The non-desensitizing and desensitizing currents were selectively inhibited by trypsin and polyvinylpyrrolidone, respectively. In conclusion, in addition to GABA receptors, GluCls play a crucial role in selectivity of fipronil to insects over mammals. GluCls form the basis for development of selective and safe insecticides. PMID:20563240

  2. Three Activities To Assist Biology Teachers in Presenting Conceptually Difficult Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Neil; Tulip, David

    1997-01-01

    Outlines three activities for different areas of biology that can serve as motivators for students or as demonstrations. Each activity is easy to organize and uses available materials. Topics include evolution, anaerobic respiration, and heat loss. (DDR)

  3. Solifluction activity in the present periglacial belt of Sierra Nevada during the last 8 ky BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, M.; Schulte, L.; Gómez Ortiz, A.

    2009-04-01

    Solifluction records in Sierra Nevada (Andalusia, Spain) reveal a succession of environmental changes during the last millennia in this massif mostly related to Holocene climate dynamics. Geomorphological processes in Sierra Nevada react sensitively to small changes in temperature or moisture regimes, showing the proximity of these processes to their climate boundaries and the small climate range necessary to carry environmental changes in the summits of this massif. Solifluction dynamics in Sierra Nevada is influenced by a complex interaction between environmental factors (slope, vegetation cover, texture) and climate parameters (ground thermal regime, length and thickness of the snow cover, water supply). Interdependant feed-back mechanisms among all these variables make difficult to understand the key factors involved in present and past solifluction processes, although monitoring control performed on lobes with different emplacements suggest today's favourable environmental conditions for solifluction displacements. Water availability controls both vegetation cover and slope processes. In fact, currently water supply determines the grass cover in gentle valley floors, but it is also decisive to provide water for the small solifluction displacements detected during the monitored period. Thermal conditions also play a decisive role to activate solifluction or soil formation with similar moisture regimes. The very weak activity pattern of hundreds of solifluction lobes suggests that they must have developed in other more favourable climate conditions. We studied more than 30 sedimentological profiles from solifluction lobes in San Juan and Rio Seco valleys, which reveal an alternation of solifluction/edaphic cycles during the Holocene, with nine different geomorphic phases in the highest western cirques of Sierra Nevada. In San Juan valley, north exposed, there are several generations of solifluction lobes covering the last 8-9 ky BP, while in the southern Rio

  4. Investigating the present and past glacial and frost activity on Pluto with a volatile transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, Francois

    2016-10-01

    The high obliquity and eccentricity of the orbit of Pluto induce seasonal cycles of condensation and sublimation of the main volatile ices: N2, CH4, and CO. The New Horizons spacecraft, which flew by Pluto in July 2015, revealed a complex surface composition including a thousand-kilometre nitrogen glacier in the "Sputnik Planum" plain near the Anti-Charon longitude, extensive methane frosts at mid and high latitudes, and equatorial ice-free regions. We present numerical simulations designed to model the evolution of Pluto's volatiles over thousands of years on the basis of straightforward universal physical equations.Our results explain the observed distribution of ices on the surface and the quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere. In particular the model predicts the N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the 3-fold increase of pressure observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes at the origin of the Sputnik Planum's nitrogen glacier. The same simulations also show frosts of methane, and sometimes nitrogen, that seasonally cover the mid and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade, and thus could be tested observationally in the near future.Using prior orbital parameters of Pluto and a realistic glacial flow parametrization, we also simulate past climates of Pluto. The results show that Pluto undergoes cycles of glacial activity (over timescales of few million years) that may explain the rugged eroded-mountain landscapes surrounding Sputnik Planum and the "bladed" methane terrains east of "Tombaugh Regio".

  5. Present-Day Seasonal Gully Activity in a South Polar Pit (Sisyphi Cavi) on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, Jan; Reiss, Dennis; Appéré, Thomas; Vincendon, Mathieu; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal activity of gullies under current climatic conditions on Mars was observed by [1-7]. Dundas et al. [2] reviewed the present-day activity of classical gullies (including the gully presented in this work), dune gullies, and other mass wasting processes in the southern hemisphere on Mars. Recent polar gullies in Sisyphi Cavi were also analyzed by [8], who estimated ages of about 20 ka to 20 Ma for the gullies. In this study we focus on a single gully in Sisyphi Cavi, located in the south polar region at 1.44° E and 68.54° S. The gully occurs on the gullied equator-facing slope of an isolated polar pit within an infilled impact crater. Multi-temporal high-resolution image data analyses show new deposits at the terminus of the gully channel and on the gully apron within spring (after solar longitudes of 236°) of martian years (MY) 29 and 31. In MY 29 deposition of material shortens the channel by about 40 m; in MY 31 a new deposit at the western flank of the gully apron with approximately 300-600 m3 of material is visible [3]. Our morphological investigations show that the identified new deposits were formed by dark flows through the entire gully deposited on top of the apron between LS ~218° and ~226°. Thermal data show a temperature increase between solar longitudes (LS) ~218° and ~226°. Near-infrared spectral data show relatively constant band strengths of CO2 ice and H2O ice in this time range. After the formation of the dark flows (after LS ~226°), temperatures increase rapidly from ~180 K to >~270 K at LS ~250°. At this time, spectral data indicate that all volatiles on the surface sublimated. However, an earlier beginning of sublimation when the dark flows were observed (between LS ~218° and ~226°) is likely, due to the fact that the instruments can only show the last phase of sublimation (decrease of volatile band strengths) [3]. Spectral modeling shows that from winter to mid-spring, the surface of the studied area is covered by CO2 slab

  6. 3-O-beta-D-Galactopyranoside of quercetin as an active principle from high altitude Podophyllum hexandrum and evaluation of its radioprotective properties.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Raman; Arora, Rajesh; Sagar, Ravinder K; Singh, Shikha; Puri, Satish C; Kumar, Raj; Singh, Surender; Sharmaa, Ashok K; Prasada, Jagdish; Khan, Haider A; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Dhar, Kanaya Lal; Spiteller, Michael; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi

    2005-01-01

    The aqueous-ethanolic extract (AEE) of high altitude Podophyllum hexandrum has earlier been reported to render a radioprotective effect against lethal gamma radiation in in vitro model. AEE has also been reported to possess metal chelating and DNA protecting properties. The present study was undertaken to isolate and characterize the bioactive principle present in AEE and investigate its role in radiation protection. A novel molecule was found to be present in AEE and was assigned as 3-O-beta-D-galactoside of quercetin by acid hydrolysis, LC-MS, LC-APCI-MS/MS and 13C NMR spectra. Various biological activities were investigated at in vitro level. The antioxidant potential of AEE in lipid and aqueous phase was determined against numerous stresses. AEE was found to be significantly (p < 0.05) protective, i.e., against Fe2+ and Cu2+-induced linoleic acid degradation, respectively. Radiation-induced lipid oxidation studies revealed that AEE maximally works at a [lignan]/0.25 kGy ratio 400 (ratio of concentration of AEE divided by the radiation dose, i.e., 0.25 kGy) and no drug-induced lipid oxidation at all concentrations tested was found. In a time-dependent study, total antioxidant activity was maximally exhibited at 1 mg/ml. The site-specific and non-site-specific deoxyribose degradation assay exhibited a dose-dependant hydroxyl scavenging potential of AEE (0.05-500 microg/ml). The anti-lipid peroxidation ability of AEE against radiation (0.25 kGy)-induced lipid peroxidation was higher in case of neural tissue homogenate as compared to kidney homogenate [activity ratio: 0.039 (brain) < 0.24 (kidney)]. The protein protection study using bovine serum albumin was also done for two time intervals (2 h and 4 h) and significant (p < 0.05) protection was observed at 500 microg/ml (> 97%). This study implies that 3-O-beta-D-galactoside present in AEE renders radioprotection by protecting lipids, proteins in renal and neural model system against supra-lethal (0.25 kGy) gamma

  7. Healthy Kids Out of School: Using Mixed Methods to Develop Principles for Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Out-of-School Settings in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shanti; Dietz, William H.; Dolan, Peter R.; Nelson, Miriam E.; Newman, Molly B.; Rockeymoore, Maya; Economos, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Widespread practices supporting availability of healthful foods, beverages, and physical activity in out-of-school-time (OST) settings would further obesity prevention efforts. The objective of this article was to describe principles to guide policy development in support of healthy eating and physical activity practices in out-of-school settings to promote obesity prevention. Methods The Institute of Medicine’s L.E.A.D. framework (Locate Evidence, Evaluate it, Assemble it, and Inform Decisions) was used to identify practices relevant to children’s healthful eating in most OST settings: 1) locate and evaluate information from a national survey of children’s perceptions of healthful-food access; published research, reports, policies and guidelines; and roundtables with OST organizations’ administrators; 2) assemble information to prioritize actionable practices; and 3) inform programmatic direction. Results Three evidence-informed guiding principles for short-duration OST resulted: 1) drink right: choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages; 2) move more: boost movement and physical activity in all programs; and 3) snack smart: fuel up on fruits and vegetables. Conclusion Healthy Kids Out of School was launched to support the dissemination and implementation of these guiding principles in short-duration OST settings, complementing efforts in other OST settings to shift norms around eating and physical activity. PMID:25551182

  8. An enzyme activity capable of endotransglycosylation of heteroxylan polysaccharides is present in plant primary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sarah L; Prakash, Roneel; Chen, Nancy J; Kumagai, Monto H; Turano, Helen M; Cooney, Janine M; Atkinson, Ross G; Paull, Robert E; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Brummell, David A; Schröder, Roswitha

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxylans in the plant cell wall have been proposed to have a role analogous to that of xyloglucans or heteromannans, forming growth-restraining networks by interlocking cellulose microfibrils. A xylan endotransglycosylase has been identified that can transglycosylate heteroxylan polysaccharides in the presence of xylan-derived oligosaccharides. High activity was detected in ripe fruit of papaya (Carica papaya), but activity was also found in a range of other fruits, imbibed seeds and rapidly growing seedlings of cereals. Xylan endotransglycosylase from ripe papaya fruit used a range of heteroxylans, such as wheat arabinoxylan, birchwood glucuronoxylan and various heteroxylans from dicotyledonous primary cell walls purified from tomato and papaya fruit, as donor molecules. As acceptor molecules, the enzyme preferentially used xylopentaitol over xylohexaitol or shorter-length acceptors. Xylan endotransglycosylase was active over a broad pH range and could perform transglycosylation reactions up to 55 °C. Xylan endotransglycosylase activity was purified from ripe papaya fruit by ultrafiltration and cation exchange chromatography. Highest endotransglycosylase activity was identified in fractions that also contained high xylan hydrolase activity and correlated with the presence of the endoxylanase CpaEXY1. Recombinant CpaEXY1 protein transiently over-expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed both endoxylanase and xylan endotransglycosylase activities in vitro, suggesting that CpaEXY1 is a single enzyme with dual activity in planta. Purified native CpaEXY1 showed two- to fourfold higher endoxylanase than endotransglycosylase activity, suggesting that CpaEXY1 may act primarily as a hydrolase. We propose that xylan endotransglycosylase activity (like xyloglucan and mannan endotransglycosylase activities) could be involved in remodelling or re-arrangement of heteroxylans of the cellulose-non-cellulosic cell wall framework.

  9. Purification and characterization of multisquamase, the prothrombin activator present in Echis multisquamatus venom.

    PubMed

    Petrovan, R J; Govers-Riemslag, J W; Nowak, G; Hemker, H C; Rosing, J; Tans, G

    1997-11-01

    The venom of Echis multisquamatus (Central Asian sand viper) contains a single prothrombin activator, designated multisquamase, which is structurally and functionally different from ecarin, the prothrombin activator from the venom of Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper). Multisquamase is comprised of a 58000 Mr and a 23000 Mr subunit that consists of two disulfide-linked chains of 12000 Mr and 10000 Mr, respectively. In contrast to ecarin, which activates prothrombin and prethrombin 1 at comparable rates, and whose activity is hardly affected by Ca2+ or by changes in ionic strength, multisquamase hardly activates prethrombin 1; prothrombin activation requires Ca2+ and is strongly inhibited at high ionic strength. The most favourable kinetic parameters are observed at 1 mM Ca2+ and at low ionic strength (Km=0.085 microM and kcat=0.68 s(-1) at I approximately 0.04). An increase in ionic strength considerably reduces the rate of prothrombin activation, due to an increase of the Km (Km=0.8 microM and kcat=1.03 s(-1) at I approximately 0.2). Studies in plasmas from patients on oral anticoagulant therapy show that E. Multisquamatus venom only activates carboxylated prothrombin, whereas E. carinatus activates both prothrombin and descarboxyprothrombin. Thus, multisquamase-dependent prothrombin activation appears to require post-translational modification of the gla-domain. This venom prothrombin activator may, therefore, become a useful tool to quantitate prothrombin and descarboxyprothrombin in cases where vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of prothrombin is impaired. PMID:9526951

  10. Modular Three-component Delivery System Facilitates HLA Class I Antigen Presentation and CD8(+) T-cell Activation Against Tumors.

    PubMed

    Umlauf, Benjamin J; Chung, Chin-Ying; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2015-06-01

    Cell-mediated immunotherapies have potential as stand-alone and adjuvant therapies for cancer. However, most current protocols suffer from one or more of three major issues: cost, safety, or efficacy. Here we present a nanoparticle delivery system that facilitates presentation of an immunogenic measles antigen specifically in cancer cells. The delivery system does not contain viral particles, toxins, or biologically derived material. Treatment with this system facilitates activation of a secondary immune response against cancer cells, bypassing the need to identify tumor-associated antigens or educate the immune system through a primary immune response. The delivery system consists of a stealth liposome displaying a cancer-specific targeting peptide, named H1299.3, on its exterior surface and encapsulating H250, an immunogenic human leukocyte antigen class 1 restricted peptide. This targeted-nanoparticle facilitates presentation of the H250 peptide in major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Activation is dependent on the targeting peptide, previous antigen exposure, and utilizes a novel autophagy-mediated mechanism to facilitate presentation. Treatment with this liposome results in a significant reduction of tumor growth using an aggressive LLC1 model in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. These data provide proof-of-principle for a novel cell-mediated immunotherapy that is scalable, contains no biologically derived material, and is an efficacious cancer therapy.

  11. Pattern formation for active particles on optically created ordered and disordered substrates (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles M.; Ray, Dipanjan; Reichhardt, Cynthia J.

    2015-08-01

    There has been tremendous growth in the field of active matter, where the individual particles that comprise the system are self-driven. Examples of this class of system include biological systems such as swimming bacteria and crawling cells. More recently, non-biological swimmers have been created using colloidal Janus particles that undergo chemical reactions on one side to produce self-propulsion. These active matter systems exhibit a wide variety of behaviors that are absent in systems undergoing purely thermal fluctuations, such as transitions from uniform liquids to clusters or living crystals, pushing objects around, ratchet effects, and phase separation in mixtures of active and passive particles. Here we examine the collective effects of active matter disks in the presence of static or dynamic substrates. For colloids, such substrates could be created optically in the form of periodic, random, or quasiperiodic patterns. For thermal particles, increasing the temperature generally increases the diffusion or mobility of the particles when they move over a random or periodic substrates. We find that when the particles are active, increasing the activity can increase the mobility for smaller run lengths but decrease the mobility at large run lengths. Additionally we find that at large run lengths on a structured substrate, a variety of novel active crystalline states can form such as stripes, squares and triangular patterns.

  12. Biochemical and antimicrobial activity of phloretin and its glycosilated derivatives present in apple and kumquat.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Davide; Bellocco, Ersilia; Laganà, Giuseppina; Ginestra, Giovanna; Bisignano, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Phloretin and its glycosylated derivatives (phlorizin and phloretin 3',5'-di-C-glucoside) are dihydrochalcones that have many interesting biological properties. The results obtained showed that the dihydrochalcones are able to inhibit growth of Gram positive bacteria, in particular Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 13932 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus clinical strains. Moreover, phloretin is active also against the Gram negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 13311. The determination of the enzymatic activity of key metabolic enzymes allowed us to shed some light on the biochemical mechanism of aglycon cell growth inhibition, showing as it remarkably influences the energetic metabolism of S. aureus. In addition, structure/activity determinations highlighted that the presence of a glycosyl moiety bound to the chalcone structure dramatically decreases the antimicrobial activity of phloretin. PMID:24799241

  13. Voluntary activation deficits of the infraspinatus present as a consequence of pitching-induced fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jaipal; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; Hurd, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Neuromuscular inhibition of the infraspinatus would be greater and external rotation muscle force would be lower after a simulated game compared with pregame values. Materials and methods The sample included 21 uninjured, asymptomatic high school–aged baseball pitchers. Maximum volitional shoulder external rotation strength was assessed before and after a simulated game with a clinical dynamometer. Voluntary activation of the infraspinatus was assessed during strength testing by a modified burst superimposition technique. Performance-related fatigue was assessed by monitoring pitch velocity, and global fatigue was assessed by subject self-report before and after the game. Statistical testing included paired and independent t tests, with α ≤ 05. Results There was no difference between throwing and non-throwing shoulder external rotation strength (P = .12) or voluntary infraspinatus activation (P = .27) before the game. After the game, voluntary activation was significantly lower in the throwing limb compared with pregame activation levels (P = .01). Lower external rotation strength after the game approached statistical significance (P =.06). Pitch velocity was lower in the final inning compared with first-inning velocity (P = .01), and fatigue was significantly greater after the game (P = .01). Conclusions Voluntary infraspinatus muscle activation is a mechanism contributing to external rotation muscle weakness in the fatigued pitcher. Understanding mechanisms contributing to muscle weakness is necessary to develop effective injury prevention and rehabilitation programs. Treatment techniques that enhance neuromuscular activation may be a useful strategy for enhancing strength in this population. Level of evidence Basic Science Study, Kinesiology Study. PMID:21831667

  14. In vitro antioxidative activity of (-)-epicatechin glucuronide metabolites present in human and rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Osakabe, Naomi; Yasuda, Akiko; Baba, Seigo; Tokunaga, Takashi; Kondo, Kazuo; Osawa, Toshihiko; Terao, Junji

    2004-12-01

    Recently we identified four conjugated glucuronide metabolites of epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (E3'G), 4'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (4'ME3'G), (-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (E7G) and 3'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (3'ME7G) from plasma and urine. E3'G and 4'ME3'G were isolated from human urine, while E7G and 3'ME7G were isolated from rats that had received oral administration of (-)-epicatechin (Natsume et al. (2003), Free Radic. Biol. Med. 34,840-849). It has been suggested that these metabolites possess considerable in vivo activity, and therefore we carried out a study to compare the antioxidant activities of the metabolites with that of the parent compound. This was achieved by measuring superoxide scavenging activity, reduction of plasma TBARS production and reduced susceptibility of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation. (-)-Epicatechin was found to have more potent antioxidant activity than the conjugated glucuronide metabolites. Both (-)-epicatechin and E7G had marked antioxidative properties with respect to superoxide radical scavenging activity, plasma oxidation induced by 2,2'-azobis-(2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and LDL oxidation induced by copper ions or 2,2'-azobis(4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (MeO-AMVN). In contrast, the other metabolites had light antioxidative activities over the range of physiological concentrations found in plasma.

  15. Genetic principles.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, D

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the basic principles of genetics, including the classification of genetic disorders and a consideration of the rules and mechanisms of inheritance. The most common pitfalls in clinical genetic diagnosis are described, with emphasis on the problem of the negative or misleading family history.

  16. Activation of photodynamic therapy in vitro with Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-03-01

    Translation of photodynamic therapy to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases where traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov luminescence, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively in order to overcome this depth limitation. We report on the use of Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 as a means to active the photodynamic therapy process in monolayer tumor cell cultures. The current study investigates the utility of Cerenkov luminescence for activating both the clinically relevant aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mM and also the more efficient photosensitizer TPPS2a at 1.2 µM. Cells were incubated with aminolevulinic acid for 6 hours prior to radionuclide addition, as well as additional daily treatments for three days. TPPS2a was delivered as a single treatment with an 18 hour incubation time before radionuclide addition. Experiments were completed for both C6 glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. Although aminolevulinic acid proved ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at any activity for either cell line, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 cell line. Current results demonstrate that it may be possible to generate a therapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov luminescence to activate the photodynamic therapy process with clinically relevant photosensitizers.

  17. Monitoring Target Engagement of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Using Activity Probes: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes or DUBs are a class of enzymes that selectively remove the polypeptide posttranslational modification ubiquitin from a number of substrates. Approximately 100 DUBs exist in human cells and are involved in key regulatory cellular processes, which drive many disease states, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Several aspects of DUB biology have been studied through genetic knock-out or knock-down, genomic, or proteomic studies. However, investigation of enzyme activation and regulation requires additional tools to monitor cellular and physiological dynamics. A comparison between genetic ablation and dominant-negative target validation with pharmacological inhibition often leads to striking discrepancies. Activity probes have been used to profile classes of enzymes, including DUBs, and allow functional and dynamic properties to be assigned to individual proteins. The ability to directly monitor DUB activity within a native biological system is essential for understanding the physiological and pathological role of individual DUBs. We will discuss the evolution of DUB activity probes, from in vitro assay development to their use in monitoring DUB activity in cells and in animal tissues, as well as recent progress and prospects for assessing DUB inhibition in vivo.

  18. Monitoring Target Engagement of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Using Activity Probes: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes or DUBs are a class of enzymes that selectively remove the polypeptide posttranslational modification ubiquitin from a number of substrates. Approximately 100 DUBs exist in human cells and are involved in key regulatory cellular processes, which drive many disease states, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Several aspects of DUB biology have been studied through genetic knock-out or knock-down, genomic, or proteomic studies. However, investigation of enzyme activation and regulation requires additional tools to monitor cellular and physiological dynamics. A comparison between genetic ablation and dominant-negative target validation with pharmacological inhibition often leads to striking discrepancies. Activity probes have been used to profile classes of enzymes, including DUBs, and allow functional and dynamic properties to be assigned to individual proteins. The ability to directly monitor DUB activity within a native biological system is essential for understanding the physiological and pathological role of individual DUBs. We will discuss the evolution of DUB activity probes, from in vitro assay development to their use in monitoring DUB activity in cells and in animal tissues, as well as recent progress and prospects for assessing DUB inhibition in vivo. PMID:27613052

  19. A Documentary Analysis of Abstracts Presented in European Congresses on Adapted Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Sklenarikova, Jana; Kudlacek, Martin; Baloun, Ladislav; Causgrove Dunn, Janice

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify trends in research abstracts published in the books of abstracts of the European Congress of Adapted Physical Activity from 2004 to 2012. A documentary analysis of the contents of 459 abstracts was completed. Data were coded based on subcategories used in a previous study by Zhang, deLisle, and Chen (2006) and by Porretta and Sherrill (2005): number of authors, data source, sample size, type of disability, data analyses, type of study, and focus of study. Descriptive statistics calculated for each subcategory revealed an overall picture of the state and trends of scientific inquiry in adapted physical activity research in Europe.

  20. A Documentary Analysis of Abstracts Presented in European Congresses on Adapted Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Sklenarikova, Jana; Kudlacek, Martin; Baloun, Ladislav; Causgrove Dunn, Janice

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify trends in research abstracts published in the books of abstracts of the European Congress of Adapted Physical Activity from 2004 to 2012. A documentary analysis of the contents of 459 abstracts was completed. Data were coded based on subcategories used in a previous study by Zhang, deLisle, and Chen (2006) and by Porretta and Sherrill (2005): number of authors, data source, sample size, type of disability, data analyses, type of study, and focus of study. Descriptive statistics calculated for each subcategory revealed an overall picture of the state and trends of scientific inquiry in adapted physical activity research in Europe. PMID:27623611

  1. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  2. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  3. Active optical remote sensing of dense clouds with diffusing light : Early results, present implementations, and the challenges ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A. B.; Cahalan, R. F.; Winker, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    We survey the rapid progress of 'off-beam' cloud lidar, from inception to validation via laboratory-scale simulations. Cloud observations from ground, aircraft and even space are covered. Finally, we describe future work in this instrument development effort born out of pure theory in the mid-1990s. We foresee a bright future for off-beam lidar which is, in essence, an atmospheric application of the general principles of optical diffuse-light tomography. The physical cloud-boundary information it delivers is, in principle, the same as given from ground or space (upcoming CloudSat mission) obtained by mm-radar. And mm-radar gives some information about internal variability. However, radar reflectivities quite often disagree with optical estimates of cloud base and optical thickness for well-understood reasons. So optical and microwave cloud probes are now considered as complimentary rather then competitive in our efforts to better understand cloud radiative properties in the context of climate research. We are confident that off-beam lidar will be a valuable and, ultimately, cost-effective source of information about cloud processes. In this, we include direct insight into the present issues in large-scale short-wave absorption based on unambiguous geometrical pathlength statistics, a unique capability of off-beam cloud lidar.

  4. Presenting Theoretical Ideas Prior to Inquiry Activities Fosters Theory-Level Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wecker, Christof; Rachel, Alexander; Heran-Dörr, Eva; Waltner, Christine; Wiesner, Hartmut; Fischer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the course of inquiry activities similar to those of real scientists, learners are supposed to develop knowledge both on the level of observable phenomena and on the level of explanatory theories. However, some theories involve theoretical entities (e.g., "Weiss domains") that cannot be observed directly and therefore may be hard to…

  5. Images of Germany: Past and Present. A Film Collection, Series II Instructional Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Glen; Hutcheson, Gwen

    This booklet offers classroom activities for use with 15 social studies-related films for teaching about Germany. The series of 25-minute films are made available by Deutsche Welle Television and Goethe House New York. Lessons in the booklet include: (1) "Germany Since 1945: A Focus on Berlin"; (2) "'I'll Get You All Out of Here!' A Portrait of…

  6. Production, characterization, and application of an organic solvent-tolerant lipase present in active inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Suxia; Lin, Kang; Pang, Huaiyu; Wu, Yixin; Xu, Jianhe

    2013-01-01

    An organic solvent-tolerant lipase from Serratia marcescens ECU1010 (rSML) was overproduced in Escherichia coli in an insoluble form. High concentrations of both biomass (50 g cell wet weight/L culture broth) and inclusion bodies (10.5 g/L) were obtained by applying a high-cell-density cultivation procedure. Activity assays indicated that the enzymatic activity of rSML reached 600 U/L. After treatment with isopropyl ether for 12 h, the maximum lipase activity reached 6,000 U/L. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy revealed the activation mechanism of rSML in the presence of organic solvents. rSML was stable in broad ranges of temperatures and pH values, as well as in a series of organic solvents. Besides, rSML showed the best enantioselectivity for the kinetic resolution of (±)-trans-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)glycidic acid methyl ester. These features render the S. marcescens ECU1010 lipase attractive for biotechnological applications in the field of organic synthesis and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:23269633

  7. Images of Germany, Past and Present: A Film Collection. Series I, Instructional Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethe House, New York, NY.

    This set of lessons accompanies a series of 30-minute films for teaching about Germany. Available to educators throughout the United States upon request, the 17 films and accompanying instructional activities focus on culture, politics, economics, society, and sports and are appropriate for middle and high school students. Permission is granted to…

  8. [The present status and development of thermal control system of spacesuits for extravehicular activity].

    PubMed

    Zhao, C Y; Sun, J B; Yuan, X G

    1999-04-01

    With the extension of extravehicular activity (EVA) duration, the need for more effective thermal control of EVA spacesuits is required. The specific schemes investigated in heat sink system for EVA are discussed, including radiator, ice storage, metal hydride heat pump, phase-change storage/radiator and sublimator. The importance and requirements of automatic thermal control for EVA are also discussed. Existed automatic thermal control for EVA are reviewed. Prospects of further developments of thermal control of spacesuits for EVA are proposed.

  9. Long-term facilitation of genioglossus activity is present in normal humans during NREM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Pierchala, Lisa; Aboubakr, Salah E.; Shkoukani, Mahdi; Badr, M. Safwan

    2008-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia (EH) is followed by increased ventilatory motor output in the recovery period indicative of long-term facilitation (LTF). We hypothesized that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF of genioglossus (GG) muscle activity in humans during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) sleep. We studied 12 normal non-flow limited humans during stable NREM sleep. We induced 10 brief (3 minute) episodes of isocapnic hypoxia followed by 5 minutes of room air. Measurements were obtained during control, hypoxia, and at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes of recovery, respectively, for minute ventilation (V̇I), supraglottic pressure (PSG), upper airway resistance (RUA) and phasic GG electromyogram (EMGGG). In addition, sham studies were conducted on room air. During hypoxia there was a significant increase in phasic EMGGG (202.7±24.1% of control, p<0.01) and in V̇I (123.0±3.3% of control, p<0.05); however, only phasic EMGGG demonstrated a significant persistent increase throughout recovery (198.9±30.9%, 203.6±29.9% and 205.4±26.4% of control, at 5, 10, and 20 minutes of recovery, respectively, p<0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, age and phasic EMGGG activity during hypoxia were significant predictors of EMGGG at recovery 20 minutes. No significant changes in any of the measured parameters were noted during sham studies. Conclusion: 1) EH elicits LTF of GG in normal non-flow limited humans during NREM sleep, without ventilatory or mechanical LTF. 2) GG activity during the recovery period correlates with the magnitude of GG activation during hypoxia, and inversely with age. PMID:17945544

  10. Questions and Answers for Ken Thomas' "Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian and Gemini Spacesuits" Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian & Gemini spacesuits. While the United States and Russia adapted to existing launch- and reentry-type suits to allow the first human ventures into the vacuum of space, there were differences in execution and capabilities. Mr. Thomas will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach compared to exclusively intravehicular or extra-vehicular suit systems.

  11. Present Research and Standardization Activities on Small Space Debris at Space Environment Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Yukihito; Hanada, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Higashide, Masumi; Okudaira, Osamu; Kamiya, Koki; Nitta, Kumi

    2016-07-01

    The micro-debris of the size from 100 μm to several mm is expected to cause a spacecraft critical failures and troubles. However, the collision probability of the micro-debris and its effect on space equipment are hardly predicted due to lack knowledge regarding the debris distribution and experimental/numerical investigation on material and components. This paper introduce research and standardization activities related on micro-debris for space environmental prevention

  12. Atmospheric methane oxidizers are present and active in Canadian high Arctic soils.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Christine; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente; Yergeau, Etienne; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2014-08-01

    The melting of permafrost and the associated potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere are major concerns in the context of global warming. However, soils can also represent a significant sink for methane through the activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). In this study, we looked at the activity, diversity, and community structure of MOB at two sampling depths within the active layer in three soils from the Canadian high Arctic. These soils had the capacity to oxidize methane at low (15 ppm) and high (1000 ppm) methane concentrations, but rates differed greatly depending on the sampling date, depth, and site. The pmoA gene sequences related to two genotypes of uncultured MOB involved in atmospheric methane oxidation, the 'upland soil cluster gamma' and the 'upland soil cluster alpha', were detected in soils with near neutral and acidic pH, respectively. Other groups of MOB, including Type I methanotrophs and the 'Cluster 1' genotype, were also detected, indicating a broader diversity of MOB than previously reported for Arctic soils. Overall, the results reported here showed that methane oxidation at both low and high methane concentrations occurs in high Arctic soils and revealed that different groups of atmospheric MOB inhabit these soils.

