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Sample records for active protease complex

  1. Relationship between free radicals produced by entamoeba histolytica and its proteases complex activity.

    PubMed

    Crisóstomo-Vázquez, M P; Cervantes-Cervantes, M P; Jiménez-Cardoso, E; Muñoz-Sánchez, J L

    2002-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite which causes health problems and there has been many approaches to know what is the factor causing its pathogenicity. In the present work, we assayed if the production of free radicals by the amoeba, has a relationship with the proteases activity. When we test the DMSO action (free radicals quenching activity) the specific activity of the proteases complex of the parasite were affected also. At 33.3% (V/V) concentration of DMSO it was present a maximal decrease of the initial activity (about 46% decrease), for to a higher concentrations existing a trend to recuperate the original activity, suggesting that the free radicals are an important factor for the hydrolysis grade of the protein substrate. All the differences except those between 46.7 and 66.6%, were significantly different compared with the control without any addition. The effects of Probucol and Probucol plus DMSO, compared to those caused by Metronidazol (MZ). We can observe that the quenchers caused a decrease on proteases activity similar to that of MZ (which is an antiparasite drug) and it was of c.a. 58% of activity decrease. These data suggest that the action of both, free radicals and proteases complex of Entamoeba histolytica, can account for the pathogenicity of the parasite.

  2. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  3. Serine protease activity in developmental stages of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Miska, K B; Lillehoj, H; Barfield, R C

    2007-04-01

    A number of complex processes are involved in Eimeria spp. survival, including control of sporulation, intracellular invasion, evasion of host immune responses, successful reproduction, and nutrition. Proteases have been implicated in many of these processes, but the occurrence and functions of serine proteases have not been characterized. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that the Eimeria tenella genome contains several serine proteases that lack homology to trypsin. Using RT-PCR, a gene encoding a subtilisin-like and a rhomboid protease-like serine protease was shown to be developmentally regulated, both being poorly expressed in sporozoites (SZ) and merozoites (MZ). Casein substrate gel electrophoresis of oocyst extracts during sporulation demonstrated bands of proteolytic activity with relative molecular weights (Mr) of 18, 25, and 45 kDa that were eliminated by coincubation with serine protease inhibitors. A protease with Mr of 25 kDa was purified from extracts of unsporulated oocysts by a combination of affinity and anion exchange chromatography. Extracts of SZ contained only a single band of inhibitor-sensitive proteolytic activity at 25 kDa, while the pattern of proteases from extracts of MZ was similar to that of oocysts except for the occurrence of a 90 kDa protease, resistant to protease inhibitors. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from MZ contained AEBSF (4-[2-Aminoethyl] benzenesulphonyl fluoride)-sensitive protease activity with a specific activity about 10 times greater than that observed in MZ extracts. No protease activity was observed in the ESP from SZ. Pretreatment of SZ with AEBSF significantly reduced SZ invasion and the release of the microneme protein, MIC2. The current results suggest that serine proteases are present in all the developmental stages examined.

  4. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  5. Active protease mapping in 2DE gels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Russell, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    Proteases act as the molecular mediators of many vital biological processes. To understand the function of each protease, it needs to be separated from other proteins and characterized in its natural, biologically active form. In the method described in this chapter, proteases in a biological sample are separated under nonreducing conditions in 2DE gels. A specific small protease substrate, tagged with a fluorescent dye, is copolymerized into the SDS gel in the second dimension. After electrophoresis, the proteins are renatured by washing the gel with Triton X-100 solution or Milli Q water to remove SDS. The gel is then incubated in a protease assay buffer. The hydrolysis of the tagged specific substrate by the renatured protease releases the free fluorescent dye, which fluoresces in situ. The fluorescent spots indicate the location of the specific proteases in the gel and the specificity of the proteases.

  6. Proteases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J

    2001-05-01

    The processes of growth and remodeling of cells and tissues in multicellular organisms require the breakdown of old protein molecules, in concert with the synthesis of new ones. For example, many newly-synthesized molecules require proteolytic processing to convert them to biologically active forms. Proteolysis can terminate the activity of a protein--e.g., capsases mediate apoptosis, which is a vital step in the life cycle of the cell. Proteolysis contributes to defense systems too, as the recognition of peptide fragments of foreign proteins triggers the immune response. Proteases are the class of enzymes involved in these important reactions. This unit discusses the general categories of proteases, and sets the stage for addition of overview units on cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases, as well as protocol units featuring techniques for analyzing mammalian and yeast proteasomes and protease inhibitors, among other topics.

  7. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  8. Structural determinants of MALT1 protease activity.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Christian; Leder, Lukas; Blank, Jutta; Bernardi, Anna; Melkko, Samu; Decock, Arnaud; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Erbel, Paulus; Hughes, Nicola; Freuler, Felix; Nikolay, Rainer; Alves, Juliano; Bornancin, Frederic; Renatus, Martin

    2012-05-25

    The formation of the CBM (CARD11-BCL10-MALT1) complex is pivotal for antigen-receptor-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Signaling is dependent on MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), which not only acts as a scaffolding protein but also possesses proteolytic activity mediated by its caspase-like domain. It remained unclear how the CBM activates MALT1. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that MALT1 activation is dependent on its dimerization and show that mutations at the dimer interface abrogate activity in cells. The unliganded protease presents itself in a dimeric yet inactive state and undergoes substantial conformational changes upon substrate binding. These structural changes also affect the conformation of the C-terminal Ig-like domain, a domain that is required for MALT1 activity. Binding to the active site is coupled to a relative movement of caspase and Ig-like domains. MALT1 binding partners thus may have the potential of tuning MALT1 protease activity without binding directly to the caspase domain.

  9. Structures of native and complexed complement factor D: implications of the atypical His57 conformation and self-inhibitory loop in the regulation of specific serine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Babu, Y S; Moore, D; Kilpatrick, J M; Liu, X Y; Volanakis, J E; Narayana, S V

    1998-10-09

    Factor D is a serine protease essential for the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. The structures of native factor D and a complex formed with isatoic anhydride inhibitor were determined at resolution of 2.3 and 1.5 A, respectively, in an isomorphous monoclinic crystal form containing one molecule per asymmetric unit. The native structure was compared with structures determined previously in a triclinic cell containing two molecules with different active site conformations. The current structure shows greater similarity with molecule B in the triclinic cell, suggesting that this may be the dominant factor D conformation in solution. The major conformational differences with molecule A in the triclinic cell are located in four regions, three of which are close to the active site and include some of the residues shown to be critical for factor D catalytic activity. The conformational flexibility associated with these regions is proposed to provide a structural basis for the previously proposed substrate-induced reversible conformational changes in factor D. The high-resolution structure of the factor D/isatoic anhydride complex reveals the binding mode of the mechanism-based inhibitor. The higher specificity towards factor D over trypsin and thrombin is based on hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitor benzyl ring and the aliphatic side-chain of Arg218 that is salt bridged with Asp189 at the bottom of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Comparison of factor D structural variants with other serine protease structures revealed the presence of a unique "self-inhibitory loop". This loop (214-218) dictates the resting-state conformation of factor D by (1) preventing His57 from adopting active tautomer conformation, (2) preventing the P1 to P3 residues of the substrate from forming anti-parallel beta-sheets with the non-specific substrate binding loop, and (3) blocking the accessibility of Asp189 to the positive1y charged P1 residue of the

  10. Understanding the specificity of serpin-protease complexes through interface analysis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Qudsia; Kapil, Charu; Singh, Poonam; Kumari, Vineeta; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2015-01-01

    Serpins such as antithrombin, heparin cofactor II, plasminogen activator inhibitor, antitrypsin, antichymotrypsin, and neuroserpin are involved in important biological processes by inhibiting specific serine proteases. Initially, the protease recognizes the mobile reactive loop of the serpin eliciting conformational changes, where the cleaved loop together with the protease inserts into β-sheet A, translocating the protease to the opposite side of inhibitor leading to its inactivation. Serpin interaction with proteases is governed mainly by the reactive center loop residues (RCL). However, in some inhibitory serpins, exosite residues apart from RCL have been shown to confer protease specificity. Further, this forms the basis of multi-specificity of some serpins, but the residues and their dimension at interface in serpin-protease complexes remain elusive. Here, we present a comprehensive structural analysis of the serpin-protease interfaces using bio COmplexes COntact MAPS (COCOMAPS), PRotein Interface Conservation and Energetics (PRICE), and ProFace programs. We have carried out interface, burial, and evolutionary analysis of different serpin-protease complexes. Among the studied complexes, non-inhibitory serpins exhibit larger interface region with greater number of residue involvement as compared to the inhibitory serpins. On comparing the multi-specific serpins (antithrombin and antitrypsin), a difference in the interface area and residue number was observed, suggestive of a differential mechanism of action of these serpins in regulating their different target proteases. Further, detailed study of these multi-specific serpins listed few essential residues (common in all the complexes) and certain specificity (unique to each complex) determining residues at their interfaces. Structural mapping of interface residues suggested that individual patches with evolutionary conserved residues in specific serpins determine their specificity towards a particular protease.

  11. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  12. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  13. Protease induced plasticity: matrix metalloproteinase-1 promotes neurostructural changes through activation of protease activated receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Megan; Ghosh, Suhasini; Ahern, Gerard P.; Villapol, Sonia; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.; Conant, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of secreted endopeptidases expressed by neurons and glia. Regulated MMP activity contributes to physiological synaptic plasticity, while dysregulated activity can stimulate injury. Disentangling the role individual MMPs play in synaptic plasticity is difficult due to overlapping structure and function as well as cell-type specific expression. Here, we develop a novel system to investigate the selective overexpression of a single MMP driven by GFAP expressing cells in vivo. We show that MMP-1 induces cellular and behavioral phenotypes consistent with enhanced signaling through the G-protein coupled protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Application of exogenous MMP-1, in vitro, stimulates PAR1 dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and dendritic arborization. Overexpression of MMP-1, in vivo, increases dendritic complexity and induces biochemical and behavioral endpoints consistent with increased GPCR signaling. These data are exciting because we demonstrate that an astrocyte-derived protease can influence neuronal plasticity through an extracellular matrix independent mechanism. PMID:27762280

  14. Amelioration of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis by synthetic protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J C; Tidwell, R R; Geratz, J D; Bing, D H; Falk, R J

    1987-06-01

    Proteases are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases by participating in the activation of mediator systems and by producing proteolytic tissue injury. Homeostatic control of inflammation is accomplished in part by physiologic protease inhibitors. The authors investigated the effectiveness of a number of synthetic protease inhibitors in ameliorating the glomerular injury induced by immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in mice. Two amidine-type protease inhibitors, bis (5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)methane and 1,2-bis (5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)ethane, had the greatest effects. They caused a marked reduction in glomerular necrosis (P less than 0.001) but did not affect the amount or site of immune complex localization or leukocyte influx. The inhibition constants of the protease inhibitors against nine purified physiologic proteases were determined. These results were discussed in relation to the effectiveness of the protease inhibitors in reducing glomerular injury. This investigation indicates that the administration of synthetic protease inhibitors can have a beneficial effect on immune-mediated inflammatory injury.

  15. Mixed ligand μ-phenoxo-bridged dinuclear copper(II) complexes with diimine co-ligands: efficient chemical nuclease and protease activities and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Suresh, Eringathodi; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2014-04-28

    a DNA cleavage activity more prominent than 1 and 2. The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order, 4 > 3 > 5 > 2 > 1. Interestingly, 3 and 4 cleave the protein in the presence of H2O2 as an activator in a non-specific manner suggesting that they can act as chemical proteases. It is remarkable that all the complexes exhibit cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) with a potency more than the widely used drug cisplatin indicating that they have the potential to act as effective anticancer drugs in a time dependent manner. The morphological assessment data obtained by using Hoechst 33258 staining reveal that 3 and 4 induce apoptosis much more effectively than the other complexes. Also, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis study (comet assay) suggests that the same complexes induce DNA fragmentation more efficiently than others.

  16. Protease and Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD. PMID:20879045

  17. Protease and protease-activated receptor-2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-11-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/ PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD.

  18. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  19. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex with anti-proteases, at higher concentrations. Data from pharmacokinetic investigations reveals dose linearity for maximum plasma levels of free proteases not unusual for body proteases and a high inter-individual variability. There is no interference with each other after oral administration of protease combinations, and absorption follows an unusual invasion and elimination kinetic due to slow velocity of absorption and a fast 100% protein binding to anti-proteases. Oral application of proteases leads to increased proteolytic serum activity and increased plasma concentrations of the corresponding anti-proteases. Their biological activity is determined by their proteolytic activity as free proteases on soluble peptides/proteins or cell surface receptors (e.g. protease activated receptors) and their activity in the complex formed with their specific and/or unspecific anti-proteases. The anti-protease-complexes, during immune reaction and injuries often loaded with different cytokines, are cleared from body fluids and tissue by receptor mediated endocytosis on hepatocytes and/or blood cells. Oral administration of enteric coated tablets containing proteolytic enzymes of plant and animal origin may be a safe method to stabilize, positively influence or enhance physiological and immunological processes during disease processes and in healthy consumers.

  20. Protease activities of rumen protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, C W; Lovelock, L K; Krumholz, L; Buchanan-Smith, J G

    1984-01-01

    Intact, metabolically active rumen protozoa prepared by gravity sedimentation and washing in a mineral solution at 10 to 15 degrees C had comparatively low proteolytic activity on azocasein and low endogenous proteolytic activity. Protozoa washed in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) at 4 degrees C and stored on ice autolysed when they were warmed to 39 degrees C. They also exhibited low proteolytic activity on azocasein, but they had a high endogenous proteolytic activity with a pH optimum of 5.8. The endogenous proteolytic activity was inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors, for example, iodoacetate (63.1%) and the aspartic proteinase inhibitor, pepstatin (43.9%). Inhibitors specific for serine proteinases and metalloproteinases were without effect. The serine and cysteine proteinase inhibitors of microbial origin, including antipain, chymostatin, and leupeptin, caused up to 67% inhibition of endogenous proteolysis. Hydrolysis of casein by protozoa autolysates was also inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Some of the inhibitors decreased endogenous deamination, in particular, phosphoramidon, which had little inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Protozoal and bacterial preparations exhibited low hydrolytic activities on synthetic proteinase and carboxypeptidase substrates, although the protozoa had 10 to 78 times greater hydrolytic activity (per milligram of protein) than bacteria on the synthetic aminopeptidase substrates L-leucine-p-nitroanilide, L-leucine-beta-naphthylamide, and L-leucinamide. The aminopeptidase activity was partially inhibited by bestatin. It was concluded that cysteine proteinases and, to a lesser extent, aspartic proteinases are primarily responsible for proteolysis in autolysates of rumen protozoa. The protozoal autolysates had high aminopeptidase activity; low deaminase activity was observed on endogenous amino acids. PMID:6364968

  1. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Dewdney, Tamaria G; Reiter, Samuel J; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Kovari, Iulia A; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2013-01-18

    The success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. In addition, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  2. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  3. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  4. Development of activity-based probes for trypsin-family serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhengying; Jeffery, Douglas A; Chehade, Kareem; Beltman, Jerlyn; Clark, James M; Grothaus, Paul; Bogyo, Matthew; Baruch, Amos

    2006-06-01

    A series of diphenylphosphonate-based probes were developed for the trypsin-like serine proteases. These probes selectively target serine proteases rather than general serine hydrolases that are targets for fluorophosphonate-based probes. This increased selectivity allows detection of low abundance serine proteases in complex proteomes using simple SDS-PAGE methods. We present here the application of multiple probes in enzyme activity profiling of intact mast cells, a type of inflammatory cell implicated in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

  5. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  6. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  7. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  8. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jong W; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A; Hughes, Anna C; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  9. Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-05-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  10. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  11. Novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives as Hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors: synthesis, activity, and X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Arasappan, Ashok; Njoroge, F. George; Parekh, Tejal N.; Yang, Xiaozheng; Pichardo, John; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Prongay, Andrew; Yao, Nanhua; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    Synthesis and HCV NS3 serine protease inhibitory activity of some novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives are reported. Inhibitors derived from this new P2 core exhibited activity in the low {micro}M range. X-ray structure of an inhibitor, 15c bound to the protease is presented.

  12. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  13. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  14. [Chromatographic separation of activated proteases from human plasma].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, B; Taucher, M; Kühne, H; Scheuch, D W

    1988-01-01

    After separation of aceton and dextran sulfate activated human plasma by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose three esterolytically and amidolytically active fractions, respectively, were obtained, which were assigned to the following species: plasma kallikrein (PK), PK.alpha-macroglobulin.HMW-Kininogen. Their percentage in the whole activity is variable. The proportion of free PK is low (0.11). For characterization of the products we studied inhibition by different polyvalent inhibitors. The Michaelis constant (Km) with p-toluene-sulfonyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) were determined. For simulation of in vivo conditions dextran sulfate activated plasma was inactivated at 37 degrees C. The residual activity and the spontaneous activity in plasma from patients with shock are produced by different active protease inhibitor complexes.

  15. Distinct contribution of Toxoplasma gondii rhomboid proteases 4 and 5 to micronemal protein protease 1 activity during invasion.

    PubMed

    Rugarabamu, George; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Guérin, Amandine; Lebrun, Maryse; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Host cell entry by the Apicomplexa is associated with the sequential secretion of invasion factors from specialized apical organelles. Secretion of micronemal proteins (MICs) complexes by Toxoplasma gondii facilitates parasite gliding motility, host cell attachment and entry, as well as egress from infected cells. The shedding of MICs during these steps is mediated by micronemal protein proteases MPP1, MPP2 and MPP3. The constitutive activity of MPP1 leads to the cleavage of transmembrane MICs and is linked to the surface rhomboid protease 4 (ROM4) and possibly to rhomboid protease 5 (ROM5). To determine their importance and respective contribution to MPP1 activity, in this study ROM4 and ROM5 genes were abrogated using Cre-recombinase and CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease, respectively, and shown to be dispensable for parasite survival. Parasites lacking ROM4 predominantly engage in twirling motility and exhibit enhanced attachment and impaired invasion, whereas intracellular growth and egress is not affected. The substrates MIC2 and MIC6 are not cleaved in rom4-ko parasites, in contrast, intramembrane cleavage of AMA1 is reduced but not completely abolished. Shedding of MICs and invasion are not altered in the absence of ROM5; however, this protease responsible for the residual cleavage of AMA1 is able to cleave other AMA family members and exhibits a detectable contribution to invasion in the absence of ROM4.

  16. Serine protease activities in Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi promastigotes.

    PubMed

    da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa; dos Santos, Tatiana Resende; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Tanaka, Marcelo Neves; de Simone, Salvatore Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    The present work reports the isolation, biochemical characterization, and subcellular location of serine proteases from aqueous, detergent soluble, and culture supernatant of Leishmania chagasi promastigote extracts, respectively, LCSII, LCSI, and LCSIII. The active enzyme molecular masses of LCSII were about 105, 66, and 60 kDa; of LCSI, 60 and 58 kDa; and of LCSIII, approximately 76 and 68 kDa. Optimal pH for the enzymes was 7.0 for LCSI and LCSIII and 8.5 for LCSII, and the optimal temperature for all enzymes was 37°C, using α-N-ρ-tosyl-L: -arginine methyl ester as substrate. Assay of thermal stability indicated that LCSIII is the more stable enzyme. Hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and ovalbumin were hydrolyzed by LCSII and LCSI but not by LCSIII. Inhibition studies suggested that enzymes belong to the serine protease class modulated by divalent cations. Rabbit antiserum against 56-kDa serine protease of Leishmania amazonensis identified proteins in all extracts of L. chagasi. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry demonstrated that serine proteases are located in flagellar pocket region and cytoplasmic vesicles of L. chagasi promastigotes. These findings indicate that L. chagasi serine proteases differ from L. amazonensis proteases and all known flagellate proteases, but display some similarities with serine proteases from other Leishmania species, suggesting a conservation of this enzymatic activity in the genus.

  17. Photoactivated Spatiotemporally-Responsive Nanosensors of in Vivo Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Jaideep S; Jain, Piyush K; Kwong, Gabriel A; Stevens, Kelly R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-12-22

    Proteases play diverse and important roles in physiology and disease, including influencing critical processes in development, immune responses, and malignancies. Both the abundance and activity of these enzymes are tightly regulated and highly contextual; thus, in order to elucidate their specific impact on disease progression, better tools are needed to precisely monitor in situ protease activity. Current strategies for detecting protease activity are focused on functionalizing synthetic peptide substrates with reporters that emit detection signals following peptide cleavage. However, these activity-based probes lack the capacity to be turned on at sites of interest and, therefore, are subject to off-target activation. Here we report a strategy that uses light to precisely control both the location and time of activity-based sensing. We develop photocaged activity-based sensors by conjugating photolabile molecules directly onto peptide substrates, thereby blocking protease cleavage by steric hindrance. At sites of disease, exposure to ultraviolet light unveils the nanosensors to allow proteases to cleave and release a reporter fragment that can be detected remotely. We apply this spatiotemporally controlled system to probe secreted protease activity in vitro and tumor protease activity in vivo. In vitro, we demonstrate the ability to dynamically and spatially measure metalloproteinase activity in a 3D model of colorectal cancer. In vivo, veiled nanosensors are selectively activated at the primary tumor site in colorectal cancer xenografts to capture the tumor microenvironment-enriched protease activity. The ability to remotely control activity-based sensors may offer a valuable complement to existing tools for measuring biological activity.

  18. Effects of detergents on the West Nile virus protease activity.

    PubMed

    Ezgimen, Manolya D; Mueller, Niklaus H; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, R

    2009-05-01

    Detergents such as Triton X-100 are often used in drug discovery research to weed out small molecule promiscuous and non-specific inhibitors which act by aggregation in solution and undesirable precipitation in aqueous assay buffers. We evaluated the effects of commonly used detergents, Triton X-100, Tween-20, Nonidet-40 (NP-40), Brij-35, and CHAPS, on the enzymatic activity of West Nile virus (WNV) protease. Unexpectedly, Triton X-100, Tween-20, and NP-40 showed an enhancement of in vitro WNV protease activity from 2 to 2.5-fold depending on the detergent and its concentration. On the other hand, Brij-35, at 0.001% enhanced the protease activity by 1.5-fold and CHAPS had the least enhancing effect. The kinetic analysis showed that the increase in protease activity by Triton X-100 was dose-dependent. Furthermore, at Triton X-100 and Tween-20 concentrations higher than 0.001%, the inhibition of compound B, one of the lead compounds against WNV protease identified in a high throughput screen (IC(50) value of 5.7+/-2.5 microM), was reversed. However, in the presence of CHAPS, compound B still showed good inhibition of WNV protease. Our results, taken together, indicate that nonionic detergents, Triton X-100, Tween, and NP-40 are unsuitable for the purpose of discrimination of true versus promiscuous inhibitors of WNV protease in high throughput assays.

  19. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  20. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-10-01

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu2(C9H3O6)4/3 MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA.

  1. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-10-24

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu₂(C₉H₃O₆)₄/₃ MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA.

  2. Complexity in modeling and understanding protonation states: computational titration of HIV-1-protease-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Fornabaio, Micaela; Spyrakis, Francesca; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Cozzini, Pietro; Kellogg, Glen E

    2007-11-01

    The computational-titration (CT) algorithm based on the 'natural' Hydropathic INTeractions (HINT) force field is described. The HINT software model is an empirical, non-Newtonian force field derived from experimentally measured partition coefficients for solvent transfer between octanol and H(2)O (log P(o/w)). The CT algorithm allows the identification, modeling, and optimization of multiple protonation states of residues and ligand functional groups at the protein-ligand active site. The importance of taking into account pH and ionization states of residues, which strongly affect the process of ligand binding, for correctly predicting binding free energies is discussed. The application of the CT protocol to a set of six cyclic inhibitors in their complexes with HIV-1 protease is presented, and the advance of HINT as a virtual-screening tool is outlined.

  3. The serine protease domain of MASP-3: enzymatic properties and crystal structure in complex with ecotin.

    PubMed

    Gaboriaud, Christine; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Martin, Lydie; Lacroix, Monique; Serre, Laurence; Teillet, Florence; Arlaud, Gérard J; Rossi, Véronique; Thielens, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and collectin-11 are known to associate with three homologous modular proteases, the MBL-Associated Serine Proteases (MASPs). The crystal structures of the catalytic domains of MASP-1 and MASP-2 have been solved, but the structure of the corresponding domain of MASP-3 remains unknown. A link between mutations in the MASP1/3 gene and the rare autosomal recessive 3MC (Mingarelli, Malpuech, Michels and Carnevale,) syndrome, characterized by various developmental disorders, was discovered recently, revealing an unexpected important role of MASP-3 in early developmental processes. To gain a first insight into the enzymatic and structural properties of MASP-3, a recombinant form of its serine protease (SP) domain was produced and characterized. The amidolytic activity of this domain on fluorescent peptidyl-aminomethylcoumarin substrates was shown to be considerably lower than that of other members of the C1r/C1s/MASP family. The E. coli protease inhibitor ecotin bound to the SP domains of MASP-3 and MASP-2, whereas no significant interaction was detected with MASP-1, C1r and C1s. A tetrameric complex comprising an ecotin dimer and two MASP-3 SP domains was isolated and its crystal structure was solved and refined to 3.2 Å. Analysis of the ecotin/MASP-3 interfaces allows a better understanding of the differential reactivity of the C1r/C1s/MASP protease family members towards ecotin, and comparison of the MASP-3 SP domain structure with those of other trypsin-like proteases yields novel hypotheses accounting for its zymogen-like properties in vitro.

  4. The Serine Protease Domain of MASP-3: Enzymatic Properties and Crystal Structure in Complex with Ecotin

    PubMed Central

    Gaboriaud, Christine; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Martin, Lydie; Lacroix, Monique; Serre, Laurence; Teillet, Florence; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Rossi, Véronique; Thielens, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and collectin-11 are known to associate with three homologous modular proteases, the MBL-Associated Serine Proteases (MASPs). The crystal structures of the catalytic domains of MASP-1 and MASP-2 have been solved, but the structure of the corresponding domain of MASP-3 remains unknown. A link between mutations in the MASP1/3 gene and the rare autosomal recessive 3MC (Mingarelli, Malpuech, Michels and Carnevale,) syndrome, characterized by various developmental disorders, was discovered recently, revealing an unexpected important role of MASP-3 in early developmental processes. To gain a first insight into the enzymatic and structural properties of MASP-3, a recombinant form of its serine protease (SP) domain was produced and characterized. The amidolytic activity of this domain on fluorescent peptidyl-aminomethylcoumarin substrates was shown to be considerably lower than that of other members of the C1r/C1s/MASP family. The E. coli protease inhibitor ecotin bound to the SP domains of MASP-3 and MASP-2, whereas no significant interaction was detected with MASP-1, C1r and C1s. A tetrameric complex comprising an ecotin dimer and two MASP-3 SP domains was isolated and its crystal structure was solved and refined to 3.2 Å. Analysis of the ecotin/MASP-3 interfaces allows a better understanding of the differential reactivity of the C1r/C1s/MASP protease family members towards ecotin, and comparison of the MASP-3 SP domain structure with those of other trypsin-like proteases yields novel hypotheses accounting for its zymogen-like properties in vitro. PMID:23861840

  5. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  6. German cockroach frass proteases modulate the innate immune response via activation of protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Day, Scottie B; Zhou, Ping; Ledford, John R; Page, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Allergen exposure can induce an early innate immune response; however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not been addressed. In this report, we demonstrate a role for the active serine proteases in German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in modulating the innate immune response. A single exposure of GC frass induced inflammatory cytokine production and cellular infiltration in the airways of mice. In comparison, exposure to protease-depleted GC frass resulted in diminution of inflammatory cytokine production and airway neutrophilia, but had no effect on macrophage infiltration. Selective activation of PAR-2 confirmed that PAR-2 was sufficient to induce airway inflammation. Exposure of GC frass to PAR-2-deficient mice led to decreased immune responses to GC frass compared to wild-type mice. Using the macrophage as an early marker of the innate immune response, we found that GC frass induced significant release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha from primary alveolar macrophages. This effect was dependent on the intrinsic proteases in GC frass. We confirmed GC frass-induced cytokine expression was mediated by activation of NF-kappaB and ERK in a macrophage cell line. Collectively, these data suggest a central role for GC frass protease-PAR-2 activation in regulating the innate immune response through the activation of alveolar macrophages. Understanding the potential role of protease-PAR-2 activation as a danger signal or adjuvant could yield attractive therapeutic targets.

  7. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury.

    PubMed

    Berry, J N; Sharrett-Field, L J; Butler, T R; Prendergast, M A

    2012-10-11

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium (Ca(2+))-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) induced excitotoxic (20 μM NMDA) cell death and changes in synaptophysin immunoreactivity. Significant NMDA-induced cytotoxicity (as measured by propidium iodide [PI] uptake) was found in the CA1 region of the hippocampus at all timepoints examined (24, 72, 120 h), an effect significantly attenuated by co-exposure to the selective NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but not MDL-28170, a potent cysteine protease inhibitor. Results indicated sparing of NMDA-induced loss of the synaptic vesicular protein synaptophysin in all regions of the hippocampus by MDL-28170, though only at early timepoints after injury. These results suggest Ca(2+)-dependent recruitment of cysteine proteases within 24h of excitotoxic insult, but activation of alternative cellular degrading mechanisms after 24h. Further, these data suggest that synaptophysin may be a substrate for calpains and related proteases.

  8. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  9. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  10. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts.

  11. Multiplex Detection of Protease Activity with Quantum Dot Nanosensors Prepared by Intein-Mediated Specific Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zuyong; Xing, Yun; So, Min-Kyung; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Rao, Jianghong

    2009-01-01

    We report here a protease sensing nanoplatform based on semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (QD-BRET) to detect the protease activity in complex biological samples. These nanosensors consist of bioluminescent proteins as the BRET donor, quantum dots as the BRET acceptor, and protease substrates sandwiched between the two as a sensing group. An intein-mediated conjugation strategy was developed for site-specific conjugation of proteins to QDs in preparing these QD nanosensors. In this traceless ligation, the intein itself is spliced out and excluded from the final conjugation product. With this method, we have synthesized a series of QD nanosensors for highly sensitive detection of an important class of protease matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. We demonstrated that these nanosensors can detect the MMP activity in buffers and in mouse serum with the sensitivity to a few ng/ml, and secreted proteases by tumor cells. The suitability of these nanosensors for a multiplex protease assay has also been shown. PMID:18922019

  12. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  13. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  14. A Tunable, Modular Approach to Fluorescent Protease-Activated Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteases are one of the most important and historically utilized classes of drug targets. To effectively interrogate this class of proteins, which encodes nearly 2% of the human proteome, it is necessary to develop effective and cost-efficient methods that report on their activity both in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a robust reporter of caspase proteolytic activity, called caspase-activatable green fluorescent protein (CA-GFP). The caspases play central roles in homeostatic regulation, as they execute programmed cell death, and in drug design, as caspases are involved in diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. CA-GFP is a genetically encoded dark-to-bright fluorescent reporter of caspase activity in in vitro, cell-based, and animal systems. Based on the CA-GFP platform, we developed reporters that can discriminate the activities of caspase-6 and -7, two highly related proteases. A second series of reporters, activated by human rhinovirus 3C protease, demonstrated that we could alter the specificity of the reporter by reengineering the protease recognition sequence. Finally, we took advantage of the spectrum of known fluorescent proteins to generate green, yellow, cyan, and red reporters, paving the way for multiplex protease monitoring. PMID:23561537

  15. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  16. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  17. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate-peptide complex structures.

    PubMed

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Skerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-10-16

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the 'water retention site', suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG.

  18. Increased activity of unlinked Zika virus NS2B/NS3 protease compared to linked Zika virus protease.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Benjamin D; Slater, Kristin; Spellmon, Nicholas; Holcomb, Joshua; Medapureddy, Prasanna; Muzzarelli, Kendall M; Yang, Zhe; Ovadia, Reuben; Amblard, Franck; Kovari, Iulia A; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2017-03-22

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus spread by daytime-active Aedes spp. mosquitoes such as A. aegypti and A. albopictus. Previously thought to be a mild infection, the latest ZIKV outbreak in the Americas is causally associated with more severe symptoms as well as severe birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently no vaccine or antiviral exists. However, recent progress has demonstrated the viral NS2B/NS3 protease may be a suitable target for the development of small-molecule antiviral agents. To better understand the ZIKV protease, we expressed, purified, and characterized unlinked and linked NS2B/NS3 protease corresponding to an isolate from the recent outbreak in Puerto Rico. Unlinked ZIKV protease is more active and binds substrate with greater affinity than linked ZIKV protease. Therefore, we propose that unlinked ZIKV protease be used when evaluating or designing ZIKV protease inhibitors. Additionally, potent inhibitors of related viral proteases, like West Nile Virus and Dengue virus, may serve as advanced starting points to identify and develop ZIKV protease inhibitors.

  19. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian M.; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L.; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R.; Crosson, Sean; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis 1. Enterotoxigenic strains producing B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis 2 and intestinal malignancy 3, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection 4,5. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis and identify a B. fragilis protease, fragipain (Fpn), which is required for endogenous activation of BFT through removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad characteristic of C11 family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient enterotoxigenic B. fragilis is attenuated in its ability to induce sepsis, however Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, indicating a greater complexity of cellular targeting and action of BFT than previously appreciated. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains suggests this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis beyond its role in toxin activation, potentially serving as a target for disease modification. PMID:27089515

  20. Pathomimetic cancer avatars for live-cell imaging of protease activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kyungmin; Heyza, Joshua; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are essential for normal physiology as well as multiple diseases, e.g., playing a causative role in cancer progression, including in tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Identification of dynamic alterations in protease activity may allow us to detect early stage cancers and to assess the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies. Despite the clinical importance of proteases in cancer progression, their functional roles individually and within the context of complex protease networks have not yet been well defined. These gaps in our understanding might be addressed with: 1) accurate and sensitive tools and methods to directly identify changes in protease activities in live cells, and 2) pathomimetic avatars for cancer that recapitulate in vitro the tumor in the context of its cellular and non-cellular microenvironment. Such avatars should be designed to facilitate mechanistic studies that can be translated to animal models and ultimately the clinic. Here, we will describe basic principles and recent applications of live-cell imaging for identification of active proteases. The avatars optimized by our laboratory are three-dimensional (3D) human breast cancer models in a matrix of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM). They are designated mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering (MAME) models as they have been designed to mimic the structural and functional interactions among cell types in the normal and cancerous human breast. We have demonstrated the usefulness of these pathomimetic avatars for following dynamic and temporal changes in cell:cell interactions and quantifying changes in protease activity associated with these interactions in real-time (4D). We also briefly describe adaptation of the avatars to custom-designed and fabricated tissue architecture and microenvironment engineering (TAME) chambers that enhance our ability to analyze concomitant changes in the malignant phenotype and the associated tumor microenvironment.

  1. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  2. Disruption of genes involved in CORVET complex leads to enhanced secretion of heterologous carboxylesterase only in protease deficient Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Lukas; Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Aleschko, Markus; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte; Puxbaum, Verena

    2017-02-23

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (Komagataella spp.) is a popular microbial host for the production of recombinant proteins. Previous studies have shown that mis-sorting to the vacuole can be a bottleneck during production of recombinant secretory proteins in yeast, however, no information was available for P. pastoris. In this work the authors have therefore generated vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutant strains disrupted in genes involved in the CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) complex at the early stages of endosomal sorting. Both Δvps8 and Δvps21 strains contained lower extracellular amounts of heterologous carboxylesterase (CES) compared to the control strain, which could be attributed to a high proteolytic activity present in the supernatants of CORVET engineered strains due to rerouting of vacuolar proteases. Serine proteases were identified to be responsible for this proteolytic degradation by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and protease inhibitor assays. Deletion of the major cellular serine protease Prb1 in Δvps8 and Δvps21 strains did not only rescue the extracellular CES levels, but even outperformed the parental CES strain (56 and 80% higher yields, respectively). Further deletion of Ybr139W, another serine protease, did not show a further increase in secretion levels. Higher extracellular CES activity and low proteolytic activity were detected also in fed batch cultivation of Δvps21Δprb1 strains, thus confirming that modifying early steps in the vacuolar pathway has a positive impact on heterologous protein secretion.

  3. Non-proteolytic functions of microbial proteases increase pathological complexity.

    PubMed

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Tacchi, Jessica L; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-03-01

    Proteases are enzymes that catalyse hydrolysis of peptide bonds thereby controlling the shape, size, function, composition, turnover and degradation of other proteins. In microbes, proteases are often identified as important virulence factors and as such have been targets for novel drug design. It is emerging that some proteases possess additional non-proteolytic functions that play important roles in host epithelia adhesion, tissue invasion and in modulating immune responses. These additional "moonlighting" functions have the potential to obfuscate data interpretation and have implications for therapeutic design. Moonlighting enzymes comprise a subcategory of multifunctional proteins that possess at least two distinct biological functions on a single polypeptide chain. Presently, identifying moonlighting proteins relies heavily on serendipitous empirical data with clues arising from proteins lacking signal peptides that are localised to the cell surface. Here, we describe examples of microbial proteases with additional non-proteolytic functions, including streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B, PepO and C5a peptidases, mycoplasmal aminopeptidases, mycobacterial chaperones and viral papain-like proteases. We explore how these non-proteolytic functions contribute to host cell adhesion, modulate the coagulation pathway, assist in non-covalent folding of proteins, participate in cell signalling, and increase substrate repertoire. We conclude by describing how proteomics has aided in moonlighting protein discovery, focusing attention on potential moonlighters in microbial exoproteomes.

  4. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  5. Trypanosomatid cysteine protease activity may be enhanced by a kininogen-like moiety from host serum.

    PubMed Central

    Lonsdale-Eccles, J D; Mpimbaza, G W; Nkhungulu, Z R; Olobo, J; Smith, L; Tosomba, O M; Grab, D J

    1995-01-01

    African trypanosomes contain cysteine proteases (trypanopains) the activity of which can be measured by in vitro digestion of fibrinogen, after electrophoresis in fibrinogen-containing SDS/polyacrylamide gels. When assessed by this procedure, trypanopain from Trypanosoma brucei (trypanopain-Tb) is estimated to have a molecular mass of 28 kDa. However, two additional bands of trypanopain activity (87 kDa and 105 kDa) are observed if serum is added to the trypanopain before electrophoresis. Formation of the 87 and 105 kDa bands is frequently accompanied by a reduction in the intensity of the 28 kDa activity which suggests that the extra bands are complexes of the 28 kDa trypanopain-Tb and a molecule from rat serum called rat trypanopain moledulator (rTM). The rTM-induced activation of cysteine proteases is not restricted to T. brucei as it is also observed with proteases from other protozoan parasites such as bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma congolense and the mammalian-infective in vitro-derived promastigote forms of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania major. The physical properties of rTM resemble those of the kininogen family of cysteine protease inhibitors. rTM is an acidic (pI 4.7) heat-stable 68 kDa glycoprotein with 15 kDa protease-susceptible domains. This resemblance between rTM and kininogens was confirmed by the positive, albeit weak, immunoreactivity between anti-(human low-molecular-mass kininogen) antibody and rTM as well as anti-rTM antibody and human low-molecular-mass kininogen. Furthermore, commercial preparations of human-low-molecular-mass kininogen and chicken egg white cystatin mimicked rTM by forming extra bands of proteolytic activity in the presence of trypanopain-Tb. In some instances, low-molecular-mass kininogen was also observed to increase the rate of hydrolysis of 7-(benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanyl-arginyl-amido)-4- methylcoumarin by live T. brucei. Although this effect was rather erratic, in no instance was significant inhibition

  6. Serine protease SP105 activates prophenoloxidase in Asian corn borer melanization, and is regulated by serpin-3

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yuan; Hong, Fang; Liu, Qizhi; An, Chunju

    2017-01-01

    Melanization reaction, resulting from the activation of prophenoloxidase, is a vital immune response in insects for encapsulating and killing the invasive organisms. Prophenoloxidase needs to be proteolytically activated by its upstream prophenoloxidase-activating protease (PAP) in melanization. Identification and characterization of PAPs facilitates the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in insect immunity. We here cloned a full-length cDNA for a serine protease, named as SP105, from Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée). The open reading frame of SP105 encodes 424-amino acid residue protein with a 19-residue signal peptide. Sequence comparison indicates that SP105 is most similar to Manduca sexta PAP3, a defined prophenoloxidase-activating protease. qRT-PCR analysis showed that SP105 mRNA levels increased significantly after a bacterial injection. Recombinant SP105 directly cleaved and activated Asian corn borer prophenoloxidase and therefore acted as the prophenoloxidase-activating protease. Additionally, SP105 formed SDS-stable complexes with a serine protease inhibitor, serpin-3, and its activity in activating prophenoloxidase was efficiently inhibited by serpin-3. Our work thus illustrated a prophenoloxidase-activating protease and revealed its regulation by serpin-3. The results would allow further advances in the understanding of the melanization in Asian corn borer and other insects. PMID:28358031

  7. Luminal Cathepsin G and Protease-Activated Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Dabek, Marta; Ferrier, Laurent; Roka, Richard; Gecse, Krisztina; Annahazi, Anita; Moreau, Jacques; Escourrou, Jean; Cartier, Christel; Chaumaz, Gilles; Leveque, Mathilde; Ait-Belgnaoui, Afifa; Wittmann, Tibor; Theodorou, Vassilia; Bueno, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Impairment of the colonic epithelial barrier and neutrophil infiltration are common features of inflammatory bowel disease. Luminal proteases affect colonic permeability through protease-activated receptors (PARs). We evaluated: (i) whether fecal supernatants from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) trigger alterations of colonic paracellular permeability and inflammation, and (ii) the roles of cathepsin G (Cat-G), a neutrophil serine protease, and its selective receptor, PAR4, in these processes. Expression levels of both PAR4 and Cat-G were determined in colonic biopsies from UC and healthy subjects. The effects of UC fecal supernatants on colonic paracellular permeability were measured in murine colonic strips. Involvement of Cat-G and PAR4 was evaluated using pepducin P4pal-10 and specific Cat-G inhibitor (SCGI), respectively. In addition, the effect of PAR4-activating peptide was assessed. UC fecal supernatants, either untreated or pretreated with SCGI, were infused into mice, and myeloperoxidase activity was determined. PAR4 was found to be overexpressed in UC colonic biopsies. Increased colonic paracellular permeability that was triggered by UC fecal supernatants was blocked by both SCGI (77%) and P4pal-10 (85%). Intracolonic infusion of UC fecal supernatants into mice increased myeloperoxidase activity. This effect was abolished by SCGI. These observations support that both Cat-G and PAR4 play key roles in generating and/or amplifying relapses in UC and provide a rationale for the development of new therapeutic agents in the treatment of this disease. PMID:19528350

  8. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  9. Evolution of the protease-activated receptor family in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    JIN, MIN; YANG, HAI-WEI; TAO, AI-LIN; WEI, JI-FU

    2016-01-01

    Belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPcr) family, the protease-activated receptors (Pars) consist of 4 members, PAR1-4. PARs mediate the activation of cells via thrombin, serine and other proteases. Such protease-triggered signaling events are thought to be critical for hemostasis, thrombosis and other normal pathological processes. In the present study, we examined the evolution of PARs by analyzing phylogenetic trees, chromosome location, selective pressure and functional divergence based on the 169 functional gene alignment sequences from 57 vertebrate gene sequences. We found that the 4 PARs originated from 4 invertebrate ancestors by phylogenetic trees analysis. The selective pressure results revealed that only PAR1 appeared by positive selection during its evolution, while the other PAR members did not. In addition, we noticed that although these PARs evolved separately, the results of functional divergence indicated that their evolutional rates were similar and their functions did not significantly diverge. The findings of our study provide valuable insight into the evolutionary history of the vertebrate PAR family. PMID:26820116

  10. Expression and activation of proteases in co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2011-01-01

    The present study concerned the expression and activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the urokinase plasminogen activator/urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPA/uPAR) system in co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids (HT29, LS180, SW948) with human normal colon epithelium (CCD 841 CoTr), myofibroblasts (CCD-18Co) and endothelial cells (HUVEC). Additionally, the influence of monensin on the production and function of the proteases was tested. Tumor cells expressed small amounts of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA. Normal cells generally produced proportionally higher concentrations of these proteases (especially MMP-2, compared with significantly smaller yields of MMP-9 and significantly lower amounts of uPAR than tumors. In co-cultures of tumor spheroids with normal cell monolayers, the concentration of the proteases was equal to the sum of the enzymes produced in monocultures of both types of cells. The highest activity of uPA, measured as the reduction of the chromogenic substrate (S-2444), was detected in supernatants and lysates of endothelial cells. Interestingly, in normal cells, the higher expression of proteases, mainly uPA, measured as the level of protein concentration, was closely linked with their lower activity and inversely, in tumor cells, the low level of the expression of the enzymes correlated with their high enzymatic activity. In zymography analysis, mainly pro-MMPs were detected both in culture supernatants and cell lysates. The highest amounts of active forms of the MMPs were detected in tumor spheroids co-cultured with endothelial cells. Monensin inhibited MMPs and uPA secretion but significantly increased uPAR release, mainly from normal cells. In conclusion, during direct interactions of tumor cells with normal cells, MMPs and the uPA/uPAR system play an important role in the degradation of ECM and tumor development, but as we found, there is a reverse relationship between the concentration and the

  11. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  12. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  13. Crystal structure of a complex between Serratia marcescens metallo-protease and an inhibitor from Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Baumann, U; Bauer, M; Létoffé, S; Delepelaire, P; Wandersman, C

    1995-05-05

    The crystal structure of the complex between the 50 kDa metallo-endoproteinase from Serratia marcescens (SMP), a member of the metzincin superfamily, and an inhibitor from Erwinia chrysanthemi (Inh) was solved by molecular replacement using the known structure of SMP, and refined at 2.30 A resolution to a crystallographic R-factor of 0.195. The E. chrysanthemi inhibitor folds into a compact eight-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel of simple up-down topology such as is found for members of the retinol binding protein family. It mainly interacts with the protease via its five N-terminal residues, which insert into the active site cleft, occupying the S' sites. The first N-terminal residue, SerI1, is partially cleaved off by the protease, while SerI2 makes a hydrogen bond with the catalytically active glutamic acid, Glu177, of the protease. Further interactions are made between one face of the inhibitor formed by the strands s3, s4 and s5 and the protease segment 218 to 228, which is located immediately after the characteristic "Met-turn" of the metzincins.

  14. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  15. Botulinum neurotoxin devoid of receptor binding domain translocates active protease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Audrey; Mushrush, Darren J; Lacy, D Borden; Montal, Mauricio

    2008-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes flaccid paralysis by disabling synaptic exocytosis. Intoxication requires the tri-modular protein to undergo conformational changes in response to pH and redox gradients across endosomes, leading to the formation of a protein-conducting channel. The approximately 50 kDa light chain (LC) protease is translocated into the cytosol by the approximately 100 kDa heavy chain (HC), which consists of two modules: the N-terminal translocation domain (TD) and the C-terminal Receptor Binding Domain (RBD). Here we exploited the BoNT modular design to identify the minimal requirements for channel activity and LC translocation in neurons. Using the combined detection of substrate proteolysis and single-channel currents, we showed that a di-modular protein consisting only of LC and TD was sufficient to translocate active protease into the cytosol of target cells. The RBD is dispensable for cell entry, channel activity, or LC translocation; however, it determined a pH threshold for channel formation. These findings indicate that, in addition to its individual functions, each module acts as a chaperone for the others, working in concert to achieve productive intoxication.

  16. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-07-15

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30-40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors.

  17. ATP-dependent Lon protease controls tumor bioenergetics by reprogramming mitochondrial activity.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Pedro M; Español, Yaiza; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Rodríguez, Francisco; Bárcena, Clea; Watanabe, Kenta; Calvo, Enrique; Loureiro, Marta; Fernández-García, M Soledad; Fueyo, Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Enríquez, José Antonio; López-Otín, Carlos

    2014-07-24

    We generated mice deficient in Lon protease (LONP1), a major enzyme of the mitochondrial quality control machinery. Homozygous deletion of Lonp1 causes early embryonic lethality, whereas its haploinsufficiency protects against colorectal and skin tumors. Furthermore, LONP1 knockdown inhibits cellular proliferation and tumor and metastasis formation, whereas its overexpression increases tumorigenesis. Clinical studies indicate that high levels of LONP1 are a poor prognosis marker in human colorectal cancer and melanoma. Additionally, functional analyses show that LONP1 plays a key role in metabolic reprogramming by remodeling OXPHOS complexes and protecting against senescence. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of LONP1 for cellular and organismal viability and identify this protease as a central regulator of mitochondrial activity in oncogenesis.

  18. Structural Insights into the Activation and Inhibition of Histo-Aspartic Protease from Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Xiao, Huogen; Hidaka, Koushi; Gustchina, Alla; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Yada, Rickey Y.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-09-17

    Histo-aspartic protease (HAP) from Plasmodium falciparum is a promising target for the development of novel antimalarial drugs. The sequence of HAP is highly similar to those of pepsin-like aspartic proteases, but one of the two catalytic aspartates, Asp32, is replaced with histidine. Crystal structures of the truncated zymogen of HAP and of the complex of the mature enzyme with inhibitor KNI-10395 have been determined at 2.1 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. As in other proplasmepsins, the propeptide of the zymogen interacts with the C-terminal domain of the enzyme, forcing the N- and C-terminal domains apart, thereby separating His32 and Asp215 and preventing formation of the mature active site. In the inhibitor complex, the enzyme forms a tight domain-swapped dimer, not previously seen in any aspartic proteases. The inhibitor is found in an unprecedented conformation resembling the letter U, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Surprisingly, the location and conformation of the inhibitor are similar to those of the fragment of helix 2 comprising residues 34p-38p in the prosegments of the zymogens of gastric aspartic proteases; a corresponding helix assumes a vastly different orientation in proplasmepsins. Each inhibitor molecule is in contact with two molecules of HAP, interacting with the carboxylate group of the catalytic Asp215 of one HAP protomer through a water molecule, while also making a direct hydrogen bond to Glu278A' of the other protomer. A comparison of the shifts in the positions of the catalytic residues in the inhibitor complex presented here with those published previously gives further hints regarding the enzymatic mechanism of HAP.

  19. Conformational transition of the lid helix covering the protease active site is essential for the ATP-dependent protease activity of FtsH.

    PubMed

    Suno, Ryoji; Shimoyama, Masakazu; Abe, Akiko; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Shimodate, Natsuka; Watanabe, Yo-hei; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-09-21

    When bound to ADP, ATP-dependent protease FtsH subunits adopt either an "open" or "closed" conformation. In the open state, the protease catalytic site is located in a narrow space covered by a lidlike helix. This space disappears in the closed form because the lid helix bends at Gly448. Here, we replaced Gly448 with various residues that stabilize helices. Most mutants retained low ATPase activity and bound to the substrate protein, but lost protease activity. However, a mutant proline substitution lost both activities. Our study shows that the conformational transition of the lid helix is essential for the function of FtsH.

  20. The protease activity of the paracaspase MALT1 is controlled by monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Christiane; Cabalzar, Katrin; Wolf, Annette; Gonzalez, Montserrat; Lenz, Georg; Thome, Margot

    2013-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase MALT1 is central to lymphocyte activation and lymphomagenesis, but how this activity is controlled remains unknown. Here we identify a monoubiquitination of MALT1 on Lys644 that activated the protease function of MALT1. Monoubiquitinated MALT1 had enhanced protease activity, whereas a ubiquitination-deficient MALT1 mutant with replacement of that lysine with arginine (MALT1(K644R)) had less protease activity, which correlated with impaired induction of interleukin 2 (IL-2) via the T cell antigen receptor in activated T cells. Expression of MALT1(K644R) diminished the survival of cells derived from diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the activated B cell-like subtype (ABC DLBCL), which require constitutive protease activity of MALT1 for survival. Thus, monoubiquitination of MALT1 is essential for its catalytic activation and is therefore a potential target for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL and for immunomodulation.

  1. Recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of cold-active microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Kuddus, Mohammed; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2012-11-01

    Microbial proteases that occupy a pivotal position with respect to their commercial applications are most important hydrolytic enzymes and have been studied extensively since the advent of enzymology. Cold-adapted microorganisms are potential source of cold-active proteases and they have been isolated from the cold regions. Although there are many microbial sources available for producing proteases, only few are recognized as commercial producer. Cold-active proteases along with their producing microbes are of commercial value and find multiple applications in various industrial and biotechnological sectors such as additives in detergents, additives in food industries, environmental bioremediations, biotransformation and molecular biology applications. Therefore, cold-active proteases are the enzymes of choice for many biotechnologists, microbiologists, biochemists, environmentalists and biochemical engineers. In the present review, we discuss some novel sources along with recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of cold-active microbial proteases.

  2. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  3. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  4. A Novel Apoptotic Protease Activated in Human Breast Cancer Cells After Poisoning Topoisomerase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    tocopherol, N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) or pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC)) did not significantly affect lethality caused by B-lap exposure (data not...will be required for the cloning of this novel noncaspase cysteine protease. The new hypothesis being tested is that B- lap activates calpain, which...caspase cysteine protease was activated within 4-8 hours, concomitant with the appearance of DNA fragmentation, measured by TUNEL assays; (e) protease

  5. Serpin1 and WSCP differentially regulate the activity of the cysteine protease RD21 during plant development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Sachin; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Reinbothe, Christiane; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2017-02-28

    Proteolytic enzymes (proteases) participate in a vast range of physiological processes, ranging from nutrient digestion to blood coagulation, thrombosis, and beyond. In plants, proteases are implicated in host recognition and pathogen infection, induced defense (immunity), and the deterrence of insect pests. Because proteases irreversibly cleave peptide bonds of protein substrates, their activity must be tightly controlled in time and space. Here, we report an example of how nature evolved alternative mechanisms to fine-tune the activity of a cysteine protease dubbed RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21). One mechanism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana studied here comprises irreversible inhibition of RD21's activity by Serpin1, whereas the other mechanism is a result of the reversible inhibition of RD21 activity by a Kunitz protease inhibitor named water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP). Activity profiling, complex isolation, and homology modeling data revealed unique interactions of RD21 with Serpin1 and WSCP, respectively. Expression studies identified only partial overlaps in Serpin1 and WSCP accumulation that explain how RD21 contributes to the innate immunity of mature plants and arthropod deterrence of seedlings undergoing skotomorphogenesis and greening.

  6. Activity of purified hepatitis C virus protease NS3 on peptide substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Steinkühler, C; Urbani, A; Tomei, L; Biasiol, G; Sardana, M; Bianchi, E; Pessi, A; De Francesco, R

    1996-01-01

    The protease domain of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS3 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to be active on peptides derived from the sequence of the NS4A-NS4B junction. Experiments were carried out to optimize protease activity. Buffer requirements included the presence of detergent, glycerol, and dithiothreitol, pH between 7.5 and 8.5, and low ionic strength. C- and N-terminal deletion experiments defined a peptide spanning from the P6 to the P4' residue as a suitable substrate. Cleavage kinetics were subsequently measured by using decamer P6-P4' peptides corresponding to all intermolecular cleavage sites of the HCV polyprotein. The following order of cleavage efficiency, in terms of kcat/Km, was determined: NS5A-NS5B > NS4A-NS4B >> NS4B-NS5A. A 14-mer peptide containing residues 21 to 34 of the protease cofactor NS4A (Pep4A 21-34), when added in stoichiometric amounts, was shown to increase cleavage rates of all peptides, the largest effect (100-fold) being observed on the hydrolysis of the NS4B-NS5A decamer. From the kinetic analysis of cleavage data, we conclude that (i) primary structure is an important determinant of the efficiency with which each site is cleaved during polyprotein processing, (ii) slow cleavage of the NS4B-NS5A site in the absence of NS4A is due to low binding affinity of the enzyme for this site, and (iii) formation of a 1:1 complex between the protease and Pep4A 21-34 is sufficient and required for maximum activation. PMID:8794305

  7. Activation of specific apoptotic caspases with an engineered small-molecule-activated protease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Daniel C; Mahrus, Sami; Wells, James A

    2010-08-20

    Apoptosis is a conserved cellular pathway that results in the activation of cysteine-aspartyl proteases, or caspases. To dissect the nonredundant roles of the executioner caspase-3, -6, and -7 in orchestrating apoptosis, we have developed an orthogonal protease to selectively activate each isoform in human cells. Our approach uses a split-tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease under small-molecule control, which we call the SNIPer, with caspase alleles containing genetically encoded TEV cleavage sites. These studies reveal that all three caspases are transiently activated but only activation of caspase-3 or -7 is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Proteomic analysis shown here and from others reveals that 20 of the 33 subunits of the 26S proteasome can be cut by caspases, and we demonstrate synergy between proteasome inhibition and dose-dependent caspase activation. We propose a model of proteolytic reciprocal negative regulation with mechanistic implications for the combined clinical use of proteasome inhibitors and proapoptotic drugs.

  8. Construction, expression, and characterization of a novel fully activated recombinant single-chain hepatitis C virus protease.

    PubMed Central

    Taremi, S. S.; Beyer, B.; Maher, M.; Yao, N.; Prosise, W.; Weber, P. C.; Malcolm, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    Efficient proteolytic processing of essential junctions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein requires a heterodimeric complex of the NS3 bifunctional protease/helicase and the NS4A accessory protein. A single-chain recombinant form of the protease has been constructed in which NS4A residues 21-32 (GSVVIVGRIILS) were fused in frame to the amino terminus of the NS3 protease domain (residues 3-181) through a tetrapeptide linker. The single-chain recombinant protease has been overexpressed as a soluble protein in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by a combination of metal chelate and size-exclusion chromatography. The single-chain recombinant protease domain shows full proteolytic activity cleaving the NS5A-5B synthetic peptide substrate, DTEDVVCCSMSYTWTGK with a Km and k(cat) of 20.0 +/- 2.0 microM and 9.6 +/- 2.0 min(-1), respectively; parameters identical to those of the authentic NS3(1-631)/NS4A(1-54) protein complex generated in eukaryotic cells (Sali DL et al., 1998, Biochemistry 37:3392-3401). PMID:9792101

  9. Serum proteases alter the antigenicity of peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1992-01-01

    Any effect of serum on the antigenicity of peptides is potentially relevant to their use as immunogens in vivo. Here we demonstrate that serum contains distinct proteases that can increase or decrease the antigenicity of peptides. By using a functional assay, we show that a serum component other than beta 2-microglobulin enhances the presentation of ovalbumin peptides produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Three features of this serum activity implicate proteolysis: it is temperature dependent, it results in increased antigenicity in a low molecular weight peptide fraction, and it is inhibited by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. Conversely, presentation of the synthetic peptide OVA-(257-264) is inhibited by serum. This inhibition is unaffected by leupeptin but is blocked by bestatin, a protease inhibitor with distinct substrate specificities. Implications for peptide-based vaccine design and immunotherapy are discussed. PMID:1518868

  10. OMP peptides activate the DegS stress-sensor protease by a relief of inhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A; Sauer, Robert T

    2009-10-14

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  11. OMP Peptides Activate the DegS Stress-Sensor Protease by a Relief of Inhibition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; MIT

    2010-03-19

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  12. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment.

  13. Bacterial proteases and virulence.

    PubMed

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host.

  14. A novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Iketani, Aya; Nakamura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Yuya; Awai, Koichiro; Shioi, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    A serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from basidiocarps of the edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes was characterized. The protease was purified to near homogeneity by three steps of chromatography using acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Ac-YVAD-MCA) as a substrate. The enzyme was termed FvSerP (F. velutipes serine protease). This enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the caspase-specific inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CHO, as well as moderately inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Based on the N-terminal sequence, the cDNA of FvSerP was identified. The deduced protease sequence was a peptide composed of 325 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of FvSerP showed similarity to neither caspases nor to the plant subtilisin-like serine protease with caspase-like activity called saspase. FvSerP shared identity to the functionally unknown genes from class of Agaricomycetes, with similarity to the peptidase S41 domain of a serine protease. It was thus concluded that this enzyme is likely a novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities belonging to the peptidase S41 family and distributed in the class Agaricomycetes. This enzyme possibly functions in autolysis, a type of programmed cell death that occurs in the later stages of development of basidiocarps with reference to their enzymatic functions.

  15. The crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease 1 from Candida parapsilosis in complex with pepstatin A

    SciTech Connect

    Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Sieglová, Irena; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2010-09-01

    Opportunistic pathogens of the genus Candida cause infections representing a major threat to long-term survival of immunocompromised patients. Virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by production of extracellular proteolytic enzymes and secreted aspartic proteases (Saps) are therefore studied as potential virulence factors and possible targets for therapeutic drug design. Candida parapsilosis is less invasive than C. albicans, however, it is one of the leading causative agents of yeast infections. We report three-dimensional crystal structure of Sapp1p from C. parapsilosis in complex with pepstatin A, the classical inhibitor of aspartic proteases. The structure of Sapp1p was determined from protein isolated from its natural source and represents the first structure of Sap from C. parapsilosis. Overall fold and topology of Sapp1p is very similar to the archetypic fold of monomeric aspartic protease family and known structures of Sap isoenzymes from C. albicans and Sapt1p from C. tropicalis. Structural comparison revealed noticeable differences in the structure of loops surrounding the active site. This resulted in differential character, shape, and size of the substrate binding site explaining divergent substrate specificities and inhibitor affinities. Determination of structures of Sap isoenzymes from various species might contribute to the development of new Sap-specific inhibitors.

  16. The Serine Protease HhoA from Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Substrate Specificity and Formation of a Hexameric Complex Are Regulated by the PDZ Domain▿

    PubMed Central

    Huesgen, Pitter F.; Scholz, Philipp; Adamska, Iwona

    2007-01-01

    Enzymes of the ATP-independent Deg serine endopeptidase family are very flexible with regard to their substrate specificity. Some family members cleave only one substrate, while others act as general proteases on unfolded substrates. The proteolytic activity of Deg proteases is regulated by PDZ protein interaction domains. Here we characterized the HhoA protease from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in vitro using several recombinant protein constructs. The proteolytic activity of HhoA was found to increase with temperature and basic pH and was stimulated by the addition of Mg2+ or Ca2+. We found that the single PDZ domain of HhoA played a critical role in regulating protease activity and in the assembly of a hexameric complex. Deletion of the PDZ domain strongly reduced proteolysis of a sterically challenging resorufin-labeled casein substrate, but unlabeled β-casein was still degraded. Reconstitution of the purified HhoA with total membrane proteins isolated from Synechocystis sp. wild-type strain PCC 6803 and a ΔhhoA mutant resulted in specific degradation of selected proteins at elevated temperatures. We concluded that a single PDZ domain of HhoA plays a critical role in defining the protease activity and oligomerization state, combining the functions that are attributed to two PDZ domains in the homologous DegP protease from Escherichia coli. Based on this first enzymatic study of a Deg protease from cyanobacteria, we propose a general role for HhoA in the quality control of extracytoplasmic proteins, including membrane proteins, in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. PMID:17616590

  17. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival.

  18. Mapping inhibitor binding modes on an active cysteine protease via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory M; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H; Craik, Charles S

    2012-12-18

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We report an autoinduction methodology that provides soluble cruzain in high yields (>30 mg/L in minimal medium). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based ligand mapping. Using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective [(15)N]Cys, [(15)N]His, and [(13)C]Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low-molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verified that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely, covalent, noncovalent, and noninteracting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies.

  19. Inactivation of chemotactic activity of C5a by the serratial 56-kilodalton protease.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, T; Kojima, Y; Akaike, T; Ijiri, S; Molla, A; Maeda, H

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the 56-kilodalton protease (56K protease) from Serratia marcescens on complement-derived chemotactic activity were examined. Fresh human serum was incubated with zymosan to produce C5a. This activated serum was then incubated with various concentrations of 56K protease, and the chemotactic activity of mouse peritoneal exudate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages was evaluated. A significant dose-dependent decrease of chemotactic activity was observed after protease treatment. Furthermore, treatment of human recombinant C5a with 56K protease at a dose of 1.0 microgram/ml resulted in a complete loss of chemotactic activity. When the living bacteria of the virulent strain, which produced about 10 times more protease than did the less virulent strain, were injected intraperitoneally into mice, the magnitude of infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity was much lower than that caused by the less virulent strain. Because complement-dependent chemotactic activity is an initial response to bacterial infection, these results suggest indirect pathogenic functions of serratial proteases that suppress chemotactic activity. PMID:1691142

  20. Role of Hsp100/Clp Protease Complexes in Controlling the Regulation of Motility in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Molière, Noël; Hoßmann, Jörn; Schäfer, Heinrich; Turgay, Kürşad

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp100/Clp protease complexes of Bacillus subtilis ClpXP and ClpCP are involved in the control of many interconnected developmental and stress response regulatory networks, including competence, redox stress response, and motility. Here we analyzed the role of regulatory proteolysis by ClpXP and ClpCP in motility development. We have demonstrated that ClpXP acts on the regulation of motility by controlling the levels of the oxidative and heat stress regulator Spx. We obtained evidence that upon oxidative stress Spx not only induces the thiol stress response, but also transiently represses the transcription of flagellar genes. Furthermore, we observed that in addition to the known impact of ClpCP via the ComK/FlgM-dependent pathway, ClpCP also affects flagellar gene expression via modulating the activity and levels of the global regulator DegU-P. This adds another layer to the intricate involvement of Clp mediated regulatory proteolysis in different gene expression programs, which may allow to integrate and coordinate different signals for a better-adjusted response to the changing environment of B. subtilis cells. PMID:27014237

  1. Characterization of the protease activity that cleaves the extracellular domain of {beta}-dystroglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Di; Saito, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuko; Nakamura, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro . E-mail: k-matsu@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp

    2006-06-30

    Dystroglycan (DG) complex, composed of {alpha}DG and {beta}DG, provides a link between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cortical cytoskeleton. Although the proteolytic processing of {beta}DG was reported in various physiological and pathological conditions, its exact mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue using the cell culture system of rat schwannoma cell line RT4. We found that the culture medium of RT4 cells was enriched with the protease activity that degrades the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of {beta}DG specifically. This activity was suppressed by the inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, but not by the inhibitors of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-8, and MMP-13. Zymography and RT-PCR analysis showed that RT4 cells secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 into the culture medium. Finally, active MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymes degraded the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of {beta}DG. These results indicate (1) that RT4 cells secrete the protease activity that degrades the extracellular domain of {beta}DG specifically and (2) that MMP-2 and MMP-9 may be involved in this process.

  2. Structural basis for dual-inhibition mechanism of a non-classical Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor from horseshoe crab in complex with subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Rajesh T; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki = 1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1∶2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  3. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Rajesh T.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J.; Kursula, Petri

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki=1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1:2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  4. Protoporphyrins Enhance Oligomerization and Enzymatic Activity of HtrA1 Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hakryul; Patterson, Victoria; Stoessel, Sean; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Hoh, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), a secreted serine protease of the HtrA family, is associated with a multitude of human diseases. However, the exact functions of HtrA1 in these diseases remain poorly understood. We seek to unravel the mechanisms of HtrA1 by elucidating its interactions with chemical or biological modulators. To this end, we screened a small molecule library of 500 bioactive compounds to identify those that alter the formation of extracellular HtrA1 complexes in the cell culture medium. An initial characterization of two novel hits from this screen showed that protoporphyrin IX (PPP-IX), a precursor in the heme biosynthetic pathway, and its metalloporphyrin (MPP) derivatives fostered the oligomerization of HtrA1 by binding to the protease domain. As a result of the interaction with MPPs, the proteolytic activity of HtrA1 against Fibulin-5, a specific HtrA1 substrate in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), was increased. This physical interaction could be abolished by the missense mutations of HtrA1 found in patients with cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL). Furthermore, knockdown of HtrA1 attenuated apoptosis induced by PPP-IX. These results suggest that PPP-IX, or its derivatives, and HtrA1 may function as co-factors whereby porphyrins enhance oligomerization and the protease activity of HtrA1, while active HtrA1 elevates the pro-apoptotic actions of porphyrin derivatives. Further analysis of this interplay may shed insights into the pathogenesis of diseases such as AMD, CARASIL and protoporphyria, as well as effective therapeutic development. PMID:25506911

  5. Studies of a calcium-activated neutral protease from chicken skeletal muscle. I. Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ishiura, S; Murofushi, H; Suzuki, K; Imahori, K

    1978-07-01

    A calcium-activated neutral protease was purified 2,700-fold over the crude extract from chicken skeletal muscle. The purified protease migrated as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with or without SDS. Its molecular weight was 80,000 and pH optimum for activity was 7.7. The activity required strictly the presence of calcium (optimum concentration: 1.8 mM) or strontium (optimum concentration: 10 mM) ions. The protease was inhibited by leupeptin, which is known to be a strong inhibitor of papain, cathepsin B, trypsin, and plasmin.

  6. Protease activation of the entomocidal protoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R E; Bibilos, M M; Bulla, L A

    1985-10-01

    Two isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were examined which produced different levels of intracellular proteases. Although the crystals from both strains had comparable toxicity, one of the strains, LB1, had a strong polypeptide band at 68,000 molecular weight in the protein from the crystal; in the other, HD251, no such band was evident. When the intracellular proteases in both strains were measured, strain HD251 produced less than 10% of the proteolytic activity found in LB1. These proteases were primarily neutral metalloproteases, although low levels of other proteases were detected. In LB1, the synthesis of protease increased as the cells began to sporulate; however, in HD251, protease activity appeared much later in the sporulation cycle. The protease activity in strain LB1 was very high when the cells were making crystal toxin, whereas in HD251 reduced proteolytic activity was present during crystal toxin synthesis. The insecticidal toxin (molecular weight, 68,000) from both strains could be prepared by cleaving the protoxin (molecular weight, 135,000) with trypsin, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The procedure described gave quantitative recovery of toxic activity, and approximately half of the total protein was recovered. Calculations show that these results correspond to stoichiometric conversion of protoxin to insecticidal toxin. The toxicities of whole crystals, soluble crystal protein, and purified toxin from both strains were comparable.

  7. Pharmacological properties and pathophysiological significance of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (Rusvikunin-II) and its protein complex (Rusvikunin complex) purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2014-10-01

    A 7.1 kDa basic peptide (Rusvikunin-II) was purified from a previously described protein complex (Rusvikunin complex, consists of Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) of Daboia russelii russelii venom. The N-terminal sequence of Rusvikunin-II was found to be blocked, but peptide mass fingerprinting analysis indicated its identity as Kunitz-type basic protease inhibitor 2, previously reported from Russell's Viper venom. A tryptic peptide sequence of Rusvikunin-II containing the N-terminal sequence HDRPTFCNLFPESGR demonstrated significant sequence homology to venom basic protease inhibitors, Kunitz-type protease inhibitors and trypsin inhibitors. The secondary structure of Rusvikunin-II was dominated by β-sheets (60.4%), followed by random coil (38.2%), whereas α-helix (1.4%) contributes the least to its secondary structure. Both Rusvikunin-II and the Rusvikunin complex demonstrated dose-dependent anticoagulant activity; however, the anticoagulant potency of latter was found to be higher. Both inhibited the amidolytic activity of trypsin > plasmin > FXa, fibrinogen clotting activity of thrombin, and, to a lesser extent, the prothrombin activation property of FXa; however, the inhibitory effect of the Rusvikunin complex was more pronounced. Neither Rusvikunin-II nor Rusvikunin complex inhibited the amidolytic activity of chymotrypsin and thrombin. Rusvikunin-II at 10 μg/ml was not cytotoxic to Colo-205, MCF-7 or 3T3 cancer cells; conversely, Rusvikunin complex showed ∼30% reduction of MCF-7 cells under identical experimental conditions. Rusvikunin-II (5.0 mg/kg body weight, i.p. injection) was not lethal to mice or House Geckos; nevertheless, it showed in vivo anticoagulant action in mice. However, the Rusvikunin complex (at 5.0 mg/kg) was toxic to NSA mice, but not to House Geckos, suggesting it has prey-specific toxicity. Rusvikunin complex-treated mice exhibited dyspnea and hind-limb paresis prior to death. The present study indicates that the Kunitz

  8. A Biocompatible “Split Luciferin” Reaction and its Application for Non-Invasive Bioluminescent Imaging of Protease Activity in Living Animals

    PubMed Central

    Godinat, Aurélien; Budin, Ghyslain; Molares, Alma R.; Park, Hyo Min; Sanman, Laura E.; Bogyo, Matthew; Yu, Allen; Stahl, Andreas; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    The great complexity of many human pathologies such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases requires new tools for studies of biological processes on the whole organism level. The discovery of novel biocompatible reactions has tremendously advanced our understanding of basic biology, however, no efficient tools exist for real-time non-invasive imaging of many human proteases that play very important roles in multiple human disorders. We recently reported that “split luciferin” biocompatible reaction represents a valuable tool for evaluation of protease activity directly in living animals using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Since BLI is the most sensitive in vivo imaging modality known to date, this method can be widely applied for the evaluation of multiple proteases activity as well as identification of their new peptide-specific substrates. In this protocol we describe several applications of this “split luciferin” reaction for quantification of protease activities in test tube assays and living animals. PMID:25205565

  9. Serotype-Specific Structural Differences in the Protease-Cofactor Complexes of the Dengue Virus Family

    SciTech Connect

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Daudenarde, Sophie; Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Cornillez-Ty, Cromwell; Kuhn, Peter

    2010-03-04

    With an estimated 40% of the world population at risk, dengue poses a significant threat to human health, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Preventative and curative efforts, such as vaccine development and drug discovery, face additional challenges due to the occurrence of four antigenically distinct serotypes of the causative dengue virus (DEN1 to -4). Complex immune responses resulting from repeat assaults by the different serotypes necessitate simultaneous targeting of all forms of the virus. One of the promising targets for drug development is the highly conserved two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3, which plays an essential role in viral replication by processing the viral precursor polyprotein into functional proteins. In this paper, we report the 2.1-{angstrom} crystal structure of the DEN1 NS2B hydrophilic core (residues 49 to 95) in complex with the NS3 protease domain (residues 1 to 186) carrying an internal deletion in the N terminus (residues 11 to 20). While the overall folds within the protease core are similar to those of DEN2 and DEN4 proteases, the conformation of the cofactor NS2B is dramatically different from those of other flaviviral apoprotease structures. The differences are especially apparent within its C-terminal region, implicated in substrate binding. The structure reveals for the first time serotype-specific structural elements in the dengue virus family, with the reported alternate conformation resulting from a unique metal-binding site within the DEN1 sequence. We also report the identification of a 10-residue stretch within NS3pro that separates the substrate-binding function from the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme. Implications for broad-spectrum drug discovery are discussed.

  10. Single Cell Analysis of Leukocyte Protease Activity Using Integrated Continuous-Flow Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Jing, Tengyang; Lai, Zhangxing; Wu, Lidan; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-12-06

    Leukocytes are the essential cells of the immune system that protect the human body against bacteria, viruses, and other foreign invaders. Secretory products of individual leukocytes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAMs), are critical for regulating the inflammatory response and mediating host defense. Conventional single cell analytical methods, such as flow cytometry for cellular surface biomarker studies, are insufficient for performing functional assays of the protease activity of individual leukocytes. Here, an integrated continuous-flow microfluidic assay is developed to effectively detect secretory protease activity of individual viable leukocytes. Leukocytes in blood are first washed on-chip with defined buffer to remove background activity, followed by encapsulating individual leukocytes with protease sensors in water-in-oil droplets and incubating for 1 h to measure protease secretion. With this design, single leukocyte protease profiles under naive and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated conditions are reliably measured. It is found that PMA treatment not only elevates the average protease activity level but also reduces the cellular heterogeneity in protease secretion, which is important in understanding immune capability and the disease condition of individual patients.

  11. Surface-associated MUC5B mucins promote protease activity in Lactobacillus fermentum biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucosal surfaces are coated with layers of mucus gel that protect the underlying tissues and promote colonization by members of the commensal microflora. Lactobacillus fermentum is a common inhabitant of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts and is one of the most important lactic acid bacteria contributing to the formation of a healthy intestinal microflora. We have investigated the proteolytic activity in L. fermentum in response to interactions with the MUC5B mucin, which is a major component of mucus gels at sites colonized by this micro-organism. Methods Biofilms of Lactobacillus fermentum were established in mini-flow cells in the presence or absence of human salivary MUC5B. The proteolytic activity of biofilm cells was examined in a confocal scanning laser microscope with a fluorescent protease substrate. Degradation of MUC5B by L. fermentum was analysed using SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting with antisera raised against the MUC5B peptide. Cell surface proteins differentialy expressed in a MUC5B-rich environment were identified with the aid of comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS. Results Lactobacillus fermentum adhered well to surfaces coated with MUC5B mucin and in biofilms of L. fermentum formed in a MUC5B environment, the proportion of proteolytically-active cells (47 ± 0.6% of the population), as shown by cleavage of a fluorescent casein substrate, was significantly greater (p < 0.01) than that in biofilms formed in nutrient broth (0.4 ± 0.04% of the population). Thus, the presence of MUC5B mucins enhanced bacterial protease activity. This effect was mainly attributable to contact with surface-associated mucins rather than those present in the fluid phase. Biofilms of L. fermentum were capable of degrading MUC5B mucins suggesting that this complex glycoprotein can be exploited as a nutrient source by the bacteria. Comparison of the surface proteomes of biofilm cells of L

  12. Structural and functional characterization of complex formation between two Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors from Russell's Viper venom.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Dutta, Sumita; Kalita, Bhargab; Jha, Deepak K; Deb, Pritam; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors (KSPIs) exhibit various biological functions including anticoagulant activity. This study elucidates the occurrence and subunit stoichiometry of a putative complex formed between two KSPIs (Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) purified from the native Rusvikunin complex of Pakistan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii russelii) venom (RVV). The protein components of the Rusvikunin complex were identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. The non-covalent interaction between two major components of the complex (Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) at 1:2 stoichiometric ratio to form a stable complex was demonstrated by biophysical techniques such as spectrofluorometric, classical gel-filtration, equilibrium gel-filtration, circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE analyses. CD measurement showed that interaction between Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II did not change their overall secondary structure; however, the protein complex exhibited enhanced hydrodynamic diameter and anticoagulant activity as compared to the individual components of the complex. This study may lay the foundation for understanding the basis of protein complexes in snake venoms and their role in pathophysiology of snakebite.

  13. Determination of the protease cleavage site repertoire—The RNase H but not the RT domain is essential for foamy viral protease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Spannaus, Ralf; Bodem, Jochen

    2014-04-15

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, the foamy virus protease is only active as a protease-reverse transcriptase fusion protein and requires viral RNA for activation. Maturation of foamy viral proteins seems to be restricted to a single cleavage site in Gag and Pol. We provide evidence that unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity, which is unique among retroviruses. Analyses of the cleavage site sequences of the Gag and Pol cleavage sites revealed a high similarity compared to those of Lentiviruses. We show that positions P2' and P2 are invariant and that Gag and Pol cleavage sites are processed with similar efficiencies. The RNase H domain is essential for protease activity, but can functionally be substituted by RNase H domains of other retroviruses. Thus, the RNase H domain might be involved in the stabilization of the protease dimer, while the RT domain is essential for RNA dependent protease activation. - Highlights: • Unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity of foamy viruses. • Positions P2 and P2' are invariant in the foamy viral cleavage sites. • The RNaseH domain is essential for protease activity. • The RNaseH domains of other retroviruses support foamy viral protease activity.

  14. Activity-based probes for rhomboid proteases discovered in a mass spectrometry-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Vosyka, Oliver; Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Wolf, Eliane V.; Brouwer, Arwin J.; Liskamp, Rob M. J.; Verhelst, Steven H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are evolutionary conserved intramembrane serine proteases. Because of their emerging role in many important biological pathways, rhomboids are potential drug targets. Unfortunately, few chemical tools are available for their study. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based assay to measure rhomboid substrate cleavage and inhibition. We have identified isocoumarin inhibitors and developed activity-based probes for rhomboid proteases. The probes can distinguish between active and inactive rhomboids due to covalent, reversible binding of the active-site serine and stable modification of a histidine residue. Finally, the structure of an isocoumarin-based inhibitor with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG uncovers an unusual mode of binding at the active site and suggests that the interactions between the 3-substituent on the isocoumarin inhibitor and hydrophobic residues on the protease reflect S′ subsite binding. Overall, these probes represent valuable tools for rhomboid study, and the structural insights may facilitate future inhibitor design. PMID:23359682

  15. Cellular aspartyl proteases promote the unconventional secretion of biologically active HIV-1 matrix protein p17

    PubMed Central

    Caccuri, Francesca; Iaria, Maria Luisa; Campilongo, Federica; Varney, Kristen; Rossi, Alessandro; Mitola, Stefania; Schiarea, Silvia; Bugatti, Antonella; Mazzuca, Pietro; Giagulli, Cinzia; Fiorentini, Simona; Lu, Wuyuan; Salmona, Mario; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    The human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein p17 (p17), although devoid of a signal sequence, is released by infected cells and detected in blood and in different organs and tissues even in HIV-1-infected patients undergoing successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Extracellularly, p17 deregulates the function of different cells involved in AIDS pathogenesis. The mechanism of p17 secretion, particularly during HIV-1 latency, still remains to be elucidated. A recent study showed that HIV-1-infected cells can produce Gag without spreading infection in a model of viral latency. Here we show that in Gag-expressing cells, secretion of biologically active p17 takes place at the plasma membrane and occurs following its interaction with phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate and its subsequent cleavage from the precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) operated by cellular aspartyl proteases. These enzymes operate a more complex Gag polypeptide proteolysis than the HIV-1 protease, thus hypothetically generating slightly truncated or elongated p17s in their C-terminus. A 17 C-terminal residues excised p17 was found to be structurally and functionally identical to the full-length p17 demonstrating that the final C-terminal region of p17 is irrelevant for the protein’s biological activity. These findings offer new opportunities to identify treatment strategies for inhibiting p17 release in the extracellular microenvironment. PMID:27905556

  16. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  17. Selection of suitable detergents for obtaining an active dengue protease in its natural form from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Wong, Ying Lei; Cheng, Jinting; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-05-01

    Dengue protease is a two-component enzyme and is an important drug target against dengue virus. The protease activity and protein stability of dengue nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) require a co-factor region from a four-span membrane protein NS2B. A natural form of dengue protease containing full-length NS2B and NS3 protease domain NS2BFL-NS3pro will be useful for dengue drug discovery. In current study, detergents that can be used for protease purification were tested. Using a water soluble protease construct, 39 detergents were selected for both NS2B and NS2BFL-NS3pro purification. The results showed that 18 detergents were able to sustain the activity of the natural dengue protease and 11 detergents could be used for NS2B purification. The results obtained in this study will be useful for biochemical and biophysical studies on dengue protease.

  18. Characterization of senescence-associated protease activities involved in the efficient protein remobilization during leaf senescence of winter oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Poret, Marine; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is a crop plant characterized by a poor nitrogen (N) use efficiency that is mainly due to low N remobilization efficiency during the sequential leaf senescence of the vegetative stage. As a high leaf N remobilization efficiency was strongly linked to a high remobilization of proteins during leaf senescence of rapeseed, our objective was to identify senescence-associated protease activities implicated in the protein degradation. To reach this goal, leaf senescence processes and protease activities were investigated in a mature leaf becoming senescent in plants subjected to ample or low nitrate supply. The characterization of protease activities was performed by using in vitro analysis of RuBisCO degradation with or without inhibitors of specific protease classes followed by a protease activity profiling using activity-dependent probes. As expected, the mature leaf became senescent regardless of the nitrate treatment, and nitrate limitation enhanced the senescence processes associated with an enhanced degradation of soluble proteins. The characterization of protease activities revealed that: (i) aspartic proteases and the proteasome were active during senescence regardless of nitrate supply, and (ii) the activities of serine proteases and particularly cysteine proteases (Papain-like Cys proteases and vacuolar processing enzymes) increased when protein remobilization associated with senescence was accelerated by nitrate limitation. Short statement: Serine and particularly cysteine proteases (both PLCPs and VPEs) seem to play a crucial role in the efficient protein remobilization when leaf senescence of oilseed rape was accelerated by nitrate limitation.

  19. The prototype foamy virus protease is active independently of the integrase domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, contradictory results on foamy virus protease activity were published. While our own results indicated that protease activity is regulated by the viral RNA, others suggested that the integrase is involved in the regulation of the protease. Results To solve this discrepancy we performed additional experiments showing that the protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) exhibits protease activity in vitro and in vivo, which is independent of the integrase domain. In contrast, Pol incorporation, and therefore PR activity in the viral context, is dependent on the integrase domain. To further analyse the regulation of the protease, we incorporated Pol in viruses by expressing a GagPol fusion protein, which supported near wild-type like infectivity. A GagPR-RT fusion, lacking the integrase domain, also resulted in wild-type like Gag processing, indicating that the integrase is dispensable for viral Gag maturation. Furthermore, we demonstrate with a trans-complementation assays that the PR in the context of the PR-RT protein supports in trans both, viral maturation and infectivity. Conclusion We provide evidence that the FV integrase is required for Pol encapsidation and that the FV PR activity is integrase independent. We show that an active PR can be encapsidated in trans as a GagPR-RT fusion protein. PMID:22574974

  20. Protonation state and free energy calculation of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex based on electrostatic polarisation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Maoyou; Jiang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The protonation states of catalytic Asp25/25‧ residues remarkably affect the binding mechanism of the HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study, which includes electrostatic polarisation effect, to investigate the influence of Asp25/25‧ protonation states upon the binding free energy of the HIV-1 protease and a C2-symmetric inhibitor. Good agreements are obtained on inhibitor structure, hydrogen bond network, and binding free energy between our theoretical calculations and the experimental data. The calculations show that the Asp25 residue is deprotonated, and the Asp25‧ residue is protonated. Our results reveal that the Asp25/25‧ residues can have different protonation states when binding to different inhibitors although the protease and the inhibitors have the same symmetry. This study offers some insights into understanding the protonation state of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex, which could be helpful in designing new inhibitor molecules.

  1. Proteolytic processing and deubiquitinating activity of papain-like proteases of human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbin; Wang, Yanhua; Ratia, Kiira; Mesecar, Andrew D; Wilkinson, Keith D; Baker, Susan C

    2007-06-01

    Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63), a common human respiratory pathogen, is associated with both upper and lower respiratory tract disease in children and adults. Currently, no antiviral drugs are available to treat CoV infections; thus, potential drug targets need to be identified and characterized. Here, we identify HCoV-NL63 replicase gene products and characterize two viral papain-like proteases (PLPs), PLP1 and PLP2, which process the viral replicase polyprotein. We generated polyclonal antisera directed against two of the predicted replicase nonstructural proteins (nsp3 and nsp4) and detected replicase proteins from HCoV-NL63-infected LLC-MK2 cells by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot assays. We found that HCoV-NL63 replicase products can be detected at 24 h postinfection and that these proteins accumulate in perinuclear sites, consistent with membrane-associated replication complexes. To determine which viral proteases are responsible for processing these products, we generated constructs representing the amino-terminal end of the HCoV-NL63 replicase gene and established protease cis-cleavage assays. We found that PLP1 processes cleavage site 1 to release nsp1, whereas PLP2 is responsible for processing both cleavage sites 2 and 3 to release nsp2 and nsp3. We expressed and purified PLP2 and used a peptide-based assay to identify the cleavage sites recognized by this enzyme. Furthermore, by using K48-linked hexa-ubiquitin substrate and ubiquitin-vinylsulfone inhibitor specific for deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), we confirmed that, like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV PLpro, HCoV-NL63 PLP2 has DUB activity. The identification of the replicase products and characterization of HCoV-NL63 PLP DUB activity will facilitate comparative studies of CoV proteases and aid in the development of novel antiviral reagents directed against human pathogens such as HCoV-NL63 and SARS-CoV.

  2. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  3. Crystal Structure of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Main Protease in Complex with Synergetic Dual Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenghua; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Xuemeng; Yang, Kailin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause highly prevalent diseases in humans and animals. Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) belongs to the genus Alphacoronavirus, resulting in a lethal systemic granulomatous disease called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), which is one of the most important fatal infectious diseases of cats worldwide. No specific vaccines or drugs have been approved to treat FIP. CoV main proteases (Mpros) play a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication, making them an ideal target for drug development. Here, we report the crystal structure of FIPV Mpro in complex with dual inhibitors, a zinc ion and a Michael acceptor. The complex structure elaborates a unique mechanism of two distinct inhibitors synergizing to inactivate the protease, providing a structural basis to design novel antivirals and suggesting the potential to take advantage of zinc as an adjunct therapy against CoV-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses (CoVs) have the largest genome size among all RNA viruses. CoV infection causes various diseases in humans and animals, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). No approved specific drugs or vaccinations are available to treat their infections. Here, we report a novel dual inhibition mechanism targeting CoV main protease (Mpro) from feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), which leads to lethal systemic granulomatous disease in cats. Mpro, conserved across all CoV genomes, is essential for viral replication and transcription. We demonstrated that zinc ion and a Michael acceptor-based peptidomimetic inhibitor synergistically inactivate FIPV Mpro. We also solved the structure of FIPV Mpro complexed with two inhibitors, delineating the structural view of a dual inhibition mechanism. Our study provides new insight into the pharmaceutical strategy against CoV Mpro through using zinc as an adjuvant therapy to enhance the efficacy of an irreversible

  4. Enhancement of the aspartame precursor synthetic activity of an organic solvent-stable protease.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Tsuchiyama, Shotaro; Yasuda, Masahiro; Doukyu, Noriyuki

    2010-03-01

    The PST-01 protease is highly stable and catalyzes the synthesis of the aspartame precursor with high reaction yields in the presence of organic solvents. However, the synthesis rate using the PST-01 protease was slower than that observed when thermolysin was used. Structural comparison of both enzymes showed particular amino acid differences near the active center. These few residue differences in the PST-01 protease were mutated to match those amino acid types found in thermolysin. The mutated PST-01 proteases at the 114th residue from tyrosine to phenylalanine showed enhancement of synthetic activity. This activity was found to be similar to thermolysin. In addition, mutating the residue in the PST-01 protease with arginine and serine showed more improvement of the activity. The mutant PST-01 protease should be more useful than thermolysin for the synthesis of the aspartame precursor, because this enzyme has higher stability and activity in the presence of organic solvents. The results show the potential of organic solvent-stable enzymes as industrial catalysts.

  5. Purification and characterization of a prothrombin-activating protease from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han-Seung; Park, Gun-Chun; Cho, Woo Ri; Tak, Eunsik; Paik, Seung R; Chang, Chung-Soon

    2002-03-01

    We report upon the purification and characterization of a novel prothrombin-activating enzyme from the body fluid (total homogenates of isolated digestive tract without eggs, spinnerets and silk glands) of the spider, Nephila clavata by a combination of acetone fractionation, ion exchange, and Soybean trypsin inhibitor-Sepharose chromatography. Analysis of the purified enzyme with SDS-PAGE and gel filtration revealed a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 24kDa. The proteolytic activity of the enzyme was stable up to 50 degrees C, however, it became unstable over 55 degrees C. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 8, and Ca(2+) was not required for the enzyme activity. According to inhibition profiles obtained with several serine protease inhibitors such as PMSF and benzamidine, the purified protease is a member of the serine proteases. Bz-Ile-Glu(gamma-OR)- Gly-Arg-pNA and Z-Arg-Gly-Arg-pNA which are known as substrates for factor Xa, were hydrolyzed favorably by the enzyme. And the Nephila protease could produce thrombin from prothrombin at nM range, and form the turbid ring using fibrinogen-agarose plate. The results obtained confirmed that the purified protease is a potent prothrombin-activating activity belonging to the family of serine protease.

  6. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  7. Protease activity of MALT1: a mystery unravelled.

    PubMed

    Kirchhofer, Daniel; Vucic, Domagoj

    2012-06-01

    Constitutive NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) activation in B-cell lymphomas relies greatly on the CARMA1 [CARD (caspase recruitment domain)-containing MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) 1]-Bcl10-MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue translocation gene 1) signalling complex. Within this protein complex, MALT1 possesses a rather unique enzymatic activity, which allows it to cleave Bcl10, RelB and CYLD, among other substrates. The catalytic activity of MALT1 promotes activation of canonical and non-canonical NF-κB as well as other signalling pathways. However, even after a decade of intense research on MALT1, many mechanistic aspects of its enzymatic activity remain elusive. A recent article by Hachmann, Snipas, van Raam, Cancino, Houlihan, Poreba, Kasperkiewicz, Drag and Salvesen [(2012) Biochem. J. 443, 287-295] provides novel insight into the activation mechanism and the substrate specificity of MALT1. These intriguing findings convincingly demonstrate the importance of MALT1 dimerization for its catalytic activity and pave the way for novel therapeutic approaches that target this crucial regulator of lymphoma survival and proliferation.

  8. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  9. Approaches for the generation of active papain-like cysteine proteases from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chunfang; Zhang, Junyan; Lin, Deqiu; Tao, Ailin

    2015-05-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases are widely expressed, fulfill specific functions in extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation and processing events, and may represent viable drug targets for major diseases. In depth and rigorous studies of the potential for these proteins to be targets for drug development require sufficient amounts of protease protein that can be used for both experimental and therapeutic purposes. Escherichia coli was widely used to express papain-like cysteine proteases, but most of those proteases are produced in insoluble inclusion bodies that need solubilizing, refolding, purifying and activating. Refolding is the most critical step in the process of generating active cysteine proteases and the current approaches to refolding include dialysis, dilution and chromatography. Purification is mainly achieved by various column chromatography. Finally, the attained refolded proteases are examined regarding their protease structures and activities.

  10. Effects of Glycosylation on the Enzymatic Activity and Mechanisms of Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications are an important feature of most proteases in higher organisms, such as the conversion of inactive zymogens into active proteases. To date, little information is available on the role of glycosylation and functional implications for secreted proteases. Besides a stabilizing effect and protection against proteolysis, several proteases show a significant influence of glycosylation on the catalytic activity. Glycans can alter the substrate recognition, the specificity and binding affinity, as well as the turnover rates. However, there is currently no known general pattern, since glycosylation can have both stimulating and inhibiting effects on activity. Thus, a comparative analysis of individual cases with sufficient enzyme kinetic and structural data is a first approach to describe mechanistic principles that govern the effects of glycosylation on the function of proteases. The understanding of glycan functions becomes highly significant in proteomic and glycomic studies, which demonstrated that cancer-associated proteases, such as kallikrein-related peptidase 3, exhibit strongly altered glycosylation patterns in pathological cases. Such findings can contribute to a variety of future biomedical applications. PMID:27898009

  11. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  12. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  13. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases.

  14. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  15. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  16. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  17. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  18. Mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of N,N-bis(benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)amine (BBA) with diimine co-ligands: efficient chemical nuclease and protease activities and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Suresh, Eringathodi; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2012-05-21

    to 3 and 4 supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, the 5,6-dmp complex 3 is selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that it induces a B to A conformational change. In contrast, 2 and 4 show induced CD responses indicating their involvement in strong DNA binding. Interestingly, only the dpq complex 4, which displays the strongest DNA binding affinity and is efficient in cleaving DNA in the absence of an activator with a rate constant of 5.8 ± 0.1 h(-1), which is higher than the uncatalyzed rate of DNA cleavage. All the complexes exhibit oxidative DNA cleavage ability, which varies as 4 > 2 > 3 > 1 (ascorbic acid) and 3 > 2 > 4 > 1 (H(2)O(2)). Also, the complexes cleave the protein bovine serum albumin in the presence of H(2)O(2) as an activator with the cleavage ability varying in the order 3 > 4 > 2 > 1. The highest efficiency of 3 to cleave both DNA and protein in the presence of H(2)O(2) is consistent with its strong hydrophobic interaction with the biopolymers. The IC(50) values of 1-4 against cervical cancer cell lines (SiHa) are almost equal to that of cisplatin, indicating that they have the potential to act as effective anticancer drugs in a time-dependent manner. The morphological assessment data obtained by using acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) and Hoechst 33258 staining reveal that 3 induces apoptosis much more effectively than the other complexes. Also, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis study (comet assay) suggests that the same complex induces DNA fragmentation more efficiently than others.

  19. A potential Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor involves in kinetics of protease inhibition and bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Harikrishnan, Ramaswamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-02-01

    Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (KSPI) is a pancreatic secretary trypsin inhibitor which involves in various cellular component regulations including development and defense process. In this study, we have characterized a KSPI cDNA sequence of freshwater striped murrel fish Channa striatus (Cs) at molecular level. Cellular location analysis predicted that the CsKSPI was an extracellular protein. The domain analysis showed that the CsKSPI contains a Kazal domain at 47-103 along with its family signature between 61 and 83. Phylogenetically, CsKSPI is closely related to KSPI from Maylandia zebra and formed a sister group with mammals. The 2D structure of CsKSPI showed three α-helical regions which are connected with random coils, one helix at signal sequence and two at the Kazal domain region. The relative gene expression showed that the CsKSPI was highly expressed in gills and its expression was induced upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and poly I:C (a viral analogue) challenge. The CsKSPI recombinant protein was produced to characterize and study the CsKSPI gene specific functions. The recombinant CsKSPI strongly inhibited trypsin compared to other tested proteases. The results of the kinetic activity of CsKSPI against trypsin was V(max)s = 1.62 nmol/min, K(M)s = 0.21 mM and K(i)s = 15.37 nM. Moreover, the recombinant CsKSPI inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria A. hydrophila at 20 μM and Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis at the MIC50 of 15 μM. Overall, the study indicated that the CsKSPI was a potential trypsin inhibitor which involves in antimicrobial activity.