  13. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Sphaerotilus natans a filamentous micro-organism present in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Giannuzzi, Leda; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-08-15

    Wastewaters produced by various industries may contain undesirable amounts of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), as chromate and dichromate, a hazardous metal affecting flora and animals of aquatic ecosystems as well as human health. One removal strategy comprises the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), a less soluble chemical species that is less toxic than Cr(VI). In this work, the ability to reduce Cr(VI) of Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium usually found in activated sludge systems, was evaluated. In aerobic conditions, S. natans was able to efficiently reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) from dichromate solutions ranging between 4.5 and 80 mg Cr(VI)l(-1) in the presence of a carbonaceous source. A simultaneous evaluation of the microbial respiratory activity inhibition was also carried out to analyze the toxic effect of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans was mathematically modeled; chromium(VI) reduction rate depended on both Cr(VI) concentration and active biomass concentration. Although it is known that S. natans removes heavy metal cations such as Cr(III) by biosorption, the ability of this micro-organism to reduce Cr(VI), which behaves as an oxyanion in aqueous solutions, is a novel finding. The distinctive capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) than remain soluble or precipitated becomes S. natans a potential micro-organism to decontaminate wastewaters.

  14. Anti-tumor-promoting activities of selected pungent phenolic substances present in ginger.

    PubMed

    Surh, Y J; Park, K K; Chun, K S; Lee, L J; Lee, E; Lee, S S

    1999-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae) has been widely used as a dietary spice, as well as in traditional oriental medicine. The rhizome of ginger contains pungent vanillyl ketones, including [6]-gingerol and [6]-paradol, and has been reported to possess a strong anti-inflammatory activity. These pungent substances have a vanilloid structure found in other chemopreventive phytochemicals, including curcumin. In our study, we found anti-tumor-promoting properties of [6]-gingerol and [6]-paradol. Thus, topical application of [6]-gingerol or [6]-paradol 30 min prior to 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) attenuated the skin papillomagenesis initiated by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in female ICR mice. These substances also significantly inhibited the tumor-promoter-stimulated inflammation, TNF-alpha production, and activation of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase in mice. In another study, [6]-gingerol and [6]-paradol suppressed the superoxide production stimulated by TPA in differentiated HL-60 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that pungent vanilloids found in ginger possess potential chemopreventive activities. PMID:15281225

  15. Study of microparticles' anomalous diffusion in active bath using speckle light fields (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Sabareesh, Sabareesh K. P.; Volpe, Giorgio; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni S.

    2015-08-01

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomenon. Examples can be given from organelles as molecular machines of cells performing physical tasks in a populated cytoplasm to human mobility in patchy environment at larger scales. Our recent results showed that it is possible to use the disordered landscape generated by speckle light fields to perform advanced manipulation tasks at the microscale. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion of micron size silica particles (5 μm) in the presence of active microswimmers. The microswimmers we used in the experiments are motile bacteria, Escherichia coli (E.coli). They constitute an active background constantly agitating passive silica particles within complex optical potentials. The speckle fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power (maximum power = 12 μW/μm2) is needed to obtain an effective random landscape pattern for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the anomalous diffusion of silica particles undergoing collisions with swimming bacteria. We observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bath of E.coli inside speckle light fields: this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interests.

  16. A macromolecular crowding study of RNA folding and activity: polymer pore size matters! (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Richard; Fiorini, Erica; Paudel, Bishnu; Rueda, David; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-03-01

    Catalytic RNAs, like the group IIB intron ribozyme of S. cerevesiae, require a high magnesium(II) concentration to show folding and function in vitro [1]. In contrast, in vivo conditions are characterized by a highly crowded cellular environment and much lower ion concentration. Molecular crowding agents are a widespread tool to mimic cellular crowding [2]. However, particular physical/chemical properties explaining the crowders influence are mostly not understood. In this study, we gain new insights on how polymer properties like viscosity, pore size etc. influence the activity and folding of a large RNA. We combined bulk activity assays and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer experiments, screening the PEG volume fraction (%) and molecular weight (MW). Our results revealed that upon the influence of crowding agents, a compaction of the underlying structure depends on the PEG % and the presence of different PEG MW and % unveiled an optimal pore size in terms of catalytic activity. In summary, an increasing density of the crowding environment shifts the RNA towards the most compact state, but the ribozyme is only active if the crowders network matches its size [4]. We interpret the most compact state as necessary, but not sufficient, to keep the ribozyme active. Financial support from the European Research Council (MIRNA N° 259092, to RKOS), the Swiss National Fund (SNF), and the Forschungskredit Grant of the University of Zürich (FK-14-096 and 15-092 to RB) are gratefully acknowledged. [1] Swisher J.F., Su L.J., Brenowitz M., Anderson V.E., Pyle A.M., J. Mol. Bio., 315, 297-310 (2002). [2] Kilburn D., Roh J.H., Guo L., Briber R.M., Woodson S.A., JACS, 132, 8690-6 (2010). [3] Steiner M., Karunatilaka K.S., Sigel R.K.O., Rueda D., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.,105, 13853-8 (2008). [4] aBörner R, Fiorini E, Sigel R.K.O., Chimia, 69, 207-212 (2015).; bFiorini E., Paudel B., Börner R., Rueda D., Sigel R.K.O., submitted. [5] König S.L.B., Hadzic M

  17. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  18. Testing Active Power Control from Wind Power at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.

    2011-05-01

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  19. Active Power Control Testing at the U.S. National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.

    2011-01-01

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  20. Antibacterial, antifungal and antiprotozoal activities of fungal communities present in different substrates from Antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antarctica is a pristine and extreme environment that represents a unique opportunity for taxonomic, ecological and biotechnological studies of the microorganisms. In the present work, the fungal communities of rhizosphere soil of Deschampsia antarctica, soil, ornithogenic soil, marine and lake sedi...

  1. Speaking off the Cuff: Strategies and Activities for Developing Presentation Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaszczynski, Carol; Green, Diana J.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation mastery is a skill of paramount importance in the business world. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills has delineated the ability to "articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal skills in a variety of forms and contexts" as a student outcome under learning and innovation skills. Ability to think on…

  2. 2-Amino-thiophene derivatives present antileishmanial activity mediated by apoptosis and immunomodulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da Franca; Dias, Cínthia Nóbrega de Sousa; Néris, Patrícia Lima do Nascimento; Rocha, Juliana da Câmara; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; Scotti, Luciana; Mascarenhas, Sandra Rodrigues; Veras, Robson Cavalcante; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida; Keesen, Tatjana de Souza Lima; de Oliveira, Tiago Bento; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Balliano, Tatiane Luciano; de Aquino, Thiago Mendonça; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Mendonça Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra; de Oliveira, Márcia Rosa

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 2-amino-thiophene derivatives on the promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis and their possible mechanisms of action. Initially, we evaluated the antileishmanial activity of ten 2-amino-thiophene derivatives on promastigote and axenic amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis and their cytotoxicity against murine macrophages and human red blood cells. Three promising compounds were selected for studies of the cell death process using flow cytometry analysis and a DNA fragmentation assay. The effects of the compounds were assessed on intramacrophagic amastigotes, and the modulation of cytokine and NO production was investigated. All thiophene derivatives showed antileishmanial activity against promastigotes and axenic amastigotes with less toxicity for murine macrophages and human red blood cells. The best values were obtained for compounds containing a lateral indole ring. Docking studies suggested that these compounds played an important role in inhibiting trypanothione reductase (TryR) activity. The selected compounds SB-200, SB-44, and SB-83 induced apoptosis in promastigotes involving phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation in a pattern similar to that observed for the positive control. Additionally, SB-200, SB-44, and SB-83 significantly reduced the infection index of macrophages by the parasites; for compounds SB-200 and SB-83 this reduction was associated with increased TNF-α, IL-12, and NO levels. This study demonstrated the effective and selective action of 2-amino-thiophene derivatives against L. amazonensis, resulting in apoptosis-like cell death and immunomodulation in vitro. The results suggest that they are promising compounds for the development of new leishmanicidal drugs.

  3. [Impact of motor activity on the musculoskeletal system of present-day schoolchildren].

    PubMed

    Mirskaia, N B; Kolomenskaia, A N; Siniakina, A D

    2010-01-01

    Moscow schoolchildren having prepathological and pathological states of the musculoskeletal system (MSS) have been found to have risk factors leading to these disorders, such as no optimal motor activity, incorrectly chosen and purposefully unused clothes and footwear, and a text-book wearing manner that is injurious to the MSS. Most parents of schoolchildren are unaware of their children's having prepathological and pathological states of the MSS, the modes of their prevention, correction, and treatment; however, they are ready to obtain knowledge on this problem.

  4. US space flight experience. Physical exertion and metabolic demand of extravehicular activity: Past, present, and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas P.

    1989-01-01

    A review of physical exertion and metabolic demands of extravehicular activity (EVA) on U.S. astronauts is given. Information is given on EVA during Gemini, Apollo and Skylab missions. It is noted that nominal EVA's should not be overstressful from a cardiovascular standpoint; that manual-intensive EVA's such as are planned for the construction phase of the Space Station can and will be demanding from a muscular standpoint, primarily for the upper extremities; that off-nominal unplanned EVA's can be physically demanding both from an endurance and from a muscular standpoint; and that crewmembers should be physically prepared and capable of performing these EVA's at any time during the mission.

  5. MIT-EAPS Neutron Activation Analysis and Radiometric Laboratory Contribution to Geosciences: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Pillalamarri, Ila

    2005-09-08

    The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Radiometric Laboratory's current system is described. This laboratory has been in continuous operation for the past thirty years. A review is provided about the laboratory's analytical participation in trace element geochemical studies of the earth's upper mantle, trace impurity studies of high purity materials, the provenance study of archaeological glass beads, trace multi-element analyses of standard reference materials, the preparation of synthetic analytical standards for Neutron Activation Analysis, and providing a training course in nuclear analytical techniques for environmental samples. The multi-element analysis by INAA consists of determining elements like the rare earths La, Ce, Nd, Sm Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, Lu, and also As, Ba, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Fe, Hf, Hg, K, Mn, Na, Ta, Th, U. The projected future of the laboratory is explained in terms of its resources, expertise in high precision analysis of trace impurities for the material selection that is to be used in rare event physics experiments. For example, this 'surface' laboratory can be efficiently interfaced/integrated with a deep underground low background counting facility, especially in the initial stages.

  6. Biodegradable nanoellipsoidal artificial antigen presenting cells for antigen specific T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Aje, Kent; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2015-04-01

    Non-spherical nanodimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (naAPCs) offer the potential to systemically induce an effective antigen-specific immune response. In this report it is shown biodegradable ellipsoidal naAPCs mimic the T-Cell/APC interaction better than equivalent spherical naAPCs. In addition, it is demonstrated ellipsoidal naAPCs offer reduced non-specific cellular uptake and a superior pharmacokinetic profile compared to spherical naAPCs. PMID:25641795

  7. Present wind activity on Mars - Relation to large latitudinally zoned sediment deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.

    1982-01-01

    The relation of present Martian winds to large latitudinally zoned sediment deposits has been investigated using global wind streak data and mapping of large sand and dust deposits. Dune sand deposits occur primarily in three latitude belts: north polar (74-85 degrees North), low latitude (5 degrees North-20 degrees South), and south polar (40-80 degrees South). Comparison with wind streak data shows the high-latitude dunes to be in areas of seasonally reversing winds. The present winds can form latitudinal dune belts from a variety of initial dune distributions, including uniform distribution and a polar source. The presence of dune sand within the polar layered deposits, the erosional state of the deposits, and the present surface wind flow away from the poles indicate that both polar dune concentrations have been derived from erosion of the layered deposits. The low-latitude dunes are topographically confined in canyons and craters; they are probably subject to long-term reversal of orientations with climate cycles.

  8. Visions, Realities and Guiding Principles for the Future: A Talk Presented to the World Commission on Culture and Development at United Nations Headquarters, New York City, NY, April 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Phil, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Reflects on challenges in establishing a new world civilization and outlines 16 principles for building sustainable, healthy, and spiritually balanced communities. Principles emerged from a 12-year process of reflection, consultation, and action within American Indian communities and are based on personal growth, social unity, spirituality, and…

  9. Effects of rhythmic stimulus presentation on oscillatory brain activity: the physiology of cueing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    te Woerd, Erik S; Oostenveld, Robert; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Lange, Floris P; Praamstra, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in beat perception and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in perception of beat-based rhythms. Rhythmic cues are nonetheless beneficial in gait rehabilitation, raising the question how rhythm improves movement in PD. We addressed this question with magnetoencephalography recordings during a choice response task with rhythmic and non-rhythmic modes of stimulus presentation. Analyses focused on (i) entrainment of slow oscillations, (ii) the depth of beta power modulation, and (iii) whether a gain in modulation depth of beta power, due to rhythmicity, is of predictive or reactive nature. The results show weaker phase synchronisation of slow oscillations and a relative shift from predictive to reactive movement-related beta suppression in PD. Nonetheless, rhythmic stimulus presentation increased beta modulation depth to the same extent in patients and controls. Critically, this gain selectively increased the predictive and not reactive movement-related beta power suppression. Operation of a predictive mechanism, induced by rhythmic stimulation, was corroborated by a sensory gating effect in the sensorimotor cortex. The predictive mode of cue utilisation points to facilitation of basal ganglia-premotor interactions, contrasting with the popular view that rhythmic stimulation confers a special advantage in PD, based on recruitment of alternative pathways. PMID:26509117

  10. Activity-guided identification of acetogenins as novel lipophilic antioxidants present in avocado pulp (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana; Silva-Platas, Christian; Rojo, Rocío P; García, Noemí; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-12-30

    Avocado fruit is a rich source of health-related lipophilic phytochemicals such as monounsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols, carotenes, acetogenins and sterols. However, limited information is available on the contribution of specific phytochemicals to the overall antioxidant capacity (AOC) of the fruit. Centrifugal partition chromatography was used as fractionation tool, guided by an in vitro chemical assay of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Subsequent experiments focused on isolation and characterization of the chemical nature of the main contributors to lipophilic AOC of avocado pulp. ORAC values obtained for acetogenins were contrasted with results from an isolated kidney mitochondria membrane lipid peroxidation bioassay. The present study established that lipophilic AOC of the pulp was significantly higher than its hydrophilic AOC. Our results confirmed the presence of acetogenins in the fractions with highest lipophilic AOC, and for the first time linked them as contributors to lipophilic-ORAC values. Further HPLC-PDA/MS-TOF analysis led to structural elucidation of two novel acetogenins, not previously reported as present in avocado pulp, along with five already known related-compounds. Antioxidant properties observed for avocado pulp acetogenins by the ORAC assay suggested that, in the presence of an emulsifying agent, acetogenins could serve as novel lipophilic antioxidants in a food matrix. Results from isolated mitochondria lipid peroxidation bioassay, indicated that L-ORAC values which may have relevance for food matrix applications, should not be interpreted to have a direct relevance in health-related claims, compounds need to be evaluated considering the complexity of biological systems.

  11. Present status of research activities relating global warming problems in Japan (mainly MITI and relating organizations)

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, O.

    1993-12-31

    Japanese government has issued action program so called {open_quotes}Action Program to Arrest Global Warming{close_quotes} for preventing global warming at Oct., 1990. According to the program, CO{sub 2} emission should be stabilized on a per capita basis in the year 2000 and beyond at about same level as in 2000 by introducing several methods such as energy conservation, improvement of energy using efficiency, expanding use of renewable energy and so on. The basic concept, target and methods are summarized. At the same time, MITI published so called {open_quotes}New Earth 21{close_quotes} project which aims remedying the earth environment modified by human activities since industrial innovation began at about 200 years ago in coming 100 years. This plan proposed yearly step of research development of technology for mitigating CO{sub 2} emission. According to the MITI`s plan, 15 institutions belonging to AIST have carrying research for developing technology of reducing emission of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases, with cooperation of other research organizations such as RITE (research Institute of Innovative Technology for Earth) and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization). Time schedule of the research development by The New Earth 21 project is summarized in Table 2. Now, in Japan, many national institutions and universities, research works relating reduction and mitigation of GHG are carried out according to this guideline.

  12. Magnetic recovery of modified activated carbon powder used for removal of endocrine disruptors present in water.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Chiara Caterina; Fabbri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    This paper was aimed at studying sustainable solutions for the treatment of water polluted by octylphenols and nonylphenols that are xenoextrogen compounds affecting human health and dangerous for the aquatic environment. We studied the removal of 4-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol with concentrations of the order of 5-10 mg/l on a laboratory scale. A mixing time of 10 min with 0.1 g/l of magnetic-activated carbons (MACs) was enough to obtain 95 +/- 5% adsorption of both 4-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol. The adsorption of the surfactants IGEPAL CO-630 and TRITON X-100, which are precursors of branched 4-nonylphenol and the carcinogenic 4-tert-octylphenol, respectively, was also studied using the same technique. For concentrations between 2 and 10mg/l of these alkylphenols ethoxylated, after 10min mixing with 0.5 g/l of MACs, a 95 +/- 5% adsorption was obtained. A 97 +/- 1% removal of MACs was achieved after 10min of continuous-flow magnetic filtration (14.5 l/min). The filter used was made of SUS440C magnetic steel spheres. Srm-Co permanent magnets provided a uniform flux density field of about 500 mT. PMID:24645486

  13. Gender difference in electrical brain activity during presentation of various film excerpts with different emotional content.

    PubMed

    Dimpfel, W; Wedekind, W; Keplinger, I

    2003-05-30

    Electrical activity of the human brain has been monitored using socalled charge mode (Laplacian estimates) during the exposure with short video film excerpts of 7 min duration. Eighty subjects (50% male and female) watched 5 different film excerpts (disney, animal, comedy, erotic and sex scenes) separated by 3 min pause. Comparison to a reference period of 7 min without video exposure revealed strong decreases in alpha and beta power starting from the electrode position T6 (right temporal) and spread to other brain areas with stronger attentional stimuli e.g. during the erotic and sex films. Highly statistically significant differences were observed between male and female in temporal areas, who in general developed stronger decreases than males. Females on the other hand produced significant increases in fronto-central delta and theta power which could be interpreted as expression of higher appreciation, whereas the decreases in alpha power in general are understood as signs of higher attention. The data are further proof that recording the computer aided quantitative EEG is a very fruitful and promising approach in psychophysiology. PMID:12844473

  14. Magnetic recovery of modified activated carbon powder used for removal of endocrine disruptors present in water.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Chiara Caterina; Fabbri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    This paper was aimed at studying sustainable solutions for the treatment of water polluted by octylphenols and nonylphenols that are xenoextrogen compounds affecting human health and dangerous for the aquatic environment. We studied the removal of 4-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol with concentrations of the order of 5-10 mg/l on a laboratory scale. A mixing time of 10 min with 0.1 g/l of magnetic-activated carbons (MACs) was enough to obtain 95 +/- 5% adsorption of both 4-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol. The adsorption of the surfactants IGEPAL CO-630 and TRITON X-100, which are precursors of branched 4-nonylphenol and the carcinogenic 4-tert-octylphenol, respectively, was also studied using the same technique. For concentrations between 2 and 10mg/l of these alkylphenols ethoxylated, after 10min mixing with 0.5 g/l of MACs, a 95 +/- 5% adsorption was obtained. A 97 +/- 1% removal of MACs was achieved after 10min of continuous-flow magnetic filtration (14.5 l/min). The filter used was made of SUS440C magnetic steel spheres. Srm-Co permanent magnets provided a uniform flux density field of about 500 mT.

  15. Present-day impact cratering rate and contemporary gully activity on Mars.

    PubMed

    Malin, Michael C; Edgett, Kenneth S; Posiolova, Liliya V; McColley, Shawn M; Dobrea, Eldar Z Noe

    2006-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera has acquired data that establish the present-day impact cratering rate and document new deposits formed by downslope movement of material in mid-latitude gullies on Mars. Twenty impacts created craters 2 to 150 meters in diameter within an area of 21.5 x 10(6) square kilometers between May 1999 and March 2006. The values predicted by models that scale the lunar cratering rate to Mars are close to the observed rate, implying that surfaces devoid of craters are truly young and that as yet unrecognized processes of denudation must be operating. The new gully deposits, formed since August 1999, are light toned and exhibit attributes expected from emplacement aided by a fluid with the properties of liquid water: relatively long, extended, digitate distal and marginal branches, diversion around obstacles, and low relief. The observations suggest that liquid water flowed on the surface of Mars during the past decade.

  16. Present-day impact cratering rate and contemporary gully activity on Mars.

    PubMed

    Malin, Michael C; Edgett, Kenneth S; Posiolova, Liliya V; McColley, Shawn M; Dobrea, Eldar Z Noe

    2006-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera has acquired data that establish the present-day impact cratering rate and document new deposits formed by downslope movement of material in mid-latitude gullies on Mars. Twenty impacts created craters 2 to 150 meters in diameter within an area of 21.5 x 10(6) square kilometers between May 1999 and March 2006. The values predicted by models that scale the lunar cratering rate to Mars are close to the observed rate, implying that surfaces devoid of craters are truly young and that as yet unrecognized processes of denudation must be operating. The new gully deposits, formed since August 1999, are light toned and exhibit attributes expected from emplacement aided by a fluid with the properties of liquid water: relatively long, extended, digitate distal and marginal branches, diversion around obstacles, and low relief. The observations suggest that liquid water flowed on the surface of Mars during the past decade. PMID:17158321

  17. Activity-guided identification of acetogenins as novel lipophilic antioxidants present in avocado pulp (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana; Silva-Platas, Christian; Rojo, Rocío P; García, Noemí; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-12-30

    Avocado fruit is a rich source of health-related lipophilic phytochemicals such as monounsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols, carotenes, acetogenins and sterols. However, limited information is available on the contribution of specific phytochemicals to the overall antioxidant capacity (AOC) of the fruit. Centrifugal partition chromatography was used as fractionation tool, guided by an in vitro chemical assay of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Subsequent experiments focused on isolation and characterization of the chemical nature of the main contributors to lipophilic AOC of avocado pulp. ORAC values obtained for acetogenins were contrasted with results from an isolated kidney mitochondria membrane lipid peroxidation bioassay. The present study established that lipophilic AOC of the pulp was significantly higher than its hydrophilic AOC. Our results confirmed the presence of acetogenins in the fractions with highest lipophilic AOC, and for the first time linked them as contributors to lipophilic-ORAC values. Further HPLC-PDA/MS-TOF analysis led to structural elucidation of two novel acetogenins, not previously reported as present in avocado pulp, along with five already known related-compounds. Antioxidant properties observed for avocado pulp acetogenins by the ORAC assay suggested that, in the presence of an emulsifying agent, acetogenins could serve as novel lipophilic antioxidants in a food matrix. Results from isolated mitochondria lipid peroxidation bioassay, indicated that L-ORAC values which may have relevance for food matrix applications, should not be interpreted to have a direct relevance in health-related claims, compounds need to be evaluated considering the complexity of biological systems. PMID:24211333

  18. Analysis on sports and recreation activity-related eye injuries presenting to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sungbae; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Ahn, Jae Yun; Park, Jung Bae; Seo, Kang Suk; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Yoo, In Sool; Cho, Jin Seong; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Jeong, Tae Oh; Yeom, Seok Ran; Kim, Young Taek; Hong, Sung Ok

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence and general characteristics of sports-related eye injuries in patients visiting the Emergency Department. METHODS A cross-sectional, multi-center, observational study. Patients with an injured eye who visited the Emergency Department at one of nine hospitals in Korea were enrolled. All data were prospectively collected between March and September 2010 using a questionnaire. Eye injuries that occurred during risky sports were examined by gender and age. Additionally, the rate of open globe injuries that occurred with and without protective eyewear was examined for each activity. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and categorical variables were compared using Chi-square test. RESULTS A total of 446 patients had sports-related eye injuries. Teenagers (10-19 years old) and young adults (20-29 years old) had the most eye injuries. Eye injuries accounted for 0.2% of Emergency Department patients. Baseball was the most common cause of sports-related eye injuries, followed by soccer and hiking. Protective gear was worn by 9.4% of all patients. Patients that were 30-39 years of age had the highest rate of protective gear use, followed by patients that were 40-49 years of age. The proportion of sports-related eye injuries that were open-globe injuries was highest for soccer and hiking. CONCLUSION Although injuries were most common in patients below the age of 10 years, these patients had the lowest rate of protective eyewear use. Injuries in adults over 40 years of age most commonly occurred during hiking, but the rate of protective eyewear use was low. Young athletes should be educated on and provided with protective eyewear and policies protective gear use should be established. For older adults, eye protection should be encouraged, especially during hiking. PMID:27803871

  19. Principles of electroanatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Deepak; Miller, John M

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiologic testing and radiofrequency ablation have evolved as curative measures for a variety of rhythm disturbances. As experience in this field has grown, ablation is progressively being used to address more complex rhythm disturbances. Paralleling this trend are technological advancements to facilitate these efforts, including electroanatomic mapping (EAM). At present, several different EAM systems utilizing various technologies are available to facilitate mapping and ablation. Use of these systems has been shown to reduce fluoroscopic exposure and radiation dose, with less significant effects on procedural duration and success rates. Among the data provided by EAM are chamber reconstruction, tagging of important anatomic landmarks and ablation lesions, display of diagnostic and mapping catheters without using fluoroscopy, activation mapping, and voltage (or scar) mapping. Several EAM systems have specialized features, such as enhanced ability to map non-sustained or hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias, ability to display diagnostic as well as mapping catheter positions, and wide compatibility with a variety of catheters. Each EAM system has its strengths and weaknesses, and the system chosen must depend upon what data is required for procedural success (activation mapping, substrate mapping, cardiac geometry), the anticipated arrhythmia, the compatibility of the system with adjunctive tools (i.e. diagnostic and ablation catheters), and the operator's familiarity with the selected system. While EAM can offer significant assistance during an EP procedure, their incorrect or inappropriate application can substantially hamper mapping efforts and procedural success, and should not replace careful interpretation of data and strict adherence to electrophysiologic principles.

  20. Interleukin-2 is Present in Human Blood Vessels and Released in Biologically Active Form by Heparanase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John D.; Clabaugh, Suzanne E.; Smith, Deandra R.; Stevens, R. B.; Wrenshall, Lucile E.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-2 is a multifaceted cytokine with both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive properties. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the availability of IL-2 is regulated, in part, by association with perlecan, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Given the abundance of perlecan in blood vessels, we asked whether IL-2 is present in vessel walls. Our results indicate that IL-2 is associated with endothelial and smooth muscle cells within the human arterial wall. This IL-2 is released by heparanase, and promotes the proliferation of an IL-2 dependent cell line. Given the presence of IL-2 in human arteries, we asked whether the large vessels of IL-2 deficient mice were normal. The aortas of IL-2 deficient mice exhibited a loss of smooth muscle cells, suggesting that IL-2 may contribute to their survival. In their entirety, these results suggest a here-to-fore unrecognized role of IL-2 in vascular biology, and have significant implications for both the immune and cardiovascular systems. PMID:21606942

  1. Decreasing the singlet-triplet gap for thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules by structural modification on the donor fragment: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jian-zhong; Lin, Li-li; Wang, Chuan-kui

    2016-05-01

    The small energy gap between singlet excitons (S) and triplet excitons (T) of organic molecules is a dominant condition for high efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). In this study, influence of modification in donor groups of a series of molecules on their geometries, S-T energy gaps, and photophysical properties, is investigated based on first-principles calculations. Investigation shows that, as the electron donating ability is increased, both S-T energy gap and overlap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) are decreased. This work provides strategy for designing high efficient and multi-color TADF devices.

  2. A specific DNA-binding protein activated by ionizing radiation in normal cells and constitutively present in ataxia telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teale, B.; Lavin, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation gives rise to a complex series of changes. This response is characterized by the induction of a variety of genes and the activation of pre-existing proteins. We describe here activation of a specific DNA-binding protein by ionizing radiation. The response was dose-dependent and specific for ionizing radiation. The binding factor appears to be normally present in the cytoplasma and responds to radiation by translocation to the nucleus, or is activated within the nucleus by an unknown mechanism. The radiation-induced activation of this protein appears to be mediated through a protein kinase C-associated pathway. A DNA-binding factor recognizing the same binding motif was found to be abnormally distributed in cells from patients with the human genetic disease, ataxiatelangiectasia. The protein was constitutively present in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of ataxia telangiectasia cells and did not respond to radiation. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  3. A cytotoxic principle of Tamarindus indica, di-n-butyl malate and the structure-activity relationship of its analogues.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Adenan, M I; Kajiyama, S; Kanzaki, H; Kawazu, K

    1996-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of Tamarindus indica fruits led to the isolation of L-(-)-di-n-butyl malate which exhibited a pronounced cytotoxic activity against sea urchin embryo cells. In order to study structure-activity relationships, close-structure relatives of di-n-butyl malate were synthesized using D-(+)- and L-(-)-malic acid as starting materials, and their cytotoxic activities were examined for the sea urchin embryo assay. L-(-)-Di-n-pentyl malate was the most effective inhibitor to the development of the fertilized eggs. Significant inhibitory activity was not seen in the esters of D-(-)-isomer.