  20. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  1. Regulation of Foamy Virus Protease Activity by Viral RNA: a Novel and Unique Mechanism among Retroviruses▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Maximilian J.; Bodem, Jochen; Jochheim, Fabian; Rethwilm, Axel; Rösch, Paul; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2011-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) synthesize the Pol precursor protein from a specific transcript. Thus, in contrast to what was found for orthoretroviruses, e.g., human immunodeficiency virus, no Gag-Pol precursor protein is synthesized. Foamy viral Pol consists of a protease (PR) domain, a reverse transcriptase domain, and an integrase domain and is processed into a mature protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) fusion protein and the integrase. Protease activity has to be strictly regulated in order to avoid premature Gag and Pol processing before virus assembly. We have demonstrated recently that FV protease is an inactive monomer with a very weak dimerization tendency and postulated protease activation through dimerization. Here, we identify a specific protease-activating RNA motif (PARM) located in the pol region of viral RNA which stimulates PR activity in vitro and in vivo, revealing a novel and unique mechanism of retroviral protease activation. This mechanism is strikingly different to that of orthoretroviruses, where the protease can be activated even in the absence of viral RNA during the assembly of virus-like particles. Although it has been shown that the integrase domain is important for Pol uptake, activation of the foamy virus protease is integrase independent. We show that at least two foamy virus PR-RT molecules bind to the PARM and only RNAs containing the PARM result in significant activation of the protease. DNA harboring the PARM is not capable of protease activation. Structure determination of the PARM by selective 2′ hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) revealed a distinct RNA folding, important for protease activation and thus virus maturation. PMID:21325405

  2. Reactive Carbonyl Species Activate Caspase-3-Like Protease to Initiate Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered programmed cell death (PCD) is a typical plant response to biotic and abiotic stressors. We have recently shown that lipid peroxide-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS), downstream products of ROS, mediate oxidative signal to initiate PCD. Here we investigated the mechanism by which RCS initiate PCD. Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cultured cells were treated with acrolein, one of the most potent RCS. Acrolein at 0.2 mM caused PCD in 5 h (i.e. lethal), but at 0.1 mM it did not (sublethal). Specifically, these two doses caused critically different effects on the cells. Both lethal and sublethal doses of acrolein exhausted the cellular glutathione pool in 30 min, while the lethal dose only caused a significant ascorbate decrease and ROS increase in 1-2 h. Prior to such redox changes, we found that acrolein caused significant increases in the activities of caspase-1-like protease (C1LP) and caspase-3-like protease (C3LP), the proteases which trigger PCD. The lethal dose of acrolein increased the C3LP activity 2-fold more than did the sublethal dose. In contrast, C1LP activity increments caused by the two doses were not different. Acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal, another RCS, activated both proteases in a cell-free extract from untreated cells. H2O2 at 1 mM added to the cells increased C1LP and C3LP activities and caused PCD, and the RCS scavenger carnosine suppressed their activation and PCD. However, H2O2 did not activate the proteases in a cell-free extract. Thus the activation of caspase-like proteases, particularly C3LP, by RCS is an initial biochemical event in oxidative signal-stimulated PCD in plants.

  3. Essential role of platelet activation via protease activated receptor 4 in tissue factor-initiated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Nathalie; Chobaz-Péclat, Veronique; Hamilton, Justin; Spee, Pieter; Wagtmann, Nicolai; So, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tissue factor (TF) activation of the coagulation proteases enhances inflammation in animal models of arthritis and endotoxemia, but the mechanism of this effect is not yet fully understood – in particular, whether this is primarily due to fibrin formation or through activation of protease activated receptors (PARs). Methods We induced extravascular inflammation by injection of recombinant soluble murine TF (sTF1–219) in the hind paw. The effects of thrombin inhibition, fibrinogen and platelet depletion were evaluated, as well as the effects of PAR deficiency using knockout mice deficient for each of the PARs. Results Injection of soluble TF provoked a rapid onset of paw swelling. Inflammation was confirmed histologically and by increased serum IL-6 levels. Inflammation was significantly reduced by depletion of fibrinogen (P < 0.05) or platelets (P = 0.015), and by treatment with hirudin (P = 0.04) or an inhibitor of activated factor VII (P < 0.001) compared with controls. PAR-4-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced paw swelling (P = 0.003). In contrast, a deficiency in either PAR-1, PAR-2 or PAR-3 did not affect the inflammatory response to soluble TF injection. Conclusion Our results show that soluble TF induces acute inflammation through a thrombin-dependent pathway and both fibrin deposition and platelet activation are essential steps in this process. The activation of PAR-4 on platelets is crucial and the other PARs do not play a major role in soluble TF-induced inflammation. PMID:18412955

  4. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  5. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Mariarosaria; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2005-10-01

    Vascular system is constituted by a complex and articulate network, e.g. arteries, arterioles, venules and veins, that requires a high degree of coordination between different elemental cell types. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) constitute a recent described family of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolysis. In recent years several evidence have been accumulated for an involvement of this receptor in the response to endothelial injury in vitro and in vivo experimental settings suggesting a role for PAR2 in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular system. This review will deal with the role of PAR2 receptor in the cardiovascular system analyzing both in vivo and in vitro published data. In particular this review will deal with the role of this receptor in vascular reactivity, ischemia/reperfusion injury, coronary atherosclerotic lesions and angiogenesis.

  6. Expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 and anti-tubulogenic activity of protease-activated receptor 1 in human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina S; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Pula, Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are obtained from the culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMNC) fractions and are characterised by high proliferative and pro-vasculogenic potential, which makes them of great interest for cell therapy. Here, we describe the detection of protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 amongst the surface proteins expressed in ECFCs. Both receptors are functionally coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, which become activated and phosphorylated in response to selective PAR1- or PAR2-activating peptides. Specific stimulation of PAR1, but not PAR2, significantly inhibits capillary-like tube formation by ECFCs in vitro, suggesting that tubulogenesis is negatively regulated by proteases able to stimulate PAR1 (e.g. thrombin). The activation of ERKs is not involved in the regulation of tubulogenesis in vitro, as suggested by use of the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and by the fact that PAR2 stimulation activates ERKs without affecting capillary tube formation. Both qPCR and immunoblotting showed a significant downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) in response to PAR1 stimulation. Moreover, the addition of VEGF (50-100 ng/ml) but not basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) (25-100 ng/ml) rescued tube formation by ECFCs treated with PAR1-activating peptide. Therefore, we propose that reduction of VEGF responsiveness resulting from down-regulation of VEGFR2 is underlying the anti-tubulogenic effect of PAR1 activation. Although the role of PAR2 remains elusive, this study sheds new light on the regulation of the vasculogenic activity of ECFCs and suggests a potential link between adult vasculogenesis and the coagulation cascade.

  7. The role of AAA+ proteases in mitochondrial protein biogenesis, homeostasis and activity control.

    PubMed

    Voos, Wolfgang; Ward, Linda A; Truscott, Kaye N

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are specialised organelles that are structurally and functionally integrated into cells in the vast majority of eukaryotes. They are the site of numerous enzymatic reactions, some of which are essential for life. The double lipid membrane of the mitochondrion, that spatially defines the organelle and is necessary for some functions, also creates a physical but semi-permeable barrier to the rest of the cell. Thus to ensure the biogenesis, regulation and maintenance of a functional population of proteins, an autonomous protein handling network within mitochondria is required. This includes resident mitochondrial protein translocation machinery, processing peptidases, molecular chaperones and proteases. This review highlights the contribution of proteases of the AAA+ superfamily to protein quality and activity control within the mitochondrion. Here they are responsible for the degradation of unfolded, unassembled and oxidatively damaged proteins as well as the activity control of some enzymes. Since most knowledge about these proteases has been gained from studies in the eukaryotic microorganism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, much of the discussion here centres on their role in this organism. However, reference is made to mitochondrial AAA+ proteases in other organisms, particularly in cases where they play a unique role such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. As these proteases influence mitochondrial function in both health and disease in humans, an understanding of their regulation and diverse activities is necessary.

  8. Peptide code-on-a-microplate for protease activity analysis via MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric quantitation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junjie; Liu, Fei; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-04-21

    A peptide-encoded microplate was proposed for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of protease activity. The peptide codes were designed to contain a coding region and the substrate of protease for enzymatic cleavage, respectively, and an internal standard method was proposed for the MS quantitation of the cleavage products of these peptide codes. Upon the cleavage reaction in the presence of target proteases, the coding regions were released from the microplate, which were directly quantitated by using corresponding peptides with one-amino acid difference as the internal standards. The coding region could be used as the unique "Protease ID" for the identification of corresponding protease, and the amount of the cleavage product was used for protease activity analysis. Using trypsin and chymotrypsin as the model proteases to verify the multiplex protease assay, the designed "Trypsin ID" and "Chymotrypsin ID" occurred at m/z 761.6 and 711.6. The logarithm value of the intensity ratio of "Protease ID" to internal standard was proportional to trypsin and chymotrypsin concentration in a range from 5.0 to 500 and 10 to 500 nM, respectively. The detection limits for trypsin and chymotrypsin were 2.3 and 5.2 nM, respectively. The peptide-encoded microplate showed good selectivity. This proposed method provided a powerful tool for convenient identification and activity analysis of multiplex proteases.

  9. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-04-22

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates.

  10. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates

    PubMed Central

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates. PMID:26182358

  11. Activity of Protease-Activated Receptors in Primary Cultured Human Myenteric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Eva M.; Mazzuoli, Gemma; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Zeller, Florian; Schemann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Activity of the four known protease-activated receptors (PARs) has been well studied in rodent enteric nervous system and results in animal models established an important role for neuronal PAR2. We recently demonstrated that, unlike in rodents, PAR1 is the dominant neuronal protease receptor in the human submucous plexus. With this study we investigated whether this also applies to the human myenteric plexus. We used voltage sensitive dye recordings to detect action potential discharge in primary cultures of human myenteric neurons in response to PAR activating peptides (APs). Application of the PAR1-AP (TFLLR) or PAR4-AP (GYPGQV) evoked spike discharge in 79 or 23% of myenteric neurons, respectively. The PAR1-AP response was mimicked by the endogenous PAR1 activator thrombin and blocked by the PAR1 antagonists SCH79797. Human myenteric neurons did not respond to PAR2-AP. This was not due to culture conditions because all three PAR-APs evoked action potentials in cultured guinea pig myenteric neurons. Consecutive application of PAR-APs revealed coexpression (relative to the population responding to PAR-APs) of PAR1/PAR2 in 51%, PAR1/PAR4 in 43%, and of PAR2/PAR4 in 29% of guinea pig myenteric neurons. Our study provided further evidence for the prominent role of neuronal PAR1 in the human enteric nervous system. PMID:22988431

  12. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA.

  13. Anti-trypanosomal activity of non-peptidic nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Furber, Mark; Gomes, Juliana C.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; Quilles, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.

    2017-01-01

    The cysteine protease cruzipain is considered to be a validated target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Chagas disease. Anti-trypanosomal activity against the CL Brener strain of T. cruzi was observed in the 0.1 μM to 1 μM range for three nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors based on two scaffolds known to be associated with cathepsin K inhibition. The two compounds showing the greatest potency against the trypanosome were characterized by EC50 values (0.12 μM and 0.25 μM) that were an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding Ki values measured against cruzain, a recombinant form of cruzipain, in an enzyme inhibition assay. This implies that the anti-trypanosomal activity of these two compounds may not be explained only by the inhibition of the cruzain enzyme, thereby triggering a putative polypharmacological profile towards cysteine proteases. PMID:28222138

  14. Three-dimensional structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protease/inhibitor complex. Implications for the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, B; Winborne, E; Minnich, M D; Culp, J S; Debouck, C; Abdel-Meguid, S S

    1993-12-07

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) proteins have considerable amino acid sequence homology to those from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); thus monkeys are considered useful models for the preclinical evaluation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapeutics. We have crystallized and determined the three-dimensional structure of SIV protease bound to the hydroxyethylene isostere inhibitor SKF107457. Crystals of the complex were grown from 25-32% saturated sodium chloride, by the hanging drop method of vapor diffusion. They belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with a = 46.3 A, b = 101.5 A, and c = 118.8 A. The structure has been determined at 2.5-A resolution by molecular replacement and refined to a crystallographic discrepancy factor, R (= sigma parallel Fo magnitude of - magnitude of Fc parallel/sigma magnitude of Fo magnitude of), of 0.189. The overall structure of the complex is very similar to previously reported structures of HIV-1 protease bound to inhibitors. The inhibitor is bound in a conformation that is almost identical to that found for the same inhibitor bound to HIV-1 protease, except for an overall translation of the inhibitor, varying along the backbone atoms from about 1.0 A at the termini to about 0.5 A around the scissile bond surrogate. The structures of the SIV and HIV-1 proteins vary significantly only in three surface loops composed of amino acids 15-20, 34-45, and 65-70. Superposition of the 1188 protein backbone atoms from the two structures gives an rms deviation of 1.0 A; this number is reduced to 0.6 A when atoms from the three surface loops are eliminated from the rms calculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  16. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  17. Silver-stained fibrin zymography: separation of proteases and activity detection using a single substrate-containing gel.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Min; Kim, Ki Eun; Ahn, Keug-Hyun; Park, Chan-Sun; Kim, Dong-Ho; Koh, Hong Bum; Chun, Hyo Kon; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Kim, Hong Jib; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Nack-Shick

    2011-08-01

    A new zymogram method, silver-stained fibrin zymography, for separation of protease bands and activity detection using a single substrate gel, was developed. The method takes advantage of the nanoscale sensitivity of both zymography and silver staining. After SDS-PAGE in a gel containing fibrin, the gel was incubated in enzyme reaction buffer and the zymogram was silver-stained. Bands with protease activity were stained with silver in clear areas where the protein substrate had been degraded. The molecular sizes of proteases were accurately determined. Furthermore, proteases of high molecular weight were clearly and sharply resolved.

  18. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease from Penicillium chrysogenum Pg222 active against meat proteins.

    PubMed

    Benito, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Núñez, Félix; Asensio, Miguel A; Bermúdez, María E; Córdoba, Juan J

    2002-07-01

    An extracellular protease from Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) isolated from dry-cured ham has been purified. The purification procedure involved several steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, filtration, and separation by high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and gel filtration, the purified fraction showed a molecular mass of about 35 kDa. The hydrolytic properties of the purified enzyme (EPg222) on extracted pork myofibrillar proteins under several conditions were evaluated by SDS-PAGE. EPg222 showed activity in the range of 10 to 60 degrees C in temperature, 0 to 3 M NaCl, and pH 5 to 7, with maximum activity at pH 6, 45 degrees C, and 0.25 M NaCl. Under these conditions the enzyme was most active against tropomyosin, actin, and myosin. EPg222 showed collagenolytic activity but did not hydrolyze myoglobin. EPg222 showed higher activity than other proteolytic enzymes like papain, trypsin, and Aspergillus oryzae protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined and was found to be Glu-Asn-Pro-Leu-Gln-Pro-Asn-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp. This partial amino acid sequence revealed a 55% homology with serine proteases from Penicillium citrinum. The activity of this novel protease may be of interest in ripening and generating the flavor of dry-cured meat products.

  19. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Protease from Penicillium chrysogenum Pg222 Active against Meat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Benito, María J.; Rodríguez, Mar; Núñez, Félix; Asensio, Miguel A.; Bermúdez, María E.; Córdoba, Juan J.

    2002-01-01

    An extracellular protease from Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) isolated from dry-cured ham has been purified. The purification procedure involved several steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, filtration, and separation by high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and gel filtration, the purified fraction showed a molecular mass of about 35 kDa. The hydrolytic properties of the purified enzyme (EPg222) on extracted pork myofibrillar proteins under several conditions were evaluated by SDS-PAGE. EPg222 showed activity in the range of 10 to 60°C in temperature, 0 to 3 M NaCl, and pH 5 to 7, with maximum activity at pH 6, 45°C, and 0.25 M NaCl. Under these conditions the enzyme was most active against tropomyosin, actin, and myosin. EPg222 showed collagenolytic activity but did not hydrolyze myoglobin. EPg222 showed higher activity than other proteolytic enzymes like papain, trypsin, and Aspergillus oryzae protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined and was found to be Glu-Asn-Pro-Leu-Gln-Pro-Asn-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp. This partial amino acid sequence revealed a 55% homology with serine proteases from Penicillium citrinum. The activity of this novel protease may be of interest in ripening and generating the flavor of dry-cured meat products. PMID:12089038

  20. Pressure-enhanced activity and stability of a hyperthermophilic protease from a deep-sea methanogen.

    PubMed

    Michels, P C; Clark, D S

    1997-10-01

    We describe the properties of a hyperthermophilic, barophilic protease from Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen. This enzyme is the first protease to be isolated from an organism adapted to a high-pressure-high-temperature environment. The partially purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 29 kDa and a narrow substrate specificity with strong preference for leucine at the P1 site of polypeptide substrates. Enzyme activity increased up to 116(deg)C and was measured up to 130(deg)C, one of the highest temperatures reported for the function of any enzyme. In addition, enzyme activity and thermostability increased with pressure: raising the pressure to 500 atm increased the reaction rate at 125(deg)C 3.4-fold and the thermostability 2.7-fold. Spin labeling of the active-site serine revealed that the active-site geometry of the M. jannaschii protease is not grossly different from that of several mesophilic proteases; however, the active-site structure may be relatively rigid at moderate temperatures. The barophilic and thermophilic behavior of the enzyme is consistent with the barophilic growth of M. jannaschii observed previously (J. F. Miller et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:3039-3042, 1988).

  1. A novel serine protease with human fibrino(geno)lytic activities from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thumanu, Kanjana; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-07-01

    A protease was isolated and purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) latex and designated as a 48-kDa antimicrobial protease (AMP48) in a previous publication. In this work, the enzyme was characterized for more biochemical and medicinal properties. Enzyme activity of AMP48 was strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and soybean trypsin inhibitor, indicating that the enzyme was a plant serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequences (A-Q-E-G-G-K-D-D-D-G-G) of AMP48 had no sequence similarity matches with any sequence databases of BLAST search and other plant serine protease. The secondary structure of this enzyme was composed of high α-helix (51%) and low β-sheet (9%). AMP48 had fibrinogenolytic activity with maximal activity between 55 and 60°C at pH 8. The enzyme efficiently hydrolyzed α followed by partially hydrolyzed β and γ subunits of human fibrinogen. In addition, the fibrinolytic activity was observed through the degradation products by SDS-PAGE and emphasized its activity by monitoring the alteration of secondary structure of fibrin clot after enzyme digestion using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. This study presented the potential role to use AMP48 as antithrombotic for treatment thromboembolic disorders such as strokes, pulmonary emboli and deep vein thrombosis.

  2. Learning and memory deficits in mice lacking protease activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Hamill, Cecily E; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Wingo, Thomas S; Barber, Jeremy A; Lyuboslavsky, Polina N; David Sweatt, J; Ressler, Kerry J; White, David A; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-10-01

    The roles of serine proteases and protease activated receptors have been extensively studied in coagulation, wound healing, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. More recently, serine proteases have been suggested to influence synaptic plasticity. In this context, we examined the role of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), which is activated following proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and plasmin, in emotionally motivated learning. We were particularly interested in PAR1 because its activation enhances the function of NMDA receptors, which are required for some forms of synaptic plasticity. We examined several baseline behavioral measures, including locomotor activity, expression of anxiety-like behavior, motor task acquisition, nociceptive responses, and startle responses in C57Bl/6 mice in which the PAR1 receptor has been genetically deleted. In addition, we evaluated learning and memory in these mice using two memory tasks, passive avoidance and cued fear-conditioning. Whereas locomotion, pain response, startle, and measures of baseline anxiety were largely unaffected by PAR1 removal, PAR1-/- animals showed significant deficits in a passive avoidance task and in cued fear conditioning. These data suggest that PAR1 may play an important role in emotionally motivated learning.

  3. Protease activity at invadopodial focal digestive areas is dependent on NHE1-driven acidic pHe.

    PubMed

    Greco, Maria Raffaella; Antelmi, Ester; Busco, Giovanni; Guerra, Lorenzo; Rubino, Rosa; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel; Cardone, Rosa Angela

    2014-02-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical step of tumor cell invasion and requires protease-dependent proteolysis focalized at the invadopodia where the proteolysis of the ECM occurs. Most of the extracellular proteases belong to serine- or metallo-proteases and the invadopodia is where protease activity is regulated. While recent data looking at global protease activity in the growth medium reported that their activity and role in invasion is dependent on Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1)-driven extracellular acidification, there is no data on this aspect at the invadopodia, and an open question remains whether this acid extracellular pH (pHe) activation of proteases in tumor cells occurs preferentially at invadopodia. We previously reported that the NHE1 is expressed in breast cancer invadopodia and that the NHE1‑dependent acidification of the peri-invadopodial space is critical for ECM proteolysis. In the present study, using, for the first time, in situ zymography analysis, we demonstrated a concordance between NHE1 activity, extracellular acidification and protease activity at invadopodia to finely regulate ECM digestion. We demonstrated that: (i) ECM proteolysis taking place at invadopodia is driven by acidification of the peri-invadopodia microenvironment; (ii) that the proteases have a functional pHe optimum that is acidic; (iii) more than one protease is functioning to digest the ECM at these invadopodial sites of ECM proteolysis; and (iv) lowering pHe or inhibiting the NHE1 increases protease secretion while blocking protease activity changes NHE1 expression at the invadopodia.

  4. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  5. Searching for discrimination rules in protease proteolytic cleavage activity using genetic programming with a min-max scoring function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Thomson, Rebecca; Hodgman, T Charles; Dry, Jonathan; Doyle, Austin K; Narayanan, Ajit; Wu, XiKun

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents an algorithm which is able to extract discriminant rules from oligopeptides for protease proteolytic cleavage activity prediction. The algorithm is developed using genetic programming. Three important components in the algorithm are a min-max scoring function, the reverse Polish notation (RPN) and the use of minimum description length. The min-max scoring function is developed using amino acid similarity matrices for measuring the similarity between an oligopeptide and a rule, which is a complex algebraic equation of amino acids rather than a simple pattern sequence. The Fisher ratio is then calculated on the scoring values using the class label associated with the oligopeptides. The discriminant ability of each rule can therefore be evaluated. The use of RPN makes the evolutionary operations simpler and therefore reduces the computational cost. To prevent overfitting, the concept of minimum description length is used to penalize over-complicated rules. A fitness function is therefore composed of the Fisher ratio and the use of minimum description length for an efficient evolutionary process. In the application to four protease datasets (Trypsin, Factor Xa, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV protease cleavage site prediction), our algorithm is superior to C5, a conventional method for deriving decision trees.

  6. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    PubMed

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E; Bikker, Floris J; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  7. Nepenthesin Protease Activity Indicates Digestive Fluid Dynamics in Carnivorous Nepenthes Plants

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E.; Bikker, Floris J.; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory. PMID:25750992

  8. Structure of a secreted aspartic protease from C. albicans complexed with a potent inhibitor: implications for the design of antifungal agents.

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Zapatero, C.; Goldman, R.; Muchmore, S. W.; Hutchins, C.; Stewart, K.; Navaza, J.; Payne, C. D.; Ray, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a secreted aspartic protease from Candida albicans complexed with a potent inhibitor reveals variations on the classical aspartic protease theme that dramatically alter the specificity of this class of enzymes. The structure presents: (1) an 8-residue insertion near the first disulfide (Cys 45-Cys 50, pepsin numbering) that results in a broad flap extending toward the active site; (2) a 7-residue deletion replacing helix hN2 (Ser 110-Tyr 114), which enlarges the S3 pocket; (3) a short polar connection between the two rigid body domains that alters their relative orientation and provides certain specificity; and (4) an ordered 11-residue addition at the carboxy terminus. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation and presents a branched structure at the P3 position. The implications of these findings for the design of potent antifungal agents are discussed. PMID:8845753

  9. [Chloroplast Deg proteases].

    PubMed

    Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Luciński, Robert; Baranek, Małgorzata; Sikora, Bogna; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    For some chloroplast proteases ATP binding and hydrolysis is not necessary for their catalytic activity, most probably because even strongly unfolded substrates may penetrate their catalytic chamber. Deg1, 2, 5 and 8 are the best known of Arabidopsis thaliana ATP- independent chloroplast proteases, encoded by orthologues of genes coding for DegP, DegQ and DegS proteases of Escherichia coli. Current awareness in the area of structure and functions of chloroplast Degs is much more limited vs the one about their bacterial counterparts. Deg5 and Deg8 form a catalytic heterododecamer which is loosely attached to luminal side of thylakoid membrane. The complex catalyses--supported by Deg1 and one of FtsH proteases--the degradation of PsbA damaged due to plant exposition to elevated irradiance and thus these protease are of key importance for the plants' sensitivity to photoinhibition. Deg2 role in the disposal of damaged PsbA has not been elucidated. Recombinant Deg1 may degrade PsbO and plastocyanin in vitro but it is not clear whether this reaction is performed in vivo as well.

  10. Proteolytic activity of Plasmodium falciparum subtilisin-like protease 3 on parasite profilin, a multifunctional protein.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asrar; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Relan, Udbhav; Mukherjee, Paushali; Chauhan, Virander S

    2013-10-01

    Subtilisin-like proteases of malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfSUB1, 2 and 3) are expressed at late asexual blood stages. PfSUB1 and 2 are considered important drug targets due to their essentiality for parasite blood stages and role in merozoite egress and invasion of erythrocytes. We have earlier shown the in vitro serine protease activity of PfSUB3 and its localization at asexual blood stages. In this study, we attempted to identify the biological substrate(s) of PfSUB3 and found parasite profilin (PfPRF) as a substrate of the protease. Eukaryotic profilins are multifunctional proteins with primary role in regulation of actin filament assembly. PfPRF possesses biochemical features of eukaryotic profilins and its rodent ortholog is essential in blood stages. Profilin from related apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (TgPRF) is known to be involved in parasite motility, host cell invasion, active egress from host cell, immune evasion and virulence in mice. In this study, mature PfSUB3 proteolysed recombinant PfPRF in a dose-dependent manner in in vitro assays. Recombinant PfPRF was assessed for its proinflammatory activity and found to induce high level of TNF-α and low but significant level of IL-12 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Proteolysis of PfPRF by PfSUB3 is suggestive of the probable role of the protease in the processes of motility, virulence and immune evasion.

  11. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  12. Protease Gene Duplication and Proteolytic Activity in Drosophila Female Reproductive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Pennington, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted proteases play integral roles in sexual reproduction in a broad range of taxa. In the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, these molecules are thought to process peptides and activate enzymes inside female reproductive tracts, mediating critical postmating responses. A recent study of female reproductive tract proteins in the cactophilic fruit fly Drosophila arizonae, identified pervasive, lineage-specific gene duplication amongst secreted proteases. Here, we compare the evolutionary dynamics, biochemical nature, and physiological significance of secreted female reproductive serine endoproteases between D. arizonae and its congener D. melanogaster. We show that D. arizonae lower female reproductive tract (LFRT) proteins are significantly enriched for recently duplicated secreted proteases, particularly serine endoproteases, relative to D. melanogaster. Isolated lumen from D. arizonae LFRTs, furthermore, exhibits significant trypsin-like and elastase-like serine endoprotease acitivity, whereas no such activity is seen in D. melanogaster. Finally, trypsin- and elastase-like activity in D. arizonae female reproductive tracts is negatively regulated by mating. We propose that the intense proteolytic environment of the D. arizonae female reproductive tract relates to the extraordinary reproductive physiology of this species and that ongoing gene duplication amongst these proteases is an evolutionary consequence of sexual conflict. PMID:19546158

  13. [Methods of increasing the activity of extracellular esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and proteases of wine yeast].

    PubMed

    Abdurazakova, S Kh; Salomov, Kh T

    1975-01-01

    Upon regular fermentation changes in the activity of the enzymes esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and protease of the yeast Saccharomyces mini of the Parkent I race were examined. The maximum activity of the enzymes occurred in the stationary phase of the yeast growth. An increase in the activity of the above enzymes was shown possible during a prolonged stabilization of the stationary conditions in the process of a continuous chemostat cultivation of wine yeast.

  14. Protease and lipase activities of fungal and bacterial strains derived from an artisanal raw ewe's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, Sebnem; Wiebenga, Ad; Bron, Peter A; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-11-21

    We previously identified the microbiota present during cheese ripening and observed high protease and lipase activity in Divle Cave cheese. To determine the contribution of individual isolates to enzyme activities, we investigated a range of species representing this microbiota for their proteolytic and lipolytic ability. In total, 17 fungal, 5 yeast and 18 bacterial strains, previously isolated from Divle Cave cheese, were assessed. Qualitative protease and lipase activities were performed on skim-milk agar and spirit-blue lipase agar, respectively, and resulted in a selection of strains for quantitative assays. For the quantitative assays, the strains were grown on minimal medium containing irradiated Divle Cave cheese, obtained from the first day of ripening. Out of 16 selected filamentous fungi, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium cavernicola and Penicillium olsonii showed the highest protease activity, while Mucor racemosus was the best lipase producer. Yarrowia lipolytica was the best performing yeast with respect to protease and lipase activity. From the 18 bacterial strains, 14 and 11 strains, respectively showed protease and lipase activity in agar plates. Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus stratosphericus, Brevibacterium antiquum, Psychrobacter glacincola and Pseudomonas proteolytica displayed the highest protease and lipase activity. The proteases of yeast and filamentous fungi were identified as mainly aspartic protease by specific inhibition with Pepstatin A, whereas inhibition by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) indicated that most bacterial enzymes belong to serine type protease. Our results demonstrate that aspartic proteases, which usually have high milk clotting activity, are predominantly derived from fungal strains, and therefore fungal enzymes appear to be more suitable for use in the cheese industry. Microbial enzymes studied in this research might be alternatives for rennin (chymosin) from animal source because of their low cost and stable

  15. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  16. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  17. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  18. Role of enteric nerves in immune-mediated changes in protease activated receptor 2 effects on gut function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on structural cells and immune cells. Control of the initiation, duration, and magnitude of the PAR effects are linked to the level of receptor expression, the availability of proteases, and the intracellular signal transduction machinery. We inve...

  19. Collagenolytic activity related to metalloproteases (and serine proteases) in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Adroher, Francisco Javier; Díaz-López, Manuel; Benítez, Rocío

    2010-06-11

    Proteases play a vital role in both the life cycle of parasites and the parasite-host relationship and are considered important virulence factors. In the present study, the presence of proteases with collagenolytic activity was investigated in the fish nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum during in vitro development. Collagenolytic activity was found in all studied developmental stages of the nematode (third [L3] and fourth [L4] larval stages and adults). In L3, the activity was maximum at pH 6.5 and, in the other stages, at 7.0. Pepsin is known to favour in vitro development of the worm, but, in this study, collagenolytic activity was shown to be significantly greater when no pepsin was added to the culture medium (at pH 6.5, p = 0.011). At pH 7.0, most activity was observed in the immature adult, after the final moult, suggesting that the collagenolytic activity may be involved in remodelling of the cuticle and in sexual maturity. On the other hand, at pH 6.5, activity may be related to tissue migration by L3 within the host. Using specific inhibitors, it was demonstrated that most of the collagenolytic activity detected in all the developmental stages was due to metalloproteases (40 to 100%), although serine proteases were also detected in L4 and adults (10 to 30%).

  20. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  1. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  2. The induction of the collagen capsule synthesis by Trichinella spiralis is closely related to protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Bo Young; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-10-30

    The muscle-stage larvae of the parasite Trichinella spiralis have the ability to survive within host muscle tissue by virtue of the formation a nurse cell-parasite complex, which is surrounded by collagen. The formation of the complex is initiated by excretory-secretory (ES) proteins produced by the parasite. To determine the mechanisms underlying collagen capsule formation, we investigated the expression levels of several types of collagen genes and TGF-βI signaling-related genes (Smad2 and Smad3) in muscle cells. Synthesis of type I, IV, and VI collagen, which are major constituents of the collagen capsule, significantly increased during T. spiralis infection. In addition, we found that expression of the protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) gene was significantly increased during this period. Expression levels of the collagen genes and TGF-βI, Smad2, and Smad3 were induced by ES proteins and a PAR2 agonist, whereas their enhanced expression levels were reduced by a PAR2 antagonist and serine protease inhibitors. To evaluate the involvement of PAR2 during T. spiralis infection in vivo, we infected wild-type and PAR2 knockout (KO) mice with T. spiralis. Expression levels of type I, IV, and VI collagen genes and TGF-βI signaling-related genes (Smad2 and Smad3) were also decreased in the PAR2 KO mice. Phosphorylation of Smad2/3, which was increased by T. spiralis infection, was significantly diminished in the PAR2 KO mice. In conclusion, ES proteins containing serine protease most likely activate collagen synthesis via PAR2 and TGF-βI signaling, and this event could influence collagen capsule formation.

  3. Protease-inhibitor interaction predictions: Lessons on the complexity of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher Mark; Pavlidis, Paul

    2017-04-06

    Protein interactions shape proteome function and thus biology. Identification of protein interactions is a major goal in molecular biology, but biochemical methods, although improving, remain limited in coverage and accuracy. Whereas computational predictions can guide biochemical experiments, low validation rates of predictions remain a major limitation. Here, we investigated computational methods in the prediction of a specific type of interaction, the inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors. Proteases generate thousands of proteoforms that dynamically shape the functional state of proteomes. Despite the important regulatory role of proteases, knowledge of their inhibitors remains largely incomplete with the vast majority of proteases lacking an annotated inhibitor. To link inhibitors to their target proteases on a large scale, we applied computational methods to predict inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors based on complementary data including coexpression, phylogenetic similarity, structural information, co-annotation, and colocalization, and also surveyed general protein interaction networks for potential inhibitory interactions. In testing nine predicted interactions biochemically, we validated the inhibition of kallikrein 5 by serpin B12. Despite the use of a wide array of complementary data, we found a high false positive rate of computational predictions in biochemical follow-up. Based on a protease-specific definition of true negatives derived from the biochemical classification of proteases and inhibitors, we analyzed prediction accuracy of individual features. Thereby we identified feature-specific limitations, which also affected general protein interaction prediction methods. Interestingly, proteases were often not coexpressed with most of their functional inhibitors, contrary to what is commonly assumed and extrapolated predominantly from cell culture experiments. Predictions of inhibitory interactions

  4. [Effects of Tagetes erecta extracts on glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis].

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-lu; Wang, You-nian; Wang, Hong-lei; Zhao, Li-lin; Liu, Su-qi; Cao, Hui; Yu, Tong-quan; Lu, Ping

    2007-02-01

    With in vivo and in vitro Tagetes erecta roots under light and dark as test materials, this paper studied the effects of their extracts on the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis. The results showed that the chloroform extract of T. erecta roots had the highest light-activated activity, followed by water extract, and methanol extract. After treated with chloroform extract, the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities in T. viennensis increased markedly, while its protein content decreased obviously. The variation degree of T. viennensis protease activity and protein content was significantly higher when the chloroform extract came from the T. erecta roots under light, suggesting that there existed active matters in the extract, which could promote the activation of protease, and thus, the decomposition of protein in T. viennensis. The bioactivity of T. erecta metabolites was mainly of light-activated one.

  5. Activation of caspase-3 by lysosomal cysteine proteases and its role in 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishisaka, R; Kanno, T; Akiyama, J; Yoshioka, T; Utsumi, K; Utsumi, T

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that in addition to mitochondrial cytochrome c dependent activation, lysosomal cysteine proteases were also involved in the activation of caspase-3. In this study, we have separately obtained the lysosomal and mitochondrial caspase-3 activating factors in a crude mitochondrial fraction and characterized their ability to activate pro-caspase-3 in the in vitro assay system. When a rat liver crude mitochondrial fraction containing lysosomes (ML) was treated with a low concentration of digitonin, lysosomal factors were selectively released without the release of a mitochondrial factor (cytochrome c, Cyt.c). Treatment of ML with Ca(2+) in the presence of inorganic phosphate (P(i)), in contrast, released mitochondrial Cyt.c without the release of lysosomal factors. The obtained lysosomal and mitochondrial factors activated caspase-3 in different manners; caspase-3 activation by lysosomal and mitochondrial factors was specifically suppressed by E-64, a cysteine protease inhibitor, and caspase-9 inhibitor, respectively. Thus, the activation of caspase-3 by lysosomal factors was found to be distinct from the activation by mitochondrial Cyt.c dependent formation of the Apaf-1/caspase-9 complex. To further determine whether or not the activation of caspase-3 by lysosomal cysteine proteases is involved in cellular apoptosis, the effect of E-64-d, a cell-permeable inhibitor of cysteine protease, on 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells was investigated. As a result, DNA fragmentation induced by AAPH was found to be remarkably (up to 50%) reduced by pretreatment with E-64-d, indicating the participation of lysosomal cysteine proteases in AAPH-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

  6. A novel TMPRSS6 mutation that prevents protease auto-activation causes IRIDA

    PubMed Central

    Altamura, Sandro; D'Alessio, Flavia; Selle, Barbara; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2010-01-01

    IRIDA (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anaemia) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder hallmarked by hypochromic microcytic anaemia, low transferrin saturation and high levels of the iron-regulated hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by mutations in the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS6 (transmembrane protease serine 6) that prevent inactivation of HJV (haemojuvelin), an activator of hepcidin transcription. In the present paper, we describe a patient with IRIDA who carries a novel mutation (Y141C) in the SEA domain of the TMPRSS6 gene. Functional characterization of the TMPRSS6(Y141C) mutant protein in cultured cells showed that it localizes to similar subcellular compartments as wild-type TMPRSS6 and binds HJV, but fails to auto-catalytically activate itself. As a consequence, hepcidin mRNA expression is increased, causing the clinical symptoms observed in this IRIDA patient. The present study provides important mechanistic insight into how TMPRSS6 is activated. PMID:20704562

  7. Differential Expression of Extracellular Lipase and Protease Activities of Mycelial and Yeast Forms in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Malassezia furfur is a dimorphic yeast that is part of the human skin microflora. This fungus is a pathogen of a certain skin diseases, such as pityriasis versicolor, and in rare cases causes systemic infection in neonates. However, the role of dimorphism in the pathogenicity remains unclear. A modified induction medium (IM) was successfully able to induce mycelial growth of M. furfur under both solid and liquid condition. Filamentous elements with branching hyphae were observed when cultured in the IM. Furthermore, addition of bovine fetus serum into the liquid IM did not promote hyphal formation; on the contrary, it retrograded hyphae to the yeast form. Plate-washing assay showed that M. furfur hyphae did not possess the ability of invasive growth. Secretory proteins from both yeast and hyphal forms were isolated, and lipase and protease activities were analyzed. Intriguingly, the hyphal form showed higher activities than those of the yeast form, particularly the protease activity.

  8. Inhibition of MALT1 protease activity is selectively toxic for activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ferch, Uta; Kloo, Bernhard; Gewies, Andreas; Pfänder, Vera; Düwel, Michael; Peschel, Christian; Krappmann, Daniel; Ruland, Jürgen

    2009-10-26

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoma in humans. The aggressive activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of DLBCL is characterized by constitutive NF-kappaB activity and requires signals from CARD11, BCL10, and the paracaspase MALT1 for survival. CARD11, BCL10, and MALT1 are scaffold proteins that normally associate upon antigen receptor ligation. Signal-induced CARD11-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complexes couple upstream events to IkappaB kinase (IKK)/NF-kappaB activation. MALT1 also possesses a recently recognized proteolytic activity that cleaves and inactivates the negative NF-kappaB regulator A20 and BCL10 upon antigen receptor ligation. Yet, the relevance of MALT1 proteolytic activity for malignant cell growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate preassembled CBM complexes and constitutive proteolysis of the two known MALT1 substrates in ABC-DLBCL, but not in germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL. ABC-DLBCL cell treatment with a MALT1 protease inhibitor blocks A20 and BCL10 cleavage, reduces NF-kappaB activity, and decreases the expression of NF-kappaB targets genes. Finally, MALT1 paracaspase inhibition results in death and growth retardation selectively in ABC-DLBCL cells. Thus, our results indicate a growth-promoting role for MALT1 paracaspase activity in ABC-DLBCL and suggest that a pharmacological MALT1 protease inhibition could be a promising approach for lymphoma treatment.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of Feline infectious peritonitis virus main protease in complex with an inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinshan; Wang, Fenghua; Tan, Yusheng; Chen, Xia; Zhao, Qi; Fu, Sheng; Li, Shuang; Chen, Cheng; Yang, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) causes a lethal systemic granulomatous disease in wild and domestic cats around the world. Currently, no effective vaccines or drugs have been developed against it. As a member of the genus Alphacoronavirus, FIPV encodes two polyprotein precursors required for genome replication and transcription. Each polyprotein undergoes extensive proteolytic processing, resulting in functional subunits. This process is mainly mediated by its genome-encoded main protease, which is an attractive target for antiviral drug design. In this study, the main protease of FIPV in complex with a Michael acceptor-type inhibitor was crystallized. The complex crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = 112.3, b = 112.3, c = 102.1 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of human coronavirus NL63 main protease in complex with an inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenghua; Tan, Yusheng; Li, Huiyan; Chen, Xia; Wang, Jinshan; Li, Shuang; Fu, Sheng; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Cheng; Su, Dan; Yang, Haitao

    2014-08-01

    Human coronavirus NL63 mainly infects younger children and causes cough, fever, rhinorrhoea, bronchiolitis and croup. It encodes two polyprotein precursors required for genome replication and transcription. Each polyprotein undergoes extensive proteolytic processing, resulting in functional subunits. This process is mainly mediated by its genome-encoded main protease, which is an attractive target for antiviral drug design. In this study, the main protease of human coronavirus NL63 was crystallized in complex with a Michael acceptor. The complex crystals diffracted to 2.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87.2, c = 212.1 Å. Two molecules were identified per asymmetric unit.

  11. Delivery of a Protease-Activated Cytolytic Peptide Prodrug by Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jallouk, Andrew P; Palekar, Rohun U; Marsh, Jon N; Pan, Hua; Pham, Christine T N; Schlesinger, Paul H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-08-19

    Melittin is a cytolytic peptide derived from bee venom that inserts into lipid membranes and oligomerizes to form membrane pores. Although this peptide is an attractive candidate for treatment of cancers and infectious processes, its nonspecific cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity have limited its therapeutic applications. Several groups have reported the development of cytolytic peptide prodrugs that only exhibit cytotoxicity following activation by site-specific proteases. However, systemic administration of these constructs has proven difficult because of their poor pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we present a platform for the design of protease-activated melittin derivatives that may be used in conjunction with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle delivery system. Although native melittin was substantially hemolytic (HD50: 1.9 μM) and cytotoxic (IC50: 2.4 μM), the prodrug exhibited 2 orders of magnitude less hemolytic activity (HD50: > 100 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: > 100 μM). Incubation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) led to cleavage of the prodrug at the expected site and restoration of hemolytic activity (HD50: 3.4 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: 8.1 μM). Incubation of the prodrug with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles led to stable loading of 10,250 peptides per nanoparticle. Nanoparticle-bound prodrug was also cleaved and activated by MMP-9, albeit at a fourfold slower rate. Intravenous administration of prodrug-loaded nanoparticles in a mouse model of melanoma significantly decreased tumor growth rate (p = 0.01). Because MMPs and other proteases play a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis, this platform holds promise for the development of personalized cancer therapies directed toward a patient's individual protease expression profile.

  12. Protease-Activated Pore-Forming Peptides for the Treatment and Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    A common hallmark of cancers with highly aggressive phenotypes is increased proteolysis in the tumor and the surrounding microenvironment. Prostate cancer has a number of proteases uniquely associated with it that may play various important roles in disease progression. In this report, we utilize the peritumoral proteolytic activity of prostate cancer to activate engineered peptide constructs for the treatment and noninvasive imaging of prostate cancer. Using a modular "propeptide" approach, a cationic diastereomeric pore-forming peptide domain was linked to an inactivating acidic peptide domain. The inactivating acidic peptide domain was engineered to be a cleavable substrate for the secreted serine protease prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or the transmembrane metalloprotease prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). The propeptides were then evaluated in a direct comparison study. Both the PSA and PSMA activated propeptides were found to be cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, however, treatment of LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 xenografts with the PSMA propeptide resulted in a pronounced cytostatic effect when compared with xenografts treated with the PSA propeptide or the cationic diastereomeric peptide alone. The PSMA activated propeptide also proved to be an effective optical imaging probe in vivo when labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore. These data suggest that protease-activated pore-forming peptides could potentially be used for both imaging and treating prostate cancer. PMID:25537662

  13. Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor from leaves of Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Satheesh, L Shilpa; Murugan, K

    2011-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor isolated from Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt. has been reported. A 14.3 kDa protease inhibitor (PI) was isolated and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation (20-85% saturation), sephadex G-75, DEAE sepharose column and trypsin-sepharose affinity chromatography from the leaves of C. grandis. The purity was checked by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. PI exhibited marked growth inhibitory effects on colon cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PI was thermostable and showed antimicrobial activity without hemolytic activity. PI strongly inhibited pathogenic microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Eschershia coli, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, Mucor indicus, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus flavus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Examination by bright field microscopy showed inhibition of mycelial growth and sporulation. Morphologically, PI treated fungus showed a significant shrinkage of hyphal tips. Reduced PI completely lost its activity indicating that disulfide bridge is essential for its protease inhibitory and antifungal activity. Results reported in this study suggested that PI may be an excellent candidate for development of novel oral or other anti-infective agents.

  14. Crystal structure of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin protease in a product-bound state: Evidence for noncanonical zinc protease activity.

    PubMed

    Segelke, Brent; Knapp, Mark; Kadkhodayan, Saloumeh; Balhorn, Rod; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-05-04

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most potent toxins known, disrupt neurotransmission through proteolysis of proteins involved in neuroexocytosis. The light chains of BoNTs are unique zinc proteases that have stringent substrate specificity and require exceptionally long substrates. We have determined the crystal structure of the protease domain from BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A). The structure reveals a homodimer in a product-bound state, with loop F242-V257 from each monomer deeply buried in its partner's catalytic site. The loop, which acts as a substrate, is oriented in reverse of the canonical direction for other zinc proteases. The Y249-Y250 peptide bond of the substrate loop is hydrolyzed, leaving the Y249 product carboxylate coordinated to the catalytic zinc. From the crystal structure of the BoNT/A protease, detailed models of noncanonical binding and proteolysis can be derived which we propose are also consistent with BoNT/A binding and proteolysis of natural substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). The proposed BoNT/A substrate-binding mode and catalytic mechanism are markedly different from those previously proposed for the BoNT serotype B.

  15. Thalidomide combined with irradiation alters the activity of two proteases.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Ece; Aydemir, Esra; Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Fişkın, Kayahan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of thalidomide, a drug known for its anti‑angiogenic and antitumor properties, at its cytotoxic dose previously determined as 40 µg/ml (according to four cytotoxic test results). The effect of the drug alone and in combination with radiotherapy using Cobalt 60 (60Co) at 45 Gy on the enzymatic activity of substance‑P degrading A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)10 and neprilysin (NEP) was investigated in the mouse breast cancer cell lines 4T1 and 4T1 heart metastases post‑capsaicin (4THMpc). Thalidomide (40 µg/ml) exerted differing effects on the activities of ADAM10 and NEP enzymes. In 4T1 cells, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone did not alter ADAM10 enzyme activity. 60Co irradiation at 45 Gy alone caused a 42% inhibition in ADAM10 activity, however, the inhibition increased to 89% when combined therapy was used. By contrast, in the 4THMpc cell line, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone induced a 66.6% increase in ADAM10 enzyme activity. Radiotherapy alone and thalidomide with 60Co combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 40% inhibition of ADAM10 activity, respectively. In 4T1 cells, thalidomide alone caused a 40.9% increase in NEP activity. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with the drug caused a 40.7% increase in NEP activity. In more aggressive 4THMpc cells, thalidomide alone caused a 26.6% increase in NEP activity. Radiotherapy alone and combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 37% increase in enzyme activity, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that thalidomide alone or in combination with radiotherapy exhibits significant cytotoxic effects on 4T1 and 4THMpc mouse breast cancer cell lines indicating that this drug affects the enzymatic activity of ADAM10 and NEP in vitro.

  16. Discovery of novel protease activated receptors 1 antagonists with potent antithrombotic activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Perez, Michel; Lamothe, Marie; Maraval, Catherine; Mirabel, Etienne; Loubat, Chantal; Planty, Bruno; Horn, Clemens; Michaux, Julien; Marrot, Sebastien; Letienne, Robert; Pignier, Christophe; Bocquet, Arnaud; Nadal-Wollbold, Florence; Cussac, Didier; de Vries, Luc; Le Grand, Bruno

    2009-10-08

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) or thrombin receptors constitute a class of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) implicated in the activation of many physiological mechanisms. Thus, thrombin activates many cell types such as vascular smooth muscle cells, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and platelets via activation of these receptors. In humans, thrombin-induced platelet aggregation is mediated by one subtype of these receptors, termed PAR1. This article describes the discovery of new antagonists of these receptors and more specifically two compounds: 2-[5-oxo-5-(4-pyridin-2-ylpiperazin-1-yl)penta-1,3-dienyl]benzonitrile 36 (F 16618) and 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-[4-(4-fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl]propenone 39 (F 16357), obtained after optimization. Both compounds are able to inhibit SFLLR-induced human platelet aggregation and display antithrombotic activity in an arteriovenous shunt model in the rat after iv or oral administration. Furthermore, these compounds are devoid of bleeding side effects often observed with other types of antiplatelet drugs, which constitutes a promising advantage for this new class of antithrombotic agents.