  4. Engaging Stakeholders From Volunteer-Led Out-of-School Time Programs in the Dissemination of Guiding Principles for Healthy Snacking and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Koomas, Alyssa; Metayer, Nesly; Fullerton, Karen J.; Hubbard, Kristie L.; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Hofer, Teresa; Nelson, Miriam; Newman, Molly; Sacheck, Jennifer; Economos, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Background Little effort has focused on the role of volunteer-led out-of-school time (OST) programs (ie, enrichment and sports programs) as key environments for the promotion of healthy eating and physical activity habits among school-aged children. The Healthy Kids Out of School (HKOS) initiative developed evidence-based, practical guiding principles for healthy snacks, beverages, and physical activity. The goal of this case study was to describe the methods used to engage regional partners to understand how successful implementation and dissemination of these principles could be accomplished. Community Context HKOS partnered with volunteer-led programs from 5 OST organizations in Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire to create a regional “learning laboratory.” Methods We engaged partners in phases. In the first phase, we conducted focus groups with local volunteer program leaders; during the second phase, we held roundtable meetings with regional and state program administrators; and in the final phase, we conducted additional outreach to refine and finalize implementation strategies. Outcomes Implementation strategies were developed based on themes and information that emerged. For enrichment programs, strategies included new patch and pin programs that were consistent with the organizations’ infrastructure and usual practices. For sports programs, the main strategy was integration with online trainings for coaches. Interpretation Through the engagement process, we learned that dissemination of the guiding principles in these large and complex OST organizations was best accomplished by using implementation strategies that were customized, integrated, and aligned with goals and usual practices. The lessons learned can benefit future efforts to prevent obesity in complex environments. PMID:26704443

  5. Determination of oenothein B as the active 5-alpha-reductase-inhibiting principle of the folk medicine Epilobium parviflorum.

    PubMed

    Lesuisse, D; Berjonneau, J; Ciot, C; Devaux, P; Doucet, B; Gourvest, J F; Khemis, B; Lang, C; Legrand, R; Lowinski, M; Maquin, P; Parent, A; Schoot, B; Teutsch, G

    1996-05-01

    Several extracts from Epilobium parviflorum, a plant used in Central Europe for the treatment of prostate disorders, were evaluated in a biochemical assay with 5-alpha-reductase. The aqueous extract displaying inhibition of the enzyme was analyzed, the fraction responsible for this activity was purified, and the active compound identified as a macrocyclic tannin, oenothein B (1). PMID:8778238

  6. Fermat's Principle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamat, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A principle is presented to show that, if the time of passage of light is expressible as a function of discrete variables, one may dispense with the more general method of the calculus of variations. The calculus of variations and the alternative are described. The phenomenon of mirage is discussed. (Author/KR)

  7. Principles of Biomedical Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation, I will discuss the principles of biomedical and Islamic medical ethics and an interfaith perspective on end-of-life issues. I will also discuss three cases to exemplify some of the conflicts in ethical decision-making. PMID:23610498

  8. Basic Comfort Heating Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempster, Chalmer T.

    The material in this beginning book for vocational students presents fundamental principles needed to understand the heating aspect of the sheet metal trade and supplies practical experience to the student so that he may become familiar with the process of determining heat loss for average structures. Six areas covered are: (1) Background…

  9. International Perspectives on Adapted Physical Activity. Selected Papers Presented at the International Symposium on Adapted Physical Activity (5th, Toronto, Canada, October 1-4, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, Mavis E., Ed.; Ward, Graham R., Ed.

    The 36 papers in this book were presented at the Fifth International Symposium on Adapted Physical Activity. Presentations document some of the research findings and new ideas in physical education and recreation programs designed to improve the quality of life for special populations. The collection represents the breadth of the field, from the…

  10. The Energy Challenge: An Activity Master Program About our Energy Past, Present, and Future for Grades 5 Through 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Energy Administration, Washington, DC.

    This publication presents 24 spirit duplicating activity masters and background materials for energy education in grades 5 through 8. These interdisciplinary materials are arranged in 6 units. Unit titles are: (1) Energy Overview; (2) Fossil Fuels - Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas; (3) Energy Resources for Today and Tomorrow; (4) Energy Conservation;…

  11. Hands-on Activities versus Worksheets in Reinforcing Physical Science Principles: Effects on Student Achievement and Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald M.; Wardlow, George W.; Franklin, Timothy D.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 132 agricultural science students were divided into an experimental group who completed hands-on activities on Ohm's Law and incline plane and a control group who completed worksheets. There were no significant differences in immediate or follow-up measures of achievement. Hands-on students had significantly more positive attitudes. (SK)

  12. Temporal bone chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as an intracranial mass with clinical seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Christopher J; Walcott, Brian P; Linskey, Katy R; Kahle, Kristopher T; Nahed, Brian V; Asaad, Wael F

    2011-06-01

    Chondroblastomas are rare tumors that characteristically arise from the epiphyseal cartilage of long bones of the immature skeleton. Intracranial involvement is uncommon, though the squamous portion of the temporal bone is preferentially affected due to its cartilaginous origin. Patients with temporal bone chondroblastomas classically present with otologic symptoms, while primary neurological complaints are rare. In this report, we describe a 33 year-old man with a chondroblastoma of the temporal bone and an associated aneurysmal bone cyst constituting a large intracranial mass lesion who presented with new-onset seizure activity. We review issues relevant to the pathology and treatment of these lesions.

  13. First principles investigation of the activity of thin film Pt, Pd and Au surface alloys for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-05-01

    Further advances in fuel cell technologies are hampered by kinetic limitations associated with the sluggish cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. We have investigated a range of different formulations of binary and ternary Pt, Pd and Au thin films as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction. The most active binary thin films are near-surface alloys of Pt with subsurface Pd and certain PdAu and PtAu thin films with surface and/or subsurface Au. The most active ternary thin films are with pure metal Pt or Pd skins with some degree of Au in the surface and/or subsurface layer and the near-surface alloys of Au with mixed Pt-Pd skins. The activity of the binary and ternary catalysts is explained through weakening of the OH binding energy caused by solute elements. However, given the low alloy formation energies it may be difficult to tune and retain the composition under operating conditions. This is particularly challenging for alloys containing Au due to a high propensity of Au to segregate to the surface. We also show that once Au is on the surface it will diffuse to defect sites, explaining why small amounts of Au retard dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. For the PtPd thin films there is no pronounced driving force for surface segregation, diffusion to defects or surface self-assembling. On the basis of stability and activity analysis we conclude that the near surface alloy of Pd in Pt and some PdAu binary and PtPdAu ternary thin films with a controlled amount of Au are the best catalysts for oxygen reduction. PMID:25865333

  14. Activity origin and catalyst design principles for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution on heteroatom-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Davey, Kenneth; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a fundamental process in electrocatalysis and plays an important role in energy conversion through water splitting to produce hydrogen. Effective candidates for HER are often based on noble metals or transition metal dichalcogenides, while carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts generally demonstrate poorer activity. Here we report evaluation of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene materials as efficient HER electrocatalysts by combining spectroscopic characterization, electrochemical measurements, and density functional theory calculations. Results of theoretical computations are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations regarding the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity and the HER reaction mechanism. As a result, we establish a HER activity trend for graphene-based materials, and explore their reactivity origin to guide the design of more efficient electrocatalysts. We predict that by rationally modifying particular experimentally achievable physicochemical characteristics, a practically realizable graphene-based material will have the potential to exceed the performance of the metal-based benchmark for HER.

  15. Comparison of the simple cyclic voltammetry (CV) and DPPH assays for the determination of antioxidant capacity of active principles.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Jesús F; Ruiz-Montoya, Mercedes; Palma, Alberto; Alonso-Garrido, Gema; Pintado, Sara; Rodríguez-Mellado, José M

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant activity of a number of small (low molecular weight) natural compounds found in spices, condiments or drugs (gallic acid, sesamol, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, vanillin, salicylaldehyde, limonene, geraniol, 4-hexylresorcinol, etc.) has been evaluated using electrochemical and DPPH• radical scavenging measurements. Structural analysis of the tested compound suggest a remarkable activity for phenol derivatives and the importance of the -R groups located on the phenolic ring in the molecule's ability to act as free radical scavenging as well as their influence in the electrochemical behavior. The voltammetric method can be used for the determination of the antioxidant capability in the same manner as the DPPH• radical scavenging because of the correlation found between oxidation potentials and anti-radical power (ARP = 1/EC₅₀). Such electrochemical determination is fast and cheap and allows making measurements under a variety of experimental conditions. The accuracy of the electrochemical measurements is the same for all the compounds, irrespective of their scavenging activity, the opposite of what occurs in the DPPH• test. PMID:22555300

  16. Long-term degradation of resin-based cements in substances present in the oral environment: influence of activation mode

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Eduardo Moreira; NORONHA-FILHO, Jaime Dutra; AMARAL, Cristiane Mariote; POSKUS, Laiza Tatiana; GUIMARÃES, José Guilherme Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Indirect restorations in contact with free gingival margins or principally within the gingival sulcus, where the presence of organic acids produced by oral biofilm is higher, may present faster degradation of the resin-based cement pellicle. Objectives: To investigate the degradation of four resin-based cements: Rely X ARC (R), Variolink II (V), enforce (E) and All Cem (A), after immersion in distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA) and artificial saliva (AS) and to analyze the influence of the activation mode on this response. Material and Methods: Two activation modes were evaluated: chemical (Ch) and dual (D). In the dual activation, a two-millimeter thick ceramic disk (IPS empress System) was interposed between the specimen and light-curing unit tip. Specimens were desiccated, immersed in distilled water, artificial saliva and lactic acid 0.1 M at 37ºC for 180 days, weighed daily for the first 7 days, and after 14, 21, 28, 90 and 180 days and were desiccated again. Sorption and solubility (µg/mm3) were calculated based on ISO 4049. The data were submitted to multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test for media comparisons (α=0.05). Results: Sorption was higher after immersion in LA (p<0.05) and increased significantly with time (p<0.05). Sorption was influenced by the activation mode: Ch>D (p<0.05). The lowest solubility was presented by R (p<0.05). Conclusions: Lactic acid increased the degradation of resin-based cements. Moreover, the physical component of activation, i.e., light-activation, contributed to a low degradation of resin-based cements. PMID:23857651

  17. Loss of proliferation and antigen presentation activity following internalization of polydispersed carbon nanotubes by primary lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Mandavi; Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells) were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells.

  18. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, N. Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism. PMID:26163514

  19. Principles for Constructing Good Clicker Questions: Going beyond Rote Learning and Stimulating Active Engagement with Course Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Clickers are also referred to as classroom response systems. They are small-handheld electronic devices that resemble a television remote control, used by students to respond to questions posed by instructors. Typically, questions are provided to students using electronic on-screen presentations. Results of students' responses can be immediately…

  20. Identification of a small protein domain present in all plant lineages that confers high prephenate dehydratase activity.

    PubMed

    El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando; Ávila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-07-01

    l-Phenylalanine serves as a building block for the biosynthesis of proteins, but also as a precursor for a wide range of plant-derived compounds essential for plants and animals. Plants can synthesize Phe within the plastids using arogenate as a precursor; however, an alternative pathway using phenylpyruvate as an intermediate, described for most microorganisms, has recently been proposed. The functionality of this pathway requires the existence of enzymes with prephenate dehydratase (PDT) activity (EC 4.2.1.51) in plants. Using phylogenetic studies, functional complementation assays in yeast and biochemical analysis, we have identified the enzymes displaying PDT activity in Pinus pinaster. Through sequence alignment comparisons and site-directed mutagenesis we have identified a 22-amino acid region conferring PDT activity (PAC domain) and a single Ala314 residue critical to trigger this activity. Our results demonstrate that all plant clades include PAC domain-containing ADTs, suggesting that the PDT activity, and thus the ability to synthesize Phe using phenylpyruvate as an intermediate, has been preserved throughout the evolution of plants. Moreover, this pathway together with the arogenate pathway gives plants a broad and versatile capacity to synthesize Phe and its derived compounds. PAC domain-containing enzymes are also present in green and red algae, and glaucophytes, the three emerging clades following the primary endosymbiont event resulting in the acquisition of plastids in eukaryotes. The evolutionary prokaryotic origin of this domain is discussed. PMID:27125254

  1. Different Citrus rootstocks present high dissimilarities in their antioxidant activity and vitamins content according to the ripening stage.

    PubMed

    Cardeñosa, Vanessa; Barros, Lillian; Barreira, João C M; Arenas, Francisco; Moreno-Rojas, José M; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-02-01

    "Lane Late" sweet orange grafted on six different citrus rootstocks and grown in the Guadalquivir valley (Seville, Spain) were picked at different ripening stages in two consecutive seasons to characterize their antioxidant activity (free radicals scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition) and quantify their main antioxidant compounds (vitamin E and vitamin C). Linear discriminant analysis and 2-way ANOVA were applied to compare the effects induced by citrus rootstock and ripening stage. The results showed that differences in antioxidant activity and related compounds are mainly dependent on the citrus rootstock, despite ripening stage had also some particular effects. Changes observed in 2012 showed less marked differences among the citrus rootstock. Nevertheless, Cleopatra rootstock showed the highest antioxidant activity in both years, indicating that an increase in its cultivation might be a good solution to sweet orange farmers. Concerning the ripening stage, samples collected in January presented higher vitamin contents, while those collected in April showed higher antioxidant activity. This result allows deciding the harvesting period according to the desired effect.

  2. First-Principles Design of Graphene-Based Active Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in the Aprotic Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joonhee; Yu, Jong-Sung; Han, Byungchan

    2016-07-21

    Using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that catalytic activities toward oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR and OER) in a Li-O2 battery can be substantially improved with graphene-based materials. We accomplish the goal by calculating free energy diagrams for the redox reactions of oxygen to identify a rate-determining step controlling the overpotentials. We unveil that the catalytic performance is well described by the adsorption energies of the intermediates LiO2 and Li2O2 and propose that graphene-based materials can be substantially optimized through either by N doping or encapsulating Cu(111) single crystals. Furthermore, our systematic approach with DFT calculations applied to design of optimum catalysts enables screening of promising candidates for the oxygen electrochemistry leading to considerable improvement of efficiency of a range of renewable energy devices. PMID:27392527

  3. Impact of the Yakutat indentor corner on present-day tectonics and fault activity in SE Alaska - SW Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotti, S.; Marechal, A.; Ritz, J. F.; Ferry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present an active tectonic model of the SE Alaska - SW Yukon region based principally on the integration of recent GPS velocity data and new fault-slip rates derived from geomorphology. In this region, the Yakutat collision results in complex tectonics with patterns of strain localization and strain partitioning that strongly vary across the various mountain ranges and active faults. We propose that deformation and fault activity in the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains are primarily controlled by the eastern syntaxis of the Yakutat collision, which produces a semi-radial tectonic pattern: Velocities, principal horizontal shortening rates, and maximum horizontal stress orientations rotate by 60 - 80 ° around the syntaxis, from roughly parallel to the relative Pacific - North America motion at the front of the collision to roughly orthogonal southeast of the syntaxis. The interaction between this strain pattern and major inherited tectonic structures inland of the collision zone (i.e., Denali and Duke River Faults) results in various reactivation modes of these structures. Specifically, the Denali Fault shows a very pronounced lateral variations of activity from ~12 mm/a of dextral slip rate in its central section to ~1 mm/a of mostly shortening slip rate along its southern section. This marked change of activity is associated with a possible relay system where the Duke River and Totschunda Faults accommodate a major part (8 - 12 mm/a) of the inland strain transfer directly in front of the syntaxis. This new tectonic model retains some questions, in particular regarding the mechanisms of deformation and strain transfer (1) from the syntaxis to the Duke River - Totschunda system and (2) at the junction between Totschunda and Denali Faults. Numerical models of present-day deformation may help address these issues and provide information about relative strength of the various crustal and inherited fault elements of this system.

  4. A Research Informed Vision of Good Practice in Multicultural Teacher Education: Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.; Grant, Carl; Gay, Geneva; Gillette, Maureen; Valli, Linda; Villegas, Ana Maria

    1998-01-01

    Presents 14 design principles that explain good practice in multicultural preservice teacher education. The principles fall under the three main categories of (1) institutional and programmatic principles, (2) personnel principles, and (3) curriculum and instruction principles. (SM)

  5. Deletion of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K. S.; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Worth, Austen J.; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P. A.; Snapper, Scott B.; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O.; Forsell, Mattias N. E.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8+ T cells at the expense of CD4+ T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  6. Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marisa A P; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K S; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Worth, Austen J; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P A; Snapper, Scott B; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O; Forsell, Mattias N E; Thrasher, Adrian J; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-07-18

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8(+) T cells at the expense of CD4(+) T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells.

  7. Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marisa A P; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K S; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Worth, Austen J; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P A; Snapper, Scott B; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O; Forsell, Mattias N E; Thrasher, Adrian J; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8(+) T cells at the expense of CD4(+) T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  8. Interethnic Differences in Antigen-Presenting Cell Activation and TLR Responses in Malian Children during Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Stéphanie; Dara, Victor; Traore, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Varani, Stefania; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2011-01-01

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be

  9. Interethnic differences in antigen-presenting cell activation and TLR responses in Malian children during Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Arama, Charles; Giusti, Pablo; Boström, Stéphanie; Dara, Victor; Traore, Boubacar; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara; Varani, Stefania; Troye-Blomberg, Marita

    2011-03-31

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be

  10. Principles of sound ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Harris, Catherine A; Scott, Alexander P; Johnson, Andrew C; Panter, Grace H; Sheahan, Dave; Roberts, Mike; Sumpter, John P

    2014-03-18

    We have become progressively more concerned about the quality of some published ecotoxicology research. Others have also expressed concern. It is not uncommon for basic, but extremely important, factors to apparently be ignored. For example, exposure concentrations in laboratory experiments are sometimes not measured, and hence there is no evidence that the test organisms were actually exposed to the test substance, let alone at the stated concentrations. To try to improve the quality of ecotoxicology research, we suggest 12 basic principles that should be considered, not at the point of publication of the results, but during the experimental design. These principles range from carefully considering essential aspects of experimental design through to accurately defining the exposure, as well as unbiased analysis and reporting of the results. Although not all principles will apply to all studies, we offer these principles in the hope that they will improve the quality of the science that is available to regulators. Science is an evidence-based discipline and it is important that we and the regulators can trust the evidence presented to us. Significant resources often have to be devoted to refuting the results of poor research when those resources could be utilized more effectively.

  11. Software for Fermat's principle and lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2012-05-01

    Fermat's principle is considered as a unifying concept. It is usually presented erroneously as a 'least time principle'. In this paper we present some software that shows cases of maxima and minima and the application of Fermat's principle to the problem of focusing in lenses.

  12. Software for Fermat's Principle and Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    Fermat's principle is considered as a unifying concept. It is usually presented erroneously as a "least time principle". In this paper we present some software that shows cases of maxima and minima and the application of Fermat's principle to the problem of focusing in lenses. (Contains 12 figures.)

  13. Arachnids of medical importance in Brazil: main active compounds present in scorpion and spider venoms and tick saliva.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Francielle A; Amorim, Fernanda G; Anjolette, Fernando A P; Arantes, Eliane C

    2015-01-01

    Arachnida is the largest class among the arthropods, constituting over 60,000 described species (spiders, mites, ticks, scorpions, palpigrades, pseudoscorpions, solpugids and harvestmen). Many accidents are caused by arachnids, especially spiders and scorpions, while some diseases can be transmitted by mites and ticks. These animals are widely dispersed in urban centers due to the large availability of shelter and food, increasing the incidence of accidents. Several protein and non-protein compounds present in the venom and saliva of these animals are responsible for symptoms observed in envenoming, exhibiting neurotoxic, dermonecrotic and hemorrhagic activities. The phylogenomic analysis from the complementary DNA of single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes shows that these animals share some common protein families known as neurotoxins, defensins, hyaluronidase, antimicrobial peptides, phospholipases and proteinases. This indicates that the venoms from these animals may present components with functional and structural similarities. Therefore, we described in this review the main components present in spider and scorpion venom as well as in tick saliva, since they have similar components. These three arachnids are responsible for many accidents of medical relevance in Brazil. Additionally, this study shows potential biotechnological applications of some components with important biological activities, which may motivate the conducting of further research studies on their action mechanisms.

  14. Malassezia yeasts activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in antigen-presenting cells via Syk-kinase signalling.

    PubMed

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Fenini, Gabriele; Jankovic, Dragana; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Kerl, Katrin; Bosshard, Philipp; Contassot, Emmanuel; French, Lars E

    2014-12-01

    Although being a normal part of the skin flora, yeasts of the genus Malassezia are associated with several common dermatologic conditions including pityriasis versicolour, seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD), folliculitis, atopic eczema/dermatitis (AE/AD) and dandruff. While Malassezia spp. are aetiological agents of pityriasis versicolour, a causal role of Malassezia spp. in AE/AD and SD remains to be established. Previous reports have shown that fungi such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus are able to efficiently activate the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to robust secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. To date, innate immune responses to Malassezia spp. are not well characterized. Here, we show that different Malassezia species could induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent IL-1β secretion in human antigen-presenting cells. In contrast, keratinocytes were not able to secrete IL-1β when exposed to Malassezia spp. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-1β secretion in antigen-presenting cells was dependent on Syk-kinase signalling. Our results identify Malassezia spp. as potential strong inducers of pro-inflammatory responses when taken up by antigen-presenting cells and identify C-type lectin receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome as crucial actors in this process. PMID:25267545

  15. Ulcerative Colitis Activity Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin, in a Patient with Longstanding Disease under Continuous Treatment with Mesalazine.

    PubMed

    Voukelatou, Panagiota; Sfendouraki, Elissavet; Karianos, Theodoros; Saranti, Sofia; Tsitsimelis, Dimitrios; Vrettos, Ioannis; Kalliakmanis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background. The presence of ulcerative colitis (UC) with no bowel symptoms, as fever of unknown origin (FUO), is uncommon. Objective. To describe the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with fever, with a history of UC under treatment with mesalazine. Case Presentation. She was admitted due to fever lasting for 12 days with no associated symptoms. Seven years earlier, she was diagnosed with UC. After an extended workup for FUO that failed to reach the diagnosis, she underwent a gallium-67 scintigraphy. This revealed a persistent diffuse concentration of gallium-67 in the ascending colon at 24-hour imaging that remained stable at 48- and 72-hour imaging without any topographic change after the use of laxatives. Considering the results and in the absence of another diagnosis, the patient was treated with 30 mg prednisone daily and mesalazine, as treatment of active UC. Subsequently, the patient's condition improved markedly and the fever retreated. One month later, she was reevaluated with a gallium-67 scintigraphy with total absence of gallium-67 concentration in the ascending colon. Conclusion. UC activity must be included in the differential diagnosis of FUO in patients with longstanding disease, since fever may present alone, with no other manifestations. PMID:27504121

  16. Ulcerative Colitis Activity Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin, in a Patient with Longstanding Disease under Continuous Treatment with Mesalazine

    PubMed Central

    Sfendouraki, Elissavet; Karianos, Theodoros; Saranti, Sofia; Tsitsimelis, Dimitrios; Vrettos, Ioannis; Kalliakmanis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background. The presence of ulcerative colitis (UC) with no bowel symptoms, as fever of unknown origin (FUO), is uncommon. Objective. To describe the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with fever, with a history of UC under treatment with mesalazine. Case Presentation. She was admitted due to fever lasting for 12 days with no associated symptoms. Seven years earlier, she was diagnosed with UC. After an extended workup for FUO that failed to reach the diagnosis, she underwent a gallium-67 scintigraphy. This revealed a persistent diffuse concentration of gallium-67 in the ascending colon at 24-hour imaging that remained stable at 48- and 72-hour imaging without any topographic change after the use of laxatives. Considering the results and in the absence of another diagnosis, the patient was treated with 30 mg prednisone daily and mesalazine, as treatment of active UC. Subsequently, the patient's condition improved markedly and the fever retreated. One month later, she was reevaluated with a gallium-67 scintigraphy with total absence of gallium-67 concentration in the ascending colon. Conclusion. UC activity must be included in the differential diagnosis of FUO in patients with longstanding disease, since fever may present alone, with no other manifestations. PMID:27504121

  17. Adaptive camouflage in the VIS and IR spectral range: main principles and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a survey of main applicable technical principles and mechanisms for adaptive camouflage in the visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) spectral ranges. All principles are described by their operation method and technical data such as the active spectral range, the degree and speed of adaptation, weight, power consumption, robustness, usability, lifetime, technology readiness level (TRL) etc.. The paper allows to compare the different principles and to assess them with regard to an application to an adaptive camouflage system.

  18. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinthika, S.; Kumar, E. Mathan; Surya, V. J.; Kawazoe, Y.; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K.; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level.

  19. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study.

    PubMed

    Sinthika, S; Kumar, E Mathan; Surya, V J; Kawazoe, Y; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level.

  20. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study.

    PubMed

    Sinthika, S; Kumar, E Mathan; Surya, V J; Kawazoe, Y; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level. PMID:26626147

  1. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study

    PubMed Central

    Sinthika, S.; Kumar, E. Mathan; Surya, V. J.; Kawazoe, Y.; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K.; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level. PMID:26626147

  2. Self-presentation and physical activity in breast cancer survivors: the moderating effect of social cognitive constructs.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2011-12-01

    This study examined (1) the relationships between self-presentation processes (i.e., impression motivation and impression construction) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among breast cancer survivors, and (2) whether social cognitive constructs (i.e., self-presentational efficacy expectancy [SPEE]; self-presentational outcome expectancy [SPOE]; self-presentational outcome value [SPOV]) moderate these relationships. Breast cancer survivors (N = 169; Mage = 55.06, SD = 10.67 years) completed self-report measures. Hierarchical regression analysis, controlling for age and body mass index, indicated that impression motivation was a significant correlate of MVPA (β = .25). Furthermore, SPEE (β = .21) and SPOV (β = .27) were moderators of this relationship. The final models accounted for 12-24% of the variance in MVPA. The findings of this study suggest that self-presentation processes (i.e., impression motivation) may indeed relate to breast cancer survivors' MVPA. In addition, social cognitive constructs (i.e., SPEE, SPOV) moderated the relationship between impression motivation and MVPA. It may be effective to target impression motivation, SPEE, and SPOV in interventions aimed at increasing MVPA among breast cancer survivors.

  3. Principles of lake sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index.

  4. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  5. Principles of Natural Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Retegan, Marius; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-01-01

    Nature relies on a unique and intricate biochemical setup to achieve sunlight-driven water splitting. Combined experimental and computational efforts have produced significant insights into the structural and functional principles governing the operation of the water-oxidizing enzyme Photosystem II in general, and of the oxygen-evolving manganese-calcium cluster at its active site in particular. Here we review the most important aspects of biological water oxidation, emphasizing current knowledge on the organization of the enzyme, the geometric and electronic structure of the catalyst, and the role of calcium and chloride cofactors. The combination of recent experimental work on the identification of possible substrate sites with computational modeling have considerably limited the possible mechanistic pathways for the critical O-O bond formation step. Taken together, the key features and principles of natural photosynthesis may serve as inspiration for the design, development, and implementation of artificial systems. PMID:26099285

  6. A Technique of Teaching the Principle of Equivalence at Ground Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubrica, Joel V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents one way of demonstrating the Principle of Equivalence in the classroom. Teaching the Principle of Equivalence involves someone experiencing acceleration through empty space, juxtaposed with the daily encounter with gravity. This classroom activity is demonstrated with a water-filled bottle containing glass marbles and…

  7. Stepping behavior and muscle activity of dairy cows on uncomfortable standing surfaces presented under 1 or 4 legs.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, E; Tucker, C B

    2015-01-01

    The comfort of dairy cattle while standing has important implications for housing design. Research has examined how cattle respond to standing surfaces by presenting options under all 4 legs or under a single leg, but no work, to date, has compared presentation methods. This study examined behavior and muscle activity when cows stood on rough floors under all 4 legs or just 1 hind leg. Three treatments were tested: smooth concrete under all 4 legs (0-ROUGH), a rough surface under all 4 legs [2cm × 2cm × 4cm trapezoidal protrusions (4-ROUGH)], and a rough surface only under 1 hind leg, with other legs on smooth concrete (1-ROUGH). Twenty-four healthy Holstein cows stood on each surface for 1h/d in a repeated-measures design. Surface electromyograms (SEMG) were used to evaluate muscle fatigue and total activity. Muscle fatigue was measured using SEMG to evaluate (1) static contractions when cows were continuously weight bearing on each hind leg, before and after 1h of standing, and (2) dynamic contractions associated with steps during 1h of standing. Behavioral measures included steps per minute, time between each consecutive step, and the latency to lie down after testing. The number of legs affected by roughness influenced both behavioral and physiological responses to flooring. Cows on 1-ROUGH stepped twice as often with the rough-treated leg and one-half as much with the hind leg on smooth concrete compared with other surfaces. Similarly, on the 1-ROUGH surface, total muscle activity was reduced in the leg on the rough surface, and muscle activity was more sustained (3× higher) in the other hind leg, suggesting that cows avoid possible discomfort under 1 leg by using muscles in the other. In the 4-ROUGH treatment, time between steps was more variable than on the other 2 treatments (coefficient of variation, 4-ROUGH: 245; 1-ROUGH: 208; 0-ROUGH: 190±5.8%), likely because cows could not move away from this uneven flooring. Thus, the method of presentation of

  8. Novel CD47: SIRPα Dependent Mechanism for the Activation of STAT3 in Antigen-Presenting Cell

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Natan; Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Ben-Yehuda, Adi; Rachmilewitz, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface CD47 interacts with its receptor, signal-regulatory-protein α (SIRPα) that is expressed predominantly on macrophages, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. This “don’t eat me” signal is mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα at the cytoplasmic ITIM motifs and the recruitment of the phosphatase, SHP-1. We previously revealed a novel mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 pathway and the regulation of human APC maturation and function that is based on cell:cell interaction. In this study, we present evidence supporting the notion that CD47:SIRPα serves as a cell surface receptor: ligand pair involved in this contact-dependent STAT3 activation and regulation of APC maturation. We show that upon co-culturing APC with various primary and tumor cell lines STAT3 phosphorylation and IL-10 expression are induced, and such regulation could be suppressed by specific CD47 siRNAs and shRNAs. Significantly, >50% reduction in CD47 expression abolished the contact-dependent inhibition of T cell activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical association between SIRPα and STAT3. Thus, we suggest that in addition to signaling through the ITIM-SHP-1 complex that transmit an anti-phagocytotic, CD47:SIRPα also triggers STAT3 signaling that is linked to an immature APC phenotype and peripheral tolerance under steady state and pathological conditions. PMID:24073274

  9. Principles of ecosystem sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, F.S. III; Torn, M.S.; Tateno, Masaki

    1996-12-01

    Many natural ecosystems are self-sustaining, maintaining an characteristic mosaic of vegetation types of hundreds to thousands of years. In this article we present a new framework for defining the conditions that sustain natural ecosystems and apply these principles to sustainability of managed ecosystems. A sustainable ecosystem is one that, over the normal cycle of disturbance events, maintains its characteristics diversity of major functional groups, productivity, and rates of biogeochemical cycling. These traits are determined by a set of four {open_quotes}interactive controls{close_quotes} (climate, soil resource supply, major functional groups of organisms, and disturbance regime) that both govern and respond to ecosystem processes. Ecosystems cannot be sustained unless the interactive controls oscillate within stable bounds. This occurs when negative feedbacks constrain changes in these controls. For example, negative feedbacks associated with food availability and predation often constrain changes in the population size of a species. Linkages among ecosystems in a landscape can contribute to sustainability by creating or extending the feedback network beyond a single patch. The sustainability of managed systems can be increased by maintaining interactive controls so that they form negative feedbacks within ecosystems and by using laws and regulations to create negative feedbacks between ecosystems and human activities, such as between ocean ecosystems and marine fisheries. Degraded ecosystems can be restored through practices that enhance positive feedbacks to bring the ecosystem to a state where the interactive controls are commensurate with desired ecosystem characteristics. The possible combinations of interactive controls that govern ecosystem traits are limited by the environment, constraining the extent to which ecosystems can be managed sustainably for human purposes. 111 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Principles of Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Fred

    2016-01-01

    While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Strategies engaged by pathogens strongly determine how a vaccine should be formulated to evoke potent and efficient protective immune responses. The improved knowledge of immune response mechanisms has facilitated the development of new vaccines with the capacity to defend against challenging pathogens and can help to protect individuals particular at risk like immunocompromised and elderly populations. Modern vaccine development technologies include the production of highly purified antigens that provide a lower reactogenicity and higher safety profile than the traditional empirically developed vaccines. Attempts to improve vaccine antigen purity, however, may result in impaired vaccine immunogenicity. Some of such disadvantages related to highly purified and/or genetically engineered vaccines yet can be overcome by innovative technologies, such as live vector vaccines, and DNA or RNA vaccines. Moreover, recent years have witnessed the development of novel adjuvant formulations that specifically focus on the augmentation and/or control of the interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the function of antigen-presenting cells. Finally, vaccine design has become more tailored, and in turn has opened up the potential of extending its application to hitherto not accessible complex microbial pathogens plus providing new

  11. Hydrotectonics; principles and relevance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopf, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrotectonics combines the principles of hydraulics and rock mechanics. The hypothesis assumes that: (1) no faults are truly planar, (2) opposing noncongruent wavy wallrock surfaces form chambers and bottlenecks along the fault, and (3) most thrusting occurs beneath the water table. These physical constraints permit the following dynamics. Shear displacement accompanying faulting must constantly change the volume of each chamber. Addition of ground water liquefies dry fault breccia to a heavy incompressible viscous muddy breccia I call fault slurry. When the volume of a chamber along a thrust fault decreases faster than its fault slurry can escape laterally, overpressurized slurry is hydraulically injected into the base of near-vertical fractures in the otherwise impervious overriding plate. Breccia pipes commonly form where such fissures intersect. Alternating decrease and increase in volume of the chamber subjects this injection slurry to reversible surges that not only raft and abrade huge clasts sporadically spalled from the walls of the conduit but also act as a forceful hydraulic ram which periodically widens the conduit and extends its top. If the pipe perforates a petroleum reservoir, leaking hydrocarbons float to its top. Sudden faulting may generate a powerful water hammer that can be amplified at some distal narrow ends of the anastomosing plumbing system, where the shock may produce shatter cones. If vented on the Earth's surface, the muddy breccia, now called extrusion slurry, forms a mud volcano. This hypothesis suggests that many highly disturbed features presently attributed to such catastrophic processes as subsurface explosions or meteorite impacts are due to the rheology of tectonic slurry in an intermittently reactivated pressure-relief tube rooted in a powerful reciprocating hydrotectonic pump activated by a long-lived deep-seated thrust fault.

  12. The combination of the active principles of Podophyllum hexandrum supports early recovery of the gastrointestinal system via activation of Nrf2-HO-1 signaling and the hematopoietic system, leading to effective whole-body survival in lethally irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Dutta, A; Gupta, M L; Kalita, B

    2015-03-01

    This study is aimed at the development of a safe radioprotective formulation to minimize human sufferings during accidental nuclear exposures. In the current study, a combination of three active principles, namely podophyllotoxin, podophyllotoxin beta-D-glucoside, and rutin (G-002M), isolated from Podophyllum hexandrum rhizomes, has been evaluated for its radioprotective potential and mode of action. Total body protection studies have demonstrated that a single prophylactic dose of G-002M delivered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to a lethal (9 Gy) dose of gamma radiation, and significantly protected the radiosensitive hematopoietic and gastrointestinal organs. Studies have also revealed a reduction in free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and cell death in mouse intestine after G-002M treatment, while GSH was observed to be enhanced in the same tissue. Redox-sensitive transcription factor (Nrf2) activation and subsequent upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and SOD-1 revealed the cytoprotective role of G-002M. A histological examination of the jejunum pretreated with the formulation also demonstrated less damage to the villi, crypts, and the mucosal layers. These observations reiterated that the reduction in the ROS levels, protection of cellular macromolecules, and activation of the antioxidant signaling pathway may have been the principle factors involved in G-002M- mediated protection against radiation-induced tissue impairment. The potentially safe and effective radioprotective characteristics of this new combination are encouraging for further studies for human application.

  13. Illustration of high-active Ag2CrO4 photocatalyst from the first-principle calculation of electronic structures and carrier effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Yu, Weilai; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Baoshun

    2015-12-01

    Although Ag2CrO4 has been frequently studied as a highly active photocatalytic material under visible light irradiation in recent years, we are still less-known on its detailed mechanism. Also, it is difficult to illustrate this issue just from the experimental discussion. Contrarily, theoretical investigation can deepen our understanding on its photocatalytic mechanism from the electronic level. In this work, the crystal structures, band structures, density of states, and chemical bonding for Ag2CrO4 were studied by the first-principles calculation based on the density functional theory. The calculation results indicate that Ag2CrO4 has an indirect band gap of ca. 1.42 eV, a deep position of valence band edge and a strong optical absorption coefficient, implying that Ag2CrO4 has strong oxidation ability and high photocatalytic activity for decomposing organic pollutant under visible light irradiation. Moreover, our calculation also indicates that Ag2CrO4 has small effective mass of electrons and holes, and great effective mass difference between hole and electron, which can respectively facilitate the migration and separation of electrons and holes, and finally improve the photocatalytic performance.

  14. PD-1 on Immature and PD-1 Ligands on Migratory Human Langerhans Cells Regulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Cruz, Victor; McDonough, Sean M.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Crum, Christopher P.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known as “sentinels” of the immune system that function as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after migration to draining lymph node. LCs are proposed to have a role in tolerance and the resolution of cutaneous immune responses. The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, are a co-inhibitory pathway that contributes to the negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activation and peripheral tolerance. Surprisingly, we found PD-1 to be expressed on immature LCs (iLCs) in situ. PD-1 engagement on iLCs reduced IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α cytokine production in response to TLR2 signals but had no effect on LC maturation. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were expressed at very low levels on iLCs. Maturation of LCs upon migration from epidermis led to loss of PD-l expression and gain of high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 as well as co-stimulatory molecules. Blockade of PD-L1 and/or PD-L2 on migratory LCs (mLCs) and DDCs enhanced T-cell activation, as has been reported for other APCs. Thus the PD-1 pathway is active in iLCs and inhibits iLC activities, but expression of receptor and ligands reverses upon maturation and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on mLC function to inhibit T-cell responses. PMID:20445553

  15. Common Principles and Multiculturalism

    PubMed Central

    Zahedi, Farzaneh; Larijani, Bagher

    2009-01-01

    Judgment on rightness and wrongness of beliefs and behaviors is a main issue in bioethics. Over centuries, big philosophers and ethicists have been discussing the suitable tools to determine which act is morally sound and which one is not. Emerging the contemporary bioethics in the West has resulted in a misconception that absolute westernized principles would be appropriate tools for ethical decision making in different cultures. We will discuss this issue by introducing a clinical case. Considering various cultural beliefs around the world, though it is not logical to consider all of them ethically acceptable, we can gather on some general fundamental principles instead of going to the extremes of relativism and absolutism. Islamic teachings, according to the presented evidence in this paper, fall in with this idea. PMID:23908720

  16. Common principles and multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Farzaneh; Larijani, Bagher

    2009-01-01

    Judgment on rightness and wrongness of beliefs and behaviors is a main issue in bioethics. Over centuries, big philosophers and ethicists have been discussing the suitable tools to determine which act is morally sound and which one is not. Emerging the contemporary bioethics in the West has resulted in a misconception that absolute westernized principles would be appropriate tools for ethical decision making in different cultures. We will discuss this issue by introducing a clinical case. Considering various cultural beliefs around the world, though it is not logical to consider all of them ethically acceptable, we can gather on some general fundamental principles instead of going to the extremes of relativism and absolutism. Islamic teachings, according to the presented evidence in this paper, fall in with this idea.

  17. Common principles and multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Farzaneh; Larijani, Bagher

    2009-01-01

    Judgment on rightness and wrongness of beliefs and behaviors is a main issue in bioethics. Over centuries, big philosophers and ethicists have been discussing the suitable tools to determine which act is morally sound and which one is not. Emerging the contemporary bioethics in the West has resulted in a misconception that absolute westernized principles would be appropriate tools for ethical decision making in different cultures. We will discuss this issue by introducing a clinical case. Considering various cultural beliefs around the world, though it is not logical to consider all of them ethically acceptable, we can gather on some general fundamental principles instead of going to the extremes of relativism and absolutism. Islamic teachings, according to the presented evidence in this paper, fall in with this idea. PMID:23908720

  18. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S. G.; McCann, R. S.; Kaiser, M. K.; Begault, D. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew on flight vehicles, surface landers and habitats, and during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Designers of displays and controls for exploration missions must be prepared to select the text formats, label styles, alarms, electronic procedure designs, and cursor control devices that provide for optimal crew performance on exploration tasks. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP are: 1) Controls, 2) Displays, 3) Procedures, and 4) EVA Operations.

  19. Principles Guiding Vocabulary Learning through Extensive Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Extensive reading is one of a range of activities that can be used in a language learning course. Ideally, the choice of activities to go into a course should be guided by principles which are well supported by research. Similarly, the way each of those activities is used should be guided by well-justified principles. In this article, we look at…

  20. Multifunctional Hyaluronic Acid and Chondroitin Sulfate Nanoparticles: Impact of Glycosaminoglycan Presentation on Receptor Mediated Cellular Uptake and Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Oommen, Oommen P; Duehrkop, Claudia; Nilsson, Bo; Hilborn, Jöns; Varghese, Oommen P

    2016-08-17

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) polymers are extensively used for various biomedical applications, such as for tissue engineering, drug delivery, and gene delivery. Although both these biopolymers are known to target cell surface CD44 receptors, their relative cellular targeting properties and immune activation potential have never been evaluated. In this article, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel self-assembled supramolecular HA and CS nanoparticles (NPs). These NPs were developed using fluorescein as a hydrophobic component that induced amphiphilicity in biopolymers and also efficiently stabilized anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) promoting a near zero-order drug release. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity studies of these NPs in different human cancer lines, namely, human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116 and human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 demonstrated dose dependent cytotoxicity. Interestingly, both NPs showed CD44 dependent cellular uptake with the CS-DOX NP displaying higher dose-dependent cytotoxicity than the HA-DOX NP in different mammalian cells tested. Immunological evaluation of these nanocarriers in an ex vivo human whole blood model revealed that unlike unmodified polymers, the HA NP and CS NP surprisingly showed platelet aggregation and thrombin-antithrombin complex formation at high concentrations (0.8 mg/mL). We also observed a clear difference in early- and late-stage complement activation (C3a and sC5b-9) with CS and CS NP triggering significant complement activation at high concentrations (0.08-0.8 mg/mL), unlike HA and HA NP. These results offer new insight into designing glycosaminoglycan-based NPs and understanding their hematological responses and targeting ability. PMID:27468113

  1. Mitochondrial H2O2 in Lung Antigen-Presenting Cells Blocks NF-κB Activation to Prevent Unwarranted Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Khare, Anupriya; Raundhal, Mahesh; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Das, Sudipta; Corey, Catherine; Kamga, Christelle K; Quesnelle, Kelly; St Croix, Claudette; Watkins, Simon C; Morse, Christina; Oriss, Timothy B; Huff, Rachael; Hannum, Rachel; Ray, Prabir; Shiva, Sruti; Ray, Anuradha

    2016-05-24

    Inhalation of environmental antigens such as allergens does not always induce inflammation in the respiratory tract. While antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells and macrophages, take up inhaled antigens, the cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that prevent an inflammatory response during this process, such as activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, are not well understood. Here, we show that the nuclear receptor PPARγ plays a critical role in blocking NF-κB activation in response to inhaled antigens to preserve immune tolerance. Tolerance induction promoted mitochondrial respiration, generation of H2O2, and suppression of NF-κB activation in WT, but not PPARγ-deficient, APCs. Forced restoration of H2O2 in PPARγ-deficient cells suppressed IκBα degradation and NF-κB activation. Conversely, scavenging reactive oxygen species from mitochondria promoted IκBα degradation with loss of regulatory and promotion of inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Thus, communication between PPARγ and the mitochondria maintains immune quiescence in the airways.

  2. Principles of liquids working in heat engines

    PubMed Central

    Allen, P. C.; Knight, W. R.; Paulson, D. N.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of liquids suggest that they should be powerful working fluids in heat engines. Their use requires heat engines based conceptually on the Stirling and Malone principles. The principles are explained, and then experiments on propylene are presented that demonstrate the principles and confirm the thermodynamic analysis. PMID:16592756

  3. Transformational Teaching: Theoretical Underpinnings, Basic Principles, and Core Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavich, George M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collaborative learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we…

  4. Recommendations and the state of the evidence for physical activity interventions for adults with rheumatoid arthritis: 2007 to present

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Maura D; Brawerman, Marisa; Iversen, Christina N

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are twice as likely as their healthy peers to suffer from cardiovascular disease. RA is also a major cause of disability and reduced quality of life. Clinical trials of exercise and physical activity interventions demonstrate positive effects on muscle strength, function, aerobic capacity, mood and disability. While RA management guidelines emphasize the role of exercise and physical activity in the management of RA, the description of physical activity and exercise is vague and patients with RA remain less physically active than their healthy counterparts. This review discusses the benefits of physical activity and current physical activity recommendations in RA, describes measurement techniques to assess physical activity, and synthesizes the data from interventions to promote physical activity and improve health outcomes in adults with RA. PMID:23538738

  5. Soft X-ray variability over the present minimum of solar activity as observed by SphinX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Bakala, J.; Podgorski, P.; Kordylewski, Z.; Plocieniak, S.; Sylwester, B.; Trzebinski, W.; Kuzin, S.

    2011-04-01

    Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) is an instrument designed to observe the Sun in X-rays in the energy range 0.85-15.00 keV. SphinX is incorporated within the Russian TESIS X and EUV telescope complex aboard the CORONAS-Photon satellite which was launched on January 30, 2009 at 13:30 UT from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, northern Russia. Since February, 2009 SphinX has been measuring solar X-ray radiation nearly continuously. The principle of SphinX operation and the content of the instrument data archives is studied. Issues related to dissemination of SphinX calibration, data, repository mirrors locations, types of data and metadata are discussed. Variability of soft X-ray solar flux is studied using data collected by SphinX over entire mission duration.

  6. Alleviation of radiation-induced genomic damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by active principles of Podophyllum hexandrum: an in vitro study using chromosomal and CBMN assay.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sangeeta; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2014-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the protection against radiation of human peripheral blood lymphocytic DNA by a formulation of three isolated active principles of Podophyllum hexandrum (G-002M). G-002M in various concentrations was administered 1h prior to irradiation in culture media containing blood. Radioprotective efficacy of G-002M to lymphocytic DNA was estimated using various parameters such as dicentrics, micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NuB) in binucleated cells. Certain experiments to ascertain the G2/M arrest potential of G-002M were also conducted. It was effective in arresting the cells even at half of the concentration of colchicine used. Observations demonstrated a radiation-dose-dependent increase in dicentric chromosomes (DC), acentric fragments, MN, NPB and NuB upto 5Gy. These changes were found significantly decreased by pre-administration of G-002M. A highly significant dose modifying factor (DMF) 1.43 and 1.39 based on dicentric assay and cytokinesis block micronuclei assay, respectively, was observed against 5Gy exposure in the current experiments. G-002M alone in its effective dose did not induct any change in any of the parameters mentioned above. Observations on cell cycle arrest by G-002M showed that the formulation has potential in arresting cells at G2/M, compared with colchicine. Based on significant DMF at highest radiation dose (5Gy) studied currently and meaningful reduction in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations, we express that G-002M has a potential of minimising radiation-induced DNA (cytogenetic) damage.

  7. In vitro chemo-preventive activities of hydroxytyrosol: the main phenolic compound present in extra-virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, Patrizia; Fuccelli, Raffaela; Sepporta, Maria Vittoria; Fabiani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The co-incubation in the culture medium with hydroxytyrosol [3,4-dihydroxyphenyl ethanol (3,4-DHPEA)], the main phenolic compound present in extra-virgin olive oil, and H2O2 reduces the oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In this study we investigate, by the comet assay, the ability of 3,4-DHPEA to inhibit the H2O2 induced DNA damage when pre-incubated with PBMC and then removed before the exposure of cells to H2O2. Low doses of 3,4-DHPEA (10-100 μM) pre-incubated for 30 min with PBMC reduced the DNA damage induced by the treatment with H2O2 200 μM for 5 min at 4 °C. Prolonging the exposure time up to 6 h completely prevented the DNA damage. Furthermore we extensively analysed, by the MTT assay, the anti-proliferative activities of 3,4-DHPEA on breast (MDA and MCF-7), prostate (LNCap and PC3) and colon (SW480 and HCT116) cancer cell lines and correlated these effects with the H2O2 accumulation. The concentration of H2O2 in the culture medium was measured by the ferrous ion oxidation-xylenol orange method. The proliferation of all the cell lines was inhibited but at different levels: the prostate cancer cells were more resistant to the growth inhibition with respect to breast and colon cancer cells. The ability of the different cell lines to remove H2O2 from the culture medium was inversely correlated with their sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effect of 3,4-DHPEA. Therefore, 3,4-DHPEA may act as a chemopreventive agent acting on both initiation and promotion/progression phases of carcinogenesis. PMID:26469183

  8. Student Perceptions of Value Added in an Active Learning Experience: Producing, Reviewing and Evaluating a Sales Team Video Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, James J.; Kezim, Boualem; Stewart, James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a video team-based activity as a learning experience in a sales management course. Students perceived this learning activity approach as a beneficial and effective instructional technique. The benefits of making a video in a marketing course reinforce the understanding and the use of the sales process…

  9. Intuitions, principles and consequences.

    PubMed

    Shaw, A B

    2001-02-01

    Some approaches to the assessment of moral intuitions are discussed. The controlled ethical trial isolates a moral issue from confounding factors and thereby clarifies what a person's intuition actually is. Casuistic reasoning from situations, where intuitions are clear, suggests or modifies principles, which can then help to make decisions in situations where intuitions are unclear. When intuitions are defended by a supporting principle, that principle can be tested by finding extreme cases, in which it is counterintuitive to follow the principle. An approach to the resolution of conflict between valid moral principles, specifically the utilitarian and justice principles, is considered. It is argued that even those who justify intuitions by a priori principles are often obliged to modify or support their principles by resort to the consideration of consequences.

  10. Chemical Principls Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1973-01-01

    Two topics are discussed: (1) Stomach Upset Caused by Aspirin, illustrating principles of acid-base equilibrium and solubility; (2) Physical Chemistry of the Drinking Duck, illustrating principles of phase equilibria and thermodynamics. (DF)

  11. Minimum Principles in Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Sascha E.

    2001-06-01

    Minimum (or minimal) principles are mathematical laws that were first used in physics: Hamilton's principle and Fermat's principle of least time are two famous example. In the past decade, a number of motor control theories have been proposed that are formally of the same kind as the minimum principles of physics, and some of these have been quite successful at predicting motor performance in a variety of tasks. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of this work. Particular attention is given to the relation between minimum theories in motor control and those used in other disciplines. Other issues around which the review is organized include: (1) the relation between minimum principles and structural models of motor planning and motor control, (2) the empirically-driven development of minimum principles and the danger of circular theorizing, and (3) the design of critical tests for minimum theories. Some perspectives for future research are discussed in the concluding section of the paper. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11401453

  12. Principles of Modern Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beim, George

    This book is written to give a better understanding of the principles of modern soccer to coaches and players. In nine chapters the following elements of the game are covered: (1) the development of systems; (2) the principles of attack; (3) the principles of defense; (4) training games; (5) strategies employed in restarts; (6) physical fitness…

  13. Chemical Principles Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1970-01-01

    This is the first of a new series of brief ancedotes about materials and phenomena which exemplify chemical principles. Examples include (1) the sea-lab experiment illustrating principles of the kinetic theory of gases, (2) snow-making machines illustrating principles of thermodynamics in gas expansions and phase changes, and (3) sunglasses that…

  14. System level electrochemical principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The traditional electrochemical storage concepts are difficult to translate into high power, high voltage multikilowatt storage systems. The increased use of electronics, and the use of electrochemical couples that minimize the difficulties associated with the corrective measures to reduce the cell to cell capacity dispersion were adopted by battery technology. Actively cooled bipolar concepts are described which represent some attractive alternative system concepts. They are projected to have higher energy densities lower volumes than current concepts. They should be easier to scale from one capacity to another and have a closer cell to cell capacity balance. These newer storage system concepts are easier to manage since they are designed to be a fully integrated battery. These ideas are referred to as system level electrochemistry. The hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cells (RFC) is probably the best example of the integrated use of these principles.

  15. Endo-[beta]-Mannanase Activity Present in Cell Wall Extracts of Lettuce Endosperm prior to Radicle Emergence.

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, S.; Bradford, K. J.; Nevins, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) endosperm cell walls isolated prior to radicle emergence underwent autohydrolysis, the rate of which was correlated with whether radicle emergence would subsequently occur. Extraction of endosperm cell walls with 6 M LiCl suppressed autohydrolysis, and the desalted extract possessed activity that was capable of hydrolyzing purified locust bean galactomannan but not arabinogalactan, carboxymethylcellulose, glucomannan, polygalacturonic acid, tomato galactomannan, or native lettuce endosperm cell walls. Some hydrolytic activity was detected on endosperm cell walls if they were modified by partial trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis or pretreatment with guanidinium thiocyanate. In extended incubations the cell wall enzyme extract released only large molecular mass fragments from locust bean galactomannan, indicating primarily endo-activity. Galactomannan-hydrolyzing activity in the cell wall extract increased as a function of imbibition time and was greatest just prior to radicle emergence. Thermoinhibition (imbibition at 32[deg]C) or treatment with abscisic acid at a temperature optimal for germination (25[deg]C) suppressed both germination and endosperm cell wall mannanase activity, whereas alleviation of thermoinhibition with gibberellic acid was accompanied by significant enhancement of mannanase activity. We conclude that a cell wall-bound endo-[beta]-mannanase is expressed in lettuce endosperm prior to radicle emergence and is regulated by the same conditions that govern germination. PMID:12223598

  16. RPL Dosimetry: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takayoshi

    2011-05-05

    The principle of radio-photoluminescence (RPL) is applied to the glass dosimeter, which is one of the most excellent solid state dosimeters. The silver activated phosphate glass irradiated with ionizing radiations emits luminescence when exposed to UV light. This phenomenon is called RPL. The most characteristic features of the glass dosimeters are data accumulation and no fading. The basic principle of RPL is described and then how it is applied to the glass dosimeter is explained. Finally some applications of RPL will be introduced.

  17. New insight into the enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activities of B-, C- and B/C-doped anatase TiO2 by first-principles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Zhou, Peng; Li, Qin

    2013-08-01

    The geometry structures, formation energies and electronic properties of the B-, C- and B/C-doped anatase TiO2 were investigated by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of first-principles. The results indicated that the visible-light absorption and photocatalytic activities of the B-, C- and B/C-doped anatase TiO2 were not only influenced by the energy gaps (Eg) and the distributions of impurity states, but also affected by the locations of Fermi levels (EF) and the energies of the edges of band gaps (Ev for the top of valence bands and Ec for the bottom of conduction bands). However, the above four factors changed with the doped models of TiO2. The impurity states in the band gaps reduced the maximum energy gaps in the band gaps, which is responsible for the absorption of visible light. The Fermi levels at the bottom of conduction bands indicated the existence of Ti(3+) ions, which enhanced the separation rates of photogenerated electrons and holes. Further, the energies of the edges of band gaps, determining the dominant types of oxidants (O2(-), hole, ˙OH) in the photocatalytic degradation, were discussed. Moreover, the stability of the doped TiO2 depended on its growth conditions (O-rich or Ti-rich environment). The O-rich growth condition is beneficial to the substitutional B and C atoms to Ti atoms, while the Ti-rich growth condition is favorable to the other doped TiO2 including the most stable co-doped TiO2 with the interstitial B atom and the substitutional C atom to O atom. In addition, our results also showed that the B/C-doped TiO2 inherited the partial electronic properties of single-doped TiO2, but also exhibited many new electronic properties, implying that the electronic properties of co-doped systems are not a mechanical mixture of those of both single-doped systems.

  18. Speed-gradient principle for description of transient dynamics in systems obeying maximum entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkov, Alexander; Krivtsov, Anton

    2011-03-01

    The speed-gradient variational principle (SG-principle) for nonstationary nonequilib-rium systems is formulated and illustrated by an example. It is proposed to use the SG-principle to model transient (relaxation) dynamics for systems satisfying maximum entropy principle. Nonstationary processes generated with the method of dynamics of particles are studied. A comparison of theoretic prediction and simulation results confirming reasonable prediction precision is presented.

  19. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  20. Type I Interferon–Inducible Gene Expression in Blood Is Present and Reflects Disease Activity in Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Ronan J.; Kong, Sek Won; Yao, Yihong; Jallal, Bahija; Kiener, Peter A.; Pinkus, Jack L.; Beggs, Alan H.; Amato, Anthony A.; Greenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To apply gene expression profiling to the study of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with inflammatory myopathies, in order to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers associated with disease activity. Methods We used Affymetrix whole-genome microarrays to measure the expression of ~38,500 genes in 65 blood and 15 muscle samples from 44 patients with dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis (IBM), myasthenia gravis, or genetically determined myopathies and from 12 healthy volunteers. In 9 patients, 2 samples were obtained at different time points, when disease was either active or improving, and these paired blood samples were also compared. Bioinformatics techniques were used to identify genes with significant differential expression among diagnostic categories and in relation to disease activity. We corroborated the microarray data with quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results Most patients with active DM or PM, but not patients with IBM, had significant and high up-regulation of the type I interferon-α/β (IFNα/β)–inducible genes in blood. Furthermore, the up-regulation of these genes correlated with disease activity in DM and PM, with down-regulation occurring when disease was controlled with treatment. Conclusion DM and PM are diseases characterized by the systemic overexpression of IFNα/β-inducible genes. The magnitude of the overexpression of these genes is higher in DM and correlates with disease activity in both disorders. Although PM and IBM have been modeled as having similar immunologic processes occurring within muscle, there are substantial differences in the expression of IFNα/β-inducible genes in blood in these diseases. PMID:17968926

  1. Effects of Different Multimedia Presentations on Viewers' Information-Processing Activities Measured by Eye-Tracking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Han-Chin

    2012-01-01

    This study implemented eye-tracking technology to understand the impact of different multimedia instructional materials, i.e., five successive pages versus a single page with the same amount of information, on information-processing activities in 21 non-science-major college students. The findings showed that students demonstrated the same number…

  2. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR EMERGING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM FUNDAMENTAL ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES - PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  3. Using "Electronic Portfolios" to Challenge Current Orthodoxies in the Presentation of an Initial Teacher Training Design and Technology Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spendlove, David

    2006-01-01

    The paper examines the extent to which a University undergraduate curriculum initiative provided initial teacher trainees with opportunities to challenge orthodox design methodologies through the production of an electronic portfolio within and extended design and technology activity. It was found that the "electronic portfolio" served primarily…

  4. Increased Interest in Physiology and Science among Adolescents after Presentations and Activities Administered by Undergraduate Physiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Rosa de Menezes, Jefferson; Billig Mello-Carpes, Pâmela

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a set of activities performed in south Brazil that are aligned with the objectives of PhUn Week and promote the integration between universities and public schools and the dissemination of knowledge of physiology. To achieve this goal, the authors adopted a program in which undergraduate physiology students…

  5. Science Cognitive and Activity Preferences and Their Relationship to Present Practices in Science Instruction in Secondary Schools in Penang, Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekkers, John; Allen, Leslie R.

    Described are science cognitive and activity preferences of a sample of secondary students in Georgetown, Malaysia whose perceptions of instructional practices in science were considered. Three instruments were used to collect data. The analysis considers the mean scores and F-test results for a Science Cognitive Preference Inventory, an Activity…

  6. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques.

  7. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques. PMID:20108488

  8. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A M; Wietstock, S M; Ruyechan, W T

    1988-03-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. In contrast, the pH optimum of the HeLa DNA primase was very sharp and fell between pH 7.9 and 8.2. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase and was eluted from single-stranded DNA agarose at higher salt concentrations than the host primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4 degrees C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. Separation or decoupling could also be achieved by gel filtration of the HSV polymerase:primase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, we believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA.