  17. Insights into the structural function of the complex of HIV-1 protease with TMC-126: molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Han, Ju-Guang; Chen, Hang; Li, Liang; Zhao, Run-Ning Zhao; Liu, Guang; Duan, Yuhua

    2012-05-01

    The binding properties of the protein-inhibitor complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease with the inhibitor TMC-126 are investigated by combining computational alanine scanning (CAS) mutagenesis with binding free-energy decomposition (BFED). The calculated results demonstrate that the flap region (residues 38-58) and the active site region (residues 23-32) in HIV-1 protease contribute 63.72% of the protease to the binding of the inhibitor. In particular, the mechanisms for the interactions of key residues of these species are fully explored and analyzed. Interestingly, the regression analyses show that both CAS and BFED based on the generalized Born model yield similar results, with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. However, compared to CAS, BFED is faster and can decompose the per-residue binding free-energy contributions into backbone and sidechain contributions. The results obtained in this study are useful for studying the binding mechanism between receptor and ligand and for designing potent inhibitors that can combat diseases.

  18. Tobacco etch virus protease retains its activity in various buffers and in the presence of diverse additives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changsheng; Liang, Jiongqiu; Shi, Rui; Gao, Xuna; Zhang, Ruijuan; Hong, Fulin; Yuan, Qihang; Wang, Shengbin

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease is widely used to remove tags from recombinant fusion proteins because of its stringent sequence specificity. It is generally accepted that the high concentrations of salts or other special agents in most protein affinity chromatography buffers can affect enzyme activity, including that of TEV protease. Consequently, tedious desalination or the substitution of standard TEV reaction buffer for elution buffer are often needed to ensure TEV protease activity when removing fusion tags after purifying target proteins using affinity chromatography. To address this issue, we used SOE PCR technology to synthesize a TEV protease gene with a codon pattern adapted to the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli, recovered the purified recombinant TEV protease, and examined its activity in various elution buffers commonly used in affinity chromatography as well as the effects of selected additives on its activity. Our results showed that the rTEV protease maintained high activity in all affinity chromatography elution buffers tested and tolerated high concentrations of additives commonly used in protein purification procedures, such as ethylene glycol, EGTA, Triton X-100, Tween-20, NP-40, CHAPS, urea, SDS, guanidine hydrochloride and β-mercaptoethanol. These results will facilitate the use of rTEV protease in removing tags from fusion proteins.

  19. Sclerotiamide: The First Non-Peptide-Based Natural Product Activator of Bacterial Caseinolytic Protease P.

    PubMed

    Lavey, Nathan P; Coker, Jesse A; Ruben, Eliza A; Duerfeldt, Adam S

    2016-04-22

    Caseinolytic protease P (ClpP) maintains essential roles in bacterial homeostasis. As such, both the inhibition and activation of this enzyme result in bactericidal activity, making ClpP a promising target for antibacterial drug development. Herein, we report the results of a fluorescence-based screen of ∼450 structurally diverse fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites. Sclerotiamide (1), a paraherquamide-related indolinone, was identified as the first non-peptide-based natural product activator of ClpP. Structure-activity relationships arising from the initial screen, preliminary biochemical evaluation of 1, and rationale for the exploitation of this chemotype to develop novel ClpP activators are presented.

  20. Hemoglobinase activity of the lysine gingipain protease (Kgp) of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J P; Dawson, J A; Hannis, J C; Muddiman, D; Macrina, F L

    1999-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal disease pathogen, forms black-pigmented colonies on blood agar. Pigmentation is believed to result from accumulation of iron protoporphyrin IX (FePPIX) derived from erythrocytic hemoglobin. The Lys-X (Lys-gingipain) and Arg-X (Arg-gingipain) cysteine proteases of P. gingivalis bind and degrade erythrocytes. We have observed that mutations abolishing activity of the Lys-X-specific cysteine protease, Kgp, resulted in loss of black pigmentation of P. gingivalis W83. Because the hemagglutinating and hemolytic potentials of mutant strains were reduced but not eliminated, we hypothesized that this protease played a role in acquisition of FePPIX from hemoglobin. In contrast to Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain was not inhibited by hemin, suggesting that this protease played a role near the cell surface where high concentrations of hemin confer the black pigmentation. Human hemoglobin contains 11 Lys residues in the alpha chain and 10 Lys residues in the beta chain. In contrast, there are only three Arg residues in each of the alpha and beta chains. These observations are consistent with human hemoglobin being a preferred substrate for Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain. The ability of the Lys-gingipain to cleave human hemoglobin at Lys residues was confirmed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of hemoglobin fragments resulting from digestion with the purified protease. We were able to detect several of the predicted hemoglobin fragments rendered by digestion with purified Lys-gingipain. Thus, we postulate that the Lys-gingipain of P. gingivalis is a hemoglobinase which plays a role in heme and iron uptake by effecting the accumulation of FePPIX on the bacterial cell surface.

  1. Activation of protease activated receptor 1 increases the excitability of the dentate granule neurons of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is expressed in multiple cell types in the CNS, with the most prominent expression in glial cells. PAR1 activation enhances excitatory synaptic transmission secondary to the release of glutamate from astrocytes following activation of astrocytically-expressed PAR1. In addition, PAR1 activation exacerbates neuronal damage in multiple in vivo models of brain injury in a manner that is dependent on NMDA receptors. In the hippocampal formation, PAR1 mRNA appears to be expressed by a subset of neurons, including granule cells in the dentate gyrus. In this study we investigate the role of PAR activation in controlling neuronal excitability of dentate granule cells. We confirm that PAR1 protein is expressed in neurons of the dentate cell body layer as well as in astrocytes throughout the dentate. Activation of PAR1 receptors by the selective peptide agonist TFLLR increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a subset of acutely dissociated dentate neurons as well as non-neuronal cells. Bath application of TFLLR in acute hippocampal slices depolarized the dentate gyrus, including the hilar region in wild type but not in the PAR1-/- mice. PAR1 activation increased the frequency of action potential generation in a subset of dentate granule neurons; cells in which PAR1 activation triggered action potentials showed a significant depolarization. The activation of PAR1 by thrombin increased the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated component of EPSPs. These data suggest that activation of PAR1 during normal function or pathological conditions, such as during ischemia or hemorrhage, can increase the excitability of dentate granule cells. PMID:21827709

  2. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis.

  3. Single-site substitutions improve cold activity and increase thermostability of the dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Yan; Wu, Li-Ying; Liu, Gang; Feng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To engineer dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP) variants to improve cold activity and increase thermostability so these variants are suitable for the leather processing industry. Based on previous studies with bacterial alkaline proteases, double-site mutations (W106K/V149I and W106K/M124L) were introduced into the DHAP from Bacillus pumilus. Compared with the wild-type DHAP hydrolytic activity, the double-site variant W106K/V149I showed an increase in specific hydrolytic activity at 15 °C by 2.3-fold toward casein in terms of hydrolytic rate and 2.7-fold toward the synthetic peptide AAPF-pN by means of kcat/Km value. The thermostability of the variant (W106K/V149I) was improved with the half-life at 60 and 70 °C increased by 2.7- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when compared with the thermostability of the wild-type DHAP. Conclusively, an increase in the cold activity and thermostability of a bacterial alkaline protease was achieved by protein engineering.

  4. Synthesis of Arylpiperazine Derivatives As Protease Activated Receptor 1 Antagonists And Their Evaluation As Antiproliferative Agents.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Di Gennaro, Elena; Corvino, Angela; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Cirino, Giuseppe; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Iannelli, Federica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Budillon, Alfredo; Severino, Beatrice

    2016-09-26

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-coupled receptor activated by α-thrombin and other proteases. Several reports demonstrate PAR1 involvement in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In order to investigate on potential use of PAR1 antagonists as antiproliferative agents, we have identified a series of arylpiperazine derivatives acting as PAR1 antagonists; the selected molecules have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties. All the compounds inhibited the growth of a panel of cell lines expressing PAR1; two of them, compounds 13 and 15, were able to inhibit, in a dose dependent manner, the growth of the selected cell lines with the lowest IC50 values, and were further characterized to define the mechanism responsible for the observed antiproliferative effect. This study directed us to the identification of two interesting leads that may help to further validate PAR1 as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  5. Inhibition of human natural killer cell activity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, B K; Kharazmi, A

    1987-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease (AP) and elastase (Ela) on human natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitro. AP and Ela were found to inhibit NK cell function. Addition of alpha interferon and interleukin-2 did not abolish this inhibition of NK cell activity. Adhesion of effector to target cells was studied in a single-cell agarose assay of monocyte-depleted NK-cell-enriched cell populations. AP and Ela were shown to inhibit effector/target cell conjugate formation. Furthermore, AP and Ela inhibited the binding of the monoclonal antibody Leu-11, which reacts with the Fc receptor of NK cells. The inhibition of NK cell binding to the target cell by P. aeruginosa proteases is most likely due to proteolytic cleavage of the surface receptors involved in the binding of the effector cell to the target cell. PMID:3030937

  6. The fibrinolytic activity of a novel protease derived from a tempeh producing fungus, Fusarium sp. BLB.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Fujii, Tadashi; Morimiya, Tatsuo; Johdo, Osamu; Nakamura, Takumi

    2007-09-01

    Tempeh is a traditional Indonesian soybean-fermented food produced by filamentous fungi, Rhizopus sp. and Fusarium sp. We isolated and sequenced the genomic gene and a cDNA clone encoding a novel protease (FP) from Fusarium sp. BLB. The genomic gene was 856 bp in length and contained two introns. An isolated cDNA clone encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of FP showed highest homology, of 76%, with that of trypsin from Fusarium oxysporum. The hydrolysis activity of FP toward synthetic peptide was higher than that of any other protease tested, including Nattokinases. Furthermore, the thrombolytic activity of FP was about 2.1-fold higher than that of Nattokinase when the concentration of plasminogen was 24 units/ml. These results suggest that FP is superior to Nattokinases in dissolving fibrin when absorbed into the blood.

  7. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Library of Thiocarbazates and their Activity as Cysteine Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuqing; Myers, Michael C.; Shah, Parag P.; Beavers, Mary Pat; Benedetti, Phillip A.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel class of potent cathepsin L inhibitors, characterized by a thiocarbazate warhead. Given the potential of these compounds to inhibit other cysteine proteases, we designed and synthesized a library of thiocarbazates containing diversity elements at three positions. Biological characterization of this library for activity against a panel proteases indicated a significant preference for members of the papain family of cysteine proteases over serine, metallo-, and certain classes of cysteine proteases, such as caspases. Several very potent inhibitors of Cathepsin L and S were identified. The SAR data was employed in docking studies in an effort to understand the structural elements required for Cathepsin S inhibition. This study provides the basis for the design of highly potent and selective inhibitors of the papain family of cysteine proteases. PMID:20438448

  8. The Role of Protease-Activated Receptors for the Development of Myocarditis: Possible Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Weithauser, Alice; Witkowski, Marco; Rauch, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a unique group of four G-protein coupled receptors. They are widely expressed within the cardiovascular system and the heart. PARs are activated via cleavage by serine proteases. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the activation of PAR1 and PAR2 plays a crucial role in virus induced inflammatory diseases. The receptors enable cells to recognize pathogen-derived changes in the extracellular environment. An infection with Coxsackie-virus B3 (CVB3) can cause myocarditis. Recent studies have been shown that PAR1 signaling enhanced the antiviral innate immune response via interferon β (IFNβ) and thus limited the virus replication and cardiac damage. In contrast, PAR2 signaling decreased the antiviral innate immune response via IFNβ und thus increased the virus replication, which caused severe myocarditis. Along with CVB3 other viruses such as influenza A virus (IAV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) can induce myocarditis. The role of PAR signaling in IAV infections is contrarily discussed. During HSV infections PARs facilitate the virus infection of the host cell. These studies show that PARs might be interesting drug targets for the treatment of virus infections and inflammatory heart diseases. First studies with PAR agonists, antagonists, and serine protease inhibitors have been conducted in mice. The inhibition of thrombin the main PAR1 activating protease decreased the IFNβ response and increased the virus replication in CVB3-induced myocarditis. This indicates that further studies with direct PAR agonists and antagonists are needed to determine whether PARs are useful drug targets for the therapy of virus-induced heart diseases.

  9. The Zinc-Dependent Protease Activity of the Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J.; Cer, Regina Z.; Mudunuri, Uma; Stephens, Robert; Singh, Bal Ram; Adler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) are some of the most toxic proteins known and are the causative agents of botulism. Following exposure, the neurotoxin binds and enters peripheral cholinergic nerve endings and specifically and selectively cleaves one or more SNARE proteins to produce flaccid paralysis. This review centers on the kinetics of the Zn-dependent proteolytic activities of these neurotoxins, and briefly describes inhibitors, activators and factors underlying persistence of toxin action. Some of the structural, enzymatic and inhibitor data that are discussed here are available at the botulinum neurotoxin resource, BotDB (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). PMID:22069621

  10. Synergism of Selective Tumor Vascular Thrombosis and Protease Activated Prodrug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    cells of the hair follicles , and cells of the reproductive and digestive tracts. Chemotherapy can also cause nausea, vomiting, 14 W81XWH-07-1-0389......selected sites promises reduced toxicity and enhanced efficacy. We propose to investigate and validate a bipartite drug delivery-activation system that

  11. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    PubMed Central

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F.Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20Å of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain. PMID:17993455

  12. Protein Degradation and Protease Activity During the Life Cycle of Blastocladiella emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, W. R.; Sonneborn, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of protein degradation during the life cycle of Blastocladiella emersonii showed that (i) protein degradation is especially high during two phases of differentiation (sporulation, 12%/h and germination, 5%/h) in contrast with a much smaller degradation rate in the other phases (growth and zoospores, less than 1%/hr); (ii) protein degradation during germination in growth medium, as well as most of the germination process, is quantitatively unaffected by cycloheximide; (iii) a caseinolytic protease (pH optimum 5.5, apparent molecular weight 55,000 to 60,000) is present in extracts of zoospores and germinating cells; (iv) this protease activity is very low (perhaps absent) in extracts of late growth phase cells, but reappears during induced sporulation; (v) a different class of caseinolytic protease activity (pH optima 7 and 10; apparent molecular weight 25,000 to 30,000) is found in cellular extracts of late growth phase and early phases of sporulation; (vi) the latter class of enzyme activity is released into the medium during later phases of sporulation and is replaced in the cells by the former class. Speculations as to the roles of protein degradation in cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:4813892

  13. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  14. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A.

    PubMed

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2008-02-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defenses and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and self-processed mature forms. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin, and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20A of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain.

  15. Cockroach protease allergen induces allergic airway inflammation via epithelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sagar L.; Agrawal, Komal; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Protease allergens are known to enhance allergic inflammation but their exact role in initiation of allergic reactions at mucosal surfaces still remains elusive. This study was aimed at deciphering the role of serine protease activity of Per a 10, a major cockroach allergen in initiation of allergic inflammation at mucosal surfaces. We demonstrate that Per a 10 increases epithelial permeability by disruption of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, and enhances the migration of Monocyte derived dendritic cell precursors towards epithelial layer as exhibited by trans-well studies. Per a 10 exposure also leads to secretion of IL-33, TSLP and intracellular Ca2+ dependent increase in ATP levels. Further, in vivo experiments revealed that Per a 10 administration in mice elevated allergic inflammatory parameters along with high levels of IL-33, TSLP, IL-1α and uric acid in the mice lungs. We next demonstrated that Per a 10 cleaves CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified B cells and CD25 (IL-2 receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified T cells in an activity dependent manner, which might favour Th2 responses. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 plays a significant role in initiation of allergic airway inflammation at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:28198394

  16. Fibroblast activation protein-alpha and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26): cell-surface proteases that activate cell signaling and are potential targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein-alpha (FAP-alpha) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) are serine proteases with post-prolyl peptidase activities that can modify tumor cell behavior. FAP-alpha and DPPIV can form heteromeric complexes with each other and may function coordinately to modulate the growth, differentiation, adhesion, and metastasis of tumor cells. This review is focused on FAP-alpha and summarizes a series of studies showing that elevated expression of FAP-alpha results in profound changes in growth and malignant behavior of tumor cells. Depending on the model system investigated, FAP-alpha expression causes dramatic promotion or suppression of tumor growth. In the case of tumor promotion, FAP-alpha expression can drive tumor growth by increasing angiogenesis and by decreasing the anti-tumor response of the immune system. In the case of tumor suppression, FAP-alpha can decrease tumorigenicity of mouse melanoma cells and restore contact inhibition and growth factor dependence even when it is catalytically inactive, implying that protein-protein interactions mediate these effects. Understanding how FAP-alpha activates cell signaling is critical to determining how FAP-alpha mediates growth promotion versus growth suppression in the different model systems and ultimately in human cancer patients. In particular, the roles of FAP-alpha protease activity and FAP-alpha complex formation with DPPIV and other surface molecules in activating cell signaling need to be elucidated since these represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Fluorigenic substrates for the protease activities of botulinum neurotoxins, serotypes A, B, and F.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James J; Stafford, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    The seven botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are zinc metalloproteases that cleave neuronal proteins involved in neurotransmitter release and are among the most toxic natural products known. High-throughput BoNT assays are needed for use in antibotulinum drug discovery and to characterize BoNT protease activities. Compared to other proteases, BoNTs exhibit unusually stringent substrate requirements with respect to amino acid sequences and polypeptide lengths. Nonetheless, we have devised a strategy for development of fluorigenic BoNT protease assays, based on earlier structure-function studies, that has proven successful for three of the seven serotypes: A, B, and F. In synthetic peptide substrates, the P(1) and P(3)' residues were substituted with 2,4-dinitrophenyl-lysine and S-(N-[4-methyl-7-dimethylamino-coumarin-3-yl]-carboxamidomethyl)-cysteine, respectively. By monitoring the BoNT-catalyzed increase in fluorescence over time, initial hydrolysis rates could be obtained in 1 to 2 min when BoNT concentrations were 60 ng/ml (about 1 nM) or higher. Each BoNT cleaved its fluorigenic substrate at the same location as in the neuronal target protein, and kinetic constants indicated that the substrates were selective and efficient. The fluorigenic assay for BoNT B was used to characterize a new competitive inhibitor of BoNT B protease activity with a K(i) value of 4 micro M. In addition to real-time activity measurements, toxin concentration determinations, and kinetic studies, the BoNT substrates described herein may be directly incorporated into automated high-throughput assay systems to screen large numbers of compounds for potential antibotulinum drugs.

  18. Evaluation of trypanocidal activity of combinations of anti-sleeping sickness drugs with cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is unsatisfactory because only a few drugs, with serious side effects and poor efficacy, are available. As drug combination regimes often achieve greater therapeutic efficacy than monotherapies, here the trypanocidal activity of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 in combination with current anti-HAT drugs using bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the interaction between cysteine protease inhibitors (K11777, CA-074Me and CAA0225) and anti-HAT drugs (suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine). Bloodstream forms of T. brucei were incubated in culture medium containing cysteine protease inhibitors or anti-HAT drugs alone or in combination at a 1:1 fixed-dose ratio. After 48 h incubation, live cells were counted, the 50% growth inhibition values determined and combination indices calculated. The general cytotoxicity of drug combinations was evaluated with human leukaemia HL-60 cells. Combinations of K11777 with suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol showed antagonistic effects while with eflornithine a synergistic effect was observed. Whereas eflornithine antagonises with CA-074Me, an inhibitor inactivating the targeted TbCATL only under reducing conditions, it synergises with CAA0255, an inhibitor structurally related to CA-074Me which inactivates TbCATL independently of thiols. These findings indicate an essential role of thiols for the synergistic interaction between K11777 and eflornithine. Encouragingly, the K11777/eflornithine combination displayed higher trypanocidal than cytotoxic activity. The results of this study suggest that the combination of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 and eflornithine display promising synergistic trypanocidal activity that warrants further investigation of the drug combination as possible alternative treatment of HAT.

  19. An 11-kDa form of human immunodeficiency virus protease expressed in Escherichia coli is sufficient for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M C; Lim, J J; Heimer, E P; Kramer, R A

    1988-01-01

    In order to define the protease domain of human immunodeficiency virus 1, various regions of the pol open reading frame were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Antiserum directed against the conserved retroviral protease active site was used to identify pol precursor and processed species containing the presumed protease domain. The smallest product that accumulates is about 11 kDa as measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE. This size agrees with that predicted from the presence in this region of two Phe-Pro sequences, which is one of the cleavage sites recognized by HIV protease. DNA encoding only the predicted 11-kDa protein was cloned, bypassing the need for autoprocessing, and the protein was expressed to a high level in E. coli. This form is active as demonstrated by its ability to specifically cleave protease-deficient pol protein in vivo in E. coli. Extracts of E. coli containing the 11-kDa protease also process human immunodeficiency virus gag substrates in vitro. These results demonstrate that the 11-kDa protease is sufficient for enzymatic activity and are consistent with a major role for this form in virus maturation. Images PMID:3282230

  20. The total protein content, protein fractions and proteases activities of drone prepupae of Apis mellifera due to varrosis.

    PubMed

    Zółtowska, Krystyna; Lipiński, Zbigniew; Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata

    2005-01-01

    The proteins level and activities of acid and alkaline proteases in whole body extracts of drone prepupae of Apis mellifera naturally infested with Varroa destructor were studied. The infested and a non-infested group did not differ significantly in their total protein content. However, some differences in protein profiles were found. A lack of three protein fractions of moderate and lower molecular weight in infested prepupae was noted. Moreover, some differences in the quantity of protein in most of the fractions were observed. The activity of acid proteases from infested prepupae was lower (p < 0.05) compared with the activity of these proteases from the non-infested one group. The infested drone had higher activity of alkaline proteases than non-infested but this difference was not statisticaly significant.

  1. [Clinical and diagnostic importance of the evaluation of the Ig proteases activity in children with intestinal dysbacteriosis].

    PubMed

    Zinkevich, O D; Bondarenko, V M; Tiurin, Iu A; Safina, N A; Anokhin, V A

    2004-01-01

    The specific activity of serine, metal dependent and thiolic Ig proteases in the coprofiltrates of children with manifestations of intestinal dysbacteriosis was determined by the enzyme immunoassay. 56 children with pronounced symptoms of intestinal disorders (37 children aged up to 1 year and 19 children over 1 year) were examined. A group of 25 clinically healthy children was used as control. Simultaneously with protease activity of coprofiltrates, there was detected the level of Ig-degrading activity of the opportunistic bacteria islolates of different taxonomic groups from feces of children with dysbacteriosis of different severity (as determined by the classical bacteriological method). The evaluation of the Ig-proteolytic activity of fecal supernatants, associated with the presence of serine, metal-dependent and thiolic proteases in the intestine, as well as detection of such proteases in microbial isolates, seems to be highly important for the diagnosis of intestinal disorders in children and is recommended for screening of intestinal dysbacteriosis.

  2. The trimeric serine protease HtrA1 forms a cage-like inhibition complex with an anti-HtrA1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Lipari, Michael T; Liang, Wei-Ching; Estevez, Alberto; Hang, Julie; Stawicki, Scott; Wu, Yan; Moran, Paul; Elliott, Mike; Eigenbrot, Charles; Katschke, Kenneth J; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    High temperature requirement A1 (HtrA1) is a trypsin-fold serine protease implicated in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Our interest in an antibody therapy to neutralize HtrA1 faces the complication that the target adopts a trimeric arrangement, with three active sites in close proximity. In the present study, we describe antibody 94, obtained from a human antibody phage display library, which forms a distinct macromolecular complex with HtrA1 and inhibits the enzymatic activity of recombinant and native HtrA1 forms. Using biochemical methods and negative-staining EM we were able to elucidate the molecular composition of the IgG94 and Fab94 complexes and the associated inhibition mechanism. The 246-kDa complex between the HtrA1 catalytic domain trimer (HtrA1_Cat) and Fab94 had a propeller-like organization with one Fab bound peripherally to each protomer. Low-resolution EM structures and epitope mapping indicated that the antibody binds to the surface-exposed loops B and C of the catalytic domain, suggesting an allosteric inhibition mechanism. The HtrA1_Cat-IgG94 complex (636 kDa) is a cage-like structure with three centrally located IgG94 molecules co-ordinating two HtrA1_Cat trimers and the six active sites pointing into the cavity of the cage. In both complexes, all antigen-recognition regions (paratopes) are found to bind one HtrA1 protomer and all protomers are bound by a paratope, consistent with the complete inhibition of enzyme activity. Therefore, in addition to its potential therapeutic usefulness, antibody 94 establishes a new paradigm of multimeric serine protease inhibition.

  3. Activation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by the alkaline protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Heidrich, Elisa M; Myerburg, Michael M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2012-09-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that significantly contributes to the mortality of patients with cystic fibrosis. Chronic infection by Pseudomonas induces sustained immune and inflammatory responses and damage to the airway. The ability of Pseudomonas to resist host defenses is aided, in part, by secreted proteases, which act as virulence factors in multiple modes of infection. Recent studies suggest that misregulation of protease activity in the cystic fibrosis lung may alter fluid secretion and pathogen clearance by proteolytic activation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). To evaluate the possibility that proteolytic activation of ENaC may contribute to the virulence of Pseudomonas, primary human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to P. aeruginosa and ENaC function was assessed by short circuit current measurements. Apical treatment with a strain known to express high levels of alkaline protease (AP) resulted in an increase in basal ENaC current and a loss of trypsin-inducible ENaC current, consistent with sustained activation of ENaC. To further characterize this AP-induced ENaC activation, AP was purified, and its folding, activity, and ability to activate ENaC were assessed. AP folding was efficient under pH and calcium conditions thought to exist in the airway surface liquid of normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Short circuit measurements of ENaC in polarized monolayers indicated that AP activated ENaC in immortalized cell lines as well as post-transplant, primary human bronchial epithelial cells from both CF and non-CF patients. This activation was mapped to the γ-subunit of ENaC. Based on these data, patho-mechanisms associated with AP in the CF lung are proposed wherein secretion of AP leads to decreased airway surface liquid volume and a corresponding decrease in mucocilliary clearance of pulmonary pathogens.

  4. 7-hydroxycalamenene Effects on Secreted Aspartic Proteases Activity and Biofilm Formation of Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Mariana M. B.; Almeida, Catia A.; Chaves, Francisco C. M.; Rodrigues, Igor A.; Bizzo, Humberto R.; Alviano, Celuta S.; Alviano, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 7-hydroxycalamenenene-rich essential oil (EO) obtained from the leaves of Croton cajucara (red morphotype) have been described as active against bacteria, protozoa, and fungi species. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 7-hydroxycalamenenene against Candida albicans and nonalbicans species. Materials and Methods: C. cajucara EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and its major compound, 7-hydroxycalamenene, was purified using preparative column chromatography. The anti-candidal activity was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and secreted aspartic proteases (SAP) and biofilm inhibition assays. Results: 7-hydroxycalamenene (98% purity) displayed anti-candidal activity against all Candida species tested. Higher activity was observed against Candida dubliniensis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans, showing MIC values ranging from 39.06 μg/ml to 78.12 μg/ml. The purified 7-hydroxycalamenene was able to inhibit 58% of C. albicans ATCC 36801 SAP activity at MIC concentration (pH 7.0). However, 7-hydroxycalamenene demonstrated poor inhibitory activity on C. albicans ATCC 10231 biofilm formation even at the highest concentration tested (2500 μg/ml). Conclusion: The bioactive potential of 7-hydroxycalamenene against planktonic Candida spp. further supports its use for the development of antimicrobials with anti-candidal activity. SUMMARY Croton cajucara Benth. essential oil provides high amounts of 7-hydroxycalamenene7-Hydroxycalameneneisolated from C. cajucarais active against Candida spp7-Hydroxycalameneneinhibits C. albicans aspartic protease activity7-Hydroxycalamenene was not active against C. albicans biofilm formation. Figure PMID:27019560

  5. A biosensor for the protease TACE reveals actin damage induced TACE activation

    PubMed Central

    Chapnick, Douglas A.; Bunker, Eric; Liu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Ligand shedding has gained increased attention as a major posttranslational modification mechanism used by cells to respond to diverse environmental conditions. The TACEadam17 protease is a critical mediator of such ligand shedding, regulating the maturation and release of an impressive range of extracellular substrates that drive diverse cellular responses. Exactly how this protease is itself activated remains unclear, in part due to the lack of available tools to measure TACE activity with temporal and spatial resolution in live cells. We have developed a FRET based biosensor for TACE activity (TSen), which is capable of reporting TACE activation kinetics in live cells with a high degree of specificity. TSen was used in combination with chemical biology to probe the dependence of various means of TACE activation on p38 and Erk kinase activities, as well as to identify a novel connection between actin cytoskeletal disruption and TACE activation. Such cytoskeletal disruption leads to rapid and robust TACE activation in some cell types and accumulation of TACE at the plasma membrane, allowing for increased cleavage of endogenous substrates. Our study highlights both the versatility of TSen as a tool to understand the mechanisms of TACE activation in live cells and the importance of actin cytoskeletal integrity as a modulator of TACE activity. PMID:25714465

  6. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis.

  7. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-08-03

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN.

  8. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  9. The crystal structure of the cysteine protease Xylellain from Xylella fastidiosa reveals an intriguing activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ney Ribeiro; Faro, Aline Regis; Dotta, Maria Amélia Oliva; Faim, Livia Maria; Gianotti, Andreia; Silva, Flavio Henrique; Oliva, Glaucius; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2013-02-14

    Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for a wide range of economically important plant diseases. We report here the crystal structure and kinetic data of Xylellain, the first cysteine protease characterized from the genome of the pathogenic X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c. Xylellain has a papain-family fold, and part of the N-terminal sequence blocks the enzyme active site, thereby mediating protein activity. One novel feature identified in the structure is the presence of a ribonucleotide bound outside the active site. We show that this ribonucleotide plays an important regulatory role in Xylellain enzyme kinetics, possibly functioning as a physiological mediator.

  10. β-Amyloid induces nuclear protease-mediated lamin fragmentation independent of caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Vijay Sankar; Islam, Md Imamul; Haque, Md Aminul; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2016-06-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ), a hallmark peptide of Alzheimer's disease, induces both caspase-dependent apoptosis and non-apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined caspase-independent non-apoptotic cell death preceding caspase activation in Aβ42-treated cells. We first determined the optimal treatment conditions for inducing cell death without caspase activation and selected a double-treatment method involving the incubation of cells with Aβ42 for 4 and 6 h (4+6 h sample). We observed that levels of lamin A (LA) and lamin B (LB) were reduced in the 4+6 h samples. This reduction was decreased by treatment with suc-AAPF-CMK, an inhibitor of nuclear scaffold (NS) protease, but not by treatment with z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor. In addition, suc-AAPF-CMK decreased the changes in nuclear morphology observed in cells in the 4+6 h samples, which were different from nuclear fragmentation observed in STS-treated cells. Furthermore, suc-AAPF-CMK inhibited cell death in the 4+6 h samples. LA and LB fragmentation occurred in the isolated nuclei and was also inhibited by suc-AAPF-CMK. Together, these data indicated that the fragmentation of LA and LB in the Aβ42-treated cells was induced by an NS protease, whose identity is not clearly determined yet. A correlation between Aβ42 toxicity and the lamin fragmentation by NS protease suggests that inhibition of the protease could be an effective method for controlling the pathological process of AD.

  11. Inhibitory Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Aspartyl Protease Inhibitors against Encephalitozoon intestinalis Evaluated by Cell Culture-Quantitative PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Jean; Santillana-Hayat, Maud; Cassinat, Bruno; Sarfati, Claudine; Derouin, Francis; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Immune reconstitution might not be the only factor contributing to the low prevalence of microsporidiosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients treated with protease inhibitors, as these drugs may exert a direct inhibitory effect against fungi and protozoa. In this study, we developed a cell culture-quantitative PCR assay to quantify Encephalitozoon intestinalis growth in U-373-MG human glioblastoma cells and used this assay to evaluate the activities of six HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors against E. intestinalis. A real-time quantitative PCR assay targeted the E. intestinalis small-subunit rRNA gene. HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors were tested over serial concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 10 mg/liter, with albendazole used as a control. Ritonavir, lopinavir, and saquinavir were able to inhibit E. intestinalis growth, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.5, 2.2, and 4.6 mg/liter, respectively, whereas amprenavir, indinavir, and nelfinavir had no inhibitory effect. Pepstatin A, a reference aspartyl protease inhibitor, could also inhibit E. intestinalis growth, suggesting that HIV protease inhibitors may act through the inhibition of an E. intestinalis-encoded aspartyl protease. These results showed that some HIV protease inhibitors can inhibit E. intestinalis growth at concentrations that are achievable in vivo and that the real-time quantitative PCR assay that we used is a valuable tool for the in vitro assessment of the activities of drugs against E. intestinalis. PMID:15917534

  12. Determination of activable proacrosin/acrosin in bovine sperm using an irreversible isocoumarin serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Palencia, D D; Garner, D L; Hudig, D; Holcombe, D W; Burner, C A; Redelman, D; Fernandez, G C; Abuelyaman, A S; Kam, C M; Powers, J C

    1996-09-01

    The activable proacrosin/acrosin levels in bovine sperm were examined using fluorescent staining and flow cytometry. The proportion of sperm with active acrosin were determined using the biotinylated isocoumarin serine protease inhibitor, Bi-Aca-Aca-OMe-IC (BIC). The presence of bound inhibitor on sperm was then determined by secondary labeling with avidin fluorescein conjugate. The proportion of sperm with activable proacrosin/acrosin was assessed by using detergent treatment to expose the active acrosin in intact sperm. The difference between untreated and detergent-treated aliquots was used to estimate the proportion of sperm with activable proacrosin/acrosin. In the 24-h stored samples from six bulls, the mean proportion of sperm with activable proacrosin/acrosin was 78.8 +/- 2.8%, whereas the mean proportion with exposed acrosin after cryopreservation of these samples was 55.8 +/- 4.1%. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found among bulls in the proportion of sperm with activable proacrosin/acrosin both before and after cryopreservation. Activable proacrosin/acrosin levels in samples of cryopreserved sperm from five bulls were not correlated with fertility. These results do indicate, however, that the irreversible isocoumarin serine protease inhibitor BIC can be used to determine the proportion of sperm cells that retain activable proacrosin/acrosin after cryopreservation and thawing.

  13. Effect of sulfur mustard exposure on protease activity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-12-31

    Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare blistering agent for which neither the mechanism of action nor an antidote is known. Papirmeister et al. (1985) have postulated a biochemical hypothesis for mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving a sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption and activation of protease. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes in cell cultures were employed as an in vitro model for alkylating agent toxicity. A chromogenic peptide substrate assay was used for detection of protease in lymphocytes treated with sulfur mustard or chloroethyl sulfide. Exposure of human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors to these alkylating agents resulted in an increase in cell associated protease activity. This increase in protease activity may contribute to the pathology or act as an indicator to predict methods of therapeutic intervention for sulfur mustard toxicity.

  14. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  15. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Salles, Hévila Oliveira; Braga, Ana Carolina Linhares; Nascimento, Maria Thayana dos Santos Canuto do; Sousa, Ana Márjory Paiva; Lima, Adriano Rodrigues; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Cavalcante, Antônio Cézar Rocha; Egito, Antonio Silvio do; Andrade, Lúcia Betânia da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (<12 kDa) for Albizia lebbeck, Ipomoea asarifolia, Jatropha curcas, Libidibia ferrea, Moringa oleifera and Ricinus communis (P<0.05, Bonferroni test). The two fractions of Crotalaria spectabilis showed the same ovicidal activity (P>0.05, Bonferroni test). Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties.

  16. Role of protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) in ocular infections and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) belong to a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are cleaved at an activation site within the N-terminal exodomain by a variety of proteinases, essentially of the serine (Ser) proteinase family. After cleavage, the new N-terminal sequence functions as a tethered ligand, which binds intramolecularly to activate the receptor and initiate signaling. Cell signals induced through the activation of PARs appear to play a significant role in innate and adoptive immune responses of the cornea, which is constantly exposed to proteinases under physiological or pathophysiological conditions. Activation of PARs interferes with all aspects of the corneal physiology such as barrier function, transports, innate and adoptive immune responses, and functions of corneal nerves. It is not known whether the proteinase released from the microorganism can activate PARs and triggers the inflammatory responses. The role of PAR2 expressed by the corneal epithelial cells and activation by serine protease released from microorganism is discussed here. Recent evidences suggest that activation of PAR2, by the serine proteinases, play an important role in innate and inflammatory responses of the corneal infection. PMID:26078987

  17. Assessing the impact of long term frozen storage of faecal samples on protein concentration and protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Laura S.; Marchesi, Julian R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The proteome is the second axis of the microbiome:host interactome and proteases are a significant aspect in this interaction. They interact with a large variety of host proteins and structures and in many situations are implicated in pathogenesis. Furthermore faecal samples are commonly collected and stored frozen so they can be analysed at a later date. So we were interested to know whether long term storage affected the integrity of proteases and total protein and whether historical native faecal samples were still a viable option for answering research questions around the functional proteome. Methods Faecal samples were collected from 3 healthy volunteers (3 biological replicates) and processed in order to be stored at both − 20 °C and − 80 °C and in a variety of storage buffers. Protein extraction, protein content and protease activity were assessed at the time of collection, after 24 h, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months 6 months and finally 1 year. Results Beadbeating impacted the quantity of protein extracted, while sodium azide did not impact protease assays. Long term storage of extracted proteins showed that both total protein and protease activity were affected when they were stored as extracted protein. Intact faecal samples were shown to maintain both protein levels and protease activity regardless of time and temperature. Conclusions Beadbeating increases the protein and protease activity when extracting from a faecal sample, however, the extracted protein is not stable and activity is lost, even with a suitable storage buffer. The most robust solution is to store the proteins in an intact frozen native faecal matrix and extract at the time of assay or analysis, this approach was shown to be suitable for samples in which, there are low levels of protease activity and which had been frozen for a year. PMID:26853125

  18. Transcriptional activation by heat and cold of a thiol protease gene in tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.A.; Fischer, R.L. )

    1990-08-01

    We previously determined that low temperature induces the accumulation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit of a cloned mRNA, designated C14, encoding a polypeptide related to thiol proteases. We now demonstrate that C14 mRNA accumulation is a response common to both high (40{degree}C) and low (4{degree}C) temperature stresses. Exposure of tomato fruit to 40{degree}C results in the accumulation of C14 mRNA, by 8 hours. This response is more rapid than that to 4{degree}C, but slower than the induction of many heat shock messages by 40{degree}C, and therefore unique. We have also studied the mechanism by which heat and cold exposure activate C14 gene expression. Both high and low temperature regulate protease gene expression through transcriptional induction of a single C14 gene. A hypothesis for the function of C14 thiol protease gene expression in response to heat and cold is discussed.

  19. Partial characterization of cold active amylases and proteases of Streptomyces sp. from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cotârleţ, Mihaela; Negoiţă, Teodor Gh.; Bahrim, Gabriela E.; Stougaard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate novel enzyme-producing bacteria from vegetation samples from East Antarctica and also to characterize them genetically and biochemically in order to establish their phylogeny. The ability to grow at low temperature and to produce amylases and proteases cold-active was also tested. The results of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the 4 Alga rRNA was 100% identical to the sequences of Streptomyces sp. rRNA from Norway and from the Solomon Islands. The Streptomyces grew well in submerged system at 20°C, cells multiplication up to stationary phase being drastically increased after 120 h of submerged cultivation. The beta-amylase production reached a maximum peak after seven days, while alpha-amylase and proteases were performing biosynthesis after nine days of submerged cultivation at 20°C. Newly Streptomyces were able to produce amylase and proteases in a cold environment. The ability to adapt to low temperature of these enzymes could make them valuable ingredients for detergents, the food industry and bioremediation processes which require low temperatures. PMID:24031702

  20. Antiviral activities of peptide-based covalent inhibitors of the Enterovirus 71 3C protease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong Wah; Ang, Melgious Jin Yan; Lau, Qiu Ying; Poulsen, Anders; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Peng, Jianhe; Hill, Jeffrey; Hong, Wan Jin; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a highly contagious disease caused by a range of human enteroviruses. Outbreaks occur regularly, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, putting a burden on public healthcare systems. Currently, there is no antiviral for treating this infectious disease and the only vaccines are limited to circulation in China, presenting an unmet medical need that needs to be filled urgently. The human enterovirus 3 C protease has been deemed a plausible drug target due to its essential roles in viral replication. In this study, we designed and synthesized 10 analogues of the Rhinovirus 3 C protease inhibitor, Rupintrivir, and tested their 3 C protease inhibitory activities followed by a cellular assay using human enterovirus 71 (EV71)-infected human RD cells. Our results revealed that a peptide-based compound containing a trifluoromethyl moiety to be the most potent analogue, with an EC50 of 65 nM, suggesting its potential as a lead for antiviral drug discovery. PMID:27645381

  1. Effects of tricyclic compounds on membrane binding of bivalent cations, activities of acetylcholinesterase and some tissue proteases.

    PubMed

    Molnar, J; Sohar, I; Kovacs, J; Rakonczay, Z; Rausch, H

    1993-01-01

    A tricyclic compound tetrahydroaminoacridine is known to improve the cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease. The possible mechanism of action of acridine and structurally related tricyclic compounds was studied on the bivalent cation content of bacterial membrane, rat brain acetylcholinesterase and some tissue proteases in model experiments. Acridine orange and disubstituted chlorpromazine (CPZ) derivatives lowered Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding and membrane polarization in the simplest biological membrane (E. coli), as revealed by reactor neutron activation analysis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was inhibited by CPZ, 3,7,8-trihydroxy-CPZ, acridine orange partially saturated desipramine, imipramine, trans-clopenthixol and tetrahydrocannabidiolic at 10(-4) to 10(-5). A metalloproteinase, MMP-7-ase, was inhibited by tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid, 3,7,8-trihydroxy-CPZ, acridine orange but other tissue proteinases, ATN-ase and cathepsin B, were less sensitive to these compounds. (ATN-ase is an acetyltyrosine-p-nitroanilide splitting enzyme, a serine protease). The chelate complex forming ability and electron donor capacity of the compounds may play a role in the biological effects tested. It is assumed that compounds which do not displace bivalent cations in membranes may exert an inhibitory effect on AChE, and that metalloproteinase enzymes may be promising for the treatment of degenerative brain diseases.

  2. Intraspecies differences in hemostatic venom activities of the South American rattlesnakes, Crotalus durissus cumanensis, as revealed by a range of protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana M; Aguilar, Irma; Guerrero, Belsy; Girón, María E; Lucena, Sara; Sánchez, Elda E; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2008-09-01

    Crotalus durissus cumanensis is an endemic rattlesnake found in Venezuela and Colombia. In this study, a comparative analysis of hemorrhagic, coagulation and fibrino(geno)lytic activities in the presence or absence of protease inhibitors was performed with venoms of the same species Crotalus durissus cumanensis, from seven geographical regions of Venezuela (Lagunetica, Santa Teresa, Carrizales, Guarenas, Anzoátegui, Margarita and Maracay). Lagunetica, Carrizales and Anzoátegui venoms induced hemorrhagic activity. All venoms, except that of snakes from the Carrizales region presented thrombin-like activity, which was inhibited completely by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and ethylene glycol-bis-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. This effect of the latter could be explained by the high chelant calcium effect, which is a cofactor for the fibrin polymerization process. Soybean trypsin inhibitor was effective on Santa Teresa venom. Antithrombin III/Hep complex and phenantroline partially inhibited this activity in all venoms except Margarita and Anzoátegui, respectively, which were not inhibited. Serine protease inhibitors were more effective against thrombin, kallikrein and plasmin-like amidolytic activities. Additionally, metalloprotease inhibitors significantly inhibited the t-PA-like amidolytic activity and completely the hemorrhagic and fibrino(geno)lytic activities. In conclusion, the thrombin-like activity observed in these venoms was partially reduced by serine protease inhibitors, indicating the possible presence of catalytic domains in those enzymes that do not interact with these inhibitors. Using protease inhibitors on venom hemostatic activities could contribute to our understanding of the active components of snake venom on the hemostatic system, and further reveal the intraspecies variation of venoms, which is important in the treatment of envenomation, and in addition represents an interesting model for the study of venom in hemostasis.

  3. Bacteriocin Activity of Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Controlled by the Serine Protease HtrA via Posttranscriptional Regulation▿

    PubMed Central

    Dawid, Suzanne; Sebert, Michael E.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    The blp locus of a type 6A strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae encodes a two-peptide bacteriocin, pneumocin MN, which mediates intraspecies competition during mouse nasopharyngeal colonization. This locus is regulated by a quorum-sensing mechanism consisting of a dedicated two-component regulatory system and a peptide pheromone. Like most clinical isolates, this type 6A strain can be separated into opaque and transparent colony variants, each playing a different role during pneumococcal infection. In this study, we show that the blp locus is differentially regulated at the posttranscriptional level in pneumococcal opacity variants. Transparent and opaque variants produce equivalent amounts of blpMNPO transcript when stimulated with a synthetic pheromone, but transparent variants have no pneumocin MN-mediated inhibitory activity while opaque variants produce large zones of inhibitory activity. The differential regulation in opacity variants is driven by the two-component regulatory system CiaRH via its regulation of the serine protease HtrA. Transparent mutants deficient in CiaH or HtrA show increased pneumocin MN-mediated inhibition. In addition, these mutants demonstrate alterations in their dose response to a synthetic peptide pheromone, suggesting that HtrA activity impacts pneumocin MN production at the level of signaling. This, in addition to its known effects on competence, suggests that HtrA is a pleiotropic regulator whose protease activity affects several important bacterial pathways. The complex regulation of pneumocins may allow the pneumococcus to reserve the secretion of active peptides for situations where the benefit of their inhibitory activity outweighs the cost of their production. PMID:19103930

  4. Serum protease activity in chronic kidney disease patients: The GANI_MED renal cohort.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Carmen; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Endlich, Nicole; Rettig, Rainer; Stracke, Sylvia; Fiene, Beate; Aymanns, Simone; Felix, Stephan B; Hannemann, Anke; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Serum or plasma proteases have been associated with various diseases including cancer, inflammation, or reno-cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate whether the enzymatic activities of serum proteases are associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study population comprised 268 participants of the "Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine" (GANI_MED) cohort. Enzymatic activity of aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B, alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leucine aminopeptidase 3, prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), angiotensin I-converting enzyme, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) proteases was measured in serum. Linear regression of the respective protease was performed on kidney function adjusted for age and sex. Kidney function was modeled either by the continuous Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-based eGFR or dichotomized by eGFR < 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. Results with a false discovery rate below 0.05 were deemed statistically significant. Among the 10 proteases investigated, only the activities of ACE2 and DPP4 were correlated with eGFR. Patients with lowest eGFR exhibited highest DPP4 and ACE2 activities. DPP4 and PEP were correlated with age, but all other serum protease activities showed no associations with age or sex. Our data indicate that ACE2 and DPP4 enzymatic activity are associated with the eGFR in patients with CKD. This finding distinguishes ACE2 and DPP4 from other serum peptidases analyzed and clearly indicates that further analyses are warranted to identify the precise role of these serum ectopeptidases in the pathogenesis of CKD and to fully elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms. Impact statement • Renal and cardiac diseases are very common and often occur concomitantly

  5. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  6. Soluble expression and enzymatic activity evaluation of protease from reticuloendotheliosis virus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feng; Zhao, Yan; Qi, Xiaole; Cui, Hongyu; Gao, Yulong; Gao, Honglei; Liu, Changjun; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Kai; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    The protease (PR) encoded by most retroviruses is deeply involved in the lifecycle and infection process of retroviruses by possessing the specificity necessary to correctly cleave the viral polyproteins and host cell proteins. However, as an important representative of avian retroviruses, the enzymatic properties of PR from reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) have not been clearly documented. The recombinant PR, its mutant fused with a His-tag, and its substrate p18-p30 fused with a GST-tag were expressed in the Escherichia coli system as soluble enzymes. The soluble PR and p18-p30 were purified using Ni-NTA His Bind Resin and Glutathione Sepharose 4B, respectively. The enzymatic activity of PR was analyzed using the substrate of p18-p30. The expressed prokaryotic protease has enzyme activity that is dependent on such conditions as temperature, pH, and ions, and its activity can be inhibited by caspase inhibitor and the divalent metal ions Ca(2+) and Ni(2+). In addition, the key role of the residue Thr (amino acids 28) for the enzymatic activity of PR was identified. Furthermore, the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK was confirmed to inhibit the PR enzymatic activity of REV. For the first time, the PR of REV was expressed in the soluble form, and the optimal enzymatic reaction system in vitro was developed and preliminarily used. This study provides essential tools and information for further understanding the infection mechanism of REV and for the development of antiviral drugs treating retroviruses.

  7. Protease-activated receptor 2 activation is sufficient to induce the transition to a chronic pain state.

    PubMed

    Tillu, Dipti V; Hassler, Shayne N; Burgos-Vega, Carolina C; Quinn, Tammie L; Sorge, Robert E; Dussor, Gregory; Boitano, Scott; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J

    2015-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) is known to play an important role in inflammatory, visceral, and cancer-evoked pain based on studies using PAR2 knockout (PAR2(-/-)) mice. We have tested the hypothesis that specific activation of PAR2 is sufficient to induce a chronic pain state through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling to protein synthesis machinery. We have further tested whether the maintenance of this chronic pain state involves a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB)/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling axis. We observed that intraplantar injection of the novel highly specific PAR2 agonist, 2-aminothiazol-4-yl-LIGRL-NH2 (2-at), evokes a long-lasting acute mechanical hypersensitivity (median effective dose ∼12 pmoles), facial grimacing, and causes robust hyperalgesic priming as revealed by a subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity and facial grimacing to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) injection. The promechanical hypersensitivity effect of 2-at is completely absent in PAR2(-/-) mice as is hyperalgesic priming. Intraplantar injection of the upstream ERK inhibitor, U0126, and the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex inhibitor, 4EGI-1, prevented the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming after 2-at injection. Systemic injection of the trkB antagonist ANA-12 similarly inhibited PAR2-mediated mechanical hypersensitivity, grimacing, and hyperalgesic priming. Inhibition of aPKC (intrathecal delivery of ZIP) or trkB (systemic administration of ANA-12) after the resolution of 2-at-induced mechanical hypersensitivity reversed the maintenance of hyperalgesic priming. Hence, PAR2 activation is sufficient to induce neuronal plasticity leading to a chronic pain state, the maintenance of which is dependent on a BDNF/trkB/aPKC signaling axis.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of a new fluorogenic active-site titrant of serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Livingston, D C; Brocklehurst, J R; Cannon, J F; Leytus, S P; Wehrly, J A; Peltz, S W; Peltz, G A; Mangel, W F

    1981-07-21

    The molecule 3',6'-bis(4-guanidinobenzoyloxy)-5-[N'-(4-carboxyphenyl)thioureido[spirop]isobenzofuran-1-(3H),9'-[9H]xanthen]-3-one, abbreviated FDE, was designed and synthesized as a fluorogenic active-site titrant for serine proteases. It is an analogue of p-nitrophenyl p-guanidino-benzoate (NPGB) in which a fluorescein derivative is substituted for p-nitrophenol. FDE and NPGB exhibit similar kinetic characteristics in an active-site titration of trypsin in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.2. The rate of acylation with FDE is extremely fast (k2 = 1.05 s-1) and the rate of deacylation extremely slow (k3 = 1.66 X 10(-5) s-1). The Ks is 3.06 X 10(-6) M, and the Km(app) is 4.85 X 10(-11) M. With two of the serine proteases involved in fibrinolysis, the rate of acylation with FDE is also fast, K2 = 0.112 s-1 for urokinase and 0.799 s-1 for plasmin, and the rate of deacylation is slow, k3 = 3.64 X 10(-4) s-1 for urokinase and 6.27 X 10(-6) s-1 for plasmin. The solubility limit of FDE in phosphate-buffered saline is 1.3 X 10(-5) M, and the first-order rate constant for spontaneous hydrolysis is 5.1 X 10(-6) s-1. The major difference between FDE and NPGB is the detectability of the product in an active-site titration. p-Nitrophenol can be detected at concentrations no lower than 10(-6) M whereas fluorescein can be detected at concentrations as low as 10(-12) M. Thus, FDE should be useful in quantitatively assaying serine proteases as very low concentrations.

  9. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 differentially regulate factor V expression from human platelets.

    PubMed

    Duvernay, Matthew; Young, Summer; Gailani, David; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Hamm, Heidi E; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    With the recent interest of protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and PAR4 as possible targets for the treatment of thrombotic disorders, we compared the efficacy of protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 in the generation of procoagulant phenotypes on platelet membranes. PAR4-activating peptide (AP)-stimulated platelets promoted thrombin generation in plasma up to 5 minutes earlier than PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. PAR4-AP-mediated factor V (FV) association with the platelet surface was 1.6-fold greater than for PAR1-AP. Moreover, PAR4 stimulation resulted in a 3-fold greater release of microparticles, compared with PAR1 stimulation. More robust FV secretion and microparticle generation with PAR4-AP was attributable to stronger and more sustained phosphorylation of myosin light chain at serine 19 and threonine 18. Inhibition of Rho-kinase reduced PAR4-AP-mediated FV secretion and microparticle generation to PAR1-AP-mediated levels. Thrombin generation assays measuring prothrombinase complex activity demonstrated 1.5-fold higher peak thrombin levels on PAR4-AP-stimulated platelets, compared with PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced PAR4-AP-mediated peak thrombin generation by 25% but had no significant effect on PAR1-AP-mediated thrombin generation. In conclusion, stimulation of PAR4 on platelets leads to faster and more robust thrombin generation, compared with PAR1 stimulation. The greater procoagulant potential is related to more efficient FV release from intracellular stores and microparticle production driven by stronger and more sustained myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data have implications about the role of PAR4 during hemostasis and are clinically relevant in light of recent efforts to develop PAR antagonists to treat thrombotic disorders.

  10. Endosomal deubiquitinating enzymes control ubiquitination and down-regulation of protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Burcu; Murphy, Jane E; Cottrell, Graeme S; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2009-10-09

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl ubiquitinates the G protein-coupled receptor protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2)), which is required for postendocytic sorting of activated receptors to lysosomes, where degradation terminates signaling. The mechanisms of PAR(2) deubiquitination and its importance in trafficking and signaling of endocytosed PAR(2) are unknown. We report that receptor deubiquitination occurs between early endosomes and lysosomes and involves the endosomal deubiquitinating proteases AMSH and UBPY. Expression of the catalytically inactive mutants, AMSH(D348A) and UBPY(C786S), caused an increase in PAR(2) ubiquitination and trapped the receptor in early endosomes, thereby preventing lysosomal trafficking and degradation. Small interfering RNA knockdown of AMSH or UBPY also impaired deubiquitination, lysosomal trafficking, and degradation of PAR(2). Trapping PAR(2) in endosomes through expression of AMSH(D348A) or UBPY(C786S) did not prolong the association of PAR(2) with beta-arrestin2 or the duration of PAR(2)-induced ERK2 activation. Thus, AMSH and UBPY are essential for trafficking and down-regulation of PAR(2) but not for regulating PAR(2) dissociation from beta-arrestin2 or PAR(2)-mediated ERK2 activation.

  11. Engineered tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease active in the secretory pathway of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cesaratto, Francesca; López-Requena, Alejandro; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2015-10-20

    Tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is a unique endopeptidase with stringent substrate specificity. TEVp has been widely used as a purified protein for in vitro applications, but also as a biological tool directly expressing it in living cells. To adapt the protease to diverse applications, several TEVp mutants with different stability and enzymatic properties have been reported. Herein we describe the development of a novel engineered TEVp mutant designed to be active in the secretory pathway. While wild type TEVp targeted to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is synthetized as an N-glycosylated and catalytically inactive enzyme, a TEVp mutant with selected mutations at two verified N-glycosylation sites and at an exposed cysteine was highly efficient. This mutant was very active in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of living cells and can be used as a biotechnological tool to cleave proteins within the secretory pathway. As an immediate practical application we report the expression of a complete functional monoclonal antibody expressed from a single polypeptide, which was cleaved by our TEVp mutant into the two antibody chains and secreted as an assembled and functional molecule. In addition, we show active TEVp mutants lacking auto-cleavage activity.

  12. Protease-activated receptor-1 modulates hippocampal memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Qadri, Laura H; Sultan, Faraz A; Watson, Jennifer A; Mount, Daniel J; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sweatt, J David

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is an unusual G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated through proteolytic cleavage by extracellular serine proteases. Although previous work has shown that inhibiting PAR1 activation is neuroprotective in models of ischemia, traumatic injury, and neurotoxicity, surprisingly little is known about PAR1's contribution to normal brain function. Here, we used PAR1-/- mice to investigate the contribution of PAR1 function to memory formation and synaptic function. We demonstrate that PAR1-/- mice have deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. We also show that while PAR1-/- mice have normal baseline synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, they exhibit severe deficits in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Mounting evidence indicates that activation of PAR1 leads to potentiation of NMDAR-mediated responses in CA1 pyramidal cells. Taken together, this evidence and our data suggest an important role for PAR1 function in NMDAR-dependent processes subserving memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

  13. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Rebecca A; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers.

  14. Cleavage of Treponema denticola PrcA polypeptide to yield protease complex-associated proteins Prca1 and Prca2 is dependent on PrtP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Young; Bian, Xue-Lin; Wong, Grace W K; Hannam, Pauline M; McBride, Barry C; Fenno, J Christopher

    2002-07-01

    Analysis of potential virulence factors of oral spirochetes focuses on surface and secreted proteins. The Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like protease (CTLP) is implicated in degradation of host cell molecules and contributes to tissue invasion. The CTLP complex, composed of the 72-kDa PrtP protein and two auxiliary proteins with molecular masses of approximately 40 and 30 kDa, is also involved in localization and oligomerization of the T. denticola major surface protein (Msp). The larger auxiliary protein was reported to be encoded by an open reading frame (ORF2) directly upstream of prtP. The deduced 39-kDa translation product of ORF2 contains a sequence matching the N-terminal sequence determined from one of the CTLP complex proteins. No proteins with significant homology are known, nor was information available on the third protein of the complex. DNA sequence analysis showed that ORF2 extended an additional 852 bp upstream of the reported sequence. The complete gene, designated prcA, encodes a predicted N-terminally-acylated polypeptide of approximately 70 kDa. Isogenic mutants with mutations in prtP, prcA, and prcA-prtP all lacked CTLP protease activity. The prcA mutant lacked all three CTLP proteins. The prcA-prtP mutant produced only a C-terminally-truncated 62-kDa PrcA protein. The prtP mutant produced a full-length 70-kDa PrcA. Immunoblot analysis of recombinant PrcA constructs confirmed that PrcA is cleaved to yield the two smaller proteins of the CTLP complex, designated PrcA1 and PrcA2. These data indicate that PrtP is required for cleavage of PrcA and suggest that this cleavage may be required for formation or stability of outer membrane complexes.

  15. Cleavage of Treponema denticola PrcA Polypeptide To Yield Protease Complex-Associated Proteins Prca1 and Prca2 Is Dependent on PrtP

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Young; Bian, Xue-Lin; Wong, Grace W. K.; Hannam, Pauline M.; McBride, Barry C.; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of potential virulence factors of oral spirochetes focuses on surface and secreted proteins. The Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like protease (CTLP) is implicated in degradation of host cell molecules and contributes to tissue invasion. The CTLP complex, composed of the 72-kDa PrtP protein and two auxiliary proteins with molecular masses of approximately 40 and 30 kDa, is also involved in localization and oligomerization of the T. denticola major surface protein (Msp). The larger auxiliary protein was reported to be encoded by an open reading frame (ORF2) directly upstream of prtP. The deduced 39-kDa translation product of ORF2 contains a sequence matching the N-terminal sequence determined from one of the CTLP complex proteins. No proteins with significant homology are known, nor was information available on the third protein of the complex. DNA sequence analysis showed that ORF2 extended an additional 852 bp upstream of the reported sequence. The complete gene, designated prcA, encodes a predicted N-terminally-acylated polypeptide of approximately 70 kDa. Isogenic mutants with mutations in prtP, prcA, and prcA-prtP all lacked CTLP protease activity. The prcA mutant lacked all three CTLP proteins. The prcA-prtP mutant produced only a C-terminally-truncated 62-kDa PrcA protein. The prtP mutant produced a full-length 70-kDa PrcA. Immunoblot analysis of recombinant PrcA constructs confirmed that PrcA is cleaved to yield the two smaller proteins of the CTLP complex, designated PrcA1 and PrcA2. These data indicate that PrtP is required for cleavage of PrcA and suggest that this cleavage may be required for formation or stability of outer membrane complexes. PMID:12081957

  16. Proteases in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N; Ahmad, Syed S

    2002-01-01

    The serine proteases, cofactors and cell-receptor molecules that comprise the haemostatic mechanism are highly conserved modular proteins that have evolved to participate in biochemical reactions in blood coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Blood coagulation is initiated by exposure of tissue factor, which forms a complex with factor VIIa and factor X, which results in the generation of small quantities of thrombin and is rapidly shutdown by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor. The generation of these small quantities of thrombin then activates factor XI, resulting in a sequence of events that lead to the activation of factor IX, factor X and prothrombin. Sufficient thrombin is generated to effect normal haemostasis by converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The anticoagulant pathways that regulate blood coagulation include the protein C anticoagulant mechanism, the serine protease inhibitors in plasma, and the Kunitz-like inhibitors, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and protease nexin 2. Finally, the fibrinolytic mechanism that comprises the activation of plasminogen into plasmin prevents excessive fibrin accumulation by promoting local dissolution of thrombi and promoting wound healing by reestablishment of blood flow.

  17. Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Activation Contributes to House Dust Mite-Induced IgE Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Post, Sijranke; Heijink, Irene H.; Petersen, Arjen H.; de Bruin, Harold G.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Aeroallergens such as house dust mite (HDM), cockroach, and grass or tree pollen are innocuous substances that can induce allergic sensitization upon inhalation. The serine proteases present in these allergens are thought to activate the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, on the airway epithelium, thereby potentially inducing allergic sensitization at the expense of inhalation tolerance. We hypothesized that the proteolytic activity of allergens may play an important factor in the allergenicity to house dust mite and is essential to overcome airway tolerance. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of PAR-2 activation in allergic sensitization and HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. In our study, Par-2 deficient mice were treated with two different HDM extracts containing high and low serine protease activities twice a week for a period of 5 weeks. We determined airway inflammation through quantification of percentages of mononuclear cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and measured total IgE and HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 levels in serum. Furthermore, Th2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-5, IL-13, Eotaxin-1, IL-17, KC, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 17 (CCL17) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), were measured in lung tissue homogenates. We observed that independent of the serine protease content, HDM was able to induce elevated levels of eosinophils and neutrophils in the airways of both wild-type (WT) and Par-2 deficient mice. Furthermore, we show that induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines by HDM exposure is independent of Par-2 activation. In contrast, serine protease activity of HDM does contribute to enhanced levels of total IgE, but not HDM-specific IgE. We conclude that, while Par-2 activation contributes to the development of IgE responses, it is largely dispensable for the HDM-induced induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and airway inflammation in an experimental mouse model of HDM

  18. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV.

  19. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity by niacinamide, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-03-11

    The pathologic mechanism of sulfur mustard-induced skin vesication is as yet undefined. Papirmeister et al. have postulated a biochemical mechanism for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption resulting in NAD+ depletion and activation of protease. The authors have utilized a chromogenic peptide substrate assay to establish that human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed 24 hr previously to sulfur mustard exhibited an increase in proteolytic activity. Doses of compounds known to alter the biochemical events associated with sulfur mustard exposure or reduce protease activity were tested in this system for their ability to block the sulfur mustard-induced protease activity. Treatment with niacinamide 1 hr after or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone 24 hr prior to sulfur mustard exposure resulted in a decrease of 39%, 33% and 42% respectively of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity. These data suggest that therapeutic intervention into the biochemical pathways that culminate in protease activation might serve as an approach to treatment of sulfur mustard-induced pathology.

  20. Effects of Hypothermia and Self-Warming on Activity of Ca(2+)-Dependent Neutral Proteases in Tissues of Ground Squirrels and Rats.

    PubMed

    Nurmagomedova, P M; Emirbekov, E Z; Abasova, M M

    2016-04-01

    Effects of hypothermia and subsequent self-warming on activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases were studied in tissues of ground squirrels and rats. Moderate hypothermia did not significantly change activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases in the analyzed tissues of ground squirrels, but reduced protease activity in rat heart. Severe hypothermia reduced enzyme activity in the analyzed tissues of rats and ground squirrels. Differences in activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases after long-term hypothermia and subsequent self-warming were found only in the heart.

  1. Protease with collagenolytic activity produced by Bacillus sp. DPUA 1728 from Amazonian soil

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lorena A.; Cruz, Raimundo F.; dos Santos, Januário G.; Silva, Wilson C.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative analyses were carried out on solid medium with insoluble collagen 0.25% (w/v) to detect proteases with collagenolytic activity produced by Bacillus sp. In cultures incubated for 24 h, a 23 full factorial design with four repetitions at the center point was developed to analyze the effects and interactions between initial pH, temperature and the concentration of gelatin. Based on the results of the first 23 full factorial design, a successive 23 full factorial design was performed. The most favorable production conditions were found to be 1.5% (w/v) gelatin, pH 9.0 and 37 °C with enzymatic activity of 86.27 U/mL. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 9.0, and it was stable over wide pH (7.2-10.0) and temperature (45 °C-60 °C) ranges. These results indicate that Bacillus sp DPUA 1728 is a potential source for producing collagenolytic protease with possible biotechnological applications, such as in the food, cosmetics and leather industries. PMID:26691484

  2. The aspartyl protease DDI2 activates Nrf1 to compensate for proteasome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Shun; Irie, Taro; Hirayama, Shoshiro; Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Yashiroda, Hideki; Naguro, Isao; Ichijo, Hidenori; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    In response to proteasome dysfunction, mammalian cells upregulate proteasome gene expression by activating Nrf1. Nrf1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident transcription factor that is continually retrotranslocated and degraded by the proteasome. Upon proteasome inhibition, Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved to become active. However, the processing enzyme for Nrf1 remains obscure. Here we show that the aspartyl protease DNA-damage inducible 1 homolog 2 (DDI2) is required to cleave and activate Nrf1. Deletion of DDI2 reduced the cleaved form of Nrf1 and increased the full-length cytosolic form of Nrf1, resulting in poor upregulation of proteasomes in response to proteasome inhibition. These defects were restored by adding back wild-type DDI2 but not protease-defective DDI2. Our results provide a clue for blocking compensatory proteasome synthesis to improve cancer therapies targeting proteasomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18357.001 PMID:27528193

  3. The Prc and RseP proteases control bacterial cell-surface signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Ibañez, Aurelia; Ramos, Juan L; Bitter, Wilbert; Llamas, María A

    2014-08-01

    Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors play a key role in the regulation of vital functions in the bacterial response to the environment. In Gram-negative bacteria, activity of these sigma factors is often controlled by cell-surface signalling (CSS), a regulatory system that also involves an outer membrane receptor and a transmembrane anti-sigma factor. To get more insight into the molecular mechanism behind CSS regulation, we have focused on the unique Iut system of Pseudomonas putida. This system contains a hybrid protein containing both a cytoplasmic ECF sigma domain and a periplasmic anti-sigma domain, apparently leading to a permanent interaction between the sigma and anti-sigma factor. We show that the Iut ECF sigma factor regulates the response to aerobactin under iron deficiency conditions and is activated by a proteolytic pathway that involves the sequential action of two proteases: Prc, which removes the periplasmic anti-sigma domain, and RseP, which subsequently removes the transmembrane domain and thereby generates the ECF active transcriptional form. We furthermore demonstrate the role of these proteases in the regulation of classical CSS systems in which the sigma and anti-sigma factors are two different proteins.

  4. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  5. Entomotoxicity, protease and chitinase activity of Bacillus thuringiensis fermented wastewater sludge with a high solids content.

    PubMed

    Brar, Satinder K; Verma, M; Tyagi, R D; Valéro, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated the production of biopesticides, protease and chitinase activity by Bacillus thuringiensis grown in raw wastewater sludge at high solids concentration (30 g/L). The rheology of wastewater sludge was modified with addition of Tween-80 (0.2% v/v). This addition resulted in 1.6 and 1.3-fold increase in cell and spore count, respectively. The maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)) augmented from 0.17 to 0.22 h(-1) and entomotoxicity (Tx) increased by 29.7%. Meanwhile, volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) showed marked variations during fermentation, and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) increased 2-fold. The proteolytic activity increased while chitinase decreased for Tween amended wastewater sludge, but the entomotoxicity increased. The specific entomotoxicity followed power law when plotted against spore concentration and the relation between Tx and protease activity was linear. The viscosity varied and volume percent of particles increased in Tween-80 amended wastewater sludge and particle size (D(50)) decreased at the end of fermentation. Thus, there was an increase in entomotoxicity at higher suspended solids (30 g/L) as Tween addition improved rheology (viscosity, particle size, surface tension); enhanced maximum growth rate and OUR.

  6. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P; Tözsér, József; Waugh, David S

    2010-11-01

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-Å resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus (∼20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by ∼10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1' position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  7. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  8. Toxin-Antitoxin Modules Are Pliable Switches Activated by Multiple Protease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muthuramalingam, Meenakumari; White, John C.; Bourne, Christina R.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are bacterial regulatory switches that facilitate conflicting outcomes for cells by promoting a pro-survival phenotypic adaptation and/or by directly mediating cell death, all through the toxin activity upon degradation of antitoxin. Intensive study has revealed specific details of TA module functions, but significant gaps remain about the molecular details of activation via antitoxin degradation used by different bacteria and in different environments. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the interaction of antitoxins with cellular proteases Lon and ClpP to mediate TA module activation. An understanding of these processes can answer long-standing questions regarding stochastic versus specific activation of TA modules and provide insight into the potential for manipulation of TA modules to alter bacterial growth. PMID:27409636

  9. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-10

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  10. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  11. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  12. Synthesis, crystal structure, structure-activity relationships, and antiviral activity of a potent SARS coronavirus 3CL protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Syaulan; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hsu, Min-Feng; Wu, Jen-Dar; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Liu, Yu-Fan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Kuo, Chun-Wei; Wu, Chi-Shen; Chang, Li-Wen; Chen, Wen-Chang; Liao, Shao-Ying; Chang, Teng-Yuan; Hung, Hsin-Hui; Shr, Hui-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Yuan; Huang, Yu-An; Chang, Ling-Yin; Hsu, Jen-Chi; Peters, Clarence J; Wang, Andrew H-J; Hsu, Ming-Chu

    2006-08-10

    A potent SARS coronavirus (CoV) 3CL protease inhibitor (TG-0205221, Ki = 53 nM) has been developed. TG-0205221 showed remarkable activity against SARS CoV and human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E replications by reducing the viral titer by 4.7 log (at 5 microM) for SARS CoV and 5.2 log (at 1.25 microM) for HCoV 229E. The crystal structure of TG-0205221 (resolution = 1.93 A) has revealed a unique binding mode comprising a covalent bond, hydrogen bonds, and numerous hydrophobic interactions. Structural comparisons between TG-0205221 and a natural peptide substrate were also discussed. This information may be applied toward the design of other 3CL protease inhibitors.

  13. Increasing activity and thermal resistance of Bacillus gibsonii alkaline protease (BgAP) by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ronny; Jakob, Felix; Tu, Ran; Siegert, Petra; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus gibsonii Alkaline Protease (BgAP) is a recently reported subtilisin protease exhibiting activity and stability properties suitable for applications in laundry and dish washing detergents. However, BgAP suffers from a significant decrease of activity at low temperatures. In order to increase BgAP activity at 15°C, a directed evolution campaign based on the SeSaM random mutagenesis method was performed. An optimized microtiter plate expression system in B. subtilis was established and classical proteolytic detection methods were adapted for high throughput screening. In parallel, the libraries were screened for increased residual proteolytic activity after incubation at 58°C. Three iterative rounds of directed BgAP evolution yielded a set of BgAP variants with increased specific activity (K(cat)) at 15°C and increased thermal resistance. Recombination of both sets of amino acid substitutions resulted finally in variant MF1 with a 1.5-fold increased specific activity (15°C) and over 100 times prolonged half-life at 60°C (224 min compared to 2 min of the WT BgAP). None of the introduced amino acid substitutions were close to the active site of BgAP. Activity-altering amino acid substitutions were from non-charged to non-charged or from sterically demanding to less demanding. Thermal stability improvements were achieved by substitutions to negatively charged amino acids in loop areas of the BgAP surface which probably fostered ionic and hydrogen bonds interactions.

  14. TRY-5 Is a Sperm-Activating Protease in Caenorhabditis elegans Seminal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph R.; Stanfield, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    Seminal fluid proteins have been shown to play important roles in male reproductive success, but the mechanisms for this regulation remain largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm differentiate from immature spermatids into mature, motile spermatozoa during a process termed sperm activation. For C. elegans males, sperm activation occurs during insemination of the hermaphrodite and is thought to be mediated by seminal fluid, but the molecular nature of this activity has not been previously identified. Here we show that TRY-5 is a seminal fluid protease that is required in C. elegans for male-mediated sperm activation. We observed that TRY-5::GFP is expressed in the male somatic gonad and is transferred along with sperm to hermaphrodites during mating. In the absence of TRY-5, male seminal fluid loses its potency to transactivate hermaphrodite sperm. However, TRY-5 is not required for either hermaphrodite or male fertility, suggesting that hermaphrodite sperm are normally activated by a distinct hermaphrodite-specific activator to which male sperm are also competent to respond. Within males, TRY-5::GFP localization within the seminal vesicle is antagonized by the protease inhibitor SWM-1. Together, these data suggest that TRY-5 functions as an extracellular activator of C. elegans sperm. The presence of TRY-5 within the seminal fluid couples the timing of sperm activation to that of transfer of sperm into the hermaphrodite uterus, where motility must be rapidly acquired. Our results provide insight into how C. elegans has adopted sex-specific regulation of sperm motility to accommodate its male-hermaphrodite mode of reproduction. PMID:22125495

  15. TRY-5 is a sperm-activating protease in Caenorhabditis elegans seminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph R; Stanfield, Gillian M

    2011-11-01

    Seminal fluid proteins have been shown to play important roles in male reproductive success, but the mechanisms for this regulation remain largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm differentiate from immature spermatids into mature, motile spermatozoa during a process termed sperm activation. For C. elegans males, sperm activation occurs during insemination of the hermaphrodite and is thought to be mediated by seminal fluid, but the molecular nature of this activity has not been previously identified. Here we show that TRY-5 is a seminal fluid protease that is required in C. elegans for male-mediated sperm activation. We observed that TRY-5::GFP is expressed in the male somatic gonad and is transferred along with sperm to hermaphrodites during mating. In the absence of TRY-5, male seminal fluid loses its potency to transactivate hermaphrodite sperm. However, TRY-5 is not required for either hermaphrodite or male fertility, suggesting that hermaphrodite sperm are normally activated by a distinct hermaphrodite-specific activator to which male sperm are also competent to respond. Within males, TRY-5::GFP localization within the seminal vesicle is antagonized by the protease inhibitor SWM-1. Together, these data suggest that TRY-5 functions as an extracellular activator of C. elegans sperm. The presence of TRY-5 within the seminal fluid couples the timing of sperm activation to that of transfer of sperm into the hermaphrodite uterus, where motility must be rapidly acquired. Our results provide insight into how C. elegans has adopted sex-specific regulation of sperm motility to accommodate its male-hermaphrodite mode of reproduction.

  16. The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae alters ambient pH, allowing extracellular protease production and activity.

    PubMed

    St Leger, R J; Nelson, J O; Screen, S E

    1999-10-01

    Ambient pH regulates the expression of virulence genes of Metarhizium anisopliae, but it was unknown if M. anisopliae can regulate ambient pH. Mutants of M. anisopliae altered in production of oxalic acid were evaluated for the interrelationship of ambient pH, buffering capacity added to media, growth, and generation of extracellular proteases and ammonia. Wild-type and acid-overproducing mutants [Acid(+)] grew almost as well at pH 8 as at pH 6, but acid-non-producing [Acid(-)] mutants showed limited growth at pH 8, indicating that acid production is linked to the ability to grow at higher pH. Production of ammonia by M. anisopliae was strongly stimulated by low levels of amino acids in the medium when cells were derepressed for nitrogen and carbon. Likewise, although Aspergillus fumigatus and Neurospora crassa produced some ammonia in minimal media, addition of low levels of amino acids enhanced production. Ammonia production by A. fumigatus, N. crassa and M. anisopliae increased the pH of the medium and allowed production of subtilisin proteases, whose activities are observed only at basic pH. In contrast, protease production by the Acid(+) mutants of M. anisopliae was greatly reduced because of the acidification of the medium. This suggests that alkalinization by ammonia production is adaptive by facilitating the utilization of proteinaceous nutrients. Collectively, the data imply that ammonia may have functions related to regulation of the microenvironment and that it represents a previously unconsidered virulence factor in diverse fungi with the potential to harm tissues and disturb the host's immune system.

  17. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  18. The Effectiveness of Negative Pressure Therapy in Diabetic Foot Ulcers with Elevated Protease Activity: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Despite several works have described the usefulness of negative pressure therapy (NPT) in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), no studies have reported its ability in the proteases modulation in DFUs. The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of NPT as a protease-modulating treatment in DFUs. Approach: We conducted a prospective study of a series of diabetic patients affected by chronic DFUs. Each ulcer was assessed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity with a protease status diagnostic test at the baseline and after 2 weeks of NPT. Results: Four patients were included. All patients had type 2 diabetes with a disease duration of ≈20 years. A1c was 79.5 ± 15.3 mmol/mol. Ulcer area was >5 cm2 in all cases. All wounds showed elevated protease activity (EPA) at the baseline. After 2 weeks, all patients showed a normalization of MMPs activity. Innovation: NPT showed its effectiveness in the reduction of EPA in chronic DFUs. Conclusion: This study confirms the role of NPT in the positive modulation of protease activity also in chronic DFUs. PMID:28116227

  19. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser Salah Shebl; Al-Salamah, Ali A.; El-Toni, Ahmed M.; Almaary, Khalid S.; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A.; Elbadawi, Yahya B.; Antranikian, Garabed

    2016-01-01

    The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS) nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS–NH2 nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6%) and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier) and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher Vmax, kcat and kcat/Km, than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media. PMID:26840303

  20. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser Salah Shebl; Al-Salamah, Ali A; El-Toni, Ahmed M; Almaary, Khalid S; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A; Elbadawi, Yahya B; Antranikian, Garabed

    2016-01-29

    The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS) nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS-NH₂ nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6%) and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier) and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher V(max), k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media.

  1. Activation of prothrombin by two subtilisin-like serine proteases from Acremonium sp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunli; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Shimizu, Kosuke; Makimura, Koichi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2007-06-22

    Two novel subtilisin-like serine proteases (AS-E1 and -E2) that activate prothrombin have been identified in a culture of the fungus Acremonium sp. The enzymes were purified through repeated hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The N-terminal sequences of AS-E1 (34.4 kDa) and AS-E2 (32 kDa) showed high similarity to the internal sequences of two distinct subtilisin-like hypothetical proteins from Chaetomium globosum. Both enzymes proteolytically activated prothrombin to meizothrombin(desF1)-like molecules, while the activation cleavage seemed to occur at a site (Tyr(316)-Ile(317)) that is four residues proximal to the canonical Xa cleavage site (Arg(320)-Ile(321)). Both enzymes inhibited plasma clotting, possibly due to extensive degradation of fibrinogen and production of meizothrombin(desF1)-like molecule.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  3. A Cell-based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Sensor Reveals Inter- and Intragenogroup Variations in Norovirus Protease Activity and Polyprotein Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Emmott, Edward; Sweeney, Trevor R; Goodfellow, Ian

    2015-11-13

    The viral protease represents a key drug target for the development of antiviral therapeutics. Because many protease inhibitors mimic protease substrates, differences in substrate recognition between proteases may affect their sensitivity to a given inhibitor. Here we use a cell-based FRET sensor to investigate the activity of different norovirus proteases upon cleavage of various norovirus cleavage sites inserted into a linker region separating cyan fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein. Using this system, we demonstrate that differences in substrate processing exist between proteases from human noroviruses (genogroups I (GI) and II) and the commonly used murine norovirus (MNV, genogroup V) model. These altered the cleavage efficiency of specific cleavage sites both within and between genogroups. The differences observed between these proteases may affect sensitivity to protease inhibitors and the suitability of MNV as a model system for testing such molecules against the human norovirus protease. Finally, we demonstrate that replacement of MNV polyprotein cleavage sites with the GI or GII equivalents, with the exception of the NS6-7 junction, leads to the production of infectious virus when the MNV NS6 protease, but not the GI or GII proteases, are present.

  4. Robust substrate profiling method reveals striking differences in specificities of serum and lung fluid proteases.

    PubMed

    Watson, Douglas S; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Askew, David S; Kodukula, Krishna; Galande, Amit K

    2011-08-01

    Proteases are candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for many diseases. Sensitive and robust techniques are needed to quantify proteolytic activities within the complex biological milieu. We hypothesized that a combinatorial protease substrate library could be used effectively to identify similarities and differences between serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), two body fluids that are clinically important for developing targeted therapies and diagnostics. We used a concise library of fluorogenic probes to map the protease substrate specificities of serum and BALF from guinea pigs. Differences in the proteolytic fingerprints of the two fluids were striking: serum proteases cleaved substrates containing cationic residues and proline, whereas BALF proteases cleaved substrates containing aliphatic and aromatic residues. Notably, cleavage of proline-containing substrates dominated all other protease activities in both human and guinea pig serum. This substrate profiling approach provides a foundation for quantitative comparisons of protease specificities between complex biological samples.

  5. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.; Bohon, J; Chance, M; Licht, S

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  6. Insecticidal activity of two proteases against Spodoptera frugiperda larvae infected with recombinant baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Baculovirus comprise the largest group of insect viruses most studied worldwide, mainly because they efficiently kill agricutural insect pests. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses containing the ScathL gene from Sarcophaga peregrina (vSynScathL), and the Keratinase gene from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus (vSynKerat), were constructed. and their insecticidal properties analysed against Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. Results Bioassays of third-instar and neonate S. frugiperda larvae with vSynScathL and vSynKerat showed a decrease in the time needed to kill the infected insects when compared to the wild type virus. We have also shown that both recombinants were able to increase phenoloxidase activity in the hemolymph of S. frugiperda larvae. The expression of proteases in infected larvae resulted in destruction of internal tissues late in infection, which could be the reason for the increased viral speed of kill. Conclusions Baculoviruses and their recombinant forms constitute viable alternatives to chemical insecticides. Recombinant baculoviruses containing protease genes can be added to the list of engineered baculoviruses with great potential to be used in integrated pest management programs. PMID:20587066

  7. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  8. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  9. SARS coronavirus papain-like protease inhibits the type I interferon signaling pathway through interaction with the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xingxing; Zheng, Yang; Yang, Yudong; Xing, Yaling; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-05-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) develops an antagonistic mechanism by which to evade the antiviral activities of interferon (IFN). Previous studies suggested that SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLpro) inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway, which would normally elicit a robust IFN response, but the mechanism(s) used by SARS PLpro to inhibit activation of the IRF3 pathway is not fully known. In this study, we uncovered a novel mechanism that may explain how SARS PLpro efficiently inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway. We found that expression of the membrane-anchored PLpro domain (PLpro-TM) from SARS-CoV inhibits STING/TBK1/IKKε-mediated activation of type I IFNs and disrupts the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3, which are activated by STING and TBK1. Meanwhile, we showed that PLpro-TM physically interacts with TRAF3, TBK1, IKKε, STING, and IRF3, the key components that assemble the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex for activation of IFN expression. However, the interaction between the components in STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex is disrupted by PLpro-TM. Furthermore, SARS PLpro-TM reduces the levels of ubiquitinated forms of RIG-I, STING, TRAF3, TBK1, and IRF3 in the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex. These results collectively point to a new mechanism used by SARS-CoV through which PLpro negatively regulates IRF3 activation by interaction with STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex, yielding a SARS-CoV countermeasure against host innate immunity.

  10. Subunits of the Plastid ClpPR Protease Complex Have Differential Contributions to Embryogenesis, Plastid Biogenesis, and Plant Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Ramirez Rodriguez, Verenice; Zybailov, Boris; Olinares, Paul Dominic B.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The plastid ClpPR protease complex in Arabidopsis thaliana consists of five catalytic ClpP and four noncatalytic ClpR subunits. An extensive analysis of the CLPR family and CLPP5 is presented to address this complexity. Null alleles for CLPR2 and CLPR4 showed delayed embryogenesis and albino embryos, with seedling development blocked in the cotyledon stage; this developmental block was overcome under heterotrophic conditions, and seedlings developed into small albino to virescent seedlings. By contrast, null alleles for CLPP5 were embryo lethal. Thus, the ClpPR proteins make different functional contributions. To further test for redundancies and functional differences between the ClpR proteins, we overexpressed full-length cDNAs for ClpR1, R2, R3, R4 in clpr1, clpr2 and clpr4 mutants. This showed that overexpression of ClpR3 can complement for the loss of ClpR1, but not for the loss of ClpR2 or ClpR4, indicating that ClpR3 can functionally substitute ClpR1. By contrast, ClpR1, R2 and R4 could not substitute each other. Double mutants of weak CLPR1 and 2 alleles were seedling lethal, showing that a minimum concentration of different ClpR proteins is essential for Clp function. Microscopy and large-scale comparative leaf proteome analyses of a CLPR4 null allele demonstrate a central role of Clp protease in chloroplast biogenesis and protein homeostasis; substrates are discussed. Lack of transcriptional and translational feedback regulation within the CLPPR gene family indicates that regulation of Clp activity occurs through Clp complex assembly and substrate delivery. PMID:19525416

  11. Structural basis for the ATP-independent proteolytic activity of LonB proteases and reclassification of their AAA+ modules.

    PubMed

    An, Young Jun; Na, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Il; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2015-10-01

    Lon proteases degrade defective or denature proteins as well as some folded proteins for the control of cellular protein quality. There are two types of Lon proteases, LonA and LonB. Each consists of two functional components: a protease component and an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ module). Here, we report the 2.03 -resolution crystal structure of the isolated AAA+ module (iAAA+ module) of LonB from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 (TonLonB). The iAAA+ module, having no bound nucleotide, adopts a conformation virtually identical to the ADP-bound conformation of AAA+ modules in the hexameric structure of TonLonB; this provides insights into the ATP-independent proteolytic activity observed in a LonB protease. Structural comparison of AAA+ modules between LonA and LonB revealed that the AAA+ modules of Lon proteases are separated into two distinct clades depending on their structural features. The AAA+ module of LonB belongs to the -H2 & Ins1 insert clade (HINS clade)- defined for the first time in this study, while the AAA+ module of LonA is a member of the HCLR clade.

  12. Labile carbon regulates protease activity and nitrogen acquisition in boreal forest topsoil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindén, A.; Heinonsalo, J.; Oinonen, M.; Sonninen, E.; Hilasvuori, E.; Pumpanen, J.

    2012-04-01

    In boreal zone, soil organic matter (SOM) contains a substantial amount of recalcitrant material and forms a large nitrogen pool. However, this pool is to a great extent inaccessible to plants, due to its low decomposability. Although, the nitrogen supply is the most limiting factor of net ecosystem production (NEP) in boreal forests, it has been speculated that as a result of the accelerated decomposition of SOM induced by climate warming, part of this nitrogen pool could be released. It has also been shown that a substantial proportion of gross primary production (GPP) is allocated below ground and acts as an energy source for decomposing rhizomicrobial organisms, and that changes in the GPP rate could therefore increase the belowground turn over rate of otherwise recalcitrant nitrogen-rich SOM. We were studying the effects of increasing labile carbon input on the symbiotic microbial N acquisition and protease activities in a controlled microcosm experiment. We compared the natural abundance of isotope ratios of 13C and 14C in soil CO2efflux, protease enzyme activity, natural abundance of 15N in the needles, and microbial biomass in microcosms containing bare soil and tree seedlings. In addition, we had treatments were additional energy was given to the bare soil and seedling microcosms in the form of glucose. The age of the CO2 originating from the decomposition process of SOM was older in all treatments where easily decomposable carbon (energy) was available for soil microorganisms. The increased natural abundance of 15N in the needles of the seedlings treated with glucose, suggests a shift in nitrogen acquisition to different SOM pool, which was reflected strongly to the total N content of the SOM and evolving 13C signature in soil CO2 efflux. The protease activity was highest in treatments with artificial glucose addition. Our results suggest that the increased input of easily available carbon from aboveground enables the decomposition of recalcitrant

  13. Novel antiviral activity and mechanism of bromocriptine as a Zika virus NS2B-NS3 protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; Yuan, Shuofeng; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; Zhu, Zheng; Tee, Kah-Meng; Tsang, Jessica Oi-Ling; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Lu, Gang; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Lai, Kin-Kui; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Kao, Richard Yi-Tsun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-02-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is associated with congenital malformations in infected fetuses and severe neurological and other systemic complications in adults. There are currently limited anti-ZIKV treatment options that are readily available and safe for use in pregnancy. In this drug repurposing study, bromocriptine was found to have inhibitory effects on ZIKV replication in cytopathic effect inhibition, virus yield reduction, and plaque reduction assays. Time-of-drug-addition assay showed that bromocriptine exerted anti-ZIKV activity between 0 and 12 h post-ZIKV inoculation, corroborating with post-entry events in the virus replication cycle prior to budding. Our docking model showed that bromocriptine interacted with several active site residues of the proteolytic cavity involving H51 and S135 in the ZIKV-NS2B-NS3 protease protein, and might occupy the active site and inhibit the protease activity of the ZIKV-NS2B-NS3 protein. A fluorescence-based protease inhibition assay confirmed that bromocriptine inhibited ZIKV protease activity. Moreover, bromocriptine exhibited synergistic effect with interferon-α2b against ZIKV replication in cytopathic effect inhibition assay. The availability of per vagina administration of bromocriptine as suppositories or vaginoadhesive discs and the synergistic anti-ZIKV activity between bromocriptine and type I interferon may make bromocriptine a potentially useful and readily available treatment option for ZIKV infection. The anti-ZIKV effects of bromocriptine should be evaluated in a suitable animal model.

  14. Multiplexed tracking of protease activity using a single color of quantum dot vector and a time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer relay.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Malanoski, Anthony P; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Hildebrandt, Niko; Medintz, Igor L

    2012-11-20

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive probes for optical sensing and imaging due to their unique photophysical attributes and nanoscale size. In particular, the development of assays and biosensors based on QDs and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) continues to be a prominent focus of research. Here, we demonstrate the application of QDs as simultaneous donors and acceptors in a time-gated FRET relay for the multiplexed detection of protease activity. In contrast to the current state-of-the-art, which uses multiple colors of QDs, multiplexing was achieved using only a single color of QD. The other constituents of the FRET relay, a luminescent terbium complex and fluorescent dye, were assembled to QDs via peptides that were selected as substrates for the model proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin. Loss of prompt FRET between the QD and dye signaled the activity of chymotrypsin; loss of time-gated FRET between the terbium and QD signaled the activity of trypsin. We applied the FRET relay in a series of quantitative, real-time kinetic assays of increasing biochemical complexity, including multiplexed sensing, measuring inhibition in a multiplexed format, and tracking the proteolytic activation of an inactive pro-protease to its active form in a coupled, multienzyme system. These capabilities were derived from a ratiometric analysis of the two FRET pathways in the relay and permitted extraction of initial reaction rates, enzyme specificity constants, and apparent inhibition constants. This work adds to the growing body of research on multifunctional nanoparticles and introduces multiplexed sensing as a novel capability for a single nanoparticle vector. Furthermore, the ability to track both enzymes within a coupled biological system using one vector represents a significant advancement for nanoparticle-based biosensing. Prospective applications in biochemical research, applied diagnostics, and drug discovery are discussed.

  15. Neutrophil maturation rate determines the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 1 inhibition on neutrophil serine protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Wikell, C; Clifton, S; Shearer, J; Benjamin, A; Peters, S A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) are activated by dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1) during neutrophil maturation. The effects of neutrophil turnover rate on NSP activity following DPP1 inhibition was studied in a rat pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. Experimental Approach Rats were treated with a DPP1 inhibitor twice daily for up to 14 days; NSP activity was measured in onset or recovery studies, and an indirect response model was fitted to the data to estimate the turnover rate of the response. Key Results Maximum NSP inhibition was achieved after 8 days of treatment and a reduction of around 75% NSP activity was achieved at 75% in vitro DPP1 inhibition. Both the rate of inhibition and recovery of NSP activity were consistent with a neutrophil turnover rate of between 4–6 days. Using human neutrophil turnover rate, it is predicted that maximum NSP inhibition following DPP1 inhibition takes around 20 days in human. Conclusions and Implications Following inhibition of DPP1 in the rat, the NSP activity was determined by the amount of DPP1 inhibition and the turnover of neutrophils and is thus supportive of the role of neutrophil maturation in the activation of NSPs. Clinical trials to monitor the effect of a DPP1 inhibitor on NSPs should take into account the delay in maximal response on the one hand as well as the potential delay in a return to baseline NSP levels following cessation of treatment. PMID:27186823

  16. Proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta by an ICE-like protease in apoptotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Y; Manome, Y; Meinhardt, G; Kisaki, H; Kharbanda, S; Robertson, M; Ghayur, T; Wong, W W; Kamen, R; Weichselbaum, R

    1995-01-01

    These studies demonstrate that treatment of human U-937 cells with ionizing radiation (IR) is associated with activation of a cytoplasmic myelin basic protein (MBP) kinase. Characterization of the kinase by gel filtration and in-gel kinase assays support activation of a 40 kDa protein. Substrate and inhibitor studies further support the induction of protein kinase C (PKC)-like activity. The results of N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the purified protein demonstrate identity of the kinase with an internal region of PKC delta. Immunoblot analysis was used to confirm proteolytic cleavage of intact 78 kDa PKC delta in control cells to the 40 kDa C-terminal fragment after IR exposure. The finding that both IR-induced proteolytic activation of PKC delta and endonucleolytic DNA fragmentation are blocked by Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL supports an association with physiological cell death (PCD). Moreover, cleavage of PKC delta occurs adjacent to aspartic acid at a site (QDN) similar to that involved in proteolytic activation of interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE). The specific tetrapeptide ICE inhibitor (YVAD) blocked both proteolytic activation of PKC delta and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in IR-treated cells. These findings demonstrate that PCD is associated with proteolytic activation of PKC delta by an ICE-like protease. Images PMID:8557034

  17. Fibrin(ogen)olytic and antiplatelet activities of a subtilisin-like protease from Solanum tuberosum (StSBTc-3).

    PubMed

    Pepe, Alfonso; Frey, María Eugenia; Muñoz, Fernando; Fernández, María Belén; Pedraza, Anabela; Galbán, Gustavo; García, Diana Noemí; Daleo, Gustavo Raúl; Guevara, María Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    Plant serine proteases have been widely used in food science and technology as well as in medicine. In this sense, several plant serine proteases have been proposed as potential anti-coagulants and anti-platelet agents. Previously, we have reported the purification and identification of a plant serine protease from Solanum tuberosum leaves. This potato enzyme, named as StSBTc-3, has a molecular weight of 72 kDa and it was characterized as a subtilisin like protease. In this work we determine and characterize the biochemical and medicinal properties of StSBTc-3. Results obtained show that, like the reported to other plant serine proteases, StSBTc-3 is able to degrade all chains of human fibrinogen and to produces fibrin clot lysis in a dose dependent manner. The enzyme efficiently hydrolyzes β subunit followed by partially hydrolyzed α and γ subunits of human fibrinogen. Assays performed to determine StSBTc-3 substrate specificity using oxidized insulin β-chain as substrate, show seven cleavage sites: Asn3-Gln4; Cys7-Gly8; Glu13-Ala14; Leu15-Tyr16; Tyr16-Leu17; Arg22-Gly23 and Phe25-Tyr26, all of them were previously reported for other serine proteases with fibrinogenolytic activity. The maximum StSBTc-3 fibrinogenolytic activity was determined at pH 8.0 and at 37 C. Additionally, we demonstrate that StSBTc-3 is able to inhibit platelet aggregation and is unable to exert cytotoxic activity on human erythrocytes in vitro at all concentrations assayed. These results suggest that StSBTc-3 could be evaluated as a new agent to be used in the treatment of thromboembolic disorders such as strokes, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

  18. Dipeptidyl peptidase I activates neutrophil-derived serine proteases and regulates the development of acute experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, April M.; Raptis, Sofia Z.; Kelley, Diane G.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment in inflammation is critical for host defense, but excessive accumulation of inflammatory cells can lead to tissue damage. Neutrophil-derived serine proteases (cathepsin G [CG], neutrophil elastase [NE], and proteinase 3 [PR3]) are expressed specifically in mature neutrophils and are thought to play an important role in inflammation. To investigate the role of these proteases in inflammation, we generated a mouse deficient in dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) and established that DPPI is required for the full activation of CG, NE, and PR3. Although DPPI–/– mice have normal in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis and in vivo neutrophil accumulation during sterile peritonitis, they are protected against acute arthritis induced by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies against type II collagen. Specifically, there is no accumulation of neutrophils in the joints of DPPI–/– mice. This protective effect correlates with the inactivation of neutrophil-derived serine proteases, since NE–/– × CG–/– mice are equally resistant to arthritis induction by anti-collagen antibodies. In addition, protease-deficient mice have decreased response to zymosan- and immune complex–mediated inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch. This defect is accompanied by a decrease in local production of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results implicate DPPI and polymorphonuclear neutrophil–derived serine proteases in the regulation of cytokine production at sites of inflammation. PMID:11827996

  19. A novel alkaline protease with antiproliferative activity from fresh fruiting bodies of the toxic wild mushroom Amanita farinosa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhao, Yongchang; Chai, Hongmei; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    A novel protease with a molecular mass of 15 kDa was purified from fresh fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Amanita farinosa. The purification protocol entailed anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The protease was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and SP-Sepharose. It demonstrated a single 15-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) and a 15-kDa peak in gel filtration. The optimal pH and optimal temperature of the protease were pH 8.0 and 65 °C, respectively. Proliferation of human hepatoma HepG2 cells was inhibited by the protease with an IC(50) of 25 µM. The protease did not have antifungal or ribonuclease activity.