  9. Trace Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals Present in Pennsylvania Groundwater are Correlated with Geogenic Brines rather than Hydraulic Fracturing Active Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drollette, B.; Shregglman, K.; D'Ambro, E.; Elsner, M.; Warner, N. R.; O'Connor, M.; Karatum, O.; Vengosh, A.; Jackson, R. B.; Darrah, T.; Plata, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that deep Marcellus shale brines migrate into shallow groundwater aquifers, presumably via fractures in the subsurface that exist independent of any gas extraction activities. However, whereas many inorganic species are conservative tracers, hydrophobic organic compounds are both sorptive and reactive, and geogenic organic chemicals may not survive transport from deep shales to the subsurface. Here, 40 shallow groundwater samples from private wells in Northeastern Pennsylvania were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline range organic compounds (GRO), and 17 were analyzed for VOCs, GRO, and diesel range organic compounds (DRO). BTEX compounds (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) were detected in 6 of 40 samples at concentrations orders of magnitude below EPA maximum contaminant levels (e.g., << 5 ppb) and did not spatially correlate with distance to the nearest active hydraulic fracturing well. GRO was detected in 10 of 40 samples at concentrations as high as 8.8 ± 0.4 ppb and did not correlate with distance to the nearest hydraulic fracturing well (p = 0.24) nor in active fracturing zones, which we defined as sample locations less than 1 km from a well (p = 0.60). However, GRO was strongly correlated (p = 0.004) with shallow groundwater with Marcellus Shale inorganic chemical character, as delineated by inorganic chemical analysis. DRO was detected in all 17 samples up to 158 ± 4 ppb and did not spatially correlate with distance to the nearest hydraulic fracturing well (p = 0.74), nor active zones (p = 0.61). Similar to GRO, DRO did correlate with shallow groundwater containing Marcellus Shale character with moderate significance (p = 0.08). These results indicate that: (a) hydrophobic organic chemicals can survive transport from the deep subsurface to shallow groundwaters, and (b) transport of these compounds is not detectably enhanced by hydraulic fracturing activities in Northeastern PA as of the

  10. SU-E-T-590: An Activation Study of Materials and Devices Present in a Proton Treatment Room

    SciTech Connect

    Spitznagel, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The use of protons for radiation therapy is growing rapidly. One consequence of protons interacting with different media is activation. These nuclear reactions induced by the protons, scattered neutrons, and gamma rays, activate different materials encountered, particularly by the therapists. The purpose of this study was to examine the derived nuclides from the activation, and also the decay rate. Methods: The study was conducted in our proton therapy facility. Protons are derived from a synchrocyclotron and pass through field shipping systems, apertures, and range compensators to define the beam within the patient.Included materials of concerns measured; the patient support couch, sheet rock in the wall, solid plastics used for quality assurance and dosimetry, and the passive scattering system itself, which includes brass apertures, and Lucite or blue wax compensators. All devices were studied post irradiation using gamma spectroscopy to determine the nuclides, and a sodium iodine scintillation detector to measure decay, particularly when the dose rate fell to background levels. Results: We have also determined from the measurements we will maintain brass apertures for three months before sending them for scrap. Some of the radionuclides arrived from these measurements included Na-22 for the blue wax compensator, C1-34m for the sheetrock, and Sc-44 and Co-60 for the brass apertures. We found compensators made out of Lucite or wax decayed to background in 2 hours. The patient support couch decayed to background in approximately 40 minutes, and sheet rock decayed in 80 minutes. In terms of the aperture layers, the most proximal aperture slab had much higher activity than the distal slab. Also the proximal sides of the slabs were much more activate than the distal. Conclusion: We have given proper instruction to therapists performing quality assurance in terms of the handled plastics, and to handle apertures rapidly as possible.

  11. [The readiness to communication and self-presentation as chosen aspects of social activity in depressive patients].

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sauer, K

    2000-01-01

    Willingness to communicate and self-presentation were examined in 68 patients with depression. The results of the patients were compared with a control group of healthy individuals. The results indicated changes in social life of patients, especially in interpersonal communication. Depressive patients showed significantly lower level of willingness to communicate than healthy persons. The self-presentation letters of patients mostly included information about the disease, negative feelings and thoughts connected with depression and negative self-description.

  12. Education and the Reality Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettelheim, Bruno

    1979-01-01

    All education is based on a middle-class morality that finds its psychoanalytic equivalent in a reality principle which insists that present pleasure must be largely foregone for greater gains in the future. Schools, however, have yet to develop ways to teach low-income students this middle-class value. (Author/GC)

  13. Mentoring: Contemporary Principles and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bey, Theresa M., Ed.; Holmes, C. Thomas, Ed.

    In the spirit of educational reform efforts, an initiative exists to restructure the education of teachers through collaborative action, using mentoring to build alliances. This monograph, based on contemporary principles and issues of mentoring, presents ways to conceptualize the professional preparation and development of teachers. Following a…

  14. Anti-Streptococcal activity of Brazilian Amazon Rain Forest plant extracts presents potential for preventive strategies against dental caries

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Juliana Paola Corrêa; de CASTILHO, Adriana Lígia; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Couri; DÍAZ, Ingrit Elida Collantes; PACIÊNCIA, Mateus Luís Barradas; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Caries is a global public health problem, whose control requires the introduction of low-cost treatments, such as strong prevention strategies, minimally invasive techniques and chemical prevention agents. Nature plays an important role as a source of new antibacterial substances that can be used in the prevention of caries, and Brazil is the richest country in terms of biodiversity. Objective In this study, the disk diffusion method (DDM) was used to screen over 2,000 Brazilian Amazon plant extracts against Streptococcus mutans. Material and Methods Seventeen active plant extracts were identified and fractionated. Extracts and their fractions, obtained by liquid-liquid partition, were tested in the DDM assay and in the microdilution broth assay (MBA) to determine their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs). The extracts were also subjected to antioxidant analysis by thin layer chromatography. Results EB271, obtained from Casearia spruceana, showed significant activity against the bacterium in the DDM assay (20.67±0.52 mm), as did EB1129, obtained from Psychotria sp. (Rubiaceae) (15.04±2.29 mm). EB1493, obtained from Ipomoea alba, was the only extract to show strong activity against Streptococcus mutans (0.08 mg/mLactive extracts, discovered in the Amazon rain forest, show potential as sources of new antibacterial agents for use as chemical coadjuvants in prevention strategies to treat caries. PMID:24676578

  15. Vibrational imaging of glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Zhang, Luyuan; Shen, Yihui; Wei, Lu; Min, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is consumed as an energy source by virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Its uptake activity closely reflects the cellular metabolic status in various pathophysiological transformations, such as diabetes and cancer. Extensive efforts such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence microscopy have been made to specifically image glucose uptake activity but all with technical limitations. Here, we report a new platform to visualize glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues with subcellular resolution and minimal perturbation. A novel glucose analogue with a small alkyne tag (carbon-carbon triple bond) is developed to mimic natural glucose for cellular uptake, which can be imaged with high sensitivity and specificity by targeting the strong and characteristic alkyne vibration on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope to generate a quantitative three dimensional concentration map. Cancer cells with differing metabolic characteristics can be distinguished. Heterogeneous uptake patterns are observed in tumor xenograft tissues, neuronal culture and mouse brain tissues with clear cell-cell variations. Therefore, by offering the distinct advantage of optical resolution but without the undesirable influence of bulky fluorophores, our method of coupling SRS with alkyne labeled glucose will be an attractive tool to study energy demands of living systems at the single cell level.

  16. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Precautionary Principle, generated during the late 1980s as a unifying principle for regulating discharge of hazardous material into the North Sea, has been broadened to include a shifting of the burden of proof to the proponent of a proposed activity, adoption of a more holi...

  17. Mucosal adjuvant activity of IL-2 presenting spores of bacillus subtilis in a murine model of Helicobacter pylori vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hinc, Krzysztof; Stasiłojć, Małgorzata; Piątek, Iwona; Peszyńska-Sularz, Grażyna; Isticato, Rachele; Ricca, Ezio; Obuchowski, Michał; Iwanicki, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The endospores of Bacillus subtilis are now widely used as a platform for presentation of heterologous proteins and due to their safety record and high resistance to harsh environmental conditions can be considered as potential vehicles for oral vaccination. In this research we show that recombinant B. subtilis spores presenting a fragment of the Helicobacter acinonychis UreB protein and expressing the ureB gene under vegetative promoter elicit a strong cellular immune response in orally immunized mice when co-administered with spores presenting IL-2. We show for the first time the successful application of two types of recombinant spores, one carrying an antigen and the other an adjuvant, in a single oral immunization.

  18. A complicated story of frost and wind: Present-day gully activity within the north polar erg, Mar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candice; Allen, Amanda; Grisby, Nathan; Li, Zheyu Joey

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of high-resolution observations have shown that the dunes within the martian north polar erg (AKA Olympia Undae) are currently very active on seasonal and yearly timescales, with 20-60% of the dunes within five polar dune fields undergoing the formation of alcove-apron features each Mars year. Previous studies have hypothesized formation mechanisms, based on observations of when new alcove and alcove-apron features form within an individual field through one Mars year. However, results are ill-constrained (and thus different hypotheses have been proposed) as the polar hood and winter night mean very few images are taken during the actual period of activity. In this study, we mitigate this limitation by examining several fields over several Mars years -- thus bringing aggregated results as well as detailed correlation checks against environmental conditions and seasonal processes to bear on the problem. From this, we propose a new process that appears consistent with all observations: (1) small alcoves form along the dune brink in the autumn (under the polar hood) due to instabilities induced by the night-formation and morning-sublimation of frost. As autumn progresses, the seasonal frost layer builds over the altered dune slope. (2) In the early spring, sublimation activity is concentrated and/or enhanced over these alcoves, causing further erosion and the formation of larger alcove-apron features. From the planform dimensions of the newly formed alcoves, we can estimate the volume of sand moved down the dune slope during one period of activity and estimate the aeolian sediment flux by looking at how quickly the alcoves are erased. We find that, over a Mars year, the amount of material moved via alcove-apron activity and via the wind are both comparable to aeolian sand flux estimates over dunes within lower-latitude regions of Mars. Thus it appears that the formation of alcoves-aprons is a significant mechanism for dune advancement and evolution within the

  19. Activation of carbon dioxide by a terminal uranium-nitrogen bond in the gas-phase: a demonstration of the principle of microscopic reversibility.

    PubMed

    Dau, Phuong D; Armentrout, P B; Michelini, Maria C; Gibson, John K

    2016-03-14

    Activation of CO2 is demonstrated by its spontaneous dissociative reaction with the gas-phase anion complex NUOCl2(-), which can be considered as NUO(+) coordinated by two chloride anion ligands. This reaction was previously predicted by density functional theory to occur exothermically, without barriers above the reactant energy. The present results demonstrate the validity of the prediction of microscopic reversibility, and provide a rare case of spontaneous dissociative addition of CO2 to a gas-phase complex. The activation of CO2 by NUOCl2(-) proceeds by conversion of a U[triple bond, length as m-dash]N bond to a U[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond and creation of an isocyanate ligand to yield the complex UO2(NCO)Cl2(-), in which uranyl, UO2(2+), is coordinated by one isocyanate and two chloride anion ligands. This activation of CO2 by a uranium(vi) nitride complex is distinctive from previous reports of oxidative insertion of CO2 into lower oxidation state U(iii) or U(iv) solid complexes, during which both C-O bonds remain intact. This unusual observation of spontaneous addition and activation of CO2 by NUOCl2(-) is a result of the high oxophilicity of uranium. If the computed Gibbs free energy of the reaction pathway, rather than the energy, is considered, there are barriers above the reactant asymptotes such that the observed reaction should not proceed under thermal conditions. This result provides a demonstration that energy rather than Gibbs free energy determines reactivity under low-pressure bimolecular conditions. PMID:26898535

  20. Lorentz Transformation from Symmetry of Reference Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Petre, M.; Dima, M.; Dima, A.; Petre, C.; Precup, I.

    2010-01-21

    The Lorentz Transformation is traditionally derived requiring the Principle of Relativity and light-speed universality. While the latter can be relaxed, the Principle of Relativity is seen as core to the transformation. The present letter relaxes both statements to the weaker, Symmetry of Reference Principle. Thus the resulting Lorentz transformation and its consequences (time dilatation, length contraction) are, in turn, effects of how we manage space and time.

  1. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovitch, O; Prister, B; Nasvit, O; Los, I; Berkovski, V

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned from the Chernobyl example. PMID:8655324

  2. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, O.; Prister, B.; Nasvit, O.; Los, I.; Berkovski, V.

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned form the Chernobyl example. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovitch, O; Prister, B; Nasvit, O; Los, I; Berkovski, V

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned from the Chernobyl example.

  4. Studies on anti-inflammatory activity of spice principles and dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A C; Lokesh, B R

    1994-01-01

    The antioxidant spice principles curcumin and eugenol when given by gavage lowered the carrageenan-induced edema in the foot pads of rats. This lowering effect was dependent on the concentration, the time gap between the administration of spice principles and the induction of inflammation by carrageenan. Dietary lipids also influenced the extent of inflammation. Animals fed 10% cod liver oil [containing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)] for 10 weeks showed a significantly lower inflammation compared to that observed in animals fed diets supplemented with 10% groundnut oil (rich in n-6 PUFA) or 10% coconut oil (rich in medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Supplementation of diets with 1 weight% of curcumin did not affect the inflammatory responses of animals to carrageenan injection. However, supplementation of diets with 0.17 weight% eugenol further lowered inflammation by 16, 32 and 30% in animals fed coconut oil, groundnut oil and cod liver oil, respectively. Therefore, combinations of dietary lipids with spice principles like eugenol can help in lowering inflammation.

  5. Past, present, and future concepts in large river ecology: How rivers function and how human activities influence river processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.L.; Richardson, W.B.; Naimo, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    This article reviews the current concepts on how flowing water, or lotic, systems function and suggest ways to expand these concepts to increase understanding of large river systems. Topics covered include the following: past and present approaches to physical and biological concepts of stream organization; the river-continuum concept; the flood-pulse concept; deficiencies of the current hypotheses (linear versis hierachical, physical verses biological control, equilibrium versus disequilibrium); future directions for large river research. 63 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Physical principles of hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Psychophysical properties of hearing * The cochlear amplifier * Mechanosensory hair cells * The "critical" oscillator as a general principle of auditory detection * Bibliography

  7. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  8. [Treatment of hypertension by acupuncture method of "activating blood and dispersing wind, harmonizing Gan-Pi": an analysis of its principle of the circular motion of ancient Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Li-Li; Du, Xin; Wang, Shu; Du, Yu-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension is one of main risk factors for the occurrence and death of stroke and coronary heart disease. Its prevalence rate is rising year by year. It severely threatens the health of the human beings. The acupuncture method of "activating blood and dispersing wind, harmonizing Gan-Pi" for treating hypertension launched by Academician SHI Xue-min has aroused great attention due to good cur- ative effect and less adverse reactions. In this paper principles of the circular motion covered by the acupuncture method of "activating blood and dispersing wind, harmonizing Gan-Pi" were clarified.

  9. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity on EEG.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Diosely C; Bashir, Mahrukh; Daniel, Joshua; Lucena, Michelle H; Bonpietro, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 20-year-old patient with a 6-month history of recurrent abdominal pain and a 3-day history of vomiting, hypertension, seizures, and encephalopathy. The brain MRI showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring showed lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity. Comprehensive CSF studies were negative. Because of severe abdominal pain without a definite etiology, we requested urine porphobilinogen and serum and fecal porphyrins, which suggested acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The patient had a complete resolution of her symptoms with carbohydrate loading and high caloric diet. Acute intermittent porphyria is potentially life-threatening without proper management and prevention of triggers if it is not recognized.

  10. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity on EEG.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Diosely C; Bashir, Mahrukh; Daniel, Joshua; Lucena, Michelle H; Bonpietro, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 20-year-old patient with a 6-month history of recurrent abdominal pain and a 3-day history of vomiting, hypertension, seizures, and encephalopathy. The brain MRI showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring showed lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity. Comprehensive CSF studies were negative. Because of severe abdominal pain without a definite etiology, we requested urine porphobilinogen and serum and fecal porphyrins, which suggested acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The patient had a complete resolution of her symptoms with carbohydrate loading and high caloric diet. Acute intermittent porphyria is potentially life-threatening without proper management and prevention of triggers if it is not recognized. PMID:27660746

  11. Past, Present, and Future of eHealth and mHealth Research to Improve Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Vandelanotte, Corneel; Müller, Andre M; Short, Camille E; Hingle, Melanie; Nathan, Nicole; Williams, Susan L; Lopez, Michael L; Parekh, Sanjoti; Maher, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    Because physical inactivity and unhealthy diets are highly prevalent, there is a need for cost-effective interventions that can reach large populations. Electronic health (eHealth) and mobile health (mHealth) solutions have shown promising outcomes and have expanded rapidly in the past decade. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the state of the evidence for the use of eHealth and mHealth in improving physical activity and nutrition behaviors in general and special populations. The role of theory in eHealth and mHealth interventions is addressed, as are methodological issues. Key recommendations for future research in the field of eHealth and mHealth are provided.

  12. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  13. The 'Herbivory Uncertainty Principle': application in a cerrado site.

    PubMed

    Gadotti, C A; Batalha, M A

    2010-05-01

    Researchers may alter the ecology of their studied organisms, even carrying out apparently beneficial activities, as in herbivory studies, when they may alter herbivory damage. We tested whether visit frequency altered herbivory damage, as predicted by the 'Herbivory Uncertainty Principle'. In a cerrado site, we established 80 quadrats, in which we sampled all woody individuals. We used four visit frequencies (high, medium, low, and control), quantifying, at the end of three months, herbivory damage for each species in each treatment. We did not corroborate the 'Herbivory Uncertainty Principle', since visiting frequency did not alter herbivory damage, at least when the whole plant community was taken into account. However, when we analysed each species separately, four out of 11 species presented significant differences in herbivory damage, suggesting that the researcher is not independent of its measurements. The principle could be tested in other ecological studies in which it may occur, such as those on animal behaviour, human ecology, population dynamics, and conservation.

  14. Projecting the environmental profile of Singapore's landfill activities: Comparisons of present and future scenarios based on LCA.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hsien H; Tan, Lester L Z; Tan, Reginald B H

    2012-05-01

    This article aims to generate the environmental profile of Singapore's Semakau landfill by comparing three different operational options associated with the life cycle stages of landfilling activities, against a 'business as usual' scenario. Before life cycle assessment or LCA is used to quantify the potential impacts from landfilling activities, an attempt to incorporate localized and empirical information into the amounts of ash and MSW sent to the landfill was made. A linear regression representation of the relationship between the mass of waste disposed and the mass of incineration ash generated was modeled from waste statistics between years 2004 and 2009. Next, the mass of individual MSW components was projected from 2010 to 2030. The LCA results highlighted that in a 'business as usual' scenario the normalized total impacts of global warming, acidification and human toxicity increased by about 2% annually from 2011 to 2030. By replacing the 8000-tonne barge with a 10000-tonne coastal bulk carrier or freighter (in scenario 2) a grand total reduction of 48% of both global warming potential and acidification can be realized by year 2030. Scenario 3 explored the importance of having a Waste Water Treatment Plant in place to reduce human toxicity levels - however, the overall long-term benefits were not as significant as scenario 2. It is shown in scenario 4 that the option of increased recycling championed over all other three scenarios in the long run, resulting in a total 58% reduction in year 2030 for the total normalized results. A separate comparison of scenarios 1-4 is also carried out for energy utilization and land use in terms of volume of waste occupied. Along with the predicted reductions in environmental burdens, an additional bonus is found in the expanded lifespan of Semakau landfill from year 2032 (base case) to year 2039. Model limitations and suggestions for improvements were also discussed.

  15. Projecting the environmental profile of Singapore's landfill activities: Comparisons of present and future scenarios based on LCA.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hsien H; Tan, Lester L Z; Tan, Reginald B H

    2012-05-01

    This article aims to generate the environmental profile of Singapore's Semakau landfill by comparing three different operational options associated with the life cycle stages of landfilling activities, against a 'business as usual' scenario. Before life cycle assessment or LCA is used to quantify the potential impacts from landfilling activities, an attempt to incorporate localized and empirical information into the amounts of ash and MSW sent to the landfill was made. A linear regression representation of the relationship between the mass of waste disposed and the mass of incineration ash generated was modeled from waste statistics between years 2004 and 2009. Next, the mass of individual MSW components was projected from 2010 to 2030. The LCA results highlighted that in a 'business as usual' scenario the normalized total impacts of global warming, acidification and human toxicity increased by about 2% annually from 2011 to 2030. By replacing the 8000-tonne barge with a 10000-tonne coastal bulk carrier or freighter (in scenario 2) a grand total reduction of 48% of both global warming potential and acidification can be realized by year 2030. Scenario 3 explored the importance of having a Waste Water Treatment Plant in place to reduce human toxicity levels - however, the overall long-term benefits were not as significant as scenario 2. It is shown in scenario 4 that the option of increased recycling championed over all other three scenarios in the long run, resulting in a total 58% reduction in year 2030 for the total normalized results. A separate comparison of scenarios 1-4 is also carried out for energy utilization and land use in terms of volume of waste occupied. Along with the predicted reductions in environmental burdens, an additional bonus is found in the expanded lifespan of Semakau landfill from year 2032 (base case) to year 2039. Model limitations and suggestions for improvements were also discussed. PMID:22257698

  16. Asynchronous presentation of global and local information reveals effects of attention on brain electrical activity specific to each level.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Fuster, Jorge; Santos-Rodríguez, Yusniel; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell J

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of selective attention within hierarchically organized Navon figures has been extensively studied with event related potentials (ERPs), by contrasting responses obtained when attending the global and the local echelons. The findings are inherently ambiguous because both levels are always presented together. Thus, only a mixture of the brain responses to two levels can be observed. Here, we use a method that allows unveiling of global and local letters at distinct times, enabling estimation of separate ERPs related to each level. Two interspersed oddball streams were presented, each using letters from one level and comprised of frequent distracters and rare targets. Previous work and our Experiment 1 show that it is difficult to divide attention between two such streams of stimuli. ERP recording in Experiment 2 evinced an early selection negativity (SN, with latencies to the 50% area of about 266 ms for global distracters and 276 ms for local distracters) that was larger for attended relative to unattended distracters. The SN was larger over right posterior occipito-temporal derivations for global stimuli and over left posterior occipito-temporal derivations for local stimuli (although the latter was less strongly lateralized). A discrimination negativity (DN, accompanied by a P3b) was larger for attended targets relative to attended distracters, with latencies to the 50% area of about 316 ms for global stimuli and 301 ms for local stimuli, which presented a similar distribution for both levels over left temporo-parietal electrodes. The two negativities apparently index successive stages in the processing of a selected level within a compound figure. By resolving the ambiguity of traditional designs, our method allowed us to observe the effects of attention for each hierarchical level on its own.

  17. Asynchronous presentation of global and local information reveals effects of attention on brain electrical activity specific to each level

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Fuster, Jorge; Santos-Rodríguez, Yusniel; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of selective attention within hierarchically organized Navon figures has been extensively studied with event related potentials (ERPs), by contrasting responses obtained when attending the global and the local echelons. The findings are inherently ambiguous because both levels are always presented together. Thus, only a mixture of the brain responses to two levels can be observed. Here, we use a method that allows unveiling of global and local letters at distinct times, enabling estimation of separate ERPs related to each level. Two interspersed oddball streams were presented, each using letters from one level and comprised of frequent distracters and rare targets. Previous work and our Experiment 1 show that it is difficult to divide attention between two such streams of stimuli. ERP recording in Experiment 2 evinced an early selection negativity (SN, with latencies to the 50% area of about 266 ms for global distracters and 276 ms for local distracters) that was larger for attended relative to unattended distracters. The SN was larger over right posterior occipito-temporal derivations for global stimuli and over left posterior occipito-temporal derivations for local stimuli (although the latter was less strongly lateralized). A discrimination negativity (DN, accompanied by a P3b) was larger for attended targets relative to attended distracters, with latencies to the 50% area of about 316 ms for global stimuli and 301 ms for local stimuli, which presented a similar distribution for both levels over left temporo-parietal electrodes. The two negativities apparently index successive stages in the processing of a selected level within a compound figure. By resolving the ambiguity of traditional designs, our method allowed us to observe the effects of attention for each hierarchical level on its own. PMID:25628590

  18. Monoclonal Antibody Combinations that Present Synergistic Neutralizing Activity: A Platform for Next-Generation Anti-Toxin Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Eran; Torgeman, Amram; Ozeri, Eyal; Zichel, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are among the fastest-growing therapeutics and are being developed for a broad range of indications, including the neutralization of toxins, bacteria and viruses. Nevertheless, MAbs potency is still relatively low when compared to conventional polyclonal Ab preparations. Moreover, the efficacy of an individual neutralizing MAb may significantly be hampered by the potential absence or modification of its target epitope in a mutant or subtype of the infectious agent. These limitations of individual neutralizing MAbs can be overcome by using oligoclonal combinations of several MAbs with different specificities to the target antigen. Studies conducted in our lab and by others show that such combined MAb preparation may present substantial synergy in its potency over the calculated additive potency of its individual MAb components. Moreover, oligoclonal preparation is expected to be better suited to compensating for reduced efficacy due to epitope variation. In this review, the synergistic neutralization properties of combined oligoclonal Ab preparations are described. The effect of Ab affinity, autologous Fc fraction, and targeting a critical number of epitopes, as well as the unexpected contribution of non-neutralizing clones to the synergistic neutralizing effect are presented and discussed. PMID:26035486

  19. Effects of rhythmic stimulus presentation on oscillatory brain activity: the physiology of cueing in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    te Woerd, Erik S.; Oostenveld, Robert; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; de Lange, Floris P.; Praamstra, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in beat perception and patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are impaired in perception of beat-based rhythms. Rhythmic cues are nonetheless beneficial in gait rehabilitation, raising the question how rhythm improves movement in PD. We addressed this question with magnetoencephalography recordings during a choice response task with rhythmic and non-rhythmic modes of stimulus presentation. Analyses focused on (i) entrainment of slow oscillations, (ii) the depth of beta power modulation, and (iii) whether a gain in modulation depth of beta power, due to rhythmicity, is of predictive or reactive nature. The results show weaker phase synchronisation of slow oscillations and a relative shift from predictive to reactive movement-related beta suppression in PD. Nonetheless, rhythmic stimulus presentation increased beta modulation depth to the same extent in patients and controls. Critically, this gain selectively increased the predictive and not reactive movement-related beta power suppression. Operation of a predictive mechanism, induced by rhythmic stimulation, was corroborated by a sensory gating effect in the sensorimotor cortex. The predictive mode of cue utilisation points to facilitation of basal ganglia-premotor interactions, contrasting with the popular view that rhythmic stimulation confers a special advantage in PD, based on recruitment of alternative pathways. PMID:26509117

  20. Teratology - past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ujházy, Eduard; Mach, Mojmír; Navarová, Jana; Brucknerová, Ingrid; Dubovický, Michal

    2012-12-01

    Teratology is the science that studies the causes, mechanisms, and patterns of abnormal development. The authors present an updated overview of the most important milestones and stages of the development of modern teratology. Development of knowledge and society led to the recognition that causes of congenital developmental disorders (CDDs) might be caused by various mechanical effects, foetal diseases, and retarded or arrested development of the embryo and foetus. Based on the analysis of the historical development of hypotheses and theories representing a decisive contribution to this field, we present a survey of the six Wilson's fundamental principles of teratology. The aim of observing these principles is to get insight into developmental relations and to understand mechanisms of action on the level of cell populations (elementary morphogenetic processes), tissues and organs. It is important to realise that any negative intervention into the normal course of these processes, either on genetic or non-genetic basis, inevitably leads to a sequence of subsequent changes resulting in CDDs. Moreover, the classical toxicologic monotonic dose-response paradigm recently has been challenged by the so-called "low dose-hypothesis", particularly in the case of endocrine active substances. These include some pesticides, dioxins, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), and bisphenol A. Despite modern approaches of molecular biology and genetics, along with top diagnostic techniques, we are still not able to identify the actual cause in more than 65 to 70% of all congenital defects classified as having an unknown etiology. Today CDDs include any birth defect, either morphological, biochemical, or behavioural.

  1. A fragment of the LG3 peptide of endorepellin is present in the urine of physically active mining workers: a potential marker of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Parker, Tony J; Sampson, Dayle L; Broszczak, Daniel; Chng, Yee L; Carter, Shea L; Leavesley, David I; Parker, Anthony W; Upton, Zee

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker analysis has been implemented in sports research in an attempt to monitor the effects of exertion and fatigue in athletes. This study proposed that while such biomarkers may be useful for monitoring injury risk in workers, proteomic approaches might also be utilised to identify novel exertion or injury markers. We found that urinary urea and cortisol levels were significantly elevated in mining workers following a 12 hour overnight shift. These levels failed to return to baseline over 24 h in the more active maintenance crew compared to truck drivers (operators) suggesting a lack of recovery between shifts. Use of a SELDI-TOF MS approach to detect novel exertion or injury markers revealed a spectral feature which was associated with workers in both work categories who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity. This feature was identified as the LG3 peptide, a C-terminal fragment of the anti-angiogenic/anti-tumourigenic protein endorepellin. This finding suggests that urinary LG3 peptide may be a biomarker of physical activity. It is also possible that the activity mediated release of LG3/endorepellin into the circulation may represent a biological mechanism for the known inverse association between physical activity and cancer risk/survival.

  2. Anionic Lipid Content Presents a Barrier to the Activity of ROMP-Based Synthetic Mimics of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDMs).

    PubMed

    Lis, Michael; Dorner, Franziska; Tew, Gregory N; Lienkamp, Karen

    2016-06-14

    Many biophysical studies of protein transduction domains (PTDs) and their synthetic mimics (PTDMs) focus on the interaction between the polycationic PTD(M) and anionic phospholipid surfaces. Most, but not all, of these studies suggest that these cation-anion interactions are vital for membrane activity. In this study, the effect of anionic lipid content on PTDM performance was examined for three ring-opening metathesis (ROMP)-based PTDMs with varying hydrophobicity. Using a series of dye-loaded vesicles with gradually increasing anionic lipid content, we saw that increased anionic lipid content inhibited dye release caused by these PTDMs. This result is the opposite of what was found in studies with poly- and oligo-arginine. While the effect is reduced for more hydrophobic PTDMs, it is observable even with the most hydrophobic PTDMs of our test panel. Additional experiments included dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements to measure size as a function of vesicle surface charge in the presence of increasing PTDM concentration and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy to quantify binding between PTDMs and surface-bound lipid layers with varying anion content. The results from these measurements suggested that PTDM hydrophobicity, not cation-anion interactions, is the main driving force of the interaction between our PTDMs and the model membranes investigated. This suggests a model of interaction where surface association and membrane insertion are driven by PTDM hydrophobicity, while anionic lipid content serves primarily to "pin" the PTDM to the membrane surface and limit insertion. PMID:27182683

  3. The transition from hydrostatic to greater than hydrostatic fluid pressure in presently active continental hydrothermal systems in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Fluid flow at hydrostatic pressure (P{sub h}) is relatively common through fractures in silicic and in mafic crystalline rocks where temperatures are less than about 350-370C. In contrast, pore-fluid pressure (P{sub f}) > P{sub h} has been encountered at the bottom of 3 geothermal exploration wells that attained temperatures >370C (at Larderello, Italy, at Nesjavellir, Iceland, and at The Geysers, California). Chemical sealing by deposition of minerals in veins appears to have allowed the development of the high P{sub f} encountered in the above wells. The upper limit for the magnitude of P{sub f} that can be attained is controlled by either the onset of shear fracturing (where differential stress is relatively high) that reopens clogged veins, or the hydraulic opening of new or old fractures (at relatively low values of differential stress). The brittle-plastic transition for silicic rocks can occur at temperatures as high as 370-400C in tectonically active regions. In regions where high-temperature geothermal systems develop and persist, it appears that either strain rates commonly are in the range 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}13}, or that silicic rocks in the shallow crust generally behave rheologically more like wet quartz diorite than wet Westerly granite.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activities of carvacrol, a monoterpene present in the essential oil of oregano.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francilene V; Guimarães, Adriana G; Silva, Elayne R S; Sousa-Neto, Benedito P; Machado, Flávia D F; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Oliveira, Francisco A; Oliveira, Rita C M

    2012-11-01

    This study reports a pharmacological evaluation of anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activities of carvacrol, a phenolic monoterpene constituent of essential oils produced by oregano and other several aromatic plants and spices, in experimental models of edema induced by different phlogistic agents and gastric lesions induced by acetic acid. In models of paw edema induced by dextran or histamine, carvacrol was effective at 50 mg/kg (46% and 35%, respectively); in these models, cyproheptadine reduced edema formation (61% and 43%, respectively). In edema induced by substance P, carvacrol (100 mg/kg) and ruthenium red (3 mg/kg) also decreased the edema formation (46% and 40%, respectively). Carvacrol significantly reduced the ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate and arachidonic acid at 0.1 mg per ear (43% and 33%, respectively), similar to indomethacin at 0.5 mg per ear or 2.0 mg per ear (55% and 57%, respectively). Carvacrol (at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) showed a healing capacity on gastric lesions induced by acid acetic (60%, 91%, and 81%, respectively) after 14 days of treatment. These results suggest that carvacrol acts on different pharmacological targets, probably interfering in release and/or synthesis of inflammatory mediators, such as the prostanoids, and thus favoring the healing process for gastric ulcers.

  5. Anionic Lipid Content Presents a Barrier to the Activity of ROMP-Based Synthetic Mimics of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDMs).

    PubMed

    Lis, Michael; Dorner, Franziska; Tew, Gregory N; Lienkamp, Karen

    2016-06-14

    Many biophysical studies of protein transduction domains (PTDs) and their synthetic mimics (PTDMs) focus on the interaction between the polycationic PTD(M) and anionic phospholipid surfaces. Most, but not all, of these studies suggest that these cation-anion interactions are vital for membrane activity. In this study, the effect of anionic lipid content on PTDM performance was examined for three ring-opening metathesis (ROMP)-based PTDMs with varying hydrophobicity. Using a series of dye-loaded vesicles with gradually increasing anionic lipid content, we saw that increased anionic lipid content inhibited dye release caused by these PTDMs. This result is the opposite of what was found in studies with poly- and oligo-arginine. While the effect is reduced for more hydrophobic PTDMs, it is observable even with the most hydrophobic PTDMs of our test panel. Additional experiments included dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements to measure size as a function of vesicle surface charge in the presence of increasing PTDM concentration and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy to quantify binding between PTDMs and surface-bound lipid layers with varying anion content. The results from these measurements suggested that PTDM hydrophobicity, not cation-anion interactions, is the main driving force of the interaction between our PTDMs and the model membranes investigated. This suggests a model of interaction where surface association and membrane insertion are driven by PTDM hydrophobicity, while anionic lipid content serves primarily to "pin" the PTDM to the membrane surface and limit insertion.

  6. Mimosine, a Toxin Present in Leguminous Trees (Leucaena spp.), Induces a Mimosine-Degrading Enzyme Activity in Some Rhizobium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Soedarjo, Muchdar; Hemscheidt, Thomas K.; Borthakur, Dulal

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-seven Rhizobium isolates obtained from the nodules of leguminous trees (Leucaena spp.) were selected on the basis of their ability to catabolize mimosine, a toxin found in large quantities in the seeds, foliage, and roots of plants of the genera Leucaena and Mimosa. A new medium containing mimosine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen was used for selection. The enzymes of the mimosine catabolic pathway were inducible and were present in the soluble fraction of the cell extract of induced cells. On the basis of a comparison of the growth rates of Rhizobium strains on general carbon and nitrogen sources versus mimosine, the toxin appears to be converted mostly to biomass and carbon dioxide. Most isolates able to grow on mimosine as a source of carbon and nitrogen are also able to utilize 3-hydroxy-4-pyridone, a toxic intermediate of mimosine degradation in other organisms. PMID:16349454

  7. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  8. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters. PMID:25690236

  9. Hamilton's Principle for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brun, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    I find that students have difficulty with Hamilton's principle, at least the first time they come into contact with it, and therefore it is worth designing some examples to help students grasp its complex meaning. This paper supplies the simplest example to consolidate the learning of the quoted principle: that of a free particle moving along a…

  10. Proteolytic Activity Present in House-Dust-Mite Extracts Degrades ENA-78/CXCL5 and Reduces Neutrophil Migration.

    PubMed

    Keglowich, Laura; Tamm, Michael; Zhong, Jun; Miglino, Nicola; Borger, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Background. Bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) are a major source of proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines, including VEGF and CXC-chemokines. CXC-chemokines act primarily on neutrophils, mediating their recruitment to and activation at the site of inflammation. In humans, house-dust mite (HDM) allergens can cause asthmatic exacerbations and trigger an inflammatory response through protease-dependent mechanisms. Objective. We investigated the effect HDM extract on the release of pro-angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokines from BSMC. Methods. Human primary BSMC were stimulated with HDM extract in the absence or presence of fetal calf serum (FCS). Twenty angiogenic cytokines were detected by a specific antibody array and modified protein levels were confirmed by ELISA. Neutrophil migration was measured using a 96-well Boyden chamber. Results. ENA-78/CXCL5 protein levels in conditioned medium of BSMC stimulated with HDM extract were significantly reduced (n = 10, P < 0.05) but restored in the presence of 5% FCS. HDM extracts did not affect ENA-78/CXCL5 mRNA levels. Recombinant ENA-78/CXCL5 was degraded after incubation with HDM extracts (n = 7, P < 0.05) but restored after the addition of the serine protease AEBSF. Neutrophil migration towards recombinant ENA-78/CXCL5 was also reduced in the presence of HDM extract. Conclusion. HDM proteases degrade ENA-78/CXCL5. Thus exposure to HDM allergens may alter ENA-78/CXCL5 levels in the lungs and may affect angiogenesis and the inflammatory response in the airways of asthma patients.

  11. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  12. High-frequency neural activity and human cognition: past, present and possible future of intracranial EEG research

    PubMed Central

    Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Axmacher, Nikolai; Mormann, Florian; Halgren, Eric; Crone, Nathan E.

    2013-01-01

    Human intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings are primarily performed in epileptic patients for presurgical mapping. When patients perform cognitive tasks, iEEG signals reveal high-frequency neural activities (HFA, between around 40 Hz and 150 Hz) with exquisite anatomical, functional and temporal specificity. Such HFA were originally interpreted in the context of perceptual or motor binding, in line with animal studies on gamma-band (‘40Hz’) neural synchronization. Today, our understanding of HFA has evolved into a more general index of cortical processing: task-induced HFA reveals, with excellent spatial and time resolution, the participation of local neural ensembles in the task-at-hand, and perhaps the neural communication mechanisms allowing them to do so. This review promotes the claim that studying HFA with iEEG provides insights into the neural bases of cognition that cannot be derived as easily from other approaches, such as fMRI. We provide a series of examples supporting that claim, drawn from studies on memory, language and default-mode networks, and successful attempts of real-time functional mapping. These examples are followed by several guidelines for HFA research, intended for new groups interested by this approach. Overall, iEEG research on HFA should play an increasing role in cognitive neuroscience in humans, because it can be explicitly linked to basic research in animals. We conclude by discussing the future evolution of this field, which might expand that role even further, for instance through the use of multi-scale electrodes and the fusion of iEEG with MEG and fMRI. PMID:22750156

  13. PINCH-2 presents functional copy number variation and suppresses migration of colon cancer cells by paracrine activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hee; Rha, Sun Young; Ahn, Joong Bae; Shin, Sang Joon; Kwon, Woo Sun; Kim, Tae Soo; An, Sungwhan; Kim, Nam Kyu; Yang, Woo-ick; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2015-05-15

    In recent years, characterization of cancer and its environment has become necessary. However, studies of the cancer microenvironment remain insufficient. Copy number variations (CNVs) occur in 40% of cancer-related genes, but few studies have reported the correlation between CNVs in morphologically normal tissues adjacent to cancer and cancer progression. In this study, we evaluated cancer cell migration and invasion according to the genetic differences between cancer tissues and their surrounding normal tissues. To study the field cancerization effect, we screened 89 systemic metastasis-related CNVs from morphologically normal tissues adjacent to colon cancers. Among these CNVs, LIM and senescent cell antigen-like domain 2 (PINCH-2) showed copy number amplification and upregulation of mRNA in the nonrelapsed group compared to the systemic relapse group. PINCH-2 expression in colon cancer cells was lower than that in normal epithelial colon cells at both the protein and mRNA levels. Suppression of PINCH-2 resulted in decreased formation of the PINCH-2-IPP (PINCH-2, integrin-linked kinase and α-parvin) complex and reciprocally increased formation of the PINCH-1-IPP complex. Although PINCH-2 expression of survival pathway-related proteins (Akt and phospho-Akt) did not change upon suppression of PINCH-2 expression, cell migration-related proteins [matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and -11] were upregulated through autocrine and paracrine activation. Thus, PINCH-2 participates in decreased systemic recurrence by competitively regulating IPP complex formation with PINCH-1, thereby suppressing autocrine and paracrine effects on motility in colon cancer. This genetic change in morphologically normal tissue suggests a field cancerization effect of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression.

  14. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells.

    PubMed

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M; Matarredona, Esperanza R; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain.

  15. Integrating Computer Concepts into Principles of Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Henry J.; Parrish, Roy James, Jr.

    A package of instructional materials for an undergraduate principles of accounting course at Danville Community College was developed based upon the following assumptions: (1) the principles of accounting student does not need to be able to write computer programs; (2) computerized accounting concepts should be presented in this course; (3)…

  16. American Evaluation Association: Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Evaluation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Evaluation Association (AEA) strives to promote ethical practice in the evaluation of programs, products, personnel, and policy. This article presents the list of principles which AEA developed to guide evaluators in their professional practice. These principles are: (1) Systematic Inquiry; (2) Competence; (3) Integrity/Honesty; (4)…

  17. Microscopic Description of Le Chatelier's Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    A simple approach that "demystifies" Le Chatelier's principle (LCP) and simulates students to think about fundamental physical background behind the well-known principles is presented. The approach uses microscopic descriptors of matter like energy levels and populations and does not require any assumption about the fixed amount of substance being…

  18. Improving Construct Validity with Cognitive Psychology Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan; Gorin, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    Examines testing practices in: (1) the past, in which the traditional paradigm left little room for cognitive psychology principles; (2) the present, in which testing research is enhanced by principles of cognitive psychology; and (3) the future, in which the potential of cognitive psychology should be fully realized through item design.…

  19. Designing and Implementing Multicultural Initiatives: Guiding Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides guiding principles for designing and implementing successful multicultural initiatives. A rationale for why these elements transcend both higher education and student affairs settings is presented. In addition to providing guiding principles, this chapter includes advice for socially and politically conscious-minded…

  20. A critique of principlism.

    PubMed

    Clouser, K D; Gert, B

    1990-04-01

    The authors use the term "principlism" to refer to the practice of using "principles" to replace both moral theory and particular moral rules and ideals in dealing with the moral problems that arise in medical practice. The authors argue that these "principles" do not function as claimed, and that their use is misleading both practically and theoretically. The "principles" are in fact not guides to action, but rather they are merely names for a collection of sometimes superficially related matters for consideration when dealing with a moral problem. The "principles" lack any systematic relationship to each other, and they often conflict with each other. These conflicts are unresolvable, since there is no unified moral theory from which they are all derived. For comparison the authors sketch the advantages of using a unified moral theory. PMID:2351895

  1. Significance, Present Status and Perspectives of the Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity Monitoring by the Russian Arctic Magnetometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Janzhura, A. S.; Takahashi, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Roshydromet magnetometer network in Russian Arctica includes the following stations: Amderma, Dickson, Cape Chelyuskin, Tiksi, Pevek, Lovozero, Heiss Island, Vieze Island, Izvestia Island. Vitality of the first 5 of them, providing the data for derivation AE/AL/AU indices, was supported during the previous years by the International project Rapidmag (Russian Auroral and Polar Ionospheric Disturbance Magnetometers). In last two years the Roshydromet network in Arctica was subjected to reconstruction. Renovation includes construction of new polar station buildings, deployment of the satellite communication system at stations, and arrangement of new acquisition system for magnetometers. The reconstruction should ensure on-line transmission of the current magnetic data from the Arctic network to AARI and analysis of these data in the near-real time. The present state of affairs and further perspectives are discussed. Examples are given, which show that run of the AL and AU indices, derived with allowance of data from Russian Arctic stations and without this information, can be principally different in case of the strong saw-tooth magnetic substorms.

  2. A computational study on the N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed Csp(2)-Csp(3) bond activation/[4+2] cycloaddition cascade reaction of cyclobutenones with imines: a new application of the conservation principle of molecular orbital symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Bohua; Zhang, Haoyang; Wei, Donghui; Tang, Mingsheng

    2016-07-20

    A comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) investigation has been performed to interrogate the mechanisms and stereoselectivities of the Csp(2)-Csp(3) single bond activation of cyclobutenones and their [4+2] cycloaddition reaction with imines via N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) organocatalysis. According to our calculated results, the fundamental reaction pathway contains four steps: nucleophilic addition of NHC to cyclobutenone, C-C bond cleavage for the formation of an enolate intermediate, [4+2] cycloaddition of the enolate intermediate with isatin imine, and the elimination of the NHC catalyst. In addition, the calculated results also reveal that the second reaction step is the rate-determining step, whereas the third step is the regio- and stereo-selectivity determining step. For the regio- and stereo-selectivity determining step, all four possible attack modes were considered. The addition of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]N bond in isatin imine to the dienolate intermediate is more energy favorable than the addition of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond to a dienolate intermediate. Moreover, the Re face addition of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]N bond in isatin imine to the Re face of the dienolate intermediate leading to the SS configuration N-containing product was demonstrated to be most energy favorable, which is mainly due to the stronger second-order perturbation energy value in the corresponding transition state. Furthermore, by tracking the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) changes in the rate-determining C-C bond cleavage step, we found that the reaction obeys the conservation principle of molecular orbital symmetry. We believe that the present work would provide valuable insights into this kind of reaction.

  3. A computational study on the N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed Csp(2)-Csp(3) bond activation/[4+2] cycloaddition cascade reaction of cyclobutenones with imines: a new application of the conservation principle of molecular orbital symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Bohua; Zhang, Haoyang; Wei, Donghui; Tang, Mingsheng

    2016-07-20

    A comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) investigation has been performed to interrogate the mechanisms and stereoselectivities of the Csp(2)-Csp(3) single bond activation of cyclobutenones and their [4+2] cycloaddition reaction with imines via N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) organocatalysis. According to our calculated results, the fundamental reaction pathway contains four steps: nucleophilic addition of NHC to cyclobutenone, C-C bond cleavage for the formation of an enolate intermediate, [4+2] cycloaddition of the enolate intermediate with isatin imine, and the elimination of the NHC catalyst. In addition, the calculated results also reveal that the second reaction step is the rate-determining step, whereas the third step is the regio- and stereo-selectivity determining step. For the regio- and stereo-selectivity determining step, all four possible attack modes were considered. The addition of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]N bond in isatin imine to the dienolate intermediate is more energy favorable than the addition of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond to a dienolate intermediate. Moreover, the Re face addition of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]N bond in isatin imine to the Re face of the dienolate intermediate leading to the SS configuration N-containing product was demonstrated to be most energy favorable, which is mainly due to the stronger second-order perturbation energy value in the corresponding transition state. Furthermore, by tracking the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) changes in the rate-determining C-C bond cleavage step, we found that the reaction obeys the conservation principle of molecular orbital symmetry. We believe that the present work would provide valuable insights into this kind of reaction. PMID:27400324

  4. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Taylor A; Young, Martin E; Rubel, Carrie E; Spaniel, Carolyn; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Gautel, Mathias; Xu, Zhelong; Anderson, Ethan J; Willis, Monte S

    2014-06-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1's role in regulating mitochondrial function to date. In the present study, we measured cardiac mitochondrial function from isolated permeabilized muscle fibers in previously phenotyped MuRF1 transgenic and MuRF1-/- mouse models to determine the role of MuRF1 in intermediate energy metabolism and ROS production. We identified a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species production in cardiac muscle fibers from MuRF1 transgenic mice with increased α-MHC driven MuRF1 expression. Increased MuRF1 expression in ex vivo and in vitro experiments revealed no alterations in the respiratory chain complex I and II function. Working perfusion experiments on MuRF1 transgenic hearts demonstrated significant changes in glucose oxidation. However, total oxygen consumption was decreased [corrected]. This data provides evidence for MuRF1 as a novel regulator of cardiac ROS, offering another mechanism by which increased MuRF1 expression may be cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion injury, in addition to its inhibition of apoptosis via proteasome-mediate degradation of c-Jun. The lack of mitochondrial function phenotype identified in MuRF1-/- hearts may be due to the overlapping interactions of MuRF1 and MuRF2 with energy regulating proteins found by yeast two-hybrid studies reported here, implying a duplicity in MuRF1 and MuRF2's regulation of mitochondrial function.

  5. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Taylor A.; Young, Martin E.; Rubel, Carrie E.; Spaniel, Carolyn; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Gautel, Mathias; Xu, Zhelong; Anderson, Ethan J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2014-01-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1’s role in regulating mitochondrial function to date. In the present study, we measured cardiac mitochondrial function from isolated permeabilized muscle fibers in previously phenotyped MuRF1 transgenic and MuRF1−/− mouse models to determine the role of MuRF1 in intermediate energy metabolism and ROS production. We identified a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species production in cardiac muscle fibers from MuRF1 transgenic mice with increased alpha-MHC driven MuRF1 expression. Increased MuRF1 expression in ex vivo and in vitro experiments revealed no alterations in the respiratory chain complex I and II function. Working perfusion experiments on MuRF1 transgenic hearts demonstrated significant changes in glucose or oleate oxidation; however, total oxygen consumption was decreased. This data provides evidence for MuRF1 as a novel regulator of cardiac ROS, offering another mechanism by which increased MuRF1 expression may be cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion injury, in addition to its inhibition of apoptosis via proteasome-mediate degradation of c-Jun. The lack of mitochondrial function phenotype identified in MuRF1−/− hearts may be due to the overlapping interactions of MuRF1 and MuRF2 with energy regulating proteins found by yeast two-hybrid studies reported here, implying a duplicity in MuRF1 and MuRF2’s regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:24733503

  6. An uncertainty principle underlying the functional architecture of V1.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Davide; Citti, Giovanna; Sanguinetti, Gonzalo; Sarti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We present a model of the morphology of orientation maps in V1 based on the uncertainty principle of the SE(2) group. Starting from the symmetries of the cortex, suitable harmonic analysis instruments are used to obtain coherent states in the Fourier domain as minimizers of the uncertainty. Cortical activities related to orientation maps are then obtained by projection on a suitable cortical Fourier basis.

  7. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present and biochemically active in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Pirger, Zsolt; Laszlo, Zita; Hiripi, Laszlo; Hernadi, Laszlo; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Mark, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    PACAP is a highly conserved adenylate cyclase (AC) activating polypeptide, which, along with its receptors (PAC1-R, VPAC1, and VPAC2), is expressed in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In vertebrates, PACAP has been shown to be involved in associative learning, but it is not known if it plays a similar role in invertebrates. To prepare the way for a detailed investigation into the possible role of PACAP and its receptors in a suitable invertebrate model of learning and memory, here, we undertook a study of their expression and biochemical role in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Lymnaea is one of the best established invertebrate model systems to study the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, including the role of cyclic AMP-activated signaling mechanisms, which crucially depend on the learning-induced activation of AC. However, there was no information available on the expression of PACAP and its receptors in sensory structures and central ganglia of the Lymnaea nervous system known to be involved in associative learning or whether or not PACAP can actually activate AC in these ganglia. Here, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunohistochemistry, we established the presence of PACAP-like peptides in the cerebral ganglia and the lip region of Lymnaea. The MALDI-TOF data indicated an identity with mammalian PACAP-27 and the presence of a squid-like PACAP-38 highly homologous to vertebrate PACAP-38. We also showed that PACAP, VIP, and maxadilan stimulated the synthesis of cAMP in Lymnaea cerebral ganglion homogenates and that this effect was blocked by the appropriate general and selective PACAP receptor antagonists.

  8. Design principles for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells and, more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the NASA Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and under contract. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low-earth-orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) application. A summary of the design principles employed is presented along with a discussion of the recommendations for component pore sizes and pore size distributions, as well as suggested materials of construction. These will be made based on our experience in these areas to show how these design principles have been translated into operating hardware.

  9. Design principles for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells and, more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the NASA Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and under contract. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) application. A summary of the design principles employed is presented along with a discussion of the recommendations for component pore sizes and pore size distributions, as well as suggested materials of construction. These will be made based on our experience in these areas to show how these design principles have been translated into operating hardware.

  10. The Penny Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Briant J.; Dunoskovic, Janice H.

    1980-01-01

    Granite School District, Salt Lake City, Utah, has developed an elementary consumer education program designed for infusion into regular subject matter teaching. This article presents goals and starter activities from each of the project's eight topic areas: money management, income determination, basic economics, advertising, purchasing, energy,…

  11. Presentation Timer

    2010-06-23

    Abstract Conferences and Meetings feature many presentations on a tight schedule. The Session Timer system provides an electronic display for showing the remaining time in a presentation. It provides continuous feedback so the speaker can judge the pace throughout a presentation. The timer automates the job so the session chairman does not have to awkwardly interrupt the speaker.

  12. [Principles and criteria used by the National Evaluation Committee of Research Activity (CNEAI-Spain) for the assessment of scientific publications: 1989-2009].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Pérez, Rafael; Delgado López-Cózar, Emilio; Jiménez-Contreras, Evaristo

    2010-11-01

    Study of the origins, philosophy and history of the criteria used to assess research activities in Spain by the CNEAI. The assessment criteria and quality evidence of publications is discussed. Results are presented on the temporal development of the criteria used, grouped by publication type (articles and books) and fields of knowledge. Between 1989-1996, assessment was based on the definition and goals set by the Spanish scientific framework and on general criteria. Between 1996-2004, the formulation of indicators began to be almost exclusively based on Journal Citation Reports (JCR). Success rates up to 2004 indicate that the evaluation criteria and publishing behaviour matched the "hard sciences", but not the Social Sciences and Economics. In 2005, the criteria used were further developed and reoriented with an eye to softening the preceding JCR-centrism by taking into consideration other databases and defining the quality criteria to be met by journals, books and conferences not included in JCR. Correspondingly, the success rates for 2007 indicate a dramatic recovery in Economics. In the last 4 years, Humanities and Social Sciences have consolidated the further opening of the criteria used with the addition of new benchmarks and the full integration of books. PMID:21044530

  13. Modeling of enhanced gravity concentrators - present status

    SciTech Connect

    A.K. Majumder; J.P. Barnwal

    2006-01-15

    The majority of the newly developed enhanced gravity concentrators (EGCs) have tremendous potentials for various applications. Therefore, the performance evaluation of these concentrators treating various minerals, coals, heavy metal recovery from tailing dams, etc., have become an active research topic. Several attempts have also been made to develop appropriate mathematical models of individual concentrators. Despite all these efforts, these concentrators have yet to find the widespread applications they deserve. The present status of modeling these EGCs with a brief description of the operating principles and the present applications are, therefore, reviewed in this article. Research needs in this direction are also highlighted.

  14. Study of Screen Design Principles for Visualizing Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenichiro; Takemura, Tadamasa; Kuroda, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    To improve UX of EMR/EHR, the screen design principles for the visualization are required. Through the study of common attributes of medical records, we present four principles and show three screen designs by applying them.

  15. Archimedes' Principle in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kires, Marian

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual understanding of Archimedes' principle can be verified in experimental procedures which determine mass and density using a floating object. This is demonstrated by simple experiments using graduated beakers. (Contains 5 figures.)

  16. Chemical Principles Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    Collection of two short descriptions of chemical principles seen in life situations: the autocatalytic reaction seen in the bombardier beetle, and molecular potential energy used for quick roasting of beef. Brief reference is also made to methanol lighters. (PS)

  17. Archimedes' principle in action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireš, Marián

    2007-09-01

    The conceptual understanding of Archimedes' principle can be verified in experimental procedures which determine mass and density using a floating object. This is demonstrated by simple experiments using graduated beakers.

  18. Application of fMRI to obesity research: differences in reward pathway activation measured with fMRI BOLD during visual presentation of high and low calorie foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Adam, Tanja C.; Goran, Michael I.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    The factors behind the neural mechanisms that motivate food choice and obesity are not well known. Furthermore, it is not known when these neural mechanisms develop and how they are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. This study uses fMRI together with clinical data to shed light on the aforementioned questions by investigating how appetite-related activation in the brain changes with low versus high caloric foods in pre-pubescent girls. Previous studies have shown that obese adults have less striatal D2 receptors and thus reduced Dopamine (DA) signaling leading to the reward-deficit theory of obesity. However, overeating in itself reduces D2 receptor density, D2 sensitivity and thus reward sensitivity. The results of this study will show how early these neural mechanisms develop and what effect the drastic endocrinological changes during puberty has on these mechanisms. Our preliminary results showed increased activations in the Putamen, Insula, Thalamus and Hippocampus when looking at activations where High Calorie > Low Calorie. When comparing High Calorie > Control and Low Calorie > Control, the High > Control test showed increased significant activation in the frontal lobe. The Low > Control also yielded significant activation in the Left and Right Fusiform Gyrus, which did not appear in the High > Control test. These results indicate that the reward pathway activations previously shown in post-puberty and adults are present in pre-pubescent teens. These results may suggest that some of the preferential neural mechanisms of reward are already present pre-puberty.

  19. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  20. Principles for system level electrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    The higher power and higher voltage levels anticipated for future space missions have required a careful review of the techniques currently in use to preclude battery problems that are related to the dispersion characteristics of the individual cells. Not only are the out-of-balance problems accentuated in these larger systems, but the thermal management considerations also require a greater degree of accurate design. Newer concepts which employ active cooling techniques are being developed which permit higher rates of discharge and tighter packing densities for the electrochemical components. This paper will put forward six semi-independent principles relating to battery systems. These principles will progressively address cell, battery and finally system related aspects of large electrochemical storage systems.

  1. Basic Concepts and Principles of Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Hal

    1986-01-01

    Presents an overview of marketing concepts and principles. These include (1) organizational objectives, (2) exchange, (3) value, (4) market segmentation, (5) market position, (6) consumer analysis, (7) product, (8) promotion, (9) place, and (10) price. (CH)

  2. Novel Principle of Contactless Gauge Block Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Buchta, Zdeněk; Řeřucha, Šimon; Mikel, Břetislav; Čížek, Martin; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel principle of contactless gauge block calibration is presented. The principle of contactless gauge block calibration combines low-coherence interferometry and laser interferometry. An experimental setup combines Dowell interferometer and Michelson interferometer to ensure a gauge block length determination with direct traceability to the primary length standard. By monitoring both gauge block sides with a digital camera gauge block 3D surface measurements are possible too. The principle presented is protected by the Czech national patent No. 302948. PMID:22737012

  3. [The Present Status of, and Issues Related to, Mental Health Activities in the Ishinomaki Region, with a Focus on Outreach Activities].

    PubMed

    Hara, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake was a colossal event, registering a magnitude of 9.0 and causing huge tsunami that in some places were more than 40 meters in height. As of March 31, 2014, the number of dead nationwide stood at 15,882, while 2,668 persons were listed as missing; 3,089 other deaths have also been classified as being disaster-related. There were 5,500 victims in the Ishinomaki area alone. The disaster, comprising the earthquake itself, the subsequent tsunami, fires, and the nuclear power plant accident, was a combined natural and man-made catastrophe of epic proportions, affecting a broad, underpopulated region. Those hit by the disaster were affected not only by the loss of life, but also the loss of homes and livelihoods. These people experience psychological stress, fear, and anxiety as a result of lifestyle and environmental changes associated with moving from evacuation areas to prefab temporary housing, or the homes of parents, siblings, relatives, friends, or acquaintances, followed by attempts to rebuild their own homes. Other changes, such as the loss of employment, the transition to new workplaces, or having to change schools, also take a psychological and emotional toll. Delays in the construction of new housing and the resulting prolongation of life as evacuees only serve to increase anxiety and the sense of stagnation. With the above as a backdrop, the author will report on activities being conducted by his organization, particularly outreach efforts. PMID:26524874

  4. [The Present Status of, and Issues Related to, Mental Health Activities in the Ishinomaki Region, with a Focus on Outreach Activities].

    PubMed

    Hara, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake was a colossal event, registering a magnitude of 9.0 and causing huge tsunami that in some places were more than 40 meters in height. As of March 31, 2014, the number of dead nationwide stood at 15,882, while 2,668 persons were listed as missing; 3,089 other deaths have also been classified as being disaster-related. There were 5,500 victims in the Ishinomaki area alone. The disaster, comprising the earthquake itself, the subsequent tsunami, fires, and the nuclear power plant accident, was a combined natural and man-made catastrophe of epic proportions, affecting a broad, underpopulated region. Those hit by the disaster were affected not only by the loss of life, but also the loss of homes and livelihoods. These people experience psychological stress, fear, and anxiety as a result of lifestyle and environmental changes associated with moving from evacuation areas to prefab temporary housing, or the homes of parents, siblings, relatives, friends, or acquaintances, followed by attempts to rebuild their own homes. Other changes, such as the loss of employment, the transition to new workplaces, or having to change schools, also take a psychological and emotional toll. Delays in the construction of new housing and the resulting prolongation of life as evacuees only serve to increase anxiety and the sense of stagnation. With the above as a backdrop, the author will report on activities being conducted by his organization, particularly outreach efforts.