  20. MALT1 Protease Activation Triggers Acute Disruption of Endothelial Barrier Integrity via CYLD Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Klei, Linda R; Hu, Dong; Panek, Robert; Alfano, Danielle N; Bridwell, Rachel E; Bailey, Kelly M; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Concel, Vincent J; Hess, Emily M; Van Beek, Matthew; Delekta, Phillip C; Gu, Shufang; Watkins, Simon C; Ting, Adrian T; Gough, Peter J; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C

    2016-09-27

    Microvascular endothelial cells maintain a tight barrier to prevent passage of plasma and circulating immune cells into the extravascular tissue compartment, yet endothelial cells respond rapidly to vasoactive substances, including thrombin, allowing transient paracellular permeability. This response is a cornerstone of acute inflammation, but the mechanisms responsible are still incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that thrombin triggers MALT1 to proteolytically cleave cylindromatosis (CYLD). Fragmentation of CYLD results in microtubule disruption and a cascade of events leading to endothelial cell retraction and an acute permeability response. This finding reveals an unexpected role for the MALT1 protease, which previously has been viewed mostly as a driver of pro-inflammatory NF-κB signaling in lymphocytes. Thus, MALT1 not only promotes immune cell activation but also acutely regulates endothelial cell biology, actions that together facilitate tissue inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 may therefore have synergistic impact by targeting multiple disparate steps in the overall inflammatory response.

  1. Purification and characterization of the cold-active alkaline protease from marine cold-adaptive Penicillium chrysogenum FS010.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-Yuan; Tian, Yong; Hou, Yun-Hua; Wang, Tian-Hong

    2009-11-01

    An extracellular cold-active alkaline serine protease from Penicillium chrysogenum FS010 has been purified. The purification procedure involved: ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE ion-exchange chromatography and sephadex G-100 gel chromatography. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme indicated a molecular weight of 41,000 +/- 1,000 Da. The protease is stable in a pH range of 7.0-9.0 and has a maximum activity at pH 9.0. Compared with other industrial proteases, the enzyme shows a high hydrolytic activities at lower temperatures and a high sensitivity at a temperature over 50 degrees C. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is approximate to 6.0. Enzymatic activity is enhanced by the addition of divalent cations such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) and inhibited by addition of Cu(2+)and Co(2+). PMSF and DFP are its specific inhibitors. The application of the cold-active alkaline protease is extremely extensive, and widely used in detergents, feed, food, leather and many other industries.

  2. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M.; Lazarides, Alexander L.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A.; Mosca, Paul J.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Cuneo, Kyle C.; Larrier, Nicole A.; O’Reilly, Erin K.; Riedel, Richard F.; Eward, William C.; Strasfeld, David B.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Lee, W. David; Griffith, Linda G.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Kirsch, David G.; Brigman, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes. PMID:26738797

  3. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M; Lazarides, Alexander L; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G; Hwang, E Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A; Mosca, Paul J; Mito, Jeffrey K; Cuneo, Kyle C; Larrier, Nicole A; O'Reilly, Erin K; Riedel, Richard F; Eward, William C; Strasfeld, David B; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G; Brigman, Brian E

    2016-01-06

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes.

  4. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R.; Prevost, Nicolette T.; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2–50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m2·g−1. A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  5. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R; Prevost, Nicolette T; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D

    2016-10-26

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m²·g(-1). A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  6. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of the human degradome composed of 561 proteases and homologs. This increased complexity of rat proteases mainly derives from the expansion of several families, including placental cathepsins, testases, kallikreins, and hematopoietic serine proteases, involved in reproductive or immunological functions. These protease families have also evolved differently in rat and mouse and may contribute to explain some functional differences between these closely related species. Likewise, genomic analysis of rat protease inhibitors has shown some differences with mouse protease inhibitors and the expansion of families of cysteine and serine protease inhibitors in rodents with respect to human. These comparative analyses may provide new views on the functional diversity of proteases and inhibitors and contribute to the development of innovative strategies for treating proteolysis diseases. PMID:15060002

  7. Labeling of active proteases in fresh-frozen tissues by topical application of quenched activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Withana, Nimali P; Garland, Megan; Verdoes, Martijn; Ofori, Leslie O; Segal, Ehud; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Active enzymes, such as proteases, often serve as valuable biomarkers for various disease pathologies. Therefore, methods to detect specific enzyme activities in biological samples can provide information to guide disease detection and diagnosis and to increase our understanding of the biological roles of specific enzyme targets. In this protocol, we outline methods for the topical application of fluorescently quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) to fresh-frozen tissue samples. This technique enables rapid imaging of enzyme activity at cellular resolution, and it can be combined with antibody labeling for immunodiagnosis. In this method, fresh-frozen tissue sections are fixed, incubated with the probe and imaged using fluorescence microscopy. This provides an advance over classical immunohistochemistry (IHC) in that it is rapid (4-8 h) and inexpensive, and it provides information on enzyme activity. Furthermore, it can be used with any of the growing number of fluorescent ABPs to provide data for more effective disease monitoring and diagnosis.

  8. Protease-activated receptor-2 stimulates intestinal epithelial chloride transport through activation of PLC and selective PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Jacques Q; Moreau, France; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-06-01

    Serine proteases play important physiological roles through their activity at G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs). We examined the roles that specific phospholipase (PL) C and protein kinase (PK) C (PKC) isoforms play in the regulation of PAR(2)-stimulated chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Confluent SCBN epithelial monolayers were grown on Snapwell supports and mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to basolateral application of the selective PAR(2) activating peptide, SLIGRL-NH(2), were monitored as a measure of net electrogenic ion transport caused by PAR(2) activation. SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a transient I(sc) response that was significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC (U73122), phosphoinositol-PLC (ET-18), phosphatidylcholine-PLC (D609), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002). Immunoblot analysis revealed the phosphorylation of both PLCbeta and PLCgamma following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of PKC (GF 109203X), PKCalpha/betaI (Gö6976), and PKCdelta (rottlerin), but not PKCzeta (selective pseudosubstrate inhibitor), also attenuated this response. Cellular fractionation and immunoblot analysis, as well as confocal immunocytochemistry, revealed increases of PKCbetaI, PKCdelta, and PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha or PKCzeta, in membrane fractions following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with U73122, ET-18, or D609 inhibited PKC activation. Inhibition of PI3K activity only prevented PKCdelta translocation. Immunoblots revealed that PAR(2) activation induced phosphorylation of both cRaf and ERK1/2 via PKCdelta. Inhibition of PKCbetaI and PI3K had only a partial effect on this response. We conclude that basolateral PAR(2)-induced chloride secretion involves activation of PKCbetaI and PKCdelta via a PLC-dependent mechanism resulting in the stimulation of cRaf and ERK1/2 signaling.

  9. Serine proteases inhibiting cyanopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radau, G

    2000-08-01

    There are many compounds inhibiting serine proteases which play an important role in the human organism. This article reviews publications on the low-molecular weight, serine protease inhibitory cyanopeptides and reports on new developments in establishing structure-activity relationships.

  10. Methylene blue not ferrocene: Optimal reporters for electrochemical detection of protease activity.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Eva; Avlonitis, Nicolaos; Murray, Alan F; Mount, Andrew R; Bradley, Mark

    2016-10-15

    Electrochemical peptide-based biosensors are attracting significant attention for the detection and analysis of proteins. Here we report the optimisation and evaluation of an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of protease activity using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces, using trypsin as a model protease. The principle of detection was the specific proteolytic cleavage of redox-tagged peptides by trypsin, which causes the release of the redox reporter, resulting in a decrease of the peak current as measured by square wave voltammetry. A systematic enhancement of detection was achieved through optimisation of the properties of the redox-tagged peptide; this included for the first time a side-by-side study of the applicability of two of the most commonly applied redox reporters used for developing electrochemical biosensors, ferrocene and methylene blue, along with the effect of changing both the nature of the spacer and the composition of the SAM. Methylene blue-tagged peptides combined with a polyethylene-glycol (PEG) based spacer were shown to be the best platform for trypsin detection, leading to the highest fidelity signals (characterised by the highest sensitivity (signal gain) and a much more stable background than that registered when using ferrocene as a reporter). A ternary SAM (T-SAM) configuration, which included a PEG-based dithiol, minimised the non-specific adsorption of other proteins and was sensitive towards trypsin in the clinically relevant range, with a Limit of Detection (LoD) of 250pM. Kinetic analysis of the electrochemical response with time showed a good fit to a Michaelis-Menten surface cleavage model, enabling the extraction of values for kcat and KM. Fitting to this model enabled quantitative determination of the solution concentration of trypsin across the entire measurement range. Studies using an enzyme inhibitor and a range of real world possible interferents demonstrated a selective response to trypsin

  11. Inherent chaperone-like activity of aspartic proteases reveals a distant evolutionary relation to double-ψ barrel domains of AAA-ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Hulko, Michael; Lupas, Andrei N.; Martin, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Chaperones and proteases share the ability to interact with unfolded proteins. Here we show that enzymatically inactive forms of the aspartic proteases HIV-1 protease and pepsin have inherent chaperone-like activity and can prevent the aggregation of denatured substrate proteins. In contrast to proteolysis, which requires dimeric enzymes, chaperone-like activity could be observed also with monomeric domains. The involvement of the active site cleft in the chaperone-like function was demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of peptide substrate inhibitors. The high structural similarity between aspartic proteases and the N-terminal double-ψ barrels of Cdc48-like proteins, which are involved in the unfolding and dissociation of proteins, suggests that they share a common ancestor. The latent chaperone-like activity in aspartic proteases can be seen as a relic that has further evolved to serve substrate binding in the context of proteolytic activity. PMID:17384229

  12. Effects of temperature and sodium chloride concentration on the activities of proteases and amylases in soy sauce koji.

    PubMed

    Su, Nan-Wei; Wang, Mei-Ling; Kwok, Kam-Fu; Lee, Min-Hsiung

    2005-03-09

    This study investigated the effects of temperature and sodium chloride concentration on the proteolytic and amylolytic activities of soy sauce koji. The optimal temperatures for both protease and amylase were found in the range of 50-55 degrees C. The protease was not stable at 55 degrees C and retained only approximately 20% residual activity after incubation at 55 degrees C for 4 h. The protease was labile in sodium chloride solution, whereas the amylase was quite stable. The residual protease activity in an 18% NaCl solution was only approximately 3%. The harvested koji was mixed with 1.5 volumes of water (v/w) and incubated at 45 degrees C for 48 h; the total nitrogen and amino nitrogen contents were 1.3 and 0.56%, respectively. The results indicated that the hydrolysis of koji at the critical temperature of 45 degrees C could be employed as a rapid fermentation method to reduce the time for soy sauce manufacturing. According to this study, the combination of 5% sodium chloride and fermentation at 45 degrees C was considered as the best condition for the prohydrolysis of koji for making soy sauce. In addition, the critical temperature of 45 degrees C was very important when used in the preparation of protein hydrolysates for the flavoring industry and for the preparation of biologically active peptides.

  13. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  14. Protease-activated receptor 2 modulates proliferation and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Eryani, Kamal; Cheng, Jun; Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Babkair, Hamzah; Essa, Ahmed; Saku, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Based on our previous finding that protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) regulates hemophagocytosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, which induces their heme oxygenase 1-dependent keratinization, we have formulated a hypothesis that PAR-2 functions in wider activities of SCC cells. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemical profiles of PAR-2 in oral SCC tissues and its functional roles in cell proliferation and invasion in SCC cells in culture. The PAR-2 expression modes were determined in 48 surgical tissue specimens of oral SCC. Using oral SCC-derived cell systems, we determined both gene and protein expression levels of PAR-2. SCC cell proliferation and invasive properties were also examined in conditions in which PAR-2 was activated by the synthetic peptide SLIGRL. PAR-2 was immunolocalized in oral SCC and carcinoma in situ cells, especially in those on the periphery of carcinoma cell foci (100% of cases), but not in normal oral epithelia. Its expression at both gene and protein levels was confirmed in 3 oral SCC cell lines including ZK-1. Activation of PAR-2 induced ZK-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAR-2-activated ZK-1 cells invaded faster than nonactivated ones. The expression of PAR-2 is specific to oral malignancies, and PAR-2 regulates the growth and invasion of oral SCC cells.

  15. RbdB, a Rhomboid Protease Critical for SREBP Activation and Virulence in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Sourabh; Kowlaski, Caitlin H.; Thammahong, Arsa; Beattie, Sarah R.; Bultman, Katherine M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT SREBP transcription factors play a critical role in fungal virulence; however, the mechanisms of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) activation in pathogenic fungi remains ill-defined. Screening of the Neurospora crassa whole-genome deletion collection for genes involved in hypoxia responses identified a gene for an uncharacterized rhomboid protease homolog, rbdB, required for growth under hypoxic conditions. Loss of rbdB in Aspergillus fumigatus also inhibited growth under hypoxic conditions. In addition, the A. fumigatus ΔrbdB strain also displayed phenotypes consistent with defective SREBP activity, including increased azole drug susceptibility, reduced siderophore production, and full loss of virulence. Expression of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) DNA binding domain of the SREBP SrbA in ΔrbdB restored all of the phenotypes linking RdbB activity with SrbA function. Furthermore, the N-terminal domain of SrbA containing the bHLH DNA binding region was absent from ΔrbdB under inducing conditions, suggesting that RbdB regulates the protein levels of this important transcription factor. As SrbA controls clinically relevant aspects of fungal pathobiology in A. fumigatus, understanding the mechanisms of SrbA activation provides opportunities to target this pathway for therapeutic development. IMPORTANCE Aspergillus fumigatus causes life-threatening infections, and treatment options remain limited. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets to treat this deadly disease. Previously, we have shown that SREBP transcription factors and their regulatory components are critical for the pathobiology of A. fumigatus. Here we identify a role for RbdB, a rhomboid protease, as an essential component of SREBP activity. Our results indicate that mutants lacking rbdB have growth defects under hypoxic conditions, are hypersusceptible to voriconazole, lack extracellular siderophore production, and fail to cause disease in a murine

  16. Identification of a 350-kDa ClpP protease complex with 10 different Clp isoforms in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Peltier, J B; Ytterberg, J; Liberles, D A; Roepstorff, P; van Wijk, K J

    2001-05-11

    A 350-kDa ClpP protease complex with 10 different subunits was identified in chloroplast of Arabidopsis thaliana, using Blue-Native gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight and nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The complex was copurified with the thylakoid membranes, and all identified Clp subunits show chloroplast targeting signals, supporting that this complex is indeed localized in the chloroplast. The complex contains chloroplast-encoded pClpP and six nuclear-encoded proteins nCpP1-6, as well as two unassigned Clp homologues (nClpP7, nClpP8). An additional Clp protein was identified in this complex; it does not belong to any of the known Clp genes families and is here assigned ClpS1. Expression and accumulation of several of these Clp proteins have never been shown earlier. Sequence and phylogenetic tree analysis suggests that nClpP5, nClpP2, and nClpP8 are not catalytically active and form a new group of Clp higher plant proteins, orthologous to the cyanobacterial ClpR protein, and are renamed ClpR1, -2, and -3, respectively. We speculate that ClpR1, -2, and -3 are part of the heptameric rings, whereas ClpS1 is a regulatory subunit positioned at the axial opening of the ClpP/R core. Several truncations and errors in intron and exon prediction of the annotated Clp genes were corrected using mass spectrometry data and by matching genomic sequences with cDNA sequences. This strategy will be widely applicable for the much needed verification of protein prediction from genomic sequence. The extreme complexity of the chloroplast Clp complex is discussed.

  17. The cooperative effect between active site ionized groups and water desolvation controls the alteration of acid/base catalysis in serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2007-08-13

    What is the driving force that alters the catalytic function of His57 in serine proteases between general base and general acid in each step along the enzymatic reaction? The stable tetrahedral complexes (TC) of chymotrypsin with trifluoromethyl ketone transition state analogue inhibitors are topologically similar to the catalytic transition state. Therefore, they can serve as a good model to study the enzyme catalytic reaction. We used DFT quantum mechanical calculations to analyze the effect of solvation and of polar factors in the active site of chymotrypsin on the pKa of the catalytic histidine in FE (the free enzyme), EI (the noncovalent enzyme inhibitor complex), and TC. We demonstrated that the acid/base alteration is controlled by the charged groups in the active site--the catalytic Asp102 carboxylate and the oxyanion. The effect of these groups on the catalytic His is modulated by water solvation of the active site.

  18. Structural Basis for the Ubiquitin-Linkage Specificity and deISGylating Activity of SARS-CoV Papain-Like Protease

    PubMed Central

    Ratia, Kiira; Kilianski, Andrew; Baez-Santos, Yahira M.; Baker, Susan C.; Mesecar, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) encodes a papain-like protease (PLpro) with both deubiquitinating (DUB) and deISGylating activities that are proposed to counteract the post-translational modification of signaling molecules that activate the innate immune response. Here we examine the structural basis for PLpro's ubiquitin chain and interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) specificity. We present the X-ray crystal structure of PLpro in complex with ubiquitin-aldehyde and model the interaction of PLpro with other ubiquitin-chain and ISG15 substrates. We show that PLpro greatly prefers K48- to K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and ISG15-based substrates to those that are mono-ubiquitinated. We propose that PLpro's higher affinity for K48-linked ubiquitin chains and ISG15 stems from a bivalent mechanism of binding, where two ubiquitin-like domains prefer to bind in the palm domain of PLpro with the most distal ubiquitin domain interacting with a “ridge” region of the thumb domain. Mutagenesis of residues within this ridge region revealed that these mutants retain viral protease activity and the ability to catalyze hydrolysis of mono-ubiquitin. However, a select number of these mutants have a significantly reduced ability to hydrolyze the substrate ISG15-AMC, or be inhibited by K48-linked diubuiquitin. For these latter residues, we found that PLpro antagonism of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NFκB) signaling pathway is abrogated. This identification of key and unique sites in PLpro required for recognition and processing of diubiquitin and ISG15 versus mono-ubiquitin and protease activity provides new insight into ubiquitin-chain and ISG15 recognition and highlights a role for PLpro DUB and deISGylase activity in antagonism of the innate immune response. PMID:24854014

  19. Metalloproteinase-9 contributes to endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis via protease activated receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Jon M.; Booshehri, Laela M.; Allen, Timothy C.; Kurdowska, Anna K.

    2017-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins when vascular endothelial cells undergo pro-inflammatory changes such as aberrant activation to dysfunctional phenotypes and apoptosis, leading to loss of vascular integrity. Our laboratory has demonstrated that exposure of mice to second hand smoke triggers an increase in expression of metalloproteinase-9. Further, metalloproteinase-9 released by second hand smoke—activated leukocytes may propagate pro-atherogenic alterations in endothelial cells. We have shown that levels of metalloproteinase-9 were increased in the plasma from apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice exposed to second hand smoke relative to non-exposed controls. Moreover, we have collected data from two different, but complementary, treatments of second hand smoke exposed atherosclerotic mice. Animals received either cell specific metalloproteinase-9 directed siRNA to minimize metalloproteinase-9 expression in neutrophils and endothelial cells, or a pharmacological inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase which indirectly limits metalloproteinase-9 production in neutrophils. These treatments reduced atherosclerotic changes in mice and improved overall vascular health. We also demonstrated that metalloproteinase-9 could activate endothelial cells and induce their apoptosis via cleavage of protease activated receptor-1. In summary, better understanding of metalloproteinase-9’s pathogenic capabilities as well as novel signaling pathways involved may lead to development of treatments which may provide additional benefits to atherosclerosis patients with a history of second hand smoke exposure. PMID:28166283

  20. Hydroxyproline substitutions stabilize non-glycosylated drosocin against serum proteases without challenging its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Knappe, Daniel; Cassone, Marco; Nollmann, Friederike Inga; Otvos, Laszlo; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The increasing incidence of multi- and pan-resistant pathogens demands novel compounds to fight Grampositive and especially Gram-negative bacteria. Among the currently investigated compound classes, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) inhibiting specific bacterial targets appear especially promising for systemic therapy of infections, although unmodified linear peptides are typically rapidly degraded by serum proteases. Proline-rich AMPs have been heavily investigated in recent years due to their low toxicity and proven in vivo efficacy. Here, we report novel unglycosylated drosocin analogs with extended half-life in mouse serum and improved activity against Gram-negative pathogens Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Substituting proline (Pro) residues in positions 3, 5, 10, and 14 with trans-4-hydroxy-Lproline ((t)Hyp) improved the antibacterial activity, whereas substitution of Pro-16 reduced the activity. Drosocin analogs with (t)Hyp in positions 3 and 5 were also four to eight times more stable in mouse serum than the unmodified analog. The new compounds were not toxic against human HeLa, HEK293, and HepG2 cell lines and showed no hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of at least 600 µg/mL.

  1. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  2. Signalling pathways induced by protease-activated receptors and integrins in T cells.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Miriam; Yongjun, Yin; Groysman, Maya; Dekel, Idit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2002-01-01

    Recent characterization of the thrombin receptor indicates that it plays a role in T-cell signalling pathways. However, little is known regarding the signalling events following stimulation of additional members of the protease-activated receptor (PAR) family, i.e. PAR2 and PAR3. Most of the postligand cascades are largely unknown. Here, we illustrate that in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells, activation of PAR1, PAR2 and PAR3 induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav1. This response was impaired in Jurkat T cells deficient in p56lck (JCaM1.6). Activation of PARs also led to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and SLP-76, two key proteins in T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling. We also demonstrated that p56lck is meaningful for integrin signalling. Thus, JCaM1.6 cells exhibited a marked reduction in their adherence to fibronectin-coated plates, as compared to the level of adherence of Jurkat T cells. While the phosphorylation of Vav1 in T cells is augmented following adhesion, no additional increase was noted following treatment of the adhered cells with PARs. Altogether, we have identified key components in the postligand-signalling cascade of PARs and integrins. Furthermore, we have identified Lck as a critical and possibly upstream component of PAR-induced Vav1 phosphorylation, as well as integrin activation, in Jurkat T cells.

  3. Protease-activated receptors (PARs)--biology and role in cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Hempel, Dominika; Sierko, Ewa; Tucker, Stephanie C; Honn, Kenneth V

    2015-12-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated that components of the hemostatic system may be involved in signaling leading to cancer progression, the potential mechanisms by which they contribute to cancer dissemination are not yet precisely understood. Among known coagulant factors, tissue factor (TF) and thrombin play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. They may be generated in the tumor microenvironment independently of blood coagulation and can induce cell signaling through activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). PARs are transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by a unique proteolytic mechanism. They play important roles in vascular physiology, neural tube closure, hemostasis, and inflammation. All of these agents (TF, thrombin, PARs-mainly PAR-1 and PAR-2) are thought to promote cancer invasion and metastasis at least in part by facilitating tumor cell migration, angiogenesis, and interactions with host vascular cells, including platelets, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Here, we discuss the role of PARs and their activators in cancer progression, focusing on TF- and thrombin-mediated actions. Therapeutic options tailored specifically to inhibit PAR-induced signaling in cancer patients are presented as well.

  4. Protease-activated receptor-1 deficiency protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Waasdorp, Maaike; Duitman, JanWillem; Florquin, Sandrine; Spek, C. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Endogenously administered activated protein C ameliorates diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-dependent manner, suggesting that PAR-1 activation limits the progression of DN. Activation of PAR-1 in fibroblast-like cells, however, induces proliferation and extracellular matrix production, thereby driving fibrotic disease. Considering the key role of mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix production during DN, PAR-1 may in fact potentiate diabetes-induced kidney injury. To determine the net effect of PAR-1 in DN, streptozotocin-induced DN was studied in wild type and PAR-1 deficient mice. Subsequent mechanistic insight was obtained by assessing profibrotic responses of mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, following PAR-1 stimulation and inhibition. Despite having similar glucose levels, PAR-1 deficient mice developed less kidney damage after induction of diabetes, as evidenced by diminished proteinuria, plasma cystatin C levels, expansion of the mesangial area, and tubular atrophy. In vitro, PAR-1 signaling in mesangial cells led to increased proliferation and expression of matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen IV. Conversely, a reduction in both proliferation and fibronectin deposition was observed in diabetic PAR-1 deficient mice. Overall, we show that PAR-1 plays an important role in the development of DN and PAR-1 might therefore be an attractive therapeutic target to pursue in DN. PMID:27618774

  5. Protease modulation of the activity of the epithelial sodium channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chraïbi, A; Vallet, V; Firsov, D; Hess, S K; Horisberger, J D

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of extracellular proteases on the amiloride-sensitive Na+ current (INa) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the three subunits alpha, beta, and gamma of the rat or Xenopus epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Low concentrations of trypsin (2 microg/ml) induced a large increase of INa within a few minutes, an effect that was fully prevented by soybean trypsin inhibitor, but not by amiloride. A similar effect was observed with chymotrypsin, but not with kallikrein. The trypsin-induced increase of INa was observed with Xenopus and rat ENaC, and was very large (approximately 20-fold) with the channel obtained by coexpression of the alpha subunit of Xenopus ENaC with the beta and gamma subunits of rat ENaC. The effect of trypsin was selective for ENaC, as shown by the absence of effect on the current due to expression of the K+ channel ROMK2. The effect of trypsin was not prevented by intracellular injection of EGTA nor by pretreatment with GTP-gammaS, suggesting that this effect was not mediated by G proteins. Measurement of the channel protein expression at the oocyte surface by antibody binding to a FLAG epitope showed that the effect of trypsin was not accompanied by an increase in the channel protein density, indicating that proteolysis modified the activity of the channel present at the oocyte surface rather than the cell surface expression. At the single channel level, in the cell-attached mode, more active channels were observed in the patch when trypsin was present in the pipette, while no change in channel activity could be detected when trypsin was added to the bath solution around the patch pipette. We conclude that extracellular proteases are able to increase the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel by an effect that does not occur through activation of a G protein-coupled receptor, but rather through proteolysis of a protein that is either a constitutive part of the channel itself or closely associated with it.

  6. Transcriptional activation of the human cytotoxic serine protease gene CSP-B in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R D; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic serine protease B (CSP-B) gene is activated during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte maturation. In this report, we demonstrate that the PEER T-cell line (bearing gamma/delta T-cell receptors) accumulates CSP-B mRNA following exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (bt2cAMP) because of transcriptional activation of the CSP-B gene. TPA and bt2cAMP act synergistically to induce CSP-B expression, since neither agent alone causes activation of CSP-B transcription or mRNA accumulation. Chromatin upstream from the CSP-B gene is resistant to DNase I digestion in untreated PEER cells, but becomes sensitive following TPA-bt2cAMP treatment. Upon activation of PEER cells, a DNase I-hypersensitive site forms upstream from the CSP-B gene within a region that is highly conserved in the mouse. Transient transfection of CSP-B promoter constructs identified two regulatory regions in the CSP-B 5'-flanking sequence, located at positions -609 to -202 and positions -202 to -80. The region from -615 to -63 is sufficient to activate a heterologous promoter in activated PEER cells, but activation is orientation specific, suggesting that this region behaves as an upstream promoter element rather than a classical enhancer. Consensus AP-1, AP-2, and cAMP response elements are found upstream from the CSP-B gene (as are several T-cell-specific consensus elements), but the roles of these elements in CSP-B gene activation have yet to be determined. Images PMID:2233710

  7. Protease inhibitor monotherapy is associated with a higher level of monocyte activation, bacterial translocation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Berta; Guardo, Alberto C; Leal, Lorna; Leon, Agathe; Lucero, Constanza; Alvarez-Martinez, Míriam J; Martinez, Miguel J; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Rebollar, María; González-Cordón, Ana; Gatell, Josep M; Plana, Montserrat; García, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Monotherapy with protease-inhibitors (MPI) may be an alternative to cART for HIV treatment. We assessed the impact of this strategy on immune activation, bacterial translocation and inflammation. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study comparing patients on successful MPI (n=40) with patients on cART (n=20). Activation, senescence, exhaustion and differentiation stage in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets, markers of monocyte activation, microbial translocation, inflammation, coagulation and low-level viremia were assessed. Results CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte subset parameters were not significantly different between both groups. Conversely, as compared with triple cART, MPI patients showed a higher proportion of activated monocytes (CD14+ CD16−CD163+ cells, p=0.031), soluble markers of monocyte activation (sCD14 p=0.004, sCD163 p=0.002), microbial translocation (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein; LBP p=0.07), inflammation (IL-6 p=0.04) and low-level viremia (p=0.035). In a multivariate model, a higher level of CD14+ CD16−CD163+ cells and sCD14, and presence of very low-level viremia were independently associated with MPI. Monocyte activation was independently associated with markers of inflammation (IL-6, p=0.006), microbial translocation (LBP, p=0.01) and low-level viremia (p=0.01). Conclusions Patients on MPI showed a higher level of monocyte activation than patients on standard therapy. Microbial translocation and low-level viremia were associated with the high level of monocyte activation observed in patients on MPI. The long-term clinical consequences of these findings should be assessed. PMID:25280865

  8. Bacterial proteases, untapped antimicrobial drug targets.

    PubMed

    Culp, Elizabeth; Wright, Gerard D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial proteases are an extensive collection of enzymes that have vital roles in cell viability, stress response and pathogenicity. Although their perturbation clearly offers the potential for antimicrobial drug development, both as traditional antibiotics and anti-virulence drugs, they are not yet the target of any clinically used therapeutics. Here we describe the potential for and recent progress in the development of compounds targeting bacterial proteases with a focus on AAA+ family proteolytic complexes and signal peptidases (SPs). Caseinolytic protease (ClpP) belongs to the AAA+ family of proteases, a group of multimeric barrel-shaped complexes whose activity is tightly regulated by associated AAA+ ATPases. The opportunity for chemical perturbation of these complexes is demonstrated by compounds targeting ClpP for inhibition, activation or perturbation of its associated ATPase. Meanwhile, SPs are also a proven antibiotic target. Responsible for the cleavage of targeting peptides during protein secretion, both type I and type II SPs have been successfully targeted by chemical inhibitors. As the threat of pan-antibiotic resistance continues to grow, these and other bacterial proteases offer an arsenal of novel antibiotic targets ripe for development.

  9. Assessment of protease activity in hydrolysed extracts from SSF of hair waste by and indigenous consortium of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Abu Yazid, Noraziah; Barrena, Raquel; Sánchez, Antoni

    2016-03-01

    Hair wastes from the tannery industry were assessed for its suitability as substrates for protease production by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using a pilot-batch mode operation and anaerobically digested sludge as co-substrate. Maximum protease activity (52,230±1601 U g(-1) DM) was observed at the 14th day of SSF. Single step purification resulted in 2 fold purification with 74% of recovery by ultrafiltration with 10 kDa cut-off. The recovered enzyme was stable at a temperature of 30°C and pH 11; optimal conditions that were determined by a central composite full factorial experimental design. The enzyme activity was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, which indicates that it belongs to serine protease group. The remaining solid material after protease extraction could be easily stabilized to obtain a final good quality compost-like material as the final dynamic respiration index was lower than 1 g O2 kg(-1) OM h(-1). The lyophilized recovered enzymes were a good alternative in the process of cowhides dehairing with respect to the current chemical treatment, avoiding the production of solid wastes and highly polluted wastewaters. In conclusion, the entire process can be considered a low-cost sustainable technology for the dehairing process, closing the organic matter cycle in the form of value added product and a compost-like material from a waste.

  10. Genetic characterization and expression of the novel fungal protease, EPg222 active in dry-cured meat products.

    PubMed

    Benito, María J; Connerton, Ian F; Córdoba, Juan J

    2006-11-01

    EPg222 protease is a novel extracellular enzyme produced by Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) isolated from dry-cured hams that has the potential for use over a broad range of applications in industries that produce dry-cured meat products. The gene encoding EPg222 protease has been identified. Peptide sequences of EPg222 were obtained by de novo sequencing of tryptic peptides using mass spectrometry. The corresponding gene was amplified by PCR using degenerated primers based on a combination of conserved serine protease-encoding sequences and reverse translation of the peptide sequences. EPg222 is encoded as a gene of 1,361 bp interrupted by two introns. The deduced amino acid sequence indicated that the enzyme is synthesized as a preproenzyme with a putative signal sequence of 19 amino acids (aa), a prosequence of 96 aa and a mature protein of 283 aa. A cDNA encoding EPg222 has been cloned and expressed as a functionally active enzyme in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant enzyme exhibits similar activities to the native enzyme against a wide range of protein substrates including muscle myofibrillar protein. The mature sequence contains conserved aa residues characteristic of those forming the catalytic triad of serine proteases (Asp42, His76 and Ser228) but notably the food enzyme exhibits specific aa substitutions in the immunoglobulin-E recognition regions that have been identified in protein homologues that are allergenic.

  11. Characterization of the in vitro activities of the P1 and helper component proteases of Soybean mosaic virus Strain G2 and Tobacco vein mottling virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potyviruses express their RNA genomes through the production of polyproteins that are processed in host cells by three virus-encoded proteases. Soybean plants produce large amounts of protease inhibitors during seed development and in response to wounding that could affect the activities of these pr...

  12. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Deficiency Offers Cardioprotection after Acute Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kolpakov, Mikhail A.; Rafiq, Khadija; Guo, Xinji; Hooshdaran, Bahman; Wang, Tao; Vlasenko, Liudmila; Bashkirova, Yulia V.; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Xiongwen; Iftikhar, Sahar; Libonati, Joseph R.; Kunapuli, Satya P.; Sabri, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR)4 is a low affinity thrombin receptor with less understood function relative to PAR1. PAR4 is involved in platelet activation and hemostasis, but its specific actions on myocyte growth and cardiac function remain unknown. This study examined the role of PAR4 deficiency on cardioprotection after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in mice. When challenged by in vivo or ex vivo IR, PAR4 knockout (KO) mice exhibited increased tolerance to injury, which was manifest as reduced infarct size and a more robust functional recovery compared to wild-type mice. PAR4 KO mice also showed reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and putative signaling shifts in survival pathways in response to IR. Inhibition of PAR4 expression in isolated cardiomyocytes by shRNA offered protection against thrombin and PAR4-agonist peptide-induced apoptosis, while overexpression of wild-type PAR4 significantly enhanced the susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to apoptosis, even under low thrombin concentrations. Further studies implicate Src- and epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent activation of JNK on the proapoptotic effect of PAR4 in cardiomyocytes. These findings reveal a pivotal role for PAR4 as a regulator of cardiomyocyte survival and point to PAR4 inhibition as a therapeutic target offering cardioprotection after acute IR injury. PMID:26643815

  13. Conservation and revised annotation of the Treponema denticola prcB-prcA-prtP locus encoding the dentilisin (CTLP) protease complex.

    PubMed

    Goetting-Minesky, M P; Godovikova, V; Li, J J; Seshadrinathan, S; Timm, J C; Kamodia, S S; Fenno, J C

    2013-06-01

    Interstrain differences in antigenic surface proteins may reflect immunological pressure or differences in receptor specificity of the antigen. Treponema denticola exhibits considerable interstrain variability in its major surface protein (Msp), but no studies have addressed this issue in dentilisin (CTLP), a surface protease complex that has a significant role in T. denticola-host interactions in periodontal disease. Furthermore, the genome annotation of the prcB-prcA-prtP operon encoding dentilisin contains apparent errors and lacks a deduced PrtP amino acid sequence. To address these issues we analysed the protease operon from diverse T. denticola strains, as well as clones of the ATCC 35405 Type strain from which the genome sequence and original GenBank prtP sequence were derived. 6xHis-tagging of the PrtP C-terminus in ATCC 35405 demonstrated absence of the 'authentic frameshift' in PrtP reported in the genome databases. We propose that T. denticola genome annotations be updated to reflect this new information. PrcB and the PrtP N-terminal region that includes the catalytic domain were highly conserved in common laboratory strains and clinical isolates of T. denticola. Dentilisin proteolytic activity varied considerably between strains. Antibodies against PrcB, PrcA and PrtP from the type strain recognized these proteins in most T. denticola strains. PrtP varied up to 20% over the C-terminal 270 residues between strains. The PrtP C-terminal eight-residues (DWFYVEYP) was present in all strains, with two strains containing an additional Y-residue preceding the stop codon. Such conserved PrtP domains may be required for interactions with PrcA and PrcB, or for substrate interactions.

  14. Conservation and revised annotation of the Treponema denticola prcB-prcA-prtP locus encoding the dentilisin (CTLP) protease complex

    PubMed Central

    Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Godovikova, Valentina; Li, Jiean J.; Seshadrinathan, Suchithra; Timm, John C.; Kamodia, Shalini S.; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Summary Interstrain differences in antigenic surface proteins may reflect immunological pressure or differences in receptor specificity of the antigen. Treponema denticola exhibits considerable interstrain variability in its major surface protein (Msp), but no studies have addressed this issue in dentilisin (CTLP), a surface protease complex that has a significant role in T. denticola – host interactions in periodontal disease. Furthermore, the genome annotation of the prcB-prcA-prtP operon encoding dentilisin contains apparent errors and lacks a deduced PrtP amino acid sequence. To address these issues we analyzed the protease operon from diverse T. denticola strains, as well as clones of the ATCC 35405 Type strain from which the genome sequence and original Genbank prtP sequence were derived. 6xHis-tagging of the PrtP C-terminus in ATCC 35405 demonstrated absence of the “authentic frameshift” in PrtP reported in the genome databases. We propose that T. denticola genome annotations be updated to reflect this new information. PrcB and the PrtP N-terminal region that includes the catalytic domain were highly conserved in common laboratory strains and clinical isolates of T. denticola. Dentilisin proteolytic activity varied considerably between strains. Antibodies against PrcB, PrcA and PrtP from the Type strain recognized these proteins in most T. denticola strains. PrtP varied up to 20% over the C-terminal 270 residues between strains. The PrtP C-terminal 8-residues (DWFYVEYP) was present in all strains, with two strains contained an additional Y-residue preceding the stop codon. Such conserved PrtP domains may be required for interactions with PrcA and PrcB, or for substrate interactions. PMID:23253337

  15. Activity-dependent isolation of the presenilin– γ-secretase complex reveals nicastrin and a γ substrate

    PubMed Central

    Esler, William P.; Kimberly, W. Taylor; Ostaszewski, Beth L.; Ye, Wenjuan; Diehl, Thekla S.; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Presenilin heterodimers apparently contain the active site of γ-secretase, a polytopic aspartyl protease involved in the transmembrane processing of both the Notch receptor and the amyloid-β precursor protein. Although critical to embryonic development and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, this protease is difficult to characterize, primarily because it is a multicomponent complex of integral membrane proteins. Here the functional γ-secretase complex was isolated by using an immobilized active site-directed inhibitor of the protease. Presenilin heterodimers and nicastrin bound specifically to this inhibitor under conditions tightly correlating with protease activity, whereas several other presenilin-interacting proteins (β-catenin, calsenilin, and presenilin-associated protein) did not bind. Moreover, anti-nicastrin antibodies immunoprecipitated γ-secretase activity from detergent-solubilized microsomes. Unexpectedly, C83, the major endogenous amyloid-β precursor protein substrate of γ-secretase, was also quantitatively associated with the complex. These results provide direct biochemical evidence that nicastrin is a member of the active γ-secretase complex, indicate that β-catenin, calsenilin, and presenilin-associated protein are not required for γ activity, and suggest an unprecedented mechanism of substrate–protease interaction. PMID:11867728

  16. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  17. A study on trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. protease inhibitory activity in Cassia tora (L.) syn Senna tora (L.) Roxb. seed extract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteases play an important role in virulence of many human, plant and insect pathogens. The proteinaceous protease inhibitors of plant origin have been reported widely from many plant species. The inhibitors may potentially be used for multiple therapeutic applications in viral, bacterial, fungal diseases and physiological disorders. In traditional Indian medicine system, Cassia tora (Senna tora) is reportedly effective in treatment of skin and gastrointestinal disorders. The present study explores the protease inhibitory activity of the above plant seeds against trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases. Methods The crushed seeds of Cassia tora were washed thoroughly with acetone and hexane for depigmentation and defatting. The proteins were fractionated by ammonium sulphate (0-30, 30-60, 60-90%) followed by dialysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The inhibitory potential of crude seed extract and most active dialyzed fraction against trypsin and proteases was established by spot test using unprocessed x-ray film and casein digestion methods, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of most active fraction (30-60%) and SEC elutes were carried employing Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Gelatin SDS-PAGE. Inhibition of fungal spore germination was studied in the presence of dialyzed active inhibitor fraction. Standard deviation (SD) and ANOVA were employed as statistical tools. Results The crude seeds' extract displayed strong antitryptic, bacterial and fungal protease inhibitory activity on x-ray film. The seed protein fraction 30-60% was found most active for trypsin inhibition in caseinolytic assay (P < 0.001). The inhibition of caseinolytic activity of the proteases increased with increasing ratio of seed extract. The residual activity of trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases remained only 4, 7 and 3.1%, respectively when proteases were incubated with 3 mg ml-1 seed protein

  18. Purification and characterization of a serine protease (CPM-2) with fibrinolytic activity from the dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Ryu, Kang Sun; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2005-07-01

    Catharsius protease-2 (CPM-2) was isolated from the body of dung beetles, Catharsius molossus, using a three step purification process (ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-60, and affinity chromatography on DEAE Affi-Gel blue). The purified CPM-2, having a molecular weight of 24 kDa, was assessed homogeneously by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of CPM-2 was composed of X Val Gln Asp Phe Val Glu Glu Ile Leu. CPM-2 was inactivated by Cu2+ and Zn2+ and strongly inhibited by typical serine proteinase inhibitors such as TLCK, soybean trypsin inhibitor, aprotinin, benzamidine, and alpha1-antitrypsin. However, EDTA, EGTA, cysteine, beta-mercaptoethanol, E64, and elastatinal had little effect on enzyme activity. In addition, antiplasmin and antithrombin III were not sensitive to CPM-2. Based on the results of a fibrinolytic activity test, CPM-2 readily cleaved Aalpha- and Bbeta-chains of fibrinogen and fibrin, and gamma-chain of fibrinogen more slowly. The nonspecific action of the enzyme resulted in extensive hydrolysis, releasing a variety of fibrinopeptides of fibrinogen and fibrin. Polyclonal antibodies of CPM-2 were reactive to the native form of antigen. The ELISA was applied to detect quantities, in nanograms, of the antigen in CPM-2 protein.

  19. Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities of Walnut (Juglans regia L.) Protein Hydrolysates Using Different Proteases.

    PubMed

    Jahanbani, Raheleh; Ghaffari, S Mahmood; Salami, Maryam; Vahdati, Kourosh; Sepehri, Houri; Sarvestani, Nazanin Namazi; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Walnut (Juglans regia L.) contains approximately 20-25 % protein with abundant essential amino acids. The enzymatic hydrolysate of Persian walnut (Chandler) seed proteins was prepared by incubation with three different proteases, including pancreatic chymotrypsin and trypsin, and a microbial enzyme proteinase K. The hydrolysates were found to possess excellent antioxidant capacities. The peptide fractions scavenged the 2, 2'-anizo-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) free radicals and inhibited the activity of reactive oxygen species. Walnut protein hydrolysates were also tested, for the first time, against the viability of human breast (MDA-MB231) and colon (HT-29) cancer cell lines. MTT, [3-(4, 5dimethylthiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide], assay was used to assess in vitro cancer cell viability upon treatment with the peptide fractions. The peptide fractions showed cell growth inhibition of 63 ± 1.73 % for breast cancer and 51 ± 1.45 % for colon cancer cells. Thus, a direct correlation between antioxidant and anticancer activities of walnut peptide fractions exists and supports their potential therapeutic benefit.

  20. Effects of L- and iso-ascorbic acid on meat protein hydrolyzing activity of four commercial plant and three microbial protease preparations.

    PubMed

    Ha, Minh; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2014-04-15

    The present study investigated the effects of both l- and iso-ascorbic acid (AA) on the activity of four plant proteases (papain, bromelain, actinidin and zingibain) and three microbial proteases (Bacterial Protease G, Fungal 31,000 and Fungal 60,000) preparations using fluorescent-labelled casein, meat myofibrillar and connective tissue extracts to explore their effects on meat structure components upon treatment with individual proteases. While l-AA in the range 0.8-3.2mM inhibited the activity of papain, bromelain and zingibain, iso-AA acted as an inhibitor of papain but as an activator of zingibain and had no significant effect on bromelain. Both AA isoforms acted as an activator of the actinidin protease and the concentration of AA isoforms appeared to affect the level of activation of the protease. The effect of the two AA isoforms on collagen and myofibrillar protein hydrolyzing activity varied depending on the concentration of the two AA isoforms. The results indicate the ability to up and down regulate the activity of the investigated proteases by using an appropriate concentration of the AA isoform.

  1. Plasmin induces in vivo monocyte recruitment through protease-activated receptor-1-, MEK/ERK-, and CCR2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Aline A F; Costa, Bruno R C; Vago, Juliana P; de Oliveira, Leonardo C; Tavares, Luciana P; Nogueira, Camila R C; Ribeiro, Ana Luíza C; Garcia, Cristiana C; Barbosa, Alan S; Brasil, Bruno S A F; Dusse, Luci M; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2014-10-01

    The plasminogen (Plg)/plasmin (Pla) system is associated with a variety of biological activities beyond the classical dissolution of fibrin clots, including cell migration, tissue repair, and inflammation. Although the capacity of Plg/Pla to induce cell migration is well defined, the mechanism underlying this process in vivo is elusive. In this study, we show that Pla induces in vitro migration of murine fibroblasts and macrophages (RAW 264.7) dependent on the MEK/ERK pathway and by requiring its proteolytic activity and lysine binding sites. Plasmin injection into the pleural cavity of BALB/c mice induced a time-dependent influx of mononuclear cells that was associated with augmented ERK1/2 and IκB-α phosphorylation and increased levels of CCL2 and IL-6 in pleural exudates. The inhibition of protease activity by using a serine protease inhibitor leupeptin or two structurally different protease-activated receptor-1 antagonists (SCH79797 and RWJ56110) abolished Pla-induced mononuclear recruitment and ERK1/2 and IκB-α phosphorylation. Interestingly, inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway abolished Pla-induced CCL2 upregulation and mononuclear cell influx. In agreement with a requirement for the CCL2/CCR2 axis to Pla-induced cell migration, the use of a CCR2 antagonist (RS504393) prevented the Plg/Pla-induced recruitment of mononuclear cells to the pleural cavity and migration of macrophages at transwell plates. Therefore, Pla-induced mononuclear cell recruitment in vivo was dependent on protease-activated receptor-1 activation of the MEK/ERK/NF-κB pathway, which led to the release of CCL2 and activation of CCR2.

  2. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  3. Two Kazal-type protease inhibitors from Macrobrachium nipponense and Eriocheir sinensis: comparative analysis of structure and activities.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ye-Qing; Li, Ye; Yang, Fan; Yu, Yan-Qin; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2012-03-01

    Kazal-type inhibitors (KPIs) play important roles in many biological and physiological processes, such as blood clotting, the immune response and reproduction. In the present study, two male reproductive tract KPIs, termed Man-KPI and Ers-KPI, were identified in Macrobrachium nipponense and Eriocheir sinensis, respectively. The inhibitory activities of recombinant Man-KPI and Ers-KPI against chymotrypsin, elastase, trypsin and thrombin were determined. The results showed that both of them strongly inhibit chymotrypsin and elastase. Kinetic studies were performed to elucidate their inhibition mechanism. Furthermore, individual domains were also expressed to learn further which domain contributes to the inhibitory activities of intact KPIs. Only Man-KPI_domain3 is active in the inhibition of chymotrypsin and elastase. Meanwhile, Ers-KPI_domain2 and 3 are responsible for inhibition of chymotrypsin, and Ers-KPI_domains2, 3 and 4 are responsible for the inhibition of elastase. Meanwhile, the inhibitory activities of these two KPIs toward Macrobrachium rosenbergii, M. nipponense and E. sinensis sperm were compared with that of the Kazal-type peptidase inhibitor (MRPINK) characterized from the M. rosenbergii reproductive tract in a previous study. The results demonstrated that KPIs can completely inhibit the gelatinolytic activities of sperm proteases from their own species, while different levels of cross-inhibition were observed between KPI and proteases from different species. These results may provide new perspective to further clarify the mechanism of KPI-proteases interaction in the male reproductive system.

  4. A fibrinolytic protease AfeE from Streptomyces sp. CC5, with potent thrombolytic activity in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhibin; Liu, Pingping; Cheng, Guangyan; Zhang, Biying; Dong, Weiliang; Su, Xingli; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli; Kong, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Fibrinolytic proteases have potential applications in cardiovascular disease therapy. A novel fibrinolytic protease, AfeE, with strong thrombolytic activity was purified from Streptomyces sp. CC5. AfeE displayed maximum activity at 40°C in the pH range of 7.0-12.0. It was strongly inhibited by serine protease inhibitor phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride, soybean trypsin inhibitor, tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone. The activity of the enzyme was partially inhibited by Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Zn(2+). AfeE exhibited higher substrate specificity for fibrin than fibrinogen, which has rarely been reported in fibrinolytic enzymes. AfeE also showed high thrombolytic activity in a carrageenan-induced mouse tail thrombosis model. AfeE prolonged prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time in rat blood. A bleeding time assay revealed that AfeE did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 1mg/kg. No acute cytotoxicity was observed for AfeE at 320μg/well in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The afeE gene was cloned from the genome of Streptomyces sp. CC5. Full-length AFE-CC5E contained 434 amino acids and was processed into a mature form consisting 284 amino acids by posttranslational modification, as revealed by high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. These results indicate that AfeE is a prospective candidate for antithrombotic drug development.

  5. Mechanisms of protease-activated receptor 2-evoked hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons innervating the mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Kayssi, Ahmed; Amadesi, Silvia; Bautista, Francisco; Bunnett, Nigel W; Vanner, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agonists of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) evoke hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons by unknown mechanisms. We examined the cellular mechanisms underlying PAR2-evoked hyperexcitability of mouse colonic DRG neurons to determine their potential role in pain syndromes such as visceral hyperalgesia. Colonic DRG neurons were identified by injecting Fast Blue and DiI retrograde tracers into the mouse colon. Using immunofluorescence, we found that DiI-labelled neurons contained PAR2 immunoreactivity, confirming the presence of receptors on colonic neurons. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings of acutely dissociated neurons demonstrated that PAR2 activation with a brief application (3 min) of PAR2 agonists, SLIGRL-NH2 and trypsin, evoked sustained depolarizations (up to 60 min) which were associated with increased input resistance and a marked reduction in rheobase (50% at 30 min). In voltage clamp, SLIGRL-NH2 markedly suppressed delayed rectifier IK currents (55% at 10 min), but had no effect on the transient IA current or TTX-resistant Na+ currents. In whole-cell current-clamp recordings, the sustained excitability evoked by PAR2 activation was blocked by the PKC inhibitor, calphostin, and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Studies of ERK1/2 phosphorylation using confocal microscopy demonstrated that SLIGRL-NH2 increased levels of immunoreactive pERK1/2 in DRG neurons, particularly in proximity to the plasma membrane. Thus, activation of PAR2 receptors on colonic nociceptive neurons causes sustained hyperexcitability that is related, at least in part, to suppression of delayed rectifier IK currents. Both PKC and ERK1/2 mediate the PAR2-induced hyperexcitability. These studies describe a novel mechanism of sensitization of colonic nociceptive neurons that may be implicated in conditions of visceral hyperalgesia such as irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:17289784

  6. N-Linked Glycosylation of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Second Extracellular Loop

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Antonio G.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2010-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) contains five N-linked glycosylation consensus sites as follows: three residing in the N terminus and two localized on the surface of the second extracellular loop (ECL2). To study the effect of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of PAR1 signaling and trafficking, we generated mutants in which the critical asparagines of the consensus sites were mutated. Here, we report that both the PAR1 N terminus and ECL2 serve as sites for N-linked glycosylation but have different functions in the regulation of receptor signaling and trafficking. N-Linked glycosylation of the PAR1 N terminus is important for transport to the cell surface, whereas the PAR1 mutant lacking glycosylation at ECL2 (NA ECL2) trafficked to the cell surface like the wild-type receptor. However, activated PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant internalization was impaired compared with wild-type receptor, whereas constitutive internalization of unactivated receptor remained intact. Remarkably, thrombin-activated PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant displayed an enhanced maximal signaling response compared with wild-type receptor. The increased PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant signaling was not due to defects in the ability of thrombin to cleave the receptor or signal termination mechanisms. Rather, the PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant displayed a greater efficacy in thrombin-stimulated G protein signaling. Thus, N-linked glycosylation of the PAR1 extracellular surface likely influences ligand docking interactions and the stability of the active receptor conformation. Together, these studies strongly suggest that N-linked glycosylation of PAR1 at the N terminus versus the surface of ECL2 serves distinct functions critical for proper regulation of receptor trafficking and the fidelity of thrombin signaling. PMID:20368337

  7. Functional regulation of PVBV Nuclear Inclusion protein-a protease activity upon interaction with Viral Protein genome-linked and phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, C.; Jimsheena, V.K.; Banerjee, S.; Makinen, K.; Gowda, L.R.; Savithri, H.S.

    2012-01-20

    Regulation of NIa-Pro is crucial for polyprotein processing and hence, for successful infection of potyviruses. We have examined two novel mechanisms that could regulate NIa-Pro activity. Firstly, the influence of VPg domain on the proteolytic activity of NIa-Pro was investigated. It was shown that the turnover number of the protease increases when these two domains interact (cis: two-fold; trans: seven-fold) with each other. Secondly, the protease activity of NIa-Pro could also be modulated by phosphorylation at Ser129. A mutation of this residue either to aspartate (phosphorylation-mimic) or alanine (phosphorylation-deficient) drastically reduces the protease activity. Based on these observations and molecular modeling studies, we propose that interaction with VPg as well as phosphorylation of Ser129 could relay a signal through Trp143 present at the protein surface to the active site pocket by subtle conformational changes, thus modulating protease activity of NIa-Pro.

  8. Integral membrane protease fibroblast activation protein sensitizes fibrosarcoma to chemotherapy and alters cell death mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baird, Sarah K; Rigopoulos, Angela; Cao, Diana; Allan, Laura; Renner, Christoph; Scott, Fiona E; Scott, Andrew M

    2015-11-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), an integral membrane serine protease, is found on fibro- and osteo-sarcoma and on myofibroblasts in epithelial carcinoma, but rarely on other adult tissue. FAP has been demonstrated to be an excellent target for tumor imaging in clinical trials, and antibodies and other FAP-targeting drugs are in development. Here we have shown that FAP overexpression increased the growth of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo, and found that the expression of FAP affects response to chemotherapy. When treated with doxorubicin, expression of FAP increased susceptibility to the drug. In spite of this, FAP-HT1080 cells had fewer markers of classical apoptosis than HT1080 cells and neither necrosis nor necroptosis were enhanced. However, levels of early mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane permeability markers were increased, and autophagy switched from a protective function in HT1080 cells to part of the cell death mechanism with FAP expression. Therefore, FAP may affect how the tumor responds to chemotherapeutic drugs overall, which should be considered in targeted drug development. The overexpression of FAP also alters cell signaling and responses to the environment in this cell line. This includes cell death mechanisms, changing the response of HT1080 cells to doxorubicin from classical apoptosis to an organelle membrane permeability-dependent form of cell death.

  9. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  10. Crystal structure of the caseinolytic protease gene regulator, a transcriptional activator in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Russo, Santina; Schweitzer, Jens-Eric; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael; Pohl, Ehmke

    2009-02-20

    Human pathogens of the genera Corynebacterium and Mycobacterium possess the transcriptional activator ClgR (clp gene regulator) which in Corynebacterium glutamicum has been shown to regulate the expression of the ClpCP protease genes. ClgR specifically binds to pseudo-palindromic operator regions upstream of clpC and clpP1P2. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a ClgR protein from C. glutamicum. The structure was determined from two different crystal forms to resolutions of 1.75 and 2.05 A, respectively. ClgR folds into a five-helix bundle with a helix-turn-helix motif typical for DNA-binding proteins. Upon dimerization the two DNA-recognition helices are arranged opposite to each other at the protein surface in a distance of approximately 30 A, which suggests that they bind into two adjacent major grooves of B-DNA in an anti-parallel manner. A binding pocket is situated at a strategic position in the dimer interface and could possess a regulatory role altering the positions of the DNA-binding helices.

  11. Insights into cleavage specificity from the crystal structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease complexed with a peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Zunszain, Patricia A; Knox, Stephen R; Sweeney, Trevor R; Yang, Jingjie; Roqué-Rosell, Núria; Belsham, Graham J; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Curry, Stephen

    2010-01-15

    Picornavirus replication is critically dependent on the correct processing of a polyprotein precursor by 3C protease(s) (3C(pro)) at multiple specific sites with related but non-identical sequences. To investigate the structural basis of its cleavage specificity, we performed the first crystallographic structural analysis of non-covalent complexes of a picornavirus 3C(pro) with peptide substrates. The X-ray crystal structure of the foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C(pro), mutated to replace the catalytic Cys by Ala and bound to a peptide (APAKQ|LLNFD) corresponding to the P5-P5' region of the VP1-2A cleavage junction in the viral polyprotein, was determined up to 2.5 A resolution. Comparison with free enzyme reveals significant conformational changes in 3C(pro) on substrate binding that lead to the formation of an extended interface of contact primarily involving the P4-P2' positions of the peptide. Strikingly, the deep S1' specificity pocket needed to accommodate P1'-Leu only forms when the peptide binds. Substrate specificity was investigated using peptide cleavage assays to show the impact of amino acid substitutions within the P5-P4' region of synthetic substrates. The structure of the enzyme-peptide complex explains the marked substrate preferences for particular P4, P2 and P1 residue types, as well as the relative promiscuity at P3 and on the P' side of the scissile bond. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis of the complex with a modified VP1-2A peptide (APAKE|LLNFD) containing a Gln-to-Glu substitution reveals an identical mode of peptide binding and explains the ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C(pro) to cleave sequences containing either P1-Gln or P1-Glu. Structure-based mutagenesis was used to probe interactions within the S1' specificity pocket and to provide direct evidence of the important contribution made by Asp84 of the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad to proteolytic activity. Our results provide a new level of detail in our understanding of the

  12. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  13. Aberrant mucosal mast cell protease expression in the enteric epithelium of nematode-infected mice lacking the integrin alphavbeta6, a transforming growth factor-beta1 activator.

    PubMed

    Knight, Pamela A; Brown, Jeremy K; Wright, Steven H; Thornton, Elisabeth M; Pate, Judith A; Miller, Hugh R P

    2007-10-01

    Infection of mice with the nematode Trichinella spiralis triggers recruitment and differentiation of intraepithelial intestinal mucosal mast cells expressing mouse mast cell protease 1 (Mcpt-1), which contributes to expulsion of the parasite. Expression of Mcpt-1 is transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-dependent in vitro. TGF-beta1, which is secreted within tissues as a biologically inactive complex with latency-associated peptide, requires extracellular modification to become functionally active. The integrin-alpha(nu)beta(6) mediates local activation of TGF-beta(1) in association with epithelia. Using T. spiralis-infected beta(6)(-/-) mice, we show accumulation of mucosal mast cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine with minimal recruitment into the epithelial compartment. This was accompanied by a coordinate reduction in expression of both Mcpt-1 and -2 in the jejunum and increased tryptase expression, whereas Mcpt-9 became completely undetectable. In contrast, the cytokine stem cell factor, a regulator of mast cell differentiation and survival, was significantly up-regulated in T. spiralis-infected beta(6)(-/-) mice compared with infected beta(6)(+/+) controls. Despite these changes, beta(6)(-/-) mice still appeared to expel the worms normally. We postulate that compromised TGF-beta(1) activation within the gastrointestinal epithelial compartment is a major, but not the only, contributing factor to the observed changes in mucosal mast cell protease and epithelial cytokine expression in beta(6)(-/-) mice.

  14. A novel cell-based assay to measure activity of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Gomez, Javier; Ahmad, Fahim; Rodriguez, Efrain; Saeed, Mohammad F.

    2016-09-15

    The encephalitic alphaviruses encode nsP2 protease (nsP2pro), which because of its vital role in virus replication, represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. To facilitate the discovery of nsP2 inhibitors we have developed a novel assay for quantitative measurement of nsP2pro activity in a cell-based format. The assay is based on a substrate fusion protein consisting of eGFP and Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) linked together by a small peptide containing a VEEV nsp2pro cleavage sequence. The expression of the substrate protein in cells along with recombinant nsP2pro results in cleavage of the substrate protein resulting in extracellular release of free Gluc. The Gluc activity in supernatants corresponds to intracellular nsP2pro-mediated substrate cleavage; thus, providing a simple and convenient way to quantify nsP2pro activity. Here, we demonstrate potential utility of the assay in identification of nsP2pro inhibitors, as well as in investigations related to molecular characterization of nsP2pro. - Highlights: • A novel cell-based assay to measure VEEV nsP2 protease activity was developed. • Assay utility was demonstrated for antiviral screening. • .The assay also proved to be useful in basic mechanistic studies of nsP2 protease.

  15. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  16. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Mediates Mucus Secretion in the Airway Submucosal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Yang, Yu-Mi; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Dong Min; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in airway epithelia and smooth muscle, plays an important role in airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that activation of PAR2 induces mucus secretion from the human airway gland and examined the underlying mechanism using the porcine and murine airway glands. The mucosa with underlying submucosal glands were dissected from the cartilage of tissues, pinned with the mucosal side up at the gas/bath solution interface of a physiological chamber, and covered with oil so that secretions from individual glands could be visualized as spherical bubbles in the oil. Secretion rates were determined by optical monitoring of the bubble diameter. The Ca2+-sensitive dye Fura2-AM was used to determine intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by means of spectrofluorometry. Stimulation of human tracheal mucosa with PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP) elevated intracellular Ca2+ and induced glandular secretion equal to approximately 30% of the carbachol response in the human airway. Porcine gland tissue was more sensitive to PAR2-AP, and this response was dependent on Ca2+ and anion secretion. When the mouse trachea were exposed to PAR2-AP, large amounts of secretion were observed in both wild type and ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant mice but there is no secretion from PAR-2 knock out mice. In conclusion, PAR2-AP is an agonist for mucus secretion from the airway gland that is Ca2+-dependent and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-independent. PMID:22916223

  17. Processing by rhomboid protease is required for Providencia stuartii TatA to interact with TatC and to form functional homo-oligomeric complexes.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Maximilian J; Krehenbrink, Martin; Tarry, Michael J; Berks, Ben C; Palmer, Tracy

    2012-06-01

    The twin arginine transport (Tat) system transports folded proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane and the plant thylakoid membrane. In Escherichia coli three membrane proteins, TatA, TatB and TatC, are essential components of the machinery. TatA from Providencia stuartii is homologous to E. coli TatA but is synthesized as an inactive pre-protein with an N-terminal extension of eight amino acids. Removal of this extension by the rhomboid protease AarA is required to activate P. stuartii TatA. Here we show that P. stuartii TatA can functionally substitute for E. coli TatA provided that the E. coli homologue of AarA, GlpG, is present. The oligomerization state of the P. stuartii TatA pro-protein was compared with that of the proteolytically activated protein and with E. coli TatA. The pro-protein still formed small homo-oligomers but cannot form large TatBC-dependent assemblies. In the absence of TatB, E. coli TatA or the processed form of P. stuartii TatA form a complex with TatC. However, this complex is not observed with the pro-form of P. stuartii TatA. Taken together our results suggest that the P. stuartii TatA pro-protein is inactive because it is unable to interact with TatC and cannot form the large TatA complexes required for transport.

  18. The Lon protease from the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii is transcriptionally linked to a cluster of putative membrane proteases and displays DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego E; Paggi, Roberto A; De Castro, Rosana E

    2011-05-20

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is universally distributed in bacteria, eukaryotic organelles and archaea. In comparison with bacterial and eukaryal Lon proteases, the biology of the archaeal Lon has been studied to a limited extent. In this study, the gene encoding the Lon protease of the alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Natrialba magadii (Nmlon) was cloned and sequenced, and the genetic organization of Nmlon was examined at the transcriptional level. Nmlon encodes a 84 kDa polypeptide with a pI of 4.42 which contains the ATPase, protease and membrane targeting domains of the archaeal-type LonB proteases. Nmlon is part of an operon that encodes membrane proteases and it is transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA in N. magadii cells at different growth stages. Accordingly, NmLon was detected in cell membranes of N. magadii throughout growth by Western blot analysis using specific anti-NmLon antibodies. Interestingly, in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified NmLon bound double stranded as well as single stranded DNA in the presence of elevated salt concentrations. This finding shows that DNA-binding is conserved in the LonA and LonB subfamilies and suggests that Lon-DNA interaction may be relevant for its function in haloarchaea.

  19. Derivation of rat embryonic stem cells and generation of protease-activated receptor-2 knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Mitsugu; Sasada, Reiko; Ooshima, Yuki; Yano, Takashi; Shinozawa, Tadahiro; Tsukimi, Yasuhiro; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2012-08-01

    One of the remarkable achievements in knockout (KO) rat production reported during the period 2008-2010 is the derivation of authentic embryonic stem (ES) cells from rat blastocysts using a novel culture medium containing glycogen synthase kinase 3 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors (2i medium). Here, we report gene-targeting technology via homologous recombination in rat ES cells, demonstrating its use through production of a protease-activated receptor-2 gene (Par-2) KO rat. We began by generating germline-competent ES cells from Dark Agouti rats using 2i medium. These ES cells, which differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro, can produce chimeras with high ES cell contribution when injected into blastocysts. We then introduced a targeting vector with a neomycin-resistant gene driven by the CAG promoter to disrupt Par-2. After a 7-day drug selection, 489 neomycin-resistant colonies were obtained. Following screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping and quantitative PCR analysis, we confirmed three homologous recombinant clones, resulting in chimeras that transmitted the Par-2 targeted allele to offspring. Par-2 KO rats showed a loss of Par-2 messenger RNA expression in their stomach cells and a lack of PAR-2 mediated smooth muscle relaxation in the aorta as indicated by pharmacological testing. Compared with mice, rats offer many advantages in biomedical research, including a larger body size; consequently, they are widely used in scientific investigation. Thus, the establishment of a gene-targeting technology using rat ES cells will be a valuable tool in human disease model production and drug discovery.

  20. Role of Fibrinogen and Protease-Activated Receptors in Acute Xenobiotic-Induced Cholestatic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Luyendyk, James P.; Mackman, Nigel; Sullivan, Bradley P.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)–induced cholestatic liver injury causes tissue factor (TF)–dependent coagulation in mice, and TF deficiency reduces ANIT-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism whereby TF contributes to hepatotoxicity in this model is not known. Utilizing pharmacological and genetic strategies, we evaluated the contribution of fibrinogen and two distinct receptors for thrombin, protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and PAR-4, in a model of acute ANIT hepatotoxicity. ANIT administration (60 mg/kg, po) caused a marked induction of the genes encoding the three fibrinogen chains (α, β, and γ) in liver, an increase in plasma fibrinogen, and concurrent deposition of thrombin-cleaved fibrin in liver. Partial depletion of circulating fibrinogen with ancrod did not impact ANIT hepatotoxicity. However, complete fibrin(ogen) deficiency significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase activity and hepatocellular necrosis in ANIT-treated mice. ANIT-induced hepatocellular necrosis was similar in PAR-1−/− mice compared with PAR-1+/+ mice. Interestingly, the progression of ANIT-induced hepatocellular necrosis was significantly reduced in PAR-4−/− mice and by administration of an inhibitory PAR-4 pepducin (P4Pal-10, 0.5 mg/kg, sc) to wild-type mice 8 h after ANIT treatment. Interestingly, a distinct lesion, parenchymal-type peliosis, was also observed in PAR-4−/− mice treated with ANIT and in mice that were given P4Pal-10 prior to ANIT administration. The results suggest that fibrin(ogen), but not PAR-1, contributes to the progression of ANIT hepatotoxicity in mice. Moreover, the data suggest a dual role for PAR-4 in ANIT hepatotoxicity, both mediating an early protection against peliosis and contributing to the progression of hepatocellular necrosis. PMID:20974703

  1. Active subtilisin-like protease from a hyperthermophilic archaeon in a form with a putative prosequence.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Y; Koga, Y; Inoue, Y; Haruki, M; Takagi, M; Imanaka, T; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S

    2001-06-01

    The gene encoding subtilisin-like protease T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was cloned from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. T. kodakaraensis subtilisin is a member of the subtilisin family and composed of 422 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 43,783. It consists of a putative presequence, prosequence, and catalytic domain. Like bacterial subtilisins, T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was overproduced in Escherichia coli in a form with a putative prosequence in inclusion bodies, solubilized in the presence of 8 M urea, and refolded and converted to an active molecule. However, unlike bacterial subtilisins, in which the prosequence was removed from the catalytic domain by autoprocessing upon refolding, T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was refolded in a form with a putative prosequence. This refolded protein of recombinant T. kodakaraensis subtilisin which is composed of 398 amino acid residues (Gly(-82) to Gly(316)), was purified to give a single band on a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel and characterized for biochemical and enzymatic properties. The good agreement of the molecular weights estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (44,000) and gel filtration (40,000) suggests that T. kodakaraensis subtilisin exists in a monomeric form. T. kodakaraensis subtilisin hydrolyzed the synthetic substrate N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide only in the presence of the Ca(2+) ion with an optimal pH and temperature of pH 9.5 and 80 degrees C. Like bacterial subtilisins, it showed a broad substrate specificity, with a preference for aromatic or large nonpolar P1 substrate residues. However, it was much more stable than bacterial subtilisins against heat inactivation and lost activity with half-lives of >60 min at 80 degrees C, 20 min at 90 degrees C, and 7 min at 100 degrees C.

  2. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer mediated by protease-activated receptor-2 in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Kang, Young-Gyu; Kim, Jaekyung; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is the result of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a key mediator of melanosome transfer, which occurs as the melanocyte extends its dendrite toward surrounding keratinocytes that take up melanosomes by phagocytosis. We investigated the effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans HOUTT. (nutmeg) on melanosome transfer and the regulation of PAR-2 in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). HaCaT cells stimulated by the PAR-2-activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH₂ (SLIGRL) were treated with macelignan; PAR-2 expression was then determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. We evaluated the effects of macelignan on calcium mobilization and keratinocyte phagocytosis. In addition, B16F10 melanoma cells and keratinocytes were co-cultured to assess the effects of macelignan on prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) secretion and subsequent dendrite formation. Macelignan decreased HaCaT PAR-2 mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, macelignan markedly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and significantly downregulated keratinocyte phagocytosis, as shown by decreased ingestion of Escherichia coli bioparticles and fluorescent microspheres. In co-culture experiments, macelignan reduced keratinocyte PGE₂ secretion, thereby preventing dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells compared with SLIGRL-treated controls. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer by downregulating PAR-2, thereby reducing keratinocyte phagocytosis and PGE₂ secretion, which in turn inhibits dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that macelignan could be used as a natural depigmenting agent to ameliorate hyperpigmentation.

  3. Identification of proteolytic bacteria from the Arctic Chukchi Sea expedition cruise and characterization of cold-active proteases.

    PubMed

    Park, Ha Ju; Lee, Yung Mi; Kim, Sunghui; Wi, Ah Ram; Han, Se Jong; Kim, Han-Woo; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Kim, Dockyu

    2014-10-01

    Following collection of seawater samples during an Arctic Chukchi Sea expedition cruise of the Korean icebreaker Araon in 2012, a total of 15,696 bacteria were randomly isolated from Marine Broth 2216 agar plates. Of these, 2,526 (16%) showed proteolytic activity and were identified as mainly Alteromonas (31%), Staphylococcus (27%), and Pseudoalteromonas (14%). Among the proteolytic strains, seven were selected based on their significant ability to grow and produce a halo on skim milk plates at low temperatures (<5°C) owing to cold-active proteases. These strains were affiliated with the genus Pseudoalteromonas and were divided into three groups based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA genes. Profiling cell membrane fatty acids confirmed the 16S rRNA-based differentiation and revealed the accordance between the two analyses. Seven genes for serine protease precursors were amplified from the corresponding strains, and based on sequence similarities, these genes were divided into three groups that were identical to those identified by the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. Three protease genes from the representative strains of each group were composed of 2,127-2,130 bp, encoding 708-709 amino acids, and these genes yielded products with calculated molecular weights of approximately 72.3-72.8 kDa. Amino acid sequence analysis suggested that the precursors are members of the subtilase serine endo- and exo-peptidase clan and contain four domains (signal peptide, N-terminal prosequence, catalytic domain, and two pre-peptidase C-terminal domains). Upon expression in E. coli, each recombinant protease exhibited proteolytic activity on zymogram gels.

  4. Effects of catechin polyphenols and preparations from the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines on protease activity and behavior in three nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease activities in preparations from the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita and the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus were inhibited by exposure to a series of 8 catechin polyphenol analogs, (+)-catechin, (-)- epicatechin (EC), (-)-gallocatechin (GC)...

  5. Missense Mutations in the Unfoldase ClpC1 of the Caseinolytic Protease Complex Are Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michelle; Gopal, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we showed that mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis panD, involved in coenzyme A biosynthesis, cause resistance against pyrazinoic acid, the bioactive component of the prodrug pyrazinamide. To identify additional resistance mechanisms, we isolated mutants resistant against pyrazinoic acid and subjected panD wild-type strains to whole-genome sequencing. Eight of the nine resistant strains harbored missense mutations in the unfoldase ClpC1 associated with the caseinolytic protease complex. PMID:27872068

  6. Multiple determinants influence complex formation of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease domain with its NS4A cofactor peptide.

    PubMed

    Urbani, A; Biasiol, G; Brunetti, M; Volpari, C; Di Marco, S; Sollazzo, M; Orrú, S; Piaz, F D; Casbarra, A; Pucci, P; Nardi, C; Gallinari, P; De Francesco, R; Steinkühler, C

    1999-04-20

    The interaction of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease domain with its NS4A cofactor peptide (Pep4AK) was investigated at equilibrium and at pre-steady state under different physicochemical conditions. Equilibrium dissociation constants of the NS3-Pep4AK complex varied by several orders of magnitude depending on buffer additives. Glycerol, NaCl, detergents, and peptide substrates were found to stabilize this interaction. The extent of glycerol-induced stabilization varied in an HCV strain-dependent way with at least one determinant mapping to an NS3-NS4A interaction site. Conformational transitions affecting at least the first 18 amino acids of NS3 were the main energy barriers for both the association and the dissociation reactions of the complex. However, deletion of this N-terminal portion of the protease molecule only slightly influenced equilibrium dissociation constants determined under different physicochemical conditions. Limited proteolysis experiments coupled with mass spectrometric identification of cleavage fragments suggested a high degree of conformational flexibility affecting at least the first 21 residues of NS3. The accessibility of this region of the protease to limited chymotryptic digestion did not significantly change in any condition tested, whereas a significant reduction of chymotryptic cleavages within the NS3 core was detected under conditions of high NS3-Pep4AK complex affinity. We conclude the following: (1) The N-terminus of the NS3 protease that, according to the X-ray crystal structure, makes extensive contacts with the cofactor peptide is highly flexible in solution and contributes only marginally to the thermodynamic stability of the complex. (2) Affinity enhancement is accomplished by several factors through a general stabilization of the fold of the NS3 molecule.

  7. Mutagenesis of a novel gene in the prcA-prtP protease locus affects expression of Treponema denticola membrane complexes.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Lin; Wang, Hong-Tao; Ning, Yu; Lee, Si Young; Fenno, J Christopher

    2005-02-01

    A novel gene was identified in the Treponema denticola prcA-prtP protease operon. Strains with mutations in either the prcA-prtP or the msp region showed altered expression of a product(s) of the other locus. Together, these results provide information on the assembly of outer membrane complexes involved in T. denticola interaction with host cells and tissue.

  8. Mutagenesis of a Novel Gene in the prcA-prtP Protease Locus Affects Expression of Treponema denticola Membrane Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-lin; Wang, Hong-tao; Ning, Yu; Lee, Si Young; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    A novel gene was identified in the Treponema denticola prcA-prtP protease operon. Strains with mutations in either the prcA-prtP or the msp region showed altered expression of a product(s) of the other locus. Together, these results provide information on the assembly of outer membrane complexes involved in T. denticola interaction with host cells and tissue. PMID:15664975

  9. Effects of cultural conditions on protease production by Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, T; Day, D F

    1983-01-01

    Production of extracellular proteolytic activity by Aeromonas hydrophila was influenced by temperature, pH, and aeration. Conditions which produced maximal growth also resulted in maximal protease production. Enzyme production appeared to be modulated by an inducer catabolite repression system whereby NH4+ and glucose repressed enzyme production and complex nitrogen and nonglucose, carbon energy sources promoted it. Under nutritional stress, protease production was high, despite poor growth. PMID:6342534

  10. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Poehlmann, Stefan

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.

  11. Processing and presentation of an antigen of Mycobacterium avium require access to an acidified compartment with active proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Holsti, M A; Allen, P M

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a murine T-cell hybridoma, 1C9, which recognizes an antigen expressed by a virulent clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium. Both peritoneal exudate macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages infected in vitro with M. avium process and present the antigen to the T-cell hybridoma. Gel filtration chromatography of a sonicate of M. avium followed by T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the antigen recognized by hybridoma 1C9 is approximately 50 kDa. In addition, treatment of macrophages with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine or with inhibitors of acid proteases inhibits processing and presentation of the antigen. These results indicate that the antigen must encounter an acidic compartment with active proteases for processing and presentation to occur. Our results are discussed in the context of our current understanding of how mycobacterial antigens are processed and presented by infected macrophages to T cells. PMID:8926074

  12. HCV NS3 protease enhances liver fibrosis via binding to and activating TGF-β type I receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Kotaro; Hara, Mitsuko; Terada, Takaho; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Takaya, Daisuke; Yaguchi, So-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Tokio; Miyazawa, Keiji; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Imoto, Masaya; Kojima, Soichi

    2013-11-01

    Viruses sometimes mimic host proteins and hijack the host cell machinery. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver fibrosis, a process largely mediated by the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen, although the precise underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we report that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3) protease affects the antigenicity and bioactivity of TGF-β2 in (CAGA)9-Luc CCL64 cells and in human hepatic cell lines via binding to TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α facilitates this mechanism by increasing the colocalization of TβRI with NS3 protease on the surface of HCV-infected cells. An anti-NS3 antibody against computationally predicted binding sites for TβRI blocked the TGF-β mimetic activities of NS3 in vitro and attenuated liver fibrosis in HCV-infected chimeric mice. These data suggest that HCV NS3 protease mimics TGF-β2 and functions, at least in part, via directly binding to and activating TβRI, thereby enhancing liver fibrosis.

  13. Enteric bacterial proteases in inflammatory bowel disease- pathophysiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ian M; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous reports have identified a dysbiosis in the intestinal microbiota in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), yet the mechanism(s) in which this complex microbial community initiates or perpetuates inflammation remains unclear. The purpose of this review is to present evidence for one such mechanism that implicates enteric microbial derived proteases in the pathogenesis of IBD. We highlight and discuss studies demonstrating that proteases and protease receptors are abundant in the digestive system. Additionally, we investigate studies demonstrating an association between increased luminal protease activity and activation of protease receptors, ultimately resulting in increased intestinal permeability and exacerbation of colitis in animal models as well as in human IBD. Proteases are essential for the normal functioning of bacteria and in some cases can serve as virulence factors for pathogenic bacteria. Although not classified as traditional virulence factors, proteases originating from commensal enteric bacteria also have a potential association with intestinal inflammation via increased enteric permeability. Reports of increased protease activity in stools from IBD patients support a possible mechanism for a dysbiotic enteric microbiota in IBD. A better understanding of these pathways and characterization of the enteric bacteria involved, their proteases, and protease receptors may pave the way for new therapeutic approaches for these diseases.

  14. CONTRIBUTION OF PROTEASE-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR 1 IN STATUS EPILEPTICUS-INDUCED EPILEPTOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Isaev, D.; Lushnikova, I.; Lunko, O.; Zapukhliak, O.; Maximyuk, O.; Romanov, A.; Skibo, G.G.; Tian, C.; Holmes, G.L.; Isaeva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations and studies on different animal models of acquired epilepsy consistently demonstrate that blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage can be an important risk factor for developing recurrent seizures. However, the involved signaling pathways remain largely unclear. Given the important role of thrombin and its major receptor in the brain, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), in the pathophysiology of neurological injury, we hypothesized that PAR1 may contribute to status epilepticus (SE)-induced epileptogenesis and that its inhibition shortly after SE will have neuroprotective and antiepileptogenic effects. Adult rats subjected to lithium-pilocarpine SE were administrated SCH79797 (a PAR1 selective antagonist) after SE termination. Thrombin and PAR1 levels and neuronal cell survival were evaluated 48 hr following SE. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on animal survival, interictal spikes (IIS) and electrographic seizures during the first two weeks after SE and behavioral seizures during the chronic period were evaluated. SE resulted in a high mortality rate and incidence of IIS and seizures in the surviving animals. There was a marked increase in thrombin, decrease in PAR1 immunoreactivity and hippocampal cell loss in the SE-treated rats. Inhibition of PAR1 following SE resulted in a decrease in mortality and morbidity, increase in neuronal cell survival in the hippocampus and suppression of IIS, electrographic and behavioral seizures following SE. These data suggest that the PAR1 signaling pathway contributes to epileptogenesis following SE. Because breakdown of the BBB occurs frequently in brain injuries, PAR1 inhibition may have beneficial effects in a variety of acquired injuries leading to epilepsy. PMID:25843668

  15. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  16. A novel carboxyl-terminal protease derived from Paenibacillus lautus CHN26 exhibiting high activities at multiple sites of substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carboxyl-terminal protease (CtpA) plays essential functions in posttranslational protein processing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. To date, only a few bacterial ctpA genes have been characterized. Here we cloned and characterized a novel CtpA. The encoding gene, ctpAp (ctpA of Paenibacillus lautus), was derived from P. lautus CHN26, a Gram-positive bacterium isolated by functional screening. Recombinant protein was obtained from protein over-expression in Escherichia coli and the biochemical properties of the enzyme were investigated. Results Screening of environmental sediment samples with a skim milk-containing medium led to the isolation of a P. lautus CHN26 strain that exhibited a high proteolytic activity. A gene encoding a carboxyl-terminal protease (ctpAp) was cloned from the isolate and characterized. The deduced mature protein contains 466 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 51.94 kDa, displaying 29-38% amino acid sequence identity to characterized bacterial CtpA enzymes. CtpAp contains an unusual catalytic dyad (Ser309-Lys334) and a PDZ substrate-binding motif, characteristic for carboxyl-terminal proteases. CtpAp was expressed as a recombinant protein and characterized. The purified enzyme showed an endopeptidase activity, which effectively cleaved α S1- and β- casein substrates at carboxyl-terminus as well as at multiple internal sites. Furthermore, CtpAp exhibited a high activity at room temperature and strong tolerance to conventional protease inhibitors, demonstrating that CtpAp is a novel endopeptidase. Conclusions Our work on CtpA represents the first investigation of a member of Family II CtpA enzymes. The gene was derived from a newly isolated P. lautus CHN26 strain exhibiting a high protease activity in the skim milk assay. We have demonstrated that CtpAp is a novel endopeptidase with distinct cleavage specificities, showing a strong potential in biotechnology and industry applications. PMID:24161150

  17. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  18. The tissue-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 complex promotes neurovascular injury in brain trauma: evidence from mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Sashindranath, Maithili; Sales, Eunice; Daglas, Maria; Freeman, Roxann; Samson, Andre L; Cops, Elisa J; Beckham, Simone; Galle, Adam; McLean, Catriona; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Madani, Rime; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Su, Enming J; Lawrence, Daniel A; Medcalf, Robert L

    2012-11-01

    The neurovascular unit provides a dynamic interface between the circulation and central nervous system. Disruption of neurovascular integrity occurs in numerous brain pathologies including neurotrauma and ischaemic stroke. Tissue plasminogen activator is a serine protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, a protease that dissolves blood clots. Besides its role in fibrinolysis, tissue plasminogen activator is abundantly expressed in the brain where it mediates extracellular proteolysis. However, proteolytically active tissue plasminogen activator also promotes neurovascular disruption after ischaemic stroke; the molecular mechanisms of this process are still unclear. Tissue plasminogen activator is naturally inhibited by serine protease inhibitors (serpins): plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, neuroserpin or protease nexin-1 that results in the formation of serpin:protease complexes. Proteases and serpin:protease complexes are cleared through high-affinity binding to low-density lipoprotein receptors, but their binding to these receptors can also transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane. The matrix metalloproteinases are the second major proteolytic system in the mammalian brain, and like tissue plasminogen activators are pivotal to neurological function but can also degrade structures of the neurovascular unit after injury. Herein, we show that tissue plasminogen activator potentiates neurovascular damage in a dose-dependent manner in a mouse model of neurotrauma. Surprisingly, inhibition of activity following administration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 significantly increased cerebrovascular permeability. This led to our finding that formation of complexes between tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the brain parenchyma facilitates post-traumatic cerebrovascular damage. We demonstrate that following trauma, the complex binds to low-density lipoprotein receptors, triggering the induction of matrix

  19. Localization and enzymatic activity profiles of the proteases responsible for tachykinin-directed oocyte growth in the protochordate, Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Masato; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo

    2012-03-01

    We previously substantiated that Ci-TK, a tachykinin of the protochordate, Ciona intestinalis (Ci), triggered oocyte growth from the vitellogenic stage (stage II) to the post-vitellogenic stage (stage III) via up-regulation of the gene expression and enzymatic activity of the proteases: cathepsin D, carboxypeptidase B1, and chymotrypsin. In the present study, we have elucidated the localization, gene expression and activation profile of these proteases. In situ hybridization showed that the Ci-cathepsin D mRNA was present exclusively in test cells of the stage II oocytes, whereas the Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 and Ci-chymotrypsin mRNAs were detected in follicular cells of the stage II and stage III oocytes. Double-immunostaining demonstrated that the immunoreactivity of Ci-cathepsin D was largely colocalized with that of the receptor of Ci-TK, Ci-TK-R, in test cells of the stage II oocytes. Ci-cathepsin D gene expression was detected at 2h after treatment with Ci-TK, and elevated for up to 5h, and then slightly decreased. Gene expression of Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 and Ci-chymotrypsin was observed at 5h after treatment with Ci-TK, and then decreased. The enzymatic activities of Ci-cathepsin D, Ci-carboxypeptidase B1, and Ci-chymotrypsin showed similar alterations with 1-h lags. These gene expression and protease activity profiles verified that Ci-cathepsin D is initially activated, which is followed by the activation of Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 and Ci-chymotrypsin. Collectively, the present data suggest that Ci-TK directly induces Ci-cahtepsin D in test cells expressing Ci-TK receptor, leading to the secondary activation of Ci-chymotrypsin and Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 in the follicle in the tachykininergic oocyte growth pathway.

  20. Central domain of IL-33 is cleaved by mast cell proteases for potent activation of group-2 innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançais, Emma; Duval, Anais; Mirey, Emilie; Roga, Stéphane; Espinosa, Eric; Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine from the IL-1 family. IL-33 activates many immune cell types expressing the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1) receptor ST2, including group-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s, natural helper cells, nuocytes), the major producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during type-2 innate immune responses and allergic airway inflammation. IL-33 is likely to play a critical role in asthma because the IL33 and ST2/IL1RL1 genes have been reproducibly identified as major susceptibility loci in large-scale genome-wide association studies. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating IL-33 activity is thus urgently needed. Here, we investigated the role of mast cells, critical effector cells in allergic disorders, known to interact with ILC2s in vivo. We found that serine proteases secreted by activated mast cells (chymase and tryptase) generate mature forms of IL-33 with potent activity on ILC2s. The major forms produced by mast cell proteases, IL-3395–270, IL-33107–270, and IL-33109–270, were 30-fold more potent than full-length human IL-331–270 for activation of ILC2s ex vivo. They induced a strong expansion of ILC2s and eosinophils in vivo, associated with elevated concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13. Murine IL-33 is also cleaved by mast cell tryptase, and a tryptase inhibitor reduced IL-33–dependent allergic airway inflammation in vivo. Our study identifies the central cleavage/activation domain of IL-33 (amino acids 66–111) as an important functional domain of the protein and suggests that interference with IL-33 cleavage and activation by mast cell and other inflammatory proteases could be useful to reduce IL-33–mediated responses in allergic asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25313073

  1. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori protease activity towards growth factors by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-09-01

    Infection with H. pylori is now recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Here, we examined the susceptibility of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) to degradation by H. pylori protease, and assessed the effect of a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, on this process. The 125I-labeled EGF, bFGF, TGF beta and PDGF were incubatet with H. pylori protease, obtained from the filtrates of saline washes of the bacterium culture, in the presence of 0-100 micrograms sulglycotide. The results showed that, under the assay conditions, H. pylori protease caused only 5% degradation of EGF and 7% degradation of bFGF. However, the protease evoked a 61.7% degradation of PDGF and a 62.3% degradation of TGF beta. Introduction of sulglycotide to the reaction assay system caused a dose-dependent inhibition in PDGF and TGF beta proteolysis by the H. pylori enzyme. The maximal inhibitory effect was obtained with sulglycotide at 100 micrograms/ml, at which dose an 84.4% decrease in PDGF and 88.3% decrease in TGF beta degradation was achieved. The results provide a strong evidence for the effectiveness of sulglycotide in the protection of gastric mucosal growth factors against degradation by H. pylori.

  2. Microplate fluorescence protease assays test the inhibition of select North American snake venoms' activities with an anti-proteinase library.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A

    2015-09-01

    Snake envenomation is a relatively neglected significant world health problem, designated an orphan disease by the WHO. While often effective, antivenins are insufficient. Could another approach greatly aid inhibition of the venom toxins? New fluorescent substrates for measuring protease activity in microplate assays suitable for high throughput screening were tested and found reproducible with snake venom. Representative North American venoms showed relatively strong proteinase and collagenase, but weaker elastase activities. Caseinolytic activity is inhibited by the nonspecific proteinase inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline and by EDTA, as is collagenase activity, consistent with the action of metalloproteinases. Both general protease and collagenase assays CV average 3%, and Km measured were above normal working conditions. Using a library of anti -proteinase compounds with multiple venoms revealed high inhibitor activity by three agents with known multiple metalloproteinase inhibitor activity (Actinonin, GM6001, and NNGH), which incidentally supports the concept that much of the degradative activity of certain venoms is due to metalloproteinases with collagenase activity. These results together support the use of microplate proteinase assays, particularly this collagenase assay, in future drug repurposing studies leading to the development of new treatments for those envenomations that have a major proteolytic component in their pathophysiology.

  3. House dust mite potentiates capsaicin-evoked Ca2+ transients in mouse pulmonary sensory neurons via activation of protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qihai; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2012-04-01

    House dust mite (HDM) is a major source of allergen in house dust and has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether HDM can modulate the sensitivity of pulmonary sensory neurons and, if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Fura-2-based ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging was carried out to determine the effect of HDM extract on the capsaicin-evoked Ca(2+) transient in mouse vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Pretreatment with HDM (50 μg ml(-1), 5 min) significantly enhanced the Ca(2+) transient evoked by capsaicin in these neurons isolated from wild-type mice. This potentiating effect of HDM was not antagonized by E-64, a selective cysteine protease inhibitor, but was completely prevented by AEBSF, a specific serine protease inhibitor. In addition, the potentiating effect of HDM on capsaicin-evoked Ca(2+) transient was absent in the pulmonary sensory neurons isolated from protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) knockout mice. Furthermore, the sensitizing effect of HDM was completely abolished by U73122, a phosholipase C inhibitor, or chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor. In summary, our results demonstrate that HDM, mainly through its serine protease activity, potentiates capsaicin-evoked Ca(2+) transient in mouse pulmonary sensory neurons via the activation of PAR(2) and the phosholipase C-protein kinase C intracellular transduction cascade.

  4. Mouse Mast Cell Protease-4 Deteriorates Renal Function by Contributing to Inflammation and Fibrosis in Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Beghdadi, Walid; Daugas, Eric; Åbrink, Magnus; Tiwari, Neeraj; Brochetta, Cristiana; Claver, Julien; Arouche, Nassim; Zang, Xingxing; Pretolani, Marina; Monteiro, Renato C.; Pejler, Gunnar; Blank, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells exert protective effects in experimental antiglomerular basement membrane-induced glomerulonephritis (GN), yet the responsible mediators have not been identified. In this study, we investigated the role of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-4, the functional homolog of human chymase, using mMCP-4–deficient mice. Compared with wild type animals, mMCP-4–deficient mice exhibited lower proteinuria, blood creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen levels, indicating an aggravating role of mMCP-4. Kidney histology confirmed less severe renal damage in mMCP-4–deficient mice with reduced deposits, glomerular and interstitial cellularity, and fibrosis scores. High amounts of mMCP-4 were detected in renal capsules, but not in the whole kidney, from wild type mice. Its expression in renal capsules was markedly decreased after GN induction, suggesting that locally released enzyme by degranulated mast cells could contribute to the functional and physiopathological hallmarks of GN. Supporting a proinflammatory role, glomerular and interstitial macrophage and T cell infiltration, levels of proinflammatory TNF and MCP-1 mRNA, and the expression of the profibrotic peptide angiotensin II together with type I collagen were markedly down-regulated in kidneys of mMCP-4–deficient mice. We conclude that mMCP-4 chymase, contrary to the global anti-inflammatory action of mast cells, aggravates GN by promoting kidney inflammation. These results highlight the complexity of mast cell-mediated inflammatory actions and suggest that chymase inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic target in GN. PMID:20530261

  5. Prediction of Extracellular Proteases of the Human Pathogen Helicobacter pylori Reveals Proteolytic Activity of the Hp1018/19 Protein HtrA

    PubMed Central

    Löwer, Martin; Weydig, Christiane; Metzler, Dirk; Reuter, Andreas; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019), which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:18946507

  6. Prediction of extracellular proteases of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori reveals proteolytic activity of the Hp1018/19 protein HtrA.

    PubMed

    Löwer, Martin; Weydig, Christiane; Metzler, Dirk; Reuter, Andreas; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Wessler, Silja; Schneider, Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019), which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies.

  7. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-Xiu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Hu, Dan-Dan; Wang, He-Xiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession), and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities. PMID:22675256

  8. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  9. Purification and characterization of serine proteases that exhibit caspase-like activity and are associated with programmed cell death in Avena sativa.

    PubMed

    Coffeen, Warren C; Wolpert, Thomas J

    2004-04-01

    Victoria blight of Avena sativa (oat) is caused by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, which is pathogenic because of the production of the toxin victorin. The victorin-induced response in sensitive A. sativa has been characterized as a form of programmed cell death (PCD) and displays morphological and biochemical features similar to apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, DNA laddering, cell shrinkage, altered mitochondrial function, and ordered, substrate-specific proteolytic events. Victorin-induced proteolysis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is shown to be prevented by caspase-specific and general protease inhibitors. Evidence is presented for a signaling cascade leading to Rubisco proteolysis that involves multiple proteases. Furthermore, two proteases that are apparently involved in the Rubisco proteolytic cascade were purified and characterized. These proteases exhibit caspase specificity and display amino acid sequences homologous to plant subtilisin-like Ser proteases. The proteases are constitutively present in an active form and are relocalized to the extracellular fluid after induction of PCD by either victorin or heat shock. The role of the enzymes as processive proteases involved in a signal cascade during the PCD response is discussed.

  10. Triterpenes from Cynomorium songaricium--analysis of HCV protease inhibitory activity, quantification, and content change under the influence of heating.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao-Mei; Wei, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Hattori, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitory activity of the three major triterpenes from the stems of Cynomorium songaricum--ursolic acid, acetyl ursolic acid, and malonyl ursolic acid hemiester--and their related compounds were tested for their inhibitory activity on HCV protease; malonyl ursolic acid hemiester was the most potent. A HPLC-PAD (photo diode array detector)-MS method was established to quantify the contents of each triterpene in C. songaricum. Using this method, the effect heating had on the contents was also investigated. It was found that among the three triterpenes, the content of malonyl ursolic acid hemiester decreased most quickly during the heating process.

  11. The influence of repeated administration of poloxamer 407 on serum lipoproteins and protease activity in mouse liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Korolenko, Tatyana A; Tuzikov, Fedor V; Johnston, Thomas P; Tuzikova, Natalia A; Kisarova, Yana A; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya; Alexeenko, Tatyana V; Zhukova, Natalia A; Brak, Ivan V; Spiridonov, Victor K; Filjushina, Elena E; Cherkanova, Marina S; Monoszon, Anna A

    2012-11-01

    The effects of repeated administration of poloxamer 407 (P-407) on lipoprotein-cholesterol (LP-C) and lipoprotein-triglyceride (LP-TG) fractions and subfractions, as well as the effect on liver and heart proteases, were studied. Repeated administration of P-407 to male CBA mice resulted in a model of atherosclerosis with increased diastolic blood pressure; there was a drastic increase in total serum cholesterol and especially TG. A novel small-angle X-ray scattering method for the determination of the fractional and subfractional composition of LP-C and LP-TG was used. In chronically P-407-treated mice, P-407 significantly increased atherogenic low-density lipoprotein C (LDL-C) fractions, as well as intermediate-density lipoprotein C (IDL-C), and LDL₁₋₃-C subfractions, and very-low-density lipoprotein-C (VLDL-C) fractions, as well as VLDL₁₋₂-C and VLDL₃₋₅-C subfractions), to a lesser extent, the total anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein C (HDL-C) fraction, as well as HDL₂-C and HDL₃-C subfractions. Additionally, we demonstrated an increase in the serum chitotriosidase activity, without significant changes in serum matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity. Morphological changes observed in P-407-treated mice included atherosclerosis in the heart and storage syndrome in the liver macrophages. P-407 significantly increased the activity of cysteine, aspartate proteases, and MMPs in the heart, and only the activity of cathepsin B and MMPs in the liver of mice. Thus, repeated administration of P-407 to mice induced atherosclerosis secondary to sustained dyslipidemia and formation of foamy macrophages in liver, and also modulated the activity of heart and liver proteases.