  5. Activation of the antigen presentation function of mononuclear phagocyte populations associated with the basilar membrane of the cochlea after acoustic overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiping; Vethanayagam, R. Robert; Dong, Youyi; Cai, Qunfeng; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-01-01

    The immune response is an important component of the cochlear response to stress. As an important player in the cochlear immune system, the basilar membrane immune cells reside on the surface of the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. At present, the immune cell properties in this region and their responses to stress are not well understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of these immune cells in the immune response to acoustic overstimulation. This study reveals that tissue macrophages are present in the entire length of the basilar membrane under steady-state conditions. Notably, these cells in the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane display distinct morphologies and immune protein expression patterns. Following acoustic trauma, monocytes infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane, and the infiltrated cells transform into macrophages. While monocyte infiltration and transformation occur in both the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane, only the basal monocytes and macrophages display a marked increase in the expression of MHC II and CIITA, a MHC II production cofactor, suggesting the site-dependent activation of antigen-presenting function. Consistent with the increased expression of the antigen-presenting proteins, CD4+ T cells, the antigen-presenting partner, infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane where antigen-presenting proteins are upregulated. Further pathological analyses revealed that the basal section of the cochlea displays a greater level of sensory cell damage, which is spatially correlated with the region of antigen-presenting activity. Together, these results suggest that the antigen-presenting function of the mononuclear phagocyte population is activated in response to acoustic trauma, which could bridge the innate immune response to adaptive immunity. PMID:26102003

  6. Evolution of a new function in an esterase: simple amino acid substitutions enable the activity present in the larger paralog, BioH.

    PubMed

    Flores, Humberto; Lin, Steven; Contreras-Ferrat, Gabriel; Cronan, John E; Morett, Enrique

    2012-08-01

    Gene duplication and divergence are essential processes for the evolution of new activities. Divergence may be gradual, involving simple amino acid residue substitutions, or drastic, such that larger structural elements are inserted, deleted or rearranged. Vast protein sequence comparisons, supported by some experimental evidence, argue that large structural modifications have been necessary for certain catalytic activities to evolve. However, it is not clear whether these activities could not have been attained by gradual changes. Interestingly, catalytic promiscuity could play a fundamental evolutionary role: a preexistent secondary activity could be increased by simple amino acid residue substitutions that do not affect the enzyme's primary activity. The promiscuous profile of the enzyme may be modified gradually by genetic drift, making a pool of potentially useful activities that can be selected before duplication. In this work, we used random mutagenesis and in vivo selection to evolve the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 carboxylesterase PA3859, a small protein, to attain the function of BioH, a much larger paralog involved in biotin biosynthesis. BioH was chosen as a target activity because it provides a highly sensitive selection for evolved enzymatic activities by auxotrophy complementation. After only two cycles of directed evolution, mutants with the ability to efficiently complement biotin auxotrophy were selected. The in vivo and in vitro characterization showed that the activity of one of our mutant proteins was similar to that of the wild-type BioH enzyme. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to evolve enzymatic activities present in larger proteins by discrete amino acid substitutions.

  7. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  8. TS-1 from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamba, Aldo; Tabacchi, Gloria; Fois, Ettore

    2009-09-01

    First principles studies on periodic TS-1 models at Ti content corresponding to 1.35% and 2.7% in weight of TiO2 are presented. The problem of Ti preferential siting is addressed by using realistic models corresponding to the TS-1 unit cell [TiSi95O192] and adopting for the first time a periodic DFT approach, thus providing an energy scale for Ti in the different crystallographic sites in nondefective TS-1. The structure with Ti in site T3 is the most stable, followed by T4 (+0.3 kcal/mol); the less stable structure, corresponding to Ti in T1, is 5.6 kcal/mol higher in energy. The work has been extended to investigate models with two Ti's per unit cell [Ti2Si94O192] (2.7%). The possible existence of Ti-O-Ti bridges, formed by two corner-sharing TiO4 tetrahedra, is discussed. By using cluster models cut from the optimized periodic DFT structures, both vibrational (DFT) and electronic excitation spectra (TDDFT) have been calculated and favorably compared with the experimental data available on TS-1. Interesting features emerged from excitation spectra: (i) Isolated tetrahedral Ti sites show a Beer-Lambert behavior, with absorption intensity proportional to concentration. Such a behavior is gradually lost when two Ti's occupy sites close to each other. (ii) The UV-vis absorption in the 200-250 nm region can be associated with transitions from occupied states delocalized on the framework oxygens to empty d states localized on Ti. Such extended-states-to-local-states transitions may help the interpretation of the photovoltaic activity recently detected in Ti zeolites.

  9. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Sandor, Aniko; McCann, Robert S.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Adelstein, Barnard D.; Begault, Durand R.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.; Godfroy, Martine

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. In addition to addressing display design issues associated with information formatting, style, layout, and interaction, the Information Presentation DRP is also working toward understanding the effects of extreme environments encountered in space travel on information processing. Work is also in progress to refine human factors-based design tools, such as human performance modeling, that will supplement traditional design techniques and help ensure that optimal information design is accomplished in the most cost-efficient manner. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP for FY10 are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. The poster will highlight completed and planned work for each subtask.

  10. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  11. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  12. Exceptional activity of sub-nm Pt clusters on CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen production: A combined of experimental and first-principles study

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Qiyuan; Su, Dong; Xiong, Shangmin; Shen, Peichuan; Zhao, Shen; Li, Yan; Orlov, Alexander

    2014-12-24

    In this work we have explored a new concept of substantially increasing photocatalytic activity for H₂ production of conventional semiconductors by modifying them with sub-nm Pt particles. By combining both experimental and theoretical approaches, we have also developed new mechanistic insights into the 17 times increase in photocatalytic activity of Pt modified CdS catalysts.

  13. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  14. The precautionary principle and medical decision making.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2004-06-01

    The precautionary principle is a useful strategy for decision-making when physicians and patients lack evidence relating to the potential outcomes associated with various choices. According to a version of the principle defended here, one should take reasonable measures to avoid threats that are serious and plausible. The reasonableness of a response to a threat depends on several factors, including benefit vs. harm, realism, proportionality, and consistency. Since a concept of reasonableness plays an essential role in applying the precautionary principle, this principle gives physicians and patients a decision-making strategy that encourages the careful weighing and balancing of different values that one finds in humanistic approaches to clinical reasoning. Properly understood, the principle presents a worthwhile alternative to approaches to clinical reasoning that apply expected utility theory to decision problems. PMID:15512973

  15. Two Fundamental Principles of Nature's Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present two fundamental principles of nature's interactions, the principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and the principle of representation invariance (PRI). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint. PID offers a completely different and natural way of introducing Higgs fields. PRI requires that physical laws be independent of representations of the gauge groups. These two principles give rise to a unified field model for four interactions, which can be naturally decoupled to study individual interactions. With these two principles, we are able to derive 1) a unified theory for dark matter and dark energy, 2) layered strong and weak interaction potentials, and 3) the energy levels of subatomic particles. Supported in part by NSF, ONR and Chinese NSF.

  16. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Matrix Protein Impairs CD1d-Mediated Antigen Presentation through Activation of the p38 MAPK Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Khan, Masood A.; Shaji, Daniel; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are unique T lymphocytes that recognize CD1d-bound lipid antigens and play an important role in both innate and acquired immune responses against infectious diseases and tumors. We have already shown that a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection results in the rapid inhibition of murine CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. In the present study, it was found that the VSV matrix (VSV-M) protein is an important element in this decrease in antigen presentation postinfection. The VSV-M protein altered the intracellular distribution of murine CD1d molecules, resulting in qualitative (but not quantitative) changes in cell surface CD1d expression. The M protein was distributed throughout the infected cell, and it was found to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 very early postinfection. Infection of CD1d+ cells with a temperature-sensitive VSV-M mutant at the nonpermissive temperature both substantially reversed the inhibition of antigen presentation by CD1d and delayed the activation of p38. Thus, the VSV-M protein plays an important role in permitting the virus to evade important components of the innate immune response by regulating specific MAPK pathways. PMID:18815300

  17. First principles calculations on oxygen vacant hydrated α-MnO2 for activating water oxidation and its self-healing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Kruthika; Murugan, P

    2016-08-10

    Understanding the mechanism behind water oxidation is the prime requirement for designing better catalysts for electrochemical energy devices. In this work, we demonstrate by employing first principles calculations that an initial step of water oxidation is observed to be associated with the dissociation of water dimers into hydronium and hydroxide ions, in the tunnel of a hydrated α-MnO2 compound with an oxygen vacancy. The former ion is intercalated within the network, while the latter ion occupies the oxygen vacant site and interacts strongly with the Mn atoms. Based on our calculations, the factor responsible for this dissociation of water molecules is observed to be the presence of mixed charge states of Mn atoms in the triangular lattice. Further, the coulombic attraction of a hydronium ion with a water molecule leads to the formation of a Zundel cation in the tunnel, while by dehydrogenating the adsorbed hydroxide ion, the self-healing property of the compound is achieved along with another hydronium ion as a reaction product. These cations can be exchanged with Li(+) ions. Thus, the protonic moieties formed in the tunnel of α-MnO2 leads to niche applications in the field of fuel cells and lithium ion batteries.

  18. First principles calculations on oxygen vacant hydrated α-MnO2 for activating water oxidation and its self-healing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Kruthika; Murugan, P

    2016-08-10

    Understanding the mechanism behind water oxidation is the prime requirement for designing better catalysts for electrochemical energy devices. In this work, we demonstrate by employing first principles calculations that an initial step of water oxidation is observed to be associated with the dissociation of water dimers into hydronium and hydroxide ions, in the tunnel of a hydrated α-MnO2 compound with an oxygen vacancy. The former ion is intercalated within the network, while the latter ion occupies the oxygen vacant site and interacts strongly with the Mn atoms. Based on our calculations, the factor responsible for this dissociation of water molecules is observed to be the presence of mixed charge states of Mn atoms in the triangular lattice. Further, the coulombic attraction of a hydronium ion with a water molecule leads to the formation of a Zundel cation in the tunnel, while by dehydrogenating the adsorbed hydroxide ion, the self-healing property of the compound is achieved along with another hydronium ion as a reaction product. These cations can be exchanged with Li(+) ions. Thus, the protonic moieties formed in the tunnel of α-MnO2 leads to niche applications in the field of fuel cells and lithium ion batteries. PMID:27447447

  19. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C.; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such “tonic” activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  20. Apollo Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This video is a compilation of scenes from the Apollo 11 mission, from the speech President Kennedy gave declaring America's intention to go to the Moon through the Lunar Module liftoff from the Moon's surface, including footage from the Apollo 11 spacecraft launch, astronaut activities on the lunar surface, the placing of the American flag on the surface on the Moon, and an astronaut on the Lunar Rover.

  1. The traveltime holographic principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunsong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    Fermat's interferometric principle is used to compute interior transmission traveltimes τpq from exterior transmission traveltimes τsp and τsq. Here, the exterior traveltimes are computed for sources s on a boundary B that encloses a volume V of interior points p and q. Once the exterior traveltimes are computed, no further ray tracing is needed to calculate the interior times τpq. Therefore this interferometric approach can be more efficient than explicitly computing interior traveltimes τpq by ray tracing. Moreover, the memory requirement of the traveltimes is reduced by one dimension, because the boundary B is of one fewer dimension than the volume V. An application of this approach is demonstrated with interbed multiple (IM) elimination. Here, the IMs in the observed data are predicted from the migration image and are subsequently removed by adaptive subtraction. This prediction is enabled by the knowledge of interior transmission traveltimes τpq computed according to Fermat's interferometric principle. We denote this principle as the `traveltime holographic principle', by analogy with the holographic principle in cosmology where information in a volume is encoded on the region's boundary.

  2. What Metadata Principles Apply to Scientific Data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayernik, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Information researchers and professionals based in the library and information science fields often approach their work through developing and applying defined sets of principles. For example, for over 100 years, the evolution of library cataloging practice has largely been driven by debates (which are still ongoing) about the fundamental principles of cataloging and how those principles should manifest in rules for cataloging. Similarly, the development of archival research and practices over the past century has proceeded hand-in-hand with the emergence of principles of archival arrangement and description, such as maintaining the original order of records and documenting provenance. This project examines principles related to the creation of metadata for scientific data. The presentation will outline: 1) how understandings and implementations of metadata can range broadly depending on the institutional context, and 2) how metadata principles developed by the library and information science community might apply to metadata developments for scientific data. The development and formalization of such principles would contribute to the development of metadata practices and standards in a wide range of institutions, including data repositories, libraries, and research centers. Shared metadata principles would potentially be useful in streamlining data discovery and integration, and would also benefit the growing efforts to formalize data curation education.

  3. Principles of nanoscience: an overview.

    PubMed

    Behari, Jitendra

    2010-10-01

    The scientific basis of nanotechnology as envisaged from the first principles is compared to bulk behavior. Development of nanoparticles having controllable physical and electronic properties has opened up possibility of designing artificial solids. Top down and bottom up approaches are emphasized. The role of nanoparticle (quantum dots) application in nanophotonics (photovoltaic cell), and drug delivery vehicle is discussed. Fundamentals of DNA structure as the prime site in bionanotechnological manipulations is also discussed. A summary of presently available devices and applications are presented. PMID:21299044

  4. Involvement of Phospholipase Cγ1 in Mouse Egg Activation Induced by a Truncated Form of the C-kit Tyrosine Kinase Present in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Sette, Claudio; Bevilacqua, Arturo; Geremia, Raffaele; Rossi, Pellegrino

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection of a truncated form of the c-kit tyrosine kinase present in mouse spermatozoa (tr-kit) activates mouse eggs parthenogenetically, and tr-kit– induced egg activation is inhibited by preincubation with an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC) (Sette, C., A. Bevilacqua, A. Bianchini, F. Mangia, R. Geremia, and P. Rossi. 1997. Development [Camb.]. 124:2267–2274). Co-injection of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins containing the src-homology (SH) domains of the γ1 isoform of PLC (PLCγ1) competitively inhibits tr-kit– induced egg activation. A GST fusion protein containing the SH3 domain of PLCγ1 inhibits egg activation as efficiently as the whole SH region, while a GST fusion protein containing the two SH2 domains is much less effective. A GST fusion protein containing the SH3 domain of the Grb2 adaptor protein does not inhibit tr-kit–induced egg activation, showing that the effect of the SH3 domain of PLCγ1 is specific. Tr-kit–induced egg activation is also suppressed by co-injection of antibodies raised against the PLCγ1 SH domains, but not against the PLCγ1 COOH-terminal region. In transfected COS cells, coexpression of PLCγ1 and tr-kit increases diacylglycerol and inositol phosphate production, and the phosphotyrosine content of PLCγ1 with respect to cells expressing PLCγ1 alone. These data indicate that tr-kit activates PLCγ1, and that the SH3 domain of PLCγ1 is essential for tr-kit–induced egg activation. PMID:9722617

  5. Characterization of ribonuclease H activities present in two cell-free protein synthesizing systems, the wheat germ extract and the rabbit reticulocyte lysate.

    PubMed

    Cazenave, C; Frank, P; Büsen, W

    1993-01-01

    Experimental evidence accumulated to date by several research groups indicates that antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted against messenger RNA (mRNA) sequences located downstream of the initiation codon fail to inhibit the translation of this mRNA unless the hybrid is cleaved by RNase H. It has previously been shown that exogenous RNase H has to be added to rabbit reticulocyte lysate to obtain translational arrest (unless freshly prepared lysates are used). In contrast there is no need of exogenous RNase H by using wheat germ extract for translation because the level of endogenous RNase H is high enough to ensure cleavage of the hybrid formed between the antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide and its complementary sequence on the mRNA. Surprisingly, we found that these two cell-free translation systems display similar amounts of RNase H activities when tested under standard conditions (extract diluted 500 times in the RNase H reaction mix). The RNase H activity of the rabbit reticulocyte lysate has a divalent cation requirement and sensitivity to inhibitors similar to class I ribonuclease H, whereas the activity of the wheat germ extract shows similarities to class II ribonuclease H. However, when these activities were assayed under conditions similar to those used for translation experiments, only highly reduced levels of activity were found in comparison to the standard assays. This reduction is due in part to sub-optimal ionic conditions for the endogenous RNase H activities in these extracts, and, for the other part, likely due to interactions with other proteins present in the lysates. In these conditions, however, the remaining activity found in the wheat germ extract was three times higher than the activity found in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Whether this difference can by itself explain the indicated differences in the two systems observed in hybrid-arrest of translation experiments remains open to discussion.

  6. Identification of Proteins with Potential Osteogenic Activity Present in the Water-Soluble Matrix Proteins from Crassostrea gigas Nacre Using a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Daniel V.; Silva, Tomé S.; Cordeiro, Odete D.; Cavaco, Sofia I.; Simes, Dina C.

    2012-01-01

    Nacre, when implanted in vivo in bones of dogs, sheep, mice, and humans, induces a biological response that includes integration and osteogenic activity on the host tissue that seems to be activated by a set of proteins present in the nacre water-soluble matrix (WSM). We describe here an experimental approach that can accurately identify the proteins present in the WSM of shell mollusk nacre. Four proteins (three gigasin-2 isoforms and a cystatin A2) were for the first time identified in WSM of Crassostrea gigas nacre using 2DE and LC-MS/MS for protein identification. These proteins are thought to be involved in bone remodeling processes and could be responsible for the biocompatibility shown between bone and nacre grafts. These results represent a contribution to the study of shell biomineralization process and opens new perspectives for the development of new nacre biomaterials for orthopedic applications. PMID:22666151

  7. Analysis of expression and inhibitory activity of a TrcC-6 phytocystatin present in developing and germinating seeds of triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm.).

    PubMed

    Simińska, Joanna; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Bielawski, Wiesław

    2015-11-01

    Storage proteins of cereal seeds are processed during accumulation and degraded during germination primarily by cysteine proteinases. One of the mechanisms controlling the activity of these enzymes is the synthesis of specific inhibitors named phytocystatins. Here we present the complete gene sequence of a triticale ( × Triticosecale Wittm.) phytocystatin, TrcC-6, which encodes a 152-amino acid protein with a putative 25-amino acid signal peptide. This protein has a calculated molecular mass of 16.2 kDa, and was assigned to phylogenetic group B of phytocystatins. Because TrcC-6 transcripts are present in triticale seeds, we hypothesized that this phytocystatin regulates storage protein accumulation and degradation. Therefore, changes in gene expression during the entire period of seed development and germination were examined. TrcC-6 transcripts and TrcC-6 protein levels increased during the maturation of seeds and remained high during the first hours of germination. This enabled us to conclude that TrcC-6 likely regulates seed germination by the regulation of storage protein hydrolysis. For the analysis of TrcC-6 inhibitory activity, recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified. Recombinant TrcC-6 proved to be a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteinases. It inhibited the in vitro activity of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) and ficin (EC 3.4.22.3). Furthermore, native PAGE analysis revealed that recombinant TrcC-6 inhibits the activity of endogenous cysteine proteinases present in germinating seeds of triticale. Based on these results, TrcC-6 is likely one of the important factors that regulate cysteine proteinase activity during the accumulation and mobilization of storage proteins.

  8. Analysis of expression and inhibitory activity of a TrcC-6 phytocystatin present in developing and germinating seeds of triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm.).

    PubMed

    Simińska, Joanna; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Bielawski, Wiesław

    2015-11-01

    Storage proteins of cereal seeds are processed during accumulation and degraded during germination primarily by cysteine proteinases. One of the mechanisms controlling the activity of these enzymes is the synthesis of specific inhibitors named phytocystatins. Here we present the complete gene sequence of a triticale ( × Triticosecale Wittm.) phytocystatin, TrcC-6, which encodes a 152-amino acid protein with a putative 25-amino acid signal peptide. This protein has a calculated molecular mass of 16.2 kDa, and was assigned to phylogenetic group B of phytocystatins. Because TrcC-6 transcripts are present in triticale seeds, we hypothesized that this phytocystatin regulates storage protein accumulation and degradation. Therefore, changes in gene expression during the entire period of seed development and germination were examined. TrcC-6 transcripts and TrcC-6 protein levels increased during the maturation of seeds and remained high during the first hours of germination. This enabled us to conclude that TrcC-6 likely regulates seed germination by the regulation of storage protein hydrolysis. For the analysis of TrcC-6 inhibitory activity, recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified. Recombinant TrcC-6 proved to be a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteinases. It inhibited the in vitro activity of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) and ficin (EC 3.4.22.3). Furthermore, native PAGE analysis revealed that recombinant TrcC-6 inhibits the activity of endogenous cysteine proteinases present in germinating seeds of triticale. Based on these results, TrcC-6 is likely one of the important factors that regulate cysteine proteinase activity during the accumulation and mobilization of storage proteins. PMID:26298807

  9. Structure-Activity Analysis of the Dermcidin-derived Peptide DCD-1L, an Anionic Antimicrobial Peptide Present in Human Sweat*

    PubMed Central

    Paulmann, Maren; Arnold, Thomas; Linke, Dirk; Özdirekcan, Suat; Kopp, Annika; Gutsmann, Thomas; Kalbacher, Hubert; Wanke, Ines; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Habeck, Michael; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S.; Schittek, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Dermcidin encodes the anionic amphiphilic peptide DCD-1L, which displays a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity under conditions resembling those in human sweat. Here, we have investigated its mode of antimicrobial activity. We found that DCD-1L interacts preferentially with negatively charged bacterial phospholipids with a helix axis that is aligned flat on a lipid bilayer surface. Upon interaction with lipid bilayers DCD-1L forms oligomeric complexes that are stabilized by Zn2+. DCD-1L is able to form ion channels in the bacterial membrane, and we propose that Zn2+-induced self-assembly of DCD-1L upon interaction with bacterial lipid bilayers is a prerequisite for ion channel formation. These data allow us for the first time to propose a molecular model for the antimicrobial mechanism of a naturally processed human anionic peptide that is active under the harsh conditions present in human sweat. PMID:22262861

  10. Spaceborne receivers: Basic principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principles of operation of microwave receivers for space observations of planetary surfaces were examined. The design philosophy of the receiver as it is applied to operate functionally as an efficient receiving system, the principle of operation of the key components of the receiver, and the important differences among receiver types are explained. The operating performance and the sensitivity expectations for both the modulated and total power receiver configurations are outlined. The expressions are derived from first principles and are developed through the important intermediate stages to form practicle and easily applied equations. The transfer of thermodynamic energy from point to point within the receiver is illustrated. The language of microwave receivers is applied statistics.

  11. The effect of stable macromolecular complexes of ionic polyphosphazene on HIV Gag antigen and on activation of human dendritic cells and presentation to T-cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Ninković, Jana; Prokopowicz, Zofia M; Mancuso, Christy J; Marin, Alexander; Andrianov, Alexander K; Dowling, David J; Levy, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Neonates and infants are susceptible to infection due to distinct immune responses in early life. Therefore, development of vaccine formulation and delivery systems capable of activating human newborn leukocytes is of global health importance. Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene] (PCPP) belongs to a family of ionic synthetic polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte compounds that can form non-covalent interactions with protein antigens and demonstrate adjuvant activity in animals and in human clinical trials. However, little is known about their ability to activate human immune cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of PCPP alone or in combination with a model antigen (recombinant HIV-Gag (Gag)), on the maturation, activation and antigen presentation by human adult and newborn dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. PCPP treatment induced DC activation as assessed by upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production. Studies benchmarking PCPP to Alum, the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant, demonstrated that both triggered cell death and release of danger signals in adult and newborn DCs. When complexed with Gag antigen, PCPP maintained its immunostimulatory characteristics while permitting internalization and presentation of Gag by DCs to HIV-Gag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. The PCPP vaccine formulation outlined here has intrinsic adjuvant activity, can facilitate effective delivery of antigen to DCs, and may be advantageous for induction of beneficial T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, polyphosphazenes can further reduce cost of vaccine production and distribution through their dose-sparing and antigen-stabilizing properties, thus potentially eliminating the need for cold chain distribution. PMID:25023392

  12. [Principle of the activity-controlled rate-adaptive cardiac pacemaker: analysis of stress and environment-induced mechanical effects on the human body].

    PubMed

    Alt, E; Matula, M; Theres, H; Heinz, M

    1989-09-01

    Rate-adaptive pacemakers are increasingly becoming part of clinical routine, the most widespread systems being activity-controlled. In order to shed more light on the foundations of mechanical forces which can possibly be utilized for controlling rate-adaptive systems, we conducted tests on six healthy volunteers and six pacemaker patients. With the aid of three orthogonal wide-band linear acceleration pick-ups attached to the body, the mechanical signals were recorded from the three axes during different activities. Along with standardized exercise on bicycle and treadmill ergometers, we tested the influence of household activities and interference influences. The results were analyzed in terms of the amplitude and frequency content of the signals. For walking activities we found a signal amplitude increasing in largely linear fashion with the walking speed, the signal amplitudes being approximately twice as high on the vertical axis as on the other two axes. Exercise on the bicycle ergometer produced mechanical signals of clearly lower amplitude than comparable walking activities. The Fast-Fourier analysis showed amplitude peaks in the low frequency range of 1 to 4 Hz for all forms of physiological exercise, while interference influences showed amplitude peaks mainly in the range above 8 Hz. The use of an acceleration pickup and a corresponding low pass filter might be a way of reducing the effect of nonphysiological interference influences on an activity-controlled pacemaker system. A sensor measuring in the horizontal axis appears to be the most favorable compromise for the various types of exercise. However, due to the considerable difference in signal amplitude for different types of exercise of the same intensity, an activity-controlled pacemaker system cannot entirely meet metabolic conditions and requirements. PMID:2815913

  13. Overview Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  14. Teaching/learning principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, D. B.; Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The potential remote sensing user community is enormous, and the teaching and training tasks are even larger; however, some underlying principles may be synthesized and applied at all levels from elementary school children to sophisticated and knowledgeable adults. The basic rules applying to each of the six major elements of any training course and the underlying principle involved in each rule are summarized. The six identified major elements are: (1) field sites for problems and practice; (2) lectures and inside study; (3) learning materials and resources (the kit); (4) the field experience; (5) laboratory sessions; and (6) testing and evaluation.

  15. Itch Management: General Principles.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Like pain, itch is a challenging condition that needs to be managed. Within this setting, the first principle of itch management is to get an appropriate diagnosis to perform an etiology-oriented therapy. In several cases it is not possible to treat the cause, the etiology is undetermined, there are several causes, or the etiological treatment is not effective enough to alleviate itch completely. This is also why there is need for symptomatic treatment. In all patients, psychological support and associated pragmatic measures might be helpful. General principles and guidelines are required, yet patient-centered individual care remains fundamental. PMID:27578069

  16. Itch Management: General Principles.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Like pain, itch is a challenging condition that needs to be managed. Within this setting, the first principle of itch management is to get an appropriate diagnosis to perform an etiology-oriented therapy. In several cases it is not possible to treat the cause, the etiology is undetermined, there are several causes, or the etiological treatment is not effective enough to alleviate itch completely. This is also why there is need for symptomatic treatment. In all patients, psychological support and associated pragmatic measures might be helpful. General principles and guidelines are required, yet patient-centered individual care remains fundamental.

  17. Anti-nucleosome and anti-chromatin antibodies are present in active systemic lupus erythematosus but not in the cutaneous form of the disease.

    PubMed

    Souza, A; da Silva, L M; Oliveira, F R; Roselino, A M F; Louzada-Junior, P

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the presence of anti-nucleosome (anti-NCS) and anti-chromatin (anti-CRT) antibodies in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) compared with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 154 subjects were evaluated: 54 patients presenting CLE, 66 patients with active SLE and 34 with inactive SLE. Lupus activity was assessed using the disease activity index (SLEDAI). Anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only one of 54 patients with CLE tested positive for both anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies. The prevalence of anti-CRT antibodies was significantly higher in active SLE (84.8%) when compared with inactive SLE (26.4%) and CLE (1.8%) (P < 0.001). Anti-NCS antibodies were also more prevalent in active SLE patients (74.2%) than inactive SLE (11.7%) and CLE patients (1.8%) (P < 0.001). The presence of anti-CRT and anti-NCS antibodies was correlated to disease activity in patients with SLE (r = 0.4937, r = 0.5621, respectively). Furthermore, the detection of both antibodies was correlated with disease activity in patients with SLE who tested negative for anti-dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.4754 for anti-NCS and r = 0.4281 for anti-CRT). The presence of these two auto-antibodies was strongly associated with renal damage in patients with SLE (OR = 13.1, for anti-CRT antibodies and OR = 25.83, for anti-NCS antibodies). The anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were not found in CLE. In patients with SLE, there is a correlation of these antibodies with disease activity and active nephritis. When compared with anti-dsDNA antibodies, anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were more sensitive in detecting disease activity and kidney damage in lupus patients.

  18. Matching the Neurobiology of Learning to Teaching Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Nelle; Fleisher, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe principles of good teaching drawn from meta-analyses of research on teaching effectiveness. Recent developments in neurobiology are presented and aligned to provide biological support for these principles. To make it easier for college faculty to try out sample instructional strategies, the authors map principles of good…

  19. Action Research and Narrative Inquiry: Five Principles for Validation Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Hannu L. T.; Huttunen, Rauno; Syrjala, Leena; Pesonen, Jyri

    2012-01-01

    The article continues the discussion of the five quality principles proposed by Heikkinen, Huttunen, and Syrjala, published in 2007 in "Educational Action Research". In the present article, the authors reconsider the five principles: historical continuity; reflexivity; dialectics; workability; and evocativeness. These five principles are…

  20. Increase in a distinct pulmonary macrophage subset possessing an antigen-presenting cell phenotype and in vitro APC activity following silica exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Migliaccio, Christopher T. . E-mail: christopher.migliaccio@umontana.edu; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Holian, Andrij

    2005-06-01

    Silica inhalation results in chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. While the role of the alveolar macrophage (AM) is considered key to the effects of silica on lung pathology, the etiology is not completely understood. Evidence suggests an increase in antigen presenting cell (APC) activity as a contributing factor to this process, as well as potential roles for both AM and interstitial macrophages (IM) in silicosis. In order to study the effects of crystalline silica on the APC activity of pulmonary macrophages, mice were exposed intranasally and changes in pulmonary macrophage populations were assessed using flow cytometry. Following intranasal instillation of silica, a significant increase in the APC activity of AM was observed, as well as a significant increase in a subset of IM expressing classic APC markers (MHC class II, CD11c). In addition, an in vitro system using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was generated to assess the effects of silica on the APC activity of macrophages in vitro. Data using BMDM in the in vitro APC assay demonstrated a significant increase in APC activity following silica exposure, but not following exposure to saline or a control particle (TiO{sub 2}). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments, the current study describes a significant increase in an interstitial macrophage subset with an APC phenotype, as well as an increase in the APC activity of both AM and BMDM, as a direct result of exposure to crystalline silica. These studies suggest a specific mechanism, macrophage subset activation, by which crystalline silica exposure results in chronic pulmonary inflammation and, eventually, fibrosis.

  1. Principles for quality undergraduate education in psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    The principles for undergraduate education in psychology presented here are designed for creating a world-class educational system that provides students with the workplace skills needed in this information age; a solid academic background that prepares them for advanced study in a wide range of fields; and the knowledge, skills, and abilities that will enhance their personal lives. A quality undergraduate education is designed to produce psychologically literate citizens who apply the principles of psychological science at work and at home. The American Psychological Association (APA) urges all stakeholders in undergraduate education in psychology to incorporate these principles in establishing goals and objectives that fit their specific institutional needs and missions.

  2. Analytical SAR-GMTI principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Majumder, Uttam K.; Barnes, Christopher; Sobota, David; Minardi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides analytical principles to relate the signature of a moving target to parameters in a SAR system. Our objective is to establish analytical tools that could predict the shift and smearing of a moving target in a subaperture SAR image. Hence, a user could identify the system parameters such as the coherent processing interval for a subaperture that is suitable to localize the signature of a moving target for detection, tracking and geolocating the moving target. The paper begins by outlining two well-known SAR data collection methods to detect moving targets. One uses a scanning beam in the azimuth domain with a relatively high PRF to separate the moving targets and the stationary background (clutter); this is also known as Doppler Beam Sharpening. The other scheme uses two receivers along the track to null the clutter and, thus, provide GMTI. We also present results on implementing our SAR-GMTI analytical principles for the anticipated shift and smearing of a moving target in a simulated code. The code would provide a tool for the user to change the SAR system and moving target parameters, and predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image for a scene that is composed of both stationary and moving targets. Hence, the SAR simulation and imaging code could be used to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the above analytical principles to predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image.

  3. Proof-of-principle results for identifying the composition of dust particles and volcanic ash samples through the technique of photon activation analysis at the IAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Mayir; Cole, Philip L.; Segebade, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Instrumental analytical methods are preferable in studying sub-milligram quantities of airborne particulates collected in dust filters. The multi-step analytical procedure used in treating samples through chemical separation can be quite complicated. Further, due to the minute masses of the airborne particulates collected on filters, such chemical treatment can easily lead to significant levels of contamination. Radio-analytical techniques, and in particular, activation analysis methods offer a far cleaner alternative. Activation methods require minimal sample preparation and provide sufficient sensitivity for detecting the vast majority of the elements throughout the periodic table. In this paper, we will give a general overview of the technique of photon activation analysis. We will show that by activating dust particles with 10- to 30-MeV bremsstrahlung photons, we can ascertain their elemental composition. The samples are embedded in dust-collection filters and are irradiated "as is" by these photons. The radioactivity of the photonuclear reaction products is measured with appropriate spectrometers and the respective analytes are quantified using multi-component calibration materials. We shall provide specific examples of identifying the elemental components of airborne dust particles and volcanic ash by making use of bremsstrahlung photons from an electron linear accelerator at the Idaho Accelerator Center in Pocatello, Idaho.

  4. A First-Principle Study of Synergized O2 Activation and CO Oxidation by Ag Nanoparticles on TiO2(101) Support.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuanyi; Zhang, Guozhen; Zhong, Wenhui; Jiang, Jun

    2016-04-27

    We performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the synergized O2 activation and CO oxidation by Ag8 cluster on TiO2(101) support. The excellent catalytic activity of the interfacial Ag atoms in O2 dissociation is ascribed to the positive polarized charges, upshift of Ag d-band center, and assistance of surface Ti5c atoms. CO oxidation then takes place via a two-step mechanism coupled with O2 dissociation: (i) CO + O2 → CO2 + O and (ii) CO + O → CO2. The synergistic effect of CO and O2 activations reduces the oxidation energy barrier (Ea) of reaction (i), especially for the up-layered Ag atoms not in contact with support. It is found that the coadsorbed CO and O2 on the up-layered Ag atoms form a metal-stable four-center O-O-CO structure motif substantially promoting CO oxidation. On the oxygen defective Ag8/TiO2(101) surface, because of the decreased positive charges and the down-shift of d-band centers in Ag, the metal cluster exhibits low O2 adsorption and activation abilities. Although the dissociation of O2 is facilitated by the TiO2(101) defect sites, the dissociated O atoms would cover the defects so strongly that further CO oxidation would be prohibited unless much extra energy is introduced to recreate oxygen defects. PMID:27049335

  5. Reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia as concomitant abnormality in patients presenting with active duodenal or gastric ulcer: cross-sectional endoscopic study in consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Loffeld, R J.L.F.; van der Putten, A B.M.M.

    2002-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Follow-up studies have shown that patients with ulcer disease are at risk of developing reflux esophagitis (RE) after successful eradication of Heliobacter pylori. It is still not clear whether this is induced by eradication of H. pylori or whether RE is already present at the time the ulcer is diagnosed. A cross-sectional study was done in consecutive patients suffering from active ulcer disease in order to assess coincidental RE. METHODS: Patients with an active duodenal or gastric ulcer were included in the study. Concomitant RE and the presence of hiatal hernia (HH) were scored. Biopsy specimens were taken for detection of H. pylori. RESULTS: In 375 patients (77%), an active duodenal ulcer was the only abnormality. In 43 patients (8.8%), duodenal ulcer and concomitant RE were present and 69 patients (14.2%) had a duodenal ulcer with concomitant HH. Patients with a duodenal ulcer were significantly younger than patients with concomitant RE or HH. From 374 patients (76.8%) with a duodenal ulcer, biopsy specimens were available for the detection of H. pylori. The majority of duodenal ulcer patients were H. pylori-positive. H. pylori was significantly more often present in patients with an active duodenal ulcer than it was in duodenal ulcer patients suffering from concomitant RE (P=0.04). In 218 patients (76%), a gastric ulcer was the only abnormality. Fifteen patients (5.2%) also had RE and 54 patients (18.8%) had a concomitant HH. There was no difference in H. pylori status in these three groups of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Given the low prevalence of concomitant RE, it is concluded that this condition is likely to occur in a large percentage of patients suffering from H. pylori-positive ulcer disease after successful eradication therapy.

  6. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  7. Multi-Target QSAR Approaches for Modeling Protein Inhibitors. Simultaneous Prediction of Activities Against Biomacromolecules Present in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery is aimed at finding therapeutic agents for the treatment of many diverse diseases and infections. However, this is a very slow an expensive process, and for this reason, in silico approaches are needed to rationalize the search for new molecular entities with desired biological profiles. Models focused on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) have constituted useful complementary tools in medicinal chemistry, allowing the virtual predictions of dissimilar pharmacological activities of compounds. In the last 10 years, multi-target (mt) QSAR models have been reported, representing great advances with respect to those models generated from classical approaches. Thus, mt- QSAR models can simultaneously predict activities against different biological targets (proteins, microorganisms, cell lines, etc.) by using large and heterogeneous datasets of chemicals. The present review is devoted to discuss the most promising mt-QSAR models, particularly those developed for the prediction of protein inhibitors. We also report the first multi-tasking QSAR (mtk-QSAR) model for simultaneous prediction of inhibitors against biomacromolecules (specifically proteins) present in Gram-negative bacteria. This model allowed us to consider both different proteins and multiple experimental conditions under which the inhibitory activities of the chemicals were determined. The mtk-QSAR model exhibited accuracies higher than 98% in both training and prediction sets, also displaying a very good performance in the classification of active and inactive cases that depended on the specific elements of the experimental conditions. The physicochemical interpretations of the molecular descriptors were also analyzed, providing important insights regarding the molecular patterns associated with the appearance/enhancement of the inhibitory potency. PMID:25961517

  8. Extended Mach Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Joe

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the meaning of symmetry of the laws of physics and symmetry of the universe and the connection between symmetries and asymmetries of the laws of physics and those of the universe. An explanation of Hamilton's principle is offered. The material is suitable for informal discussions with students. (Author/SK)

  9. Matters of Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    1999-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" looks at individuals who have stood on principle against authority or popular opinion. The first article investigates John Adams and his defense of British soldiers at the Boston Massacre trials. The second article explores Archbishop Thomas Becket's fatal conflict with England's King Henry II. The final…

  10. The Denver principles.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    The Denver principles articulate the self empowerment movement of People With AIDS (PWA). The statements, written in 1983 by the Advisory Committee of the People With AIDS, include recommendations on how to support those with disease. It also includes suggestions for people who have AIDS. It concludes by listing the "rights of people with AIDS."

  11. Reprographic Principles Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. B.

    Means for reproducing graphic materials are explained. There are several types of processes: those using light sensitive material, those using heat sensitive material, those using photo conductive materials (electrophotography), and duplicating processes using ink. For each of these, the principles behind them are explained, the necessary…

  12. The Idiom Principle Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siyanova-Chanturia, Anna; Martinez, Ron

    2015-01-01

    John Sinclair's Idiom Principle famously posited that most texts are largely composed of multi-word expressions that "constitute single choices" in the mental lexicon. At the time that assertion was made, little actual psycholinguistic evidence existed in support of that holistic, "single choice," view of formulaic language. In…

  13. Principles of Teaching. Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Joseph W.

    This module on principles of teaching is 1 in a series of 10 modules written for vocational education teacher education programs. It is designed to enable the teacher to do the following: (1) identify subject matter and integrate that subject matter with thought-provoking questions; (2) organize and demonstrate good questioning techniques; and (3)…

  14. Hydrogen evolution: Guiding principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-10-01

    Lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are being explored for the sustainable production of hydrogen, but often trial-and-error approaches are used for their development. Now, principles are elucidated that suggest pathways to rationally design efficient metal-free electrocatalysts based on doped graphene.

  15. Militarism, human welfare, and the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists.

    PubMed

    Summers, Craig

    1992-01-01

    A case study is presented of the American Psychological Association (APA), as a health care organization that promotes human welfare. APA includes policies on human welfare in its Ethical Principles of Psychologists and even lists the advancement of psychology "as a means of promoting human welfare" on its letterhead. Nevertheless, APA has other policies and activities based on military and weapons work that appear to conflict with its promotion of human welfare. Although military work in and of itself may not necessarily be problematic, work that contributes to people purposely being harmed or killed should be squared with the association's ethical guidelines. The results presented here show that this may not be the case: There currently appears to be little justification in the Ethical Principles for work intended to harm people. APA's active lobbying, research, and development for the military are documented here, in relation to an analysis of the Ethical Principles. APA's uncritical support for Operation Desert Storm is examined specifically, with regard to weapons technology and therapeutic treatment of U.S. soldiers on the battlefield. This one-sided support for victims of the war is not in keeping with a Hippocratic health care ethic to treat patients needing care, and to do so with neutrality and impartiality. Similarities to a historical example of nationalistic mental health ethics are discussed, with a review of the development of the German Institute for Psychological Research and Psychotherapy and of the German Society for Psychology in the Nazi wartime effort and the Holocaust. The results here show similar deficiencies in APA's ethical standards, not the least of which is that the code applies to individual members but not to APA policies, committees, or activities. This article concludes with suggested criteria for the Ethical Principles that would at least (a) recognize the ambiguities in systematically developing and using weapons to hurt people

  16. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 "favoring" chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 "favoring" chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1-3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1-3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK) axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo therapeutic effect of

  17. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 “favoring” chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 “favoring” chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1–3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1–3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK) axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo therapeutic

  18. Teaching Principles of One-Way Analysis of Variance Using M&M's Candy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    I present an active learning classroom exercise illustrating essential principles of one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods. The exercise is easily conducted by the instructor and is instructive (as well as enjoyable) for the students. This is conducive for demonstrating many theoretical and practical issues related to ANOVA and lends itself…

  19. Application of the Total Quality Management Approach Principles and the ISO 9000 Standards in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waks, Shlomo; Frank, Moti

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the applicability of the definition, principles, and underlying strategies of total quality management (TQM) for engineering education. Describes several tools and methods for the implementation of TQM and its suitability for a variety of school activities. Presents a TQM course outline combining lectures, discussions, suggested…

  20. Potent immunosuppressive principles, dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids, isolated from nupharis rhizoma, the rhizoma of Nuphar pumilum (nymphaeaceae): structure-requirement of nuphar-alkaloid for immunosuppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Yamahara, J; Shimoda, H; Matsuda, H; Yoshikawa, M

    1996-09-01

    Potent immunosuppressants, the dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids, 6-hydroxythiobinupharidine (2), 6,6'-dihydroxythiobinupharidine (3), 6-hydroxythionuphlutine B (5) and 6'-hydroxythionuphlutine B (6), were isolated from a natural medicine, Nupharis Rhizoma, the rhizoma of Nuphar pumilum (TIMM.) DC., through bioassay-guided separation together with five quinolizidine alkaloids (8, 9, 10, 11, 12). Dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids (2, 3, 5, 6) were found to significantly inhibit anti-sheep erythrocyte plaque forming cell formation in mice spleen cells at 10(-6) M concentration. At this concentration, 2, 5 and 6 were found to exhibit no cytotoxicity to mice spleen cells, and 3 also showed only a little cytotoxicity. In addition, the inhibitory activity of several Nuphar alkaloids, dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids (1, 4, 7, 8), and monomeric sesquiterpene alkaloids (9, 10, 11, 12) on anti-sheep erythrocyte plaque forming cell formation was examined and some structural requirement of Nuphar alkaloid for immunosuppressive activity was determined.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of the partially purified extract of radix Stephaniae tetrandrae: comparative studies of its active principles tetrandrine and fangchinoline on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y C; Chou, C J; Chiou, W F; Chen, C F

    2001-11-01

    We hypothesized that prevention of neutrophil from activation may underlie the myocardial protective effect of the specially processed extract of radix Stephaniae tetrandrae (SPRST). Inflammatory responses in isolated peripheral human neutrophils were studied in the presence or absence of SPRST. SPRST (1-10 microg/ml) concentration-dependently prevented N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)- or leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4))-induced neutrophil adhesion and transmigration. Comparable results were also observed in neutrophils pretreated with fangchinoline (Fan) or tetrandrine (Tet), two active components in SPRST. It has been reported that neutrophil adhesion/transmigration is mainly Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-dependent and could be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. SPRST, Tet, and Fan diminished fMLP- or LTB4-induced Mac-1 up-regulation and ROS production. SPRST, Fan, Tet, and verapamil impaired fMLP-induced rapid intracellular alkalization, an essential mechanism for neutrophil ROS production, and [Ca(2+)](i) increment, suggesting that a calcium dependent pathway might be involved. Direct G protein activation by AlF(4)(-) also triggered [Ca(2+)](i) increment and adhesion that could be abolished by pertussis toxin and were partially reversed by SPRST, Fan, and Tet. These results reveal that inhibition of neutrophil adhesion and transmigration may account for SPRST's myocardial protective effect. This effect of SPRST may be mediated by component(s) in addition to Tet and Fan because combination of 0.1 microg/ml of Tet and Fan did not mimic the effect of SPRST. We conclude that SPRST exerts anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with ROS production and Ca(2+) influx through G protein modulation to prevent Mac-1 up-regulation in neutrophil activation. PMID:11641437

  2. Assessing the apparent imbalance between geochemical and biochemical indicators of meso- and bathypelagic biological activity: What the @$♯! is wrong with present calculations of carbon budgets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Adrian B.; Hansell, Dennis A.; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Anderson, Thomas R.; Arístegui, Javier; Baltar, Federico; Beaupré, Steven R.; Buesseler, Ken O.; DeHairs, Frank; Jackson, George A.; Kadko, David C.; Koppelmann, Rolf; Lampitt, Richard S.; Nagata, Toshi; Reinthaler, Thomas; Robinson, Carol; Robison, Bruce H.; Tamburini, Christian; Tanaka, Tsuneo

    2010-08-01

    Metabolic activity in the water column below the euphotic zone is ultimately fuelled by the vertical flux of organic material from the surface. Over time, the deep ocean is presumably at steady state, with sources and sinks balanced. But recently compiled global budgets and intensive local field studies suggest that estimates of metabolic activity in the dark ocean exceed the influx of organic substrates. This imbalance indicates either the existence of unaccounted sources of organic carbon or that metabolic activity in the dark ocean is being over-estimated. Budgets of organic carbon flux and metabolic activity in the dark ocean have uncertainties associated with environmental variability, measurement capabilities, conversion parameters, and processes that are not well sampled. We present these issues and quantify associated uncertainties where possible, using a Monte Carlo analysis of a published data set to determine the probability that the imbalance can be explained purely by uncertainties in measurements and conversion factors. A sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the bacterial growth efficiencies and assumed cell carbon contents have the greatest effects on the magnitude of the carbon imbalance. Two poorly quantified sources, lateral advection of particles and a population of slowly settling particles, are discussed as providing a means of closing regional carbon budgets. Finally, we make recommendations concerning future research directions to reduce important uncertainties and allow a better determination of the magnitude and causes of the unbalanced carbon budgets.

  3. Furanodiene presents synergistic anti-proliferative activity with paclitaxel via altering cell cycle and integrin signaling in 95-D lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Shan; Dang, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2014-02-01

    Furanodiene (FUR) is a natural terpenoid isolated from Rhizoma Curcumae, a well-known Chinese medicinal herb that presents anti-proliferative activities in several cancer cell lines. Recently, we found that the combined treatment of FUR with paclitaxel (TAX) showed synergetic anti-proliferative activities in 95-D lung cancer cells. Herein, we showed that FUR reduced the cell numbers distributed in mitosis phase induced by TAX while increased those in G1 phase. The protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin B1, CDK6 and c-Myc were all down-regulated in the group of combined treatment. The dramatically down-regulated expression of integrin β4, focal adhesion kinase and paxillin might partially contribute to the synergic effect. Though FUR alone obviously induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, this signaling pathway may not contribute to the synergetic anti-proliferative effect as the protein expression of CHOP and BIP was similar in FUR alone and combined treatment group.

  4. Equivalence principle in Chameleon models .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Landau, S.; Salgado, M.; Sudarsky, D.

    Most theories that predict time and/or space variation of fundamental constants also predict violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). Khoury and Weltmann proposed the chameleon model in 2004 and claimed that this model avoids experimental bounds on WEP. We present a contrasting view based on an approximate calculation of the two body problem for the chameleon field and show that the force depends on the test body composition. Furthermore, we compare the prediction of the force on a test body with Eötvös type experiments and find that the chameleon field effect cannot account for current bounds.

  5. Artificial intelligence: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Following the Japanese announcement that they intend to devise, make, and market, in the 1990s, computers incorporating a level of intelligence, a vast amount of energy and expense has been diverted at the field of Artificial Intelligence. Workers for the past 25 years in this discipline have tried to reproduce human behavior on computers and this book presents their achievements and the problems. Subjects include: computer vision, speech processing, robotics, natural language processing expert systems and machine learning. The book also attempts to show the general principles behind the various applications and finally attempts to show their implications for other human endeavors such as philosophy, psychology, and the development of modern society.

  6. Immunomodulatory Glycan Lacto-N-Fucopentaose III Requires Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis To Induce Alternative Activation of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Leena; Tundup, Smanla; Choi, Beak-San; Norberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of alternative activation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is largely unknown. Lacto-N-fucopentaose III (LNFPIII) is a biologically conserved pentasaccharide that contains the Lewisx trisaccharide. LNFPIII conjugates and schistosome egg antigens, which contain the Lewisx trisaccharide, drive alternative activation of APCs and induce anti-inflammatory responses in vivo, preventing inflammation-based diseases, including psoriasis, transplant organ rejection, and metabolic disease. In this study, we show that LNFPIII conjugates and schistosome egg antigens interact with APCs via a receptor-mediated process, requiring internalization of these molecules through a clathrin/dynamin-dependent but caveolus-independent endocytic pathway. Using inhibitors/small interfering RNA (siRNA) against dynamin and clathrin, we show for the first time that endocytosis of Lewisx-containing glycans is required to drive alternative maturation of antigen-presenting cells and Th2 immune responses. We identified mouse SIGNR-1 as a cell surface receptor for LNFPIII conjugates. Elimination of SIGNR-1 showed no effect on uptake of LNFPIII conjugates, suggesting that other receptors bind to and facilitate uptake of LNFPIII conjugates. We demonstrate that disruption of actin filaments partially prevented the entry of LNFPIII conjugates into APCs and that LNFPIII colocalizes with both early and late endosomal markers and follows the classical endosomal pathway leading to lysosome maturation. The results of this study show that the ability of LNFPIII to induce alternative activation utilizes a receptor-mediated process that requires a dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Thus, key steps have been defined in the previously unknown mechanism of alternative activation that ultimately leads to induction of anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24566617

  7. The inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Vink, A A; Moodycliffe, A M; Shreedhar, V; Ullrich, S E; Roza, L; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1997-05-13

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase (Photosomes; Applied Genetics, Freeport, NY), which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosome treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function. PMID:9144224

  8. Novel class of spider toxin: active principle from the yellow sac spider Cheiracanthium punctorium venom is a unique two-domain polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Vassilevski, Alexander A; Fedorova, Irina M; Maleeva, Ekaterina E; Korolkova, Yuliya V; Efimova, Svetlana S; Samsonova, Olga V; Schagina, Ludmila V; Feofanov, Alexei V; Magazanik, Lev G; Grishin, Eugene V

    2010-10-15

    Venom of the yellow sac spider Cheiracanthium punctorium (Miturgidae) was found unique in terms of molecular composition. Its principal toxic component CpTx 1 (15.1 kDa) was purified, and its full amino acid sequence (134 residues) was established by protein chemistry and mass spectrometry techniques. CpTx 1 represents a novel class of spider toxin with modular architecture. It consists of two different yet homologous domains (modules) each containing a putative inhibitor cystine knot motif, characteristic of the widespread single domain spider neurotoxins. Venom gland cDNA sequencing provided precursor protein (prepropeptide) structures of three CpTx 1 isoforms (a-c) that differ by single residue substitutions. The toxin possesses potent insecticidal (paralytic and lethal), cytotoxic, and membrane-damaging activities. In both fly and frog neuromuscular preparations, it causes stable and irreversible depolarization of muscle fibers leading to contracture. This effect appears to be receptor-independent and is inhibited by high concentrations of divalent cations. CpTx 1 lyses cell membranes, as visualized by confocal microscopy, and destabilizes artificial membranes in a manner reminiscent of other membrane-active peptides by causing numerous defects of variable conductance and leading to bilayer rupture. The newly discovered class of modular polypeptides enhances our knowledge of the toxin universe.

  9. Effects of intensive dietary treatment on insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glycogen synthase activation and insulin secretion in newly presenting type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A B; Argyraki, M; Thow, J C; Broughton, D; Jones, I R; Taylor, R

    1990-06-01

    Ten newly presenting, untreated, Europid Type 2 diabetic patients were studied before and after 8 weeks treatment with intensive diet alone. Nine normal control subjects were also studied. The degree of activation of skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS) was used as an intracellular marker of insulin action, prior to and during a 240-min insulin infusion (100 mU kg-1 h-1). Fasting blood glucose decreased from 12.1 +/- 0.9 (+/- SE) to 9.2 +/- 0.8 mmol l-1 (p less than 0.01), but there was no change in fasting insulin concentrations, 9.9 +/- 2.3 vs 9.3 +/- 2.1 mU l-1. Fractional GS activity did not increase in the Type 2 diabetic patients during the insulin infusion either at presentation (change -1.5 +/- 1.9%) or after treatment (change +0.9 +/- 1.8%), and was markedly decreased compared with the control subjects (change +14.5 +/- 2.8%, both p less than 0.001). Glucose requirement during the clamp was decreased in the Type 2 diabetic patients at presentation (2.2 +/- 0.7 vs 7.3 +/- 0.6 mg kg-1 min-1, p less than 0.001), and despite improvement following dietary treatment to 3.3 +/- 0.6 mg kg-1 min-1 (p less than 0.01) remained lower than in the control subjects (p less than 0.001). Fasting plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were elevated at presentation (p less than 0.05), and failed to suppress normally during the insulin infusion. After treatment fasting NEFA concentrations decreased (p less than 0.05) and suppressed normally (p less than 0.05). Insulin secretion was assessed following an intravenous bolus of glucose (0.5 g kg-1) at euglycaemia before and after treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  11. Principles of Glacier Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, Edwin D.

    Glaciers are awesome in size and move at a majestic pace, and they frequently occupy spectacular mountainous terrain. Naturally, many Earth scientists are attracted to glaciers. Some of us are even fortunate enough to make a career of studying glacier flow. Many others work on the large, flat polar ice sheets where there is no scenery. As a leader of one of the foremost research projects now studying the flow of mountain glaciers (Storglaciaren, Norway), Roger Hooke is well qualified to describe the principles of glacier mechanics. Principles of Glacier Mechanics is written for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students with an interest in glaciers and the landforms that glaciers produce. While most of the examples in the text are drawn from valley glacier studies, much of the material is also relevant to “glacier flatland” on the polar ice sheets.

  12. Anticancer Principles from Medicinal Piper (胡椒 Hú Jiāo) Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hu; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yang, Jun; Niu, Hong-Mei; Long, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    The ethnomedical uses of Piper (胡椒 Hú Jiāo) plants as anticancer agents, in vitro cytotoxic activity of both extracts and compounds from Piper plants, and in vivo antitumor activity and mechanism of action of selected compounds are reviewed in the present paper. The genus Piper (Piperaceae) contains approximately 2000 species, of which 10 species have been used in traditional medicines to treat cancer or cancer-like symptoms. Studies have shown that 35 extracts from 24 Piper species and 32 compounds from Piper plants possess cytotoxic activity. Amide alkaloids account for 53% of the major active principles. Among them, piplartine (piperlongumine) shows the most promise, being toxic to dozens of cancer cell lines and having excellent in vivo activity. It is worthwhile to conduct further anticancer studies both in vitro and in vivo on Piper plants and their active principles. PMID:24872928

  13. Principle and applications of Faraday-Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Nan; Zhao, Jianlin

    2010-10-01

    A Faraday-Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavity, composed of an Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity and a piece of Faraday magneto-optical material, is presented. The principle of FFP cavity and its polarization modulation effect are described by use of optical matrix analysis. The result shows that the Faraday rotation is able to be magnified by more than two orders of magnitude in resonant FFP cavity, while different elliptically polarized lights are obtained in non-resonant cavity. Furthermore two novel applications, that is, optical isolator based on passive FFP cavity (FOI) and Faraday-Zeeman dual-frequency laser (FZDL) based on active FFP cavity whose eigen modes operate as circularly polarized lights and whose frequency difference can be adjusted continuously by magnetic field, are introduced. The principles, typical parameters and performance characteristics are analyzed in both applications.

  14. Fundamental base closure environmental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Military base closures present a paradox. The rate, scale and timing of military base closures is historically unique. However, each base itself typically does not present unique problems. Thus, the challenge is to design innovative solutions to base redevelopment and remediation issues, while simultaneously adopting common, streamlined or pre-approved strategies to shared problems. The author presents six environmental principles that are fundamental to base closure. They are: remediation not clean up; remediation will impact reuse; reuse will impact remediation; remediation and reuse must be coordinated; environmental contamination must be evaluated as any other initial physical constraint on development, not as an overlay after plans are created; and remediation will impact development, financing and marketability.

  15. Pauli Exclusion Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A principle of quantum theory, devised in 1925 by Wolfgang Pauli (1900-58), which states that no two fermions may exist in the same quantum state. The quantum state of a particle is defined by a set of numbers that describe quantities such as energy, angular momentum and spin. Fermions are particles such as quarks, protons, neutrons and electrons, that have spin = ½ (in units of h/2π, where h is ...

  16. Principles of nuclear geology

    SciTech Connect

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    1985-01-01

    This book treats the basic principles of nuclear physics and the mineralogy, geochemistry, distribution and ore deposits of uranium and thorium. The application of nuclear methodology in radiogenic heat and thermal regime of the earth, radiometric prospecting, isotopic age dating, stable isotopes and cosmic-ray produced isotopes is covered. Geological processes, such as metamorphic chronology, petrogenesis, groundwater movement, and sedimentation rate are focussed on.

  17. A correspondence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Barry D.; Ninham, Barry W.

    2016-02-01

    A single mathematical theme underpins disparate physical phenomena in classical, quantum and statistical mechanical contexts. This mathematical "correspondence principle", a kind of wave-particle duality with glorious realizations in classical and modern mathematical analysis, embodies fundamental geometrical and physical order, and yet in some sense sits on the edge of chaos. Illustrative cases discussed are drawn from classical and anomalous diffusion, quantum mechanics of single particles and ideal gases, quasicrystals and Casimir forces.

  18. Computational principles of memory.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rishidev; Fiete, Ila

    2016-03-01

    The ability to store and later use information is essential for a variety of adaptive behaviors, including integration, learning, generalization, prediction and inference. In this Review, we survey theoretical principles that can allow the brain to construct persistent states for memory. We identify requirements that a memory system must satisfy and analyze existing models and hypothesized biological substrates in light of these requirements. We also highlight open questions, theoretical puzzles and problems shared with computer science and information theory. PMID:26906506

  19. Heisenberg's observability principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Johanna

    2014-02-01

    Werner Heisenberg's 1925 paper 'Quantum-theoretical re-interpretation of kinematic and mechanical relations' marks the beginning of quantum mechanics. Heisenberg famously claims that the paper is based on the idea that the new quantum mechanics should be 'founded exclusively upon relationships between quantities which in principle are observable'. My paper is an attempt to understand this observability principle, and to see whether its employment is philosophically defensible. Against interpretations of 'observability' along empiricist or positivist lines I argue that such readings are philosophically unsatisfying. Moreover, a careful comparison of Heisenberg's reinterpretation of classical kinematics with Einstein's argument against absolute simultaneity reveals that the positivist reading does not fit with Heisenberg's strategy in the paper. Instead the appeal to observability should be understood as a specific criticism of the causal inefficacy of orbital electron motion in Bohr's atomic model. I conclude that the tacit philosophical principle behind Heisenberg's argument is not a positivistic connection between observability and meaning, but the idea that a theory should not contain causally idle wheels.

  20. Teaching professionalism: general principles.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R

    2006-05-01

    There are educational principles that apply to the teaching of professionalism during undergraduate education and postgraduate training. It is axiomatic that there is a single cognitive base that applies with increasing moral force as students enter medical school, progress to residency or registrar training, and enter practice. While parts of this body of knowledge are easier to teach and learn at different stages of an individual's career, it remains a definable whole at all times and should be taught as such. While the principle that self-reflection on theoretical and real issues encountered in the life of a student, resident or practitioner is essential to the acquisition of experiential learning and the incorporation of the values and behaviors of the professional, the opportunities to provide situations where this can take place will change as an individual progresses through the system, as will the sophistication of the level of learning. Teaching the cognitive base of professionalism and providing opportunities for the internalization of its values and behaviors are the cornerstones of the organization of the teaching of professionalism at all levels. Situated learning theory appears to provide practical guidance as to how this may be implemented. While the application of this theory will vary with the type of curriculum, the institutional culture and the resources available, the principles outlined should remain constant.