  12. Evaluation of cytotoxic and anti-tumor activity of partially purified serine protease isolate from the Indian earthworm Pheretima posthuma

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mahendra Kumar; Xavier, Francies; Verma, Yogendra Kumar; Sobha, Kota

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate, partially purify and evaluate the cytotoxic and antitumor activity of a serine protease from the chosen Indian earthworm Pheretima posthuma. Methods Whole animal extract was prepared and purified its protein constituents by size and charge based chromatographic separation techniques using Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-Cellulose resin respectively. Average molecular weight of the protein isolate was determined and analyzed for its cytotoxic property against Vero cells in different dilutions (1: 20 and 1: 40) and anti-tumor activity by MTT assay (a colorimetric assay) using breast cancer cell line MCF-7, with tamoxifen as standard. Results One of the protein constituents after purification was characterized as serine protease by Caseinolytic plate diffusion assay. Average molecular weight of this purified isolate was determined, by SDS-PAGE analysis with standard protein ladder, as of 15 kDa. The performed tests suggested that the 15kDa fraction has potent cytotoxic activity and satisfactory antitumor activity as well in vitro. Conclusions Exact molecular mechanism of the cytotoxic and antitumor activities is yet to be explored and currently we are working on ultra-purification and biophysical characterization of this fraction. Further investigation into the mechanism(s) of cytotoxic and antitumor activities at molecular level would be useful in treatment of various classes of cancer and viral infections in future.

  13. Molecular docking and structure-based virtual screening studies of potential drug target, CAAX prenyl proteases, of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Vijaya Prabhu, Sitrarasu; Suryanarayanan, Venkatesan; Bhardwaj, Ruchika; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Targeting CAAX prenyl proteases of Leishmania donovani can be a good approach towards developing a drug molecule against Leishmaniasis. We have modeled the structure of CAAX prenyl protease I and II of L. donovani, using homology modeling approach. The structures were further validated using Ramachandran plot and ProSA. Active site prediction has shown difference in the amino acid residues present at the active site of CAAX prenyl protease I and CAAX prenyl protease II. The electrostatic potential surface of the CAAX prenyl protease I and II has revealed that CAAX prenyl protease I has more electropositive and electronegative potentials as compared CAAX prenyl protease II suggesting significant difference in their activity. Molecular docking with known bisubstrate analog inhibitors of protein farnesyl transferase and peptidyl (acyloxy) methyl ketones reveals significant binding of these molecules with CAAX prenyl protease I, but comparatively less binding with CAAX prenyl protease II. New and potent inhibitors were also found using structure-based virtual screening. The best docked compounds obtained from virtual screening were subjected to induced fit docking to get best docked configurations. Prediction of drug-like characteristics has revealed that the best docked compounds are in line with Lipinski's rule. Moreover, best docked protein-ligand complexes of CAAX prenyl protease I and II are found to be stable throughout 20 ns simulation. Overall, the study has identified potent drug molecules targeting CAAX prenyl protease I and II of L. donovani whose drug candidature can be verified further using biochemical and cellular studies.

  14. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  15. Characterisation of faecal protease activity in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea: origin and effect of gut transit

    PubMed Central

    Tooth, David; Garsed, Klara; Singh, Gulzar; Marciani, Luca; Lam, Ching; Fordham, Imogen; Fields, Annie; Banwait, Rawinder; Lingaya, Melanie; Layfield, Robert; Hastings, Maggie; Whorwell, Peter; Spiller, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Faecal serine proteases (FSPs) may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D), but their origin is unclear. We aimed to structurally characterise them and define the impact of colonic cleansing and transit time. Design Faecal samples were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers (HV) and 79 patients with IBS-D participating in a trial of ondansetron versus placebo. Colonic transit was measured using radio-opaque markers. Samples were also obtained from 24 HV before and after colonic cleansing with the osmotic laxative MoviPrep. FSPs were purified from faecal extracts using benzamidine-Sepharose affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE profiled components were identified using trypsinolysis and tandem mass spectrometry. Functional protease activity in faecal extracts was measured using a colorimetric assay based on the proteolysis of azo-casein. Results Protein analysis identified the most abundant FSPs as being of human origin and probably derived from pancreatic juice. Functional assays showed increased faecal protease (FP) and amylase in patients with IBS-D compared with HV. Those with higher amylase had significantly higher FP and greater anxiety. FP activity correlated negatively with whole gut transit in patients with IBS-D (Spearman r=−0.32, p=0.005) and HV (r=−0.55, p=0.014). Colon cleansing caused a significant rise in FP activity in HV from a baseline of median (IQR) 253 (140–426) to 1031 (435–2296), levels similar to those seen in patients with IBS-D. FSP activity correlated positively with days/week with urgency. Conclusions The most abundant FSPs are of human origin. Rapid transit through the colon and/or decreased (possibly bacterial) proteolytic degradation increases their faecal concentration and could contribute to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with IBS-D. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00745004. PMID:23911555

  16. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  17. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα+) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα+ cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K+ channels in PDGFRα+ cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl− conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC–ICC–PDGFRα+ cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium. Key points Activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR) regulates gastrointestinal (GI) motility but little is known about the cells and mechanisms in GI muscles responsible for PAR responses. Using mouse cells, we

  18. Characterization of detergent compatible protease of a halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9: differential role of metal ions in stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2013-10-01

    A moderately halophilic protease producer, Bacillus sp. strain isolated from sea water is described. The protease is purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation and CM cellulose chromatography. The serine protease has a molecular mass of 29 kDa. Enzymatic characterization of protease revealed K(m) 2.22 mg mL(-1), Vmax 1111.11 U mL(-1), pH optimum 9.0, t1/2 190 min at 60°C and salt optima 1% (w/v) NaCl. The protease is remarkably stable in hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents at high concentrations. The purified preparation is unstable at room temperature. Ca(2+) ions are required for preventing this loss of activity. Interestingly, the activity and stability are modulated differentially. Whereas, divalent cation Ca(2+) are involved in maintaining stability in solution at room temperature by preventing unfolding, monovalent Na(+) and K(+) ions participate in regulating the activity and assist in refolding of the enzyme. Application of the protease is shown in efficient removal of blood stain.

  19. Inhibition of ribonuclease and protease activities in arsenic exposed rice seedlings: role of proline as enzyme protectant.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shruti; Dubey, Rama Shanker

    2006-09-01

    When seedlings of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cvs. Malviya-36 and Pant-12 were raised under 25 and 50 microM As2O3 in the medium an increase in the level of RNA, proteins and proline accompanied with a decline in the level of free amino acid pool was observed under arsenic supplementation compared to controls. In situ As3+ treatment caused a marked inhibition in activities of ribonuclease (RNase, EC 3.1.27.1), protease and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP, EC 3.4.11.1) whereas the activity level of carboxypeptidase (EC 3.4.16.5) was enhanced. In vitro supply of As2O3 in the enzyme assay medium beyond 400 microM resulted in gradual inhibition of RNase and beyond 5 microM inhibition of LAP activities. Addition of 1M proline in the assay medium significantly restored the loss in RNase activity due to in vitro arsenic treatment or due to osmotic stress created by incorporation of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Isoform pattern of RNase extracted from As3+ -exposed seedlings showed a significant alteration compared to its pattern in unexposed seedlings. Results suggest that arsenic exposure impairs hydrolysis of RNA and proteins in rice seedlings due to inhibition of RNase and proteases activities and that proline accumulating under As3+ toxicity appears to serve as enzyme protectant.

  20. Structure of a Switchable Subtilisin Complexed with a Substrate and with the Activator Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Travis; Ruan, Biao; London, Mariya; Bryan, Molly A.; Bryan, Philip N.; NIST

    2010-01-12

    An engineered variant of the protease subtilisin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, in which the D32A mutation renders the enzyme's activity dependent on the presence of certain small anions such as fluoride or azide, has been produced. This modified enzyme has applications as an azide or fluoride-triggered expression-purification tool. We report activity measurements showing that the enzyme is activated more than 3000-fold by azide and describe the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution structure of an inactive form (by replacing the catalytic nucleophile Ser 221 with alanine) of the protease, in complex with azide and with a substrate that spans the active site. Both enzyme and substrate have been engineered to increase their stability and the affinity of their interaction. The substrate is based on a stabilized subtilisin prodomain, extended across the active site by the addition of four residues at its C-terminus. In the crystal structure, the substrate is well-ordered across the active site, and the azide anion is observed bound adjacent to Ala 32. The structures of the substrate complex in three different crystals (anion-free, fluoride-soaked, and azide-soaked) are compared. These structures provide extensive information for understanding subtilisin's substrate binding and catalytic mechanism, and for the development of biotechnology tools based on anion-activated proteolysis. The mechanism of anion-dependent proteolysis appears to be a slight modification of the accepted charge-relay mechanism for serine proteases.

  1. Using C. elegans to Identify the Protease Targets of Serpins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sangeeta R.; Miedel, Mark T.; Chotoo, Cavita K.; Graf, Nathan J.; Hood, Brian L.; Conrads, Thomas P.; Silverman, Gary A.; Luke, Cliff J.

    2015-01-01

    Most serpins inhibit serine and/or cysteine proteases, and their inhibitory activities are usually defined in vitro. However, the physiological protease targets of most serpins are unknown despite many years of research. This may be due to the rapid degradation of the inactive serpin:protease complexes and/or the conditions under which the serpin inhibits the protease. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal system for identifying protease targets due to powerful forward and reverse genetics, as well as the ease of creating transgenic animals. Using combinatorial approaches of genetics and biochemistry in C. elegans, the true in vivo protease targets of the endogenous serpins can be elucidated. PMID:21683259

  2. Targeting Proteases in Cardiovascular Diseases by Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Diana; Hardt, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze peptide bonds, thereby controlling the function of proteins and peptides on the posttranslational level. In the cardiovascular system, proteases play pivotal roles in the regulation of blood pressure, coagulation and other essential physiological processes. Accordingly, proteases are prime targets for therapeutic interventions and diagnostics. Proteases are part of complex proteolytic networks comprised of enzymes, inhibitors, activators, substrates and cleavage products. Analyzing these networks on a system-wide level is essential to understanding cardiovascular function and how dysregulation can lead to pathological conditions. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative and dynamic proteomics approaches are leading the way to enhance our knowledge of proteolytic networks such as the renin-angiotensin-system. Here, we critically review proteomics tools utilized in protease biology and provide an overview on how these methods can be used to characterize and validate protease function. PMID:22511707

  3. TMPRSS12 Is an Activating Protease for Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-12-15

    The entry of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) into host cells initially requires the fusion of viral and cell membranes, which is exclusively mediated by fusion (F) protein. Proteolysis of aMPV F protein by endogenous proteases of host cells allows F protein to induce membrane fusion; however, these proteases have not been identified. Here, we provide the first evidence that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitates the cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. We found that overexpression of TMPRSS12 enhanced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. Subsequently, knockdown of TMPRSS12 with specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) reduced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. We also found a cleavage motif in the aMPV/B F protein (amino acids 100 and 101) that was recognized by TMPRSS12. The histidine, aspartic acid, and serine residue (HDS) triad of TMPRSS12 was shown to be essential for the proteolysis of aMPV/B F protein via mutation analysis. Notably, we observed TMPRSS12 mRNA expression in target organs of aMPV/B in chickens. Overall, our results indicate that TMPRSS12 is crucial for aMPV/B F protein proteolysis and aMPV/B infectivity and that TMPRSS12 may serve as a target for novel therapeutics and prophylactics for aMPV.

  4. Determining Protease Activity In Vivo by Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Tobias; Haustein, Elke; Schwille, Petra

    2005-01-01

    To date, most biochemical approaches to unravel protein function have focused on purified proteins in vitro. Whereas they analyze enzyme performance under assay conditions, they do not necessarily tell us what is relevant within a living cell. Ideally, cellular functions should be examined in situ. In particular, association/dissociation reactions are ubiquitous, but so far there is no standard technique permitting online analysis of these processes in vivo. Featuring single-molecule sensitivity combined with intrinsic averaging, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a minimally invasive technique ideally suited to monitor proteins. Moreover, endogenous fluorescence-based assays can be established by genetically encoding fusions of autofluorescent proteins and cellular proteins, thus avoiding the disadvantages of in vitro protein labeling and subsequent delivery to cells. Here, we present an in vivo protease assay as a model system: Green and red autofluorescent proteins were connected by Caspase-3- sensitive and insensitive protein linkers to create double-labeled protease substrates. Then, dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy was employed to study the protease reaction in situ. Allowing assessment of multiple dynamic parameters simultaneously, this method provided internal calibration and improved experimental resolution for quantifying protein stability. This approach, which is easily extended to reversible protein-protein interactions, seems very promising for elucidating intracellular protein functions. PMID:16055538

  5. In vitro ANTIGIARDIAL ACTIVITY OF THE CYSTEINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR E-64

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Thaís Batista; Oliveira-Sequeira, Teresa Cristina Goulart; Guimarães, Semíramis

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antiparasitic alternatives has led researchers to base their studies on insights into biology, host-parasite interactions and pathogenesis. In this context, proteases and their inhibitors are focused, respectively, as druggable targets and new therapy alternatives. Herein, we proposed to evaluate the in vitro effect of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 on Giardia trophozoites growth, adherence and viability. Trophozoites (105) were exposed to E-64 at different final concentrations, for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 °C. In the growth and adherence assays, the number of trophozoites was estimated microscopically in a haemocytometer, whereas cell viability was evaluated by a dye-reduction assay using MTT. The E-64 inhibitor showed effect on growth, adherence and viability of trophozoites, however, its better performance was detected in the 100 µM-treated cultures. Although metronidazole was more effective, the E-64 was shown to be able to inhibit growth, adherence and viability rates by ≥ 50%. These results reveal that E-64 can interfere in some crucial processes to the parasite survival and they open perspectives for future investigations in order to confirm the real antigiardial potential of the protease inhibitors. PMID:24553607

  6. In vitro anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of transition state mimetic HIV protease inhibitors containing allophenylnorstatine.

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, S; Mimoto, T; Murakawa, Y; Nomizu, M; Ford, H; Shirasaka, T; Gulnik, S; Erickson, J; Takada, K; Hayashi, H

    1993-01-01

    Transition state mimetic tripeptide human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors containing allophenylnorstatine [(2S,3S)-3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid] were synthesized and tested for activity against HIV in vitro. Two compounds, KNI-227 and KNI-272, which were highly potent against HIV protease with little inhibition of other aspartic proteases, showed the most potent activity against the infectivity and cytopathic effect of a wide spectrum of HIV strains. As tested in target CD4+ ATH8 cells, the 50% inhibitory concentrations of KNI-227 against HIV type 1 LAI (HIV-1LAI), HIV-1RF, HIV-1MN, and HIV-2ROD were 0.1, 0.02, 0.03, and 0.1 microM, respectively, while those of KNI-272 were 0.1, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.1 microM, respectively. Both agents completely blocked the replication of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine-sensitive and -insensitive clinical HIV-1 isolates at 0.08 microM as tested in target phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The ratios of 50% cytotoxic concentrations to 50% inhibitory concentrations for KNI-227 and KNI-272 were approximately 2,500 and > 4,000, respectively, as assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both compounds blocked the posttranslational cleavage of the p55 precursor protein to generate the mature p24 Gag protein in stably HIV-1-infected cells. The n-octanol-water partition coefficients of KNI-227 and KNI-272 were high, with log Po/w values of 3.79 and 3.56, respectively. Degradation of KNI-227 and KNI-272 in the presence of pepsin (1 mg/ml, pH 2.2) at 37 degrees C for 24 h was negligible. Current data warrant further careful investigations toward possible clinical application of these two novel compounds. Images PMID:8494379

  7. Genetic and biochemical analysis of gonococcal IgA1 protease: cloning in Escherichia coli and construction of mutants of gonococci that fail to produce the activity.

    PubMed Central

    Koomey, J M; Gill, R E; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    The biological significance of bacterial extracellular proteases that specifically cleave human IgA1 is unknown. We have prepared a gene bank of gonococcal chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli K-12 using a cosmid cloning system. Among these clones, we have identified and characterized an E. coli strain that elaborates an extracellular endopeptidase that is indistinguishable from gonococcal IgA1 protease in its substrate specificity and action on human IgA1. Analysis of recombinant plasmids and examination of plasmid-specific peptides in minicells have shown that the IgA1 protease activity in E. coli is associated with expression of a Mr 140,000 peptide. We have isolated IgA1 protease-deficient mutants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by reintroduction of physically defined deletions of the cloned gene into the gonococcal chromosome by transformation. Images PMID:6818556

  8. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Supports Locomotor Recovery by Biased Agonist Activated Protein C after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Whetstone, William D.; Walker, Breset; Trivedi, Alpa; Lee, Sangmi; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Hsu, Jung-Yu C.

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-induced secondary injury is mediated through its receptor, protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), by "biased agonism." Activated protein C (APC) acts through the same PAR-1 receptor but functions as an anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory protein, which counteracts many of the effects of thrombin. Although the working mechanism of PAR-1 is becoming clear, the functional role of PAR-1 and its correlation with APC in the injured spinal cord remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated if PAR-1 and APC are determinants of long-term functional recovery after a spinal cord contusive injury using PAR-1 null and wild-type mice. We found that neutrophil infiltration and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier were significantly reduced in spinal cord injured PAR-1 null mice relative to the wild-type group. Both locomotor recovery and ability to descend an inclined grid were significantly improved in the PAR-1 null group 42 days after injury and this improvement was associated with greater long-term sparing of white matter and a reduction in glial scarring. Wild-type mice treated with APC acutely after injury showed a similar level of improved locomotor recovery to that of PAR-1 null mice. However, improvement of APC-treated PAR-1 null mice was indistinguishable from that of vehicle-treated PAR-1 null mice, suggesting that APC acts through PAR-1. Collectively, our findings define a detrimental role of thrombin-activated PAR-1 in wound healing and further validate APC, also acting through the PAR-1 by biased agonism, as a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord injury. PMID:28122028

  9. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  10. [Development of agonists/antagonists for protease-activated receptors (PARs) and the possible therapeutic application to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko

    2005-06-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-domain receptors, are activated by proteolytic unmasking of the N-terminal cryptic tethered ligand by certain serine proteases. Among four PAR family members cloned to date, PAR-1, PAR-2, and PAR-4 can also be activated through a non-enzymatic mechanism, which is achieved by direct binding of exogenously applied synthetic peptides based on the tethered ligand sequence, known as PARs-activating peptides, to the body of the receptor. Various peptide mimetics have been synthesized as agonists for PARs with improved potency, selectivity, and stability. Some peptide mimetics and/or nonpeptide compounds have also been developed as antagonists for PAR-1 and PAR-4. PARs are widely distributed in the mammalian body, especially throughout the alimentary systems, and play various roles in physiological/pathophysiological conditions, i.e., modulation of salivary, gastric, or pancreatic glandular exocrine secretion, gastrointestinal smooth muscle motility, gastric mucosal cytoprotection, suppression/facilitation of visceral pain and inflammation, etc. Thus PARs are now considered novel therapeutic targets, and development of selective agonists and/or antagonists for PARs might provide a novel strategy for the treatment of various diseases that are resistant to current therapeutics.

  11. Cylindrospermopsin inhibits growth and modulates protease activity in the aquatic plants Lemna minor L. and Wolffia arrhiza (L.) Horkel.

    PubMed

    Jámbrik, Katalin; Máthé, C; Vasas, G; Bácsi, I; Surányi, G; Gonda, S; Borbély, G; M-Hamvas, Márta

    2010-01-01

    The toxic effects of cylindrospermopsin (cyanobacterial toxin) on animals have been examined extensively, but little research has focused on their effects on plants. In this study cylindrospermopsin (CYN) caused alterations of growth, soluble protein content and protease enzyme activity were studied on two aquatic plants Lemna minor and Wolffia arrhiza in short-term (5 days) experiments. For the treatments we used CYN containing crude extracts of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum (BGSD-423) and purified CYN as well. The maximal inhibitory effects on fresh weight of L. minor and W. arrhiza caused by crude extract were 60% and 54%, respectively, while the maximum inhibitory effects were 30% and 43% in the case of purified CYN at 20 μg ml(-1) CYN content of culture medium. In CYN-treated plants the concentration of soluble protein showed mild increases, especially in W. arrhiza. Protease isoenzyme activity gels showed significant alterations of enzyme activities under the influence of CYN. Several isoenzymes were far more active and new ones appeared in CYN-treated plants. Treatments with cyanobacterial crude extract caused stronger effects than the purified cyanobacterial toxins used in equivalent CYN concentrations.

  12. Saliva Enables the Antimicrobial Activity of LL-37 in the Presence of Proteases of Porphyromonas gingivalis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gutner, Michal; Chaushu, Stella; Balter, Daniela; Bachrach, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    Proteolysis is a common microbial virulence mechanism that enables the destruction of host tissue and evasion from host defense mechanisms. Antimicrobial peptides, also known as host defense peptides, are effector molecules of the innate immunity that demonstrate a broad range of antimicrobial and immunoregulatory activities. Deficiency of the human LL-37 antimicrobial peptide was previously correlated with severe periodontal disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis, the major pathogen associated with periodontitis, is highly proteolytic. In this study, P. gingivalis was found capable of degrading LL-37 by utilizing its arginine-specific gingipains. Saliva collected from volunteers with a healthy periodontium protected LL-37 from proteolysis by P. gingivalis. Salivary protection of LL-37 was heat resistant and specific and enabled LL-37 to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli in the presence of the P. gingivalis proteases. Previously, saliva and other body fluids have been shown to inhibit the antimicrobial activity of LL-37. Here we demonstrate that at a cost of a small reduction in the bactericidal activity of LL-37, saliva enables the antibacterial activity of LL-37 despite the presence of proteases secreted by the main periodontopathogen. PMID:19805540

  13. Design of Protease Activated Optical Contrast Agents That Exploit a Latent Lysosomotropic Effect for Use in Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for new molecular-guided contrast agents to enhance surgical procedures such as tumor resection that require a high degree of precision. Cysteine cathepsins are highly up-regulated in a wide variety of cancers, both in tumor cells and in the tumor-supporting cells of the surrounding stroma. Therefore, tools that can be used to dynamically monitor their activity in vivo could be used as imaging contrast agents for intraoperative fluorescence image guided surgery (FGS). Although multiple classes of cathepsin-targeted substrate probes have been reported, most suffer from overall fast clearance from sites of protease activation, leading to reduced signal intensity and duration in vivo. Here we describe the design and synthesis of a series of near-infrared fluorogenic probes that exploit a latent cationic lysosomotropic effect (LLE) to promote cellular retention upon protease activation. These probes show tumor-specific retention, fast activation kinetics, and rapid systemic distribution. We demonstrate that they are suitable for detection of diverse cancer types including breast, colon and lung tumors. Most importantly, the agents are compatible with the existing, FDA approved, da Vinci surgical system for fluorescence guided tumor resection. Therefore, our data suggest that the probes reported here can be used with existing clinical instrumentation to detect tumors and potentially other types of inflammatory lesions to guide surgical decision making in real time. PMID:26039341

  14. Identification and functional characterizations of serpin8, a potential prophenoloxidase-activating protease inhibitor in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjie; Sun, Yuhang; Wang, Qiai; Hou, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Serpins have been characterized from varieties of organisms by their inhibitory roles on serine or cysteine proteases. However, research for the functional study of serpins in crustacean is relatively small. To fully clarify the immune characterizations of serpin, a novel serpin (named Lvserpin8) encoding 414 amino acids with a 19-amino acid signal peptide and a serpin domain was identified from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Sequence analysis indicated that the genomic Lvserpin8 gene contains 5 exons and 4 introns. The P1 residues of the predicted scissile bond in the reactive center loop (RCL) region represented for Lysine (Lys), which is in accordance with Pmserpin8, Dmserpin27A, Ofserpin3, Bmserpin3 and Msserpin3. Quantitative results showed that high mRNA expression of Lvserpin8 was detected in hepatopancreas and testis. Notably, a significant increase of Lvserpin8 was appeared post injection of Vibrio anguillarum, and Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Moreover, Lvserpin8 was knocked down in vivo by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mediated RNA interference (RNAi). Suppression of Lvserpin8 led to a significant increase in the transcripts of LvPPAE2 (Prophenoloxidase-activating Enzyme 2) and cumulative mortality. What's more, recombinant Lvserpin8 protein (rLvserpin8) displayed inhibition roles on trypsin activity, and prophenoloxidase activation. Taken together, the results implied that Lvserpin8 may be involved in shrimp innate immunity via the inhibition of prophenoloxidase-activating proteases.

  15. Comparison of the active sites of atropinesterase and some serine proteases by spin-labeling.

    PubMed

    van der Drift, A C; Moes, G W; van der Drift, E; Rousseeuw, B A

    1985-09-24

    going from label I to label II, the relative contribution of the latter state increases at the expense of that of the former. This is ascribed to an equilibrium between a relatively free state of the aromatic cores and a firmly bound position in the specificity pocket of these proteases. The apparently more rigid embedding of the spin-labels in the enzyme structure of AtrE suggests that the size of the nonpolar binding pocket in the active center region of this esterase allows a deeper penetration of the aromatic portions of the labels than is possible for the specificity pocket of Chymo or Sub.

  16. SLC6 family transporter SNF-10 is required for protease-mediated activation of sperm motility in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fenker, Kristin E.; Hansen, Angela A.; Chong, Conrad A.; Jud, Molly C.; Duffy, Brittany A.; Norton, J. Paul; Hansen, Jody M.; Stanfield, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Motility of sperm is crucial for their directed migration to the egg. The acquisition and modulation of motility are regulated to ensure that sperm move when and where needed, thereby promoting reproductive success. One specific example of this phenomenon occurs during differentiation of the amoeboid sperm of C. elegans as they activate from a round spermatid to a mature, crawling spermatozoon. Sperm activation is regulated by redundant pathways to occur at a specific time and place for each sex. Here, we report the identification of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) transporter protein SNF-10 as a key regulator of C. elegans sperm activation in response to male protease activation signals. We find that SNF-10 is present in sperm and is required for activation by the male but not by the hermaphrodite. Loss of both snf-10 and a hermaphrodite activation factor render sperm completely insensitive to activation. Using in vitro assays, we find that snf-10 mutant sperm show a specific deficit in response to protease treatment but not to other activators. Prior to activation, SNF-10 is present in the plasma membrane, where it represents a strong candidate to receive signals that lead to subcellular morphogenesis. After activation, it shows polarized localization to the cell body region that is dependent on membrane fusions mediated by the dysferlin FER-1. Our discovery of snf-10 offers insight into the mechanisms differentially employed by the two sexes to accomplish the common goal of producing functional sperm, as well as how the physiology of nematode sperm may be regulated to control motility as it is in mammals. PMID:24929237

  17. The Pig: A Relevant Model for Evaluating the Neutrophil Serine Protease Activities during Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bréa, Déborah; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Barc, Céline; Pezant, Jérémy; Melo, Sandrine; Olivier, Michel; Delaunay, Rémy; Boulesteix, Olivier; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Becq, Frédéric; Gauthier, Francis; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Caballero-Posadas, Ignacio; Attucci, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The main features of lung infection and inflammation are a massive recruitment of neutrophils and the subsequent release of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs). Anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory treatments must be tested on a suitable animal model. Mice models do not replicate several aspects of human lung disease. This is particularly true for cystic fibrosis (CF), which has led the scientific community to a search for new animal models. We have shown that mice are not appropriate for characterizing drugs targeting neutrophil-dependent inflammation and that pig neutrophils and their NSPs are similar to their human homologues. We induced acute neutrophilic inflammatory responses in pig lungs using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen. Blood samples, nasal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h post-insfection (p.i.) and biochemical parameters, serum and BAL cytokines, bacterial cultures and neutrophil activity were evaluated. The release of proinflammatory mediators, biochemical and hematological blood parameters, cell recruitment and bronchial reactivity, peaked at 6h p.i.. We also used synthetic substrates specific for human neutrophil proteases to show that the activity of pig NSPs in BALFs increased. These proteases were also detected at the surface of lung neutrophils using anti-human NSP antibodies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung infection in pigs results in a neutrophilic response similar to that described for cystic fibrosis and ventilator-associated pneumonia in humans. Altogether, this indicates that the pig is an appropriate model for testing anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory drugs to combat adverse proteolytic effects of neutrophil in human lung diseases. PMID:27992534

  18. Assessing Activity and Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Papain-Like and 3C-Like Proteases Using Luciferase-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Mielech, Anna M.; Deng, Xufang

    2013-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with an outbreak of more than 90 cases of severe pneumonia with high mortality (greater than 50%). To date, there are no antiviral drugs or specific therapies to treat MERS-CoV. To rapidly identify potential inhibitors of MERS-CoV replication, we expressed the papain-like protease (PLpro) and the 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) from MERS-CoV and developed luciferase-based biosensors to monitor protease activity in cells. We show that the expressed MERS-CoV PLpro recognizes and processes the canonical CoV-PLpro cleavage site RLKGG in the biosensor. However, existing CoV PLpro inhibitors were unable to block MERS-CoV PLpro activity, likely due to the divergence of the amino acid sequence in the drug binding site. To investigate MERS-CoV 3CLpro activity, we expressed the protease in context with flanking nonstructural protein 4 (nsp4) and the amino-terminal portion of nsp6 and detected processing of the luciferase-based biosensors containing the canonical 3CLpro cleavage site VRLQS. Importantly, we found that a small-molecule inhibitor that blocks replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and murine CoV also inhibits the activity of MERS-CoV 3CLpro. Overall, the protease expression and biosensor assays developed here allow for rapid evaluation of viral protease activity and the identification of protease inhibitors. These biosensor assays can now be used to screen for MERS-CoV-specific or broad-spectrum coronavirus PLpro and 3CLpro inhibitors. PMID:23986593

  19. Proteochemometrics mapping of the interaction space for retroviral proteases and their substrates.

    PubMed

    Kontijevskis, Aleksejs; Petrovska, Ramona; Yahorava, Sviatlana; Komorowski, Jan; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2009-07-15

    Understanding the complex interactions of retroviral proteases with their ligands is an important scientific challenge in efforts to achieve control of retroviral infections. Development of drug resistance because of high mutation rates and extensive polymorphisms causes major problems in treating the deadly diseases these viruses cause, and prompts efforts to identify new strategies. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of the interaction of 63 retroviral proteases from nine different viral species with their substrates and inhibitors based on publicly available data from the past 17years of retroviral research. By correlating physico-chemical descriptions of retroviral proteases and substrates to their biological activities we constructed a highly statistically valid 'proteochemometric' model for the interactome of retroviral proteases. Analysis of the model indicated amino acid positions in retroviral proteases with the highest influence on ligand activity and revealed general physicochemical properties essential for tight binding of substrates across multiple retroviral proteases. Hexapeptide inhibitors developed based on the discovered general properties effectively inhibited HIV-1 proteases in vitro, and some exhibited uniformly high inhibitory activity against all HIV-1 proteases mutants evaluated. A generalized proteochemometric model for retroviral proteases interactome has been created and analysed in this study. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using the developed general strategy in the design of inhibitory peptides that can potentially serve as templates for drug resistance-improved HIV retardants.

  20. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  1. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  2. Partial properties of an aspartic protease in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) fruit and its activation by heating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianzhen; Wang, Meng; Li, Quanhong; Cai, Tongyi; Jiang, Weibo

    2008-05-15

    Bitter gourd (BG fruit) is usually heated in hot water to reduce bitterness and improve flavour before being served. Protein extract from BG was analyzed for protease activity by gelatin-gel electrophoresis. The study showed that the proteolytic activity in BG flesh was enhanced by heat-treatment at temperatures ranging from 50°C to 75°C. An aspartic protease (AP) was characterized by gel electrophoresis. The optimal AP activity was at pH 7; the pI of the AP was demonstrated to be 4.8; the protein molecular weight of the BG-AP was estimated to be 60KD by SDS-PAGE. The AP was implicated in the proteolysis of the photosynthetic enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. The AP was further purified and submitted for analysis of peptide mass fingerprint (PMF). The Mascot peptide mass fingerprint of the AP protein hit no existing protein (score>60), and it proved to be a novel AP.

  3. Novel thrombolytic protease from edible and medicinal plant Aster yomena (Kitam.) Honda with anticoagulant activity: purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Se-Eun; Choi, Bong-Suk; Sapkota, Kumar; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2014-10-01

    A thrombolytic protease named kitamase possessing anticoagulant property was purified from edible and medicinal plant Aster yomena (Kitam.) Honda. Kitamase showed a molecular weight of 50 kDa by SDS-PAGE and displayed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to the similar molecular mass. The enzyme was active at high temperatures (50°C). The fibrinolytic activity of kitamase was strongly inhibited by EDTA, EGTA, TPCK and PMSF, inhibited by Zn(2+). The Km and Vmax values for substrate S-2251 were determined as 4.31 mM and 23.81 mM/mg respectively. It dissolved fibrin clot directly and specifically cleaved the α, Aα and γ-γ chains of fibrin and fibrinogen. In addition, kitamase delayed the coagulation time and increased activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. Kitamase exerted a significant protective effect against collagen and epinephrine induced pulmonary thromboembolism in mice. These results suggest that kitamase may have the property of metallo-protease like enzyme, novel fibrino(geno)lytic enzyme and a potential to be a therapeutic agent for thrombosis.

  4. Evaluation of the anti-arenaviral activity of the subtilisin kexin isozyme-1/site-1 protease inhibitor PF-429242

    PubMed Central

    Pasquato, Antonella; Rochat, Cylia; Burri, Dominique J.; Pasqual, Giulia; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The cellular protease subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P) is implicated in the proteolytic processing of the viral envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) of arenaviruses, a step strictly required for production of infectious progeny. The small molecule SKI-1/S1P inhibitor PF-429242 was shown to have anti-viral activity against Old World arenaviruses. Here we extended these studies and show that PF-429242 also inhibits GPC processing and productive infection of New World arenaviruses, making PF-429242 a broadly active anti-arenaviral drug. In combination therapy, PF-429242 potentiated the anti-viral activity of ribavirin, indicating a synergism between the two drugs. A hallmark of arenaviruses is their ability to establish persistent infection in vitro and in vivo. Notably, PF-429242 was able to efficiently and rapidly clear persistent infection by arenaviruses. Interruption of drug treatment did not result in re-emergence of infection, indicating that PF-429242 treatment lead to virus extinction. PMID:22154237

  5. Potential antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of autochthonous starter cultures and protease EPg222 in dry-fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Margarita; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Benito, María José; Martín, Alberto; Hernández, Alejandro; Córdoba, María de Guía

    2016-05-18

    This work studied the presence of nitrogen compounds with bioactive properties in Iberian pork sausages that were manufactured using different autochthonous starter cultures (Pediococcus acidilactici MS200 and Staphylococcus vitulus RS34) and protease EPg222. Nitrogen compounds were extracted and evaluated for their antimicrobial effect against spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, and antiproliferative activity on the HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cell line. Dry-fermented sausages elaborated with starter cultures P200S34 and protease EPg222 generate extracts that cause inhibition of the growth of pathogens reaching 25% inhibition of Bacillus cereus, making this a promising tool for biocontrol in the meat industry. On the other hand, the inoculation of well-adapted starter cultures with high proteolytic activity also increased the antiproliferative activity of these extracts, around 45% inhibition at 72 h, mainly due to an increase in free amino acids, such as Lys and Pro, but also small peptides.

  6. Proteasome dysfunction triggers activation of SKN-1A/Nrf1 by the aspartic protease DDI-1

    PubMed Central

    Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Proteasomes are essential for protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. To preserve cellular function, transcription of proteasome subunit genes is induced in response to proteasome dysfunction caused by pathogen attacks or proteasome inhibitor drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this response requires SKN-1, a transcription factor related to mammalian Nrf1/2. Here, we use comprehensive genetic analyses to identify the pathway required for C. elegans to detect proteasome dysfunction and activate SKN-1. Genes required for SKN-1 activation encode regulators of ER traffic, a peptide N-glycanase, and DDI-1, a conserved aspartic protease. DDI-1 expression is induced by proteasome dysfunction, and we show that DDI-1 is required to cleave and activate an ER-associated isoform of SKN-1. Mammalian Nrf1 is also ER-associated and subject to proteolytic cleavage, suggesting a conserved mechanism of proteasome surveillance. Targeting mammalian DDI1 protease could mitigate effects of proteasome dysfunction in aging and protein aggregation disorders, or increase effectiveness of proteasome inhibitor cancer chemotherapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17721.001 PMID:27528192

  7. Recycling and Endosomal Sorting of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Is Distinctly Regulated by Rab11A and Rab11B Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that undergoes proteolytic irreversible activation by coagulant and anti-coagulant proteases. Given the irreversible activation of PAR1, signaling by the receptor is tightly regulated through desensitization and intracellular trafficking. PAR1 displays both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of PAR1 is important for generating an internal pool of naïve receptors that replenish the cell surface and facilitate resensitization, whereas agonist-induced internalization of PAR1 is critical for terminating G protein signaling. We showed that PAR1 constitutive internalization is mediated by the adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), whereas AP-2 and epsin control agonist-induced PAR1 internalization. However, the mechanisms that regulate PAR1 recycling are not known. In the present study we screened a siRNA library of 140 different membrane trafficking proteins to identify key regulators of PAR1 intracellular trafficking. In addition to known mediators of PAR1 endocytosis, we identified Rab11B as a critical regulator of PAR1 trafficking. We found that siRNA-mediated depletion of Rab11B and not Rab11A blocks PAR1 recycling, which enhanced receptor lysosomal degradation. Although Rab11A is not required for PAR1 recycling, depletion of Rab11A resulted in intracellular accumulation of PAR1 through disruption of basal lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Moreover, enhanced degradation of PAR1 observed in Rab11B-deficient cells is blocked by depletion of Rab11A and the autophagy related-5 protein, suggesting that PAR1 is shuttled to an autophagic degradation pathway in the absence of Rab11B recycling. Together these findings suggest that Rab11A and Rab11B differentially regulate intracellular trafficking of PAR1 through distinct endosomal sorting mechanisms. PMID:26635365

  8. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα(+)) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels in PDGFRα(+) cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl(-) conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC-ICC-PDGFRα(+) cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium.

  9. Investigation on the mechanism for the binding and drug resistance of wild type and mutations of G86 residue in HIV-1 protease complexed with Darunavir by molecular dynamic simulation and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Run-Ning; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Residue Gly86 is considered as the highly conversed residue in the HIV-1 protease. In our work, the detailed binding free energies for the wild-type (WT) and mutated proteases binding to the TMC-114 are estimated to investigate the protein-inhibitor binding and drug resistance mechanism by molecule dynamic simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The binding affinities between the mutants and inhibitor are different than that in the wild-type complex and the major resistance to Darunavir (DRV) of G86A and G86S originate from the electrostatic energy and entropy, respectively. Furthermore, free energy decomposition analysis for the WT and mutated complexes on the basis of per-residue indicates that the mutagenesis influences the energy contribution of the residue located at three regions: active site region (residue 24-32), the flap region, and the region around the mutated residue G86 (residue 79-88), especially the flap region. Finally, further hydrogen bonds and structure analysis are carried out to detect the relationship between the energy and conformation. In all, the G86 mutations change the flap region's conformation. The experimental results are in good agreement with available results.

  10. A computational modeling and molecular dynamics study of the Michaelis complex of human protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and factor Xa (FXa)

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vasudevan; Lee, Chang Jun; Lin, Ping; Duke, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and antithrombin III (AT3) are members of the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors that inhibit factor Xa (FXa) and other proteases in the coagulation pathway. While experimental structural information is available for the interaction of AT3 with FXa, at present there is no structural data regarding the interaction of ZPI with FXa, and the precise role of this interaction in the blood coagulation pathway is poorly understood. In an effort to gain a structural understanding of this system, we have built a solvent equilibrated three-dimensional structural model of the Michaelis complex of human ZPI/FXa using homology modeling, protein–protein docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. Preliminary analysis of interactions at the complex interface from our simulations suggests that the interactions of the reactive center loop (RCL) and the exosite surface of ZPI with FXa are similar to those observed from X-ray crystal structure-based simulations of AT3/FXa. However, detailed comparison of our modeled structure of ZPI/FXa with that of AT3/FXa points to differences in interaction specificity at the reactive center and in the stability of the inhibitory complex, due to the presence of a tyrosine residue at the P1 position in ZPI, instead of the P1 arginine residue in AT3. The modeled structure also shows specific structural differences between AT3 and ZPI in the heparin-binding and flexible N-terminal tail regions. Our structural model of ZPI/FXa is also compatible with available experimental information regarding the importance for the inhibitory action of certain basic residues in FXa. PMID:19172319

  11. [Peptide hydrolases with catalytic dyad Ser-Lys. Similarity and distinctions of the active centers of ATP-dependent Lon proteases, LexA repressors, signal peptidases and C-terminal processing proteases].

    PubMed

    Rotanova, T V

    2002-01-01

    It is established that ATP-dependent protease Lon family belongs to the serine-lysine peptide hydrolases clan. Significant similarity of amino acid sequences of proteases Lon and repressors LexA in the regions including the catalytic serine and lysine residues is revealed by comparing primary structures of different families of the enzymes with Ser-Lys catalytic dyad. The both Lon and LexA families are shown to be divided into two subfamilies in accordance with the nature of amino acids in the catalytically active serine environment. Putative DNA binding sites are revealed in proteolytic domains of Lon A subfamily. Similarities and distinctions of the all families peptide hydrolases of the clan in the regions of their active centers are discussed.

  12. Protease inhibitors and proteolytic signalling cascades in insects.

    PubMed

    Gubb, David; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Barcena, Laura; Troxler, Laurent; Fullaondo, Ane

    2010-12-01

    Proteolytic signalling cascades control a wide range of physiological responses. In order to respond rapidly, protease activity must be maintained at a basal level: the component zymogens must be sequentially activated and actively degraded. At the same time, signalling cascades must respond precisely: high target specificity is required. The insects have a wide range of trapping- and tight-binding protease inhibitors, which can regulate the activity of individual proteases. In addition, the interactions between component proteases of a signalling cascade can be modified by serine protease homologues. The suicide-inhibition mechanism of serpin family inhibitors gives rapid turnover of both protease and inhibitor, but target specificity is inherently broad. Similarly, the TEP/macroglobulins have extremely broad target specificity, which suits them for roles as hormone transport proteins and sensors of pathogenic virulence factors. The tight-binding inhibitors, on the other hand, have a lock-and-key mechanism capable of high target specificity. In addition, proteins containing multiple tight-binding inhibitory domains may act as scaffolds for the assembly of signalling complexes. Proteolytic cascades regulated by combinations of different types of inhibitor could combine the rapidity of suicide-inhibitors with the specificity lock-and-key inhibitors. This would allow precise control of physiological responses and may turn out to be a general rule.

  13. Identification of Residues in the Dengue Virus Type 2 NS2B Cofactor That Are Critical for NS3 Protease Activation

    PubMed Central

    Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Winoyanuwattikun, Pakorn; Chanprapaph, Santad; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan; Panyim, Sakol; Katzenmeier, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the dengue virus polyprotein is mediated by host cell proteases and the virus-encoded NS2B-NS3 two-component protease. The NS3 protease represents an attractive target for the development of antiviral inhibitors. The three-dimensional structure of the NS3 protease domain has been determined, but the structural determinants necessary for activation of the enzyme by the NS2B cofactor have been characterized only to a limited extent. To test a possible functional role of the recently proposed Φx3Φ motif in NS3 protease activation, we targeted six residues within the NS2B cofactor by site-specific mutagenesis. Residues Trp62, Ser71, Leu75, Ile77, Thr78, and Ile79 in NS2B were replaced with alanine, and in addition, an L75A/I79A double mutant was generated. The effects of these mutations on the activity of the NS2B(H)-NS3pro protease were analyzed in vitro by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of autoproteolytic cleavage at the NS2B/NS3 site and by assay of the enzyme with the fluorogenic peptide substrate GRR-AMC. Compared to the wild type, the L75A, I77A, and I79A mutants demonstrated inefficient autoproteolysis, whereas in the W62A and the L75A/I79A mutants self-cleavage appeared to be almost completely abolished. With exception of the S71A mutant, which had a kcat/Km value for the GRR-AMC peptide similar to that of the wild type, all other mutants exhibited drastically reduced kcat values. These results indicate a pivotal function of conserved residues Trp62, Leu75, and Ile79 in the NS2B cofactor in the structural activation of the dengue virus NS3 serine protease. PMID:15564480

  14. Quantitative Characterization of the Activation Steps of Mannan-binding Lectin (MBL)-associated Serine Proteases (MASPs) Points to the Central Role of MASP-1 in the Initiation of the Complement Lectin Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, Márton; Harmat, Veronika; Major, Balázs; Végh, Ádám; Balczer, Júlia; Héja, Dávid; Szilágyi, Katalin; Datz, Dániel; Pál, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Dobó, József

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases, MASP-1 and MASP-2, have been thought to autoactivate when MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes bind to pathogens triggering the complement lectin pathway. Autoactivation of MASPs occurs in two steps: 1) zymogen autoactivation, when one proenzyme cleaves another proenzyme molecule of the same protease, and 2) autocatalytic activation, when the activated protease cleaves its own zymogen. Using recombinant catalytic fragments, we demonstrated that a stable proenzyme MASP-1 variant (R448Q) cleaved the inactive, catalytic site Ser-to-Ala variant (S646A). The autoactivation steps of MASP-1 were separately quantified using these mutants and the wild type enzyme. Analogous mutants were made for MASP-2, and rate constants of the autoactivation steps as well as the possible cross-activation steps between MASP-1 and MASP-2 were determined. Based on the rate constants, a kinetic model of lectin pathway activation was outlined. The zymogen autoactivation rate of MASP-1 is ∼3000-fold higher, and the autocatalytic activation of MASP-1 is about 140-fold faster than those of MASP-2. Moreover, both activated and proenzyme MASP-1 can effectively cleave proenzyme MASP-2. MASP-3, which does not autoactivate, is also cleaved by MASP-1 quite efficiently. The structure of the catalytic region of proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q was solved at 2.5 Å. Proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q readily cleaves synthetic substrates, and it is inhibited by a specific canonical inhibitor developed against active MASP-1, indicating that zymogen MASP-1 fluctuates between an inactive and an active-like conformation. The determined structure provides a feasible explanation for this phenomenon. In summary, autoactivation of MASP-1 is crucial for the activation of MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes, and in the proenzymic phase zymogen MASP-1 controls the process. PMID:23386610

  15. Inhibition of Clostridium botulinum 52A toxicity and protease activity by sodium acid pyrophosphate in media systems.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M K; Busta, F F

    1985-01-01

    The effects of two pH levels (5.55 or 5.85) in combination with 0.4% sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP), NaH2PO4 X H2O, Na2HPO4 X 7H2O, or NaCl on the growth and toxicity of Clostridium botulinum 52A were studied. Absorbancy measurements at 630 nm, microscopic observations, and the mouse bioassay procedure were used to observe the effects. At pH 5.55 and 5.85 most control cultures exhibited toxicity when cell lysis began. Vegetative cell development was normal (4 micron long; 1 micron wide). SAPP-containing (0.4%) treatment cultures displayed similar growth and lysis but no or delayed (48 h) toxicity. Cells grown in the SAPP treatment culture were longer and wider (6 micron long; 1.5 micron wide) than in most other treatment cultures. Trypsinization of nontoxic supernatants from 0.4% SAPP resulted in toxicity. Addition of 0.4% SAPP to toxic C. botulinum supernatant delayed but did not prevent death of mice. The addition of various levels of SAPP to toxic supernatants resulted in a decrease in zone size with an increase in the level of SAPP (9 mm with 0.4% SAPP to 7 mm with 1.0% SAPP), using a dual substrate protease assay. A decrease in the zone size also occurred with the supernatant from cultures grown in the presence of SAPP and with Bacillus polymyxa protease dilutions containing 0.4% SAPP. Results suggest that the actual production or function of the protease responsible for toxin activation may have been inhibited by the presence of SAPP. PMID:2992374

  16. The site-2 protease.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    The site-2 protease (S2P) is an unusually-hydrophobic integral membrane protease. It cleaves its substrates, which are membrane-bound transcription factors, within membrane-spanning helices. Although structural information for S2P from animals is lacking, the available data suggest that cleavage may occur at or within the lipid bilayer. In mammalian cells, S2P is essential owing to its activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein