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Sample records for active protein phosphatase

  1. A Theileria parva type 1 protein phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Cayla, X; Garcia, A; Baumgartner, M; Ozon, R; Langsley, G

    2000-09-01

    The protozoan parasite Theileria (spp. parva and annulata) infects bovine leukocytes and provokes a leukaemia-like disease in vivo. In this study, we have detected a type 1 serine/threonine phosphatase activity with phosphorylase a as a substrate, in protein extracts of parasites purified from infected B lymphocytes. In contrast to this type 1 activity, dose response experiments with okadaic acid (OA), a well characterised inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, indicated that type 2A is the predominant activity detected in host B cells. Furthermore, consistent with polycation-specific activation of the type 2A phosphatase, protamine failed to activate the parasite-associated phosphorylase a phosphatase activity. Moreover, inhibition of phosphorylase a dephosphorylation by phospho-DARPP-32, a specific type 1 inhibitor, clearly demonstrated that a type 1 phosphatase is specifically associated with the parasite, while the type 2A is predominantly expressed in the host lymphocyte. Since an antibody against bovine catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit only recognised the PP1 in B cells, but not in parasite extracts, we conclude that in parasites the PP1 activity is of parasitic origin. Intriguingly, since type 1 OA-sensitive phosphatase activity has been recently described in Plasmodium falciparum, we can conclude that these medically important parasites produce their one PP1. PMID:10989153

  2. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  3. Centromeric binding and activity of Protein Phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Lipinszki, Zoltan; Lefevre, Stephane; Savoian, Matthew S.; Singleton, Martin R.; Glover, David M.; Przewloka, Marcin R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell division cycle requires tight coupling between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. However, understanding the cell cycle roles of multimeric protein phosphatases has been limited by the lack of knowledge of how their diverse regulatory subunits target highly conserved catalytic subunits to their sites of action. Phosphoprotein phosphatase 4 (PP4) has been recently shown to participate in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We now find that the EVH1 domain of the regulatory subunit 3 of Drosophila PP4, Falafel (Flfl), directly interacts with the centromeric protein C (CENP-C). Unlike other EVH1 domains that interact with proline-rich ligands, the crystal structure of the Flfl amino-terminal EVH1 domain bound to a CENP-C peptide reveals a new target-recognition mode for the phosphatase subunit. We also show that binding of Flfl to CENP-C is required to bring PP4 activity to centromeres to maintain CENP-C and attached core kinetochore proteins at chromosomes during mitosis. PMID:25562660

  4. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  6. Protein phosphatase 1α is a Ras-activated Bad phosphatase that regulates interleukin-2 deprivation-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayllón, Verónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; García, Alphonse; Cayla, Xavier; Rebollo, Angelita

    2000-01-01

    Growth factor deprivation is a physiological mechanism to regulate cell death. We utilize an interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent murine T-cell line to identify proteins that interact with Bad upon IL-2 stimulation or deprivation. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins and co-immunoprecipitation techniques, we found that Bad interacts with protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α). Serine phosphorylation of Bad is induced by IL-2 and its dephosphorylation correlates with appearance of apoptosis. IL-2 deprivation induces Bad dephosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of a serine phosphatase. A serine/threonine phosphatase activity, sensitive to the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, was detected in Bad immunoprecipitates from IL-2-stimulated cells, increasing after IL-2 deprivation. This enzymatic activity also dephosphorylates in vivo 32P-labeled Bad. Treatment of cells with okadaic acid blocks Bad dephosphorylation and prevents cell death. Finally, Ras activation controls the catalytic activity of PP1α. These results strongly suggest that Bad is an in vitro and in vivo substrate for PP1α phosphatase and that IL-2 deprivation-induced apoptosis may operate by regulating Bad phosphorylation through PP1α phosphatase, whose enzymatic activity is regulated by Ras. PMID:10811615

  7. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  8. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  9. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  11. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  12. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  13. Stabilization of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by a 21 000-dalton hepatic microsomal protein.

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, A; Burchell, B; Monaco, M; Walls, H E; Arion, W J

    1985-01-01

    Hepatic microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase activity was rendered extremely unstable by a variety of techniques: (a) incubation at pH 5.0; (b) extraction of the microsomal fraction in the presence of 1% Lubrol; (c) various purification procedures. These techniques all result in the removal of a 21 kDa polypeptide from the fraction containing glucose-6-phosphatase activity. The 21 kDa protein was purified to apparent homogeneity by solubilization in the detergent Lubrol 12A-9 and chromatography on Fractogel TSK DEAE-650(S) and centrifugation at 105 000 g. The 21 kDa protein stabilizes glucose-6-phosphatase activity, whereas other purified hepatic microsomal proteins do not. The 21 kDa protein appears to be a potential regulator of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2996501

  14. Circadian Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase Activity in Tomato by Protein Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. L.; Ort, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), a key enzyme in sucrose biosynthesis, is regulated by protein phosphorylation and shows a circadian pattern of activity in tomato. SPS is most active in its dephosphorylated state, which normally coincides with daytime. Applying okadaic acid, a potent protein phosphatase inhibitor, prevents SPS activation. More interesting is that a brief treatment with cycloheximide, a cytoplasmic translation inhibitor, also prevents the light activation of SPS without any effect on the amount of SPS protein. Cordycepin, an inhibitor of transcript synthesis and processing, has the same effect. Both of these inhibitors also prevent the activation phase of the circadian rhythm in SPS activity. Conversely, cycloheximide and cordycepin do not prevent the decline in circadian SPS activity that normally occurs at night. These observations indicate that SPS phosphatase activity but not SPS kinase activity is controlled, directly or indirectly, at the level of gene expression. Taken together, these data imply that there is a circadian rhythm controlling the transcription of a protein phosphatase that subsequently dictates the circadian rhythm in SPS activity via effects on this enzyme's phosphorylation state. PMID:12223667

  15. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  16. Eya protein phosphatase activity regulates Six1-Dach-Eya transcriptional effects in mammalian organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Oghi, Kenneth A; Zhang, Jie; Krones, Anna; Bush, Kevin T; Glass, Christopher K; Nigam, Sanjay K; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Maas, Richard; Rose, David W; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2003-11-20

    The precise mechanistic relationship between gene activation and repression events is a central question in mammalian organogenesis, as exemplified by the evolutionarily conserved sine oculis (Six), eyes absent (Eya) and dachshund (Dach) network of genetically interacting proteins. Here, we report that Six1 is required for the development of murine kidney, muscle and inner ear, and that it exhibits synergistic genetic interactions with Eya factors. We demonstrate that the Eya family has a protein phosphatase function, and that its enzymatic activity is required for regulating genes encoding growth control and signalling molecules, modulating precursor cell proliferation. The phosphatase function of Eya switches the function of Six1-Dach from repression to activation, causing transcriptional activation through recruitment of co-activators. The gene-specific recruitment of a co-activator with intrinsic phosphatase activity provides a molecular mechanism for activation of specific gene targets, including those regulating precursor cell proliferation and survival in mammalian organogenesis. PMID:14628042

  17. Protein Phosphatases Decrease Their Activity during Capacitation: A New Requirement for This Event

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Janetti R.; Díaz, Emilce S.; Fara, Karla; Barón, Lina; Morales, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    There are few reports on the role of protein phosphatases during capacitation. Here, we report on the role of PP2B, PP1, and PP2A during human sperm capacitation. Motile sperm were resuspended in non-capacitating medium (NCM, Tyrode's medium, albumin- and bicarbonate-free) or in reconstituted medium (RCM, NCM plus 2.6% albumin/25 mM bicarbonate). The presence of the phosphatases was evaluated by western blotting and the subcellular localization by indirect immunofluorescence. The function of these phosphatases was analyzed by incubating the sperm with specific inhibitors: okadaic acid, I2, endothall, and deltamethrin. Different aliquots were incubated in the following media: 1) NCM; 2) NCM plus inhibitors; 3) RCM; and 4) RCM plus inhibitors. The percent capacitated sperm and phosphatase activities were evaluated using the chlortetracycline assay and a phosphatase assay kit, respectively. The results confirm the presence of PP2B and PP1 in human sperm. We also report the presence of PP2A, specifically, the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunits PR65 and B. PP2B and PP2A were present in the tail, neck, and postacrosomal region, and PP1 was present in the postacrosomal region, neck, middle, and principal piece of human sperm. Treatment with phosphatase inhibitors rapidly (≤1 min) increased the percent of sperm depicting the pattern B, reaching a maximum of ∼40% that was maintained throughout incubation; after 3 h, the percent of capacitated sperm was similar to that of the control. The enzymatic activity of the phosphatases decreased during capacitation without changes in their expression. The pattern of phosphorylation on threonine residues showed a sharp increase upon treatment with the inhibitors. In conclusion, human sperm express PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, and the activity of these phosphatases decreases during capacitation. This decline in phosphatase activities and the subsequent increase in threonine phosphorylation may be an important requirement for the

  18. Activation of a protein tyrosine phosphatase and inactivation of Raf-1 by somatostatin.

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, D B; Wood, S L; Brautigan, D L; Bell, G I; Dent, P; Sturgill, T W

    1996-01-01

    Human somatostatin receptor 3 ('hsstr3') was transiently expressed in NIH 3T3 cells stably transformed with Ha-Ras (G12V). Somatostatin activated a protein tyrosine phosphatase and inactivated the constitutively active, membrane-associated form of the Raf-1 serine kinase present in these cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:8670047

  19. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  20. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. An inactive protein phosphatase 2A population is associated with methylesterase and can be re-activated by the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator.

    PubMed Central

    Longin, Sari; Jordens, Jan; Martens, Ellen; Stevens, Ilse; Janssens, Veerle; Rondelez, Evelien; De Baere, Ivo; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Goris, Jozef; Van Hoof, Christine

    2004-01-01

    We have described recently the purification and cloning of PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) leucine carboxylmethyltransferase. We studied the purification of a PP2A-specific methylesterase that co-purifies with PP2A and found that it is tightly associated with an inactive dimeric or trimeric form of PP2A. These inactive enzyme forms could be reactivated as Ser/Thr phosphatase by PTPA (phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of PP2A). PTPA was described previously by our group as a protein that stimulates the in vitro phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activity of PP2A; however, PP2A-specific methyltransferase could not bring about the activation. The PTPA activation could be distinguished from the Mn2+ stimulation observed with some inactive forms of PP2A, also found associated with PME-1 (phosphatase methylesterase 1). We discuss a potential new function for PME-1 as an enzyme that stabilizes an inactivated pool of PP2A. PMID:14748741

  2. Activation of SPS from darkened spinach leaves by an endogenous protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.C.; Huber, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Sucrose-phosphate synthase from darkened spinach leaves has a low activation state but can undergo a time-dependent activation in desalted leaf extracts that is inhibited by Pi, molybdate, okadaic acid and vanadate, but stimulated by fluoride. SPS labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)Pi in excised leaves in the dark loses incorporated {sup 32}P with time when extracts are incubated at 25{degree}C. This loss is largely prevented by vanadate, suggesting that an endogenous protein phosphatase can use SPS as substrate. Changes in phosphorylation state are closely paralleled by changes in SPS activation state. The spontaneous activation achieved in the extracts can be reversed by addition of 2 mM MgATP. Feeding okadaic acid to darkened leaves prevents light activation of SPS suggesting that the endogenous protein phosphatase is similar to the type-1 enzyme of animal tissues. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that light activation of SPS involves dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylation site(s). Regulation of the protein phosphatase by Pi may be of physiological significance.

  3. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  4. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  5. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine–threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias. PMID:27611305

  6. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  7. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  8. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  9. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 2 Regulates the Inflammatory Response in Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Timothy T.; Rodenhouse, Paul; Cai, Qing; Sun, Lei; Shanley, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis results from a dysregulation of the regulatory mechanisms of the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to invading pathogens. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are key signal transduction pathways involved in the cellular production of cytokines. The dual-specific phosphatase 1 (DUSP 1), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), has been shown to be an important negative regulator of the inflammatory response by regulating the p38 and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) MAP kinase pathways to influence pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. MKP-2, also a dual-specific phosphatase (DUSP 4), is a phosphatase highly homologous with MKP-1 and is known to regulate MAP kinase signaling; however, its role in regulating the inflammatory response is not known. We hypothesized a regulatory role for MKP-2 in the setting of sepsis. Mice lacking the MKP-2 gene had a survival advantage over wild-type mice when challenged with intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a polymicrobial infection via cecal ligation and puncture. The MKP-2−/− mice also exhibited decreased serum levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) following endotoxin challenge. Isolated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from MKP-2−/− mice showed increased phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and increased induction of MKP-1 following LPS stimulation. The capacity for cytokine production increased in MKP-2−/− BMDMs following MKP-1 knockdown. These data support a mechanism by which MKP-2 targets ERK deactivation, thereby decreasing MKP-1 and thus removing the negative inhibition of MKP-1 on cytokine production. PMID:20351138

  10. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  11. Glucose-induced posttranslational activation of protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Castermans, Dries; Somers, Ils; Kriel, Johan; Louwet, Wendy; Wera, Stefaan; Versele, Matthias; Janssens, Veerle; Thevelein, Johan M

    2012-01-01

    The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 are major regulators of a variety of cellular processes in yeast and other eukaryotes. Here, we reveal that both enzymes are direct targets of glucose sensing. Addition of glucose to glucose-deprived yeast cells triggered rapid posttranslational activation of both PP2A and PP1. Glucose activation of PP2A is controlled by regulatory subunits Rts1, Cdc55, Rrd1 and Rrd2. It is associated with rapid carboxymethylation of the catalytic subunits, which is necessary but not sufficient for activation. Glucose activation of PP1 was fully dependent on regulatory subunits Reg1 and Shp1. Absence of Gac1, Glc8, Reg2 or Red1 partially reduced activation while Pig1 and Pig2 inhibited activation. Full activation of PP2A and PP1 was also dependent on subunits classically considered to belong to the other phosphatase. PP2A activation was dependent on PP1 subunits Reg1 and Shp1 while PP1 activation was dependent on PP2A subunit Rts1. Rts1 interacted with both Pph21 and Glc7 under different conditions and these interactions were Reg1 dependent. Reg1-Glc7 interaction is responsible for PP1 involvement in the main glucose repression pathway and we show that deletion of Shp1 also causes strong derepression of the invertase gene SUC2. Deletion of the PP2A subunits Pph21 and Pph22, Rrd1 and Rrd2, specifically enhanced the derepression level of SUC2, indicating that PP2A counteracts SUC2 derepression. Interestingly, the effect of the regulatory subunit Rts1 was consistent with its role as a subunit of both PP2A and PP1, affecting derepression and repression of SUC2, respectively. We also show that abolished phosphatase activation, except by reg1Δ, does not completely block Snf1 dephosphorylation after addition of glucose. Finally, we show that glucose activation of the cAMP-PKA (protein kinase A) pathway is required for glucose activation of both PP2A and PP1. Our results provide novel insight into the complex regulatory role of these two major protein

  12. PD-1 Increases PTEN Phosphatase Activity While Decreasing PTEN Protein Stability by Inhibiting Casein Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Li, Lequn; Sari, Duygu; Petkova, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a potent inhibitor of T cell responses. PD-1 abrogates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, but the mechanism remains unclear. We determined that during T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3- and CD28-mediated stimulation, PTEN is phosphorylated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) in the Ser380-Thr382-Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal regulatory domain, which stabilizes PTEN, resulting in increased protein abundance but suppressed PTEN phosphatase activity. PD-1 inhibited the stabilizing phosphorylation of the Ser380-Thr382-Thr383 cluster within the C-terminal domain of PTEN, thereby resulting in ubiquitin-dependent degradation and diminished abundance of PTEN protein but increased PTEN phosphatase activity. These effects on PTEN were secondary to PD-1-mediated inhibition of CK2 and were recapitulated by pharmacologic inhibition of CK2 during TCR/CD3- and CD28-mediated stimulation without PD-1. Furthermore, PD-1-mediated diminished abundance of PTEN was reversed by inhibition of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Our results identify CK2 as a new target of PD-1 and reveal an unexpected mechanism by which PD-1 decreases PTEN protein expression while increasing PTEN activity, thereby inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling axis. PMID:23732914

  13. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  15. Protein phosphatases in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Ortsäter, Henrik; Grankvist, Nina; Honkanen, Richard E.; Sjöholm1, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly world-wide. A cardinal feature of most forms of diabetes is the lack of insulin-producing capability, due to the loss of insulin-producing β-cells, impaired glucose-sensitive insulin secretion from the β-cell, or a combination thereof, the reasons for which largely remain elusive. Reversible phosphorylation is an important and versatile mechanism for regulating the biological activity of many intracellular proteins, which, in turn, controls a variety of cellular functions. For instance, significant changes in protein kinase activities and in protein phosphorylation patterns occur subsequent to stimulation of insulin release by glucose. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphorylation of proteins involved in the insulin secretory process by the β-cell have been extensively investigated. However, far less is known about the role and regulation of protein dephosphorylation by various protein phosphatases. Herein we review extant data implicating serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases in various aspects of healthy and diabetic islet biology, ranging from control of hormonal stimulus-secretion coupling to mitogenesis and apoptosis. PMID:24681827

  16. Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulates Interleukin-2 Receptor Complex Formation and JAK3/STAT5 Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jeremy A.; Cheng, Hanyin; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S.; Frost, Jeffrey A.; Kirken, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a key role in interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor-mediated activation of Janus tyrosine kinase 3 (JAK3) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in lymphocytes. Although the mechanisms governing IL-2-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of JAK3/STAT5 have been extensively studied, the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in controlling these effectors remains to be elucidated. Using phosphoamino acid analysis, JAK3 and STAT5 were determined to be serine and tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to IL-2 stimulation of the human natural killer-like cell line, YT. IL-2 stimulation also induced serine/threonine phosphorylation of IL-2Rβ, but not IL-2Rγ. To investigate the regulation of serine/threonine phosphorylation in IL-2 signaling, the roles of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A) were examined. Inhibition of phosphatase activity by calyculin A treatment of YT cells resulted in a significant induction of serine phosphorylation of JAK3 and STAT5, and serine/threonine phosphorylation of IL-2Rβ. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A, but not PP1, diminished IL-2-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IL-2Rβ, JAK3, and STAT5, and abolished STAT5 DNA binding activity. Serine/threonine phosphorylation of IL-2Rβ by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase also blocked its association with JAK3 and IL-2Rγ in YT cells. Taken together, these data indicate that serine/threonine phosphorylation negatively regulates IL-2 signaling at multiple levels, including receptor complex formation and JAK3/STAT5 activation, and that this regulation is counteracted by PP2A. These findings also suggest that PP2A may serve as a therapeutic target for modulating JAK3/STAT5 activation in human disease. PMID:19923221

  17. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase NOSIP Modulates Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity in Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Meike; Prelle, Carola; Küchler, Philipp; Kovacevic, Igor; Moser, Markus; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans. PMID:25546391

  18. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  19. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  20. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-2 Deletion Impairs Synaptic Plasticity and Hippocampal-Dependent Memory

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahman, Nor Zaihana; Greenwood, Sam M.; Brett, Ros R.; Tossell, Kyoko; Ungless, Mark A.; Plevin, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate brain function and their dysfunction is implicated in a number of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the signaling systems that control MAPK function. One family of proteins that contribute to this process, the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs), directly inactivate MAPKs through dephosphorylation. Recent studies have identified novel functions of MKPs in development, the immune system, and cancer. However, a significant gap in our knowledge remains in relation to their role in brain functioning. Here, using transgenic mice where the Dusp4 gene encoding MKP-2 has been knocked out (MKP-2−/− mice), we show that long-term potentiation is impaired in MKP-2−/− mice compared with MKP-2+/+ controls whereas neuronal excitability, evoked synaptic transmission, and paired-pulse facilitation remain unaltered. Furthermore, spontaneous EPSC (sEPSC) frequency was increased in acute slices and primary hippocampal cultures prepared from MKP-2−/− mice with no effect on EPSC amplitude observed. An increase in synapse number was evident in primary hippocampal cultures, which may account for the increase in sEPSC frequency. In addition, no change in ERK activity was detected in both brain tissue and primary hippocampal cultures, suggesting that the effects of MKP-2 deletion were MAPK independent. Consistent with these alterations in hippocampal function, MKP-2−/− mice show deficits in spatial reference and working memory when investigated using the Morris water maze. These data show that MKP-2 plays a role in regulating hippocampal function and that this effect may be independent of MAPK signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recently, there has been significant focus on proteins that control mitogen-activated protein kinases' (MAPKs) function, namely the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs). Recent studies have revealed novel

  2. Basal protein phosphatase 2A activity restrains cytokine expression: role for MAPKs and tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Morris, Jonathan C; Clark, Andrew R; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2015-01-01

    PP2A is a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways. It is a target in asthma; however the molecular mechanisms by which PP2A controls inflammation warrant further investigation. In A549 lung epithelial cells in vitro we show that inhibition of basal PP2A activity by okadaic acid (OA) releases restraint on MAPKs and thereby increases MAPK-mediated pro-asthmatic cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-8. Notably, PP2A inhibition also impacts on the anti-inflammatory protein - tristetraprolin (TTP), a destabilizing RNA binding protein regulated at multiple levels by p38 MAPK. Although PP2A inhibition increases TTP mRNA expression, resultant TTP protein builds up in the hyperphosphorylated inactive form. Thus, when PP2A activity is repressed, pro-inflammatory cytokines increase and anti-inflammatory proteins are rendered inactive. Importantly, these effects can be reversed by the PP2A activators FTY720 and AAL(s), or more specifically by overexpression of the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A-C). Moreover, PP2A plays an important role in cytokine expression in cells stimulated with TNFα; as inhibition of PP2A with OA or PP2A-C siRNA results in significant increases in cytokine production. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms of PP2A regulation and highlight the potential of boosting the power of endogenous phosphatases as novel anti-inflammatory strategies to combat asthmatic inflammation. PMID:25985190

  3. Activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glutamate and Mg2+ is mediated by protein phosphatase-2A.

    PubMed Central

    Gaussin, V; Hue, L; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1996-01-01

    The activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by Na(+)-cotransported amino acids such as glutamine has been attributed mainly to the stimulation of its dephosphorylation by accumulating dicarboxylic acids, e.g. glutamate. We report here on a hepatic species of protein phosphatase-2A that activates acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the presence of physiological concentrations of glutamate or Mg2+ and, under these conditions, accounts for virtually all the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity. Glutamate also stimulated the dephosphorylation of a synthetic pentadecapeptide encompassing the Ser-79 phosphorylation site of rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but did not affect the dephosphorylation of other substrates such as phosphorylase. Conversely, protamine, which stimulated the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase, inhibited the activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. A comparison with various species of muscle protein phosphatase-2A showed that the stimulatory effects of glutamate and Mg2+ on the acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity are largely mediated by the regulatory A subunit. Glutamate and Mg2+ emerge from our study as novel regulators of protein phosphatase-2A when acting on acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:8645208

  4. Role of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in regulation of osteoclastic activity.

    PubMed

    Sheng, M H-C; Lau, K-H W

    2009-06-01

    Osteoclasts, the primary cell type mediating bone resorption, are multinucleated, giant cells derived from hematopoietic cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. Osteoclast activity is, in a large part, regulated by protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. While information about functional roles of several protein-tyrosine kinases (PTK), including c-Src, in osteoclastic resorption has been accumulated, little is known about the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in regulation of osteoclast activity. Recent evidence implicates important regulatory roles for four PTPs (SHP-1, cyt-PTP-epsilon, PTP-PEST, and PTPoc) in osteoclasts. Cyt-PTP-epsilon, PTP-PEST, and PTP-oc are positive regulators of osteoclast activity, while SHP-1 is a negative regulator. Of these PTPs in osteoclasts, only PTP-oc is a positive regulator of c-Src PTK through dephosphorylation of the inhibitory phosphotyrosine-527 residue. Although some information about mechanisms of action of these PTPs to regulate osteoclast activity is reviewed in this article, much additional work is required to provide more comprehensive details about their functions in osteoclasts. PMID:19189046

  5. Ahnak protein activates protein kinase C (PKC) through dissociation of the PKC-protein phosphatase 2A complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hye; Lim, Hee Jung; Yoon, Suhyeon; Seong, Je Kyung; Bae, Duk Soo; Rhee, Sue Goo; Bae, Yun Soo

    2008-03-01

    We have previously reported that central repeated units (CRUs) of Ahnak act as a scaffolding protein networking phospholipase Cgamma and protein kinase C (PKC). Here, we demonstrate that an Ahnak derivative consisting of four central repeated units binds and activates PKC-alpha in a phosphatidylserine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol-independent manner. Moreover, NIH3T3 cells expressing the 4 CRUs of Ahnak showed enhanced c-Raf, MEK, and Erk phosphorylation in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) compared with parental cells. To evaluate the effect of loss-of-function of Ahnak in cell signaling, we investigated PKC activation and Raf phosphorylation in embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) of the Ahnak knock-out (Ahnak(-/-)) mouse. Membrane translocation of PKC-alpha and phosphorylation of Raf in response to PMA or platelet-derived growth factor were decreased in Ahnak null MEF cells compared with wild type MEFs. Several lines of evidence suggest that PKC-alpha activity is regulated through association with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). A co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the association of PKC-alpha with PP2A was disrupted in NIH3T3 cells expressing 4 CRUs of Ahnak in response to PMA. Consistently, Ahnak null MEF cells stimulated by PMA showed enhanced PKC-PP2A complex formation, and add-back expression of Ahnak into Ahnak null MEF cells abolished the PKC-PP2A complex formation in response to PMA. These data indicate that Ahnak potentiates PKC activation through inhibiting the interaction of PKC with PP2A. PMID:18174170

  6. Activation of the Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Keratinocytes Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L. G.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C. C.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B.; Souza, Ana Carolina S.; Justo, Giselle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  7. Activation of Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatase PP2Cα Efficiently Prevents Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhengyi; Yu, Liang; Hu, Lihong; Shen, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Background Over-activation of TGFβ signaling pathway and uncontrolled cell proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play pivotal roles in liver fibrogenesis, while the protein serine/threonine phosphatase PP2Cα was reported to negatively regulate TGFβ signaling pathway and cell cycle. Our study aimed to investigate the role of PP2Cα in liver fibrogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The effects of PP2Cα activation on liver fibrosis were investigated in human HSCs and primary rat HSCs in vitro using western blotting, real-time PCR, nuclear translocation, cell viability and cell cycle analyses. The antifibrogenic effects in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mice in vivo were assessed using biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The results demonstrated that activation of PP2Cα by overexpression or the new discovered small molecular activator NPLC0393 terminated TGFβ-Smad3 and TGFβ-p38 signaling pathways, induced cell cycle arrest in HSCs and decreased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, collagen deposition and hepatic hydroxyproline (HYP) level in CCl4- and BDL-induced mice. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggested that PP2Cα activation might be an attractive new strategy for treating liver fibrosis while the small molecular activator NPLC0393 might represent a lead compound for antifibrogenic drug development. Moreover, our study might provide the first evidence for the role of PP2C family members in the fibrotic disease. PMID:21151953

  8. Global Analysis of Serine/Threonine and Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Genes in Neurospora crassa Reveals Interplay Between Phosphatases and the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arit; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Park, Gyungsoon; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatases are integral components of the cellular signaling machinery in eukaryotes, regulating diverse aspects of growth and development. The genome of the filamentous fungus and model organism Neurospora crassa encodes catalytic subunits for 30 protein phosphatase genes. In this study, we have characterized 24 viable N. crassa phosphatase catalytic subunit knockout mutants for phenotypes during growth, asexual development, and sexual development. We found that 91% of the mutants had defects in at least one of these traits, whereas 29% possessed phenotypes in all three. Chemical sensitivity screens were conducted to reveal additional phenotypes for the mutants. This resulted in the identification of at least one chemical sensitivity phenotype for 17 phosphatase knockout mutants, including novel chemical sensitivities for two phosphatase mutants lacking a growth or developmental phenotype. Hence, chemical sensitivity or growth/developmental phenotype was observed for all 24 viable mutants. We investigated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation profiles in the phosphatase mutants and identified nine potential candidates for regulators of the p38 MAPK. We demonstrated that the PP2C class phosphatase pph-8 (NCU04600) is an important regulator of female sexual development in N. crassa. In addition, we showed that the Δcsp-6 (ΔNCU08380) mutant exhibits a phenotype similar to the previously identified conidial separation mutants, Δcsp-1 and Δcsp-2, that lack transcription factors important for regulation of conidiation and the circadian clock. PMID:24347630

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A activity is required for functional adherent junctions in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Czikora, István; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Csortos, Csilla

    2013-09-01

    Reversible Ser/Thr phosphorylation of cytoskeletal and adherent junction (AJ) proteins has a critical role in the regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. We have demonstrated earlier that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity is important in EC barrier integrity. In the present work, macro- and microvascular EC were examined and we provided further evidence on the significance of PP2A in the maintenance of EC cytoskeleton and barrier function with special focus on the Bα (regulatory) subunit of PP2A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the inhibition of PP2A results in changes in the organization of EC cytoskeleton as microtubule dissolution and actin re-arrangement were detected. Depletion of Bα regulatory subunit of PP2A had similar effect on the cytoskeleton structure of the cells. Furthermore, transendothelial electric resistance measurements demonstrated significantly slower barrier recovery of Bα depleted EC after thrombin treatment. AJ proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, were detected along with Bα in pull-down assay. Also, the inhibition of PP2A (by okadaic acid or fostriecin) or depletion of Bα caused β-catenin translocation from the membrane to the cytoplasm in parallel with its phosphorylation on Ser552. In conclusion, our data suggest that the A/Bα/C holoenzyme form of PP2A is essential in EC barrier integrity both in micro- and macrovascular EC. PMID:23721711

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1: function and regulation in bone and related tissues.

    PubMed

    Broome, David T; Datta, Nabanita S

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we have highlighted work that has clearly demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of MAPKs, is an important signaling mediator in bone, muscle, and fat tissue homeostasis and differentiation. Further, we examined recent studies with particular focus on MKP-1 overexpression or deletion and its impact on tissues connected to bone. We also summarized regulation of MKP-1 by known skeletal regulators like parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) and bone morphogenic proteins. MKP-1's integration into the pathophysiological state of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, and muscular dystrophy are examined to emphasize possible involvement of MKP-1 both at the molecular level and in disease complications such as sarcopenia- or diabetes-related osteoporosis. We predict that understanding the mechanism of MKP-1-mediated signaling in bone-muscle-fat crosstalk will be a key in coordinating their activities and developing therapeutics to improve clinical outcomes for diseases associated with advanced age. PMID:27031422

  11. Measurement of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity in Single Cells by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ryan M.; Bair, Eric; Lawrence, David S.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescent peptide substrate was used to measure dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) in cell lysates, and single cells and to investigate the effect of environmental toxins on PTP activity in these systems. Dephosphorylation of the substrate by PTPN1 and PTPN2 obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with KM values of 770 ± 250 nM and 290 ± 54 nM, respectively. Dose-response curves and IC50 values were determined for the inhibition of these two enzymes by the environmental toxins Zn2+ and 1,2-naphthoquinone, as well as pervanadate. In A431 cell lysates, the reporter was a poor substrate for peptidases (degradation rate of 100 ± 8.2 fmol min−1 mg−1) but an excellent substrate for phosphatases (dephosphorylation rate of 1.4 ± 0.3 nmol min−1 mg−1). Zn2+, 1,2-naphthoquinone and pervanadate inhibited dephosphorylation of the reporter in cell lysates with IC50 values of 470 nM, 35 μM, and 100 nM, respectively. Dephosphorylation of the reporter following loading into living single cells occurred at rates of at least 2 pmol min−1 mg−1. When single cells were exposed to 1,2-naphthoquinone (50 μM), Zn2+ (100 μM), and pervandate (1 mM), dephosphorylation was inhibited with median values and first and third quartile values of 41 (Q1 = 0%, Q3 = 96%), 50 (Q1 = 46%, Q3 = 74%), and 53% (Q1 = 36%, Q3 = 77%), respectively, demonstrating both the impact of these toxic exposures on cell signaling and the heterogeneity of response between cells. This approach will provide a valuable tool for the study of PTP dynamics, particularly in small, heterogeneous populations such as human biopsy specimens. PMID:23682679

  12. Conserved Residues in the N Terminus of Lipin-1 Are Required for Binding to Protein Phosphatase-1c, Nuclear Translocation, and Phosphatidate Phosphatase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Bernard P. C.; Skene-Arnold, Tamara D.; Ling, Ji; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Dewald, Jay; Harris, Thurl E.; Holmes, Charles F. B.; Brindley, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Lipin-1 is a phosphatidate phosphatase in glycerolipid biosynthesis and signal transduction. It also serves as a transcriptional co-regulator to control lipid metabolism and adipogenesis. These functions are controlled partly by its subcellular distribution. Hyperphosphorylated lipin-1 remains sequestered in the cytosol, whereas hypophosphorylated lipin-1 translocates to the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP-1c) is a major protein dephosphorylation enzyme. Its activity is controlled by interactions with different regulatory proteins, many of which contain conserved RVXF binding motifs. We found that lipin-1 binds to PP-1cγ through a similar HVRF binding motif. This interaction depends on Mg2+ or Mn2+ and is competitively inhibited by (R/H)VXF-containing peptides. Mutating the HVRF motif in the highly conserved N terminus of lipin-1 greatly decreases PP-1cγ interaction. Moreover, mutations of other residues in the N terminus of lipin-1 also modulate PP-1cγ binding. PP-1cγ binds poorly to a phosphomimetic mutant of lipin-1 and binds well to the non-phosphorylatable lipin-1 mutant. This indicates that lipin-1 is dephosphorylated before PP-1cγ binds to its HVRF motif. Importantly, mutating the HVRF motif also abrogates the nuclear translocation and phosphatidate phosphatase activity of lipin-1. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence of the importance of the lipin-1 N-terminal domain for its catalytic activity, nuclear localization, and binding to PP-1cγ. PMID:24558042

  13. Effect of chlorination on the protein phosphatase inhibition activity for several microcystins.

    PubMed

    Mash, H; Wittkorn, A

    2016-05-15

    Microcystins are of particular concern due to their toxicity to both humans and animals and may be the most prominent cyanotoxin observed in freshwater. Although a number of studies have investigated the fate of microcystins and other algal toxins through drinking water treatment facilities, measurement of their potential for toxic activity after chlorination, a popular form of treatment in the United States, has not been investigated. In this study, six microcystin variants are subjected to chlorine oxidation. The degradation of each microcystin variant is measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry simultaneously with protein phosphatase inhibition (PPI) response over reaction time with chlorine. Results show that inhibition is dependent on the incorporated amino acid residues, their placement within the microcystin structure, as well as pH. This pH dependence may have practical implications to such activities such as drinking water treatment when the pH is usually adjusted to around 8. Namely, at this pH, even with chlorine addition for disinfection, PPI activity may not be totally eliminated even when the initial MYCs are eliminated. PMID:26999255

  14. Activation of HIV-1 with Nanoparticle-Packaged Small-Molecule Protein Phosphatase-1-Targeting Compound

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kahli A.; Lin, Xionghao; Bolshakov, Oleg; Griffin, James; Niu, Xiaomei; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Taylor, Robert E.; Akala, Emmanuel; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in which the integrated HIV-1 provirus is transcriptionally inactive. Activation of HIV-1 transcription requires the viral Tat protein and host cell factors, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1). We previously developed a library of small compounds that targeted PP1 and identified a compound, SMAPP1, which induced HIV-1 transcription. However, this compound has a limited bioavailability in vivo and may not be able to reach HIV-1-infected cells and induce HIV-1 transcription in patients. We packaged SMAPP1 in polymeric polyethylene glycol polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles and analyzed its release and the effect on HIV-1 transcription in a cell culture. SMAPP1 was efficiently packaged in the nanoparticles and released during a 120-hr period. Treatment of the HIV-1-infected cells with the SMAPP1-loaded nanoparticles induced HIV-1 transcription. Thus, nanoparticles loaded with HIV-1-targeting compounds might be useful for future anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:26839837

  15. Reactive Nitrogen Species and Hydrogen Sulfide as Regulators of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Redox modifications of thiols serve as a molecular code enabling precise and complex regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and other proteins. Particular gasotransmitters and even the redox modifications themselves affect each other, of which a typical example is S-nitrosylation-mediated protection against the further oxidation of protein thiols. Recent Advances: For a long time, PTPs were considered constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. This view has changed substantially over the last two decades, and the PTP family is now recognized as a group of tightly and flexibly regulated fundamental enzymes. In addition to the conventional ways in which they are regulated, including noncovalent interactions, phosphorylation, and oxidation, the evidence that has accumulated during the past two decades suggests that many of these enzymes are also modulated by gasotransmitters, namely by nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Critical Issues: The specificity and selectivity of the methods used to detect nitrosylation and sulfhydration remains to be corroborated, because several researchers raised the issue of false-positive results, particularly when using the most widespread biotin switch method. Further development of robust and straightforward proteomic methods is needed to further improve our knowledge of the full extent of the gasotransmitters-mediated changes in PTP activity, selectivity, and specificity. Further Directions: Results of the hitherto performed studies on gasotransmitter-mediated PTP signaling await translation into clinical medicine and pharmacotherapeutics. In addition to directly affecting the activity of particular PTPs, the use of reversible S-nitrosylation as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress should be of high interest. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2191–2209. PMID:24328688

  16. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-2 Deletion Impairs Synaptic Plasticity and Hippocampal-Dependent Memory.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Nor Zaihana; Greenwood, Sam M; Brett, Ros R; Tossell, Kyoko; Ungless, Mark A; Plevin, Robin; Bushell, Trevor J

    2016-02-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate brain function and their dysfunction is implicated in a number of brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the signaling systems that control MAPK function. One family of proteins that contribute to this process, the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs), directly inactivate MAPKs through dephosphorylation. Recent studies have identified novel functions of MKPs in development, the immune system, and cancer. However, a significant gap in our knowledge remains in relation to their role in brain functioning. Here, using transgenic mice where the Dusp4 gene encoding MKP-2 has been knocked out (MKP-2(-/-) mice), we show that long-term potentiation is impaired in MKP-2(-/-) mice compared with MKP-2(+/+) controls whereas neuronal excitability, evoked synaptic transmission, and paired-pulse facilitation remain unaltered. Furthermore, spontaneous EPSC (sEPSC) frequency was increased in acute slices and primary hippocampal cultures prepared from MKP-2(-/-) mice with no effect on EPSC amplitude observed. An increase in synapse number was evident in primary hippocampal cultures, which may account for the increase in sEPSC frequency. In addition, no change in ERK activity was detected in both brain tissue and primary hippocampal cultures, suggesting that the effects of MKP-2 deletion were MAPK independent. Consistent with these alterations in hippocampal function, MKP-2(-/-) mice show deficits in spatial reference and working memory when investigated using the Morris water maze. These data show that MKP-2 plays a role in regulating hippocampal function and that this effect may be independent of MAPK signaling. PMID:26911683

  17. The Protein Phosphatases of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Open Reading Frames sll1033 and sll1387 Encode Enzymes That Exhibit both Protein-Serine and Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruiliang; Potters, M B.; Shi, Liang; Kennelly, Peter J.

    2005-09-01

    The open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two potential protein-serine/threonine phosphatases from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 were cloned and their protein products expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The product of ORF sll1033, SynPPM3, is a homologue of the PPM family of protein-serine/threonine phosphatases found in all eukaryotes as well as many members of the Bacteria. Surprisingly, the recombinant protein phosphatase dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine- as well as phosphoserine-containing proteins in vitro. While kinetic analyses indicate that the enzyme was more efficient at dephosphorylating the latter, replacement of Asp(608) by asparagine enhanced activity toward a phosphotyrosine-containing protein fourfold. The product of ORF sll1387, SynPPP1, is the sole homolog of the PPP family of protein phosphatases encoded by the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Like many other bacterial PPPs, the enzyme dephosphorylated phosphoserine- and phosphotyrosine-containing proteins with comparable efficiencies. However, while previously described PPPs from prokaryotic organisms required the addition of exogenous metal ion cofactors, such as Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), for activity, recombinantly produced SynPPP1 displayed near-maximal activity in the absence of added metals. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated that recombinant SynPPP1 contained significant quantities, 0.32 to 0.44 mol/mole total, of Mg and Mn. In this respect, the cyanobacterial enzyme resembled eukaryotic members of the PPP family, which are metalloproteins. mRNA encoding SynPPP1 or SynPPM3 could be detected in cells grown under many, but not all, environmental conditions.

  18. Modulation of Spc1 stress-activated protein kinase activity by methylglyoxal through inhibition of protein phosphatase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsume, Yoshifumi; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2007-11-30

    Methylglyoxal, a ubiquitous metabolite derived from glycolysis has diverse physiological functions in yeast cells. Previously, we have reported that extracellularly added methylglyoxal activates Spc1, a stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe [Y. Takatsume, S. Izawa, Y. Inoue, J. Biol. Chem. 281 (2006) 9086-9092]. Phosphorylation of Spc1 by treatment with methylglyoxal in S. pombe cells defective in glyoxalase I, an enzyme crucial for the metabolism of methylglyoxal, continues for a longer period than in wild-type cells. Here we show that methylglyoxal inhibits the activity of the protein phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation of Spc1 in vitro. In addition, we found that methylglyoxal inhibits human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) also. We propose a model for the regulation of the activity of the Spc1-SAPK signaling pathway by methylglyoxal in S. pombe.

  19. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  20. Coumarins from Angelica decursiva inhibit α-glucosidase activity and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Yousof; Jannat, Susoma; Jung, Hyun Ah; Jeong, Hyong Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2016-05-25

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-diabetic potential of six natural coumarins, 4-hydroxy Pd-C-III (1), 4'-methoxy Pd-C-I (2), decursinol (3), decursidin (4), umbelliferone 6-carboxylic acid (5), and 2'-isopropyl psoralene (6) isolated from Angelica decursiva and evaluated their inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), α-glucosidase, and ONOO(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. Coumarins 1-6 showed potent PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with ranges of IC50 values of 5.39-58.90 μM and 65.29-172.10 μM, respectively. In the kinetic study for PTP1B enzyme inhibition, compounds 1, 5, and 6 were competitive, whereas 2 and 4 showed mixed type, and 3 displayed noncompetitive type inhibition. For α-glucosidase enzyme inhibition, compounds 1 and 3 exhibited good mixed-type, while 2, 5, and 6 showed noncompetitive and 4 displayed competitive type inhibition. Furthermore, these coumarins also effectively suppressed ONOO(-)-mediated tyrosine nitration in a dose-dependent manner. To further investigate PTP1B inhibition, we generated a 3D structure of PTP1B using Autodock 4.2 and simulated the binding of compounds 1-6. Docking simulations showed that different residues of PTP1B interacted with different functional groups of compounds 1-6 through hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the binding energies of compounds 1-6 were negative, suggesting that hydrogen bonding may stabilize the open form of the enzyme and potentiate tight binding of the active site of PTP1B, thereby resulting in more effective PTP1B inhibition. These results demonstrate that the whole plant of A. decursiva and its coumarins are useful as potential functional food ingredients for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27085377

  1. Ceramide-Initiated Protein Phosphatase 2A Activation Contributes to Arterial Dysfunction In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bharath, Leena P; Ruan, Ting; Li, Youyou; Ravindran, Anindita; Wan, Xin; Nhan, Jennifer Kim; Walker, Matthew Lewis; Deeter, Lance; Goodrich, Rebekah; Johnson, Elizabeth; Munday, Derek; Mueller, Robert; Kunz, David; Jones, Deborah; Reese, Van; Summers, Scott A; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Holland, William L; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies have implicated accumulation of ceramide in blood vessels as a basis for vascular dysfunction in diet-induced obesity via a mechanism involving type 2 protein phosphatase (PP2A) dephosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The current study sought to elucidate the mechanisms linking ceramide accumulation with PP2A activation and determine whether pharmacological inhibition of PP2A in vivo normalizes obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and limits the severity of hypertension. We show in endothelial cells that ceramide associates with the inhibitor 2 of PP2A (I2PP2A) in the cytosol, which disrupts the association of I2PP2A with PP2A leading to its translocation to the plasma membrane. The increased association between PP2A and eNOS at the plasma membrane promotes dissociation of an Akt-Hsp90-eNOS complex that is required for eNOS phosphorylation and activation. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of PP2A attenuated PP2A activation, prevented disruption of the Akt-Hsp90-eNOS complex in the vasculature, preserved arterial function, and maintained normal blood pressure in obese mice. These findings reveal a novel mechanism whereby ceramide initiates PP2A colocalization with eNOS and demonstrate that PP2A activation precipitates vascular dysfunction in diet-induced obesity. Therapeutic strategies targeted to reducing PP2A activation might be beneficial in attenuating vascular complications that exist in the context of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and conditions associated with insulin resistance. PMID:26253611

  2. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  3. Small Molecule Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) Ligands That Inhibit Phosphatase Activity via Perturbation of the Tryptophan-Proline-Aspartate (WPD) Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sheriff, Steven; Beno, Brett R; Zhai, Weixu; Kostich, Walter A; McDonnell, Patricia A; Kish, Kevin; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Kiefer, Susan E; Yanchunas, Joseph; Huang, Yanling; Shi, Shuhao; Zhu, Shirong; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E; Appiah, Kingsley K; Westphal, Ryan S; O’Connell, Jonathan; Gerritz, Samuel W

    2012-11-09

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) catalyze the dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues, a process that involves a conserved tryptophan-proline-aspartate (WPD) loop in catalysis. In previously determined structures of PTPs, the WPD-loop has been observed in either an 'open' conformation or a 'closed' conformation. In the current work, X-ray structures of the catalytic domain of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) revealed a ligand-induced 'superopen' conformation not previously reported for PTPs. In the superopen conformation, the ligand acts as an apparent competitive inhibitor and binds in a small hydrophobic pocket adjacent to, but distinct from, the active site. In the open and closed WPD-loop conformations of RPTPγ, the side chain of Trp1026 partially occupies this pocket. In the superopen conformation, Trp1026 is displaced allowing a 3,4-dichlorobenzyl substituent to occupy this site. The bound ligand prevents closure of the WPD-loop over the active site and disrupts the catalytic cycle of the enzyme.

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 +1858C/T polymorphism is associated with active vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    GARCIA-MELENDEZ, MARTHA ELENA; SALINAS-SANTANDER, MAURICIO; SANCHEZ-DOMINGUEZ, CELIA; GONZALEZ-CARDENAS, HUGO; CERDA-FLORES, RICARDO M.; OCAMPO-CANDIANI, JORGE; ORTIZ-LÓPEZ, ROCÍO

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by a skin depigmentation disorder resulting from an autoimmune response targeting melanocytes. Within the genetic factors involved in the development of the vitiligo immune response, various genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci have been considered to be risk factors. The PTPN22 gene encodes for a lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase, a regulator of the activation and development of T-cells. The +1858C/T polymorphism has been associated to autoimmune disease susceptibility in different populations and could be implicated in the onset of vitiligo. To assess the possible association between the presence of PTPN22 +1858C/T and vitiligo, 187 patients with vitiligo and 223 control subjects were analyzed in the study. Genomic DNA was isolated using the salting-out method and samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in order to detect the PTPN22 +1858C/T polymorphism. Causal associations were determined by χ2 test and their respective odds ratio (OR) was assessed in a 2×2 contingency table. The results showed an association between active vitiligo and the allele T load [P=0.0418; OR, 2.5706; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0040–6.5816], and active vitiligo-CT genotype (P=0.0389, OR, 2.6548; 95% CI, 1.0191–6.9156). In conclusion, the present data indicates a possible association between the PTPN22 +1858C/T genotype and a significant susceptibility of developing an active form of vitiligo. PMID:25289035

  5. Ex Vivo Chemical Cytometric Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity in Single Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ryan M.; Dailey, Lisa A.; Bair, Eric; Samet, James M.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel method for the measurement of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in single human airway epithelial cells (hAECs) using capillary electrophoresis. This technique involved the microinjection of a fluorescent phosphopeptide that is hydrolyzed specifically by PTPs. Analyses in BEAS-2B immortalized bronchial epithelial cells showed rapid PTP-mediated dephosphorylation of the substrate (2.2 pmol min−1 mg−1) that was blocked by pretreatment of the cells with the PTP inhibitors pervanadate, Zn2+, and 1,2-naphthoquinone (76%, 69%, 100% inhibition relative to PTP activity in untreated controls, respectively). These studies were then extended to a more physiologically relevant model system: primary hAECs cultured from bronchial brushings of living human subjects. In primary hAECs, dephosphorylation of the substrate occurred at a rate of 2.2 pmol min−1 mg−1, and was also effectively inhibited by pre-incubation of the cells with the inhibitors pervanadate, Zn2+, and 1,2- naphthoquinone (91%, 88%, and 87% median PTP inhibition, respectively). Reporter proteolysis in single BEAS-2B cells occurred at a median rate of 43 fmol min−1 mg−1 resulting in a mean half-life of 20 min. The reporter displayed a similar median half-life of 28 min in these single primary cells. Finally, single viable epithelial cells (which were assayed for PTP activity immediately after collection by bronchial brushing of a human volunteer) showed dephosphorylation rates ranging from 0.34–36 pmol min−1 mg−1 (n = 6). These results demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique for the ex vivo quantification of PTP activity in small, heterogeneous, human cells and tissues. PMID:24380370

  6. A Novel Interaction of the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A with the Adaptor Protein CIN85 Suppresses Phosphatase Activity and Facilitates Platelet Outside-in αIIbβ3 Integrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Khatlani, Tanvir; Pradhan, Subhashree; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner; Buchman, Vladimir L; Cruz, Miguel A; Vijayan, K Vinod

    2016-08-12

    The transduction of signals generated by protein kinases and phosphatases are critical for the ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to support stable platelet adhesion and thrombus formation. Unlike kinases, it remains unclear how serine/threonine phosphatases engage the signaling networks that are initiated following integrin ligation. Because protein-protein interactions form the backbone of signal transduction, we searched for proteins that interact with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac). In a yeast two-hybrid study, we identified a novel interaction between PP2Ac and an adaptor protein CIN85 (Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa). Truncation and alanine mutagenesis studies revealed that PP2Ac binds to the P3 block ((396)PAIPPKKPRP(405)) of the proline-rich region in CIN85. The interaction of purified PP2Ac with CIN85 suppressed phosphatase activity. Human embryonal kidney 293 αIIbβ3 cells overexpressing a CIN85 P3 mutant, which cannot support PP2Ac binding, displayed decreased adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen. Platelets contain the ∼85 kDa CIN85 protein along with the PP2Ac-CIN85 complex. A myristylated cell-permeable peptide derived from residues 395-407 of CIN85 protein (P3 peptide) disrupted the platelet PP2Ac-CIN85 complex and decreased αIIbβ3 signaling dependent functions such as platelet spreading on fibrinogen and thrombin-mediated fibrin clot retraction. In a phospho-profiling study P3 peptide treated platelets also displayed decreased phosphorylation of several signaling proteins including Src and GSK3β. Taken together, these data support a role for the novel PP2Ac-CIN85 complex in supporting integrin-dependent platelet function by dampening the phosphatase activity. PMID:27334924

  7. PME-1 protects ERK pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R.; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A.; Hector, Melissa E.; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C.; Westermarck, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    ERK/MAPK pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies, however the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) promotes basal ERK pathway activity, and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and PKC. In malignant glioblastoma, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (N=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells, and suggest important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas. PMID:19293187

  8. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  9. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Trappanese, Danielle M; Sivilich, Sarah; Ets, Hillevi K; Kako, Farah; Autieri, Michael V; Moreland, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle contraction is primarily regulated by phosphorylation of myosin light chain. There are also modulatory pathways that control the final level of force development. We tested the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase modulate vascular smooth muscle activity via effects on MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1). Swine carotid arteries were mounted for isometric force recording and subjected to histamine stimulation in the presence and absence of inhibitors of PKC [bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis)], MAP kinase kinase (MEK) (U0126), and MKP-1 (sanguinarine) and flash frozen for measurement of MAP kinase, PKC-potentiated myosin phosphatase inhibitor 17 (CPI-17), and caldesmon phosphorylation levels. CPI-17 was phosphorylated in response to histamine and was inhibited in the presence of Bis. Caldesmon phosphorylation levels increased in response to histamine stimulation and were decreased in response to MEK inhibition but were not affected by the addition of Bis. Inhibition of PKC significantly increased p42 MAP kinase, but not p44 MAP kinase. Inhibition of MEK with U0126 inhibited both p42 and p44 MAP kinase activity. Inhibition of MKP-1 with sanguinarine blocked the Bis-dependent increase of MAP kinase activity. Sanguinarine alone increased MAP kinase activity due to its effects on MKP-1. Sanguinarine increased MKP-1 phosphorylation, which was inhibited by inhibition of MAP kinase. This suggests that MAP kinase has a negative feedback role in inhibiting MKP-1 activity. Therefore, PKC catalyzes MKP-1 phosphorylation, which is reversed by MAP kinase. Thus the fine tuning of vascular contraction is due to the concerted effort of PKC, MAP kinase, and MKP-1. PMID:27053523

  10. Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C contributes to glucose regulation of SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Amparo; Xu, Xinjing; Carlson, Marian

    2013-10-25

    The SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs) function in energy regulation in eukaryotic cells. SNF1/AMPKs are αβγ heterotrimers that are activated by phosphorylation of the activation loop Thr on the catalytic subunit. Protein kinases that activate SNF1/AMPK have been identified, but the protein phosphatases responsible for dephosphorylation of the activation loop are less well defined. For Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF1/AMPK, Reg1-Glc7 protein phosphatase 1 and Sit4 type 2A-related phosphatase function together to dephosphorylate Thr-210 on the Snf1 catalytic subunit during growth on high concentrations of glucose; reg1Δ and sit4Δ single mutations do not impair dephosphorylation when inappropriate glycogen synthesis, also caused by these mutations, is blocked. We here present evidence that Ptc1 protein phosphatase 2C also has a role in dephosphorylation of Snf1 Thr-210 in vivo. The sit4Δ ptc1Δ mutant exhibited partial defects in regulation of the phosphorylation state of Snf1. The reg1Δ ptc1Δ mutant was viable only when expressing mutant Snf1 proteins with reduced kinase activity, and Thr-210 phosphorylation of the mutant SNF1 heterotrimers was substantially elevated during growth on high glucose. This evidence, together with findings on the reg1Δ sit4Δ mutant, indicates that although Reg1-Glc7 plays the major role, all three phosphatases contribute to maintenance of the Snf1 activation loop in the dephosphorylated state during growth on high glucose. Ptc1 has overlapping functions with Reg1-Glc7 and Sit4 in glucose regulation of SNF1/AMPK and cell viability. PMID:24019512

  11. Protein phosphatases and their regulation in the control of mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Satoru; Hunt, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle transitions depend on protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The discovery of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their mode of activation by their cyclin partners explained many important aspects of cell cycle control. As the cell cycle is basically a series of recurrences of a defined set of events, protein phosphatases must obviously be as important as kinases. However, our knowledge about phosphatases lags well behind that of kinases. We still do not know which phosphatase(s) is/are truly responsible for dephosphorylating CDK substrates, and we know very little about whether and how protein phosphatases are regulated. Here, we summarize our present understanding of the phosphatases that are important in the control of the cell cycle and pose the questions that need to be answered as regards the regulation of protein phosphatases. PMID:22482124

  12. The activity of protein phosphatase 5 towards native clients is modulated by the middle- and C-terminal domains of Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Eckl, Julia M.; Drazic, Adrian; Rutz, Daniel A.; Lorenz, Oliver R.; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Kriehuber, Thomas; Lindemann, Claudia; Madl, Tobias; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 is involved in the regulation of kinases and transcription factors. The dephosphorylation activity is modulated by the molecular chaperone Hsp90, which binds to the TPR-domain of protein phosphatase 5. This interaction is dependent on the C-terminal MEEVD motif of Hsp90. We show that C-terminal Hsp90 fragments differ in their regulation of the phosphatase activity hinting to a more complex interaction. Also hydrodynamic parameters from analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering data suggest a compact structure for the Hsp90-protein phosphatase 5 complexes. Using crosslinking experiments coupled with mass spectrometric analysis and structural modelling we identify sites, which link the middle/C-terminal domain interface of C. elegans Hsp90 to the phosphatase domain of the corresponding kinase. Studying the relevance of the domains of Hsp90 for turnover of native substrates we find that ternary complexes with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are cooperatively formed by full-length Hsp90 and PPH-5. Our data suggest that the direct stimulation of the phosphatase activity by C-terminal Hsp90 fragments leads to increased dephosphorylation rates. These are further modulated by the binding of clients to the N-terminal and middle domain of Hsp90 and their presentation to the phosphatase within the phosphatase-Hsp90 complex. PMID:26593036

  13. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  14. Regulation of a protein phosphatase cascade allows convergent dopamine and glutamate signals to activate ERK in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Valjent, Emmanuel; Pascoli, Vincent; Svenningsson, Per; Paul, Surojit; Enslen, Hervé; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Stipanovich, Alexandre; Caboche, Jocelyne; Lombroso, Paul J; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2005-01-11

    Many drugs of abuse exert their addictive effects by increasing extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, where they likely alter the plasticity of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission. This mechanism implies key molecular alterations in neurons in which both dopamine and glutamate inputs are activated. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an enzyme important for long-term synaptic plasticity, is a good candidate for playing such a role. Here, we show in mouse that d-amphetamine activates ERK in a subset of medium-size spiny neurons of the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, through the combined action of glutamate NMDA and D1-dopamine receptors. Activation of ERK by d-amphetamine or by widely abused drugs, including cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was absent in mice lacking dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of M(r) 32,000 (DARPP-32). The effects of d-amphetamine or cocaine on ERK activation in the striatum, but not in the prefrontal cortex, were prevented by point mutation of Thr-34, a DARPP-32 residue specifically involved in protein phosphatase-1 inhibition. Regulation by DARPP-32 occurred both upstream of ERK and at the level of striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). Blockade of the ERK pathway or mutation of DARPP-32 altered locomotor sensitization induced by a single injection of psychostimulants, demonstrating the functional relevance of this regulation. Thus, activation of ERK, by a multilevel protein phosphatase-controlled mechanism, functions as a detector of coincidence of dopamine and glutamate signals converging on medium-size striatal neurons and is critical for long-lasting effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:15608059

  15. New Hippolide Derivatives with Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activity from the Marine Sponge Hippospongia lachne

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Shu-Juan; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Yang, Fan; Yi, Yang-Hua; Di, Ying-Tong; Han, Bing-Nan; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Five new sesterterpenoids, compounds 1–5, have been isolated from the sponge Hippospongia lachne off Yongxing Island in the South China Sea. The structures of compounds 1–5 were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HRMS, 1D, and 2D NMR experiments. The stereochemistry, including absolute configurations of these compounds, was determined by spectroscopic, chemical, and computational methods. Compounds 1 and 5 showed moderate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 5.2 μM and 8.7 μM, respectively, more potent than previously reported hippolides. PMID:25007159

  16. Measles Virus Infection Inactivates Cellular Protein Phosphatase 5 with Consequent Suppression of Sp1 and c-Myc Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Yoneda, Misako; Honma, Reiko; Ikeda, Fusako; Watanabe, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MeV) causes several unique syndromes, including transient immunosuppression. To clarify the cellular responses to MeV infection, we previously analyzed a MeV-infected epithelial cell line and a lymphoid cell line by microarray and showed that the expression of numerous genes was up- or downregulated in the epithelial cells. In particular, there was a characteristic comprehensive downregulation of housekeeping genes during late stage infection. To identify the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we examined the phosphorylation status of transcription factors and kinase/phosphatase activities in epithelial cells after infection. MeV infection inactivated cellular protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) that consequently inactivated DNA-dependent protein kinase, which reduced Sp1 phosphorylation levels, and c-Myc degradation, both of which downregulated the expression of many housekeeping genes. In addition, intracellular accumulation of viral nucleocapsid inactivated PP5 and subsequent downstream responses. These findings demonstrate a novel strategy of MeV during infection, which causes the collapse of host cellular functions. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MeV) is one of the most important pathogens in humans. We previously showed that MeV infection induces the comprehensive downregulation of housekeeping genes in epithelial cells. By examining this phenomenon, we clarified the molecular mechanism underlying the constitutive expression of housekeeping genes in cells, which is maintained by cellular protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) and DNA-dependent protein kinase. We also demonstrated that MeV targets PP5 for downregulation in epithelial cells. This is the first report to show how MeV infection triggers a reduction in overall cellular functions of infected host cells. Our findings will help uncover unique pathogenicities caused by MeV. PMID:26157124

  17. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  18. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-04-15

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  19. Analysis of Smad Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Qin, Lan; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 at the C-terminal SXS motif by BMP type I receptors is one of the most critical events in BMP signaling. Conversely, protein phosphatases that dephosphorylate phospho-Smad1/5/8 can consequently prevent or terminate BMP signaling. PPM1H is an undercharacterized phosphatase in the PPM family. We recently demonstrated that PPM1H can dephosphorylate Smad1 in the cytoplasm and block BMP signaling responses in cellular assays. Here we describe in vitro method showing that PPM1H is a bona fide phosphatase for Smad1/5/8. PPM1H is produced as GST fusion protein in E. coli, and purified against glutathione sepharose beads. Bacterially purified recombinant PPM1H possesses phosphatase activity toward artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Recombinant PPM1H also dephosphorylates immuno-purified phosphorylated Smad1 in test tubes. These direct in vitro phosphatase assays provide convincing evidence demonstrating the role of PPM1H as a specific phosphatase for P-Smad1. PMID:26520120

  20. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a conserved active inhibitor-2 for Protein Phosphatase type 1: perspectives for novel anti-plasmodial therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is clear that the coordinated and reciprocal actions of kinases and phosphatases are fundamental in the regulation of development and growth of the malaria parasite. Protein Phosphatase type 1 is a key enzyme playing diverse and essential roles in cell survival. Its dephosphorylation activity/specificity is governed by the interaction of its catalytic subunit (PP1c) with regulatory proteins. Among these, inhibitor-2 (I2) is one of the most evolutionarily ancient PP1 regulators. In vivo studies in various organisms revealed a defect in chromosome segregation and cell cycle progression when the function of I2 is blocked. Results In this report, we present evidence that Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of malaria, expresses a structural homolog of mammalian I2, named PfI2. Biochemical, in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that PfI2 binds PP1 and inhibits its activity. We further showed that the motifs 12KTISW16 and 102HYNE105 are critical for PfI2 inhibitory activity. Functional studies using the Xenopus oocyte model revealed that PfI2 is able to overcome the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint by inducing germinal vesicle breakdown. Genetic manipulations in P. falciparum suggest an essential role of PfI2 as no viable mutants with a disrupted PfI2 gene were detectable. Additionally, peptides derived from PfI2 and competing with RVxF binding sites in PP1 exhibit anti-plasmodial activity against blood stage parasites in vitro. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that the PfI2 protein could play a role in the regulation of the P. falciparum cell cycle through its PfPP1 phosphatase regulatory activity. Structure-activity studies of this regulator led to the identification of peptides with anti-plasmodial activity against blood stage parasites in vitro suggesting that PP1c-regulator interactions could be a novel means to control malaria. PMID:23837822

  1. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  2. Presence of ecto-protein tyrosine phosphatase activity is vital for survival of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Heneberg, Petr; Rathaur, Sushma

    2014-10-01

    The ecto protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) are known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the intracellular parasites. However, their presence and role in filarial parasites is still unknown. We found a significant amount of tyrosine phosphatase activity in the surface antigen fraction extracted from Setaria cervi (S. cervi), a bovine filarial parasite. An antibody designed against the conserved catalytic core of human protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B cross reacted with a 63 kDa band in the surface antigen. We detected a significant amount of PTP activity in the intact S. cervi adult parasites as well as microfilariae in this study for the first time. This PTP may be localized on the surface of the parasite with an exposed active site available for the external substrates. The PTP activity was also inhibited by sodium orthovanadate and phenyl arsine oxide, specific inhibitors of PTP in both the life stages. The Km and Vmax for PTP in the adult parasites and microfilariae were determined to be 2.574 ± 0.14 mM; 206.3 ± 2.75 μM Pi/h/two parasites and 5.510 ± 0.59 mM; 62.27 ± 2.27 μM Pi/h/10(6) parasites respectively using O-P-L-Tyrosine as substrate. Interestingly, a positive correlation was observed between the inhibition in PTP activity and reduction in the motility/ viability of the parasites when they were subjected to the specific PTP inhibitors (Orthovanadate and Phenyl arsine oxide) for 4 h in the KRB maintenance medium. The activity was also significantly inhibited in the parasites exposed to antifilarial drug/compounds for e.g. Diethylcarbamazine, Acetylsalicylic Acid and SK7, a methyl chalcone. Therefore suggesting a possible role played by PTP in the survival of the parasite, its interaction with the host as well as in the screening of newly synthesized antifilarials/drugs. PMID:25028209

  3. Sesquiterpene Hydroquinones with Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activities from a Dysidea sp. Marine Sponge Collected in Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-07-22

    Three new sesquiterpene hydroquinones, avapyran (1), 17-O-acetylavarol (2), and 17-O-acetylneoavarol (3), were isolated from a Dysidea sp. marine sponge collected in Okinawa together with five known congeners: avarol (4), neoavarol (5), 20-O-acetylavarol (6), 20-O-acetylneoavarol (7), and 3'-aminoavarone (8). The structures of 1-3 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-3 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with IC50 values of 11, 9.5, and 6.5 μM, respectively, while known compounds 4-8 gave IC50 values of 12, >32, 10, 8.6, and 18 μM, respectively. In a preliminary investigation on structure-activity relationships, six ester and methoxy derivatives (9-14) were prepared from 4 and 5. PMID:27336796

  4. Heat stress activates the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatases are essential under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-04-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1 delta strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  5. Heat Stress Activates the Yeast High-Osmolarity Glycerol Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway, and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Are Essential under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P.; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1Δ strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  6. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  7. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Laura R; Ather, Jennifer L; Randall, Matthew J; DePuccio, Daniel P; Landry, Christopher C; Wewers, Mark D; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-08-15

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol, and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor activation or N-methyl-d-asparate receptor inhibition but were associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other

  8. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  9. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin negatively regulates EGF receptor signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kathleen M C; Rubin, Gerald M

    2002-01-01

    Calcineurin is a Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated, Ser-Thr protein phosphatase that is essential for the translation of Ca(2+) signals into changes in cell function and development. We carried out a dominant modifier screen in the Drosophila eye using an activated form of the catalytic subunit to identify new targets, regulators, and functions of calcineurin. An examination of 70,000 mutagenized flies yielded nine specific complementation groups, four that enhanced and five that suppressed the activated calcineurin phenotype. The gene canB2, which encodes the essential regulatory subunit of calcineurin, was identified as a suppressor group, demonstrating that the screen was capable of identifying genes relevant to calcineurin function. We demonstrated that a second suppressor group was sprouty, a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Wing and eye phenotypes of ectopic activated calcineurin and genetic interactions with components of signaling pathways suggested a role for calcineurin in repressing Egf receptor/Ras signal transduction. On the basis of our results, we propose that calcineurin, upon activation by Ca(2+)-calmodulin, cooperates with other factors to negatively regulate Egf receptor signaling at the level of sprouty and the GTPase-activating protein Gap1. PMID:12019233

  10. Integrin α1β1 Promotes Caveolin-1 Dephosphorylation by Activating T Cell Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Chen, Xiwu; Mathew, Sijo; Mont, Stacey; Sanders, Charles R.; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-01-01

    Integrin α1β1 is a collagen receptor that down-regulates collagen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mice lacking this receptor show increased ROS levels and exacerbated glomerular sclerosis following injury. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a multifunctional protein that is tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to injury and has been implicated in ROS-mediated injury. Cav-1 interacts with integrins, and integrin α1β1 binds/activates T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which is homologous to the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B known to dephosphorylate Cav-1. In this study, we analyzed whether phosphorylated Cav-1 (pCav-1) is a substrate of TCPTP and if integrin α1β1 is essential for promoting TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation. We found that Cav-1 phosphorylation is significantly higher in cells lacking integrin α1β1 at base line and following oxidative stress. Overexpression of TCPTP leads to reduced pCav-1 levels only in cells expressing integrin α1β1. Using solid phase binding assays, we demonstrated that 1) purified Cav-1 directly interacts with TCPTP and the integrin α1 subunit, 2) pCav-1 is a substrate of TCPTP, and 3) TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation is highly increased by the addition of purified integrin α1β1 or an integrin α1 cytoplasmic peptide to which TCPTP has been shown to bind. Thus, our results demonstrate that pCav-1 is a new substrate of TCPTP and that integrin α1β1 acts as a negative regulator of Cav-1 phosphorylation by activating TCPTP. This could explain the protective function of integrin α1β1 in oxidative stress-mediated damage and why integrin α1-null mice are more susceptible to fibrosis following injury. PMID:20940300

  11. Integrin {alpha}1{beta}1 promotes caveolin-1 dephosphorylation by activating T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Chen, Xiwu; Mathew, Sijo; Mont, Stacey; Sanders, Charles R; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-12-17

    Integrin α1β1 is a collagen receptor that down-regulates collagen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mice lacking this receptor show increased ROS levels and exacerbated glomerular sclerosis following injury. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a multifunctional protein that is tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to injury and has been implicated in ROS-mediated injury. Cav-1 interacts with integrins, and integrin α1β1 binds/activates T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which is homologous to the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B known to dephosphorylate Cav-1. In this study, we analyzed whether phosphorylated Cav-1 (pCav-1) is a substrate of TCPTP and if integrin α1β1 is essential for promoting TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation. We found that Cav-1 phosphorylation is significantly higher in cells lacking integrin α1β1 at base line and following oxidative stress. Overexpression of TCPTP leads to reduced pCav-1 levels only in cells expressing integrin α1β1. Using solid phase binding assays, we demonstrated that 1) purified Cav-1 directly interacts with TCPTP and the integrin α1 subunit, 2) pCav-1 is a substrate of TCPTP, and 3) TCPTP-mediated Cav-1 dephosphorylation is highly increased by the addition of purified integrin α1β1 or an integrin α1 cytoplasmic peptide to which TCPTP has been shown to bind. Thus, our results demonstrate that pCav-1 is a new substrate of TCPTP and that integrin α1β1 acts as a negative regulator of Cav-1 phosphorylation by activating TCPTP. This could explain the protective function of integrin α1β1 in oxidative stress-mediated damage and why integrin α1-null mice are more susceptible to fibrosis following injury. PMID:20940300

  12. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  13. Protein phosphatase 1 is a key player in nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sandra; Santos, Mariana; Martins, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B

    2015-12-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation at serine (Ser), threonine (Thr) and tyrosine (Tyr) residues is among the major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. The eukaryotic genome encodes many protein kinases and protein phosphatases. However, the localization, activity and specificity towards phosphatase substrates are dictated by a large array of phosphatase binding and regulatory subunits. For protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) more than 200 binding subunits have been described. The various PP1 isoforms and the binding subunits can be located throughout the cell, including in the nucleus. It follows that several nuclear specific PP1 binding proteins (PIPs) have been described and these will be discussed. Among them are PNUTS (phosphatase 1 nuclear targeting subunit), NIPP1 (nuclear inhibitor of PP1) and CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein), which have all been associated with transcription. In fact PP1 can associate with transcription factors fulfilling an important regulatory function, in this respect it can bind to Hox11, human factor C1 (HCF1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2). PP1 also regulates cell cycle progression and centrosome maturation and splitting, again by binding to specific regulatory proteins. Moreover, PP1 together with other protein phosphatases control the entry into mitosis by regulating the activity of mitotic kinases. Thus, PP1, its binding proteins and/or the phosphorylation states of both, directly control a vast array of cell nucleus associated functions, many of which are starting to be unraveled. PMID:26275498

  14. Avicin D: A Protein Reactive Plant Isoprenoid Dephosphorylates Stat 3 by Regulating Both Kinase and Phosphatase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Valsala; Nishimura, Goshi; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Connolly, Fiona; Hanausek, Margaret; Walaszek, Zbigniew; Zoltaszek, Robert; Gutterman, Jordan U.

    2009-01-01

    Avicins, a class of electrophilic triterpenoids with pro-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, have been shown to induce redox-dependant post-translational modification of cysteine residues to regulate protein function. Based on (a) the cross-talk that occurs between redox and phosphorylation processes, and (b) the role of Stat3 in the process of apoptosis and carcinogenesis, we chose to study the effects of avicins on the processes of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in Stat3. Avicins dephosphorylate Stat3 in a variety of human tumor cell lines, leading to a decrease in the transcriptional activity of Stat3. The expression of Stat3-regulated proteins such as c-myc, cyclin D1, Bcl2, survivin and VEGF were reduced in response to avicin treatment. Underlying avicin-induced dephosphorylation of Stat3 was dephosphorylation of JAKs, as well as activation of protein phosphatase-1. Downregulation of both Stat3 activity and expression of Stat 3-controlled pro-survival proteins, contributes to the induction of apoptosis in avicin treated tumor cells. Based on the role of Stat3 in inflammation and wounding, and the in vivo inhibition of VEGF by avicins in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model, it is likely that avicin-induced inhibition of Stat3 activity results in the suppression of the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant stromal environment of tumors. Activation of PP-1, which also acts as a cellular economizer, combined with the redox regulation by avicins, can aid in redirecting metabolism from growth promoting anabolic to energy sparing pathways. PMID:19440292

  15. Avicin D: a protein reactive plant isoprenoid dephosphorylates Stat 3 by regulating both kinase and phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Valsala; Nishimura, Goshi; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Connolly, Fiona; Hanausek, Margaret; Walaszek, Zbigniew; Zoltaszek, Robert; Gutterman, Jordan U

    2009-01-01

    Avicins, a class of electrophilic triterpenoids with pro-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, have been shown to induce redox-dependant post-translational modification of cysteine residues to regulate protein function. Based on (a) the cross-talk that occurs between redox and phosphorylation processes, and (b) the role of Stat3 in the process of apoptosis and carcinogenesis, we chose to study the effects of avicins on the processes of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in Stat3. Avicins dephosphorylate Stat3 in a variety of human tumor cell lines, leading to a decrease in the transcriptional activity of Stat3. The expression of Stat3-regulated proteins such as c-myc, cyclin D1, Bcl2, survivin and VEGF were reduced in response to avicin treatment. Underlying avicin-induced dephosphorylation of Stat3 was dephosphorylation of JAKs, as well as activation of protein phosphatase-1. Downregulation of both Stat3 activity and expression of Stat 3-controlled pro-survival proteins, contributes to the induction of apoptosis in avicin treated tumor cells. Based on the role of Stat3 in inflammation and wounding, and the in vivo inhibition of VEGF by avicins in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model, it is likely that avicin-induced inhibition of Stat3 activity results in the suppression of the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant stromal environment of tumors. Activation of PP-1, which also acts as a cellular economizer, combined with the redox regulation by avicins, can aid in redirecting metabolism from growth promoting anabolic to energy sparing pathways. PMID:19440292

  16. Betulinic Acid Suppresses STAT3 Activation Pathway Through Induction of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 in Human Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    STAT3 activation has been associated with survival, proliferation and invasion of various human cancers. Whether betulinic acid, a pentacyclic triterpene, can modulates the STAT3 pathway, was investigated in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We found that betulinic acid inhibited constitutive activation of STAT3, Src kinase, JAK1 and JAK2. Pervanadate reversed the betulinic acid -induced down regulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Furthermore, betulinic acid induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1 and silencing of the SHP-1 gene abolished the ability of betulinic acid to inhibit STAT3 activation and rescues betulinic acid-induced cell death. Betulinic acid also downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products such as bcl-xL, bcl-2, cyclin D1, and survivin. This correlated with an increase in apoptosis as indicated by an increase in the sub-G1 cell population and an increase in caspase-3–induced PARP cleavage. Consistent with these results, over expression of constitutive active STAT3 significantly reduced the betulinic acid-induced apoptosis. Betulinic acid also enhanced the apoptosis induced by thalidomide (from 10% to 55%) and bortezomib (from 5% to 70%) in MM cells. Overall, our results suggest that betulinic acid down regulates STAT3 activation through upregulation of SHP-1 and this may have potential in sensitization of STAT3 over expressing tumors to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:19937797

  17. Chimeric proteins combining phosphatase and cellulose-binding activities: proof-of-concept and application in the hydrolysis of paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Larissa M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Marana, Sandro R

    2014-05-01

    Phosphatases for organophosphate degradation and carbohydrate-binding domains (CBMs) have potential biotechnological applications. As a proof-of-concept, a soluble chimeric protein that combines acid phosphatase (AppA) from Escherichia coli and a CBM from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (AppA-CBM) was produced in E.coli. AppACBM adsorbed in microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH101 catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP). The binding to microcrystalline cellulose displayed saturation behavior with an apparent binding constant (Kb) of 22 ± 5 mg and a maximum binding (Bmax) of 1.500 ± 0.001 enzyme units. Binding was highest at pH 2.5 and decreased above pH 6.5, as previously observed for family 2 CBMs. The Km values for PNPP of AppA-CBM and native AppA were identical (2.7 mM). To demonstrate that this strategy for protein engineering has practical applications and is largely functional, even for phosphatases exhibiting diverse folds, a chimeric protein combining human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) and the CBM was produced. Both PON1-CBM and hPON1 had identical Km values for paraoxon (1.3 mM). Additionally, hPON1 bound to microcrystalline cellulose with a Kb of 27 ± 3 mg, the same as that observed for AppA-CBM. These data show that the phosphatase domains are as functional in both of the chimeric proteins as they are in the native enzymes and that the CBM domain maintains the same cellulose affinity. Therefore, the engineering of chimeric proteins combining domains of phosphatases and CBMs is fully feasible, resulting in chimeric enzymes that exhibit potential for OP detoxification. PMID:24555432

  18. Synthesis and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibition activities of two new synthetic bromophenols and their methoxy derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongchao; Shi, Dayong; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2011-11-01

    3-bromo-4,5-bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl)-1,2-benzenediol ( 1) is a natural bromophenol isolated from the red algae Rhodomela confervoides that exhibits significant inhibition against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Based on its activity, we synthesized two new synthetic bromophenols and their methoxy derivatives from vanillin using the structure of natural bromophenol 1 as a scaffold. The structures of these bromophenols were elucidated from 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and high resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry as 2,3-dibromo-1-(2'-bromo-6'-(3″,4″-dimethoxybenzyl)-3',4'-dimethoxybenzyl)-4,5-dimethoxybenzene ( 2), 2,3-dibromo-1-(2'-bromo-6'-(2″-bromo-4″,5″-dimethoxybenzyl)-3',4'-dimethoxybenzyl)-4,5-dimethoxybenzene ( 3), 3,4-dibromo-5-(2'-bromo-6'-(2″-bromo-4″,5″-dihydroxybenzyl)-3',4'-dihydroxybenzyl)pyrocatechol ( 4) and 3,4-dibromo-5-(2'-bromo-6'-(3″,4″-dihydroxybenzyl)-3',4'-dihydroxybenzyl)pyrocatechol ( 5). PTP1B inhibition activities of these compounds were evaluated using a colorimetric assay, and compounds 3 and 4 demonstrated interesting activity against PTP1B.

  19. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade controls phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Di Sanza, Cristina; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Eramo, Adriana; Desideri, Marianna; Biagioni, Francesca; Passeri, Daniela; Falcone, Italia; Sette, Giovanni; Bergamo, Paola; Anichini, Andrea; Sabapathy, Kanaga; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Blandino, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways are regulated by extensive crosstalk, occurring at different levels. In tumors, transactivation of the alternate pathway is a frequent "escape" mechanism, suggesting that combined inhibition of both pathways may achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Here we show that, in the M14 melanoma model, simultaneous inhibition of both MEK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) achieves synergistic effects at suboptimal concentrations, but becomes frankly antagonistic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of MEK inhibitors. This observation led to the identification of a novel crosstalk mechanism, by which either pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of constitutive MEK signaling restores phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibits downstream signaling through AKT and mTOR, thus bypassing the need for double pathway blockade. This appears to be a general regulatory mechanism and is mediated by multiple mechanisms, such as MAPK-dependent c-Jun and miR-25 regulation. Finally, PTEN upregulation appears to be a major effector of MEK inhibitors' antitumor activity, as cancer cells in which PTEN is inactivated are consistently more resistant to the growth inhibitory and anti-angiogenic effects of MEK blockade. PMID:22215152

  20. Plasmodium falciparum inhibitor-3 homolog increases protein phosphatase type 1 activity and is essential for parasitic survival.

    PubMed

    Fréville, Aline; Landrieu, Isabelle; García-Gimeno, M Adelaida; Vicogne, Jérôme; Montbarbon, Muriel; Bertin, Benjamin; Verger, Alexis; Kalamou, Hadidjatou; Sanz, Pascual; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the protein regulators governing protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity have crucial functions because their deletion drastically affects cell growth and division. PP1 has been found to be essential in Plasmodium falciparum, but little is known about its regulators. In this study, we have identified a homolog of Inhibitor-3 of PP1, named PfI3. NMR analysis shows that PfI3 belongs to the disordered protein family. High affinity interaction of PfI3 and PfPP1 is demonstrated in vitro using several methods, with an apparent dissociation constant K(D) of 100 nm. We further show that the conserved (41)KVVRW(45) motif is crucial for this interaction as the replacement of the Trp(45) by an Ala(45) severely decreases the binding to PfPP1. Surprisingly, PfI3 was unable to rescue a yeast strain deficient in I3 (Ypi1). This lack of functional orthology was supported as functional assays in vitro have revealed that PfI3, unlike yeast I3 and human I3, increases PfPP1 activity. Reverse genetic approaches suggest an essential role of PfI3 in the growth and/or survival of blood stage parasites because attempts to obtain knock-out parasites were unsuccessful, although the locus of PfI3 is accessible. The main localization of a GFP-tagged PfI3 in the nucleus of all blood stage parasites is compatible with a regulatory role of PfI3 on the activity of nuclear PfPP1. PMID:22128182

  1. Plasmodium falciparum Inhibitor-3 Homolog Increases Protein Phosphatase Type 1 Activity and Is Essential for Parasitic Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Fréville, Aline; Landrieu, Isabelle; García-Gimeno, M. Adelaida; Vicogne, Jérôme; Montbarbon, Muriel; Bertin, Benjamin; Verger, Alexis; Kalamou, Hadidjatou; Sanz, Pascual; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the protein regulators governing protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity have crucial functions because their deletion drastically affects cell growth and division. PP1 has been found to be essential in Plasmodium falciparum, but little is known about its regulators. In this study, we have identified a homolog of Inhibitor-3 of PP1, named PfI3. NMR analysis shows that PfI3 belongs to the disordered protein family. High affinity interaction of PfI3 and PfPP1 is demonstrated in vitro using several methods, with an apparent dissociation constant KD of 100 nm. We further show that the conserved 41KVVRW45 motif is crucial for this interaction as the replacement of the Trp45 by an Ala45 severely decreases the binding to PfPP1. Surprisingly, PfI3 was unable to rescue a yeast strain deficient in I3 (Ypi1). This lack of functional orthology was supported as functional assays in vitro have revealed that PfI3, unlike yeast I3 and human I3, increases PfPP1 activity. Reverse genetic approaches suggest an essential role of PfI3 in the growth and/or survival of blood stage parasites because attempts to obtain knock-out parasites were unsuccessful, although the locus of PfI3 is accessible. The main localization of a GFP-tagged PfI3 in the nucleus of all blood stage parasites is compatible with a regulatory role of PfI3 on the activity of nuclear PfPP1. PMID:22128182

  2. Expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in the early phases of human epithelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Loda, M.; Capodieci, P.; Mishra, R.; Yao, H.; Corless, C.; Grigioni, W.; Wang, Y.; Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Stork, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Many mitogens and human oncogenes activate extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), which in turn convey proliferation signals. ERKs or mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are inactivated in vitro by MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs). The gene encoding one of these MKPs, MKP-1, is a serum-inducible gene and is transcriptionally activated by mitogenic signals in cultured cells. As MKP-1 has been shown to block DNA synthesis by inhibiting ERKs when expressed at elevated levels in cultured cells, it has been suggested that it may act as a tumor suppressor. MKP-1 mRNA and MAP kinase (ERK-1 and -2) protein expression was assessed in 164 human epithelial tumors of diverse tissue origin by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. MKP-1 was overexpressed in the early phases of prostate, colon, and bladder carcinogenesis, with progressive loss of expression with higher histological grade and in metastases. In contrast, breast carcinomas showed significant MKP-1 expression even when poorly differentiated or in late stages of the disease. MKP-1, ERK-1, and ERK-2 were co-expressed in most tumors examined. In a subset of 15 tumors, ERK-1 enzymatic activity as well as structural alterations that might be responsible for loss of function of MKP-1 during tumor progression, were examined. ERK-1 enzymatic activity was found to be elevated despite MKP-1 overexpression. No loss of 5q35-ter (containing the MKP-1 locus) was detected by polymerase chain reaction in metastases compared with primary tumors. Finally, no mutations were found in the catalytic domain of MKP-1. These data indicate that MKP-1 is an early marker for a wide range of human epithelial tumors and suggest that MKP-1 does not behave as a tumor suppressor in epithelial tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8909245

  3. Molecular Basis of the Interaction of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 4 (PTPN4) with the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Pierre; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Bibi-Zainab, Edoo; Sawyer, Kristi; Raynal, Bertrand; Haouz, Ahmed; Delepierre, Muriel; Lafon, Monique; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The human protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) prevents cell death induction in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines in a PDZ·PDZ binding motifs-dependent manner, but the cellular partners of PTPN4 involved in cell protection are unknown. Here, we described the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38γ as a cellular partner of PTPN4. The main contribution to the p38γ·PTPN4 complex formation is the tight interaction between the C terminus of p38γ and the PDZ domain of PTPN4. We solved the crystal structure of the PDZ domain of PTPN4 bound to the p38γ C terminus. We identified the molecular basis of recognition of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ that displays the highest affinity among all endogenous partners of PTPN4. We showed that the p38γ C terminus is also an efficient inducer of cell death after its intracellular delivery. In addition to recruiting the kinase, the binding of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ to PTPN4 abolishes the catalytic autoinhibition of PTPN4 and thus activates the phosphatase, which can efficiently dephosphorylate the activation loop of p38γ. We presume that the p38γ·PTPN4 interaction promotes cellular signaling, preventing cell death induction. PMID:27246854

  4. Role of protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi Quintaje, S; Church, D J; Rebsamen, M; Valloton, M B; Hemmings, B A; Lang, U

    1996-04-25

    Incubation of cultured, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) induced a transient suppression of PP2A activity at 5 min, an effect that was reversed after 15 min of exposure to PMA. This inactivation was correlated with a transient increase in the phosphorylation level of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (193 +/- 38% of control levels at 5 min). Simultaneously to the transient inactivation of PP2A, we observed a rapid and reversible phosphorylation of 42-kDa MAP kinase (474 +/- 65% of control levels at 5 min, and 316 +/- 44% at 15 min) in cardiomyocytes treated with PMA. This transient phosphorylation was accompanied by a transient increase in cytosolic MAP kinase activity (209 +/- 17% of control values at 5 min and 125 +/- 7% at 15 min). Okadaic acid (1 microM ) completely blocked the decrease in the phosphorylation level and activity of MAP kinase occurring after 5 min of exposure to PMA. These data demonstrate that PP2A inactivation and MAP kinase activation are very strongly correlated in cardiomyocytes, indicating that PP2A plays a negative modulatory role in the regulation of MAP kinase activity. PMID:8629997

  5. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  6. Smooth-muscle caldesmon phosphatase is SMP-I, a type 2A protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Pato, M D; Sutherland, C; Winder, S J; Walsh, M P

    1993-07-01

    Caldesmon phosphatase was identified in chicken gizzard smooth muscle by using as substrates caldesmon phosphorylated at different sites by protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and cdc2 kinase. Most (approximately 90%) of the phosphatase activity was recovered in the cytosolic fraction. Gel filtration after (NH4)2SO4 fractionation of the cytosolic fraction revealed a single major peak of phosphatase activity which coeluted with calponin phosphatase [Winder, Pato and Walsh (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 197-203] and myosin LC20 phosphatase. Further purification of caldesmon phosphatase was achieved by sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel, omega-amino-octyl-agarose, aminopropyl-agarose and thiophosphorylated myosin LC20-Sepharose. A single peak of caldesmon phosphatase activity was detected at each step of the purification. The purified phosphatase was identified as SMP-I [Pato and Adelstein (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 6535-6538] by subunit composition (three subunits, of 60, 55 and 38 kDa) and Western blotting using antibodies against the holoenzyme which recognize all three subunits and antibodies specific for the 38 kDa catalytic subunit. SMP-I is a type 2A protein phosphatase [Pato, Adelstein, Crouch, Safer, Ingebritsen and Cohen (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 132, 283-287; Winder et al. (1992), cited above]. Consistent with the conclusion that SMP-I is the major caldesmon phosphatase of smooth muscle, purified SMP-I from turkey gizzard dephosphorylated all three phosphorylated forms of caldesmon, whereas SMP-II, -III and -IV were relatively ineffective. Kinetic analysis of dephosphorylation by chicken gizzard SMP-I of the three phosphorylated caldesmon species and calponin phosphorylated by protein kinase C indicates that calponin is a significantly better substrate of SMP-I than are any of the three phosphorylated forms of caldesmon. We therefore suggest that caldesmon phosphorylation in vivo can be maintained after kinase

  7. Endotoxin Tolerance Inhibits Lyn and c-Src Phosphorylation and Association with Toll-Like Receptor 4 but Increases Expression and Activity of Protein Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanbao; Murphy, Michael; Manavalan, Tissa T; Pattabiraman, Goutham; Qiu, Fu; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Ho, I-Cheng; Medvedev, Andrei E

    2016-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance protects the host by limiting excessive 'cytokine storm' during sepsis, but compromises the ability to counteract infections in septic shock survivors. It reprograms Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 responses by attenuating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines without suppressing anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial mediators, but the mechanisms of reprogramming remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the induction of endotoxin tolerance in human monocytes, THP-1 and MonoMac-6 cells inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated phosphorylation of Lyn, c-Src and their recruitment to TLR4, but increased total protein phosphatase (PP) activity and the expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B, PP2A, PTP nonreceptor type (PTPN) 22 and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1. Chemical PP inhibitors, okadaic acid, dephostatin and cantharidic acid markedly decreased or completely abolished LPS tolerance, indicating the importance of phosphatases in endotoxin tolerization. Overexpression of PTPN22 decreased LPS-mediated nuclear factor (NF)-x03BA;B activation, p38 phosphorylation and CXCL8 gene expression, while PTPN22 ablation upregulated LPS-induced p65 NF-x03BA;B and p38 phosphorylation and the expression of TNF-α and pro-IL-1β mRNA, indicating PTPN22 as an inhibitor of TLR4 signaling. Thus, LPS tolerance interferes with TLR4 signaling by inhibiting Lyn and c-Src phosphorylation and their recruitment to TLR4, while increasing the phosphatase activity and expression of PP2A, PTPN22, PTP1B and MKP1. PMID:26457672

  8. Mycobacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases A and B Inhibitors Augment the Bactericidal Activity of the Standard Anti-tuberculosis Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; He, Rongjun; Pinn, Michael L.; He, Yantao; Burrows, Francis; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Karakousis, Petros C.

    2016-01-01

    Novel drugs are required to shorten the duration of treatment for tuberculosis (TB) and to combat the emergence of drug resistance. One approach has been to identify and target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence factors, which promote the establishment of TB infection and pathogenesis. Mtb produces a number of virulence factors, including two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), mPTPA and mPTPB, to evade the antimicrobial functions of host macrophages. To assess the therapeutic potential of targeting the virulent Mtb PTPs, we developed highly potent and selective inhibitors of mPTPA (L335-M34) and mPTPB (L01-Z08) with drug-like properties. We tested the bactericidal activity of L335-M34 and L01-Z08 alone or together in combination with the standard antitubercular regimen of isoniazid-rifampicin-pyrazinamide (HRZ) in the guinea pig model of chronic TB infection, which faithfully recapitulates some of the key histological features of human TB lesions. Following a single dose of L335-M34 50mg/kg and L01-Z08 20 mg/kg, plasma levels were maintained at levels 10-fold greater than the biochemical IC50 for 12–24 hours. Although neither PTP inhibitor alone significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity of HRZ, dual inhibition of mPTPA and mPTPB in combination with HRZ showed modest synergy, even after 2 weeks of treatment. After 6 weeks of treatment, the degree of lung inflammation correlated with the bactericidal activity of each drug regimen. This study highlights the potential utility of targeting Mtb virulence factors, and specifically the Mtb PTPs, as a strategy for enhancing the activity of standard anti-TB treatment. PMID:27478867

  9. The Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2C5 affects seed germination, stomatal aperture, and abscisic acid-inducible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brock, Anita K; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Grefen, Laure; Lajunen, Heini M; Bethke, Gerit; Lee, Justin; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2010-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone regulating various cellular processes in plants, including stomatal opening and seed germination. Although protein phosphorylation via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) has been suggested to be important in ABA signaling, the corresponding phosphatases are largely unknown. Here, we show that a member of the Protein Phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PP2C5, is acting as a MAPK phosphatase. The PP2C5 protein colocalizes and directly interacts with stress-induced MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6, predominantly in the nucleus. Importantly, altered PP2C5 levels affect MAPK activation. Whereas Arabidopsis plants depleted of PP2C5 show an enhanced ABA-induced activation of MPK3 and MPK6, ectopic expression of PP2C5 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) resulted in the opposite effect, with the two MAPKs salicylic acid-induced protein kinase and wound-induced protein kinase not being activated any longer after ABA treatment. Moreover, depletion of PP2C5, whose gene expression itself is affected by ABA treatment, resulted in altered ABA responses. Loss-of-function mutation in PP2C5 or AP2C1, a close PP2C5 homolog, resulted in an increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions and a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype in seed germination that was most prominent in the pp2c5 ap2c1 double mutant line. In addition, the response of ABA-inducible genes such as ABI1, ABI2, RD29A, and Erd10 was reduced in the mutant plants. Thus, we suggest that PP2C5 acts as a MAPK phosphatase that positively regulates seed germination, stomatal closure, and ABA-inducible gene expression. PMID:20488890

  10. A Role for Prefrontal Calcium-Sensitive Protein Phosphatase and Kinase Activities in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runyan, Jason D.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2005-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is involved in the integration and interpretation of information for directing thoughts and planning action. Working memory is defined as the active maintenance of information in mind and is thought to lie at the core of many prefrontal functions. Although dopamine and other neurotransmitters have been implicated, the…

  11. Chemical constituents of Blumea balsamifera of Indonesia and their protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Saifudin, Azis; Tanaka, Ken; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2012-07-01

    A methanol extract of the leaves of Blumea balsamifera (L.) DC. (Asteraceae) afforded a new guaian-type sesquiterpene, epiblumeaene K (1), together with four known guaian-type sesquiterpenes (2-5), three known sesquiterpenes (6-8), and nine known flavonoids (9-17) by a combination of chromatography and preparative TLC techniques. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods and comparison with the literature data. Among the isolated compounds, a known sesquiterpene, beta-caryophyllene 8R,9R-oxide (6), exhibited a significant PTP1B inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 25.8 microM (5.62 microg/mL). PMID:22908553

  12. Visualizing and Quantitating the Spatiotemporal Regulation of Ras/ERK Signaling by Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Caunt, Christopher J; Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway is critical in determining the physiological and pathophysiological outcome of signaling. Dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (DUSPs or MKPs) are key regulators of pathway activity and may also localize ERK to distinct subcellular locations. Here we present methods largely based on the use of high content microscopy to both visualize and quantitate the subcellular distribution of activated (p-ERK) and total ERK in populations of mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice lacking DUSP5, a nuclear ERK-specific MKP. Such methods in combination with rescue experiments using adenoviral vectors encoding wild-type and mutant forms of DUSP5 have allowed us to visualize specific defects in ERK regulation in these cells thus confirming the role of this phosphatase as both a nuclear regulator of ERK activity and localization. PMID:27514808

  13. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation. PMID:27414789

  14. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  15. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 Modulates Regional Effects of Injurious Mechanical Ventilation in Rodent Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moo Suk; Edwards, Michael G.; Sergew, Amen; Riches, David W. H.; Albert, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Mechanical ventilation induces heterogeneous lung injury by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB. Mechanisms regulating regional injury and protective effects of prone positioning are unclear. Objectives: To determine the key regulators of the lung regional protective effects of prone positioning in rodent lungs exposed to injurious ventilation. Methods: Adult rats were ventilated with high (18 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] 0) or low Vt (6 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H2O; 3 h) in supine or prone position. Dorsal–caudal lung mRNA was analyzed by microarray and MAPK phosphatases (MKP)-1 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MKP-1−/− or wild-type mice were ventilated with very high (24 ml/kg; PEEP 0) or low Vt (6–7 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H2O). The MKP-1 regulator PG490-88 (MRx-108; 0.75 mg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline was administered preventilation. Injury was assessed by lung mechanics, bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts, protein content, and lung injury scoring. Immunoblotting for MKP-1, and IκBα and cytokine ELISAs were performed on lung lysates. Measurements and Main Results: Prone positioning was protective against injurious ventilation in rats. Expression profiling demonstrated MKP-1 20-fold higher in rats ventilated prone rather than supine and regional reduction in p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation. MKP-1−/− mice experienced amplified injury. PG490-88 improved static lung compliance and injury scores, reduced bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts and cytokine levels, and induced MKP-1 and IκBα. Conclusions: Injurious ventilation induces MAPK in an MKP-1–dependent fashion. Prone positioning is protective and induces MKP-1. PG490-88 induced MKP-1 and was protective against high Vt in a nuclear factor-κB–dependent manner. MKP-1 is a potential target for modulating regional effects of injurious ventilation. PMID:22582160

  16. Conservative tryptophan mutants of the protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH exhibit impaired WPD-loop function and crystallize with divanadate esters in their active sites.

    PubMed

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C; Johnson, Sean J

    2015-10-27

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  17. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity of Indonesian herbal medicines and constituents of Cinnamomum burmannii and Zingiber aromaticum.

    PubMed

    Saifudin, Azis; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    We screened water and methanol extracts of 28 Indonesian medicinal plants for their protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activities. Nine water extracts, i.e., Alstonia scholaris leaf, Blumea balsamifera, Cinnamomum burmannii, Cymbopogon nardus, Melaleuca leucadendra, Phyllanthus niruri, Piper nigrum, Syzygium aromaticum, and Sy. polyanthum, exhibited ≥70 % inhibition at 25 μg/mL, whereas 11 methanol extracts, i.e., Als. scholaris, Andrographis paniculata, B. balsamifera, Ci. burmannii, Curcuma heyneana, Glycyrrhiza glabra, M. leucadendra, Punica granatum, Rheum palmatum, Sy. polyanthum, and Z. aromaticum, exhibited ≥70 % inhibition at 25 μg/mL. Water extracts of B. balsamifera (IC50, 2.26 μg/mL) and M. leucadendra (IC50, 2.05 μg/mL), and methanol extracts of Ci. burmannii (IC50, 2.47 μg/mL), Pu. granatum (IC50, 2.40 μg/mL), and Sy. polyanthum (IC50, 1.03 μg/mL) exhibited strong inhibitory activity, which was comparable with that of the positive control, RK-682 (IC50, 2.05 μg/mL). The PTP1B inhibitory activity of the constituents of Ci. burmannii and Z. aromaticum was then evaluated. 5'-Hydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-4″,5″-methylenedioxy-1,2,3,4-dibenzo-1,3,5-cycloheptatriene (2; IC50, 29.7 μM) and trans-cinnamaldehyde (5; IC50, 57.6 μM) were the active constituents of Ci. burmannii, while humulatrien-5-ol-8-one (21; IC50, 27.7 μM), kaempferol-3,4'-di-O-methyl ether (32; IC50, 17.5 μM), and (S)-6-gingerol (33; IC50, 28.1 μM) were those of Z. aromaticum. These results suggest that these medicinal plants may contribute to the treatment and/or prevention of type II diabetes and/or obesity through PTP1B inhibition. PMID:22645080

  19. Sodium selenate, a protein phosphatase 2A activator, mitigates hyperphosphorylated tau and improves repeated mild traumatic brain injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie; Hovens, Christopher; O'Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries may result in cumulative brain damage and neurodegenerative disease. To date, there is no pharmaceutical intervention known to prevent these consequences. Hyperphosphorylated tau has been associated in this process, and protein phosphatase 2A 55 kDa regulatory B subunit (PP2A/PR55) - the major tau phosphatase - is decreased after a brain insult. Sodium selenate up-regulates PP2A/PR55 and dephosphorylates tau, and may hold promise as a treatment in the mild brain injury setting. Here we investigated sodium selenate treatment in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Rats were given three mild fluid percussion injuries or three sham-injuries, and treated with sodium selenate (1 mg/kg/day) or saline-vehicle for three months before undergoing behavioral testing, MRI, and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue. Repeated mild traumatic brain injuries increased the phosphorylation of tau and decreased PP2A/PR55, whilst inducing brain atrophy and cognitive and sensorimotor deficits. Sodium selenate treatment increased PP2A/PR55, and decreased tau phosphorylation, brain damage, and cognitive and motor impairments in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Our findings implicate PP2A/PR55 and tau as important mechanisms in the pathophysiological aftermath of repeated mild brain traumas, and support sodium selenate as a novel and translatable treatment for these common injuries. PMID:27163189

  20. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  1. Manganese modulation of MAPK pathways: effects on upstream mitogen activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs) and mitogen activated kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Patrick L.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that manganese (Mn) exposure potentiates inflammatory mediator output from activated glia; this increased output is associated with enhanced mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK: p38, ERK, and JNK) activity. We hypothesized that Mn activates MAPK by activating the kinases upstream of MAPK, i.e., MKK-3/6, MKK-1/2, and MKK-4 (responsible for activation of p38, ERK, and JNK, respectively), and/or by inhibiting a major phosphatase responsible for MAPK inactivation, MKP-1. Exposure of N9 microglia to Mn (250μM), LPS (100 ng/ml), or Mn+LPS increased MKK-3/6 and MKK-4 activity at 1 h; the effect of Mn+LPS on MKK-4 activation was greater than the rest. At 4 h, Mn, LPS, and Mn+LPS increased MKK-3/6 and MKK-1/2 phosphorylation, whereas MKK-4 was activated only by Mn and Mn+LPS. Besides activating MKK-4 via Ser257/Thr261 phosphorylation, Mn (4 h) prevented MKK-4’s phosphorylation on Ser80, which negatively regulates MKK-4 activity. Exposure to Mn or Mn+LPS (1 h) decreased both mRNA and protein expression of MKP-1, the negative MAPK regulator. In addition, we observed that at 4 h, but not at 1 h, a time point coinciding with increased MAPK activity, Mn+LPS markedly increased TNF-α , IL-6, and Cox-2 mRNA, suggesting a delayed effect. The fact that all three major groups of MKKs, MKK-1/2, MKK-3/6, and MKK-4 are activated by Mn suggests that Mn-induced activation of MAPK occurs via traditional mechanisms, which perhaps involve the MAPKs farthest upstream, MKKKs (MAP3Ks). In addition, for all MKKs, Mn-induced activation was persistent at least for 4 h, indicating a long-term effect. PMID:20589745

  2. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  3. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  4. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulates phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHP2 in bovine adrenocortical cells: phosphorylation and activation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rocchi, S; Gaillard, I; van Obberghen, E; Chambaz, E M; Vilgrain, I

    2000-01-01

    During activation of adrenocortical cells by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), tyrosine dephosphorylation of paxillin is stimulated and this correlates with protrusion of filopodial structures and a decreased number of focal adhesions. These effects are inhibited by Na(3)VO(4), a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor [Vilgrain, Chinn, Gaillard, Chambaz and Feige (1998) Biochem. J. 332, 533-540]. However, the tyrosine phosphatases involved in these processes remain to be identified. In this study, we provide evidence that the Src homology domain (SH)2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase (SHP)2, but not SHP1, is expressed in adrenocortical cells and is phosphorylated upon ACTH challenge. ACTH (10(-8) M) treatment of (32)P-labelled adrenocortical cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylated SHP2. By probing SHP2-containing immunoprecipitates with an antibody to phosphoserine we found that SHP2 was phosphorylated on serine in ACTH-treated cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, using an in vitro kinase assay, we showed that SHP2 was a target for cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Serine was identified as the only target amino acid phosphorylated in SHP2. Phosphorylation of SHP2 by PKA resulted in a dramatic stimulation of phosphatase activity measured either with insulin receptor substrate-1 or with the synthetic peptide [(32)P]poly(Glu/Tyr) as substrate. In an in-gel assay of SHP2-containing immunoprecipitates, phosphorylated in vitro by PKA or isolated from adrenocortical cells treated with 10 nM ACTH, a pronounced activation of SHP2 activity was shown. These observations clearly support the idea that a PKA-mediated signal transduction pathway contributes to SHP2 regulation in adrenocortical cells and point to SHP2 as a possible mediator of the effects of ACTH. PMID:11085942

  5. 67-kDa laminin receptor-dependent protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation elicits melanoma-specific antitumor activity overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Shuntaro; Huang, Yuhui; Umeda, Daisuke; Yamada, Shuhei; Yamashita, Shuya; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Kim, Yoonhee; Murata, Motoki; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2014-11-21

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway has been identified as a major, druggable regulator of melanoma. Mutational activation of BRAF is the most prevalent genetic alteration in human melanoma, resulting in constitutive melanoma hyperproliferation. A selective BRAF inhibitor showed remarkable clinical activity in patients with mutated BRAF. Unfortunately, most patients acquire resistance to the BRAF inhibitor, highlighting the urgent need for new melanoma treatment strategies. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) inhibits cell proliferation independently of BRAF inhibitor sensitivity, suggesting that increased understanding of the anti-melanoma activity of EGCG may provide a novel therapeutic target. Here, by performing functional genetic screening, we identified protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a critical factor in the suppression of melanoma cell proliferation. We demonstrated that tumor-overexpressed 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR) activates PP2A through adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway eliciting inhibitions of oncoproteins and activation of tumor suppressor Merlin. Activating 67LR/PP2A pathway leading to melanoma-specific mTOR inhibition shows strong synergy with the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 in the drug-resistant melanoma. Moreover, SET, a potent inhibitor of PP2A, is overexpressed on malignant melanoma. Silencing of SET enhances 67LR/PP2A signaling. Collectively, activation of 67LR/PP2A signaling may thus be a novel rational strategy for melanoma-specific treatment. PMID:25294877

  6. Theophylline Represses IL-8 Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Independently of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition. Novel Role as a Protein Phosphatase 2A Activator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijeshkumar S; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Oliver, Brian G; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-06-01

    Theophylline is an old drug experiencing a renaissance owing to its beneficial antiinflammatory effects in chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multiple modes of antiinflammatory action have been reported, including inhibition of the enzymes that degrade cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Using primary cultures of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, we recently revealed that PDE4 inhibitors can potentiate the antiinflammatory action of β2-agonists by augmenting cAMP-dependent expression of the phosphatase that deactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-MAPK phosphatase (MKP)-1. Therefore, the aim of this study was to address whether theophylline repressed cytokine production in a similar, PDE-dependent, MKP-1-mediated manner. Notably, theophylline did not potentiate cAMP release from ASM cells treated with the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol. Moreover, theophylline (0.1-10 μM) did not increase formoterol-induced MKP-1 messenger RNA expression nor protein up-regulation, consistent with the lack of cAMP generation. However, theophylline (at 10 μM) was antiinflammatory and repressed secretion of the neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine IL-8, which is produced in response to TNF-α. Because theophylline's effects were independent of PDE4 inhibition or antiinflammatory MKP-1, we then wished to elucidate the novel mechanisms responsible. We investigated the impact of theophylline on protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, and show that theophylline increases TNF-α-induced PP2A activity in ASM cells. Confirmatory results were obtained in A549 lung epithelial cells. PP2A activators have beneficial effects in ex vivo and in vivo models of respiratory disease. Thus, our study is the first to link theophylline with PP2A activation as a novel mechanism to control respiratory inflammation. PMID:26574643

  7. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1). PMID:17933343

  8. Calyculin A Reveals Serine/Threonine Phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 1 as a Regulatory Nodal Point in Canonical Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Signaling of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zgheib, Carlos; Zouein, Fouad A.; Chidiac, Rony; Kurdi, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is initiated by stimuli acting on endothelial cells. A clinical feature of vascular inflammation is increased circulating interleukin 6 (IL-6) type cytokines such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), but their role in vascular inflammation is not fully defined. IL-6 type cytokines activate transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which has a key role in inflammation and the innate immune response. Canonical STAT3 gene induction is due to phosphorylation of (1) Y705, leading to STAT3 dimerization and DNA binding and (2) S727, enhancing homodimerization and DNA binding by recruiting p300/CBP. We asked whether enhancing S727 STAT3 phosphorylation using the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor, calyculin A, would enhance LIF-induced gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Cotreatment with calyculin A and LIF markedly increased STAT3 S727 phosphorylation, without affecting the increase in the nuclear fraction of STAT3 phosphorylated on Y705. PP2A inhibitors, okadaic acid and fostriecin, did not enhance STAT3 S727 phosphorylation. Surprisingly, calyculin A eliminated LIF-induced gene expression: (1) calyculin A reduced binding of nuclear extracts to a STAT3 consensus site, thereby reducing the overall level of binding observed with LIF; and (2) calyculin A caused p300/CBP phosphorylation, thus resulting in reduced acetylation activity and degradation. Together, these findings reveal a pivotal role of a protein serine/threonine phosphatases that is likely PP1 in HMEC in controlling STAT3 transcriptional activity. PMID:22142222

  9. Arabidopsis ABA-Activated Kinase MAPKKK18 is Regulated by Protein Phosphatase 2C ABI1 and the Ubiquitin–Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mitula, Filip; Tajdel, Malgorzata; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Kulik, Anna; Babula-Skowrońska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal; Dobrowolska, Grazyna; Sadowski, Jan; Ludwików, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events play an important role in the transmission of the ABA signal. Although SnRK2 [sucrose non-fermenting1-related kinase2] protein kinases and group A protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2C)-type phosphatases constitute the core ABA pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are also involved in plant response to ABA. However, little is known about the interplay between MAPKs and PP2Cs or SnRK2 in the regulation of ABA pathways. In this study, an effort was made to elucidate the role of MAP kinase kinase kinase18 (MKKK18) in relation to ABA signaling and response. The MKKK18 knockout lines showed more vigorous root growth, decreased abaxial stomatal index and increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions, compared with the control wild-type Columbia line. In addition to transcriptional regulation of the MKKK18 promoter by ABA, we demonstrated using in vitro and in vivo kinase assays that the kinase activity of MKKK18 was regulated by ABA. Analysis of the cellular localization of MKKK18 showed that the active kinase was targeted specifically to the nucleus. Notably, we identified abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABI1) PP2C as a MKKK18-interacting protein, and demonstrated that ABI1 inhibited its activity. Using a cell-free degradation assay, we also established that MKKK18 was unstable and was degraded by the proteasome pathway. The rate of MKKK18 degradation was delayed in the ABI1 knockout line. Overall, we provide evidence that ABI1 regulates the activity and promotes proteasomal degradation of MKKK18. PMID:26443375

  10. Notch1 Receptor Regulates AKT Protein Activation Loop (Thr308) Dephosphorylation through Modulation of the PP2A Phosphatase in Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)-null T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Eric C.; Orr, Steven M.; Larson Gedman, Amanda; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Matherly, Larry H.

    2013-01-01

    Notch1 activating mutations occur in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases and increase expression of Notch1 target genes, some of which activate AKT. HES1 transcriptionally silences phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in AKT activation, which is reversed by Notch1 inhibition with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Mutational loss of PTEN is frequent in T-ALL and promotes resistance to GSIs due to AKT activation. GSI treatments increased AKT-Thr308 phosphorylation and signaling in PTEN-deficient, GSI-resistant T-ALL cell lines (Jurkat, CCRF-CEM, and MOLT3), suggesting that Notch1 represses AKT independent of its PTEN transcriptional effects. AKT-Thr308 phosphorylation and downstream signaling were also increased by knocking down Notch1 in Jurkat (N1KD) cells. This was blocked by treatment with the AKT inhibitor perifosine. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and the protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor okadaic acid both impacted AKT-Thr308 phosphorylation to a greater extent in nontargeted control than N1KD cells, suggesting decreased dephosphorylation of AKT-Thr308 by PP2A in the latter. Phosphorylations of AMP-activated protein kinaseα (AMPKα)-Thr172 and p70S6K-Thr389, both PP2A substrates, were also increased in both N1KD and GSI-treated cells and responded to okadaic acid treatment. A transcriptional regulatory mechanism was implied because ectopic expression of dominant-negative mastermind-like protein 1 increased and wild-type HES1 decreased phosphorylation of these PP2A targets. This was independent of changes in PP2A subunit levels or in vitro PP2A activity, but was accompanied by decreased association of PP2A with AKT in N1KD cells. These results suggest that Notch1 can regulate PP2A dephosphorylation of critical cellular regulators including AKT, AMPKα, and p70S6K. PMID:23788636

  11. Structural and functional basis of protein phosphatase 5 substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Jasmeen; Dunn, Diana M.; Woodford, Mark R.; Mariotti, Laura; Schulman, Jacqualyn; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates hormone- and stress-induced cellular signaling by association with the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). PP5-mediated dephosphorylation of the cochaperone Cdc37 is essential for activation of Hsp90-dependent kinases. However, the details of this mechanism remain unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a Cdc37 phosphomimetic peptide bound to the catalytic domain of PP5. The structure reveals PP5 utilization of conserved elements of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) structure to bind substrate and provides a template for many PPP–substrate interactions. Our data show that, despite a highly conserved structure, elements of substrate specificity are determined within the phosphatase catalytic domain itself. Structure-based mutations in vivo reveal that PP5-mediated dephosphorylation is required for kinase and steroid hormone receptor release from the chaperone complex. Finally, our data show that hyper- or hypoactivity of PP5 mutants increases Hsp90 binding to its inhibitor, suggesting a mechanism to enhance the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors by regulation of PP5 activity in tumors. PMID:27466404

  12. Dual-specificity Phosphatase 1 Deficiency Induces Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma Progression via Activation of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan; Zhou, Jing-Yi; Zhao, Li-Jun; Gao, Bao-Rong; Wan, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previously, we reported that dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) was differentially expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEA). However, the role of DUSP1 in EEA progression and the relationship between DUSP1 and medroxyprogesterone (MPA) are still unclear. Methods: The expression of DUSP1 in EEA specimens was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of DUSP1 on cell proliferation was analyzed by Cell Counting Kit 8 and colony formation assay, and cell migration was analyzed by transwell assay. MPA-induced DUSP1 expression in EEA cells was measured by Western blot. Results: DUSP1 expression was deficient in advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, high-grade and myometrial invasive EEA. In EEA cell lines (Hec1A, Hec1B, RL952, and Ishikawa), the DUSP1 expression was substantially higher in Ishikawa cells than in other cell lines (P < 0.05). Knockdown of DUSP1 promoted Ishikawa cells proliferation, migration, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathway. MPA-induced DUSP1 expression and inhibited MAPK/Erk pathway in Ishikawa cells. Conclusions: Our data suggest that DUSP1 deficiency promotes EEA progression via MAPK/Erk pathway, which may be reversed by MPA, suggesting that DUSP1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of EEA. PMID:27174322

  13. Plumbagin, Vitamin K3 Analogue, Suppresses STAT3 Activation Pathway through Induction of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, SHP-1: Potential Role in Chemosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Sandur, Santosh K.; Pandey, Manoj K; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    The activation of STAT3 has been linked with carcinogenesis through survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis of tumor cells. Agents that can suppress STAT3 activation have potential not only for prevention but also for treatment of cancer. In the present report, we investigated whether plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), an analogue of Vitamin K and isolated from chitrak (Plumbago zeylanica), an Ayurvedic medicinal plant, can modulate the STAT3 pathway. We found that plumbagin inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-inducible STAT3 phosphorylation in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and this correlated with the inhibition of c-Src, JAK1, and JAK2 activation. Vanadate, however, reversed the plumbagin-induced downregulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, we found that plumbagin induced the expression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1; and silencing of the SHP-1 abolished the effect of plumbagin. This agent also downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated cyclin D1, Bcl-xL, and VEGF, activated caspase-3, induced PARP cleavage, and increased the sub-G1 population of MM cells. Consistent with these results, overexpression of constitutive active STAT3 significantly reduced the plumbagin-induced apoptosis. When compared with AG490, a rationally designed STAT3/JAK2 inhibitor, plumbagin was found more potent in suppressing proliferation of cells. Plumbagin also significantly potentiated the apoptotic effects of thalidomide and bortezomib in MM cells. Overall, these results suggest that the plumbagin inhibits STAT3 activation pathway through induction of SHP-1 and this may mediate sensitization of STAT3 overexpressing cancers to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:20068065

  14. Induction of a tumor-associated activating mutation in protein tyrosine phosphatase Ptpn11 (Shp2) enhances mitochondrial metabolism, leading to oxidative stress and senescence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Shanhu; Hsu, Peter; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2013-09-01

    Activating mutations in Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in diverse cell signaling pathways, are associated with pediatric leukemias and solid tumors. However, the pathogenic effects of these mutations have not been fully characterized. Here, we report that induction of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation, the most common and active Ptpn11 mutation found in leukemias and solid tumors, in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in proliferative arrest and premature senescence. As a result, apoptosis was markedly increased. These cellular responses were accompanied and mediated by up-regulation of p53 and p21. Moreover, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, were elevated in Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells. Since Shp2 is also distributed to the mitochondria (in addition to the cytosol), the impact of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation on mitochondrial function was analyzed. These analyses revealed that oxygen consumption of Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells and the respiratory function of Ptpn11(E76K/+) mitochondria were significantly increased. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of mitochondrial Stat3, one of the substrates of Shp2 phosphatase, was greatly decreased in the mutant cells with the activating mutation Ptpn11(E76K/+). This study provides novel insights into the initial effects of tumor-associated Ptpn11 mutations. PMID:23884424

  15. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-04-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis.

  16. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-01-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27101899

  17. Viewing serine/threonine protein phosphatases through the eyes of drug designers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengmeng; Yogesha, S. D.; Mayfield, Joshua E.; Gill, Gordon N.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, as the counterpart to protein kinases, are essential for homeostatic balance of cell signaling. Small chemical compounds that modulate the specific activity of phosphatases can be powerful tools to elucidate the biological functions of these enzymes. More importantly, many phosphatases are central players in the development of pathological pathways where inactivation can reverse or delay the onset of human diseases. Therefore, potent inhibitors for such phosphatases can be of great therapeutic benefit. In contrast to the seemingly identical enzymatic mechanism and structural characterization of eukaryotic protein kinases, protein phosphatases evolved from diverse ancestors, resulting in different domain architectures, reaction mechanisms and active site properties. In this review, we will discuss for each family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, their involvement in biological process and corresponding strategies for small chemical intervention. Recent advances in modern drug discovery technologies have markedly facilitated the identification of selective inhibitors for some members of the phosphatase family. Furthermore, the rapid growth in knowledge about structure-activity relationships related to possible new drug targets has aided the discovery of natural product inhibitors for phosphatase family. This review summarizes the current state of investigation of the small molecules that regulate the function of serine/threonine phosphatases, the challenges presented and also strategies to overcome these obstacles. PMID:23937612

  18. Type 2C protein phosphatase Ptc6 participates in activation of the Slt2-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from an equilibrium between the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important aspect of signal transduction that regulate many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes 40 PPases, including seven members of the protein phosphatase 2C subfamily (PTC1 to PTC7). In contrast to other PPases, the cellular roles of PTCs have not been investigated in detail. Here, we sought to determine the cellular role of PTC6 in S. cerevisiae with disruption of PTC genes. We found that cells with Δptc6 disruption were tolerant to the cell wall-damaging agents Congo red (CR) and calcofluor white (CFW); however, cells with simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 were very sensitive to these agents. Thus, simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 gave a synergistic response to cell wall damaging agents. The level of phosphorylated Slt2 increased significantly after CR treatment in Δptc1 cells and more so in Δptc1Δptc6 cells; therefore, deletion of PTC6 enhanced Slt2 phosphorylation in the Δptc1 disruptant. The level of transcription of KDX1 upon exposure to CR increased to a greater extent in the Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant than the Δptc1 single disruptant. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant cells showed normal vacuole formation under standard growth conditions, but fragmented vacuoles were present in the presence of CR or CFW. Our analyses indicate that S. cerevisiae PTC6 participates in the negative regulation of Slt2 phosphorylation and vacuole morphogenesis under cell wall stress conditions. PMID:25449759

  19. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, A M; Zapella, P D; Andrioli, L P; Campanhã, R B; Fiorini, L C; Etchebehere, L C; da-Costa-Maia, J C; Terenzi, H F

    1999-07-01

    Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs) into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively). Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism. PMID:10454741

  20. Modulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity alters the subunit assembly in native N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Ferrani-Kile, Karima; Leslie, Steven W

    2005-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is crucial for development and neuroplasticity as well as excitotoxicity. The biochemical basis of the disassembly and reassembly of NMDA receptor has never been reported. Using coimmunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry, we show that inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases triggers disassembly of NR1, NR2A, and NR2B in cortical NMDA receptor complexes. Furthermore, the disassembly of the NMDA receptor subunits is immediate, dose-dependent, and reversible and seems to occur through mechanisms linked to Src kinases. Together, these results define a novel role for tyrosine phosphatases in the complex mechanism of NMDA receptor regulation. PMID:15837820

  1. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR promotes R7 photoreceptor axon targeting by a phosphatase-independent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) control many aspects of nervous system development. At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), regulation of synapse growth and maturation by the RPTP LAR depends on catalytic phosphatase activity and on the extracellular ligands Syndecan and Dally-like. We show here that the function of LAR in controlling R7 photoreceptor axon targeting in the visual system differs in several respects. The extracellular domain of LAR important for this process is distinct from the domains known to bind Syndecan and Dally-like, suggesting the involvement of a different ligand. R7 targeting does not require LAR phosphatase activity, but instead depends on the phosphatase activity of another RPTP, PTP69D. In addition, a mutation that prevents dimerization of the intracellular domain of LAR interferes with its ability to promote R7 targeting, although it does not disrupt phosphatase activity or neuromuscular synapse growth. We propose that LAR function in R7 is independent of its phosphatase activity, but requires structural features that allow dimerization and may promote the assembly of downstream effectors. PMID:19889974

  2. Overexpression of AtPTPA in Arabidopsis increases protein phosphatase 2A activity by promoting holoenzyme formation and ABA negatively affects holoenzyme formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zhu, Xunlu; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    AtPTPA is a critical regulator for the holoenzyme assembling of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Arabidopsis. Characterization of AtPTPA improves our understanding of the function and regulation of PP2A in eukaryotes. Further analysis of AtPTPA-overexpressing plants indicates that AtPTPA increases PP2A activity by promoting PP2A's AC dimer formation, thereby holoenzyme assembling. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) reduces PP2A enzyme activity by negatively affects PP2A's AC dimer formation. Therefore, AtPTPA is a positive factor that promotes PP2A holoenzyme assembly, and ABA is a negative factor that prevents PP2A holoenzyme assembly. PMID:26633567

  3. Ptc1, a type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatase, inactivates the HOG pathway by dephosphorylating the mitogen-activated protein kinase Hog1.

    PubMed

    Warmka, J; Hanneman, J; Lee, J; Amin, D; Ota, I

    2001-01-01

    The HOG (high-osmolarity glycerol) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates the osmotic stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatases (PTCs), Ptc1, Ptc2, and Ptc3, have been isolated as negative regulators of this pathway. Previously, multicopy expression of PTC1 and PTC3 was shown to suppress lethality of the sln1Delta strain due to hyperactivation of the HOG pathway. In this work, we show that PTC2 also suppresses sln1Delta lethality. Furthermore, the phosphatase activity of these PTCs was needed for suppression, as mutation of a conserved Asp residue, likely to coordinate a metal ion, inactivated PTCs. Further analysis of Ptc1 function in vivo showed that it inactivates the MAPK, Hog1, but not the MEK, Pbs2. In the wild type, Hog1 kinase activity increased transiently, approximately 12-fold in response to osmotic stress, while overexpression of PTC1 limited activation to approximately 3-fold. In contrast, overexpression of PTC1 did not inhibit phosphorylation of Hog1 Tyr in the phosphorylation lip, suggesting that Ptc1 does not act on Pbs2. Deletion of PTC1 also strongly affected Hog1, leading to high basal Hog1 activity and sustained Hog1 activity in response to osmotic stress, the latter being consistent with a role for Ptc1 in adaptation. In vitro, Ptc1 but not the metal binding site mutant, Ptc1D58N, inactivated Hog1 by dephosphorylating the phosphothreonine but not the phosphotyrosine residue in the phosphorylation lip. Consistent with its role as a negative regulator of Hog1, which accumulates in the nucleus upon activation, Ptc1 was found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Thus, one function of Ptc1 is to inactivate Hog1. PMID:11113180

  4. cAMP-stimulated Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity Associated with Muscle A Kinase-anchoring Protein (mAKAP) Signaling Complexes Inhibits the Phosphorylation and Activity of the cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterase PDE4D3*

    PubMed Central

    Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Bauman, Andrea; Mayer, Nicole; Henson, Edward; Heredia, Lorena; Ahn, Jung; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of the second messenger cAMP is tightly controlled in cells by the activity of phosphodiesterases. We have previously described how the protein kinase A-anchoring protein mAKAP serves as a scaffold for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA and the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 in cardiac myocytes. PKA and PDE4D3 constitute a negative feedback loop whereby PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D3 attenuate local cAMP levels. We now show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associated with mAKAP complexes is responsible for reversing the activation of PDE4D3 by catalyzing the dephosphorylation of PDE4D3 serine residue 54. Mapping studies reveal that a C-terminal mAKAP domain (residues 2085–2319) binds PP2A. Binding to mAKAP is required for PP2A function, such that deletion of the C-terminal domain enhances both base-line and forskolin-stimulated PDE4D3 activity. Interestingly, PP2A holoenzyme associated with mAKAP complexes in the heart contains the PP2A targeting subunit B56δ. Like PDE4D3, B56δ is a PKA substrate, and PKA phosphorylation of mAKAP-bound B56δ enhances phosphatase activity 2-fold in the complex. Accordingly, expression of a B56δ mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PKA results in increased PDE4D3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2A associated with mAKAP complexes promotes PDE4D3 dephosphorylation, serving both to inhibit PDE4D3 in unstimulated cells and also to mediate a cAMP-induced positive feedback loop following adenylyl cyclase activation and B56δ phosphorylation. In general, PKA·PP2A·mAKAP complexes exemplify how protein kinases and phosphatases may participate in molecular signaling complexes to dynamically regulate localized intracellular signaling. PMID:20106966

  5. cAMP-stimulated protein phosphatase 2A activity associated with muscle A kinase-anchoring protein (mAKAP) signaling complexes inhibits the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3.

    PubMed

    Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L; Bauman, Andrea; Mayer, Nicole; Henson, Edward; Heredia, Lorena; Ahn, Jung; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C; Kapiloff, Michael S

    2010-04-01

    The concentration of the second messenger cAMP is tightly controlled in cells by the activity of phosphodiesterases. We have previously described how the protein kinase A-anchoring protein mAKAP serves as a scaffold for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA and the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 in cardiac myocytes. PKA and PDE4D3 constitute a negative feedback loop whereby PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D3 attenuate local cAMP levels. We now show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associated with mAKAP complexes is responsible for reversing the activation of PDE4D3 by catalyzing the dephosphorylation of PDE4D3 serine residue 54. Mapping studies reveal that a C-terminal mAKAP domain (residues 2085-2319) binds PP2A. Binding to mAKAP is required for PP2A function, such that deletion of the C-terminal domain enhances both base-line and forskolin-stimulated PDE4D3 activity. Interestingly, PP2A holoenzyme associated with mAKAP complexes in the heart contains the PP2A targeting subunit B56delta. Like PDE4D3, B56delta is a PKA substrate, and PKA phosphorylation of mAKAP-bound B56delta enhances phosphatase activity 2-fold in the complex. Accordingly, expression of a B56delta mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PKA results in increased PDE4D3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2A associated with mAKAP complexes promotes PDE4D3 dephosphorylation, serving both to inhibit PDE4D3 in unstimulated cells and also to mediate a cAMP-induced positive feedback loop following adenylyl cyclase activation and B56delta phosphorylation. In general, PKA.PP2A.mAKAP complexes exemplify how protein kinases and phosphatases may participate in molecular signaling complexes to dynamically regulate localized intracellular signaling. PMID:20106966

  6. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  7. Assessing the Biological Activity of the Glucan Phosphatase Laforin.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Raththagala, Madushi; Gentry, Mathew S; Sanz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered family of enzymes that dephosphorylate either starch or glycogen and are essential for proper starch metabolism in plants and glycogen metabolism in humans. Mutations in the gene encoding the only human glucan phosphatase, laforin, result in the fatal, neurodegenerative, epilepsy known as Lafora disease. Here, we describe phosphatase assays to assess both generic laforin phosphatase activity and laforin's unique glycogen phosphatase activity. PMID:27514803

  8. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  9. Phosphatase activities as biosignatures of extant life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Itoh, Y.; Edazawa, Y.; Moroi, A.; Takano, Y.

    It has been recognized that terrestrial biosphere expands to such extreme environments as deep subsurface lithosphere high temperature hot springs and stratosphere Possible extraterrestrial biospheres in Mars Europa and Titan are being discussed Many biosignatures or biomarkers have been proposed to detect microbial activities in such extreme environments Phosphate esters are essential for the terrestrial life since they are constituents of nucleic acids and cell mebranes Thus all the terrestrial organisms have phosphatases that are enzymes catalyzing hydrolysis of phosphate esters We analyzed phosphatase activities in the samples obtained in extreme environments such as submarine hydrothermal systems and discussed whether they can be used as biosignatures for extant life Core samples and chimney samples were collected at the Suiyo Seamount Izu-Bonin Arc the Pacific Ocean in 2001 and 2002 and in South Mariana hydrothermal systems the Pacific Oceanas in 2003 both in a part of the Archaean Park Project Phosphatase activity in solid rock samples was measured spectrometrically by using 25 mM p-nitrophenyl phosphate pH 8 0 or pH 6 5 as a substrate as follows Pulverized samples were incuvated with substrate solution for an hour and then production rate of p-nitrophenol was calculated with absorbance at 410 nm Phosphatase activity in extracts was measured fluorometrically by using 4-methylumberyferryl phosphate as a substrate Concentration of amino acids and their enantiomeric ratio were determined by HPLC after HF digestion of the

  10. New protein kinase and protein phosphatase families mediate signal transduction in bacterial catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Galinier, A; Kravanja, M; Engelmann, R; Hengstenberg, W; Kilhoffer, M C; Deutscher, J; Haiech, J

    1998-02-17

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is the prototype of a signal transduction mechanism. In enteric bacteria, cAMP was considered to be the second messenger in CCR by playing a role reminiscent of its actions in eukaryotic cells. However, recent results suggest that CCR in Escherichia coli is mediated mainly by an inducer exclusion mechanism. In many Gram-positive bacteria, CCR is triggered by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which activates HPr kinase, presumed to be one of the most ancient serine protein kinases. We here report cloning of the Bacillus subtilis hprK and hprP genes and characterization of the encoded HPr kinase and P-Ser-HPr phosphatase. P-Ser-HPr phosphatase forms a new family of phosphatases together with bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatase, yeast glycerol-3-phosphatase, and 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase whereas HPr kinase represents a new family of protein kinases on its own. It does not contain the domain structure typical for eukaryotic protein kinases. Although up to now the HPr modifying/demodifying enzymes were thought to exist only in Gram-positive bacteria, a sequence comparison revealed that they also are present in several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. PMID:9465101

  11. Nitric oxide modulates chromatin folding in human endothelial cells via protein phosphatase 2A activation and class II histone deacetylases nuclear shuttling.

    PubMed

    Illi, Barbara; Dello Russo, Claudio; Colussi, Claudia; Rosati, Jessica; Pallaoro, Michele; Spallotta, Francesco; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Ragone, Gianluca; Martelli, Fabio; Biglioli, Paolo; Steinkuhler, Christian; Gallinari, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates important endothelial cell (EC) functions and gene expression by a molecular mechanism which is still poorly characterized. Here we show that in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) NO inhibited serum-induced histone acetylation and enhanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. By immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses it was found that NO induced class II HDAC4 and 5 nuclear shuttling and that class II HDACs selective inhibitor MC1568 rescued serum-dependent histone acetylation above control level in NO-treated HUVECs. In contrast, class I HDACs inhibitor MS27-275 had no effect, indicating a specific role for class II HDACs in NO-dependent histone deacetylation. In addition, it was found that NO ability to induce HDAC4 and HDAC5 nuclear shuttling involved the activation of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In fact, HDAC4 nuclear translocation was impaired in ECs expressing small-t antigen and exposed to NO. Finally, in cells engineered to express a HDAC4-Flag fusion protein, NO induced the formation of a macromolecular complex including HDAC4, HDAC3, HDAC5, and an active PP2A. The present results show that NO-dependent PP2A activation plays a key role in class II HDACs nuclear translocation. PMID:17975112

  12. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  13. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-09-13

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:7522329

  14. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  15. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  16. Characterization of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tapia, Ana Lilia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Espíritu-Gordillo, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of phosphatases that has not been broadly studied in protozoan parasites. In humans, PRLs are involved in metastatic cancer, the promotion of cell migration and invasion. PTPs have been increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. We characterized the only putative protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (PTP EhPRL) in the eukaryotic human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we reported that the EhPRL protein possessed the classical HCX5R catalytic motif of PTPs and the CAAX box characteristic of the PRL family and exhibited 31-32% homology with the three human PRL isoforms. In amebae, the protein was expressed at low but detectable levels. The recombinant protein (rEhPRL) had enzymatic activity with the 3-o-methyl fluorescein phosphate (OMFP) substrate; this enzymatic activity was inhibited by the PTP inhibitor o-vanadate. Using immunofluorescence we showed that native EhPRL was localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When the trophozoites interacted with collagen, EhPRL relocalized over time to vesicle-like structures. Interaction with fibronectin increased the presence of the enzyme in the cytoplasm. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that EhPRL mRNA expression was upregulated when the trophozoites interacted with collagen but not with fibronectin. Trophozoites recovered from amoebic liver abscesses showed higher EhPRL mRNA expression levels than normal trophozoites. These results strongly suggest that EhPRL may play an important role in the biology and adaptive response of the parasite to the host environment during amoebic liver abscess development, thereby participating in the pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26431820

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A: a highly regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Goris, J

    2001-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) comprises a family of serine/threonine phosphatases, minimally containing a well conserved catalytic subunit, the activity of which is highly regulated. Regulation is accomplished mainly by members of a family of regulatory subunits, which determine the substrate specificity, (sub)cellular localization and catalytic activity of the PP2A holoenzymes. Moreover, the catalytic subunit is subject to two types of post-translational modification, phosphorylation and methylation, which are also thought to be important regulatory devices. The regulatory ability of PTPA (PTPase activator), originally identified as a protein stimulating the phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity of PP2A, will also be discussed, alongside the other regulatory inputs. The use of specific PP2A inhibitors and molecular genetics in yeast, Drosophila and mice has revealed roles for PP2A in cell cycle regulation, cell morphology and development. PP2A also plays a prominent role in the regulation of specific signal transduction cascades, as witnessed by its presence in a number of macromolecular signalling modules, where it is often found in association with other phosphatases and kinases. Additionally, PP2A interacts with a substantial number of other cellular and viral proteins, which are PP2A substrates, target PP2A to different subcellular compartments or affect enzyme activity. Finally, the de-regulation of PP2A in some specific pathologies will be touched upon. PMID:11171037

  18. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has a potential role in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells via effecting human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity.

    PubMed

    Avci, Cigir Biray; Sahin, Fahri; Gunduz, Cumhur; Selvi, Nur; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Oktem, Gulperi; Topcuoglu, Nejat; Saydam, Guray

    2007-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most effective components of propolis which is collected by honey bees. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of CAPE in the CCRF-CEM cell line and to clarify the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) activity as an underlining mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis. Trypan blue dye exclusion test and XTT methods were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and ELISA based oligonucleotide detection, which can be seen during apoptosis, was used to determine apoptosis. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide dye technique was also used to evaluate apoptosis. The cytotoxic effect of CAPE was detected in a dose and time dependent manner with the IC(50) of 1 muM. ELISA and acridine orange/ethidium bromide methods have shown remarkable apoptosis at 48th hour in CAPE treated cells. To investigate the role of PP2A in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells, we performed combination studies with CAPE and, Calyculin A and Okadaic acid, which are very well known inhibitors of PP2A, in IC(20) of inhibitors and IC(50) of CAPE. Combination studies revealed synergistic effect of both drugs by concomitant use. Western blot analyses of PP2A catalytic and regulatory subunits showed down-regulation of expression of PP2A catalytic subunit in CAPE treated cells at 48th hour. Since, PP2A is important in hTERT (telomerase catalytic subunit) activation and deactivation, we also performed hTERT activity in CAPE treated cells simultaneously. Treating cells with IC(50) of CAPE for 96 h with the intervals of 24 h showed marked reduction of hTERT activity. The reduction of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells was more prominent in the initial 48 h. The variation of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells may be the reason for the protein phosphatase interaction that occurred after treatment with CAPE. PMID:17852432

  20. Fusarochromanone-induced reactive oxygen species results in activation of JNK cascade and cell death by inhibiting protein phosphatases 2A and 5

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Barzegar, Mansoureh; Chen, Xin; Wu, Yang; Shang, Chaowei; Mahdavian, Elahe; Salvatore, Brian A.; Jiang, Shanxiang; Huang, Shile

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that fusarochromanone (FC101), a mycotoxin, is cytotoxic in a variety of cell lines. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxicity remains elusive. Here we found that FC101 induced cell death in COS7 and HEK293 cells in part by activating JNK pathway. This is evidenced by the findings that inhibition of JNK with SP600125 or expression of dominant negative c-Jun partially prevented FC101-induced cell death. Furthermore, we observed that FC101-activated JNK pathway was attributed to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger and antioxidant, suppressed FC101-induced activation of JNK and cell death. Moreover, we noticed that FC101 inhibited the serine/threonine protein phosphatases 2A (PP2A) and 5 (PP5) in the cells, which was abrogated by NAC. Overexpression of PP2A or PP5 partially prevented FC101-induced activation of JNK and cell death. The results indicate that FC101-induced ROS inhibits PP2A and PP5, leading to activation of JNK pathway and consequently resulting in cell death. PMID:26517353

  1. Okadaic acid-sensitive protein phosphatases constrain phrenic long-term facilitation after sustained hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Julia E R; Satriotomo, Irawan; Baker-Herman, Tracy L; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-03-12

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a serotonin-dependent form of pattern-sensitive respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia (IH), but not sustained hypoxia (SH). The mechanism(s) underlying pLTF pattern sensitivity are unknown. SH and IH may differentially regulate serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity, thereby inhibiting relevant protein phosphatases uniquely during IH and conferring pattern sensitivity to pLTF. We hypothesized that spinal protein phosphatase inhibition would relieve this braking action of protein phosphatases, thereby revealing pLTF after SH. Anesthetized rats received intrathecal (C4) okadaic acid (25 nm) before SH (25 min, 11% O(2)). Unlike (vehicle) control rats, SH induced a significant pLTF in okadaic acid-treated rats that was indistinguishable from rats exposed to IH (three 5 min episodes, 11% O(2)). IH and SH with okadaic acid may elicit pLTF by similar, serotonin-dependent mechanisms, because intravenous methysergide blocks pLTF in rats receiving IH or okadaic acid plus SH. Okadaic acid did not alter IH-induced pLTF. In summary, pattern sensitivity in pLTF may reflect differential regulation of okadaic acid-sensitive serine/threonine phosphatases; presumably, these phosphatases are less active during/after IH versus SH. The specific okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase(s) constraining pLTF and their spatiotemporal dynamics during and/or after IH and SH remain to be determined. PMID:18337426

  2. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae. PMID:16350755

  3. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests. PMID:24823652

  4. Cellular phosphatases facilitate combinatorial processing of receptor-activated signals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Dua, Raina; Srikanth, Ravichandran; Jayaswal, Shilpi; Siddiqui, Zaved; Rao, Kanury VS

    2008-01-01

    Background Although reciprocal regulation of protein phosphorylation represents a key aspect of signal transduction, a larger perspective on how these various interactions integrate to contribute towards signal processing is presently unclear. For example, a key unanswered question is that of how phosphatase-mediated regulation of phosphorylation at the individual nodes of the signaling network translates into modulation of the net signal output and, thereby, the cellular phenotypic response. Results To address the above question we, in the present study, examined the dynamics of signaling from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) under conditions where individual cellular phosphatases were selectively depleted by siRNA. Results from such experiments revealed a highly enmeshed structure for the signaling network where each signaling node was linked to multiple phosphatases on the one hand, and each phosphatase to several nodes on the other. This resulted in a configuration where individual signaling intermediates could be influenced by a spectrum of regulatory phosphatases, but with the composition of the spectrum differing from one intermediate to another. Consequently, each node differentially experienced perturbations in phosphatase activity, yielding a unique fingerprint of nodal signals characteristic to that perturbation. This heterogeneity in nodal experiences, to a given perturbation, led to combinatorial manipulation of the corresponding signaling axes for the downstream transcription factors. Conclusion Our cumulative results reveal that it is the tight integration of phosphatases into the signaling network that provides the plasticity by which perturbation-specific information can be transmitted in the form of a multivariate output to the downstream transcription factor network. This output in turn specifies a context-defined response, when translated into the resulting gene expression profile. PMID:18798986

  5. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-PEST and β8 Integrin Regulate Spatiotemporal Patterns of RhoGDI1 Activation in Migrating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Shin; Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahiman; Chaki, Sankar P.; Reyes, Steve B.; Zheng, Yanhua; Lu, Zhimin; Paidassi, Helena; DerMardirossian, Celine; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Rivera, Gonzalo M.

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell motility is essential for normal development and physiology, although how motile cells spatiotemporally activate signaling events remains largely unknown. Here, we have characterized an adhesion and signaling unit comprised of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST and the extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion receptor β8 integrin that plays essential roles in directional cell motility. β8 integrin and PTP-PEST form protein complexes at the leading edge of migrating cells and balance patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling by controlling the subcellular localization and phosphorylation status of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDI1). Translocation of Src-phosphorylated RhoGDI1 to the cell's leading edge promotes local activation of Rac1 and Cdc42, whereas dephosphorylation of RhoGDI1 by integrin-bound PTP-PEST promotes RhoGDI1 release from the membrane and sequestration of inactive Rac1/Cdc42 in the cytoplasm. Collectively, these data reveal a finely tuned regulatory mechanism for controlling signaling events at the leading edge of directionally migrating cells. PMID:25666508

  6. Phosphatase activity of the voltage-sensing phosphatase, VSP, shows graded dependence on the extent of activation of the voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Okamura, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) consists of a voltage sensor and a cytoplasmic phosphatase region, and the movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to the phosphatase activity. However, its coupling mechanisms still remain unclear. One possible scenario is that the phosphatase is activated only when the voltage sensor is in a fully activated state. Alternatively, the enzymatic activity of single VSP proteins could be graded in distinct activated states of the voltage sensor, and partial activation of the voltage sensor could lead to partial activation of the phosphatase. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we studied a voltage sensor mutant of zebrafish VSP, where the voltage sensor moves in two steps as evidenced by analyses of charge movements of the voltage sensor and voltage clamp fluorometry. Measurements of the phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate revealed that both steps of voltage sensor activation are coupled to the tuning of phosphatase activities, consistent with the idea that the phosphatase activity is graded by the magnitude of the movement of the voltage sensor. PMID:24277865

  7. Rhizobiales-like Phosphatase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Novel Phospho-tyrosine-specific Phospho-protein Phosphatase (PPP) Family Protein Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Muhammad, Jamshed; Samuel, Marcus; Moorhead, Greg B

    2016-03-11

    Cellular signaling through protein tyrosine phosphorylation is well established in mammalian cells. Although lacking the classic tyrosine kinases present in humans, plants have a tyrosine phospho-proteome that rivals human cells. Here we report a novel plant tyrosine phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtRLPH2) that, surprisingly, has the sequence hallmarks of a phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase belonging to the PPP family. Rhizobiales/Rhodobacterales/Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases (RLPHs) are conserved in plants and several other eukaryotes, but not in animals. We demonstrate that AtRLPH2 is localized to the plant cell cytosol, is resistant to the classic serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin, but is inhibited by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and is particularly sensitive to inhibition by the adenylates, ATP and ADP. AtRLPH2 displays remarkable selectivity toward tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides versus serine/threonine phospho-peptides and readily dephosphorylates a classic tyrosine phosphatase protein substrate, suggesting that in vivo it is a tyrosine phosphatase. To date, only one other tyrosine phosphatase is known in plants; thus AtRLPH2 represents one of the missing pieces in the plant tyrosine phosphatase repertoire and supports the concept of protein tyrosine phosphorylation as a key regulatory event in plants. PMID:26742850

  8. EX VIVIO DETECTION OF KINASE AND PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL BIOPSIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification involved in every aspect cellular function. Levels of protein phosphotyrosine, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are regulated by the opposing activities of kinases and phosphatases, the expression of which can be alt...

  9. Functional Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Thrombosis and Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Souad; Hego, Alexandre; Delierneux, Céline; Wéra, Odile; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are small blood cells derived from cytoplasmic fragments of megakaryocytes and play an essential role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelet activation depends on the rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of key signaling molecules, and a number of kinases and phosphatases have been identified as major regulators of platelet function. However, the investigation of novel signaling proteins has suffered from technical limitations due to the anucleate nature of platelets and their very limited levels of mRNA and de novo protein synthesis. In the past, experimental methods were restricted to the generation of genetically modified mice and the development of specific antibodies. More recently, novel (phospho)proteomic technologies and pharmacological approaches using specific small-molecule inhibitors have added additional capabilities to investigate specific platelet proteins.In this chapter, we report methods for using genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate the function of platelet signaling proteins. While the described experiments focus on the role of the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling, the presented methods are applicable to any signaling enzyme. Specifically, we describe a testing strategy that includes (1) aggregation and secretion experiments with mouse and human platelets, (2) immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays to study platelet signaling events, (3) detailed protocols to use selected animal models in order to investigate thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo, and (4) strategies for utilizing pharmacological inhibitors on human platelets. PMID:27514813

  10. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  11. A single electrochemical biosensor for detecting the activity and inhibition of both protein kinase and alkaline phosphatase based on phosphate ions induced deposition of redox precipitates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Li, Xiangzhi; Rasooly, Avraham; Guo, Linyan; Zhang, Kaina; Yang, Minghui

    2016-11-15

    Protein kinase (PKA) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) are clinically relevant enzymes for a number of diseases. In this work, we developed a new simple electrochemical biosensor for the detection of the activity and inhibition of both PKA and ALP. One common feature of the PKA and ALP catalyzing process is that PKA can hydrolysis adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and ALP can hydrolysis pyrophosphate, both reactions produce phosphate ions, and the amount of phosphate ion produced is proportional to enzyme activity. Our assay is based on the principle that phosphate ions react with molybdate to form redox molybdophosphate precipitates on the electrode surface, thus generating electrochemical current. The detection limit for PKA and ALP were much lower than existing assays. The biosensor has good specificity and was used to measure drug-stimulated PKA from lysates of HeLa cells. We also evaluated the use of the biosensor as a screening tool for enzyme inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a biosensor capable of detecting the activity of both PKA and ALP. This tool has the potential to simplify PKA and ALP clinical measurement, thereby improving diagnostics of relevant diseases. It also may serve as the basis for a simple screening method for new enzyme inhibitors for disease treatment. PMID:27179562

  12. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity mediates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in human airway epithelial cells exposed to Zn{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, T.L.; Graves, L.M.; Silbajoris, R.; Bromberg, P.A.; Wu, W.; Samet, J.M. . E-mail: samet.james@epa.gov

    2006-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads to Src-dependent activation of EGFR signaling in B82 and A431 cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism of Zn{sup 2+}-induced EGFR activation in HAEC, we treated HAEC with 500 {mu}M ZnSO{sub 4} for 5-20 min and measured the state of activation of EGFR, c-Src and PTPs. Western blots revealed that exposure to Zn{sup 2+} results in increased phosphorylation at both trans- and autophosphorylation sites in the EGFR. Zn{sup 2+}-mediated EGFR phosphorylation did not require ligand binding and was ablated by the EGFR kinase inhibitor PD153035, but not by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2. Src activity was inhibited by Zn{sup 2+} treatment of HAEC, consistent with Src-independent EGFR transactivation in HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. The rate of exogenous EGFR dephosphorylation in lysates of HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+} or V{sup 4+} was significantly diminished. Moreover, exposure of HAEC to Zn{sup 2+} also resulted in a significant impairment of dephosphorylation of endogenous EGFR. These data show that Zn{sup 2+}-induced activation of EGFR in HAEC involves a loss of PTP activities whose function is to dephosphorylate EGFR in opposition to baseline EGFR kinase activity. These findings also suggest that there are marked cell-type-specific differences in the mechanism of EGFR activation induced by Zn{sup 2+} exposure.

  13. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  14. New functional aspects of the atypical protein tyrosine phosphatase VHZ

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I.; Hengge, Alvan C.

    2013-01-01

    LDP3 (VHZ) is the smallest classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) known to date, and was originally misclassified as an atypical dual specificity phosphatase (DSP). Kinetic isotope effects with steady state and pre-steady state kinetics of VHZ and mutants with para-nitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) have revealed several unusual properties. VHZ is significantly more active than previously reported, but remains one of the least active PTPs. Highly unusual for a PTP, VHZ possesses two acidic residues (E134 and D65) in the active site. D65 occupies the position corresponding to the typical general acid in the PTP family. However, VHZ primarily utilizes E134 as the general acid, with D65 taking over this role when E134 is mutated. This unusual behavior is facilitated by two coexisting, but unequally populated, substrate binding modes. Unlike most classical PTPs, VHZ exhibits phosphotransferase activity. Despite the presence of the Q-loop that normally prevents alcoholysis of the phosphoenzyme intermediate in other classical PTPs, VHZ readily phosphorylates ethylene glycol. Although mutations to Q-loop residues affect this phosphotransferase activity, mutations on the IPD-loop that contains the general acid exert more control over this process. A single P68V substitution on this loop completely abolishes phosphotransferase activity. The ability of native VHZ to catalyze transphosphorylation may lead to an imbalance of intracellular phosphorylation, which could explain the correlation of its overexpression with several types of cancer. PMID:24073992

  15. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authors find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.

  16. Cholesterol modulates alkaline phosphatase activity of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed

    Brasitus, T A; Dahiya, R; Dudeja, P K; Bissonnette, B M

    1988-06-25

    Experiments were conducted, using a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, to vary the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of rat proximal small intestinal microvillus membranes in order to assess the possible role of cholesterol in modulating enzymatic activities of this plasma membrane. Cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios from 0.71 to 1.30 were produced from a normal value of 1.05 by incubation with the transfer protein and an excess of either phosphatidylcholine or cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Cholesterol loading or depletion of the membranes was accompanied by a decrease or increase, respectively, in their lipid fluidity, as assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the lipid-soluble fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Increasing the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio also decreased alkaline phosphatase specific activity by approximately 20-30%, whereas decreasing this ratio increased this enzymatic activity by 20-30%. Sucrase, maltase, and lactase specific activities were not affected in these same preparations. Since the changes in alkaline phosphatase activity could be secondary to alterations in fluidity, cholesterol, or both, additional experiments were performed using benzyl alcohol, a known fluidizer. Benzyl alcohol (25 mM) restored the fluidity of cholesterol-enriched preparations to control levels, did not change the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio, and failed to alter alkaline phosphatase activity. These findings, therefore, indicate that alterations in the cholesterol content and cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of microvillus membranes can modulate alkaline phosphatase but not sucrase, maltase, or lactase activities. Moreover, membrane fluidity does not appear to be an important physiological regulator of these enzymatic activities. PMID:3379034

  17. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  18. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). PMID:26636645

  19. The auxiliary protein complex SaePQ activates the phosphatase activity of sensor kinase SaeS in the SaeRS two-component system of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Do-Won; Cho, Hoonsik; Jones, Marcus B.; Shatzkes, Kenneth; Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Liu, Qian; Peterson, Scott N.; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2012-01-01

    Summary In bacterial two-component regulatory systems (TCSs), dephosphorylation of phosphorylated response regulators is essential for resetting the activated systems to the pre-activation state. However, in the SaeRS TCS, a major virulence TCS of Staphylococcus aureus, the mechanism for dephosphorylation of the response regulator SaeR has not been identified. Here we report that two auxiliary proteins from the sae operon, SaeP and SaeQ, form a protein complex with the sensor kinase SaeS and activate the sensor kinase’s phosphatase activity. Efficient activation of the phosphatase activity required the presence of both SaeP and SaeQ. When SaeP and SaeQ were ectopically expressed, the expression of coagulase, a sae target with low affinity for phosphorylated SaeR, was greatly reduced, while the expression of alpha-hemolysin, a sae target with high affinity for phosphorylated SaeR, was not, demonstrating a differential effect of SaePQ on sae target gene expression. When expression of SaePQ was abolished, most sae target genes were induced at an elevated level. Since the expression of SaeP and SaeQ is induced by the SaeRS TCS, these results suggest that the SaeRS TCS returns to the pre-activation state by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:22882143

  20. Geranylated 2-arylbenzofurans from Morus alba var. tatarica and their α-glucosidase and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Long; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wan, Chuan-Xing; Zhou, Zhong-Bo; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Ten new geranylated 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives, including two monoterpenoid 2-arylbenzofurans (1 and 2), two geranylated 2-arylbenzofuran enantiomers (3a and 3b), and six geranylated 2-arylbenzofurans (4-9), along with four known 2-arylbenzofurans (10-13) were isolated from the root bark of Morus alba var. tatarica. Their structures and relative configurations were established on the basis of spectroscopic data analysis. Compounds 3-7 with one asymmetric carbon at C-7″ were supposed to be enantiomeric mixtures confirmed by chiral HPLC analysis, and the absolute configurations of each enantiomer in 3-7 were determined by Rh2(OCOCF3)4-induced CD and Snatzke's method. The enantiomers with the substituting group at C-2' exhibited better resolutions on a Chiralpak AD-H column than those with the substituting group at C-4'. Compounds 1-7, 10, 11 and 13, showed α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 11.9-131.9 μM, and compounds 1 and 9-13 inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 7.9-38.1 μM. PMID:24216050

  1. Dephosphorylation of Tctex2-related dynein light chain by type 2A protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazuo

    2002-10-01

    Sperm flagellar movements are regulated by cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation. Tctex2-related light chain of outer arm dynein is a well-defined phosphorylated protein that is phosphorylated at activation of sperm motility. Here, the protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates Tctex2-related dynein light chain (LC2) has been characterized in salmonid fish sperm. Most of the phosphatase activity against LC2 is found in Triton-soluble fraction of flagella but trace extent of the activity is retained in the axoneme. The dephosphorylation of LC2 is inhibited by okadaic acid at more than 1nM, whereas that of dynein alpha heavy chain is inhibited at more than 10nM. The addition of Ca(2+) gives no direct effect on LC2 dephosphorylation, but it accelerates the dephosphorylation of the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, resulting in the decrease of LC2 phosphorylation. The activity to dephosphorylate the LC2 is separated by MonoQ ion-exchange column chromatography along with the immunoreactivity to the antibody against the catalytic subunit of type 2A protein phosphatase. These results suggest that LC2 is dephosphorylated by type 2A protein phosphatase and that dynein alpha heavy chain and the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase are dephosphorylated by other types of protein phosphatases. PMID:12359223

  2. Protein kinase and phosphoprotein phosphatase activities of nitrogen regulatory proteins NTRB and NTRC of enteric bacteria: roles of the conserved amino-terminal domain of NTRC.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, J; Kustu, S

    1988-01-01

    The NTRC protein (ntrC product) of enteric bacteria activates transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes by a holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase that contains the ntrA product (sigma 54) as sigma factor. Although unmodified NTRC will bind to DNA, it must be phosphorylated to activate transcription. Both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of NTRC occur in the presence of the NTRB protein (ntrB product). We here demonstrate rigorously that it is the NTRB protein that is a protein kinase by showing that NTRB can phosphorylate itself, whereas NTRC cannot. Phosphorylated NTRC (NTRC-P) is capable of autodephosphorylation with a first-order rate constant of 0.14-0.19 min-1 (t 1/2 of 5.0-3.6 min) at 37 degrees C. In addition, there is regulated dephosphorylation of NTRC-P. By contrast to the autophosphatase activity, regulated dephosphorylation requires three components in addition to NTRC-P: the PII regulatory protein, NTRB, and ATP. NTRC is phosphorylated within its amino-terminal domain, which is conserved in one partner of a number of two-component regulatory systems in a wide variety of eubacteria. A purified amino-terminal fragment of NTRC (approximately equal to 12.5 kDa) is sufficient for recognition by NTRB and is autodephosphorylated at the same rate as the native protein. Images PMID:2839825

  3. Protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Sontag, Estelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a large family of enzymes that account for the majority of brain Ser/Thr phosphatase activity. While PP2A enzymes collectively modulate most cellular processes, sophisticated regulatory mechanisms are ultimately responsible for ensuring isoform-specific substrate specificity. Of particular interest to the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) field, alterations in PP2A regulators and PP2A catalytic activity, subunit expression, methylation and/or phosphorylation, have been reported in AD-affected brain regions. “PP2A” dysfunction has been linked to tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloidogenesis and synaptic deficits that are pathological hallmarks of this neurodegenerative disorder. Deregulation of PP2A enzymes also affects the activity of many Ser/Thr protein kinases implicated in AD. This review will more specifically discuss the role of the PP2A/Bα holoenzyme and PP2A methylation in AD pathogenesis. The PP2A/Bα isoform binds to tau and is the primary tau phosphatase. Its deregulation correlates with increased tau phosphorylation in vivo and in AD. Disruption of PP2A/Bα-tau protein interactions likely contribute to tau deregulation in AD. Significantly, alterations in one-carbon metabolism that impair PP2A methylation are associated with increased risk for sporadic AD, and enhanced AD-like pathology in animal models. Experimental studies have linked deregulation of PP2A methylation with down-regulation of PP2A/Bα, enhanced phosphorylation of tau and amyloid precursor protein, tau mislocalization, microtubule destabilization and neuritic defects. While it remains unclear what are the primary events that underlie “PP2A” dysfunction in AD, deregulation of PP2A enzymes definitely affects key players in the pathogenic process. As such, there is growing interest in developing PP2A-centric therapies for AD, but this may be a daunting task without a better understanding of the regulation and function of specific PP2A enzymes. PMID:24653673

  4. Developmental regulation of hexosamine biosynthesis by protein phosphatases 2A and 2C in Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Etchebehere, L C; Simon, M N; Campanhã, R B; Zapella, P D; Véron, M; Maia, J C

    1993-08-01

    Extracts of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii were found to contain protein phosphatases type 1, type 2A, and type 2C with properties analogous to those found in mammalian tissues. The activities of all three protein phosphatases are developmentally regulated, increasing during sporulation, with maximum level in zoospores. Protein phosphatases 2A and 2C, present in zoospore extracts, catalyze the dephosphorylation of L-glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (EC 2.6.1.16, amidotransferase), a key regulatory enzyme in hexosamine biosynthesis. The protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induces encystment and inhibits germ tube formation but does not affect the synthesis of the chitinous cell wall. These results strongly suggest that phosphatase 2C is responsible for the dephosphorylation of amidotransferase in vivo. This dephosphorylation is inhibited by uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine, the end product of hexosamine synthesis and the substrate for chitin synthesis. This result demonstrates a dual role of uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine by inhibiting the activity of the phosphorylated form of amidotransferase and by preventing its dephosphorylation by protein phosphatases. PMID:8394312

  5. Role of hippocampus mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 mRNA expression and DNA methylation in the depression of the rats with chronic unpredicted stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Li, Yan; Wang, Guo-Dong; Wang, Xin-Kai; Dong, Jiao; Ning, Qiu-Fen

    2015-05-01

    Stressful life events especially the chronic unpredictable stress are the obvious precipitating factors of depression. The biological information transduction in cells plays an important role in the molecular biology mechanism of depression. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) regulates the cell physiological activity and involves in the adjustment of neural plasticity, function, and survival. This experiment tried to explore the possible effects of MKP-1 in hippocampus on depression of rats by determining the expression of MKP-1 mRNA and DNA methylation in MKP-1 gene promoter. The animal model was established by chronic unpredictable stress, and evaluated by open-field test and weight changes. All the rats were divided into the sham stimulation, the physiological saline, and the fluoxetine (1.25, 2.50, and 5.00 mg/kg) groups randomly. The expression of MKP-1 mRNA in the hippocampus was measured by RT-PCR and the methylation of MKP-1 promoter DNA was detected by COBRA. The chronic unpredicted stress (1) increased the animal movement scores in open-field test, and fluoxetine could prevent this increasement; (2) increased the body weight, and fluoxetine could not prevent this increasement; and (3) increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in the hippocampus, and fluoxetine could prevent it. However, fluoxetine did not influence the DNA methylation of MKP-1 gene promoter in the hippocampus during the chronic unpredicted stress. MKP-1 in the hippocampus might be involved in the etiology of depression, and DNA methylation of MKP-1 gene promoter in the hippocampus did not related with the depression. PMID:25410305

  6. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  7. Characterization of the major phosphofructokinase-dephosphorylating protein phosphatases from Ascaris suum muscle.

    PubMed

    Daum, G; Schmid, B; MacKintosh, C; Cohen, P; Hofer, H W

    1992-07-13

    In contrast to the mammalian enzyme, PFK from the nematode Ascaris suum is activated following phosphorylation (Daum et al. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 139, 215-221) catalyzed by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Thalhofer et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 952-957). In the present report, we describe the characterization of the major PFK dephosphorylating phosphatases from Ascaris muscle. Two of these phosphatases exhibit apparent M(r) values of 174,000 and 126,000, respectively, and are dissociated to active 33 kDa proteins by ethanol precipitation. Denaturing electrophoresis of each of the enzyme preparations showed two bands of M(r) 33,000 and 63,000. The enzymes are classified as type 2A phosphatases according to their inhibition by subnanomolar concentrations of okadaic acid, the lack of inhibition by heat-stable phosphatase inhibitors 1 and 2, and their preference for the alpha- rather than for the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase. Like other type 2A phosphatases, they exhibit broad substrate specificities, are activated by divalent cations and polycations, and inhibited by fluoride, inorganic phosphate and adenine nucleotides. In addition, we have found that PFK is also dephosphorylated by an unusual protein phosphatase. This exhibits kinetic properties similar to type 2A protein phosphatases, but has a distinctly lower sensitivity towards inhibition by okadaic acid (IC50 approx. 20 nM). Partial purification of the enzyme provided evidence that it is composed of a 30 kDa catalytic subunit and probably two other subunits (molecular masses 66 and 72 kDa). The dephosphorylation of PFK by protein phosphatases is strongly inhibited by heparin. This effect, however, is substrate-specific and does not occur with Ascaris phosphorylase a. PMID:1321672

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors from Morinda citrifolia (Noni) and their insulin mimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Yang, Jun-Li; Uddin, Mohammad N; Park, So-Lim; Lim, Seong-Il; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Oh, Won-Keun

    2013-11-22

    As part of our ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, we found that a methanol extract of Morinda citrifolia showed potential stimulatory effects on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this active extract yielded two new lignans (1 and 2) and three new neolignans (9, 10, and 14), as well as 10 known compounds (3-8, 11-13, and 15). The absolute configurations of compounds 9, 10, and 14 were determined by ECD spectra analysis. Compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values of 21.86 ± 0.48, 15.01 ± 0.20, 16.82 ± 0.42, and 4.12 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed strong stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. This study indicated the potential of compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 as lead molecules for antidiabetic agents. PMID:24224843

  9. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI)

    SciTech Connect

    Onouchi, Takashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMKP-N/PPM1E underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proteolysis was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser-480 of zebrafish CaMKP-N was phosphorylated by cytosolic CaMKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of CaMKP-N showed enhanced activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results suggest that CaMKP-N is regulated by CaMKI. -- Abstract: Nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) is an enzyme that dephosphorylates and downregulates multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) as well as AMP-dependent protein kinase. In our previous study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol in a proteasome inhibitor-sensitive manner. In the present study, we found that zCaMKP-N is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser-480. When zCaMKP-N was incubated with the activated CaMKI, time-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme was observed. This phosphorylation was significantly reduced when Ser-480 was replaced by Ala, suggesting that CaMKI phosphorylates Ser-480 of zCaMKP-N. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants, S480D and S480E, showed higher phosphatase activities than those of wild type and S480A mutant in solution-based phosphatase assay using various substrates. Furthermore, autophosphorylation of CaMKII after ionomycin treatment was more severely attenuated in Neuro2a cells when CaMKII was cotransfected with the phosphorylation-mimic mutant of zCaMKP-N than with the wild-type or non-phosphorylatable zCaMKP-N. These results strongly suggest that phosphorylation of zCaMKP-N at Ser-480 by CaMKI activates CaMKP-N catalytic activity and thereby downregulates multifunctional CaMKs in the cytosol.

  10. Protein Phosphatase 1c Associated with the Cardiac Sodium Calcium Exchanger 1 Regulates Its Activity by Dephosphorylating Serine 68-phosphorylated Phospholemman.

    PubMed

    Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Hodne, Kjetil; Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Dalhus, Bjørn; Lunde, Per Kristian; Lunde, Marianne; Martinsen, Marita; Enger, Ulla Helene; Fuller, William; Sjaastad, Ivar; Louch, William Edward; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2016-02-26

    The sodium (Na(+))-calcium (Ca(2+)) exchanger 1 (NCX1) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Serine 68-phosphorylated phospholemman (pSer-68-PLM) inhibits NCX1 activity. In the context of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) regulation, pSer-68-PLM is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). PP1 also associates with NCX1; however, the molecular basis of this association is unknown. In this study, we aimed to analyze the mechanisms of PP1 targeting to the NCX1-pSer-68-PLM complex and hypothesized that a direct and functional NCX1-PP1 interaction is a prerequisite for pSer-68-PLM dephosphorylation. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we show that PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) co-localized, co-fractionated, and co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1 in rat cardiomyocytes, left ventricle lysates, and HEK293 cells. Bioinformatic analysis, immunoprecipitations, mutagenesis, pulldown experiments, and peptide arrays constrained PP1c anchoring to the K(I/V)FF motif in the first Ca(2+) binding domain (CBD) 1 in NCX1. This binding site is also partially in agreement with the extended PP1-binding motif K(V/I)FF-X5-8Φ1Φ2-X8-9-R. The cytosolic loop of NCX1, containing the K(I/V)FF motif, had no effect on PP1 activity in an in vitro assay. Dephosphorylation of pSer-68-PLM in HEK293 cells was not observed when NCX1 was absent, when the K(I/V)FF motif was mutated, or when the PLM- and PP1c-binding sites were separated (mimicking calpain cleavage of NCX1). Co-expression of PLM and NCX1 inhibited NCX1 current (both modes). Moreover, co-expression of PLM with NCX1(F407P) (mutated K(I/V)FF motif) resulted in the current being completely abolished. In conclusion, NCX1 is a substrate-specifying PP1c regulator protein, indirectly regulating NCX1 activity through pSer-68-PLM dephosphorylation. PMID:26668322

  11. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  12. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  13. Characterization of the PEST family protein tyrosine phosphatase BDP1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y W; Wang, H; Sures, I; Lammers, R; Martell, K J; Ullrich, A

    1996-11-21

    Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification strategy, we identified a novel protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) designated Brain Derived Phosphatase (BDP1). The full length sequence encoded an open reading frame of 459 amino acids with no transmembrane domain and had a calculated molecular weight of 50 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence contained a PEST motif and accordingly, BDP1 shared the greatest homology with members of the PTP-PEST family. When transiently expressed in 293 cells BDP1 hydrolyzed p-Nitrophenylphosphate, confirming it as a functional protein tyrosine phosphatase. Northern blot analysis indicated that BDP1 was expressed not only in brain, but also in colon and several different tumor-derived cell lines. Furthermore, BDP1 was found to differentially dephosphorylate autophosphorylated tyrosine kinases which are known to be overexpressed in tumor tissues. PMID:8950995

  14. Negative regulation of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases: physiological and pharmacological significance of protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, A; Sueyoshi, N; Shigeri, Y; Kameshita, I

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) play pivotal roles in intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways. There is growing evidence that CaMKs are involved in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various human diseases. In this review, we begin by briefly summarizing our knowledge of the involvement of CaMKs in the pathogenesis of various diseases suggested to be caused by the dysfunction/dysregulation or aberrant expression of CaMKs. It is widely known that the activities of CaMKs are strictly regulated by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of specific phosphorylation sites. Since phosphorylation status is balanced by protein kinases and protein phosphatases, the mechanism of dephosphorylation/deactivation of CaMKs, corresponding to their ‘switching off', is extremely important, as is the mechanism of phosphorylation/activation corresponding to their ‘switching on'. Therefore, we focus on the regulation of multifunctional CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We summarize the current understanding of negative regulation of CaMKs by protein phosphatases. We also discuss the biochemical properties and physiological significance of a protein phosphatase that we designated as Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP), and those of its homologue CaMKP-N. Pharmacological applications of CaMKP inhibitors are also discussed. These compounds may be useful not only for exploring the physiological functions of CaMKP/CaMKP-N, but also as novel chemotherapies for various diseases. PMID:18454172

  15. The endogenous inhibitor of protein kinase-C in the rat ovary is a protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Eyster, K M; Waller, M S; Miller, T L; Miller, C J; Johnson, M J; Persing, J S

    1993-09-01

    Calcium- and lipid-dependent protein kinase (PKC) activity in the ovary of the pseudopregnant rat is masked by an endogenous inhibitor of PKC. These studies were undertaken to examine the mechanism of action of the endogenous inhibitor of PKC in the rat ovary. The addition of the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin-A (0.09 nM), microcystin-LR (6.4 nM), and okadaic acid (10 nM) resulted in the loss of PKC inhibitory activity and an increase in basal PKC activity in rat ovarian cytosol. In phosphatase assays, significant dephosphorylation of histone-III-S or myelin basic protein that had been phosphorylated by PKC occurred within 4 min after the addition of ovarian cytosol from the pseudopregnant rat. This dephosphorylation was prevented from the pseudopregnant rat. This dephosphorylation was prevented by the addition of calyculin-A (0.73 nM) and was removed by fractionation of ovarian cytosol on diethylaminoethyl cellulose. No inhibition of PKC activity was observed when the PKC-specific peptides AcMBP-(4-14) and [Ser25]PKC-(19-31) were used as the substrate for phosphorylation. In addition, rat ovarian cytosol did not exhibit phosphatase activity when the peptide AcMBP-(4-14) was used as the substrate. Addition of ovarian cytosol resulted in dephosphorylation of phosphorylase-alpha phosphorylated by phosphorylase kinase, but not dephosphorylation of histone-II-A or histone-VIII-S phosphorylated by PKA. The data suggest that the endogenous inhibitor of PKC in the rat ovary is a protein phosphatase. PMID:7689949

  16. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-04-29

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  17. Detection of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity in intact cells by flow cytometry using the fluorogenic ELF-97 phosphatase substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telford, W. G.; Cox, W. G.; Stiner, D.; Singer, V. L.; Doty, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate 2-(5'-chloro-2'-phosphoryloxyphenyl)-6-chloro-4-(3H)-quinazolinone (ELF((R))-97 for enzyme-labeled fluorescence) has been found useful for the histochemical detection of endogenous AP activity and AP-tagged proteins and oligonucleotide probes. In this study, we evaluated its effectiveness at detecting endogenous AP activity by flow cytometry. METHODS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate was used to detect endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 rat osteosarcoma cells and primary cultures of chick chondrocytes. Cells were labeled with the ELF-97 reagent and analyzed by flow cytometry using an argon ultraviolet (UV) laser. For comparison purposes, cells were also assayed for AP using a Fast Red Violet LB azo dye assay previously described for use in detecting AP activity by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The ELF-97 phosphatase substrate effectively detected endogenous AP activity in UMR-106 cells, with over 95% of the resulting fluorescent signal resulting from AP-specific activity (as determined by levamisole inhibition of AP activity). In contrast, less than 70% of the fluorescent signal from the Fast Red Violet LB (FRV) assay was AP-dependent, reflecting the high intrinsic fluorescence of the unreacted components. The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was also able to detect very low AP activity in chick chondrocytes that was undetectable by the azo dye method. CONCLUSIONS: The ELF-97 phosphatase assay was able to detect endogenous AP activity in fixed mammalian and avian cells by flow cytometry with superior sensitivity to previously described assays. This work also shows the applicability of ELF-97 to flow cytometry, supplementing its previously demonstrated histochemical applications. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds. PMID:26118418

  19. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moorhead, Greg BG; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Nimick, Mhairi; De Wever, Veerle; Campbell, David G; Gourlay, Robert; Lam, Yun Wah; Lamond, Angus I

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1) is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes. PMID:19000314

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase/sub b/ phosphatase inhibition by NADH and dihydrolipoamide along with effects of and capacity for binding the phosphatase to the bovine kidney transacetylase-protein X subcomplex

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, T.E.; Rahmatullah, M.; Maher, J.

    1986-05-01

    NADH inhibits PDH/sub b/ phosphatase activity when /sup 32/P-PDH is associated with the intact complex but not when /sup 32/P-PDH is prepared free of other components of the complex. Addition of the transacetylase-protein X (E2-X) subcomplex both activated the phosphatase and restored NADH inhibition. Low levels of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase associated with the subcomplex might be required for NADH inhibition. Dihydrolipoamide gave inhibition of the phosphatase equivalent to NADH and the combination did not give additional inhibition suggesting a common mechanism. Pretreatment of phosphorylated complex and phosphatase with 2.0 mM dithiothreitol nearly eliminated inhibition of the phosphatase by NADH or dihydrolipoamide. Strong arsenite inhibition of phosphatase activity occurred only in the presence of NADH suggesting modification of thiols reduced by NADH can alter phosphatase activity. Only about 6 molecules of purified phosphatase could be activated by 1 molecule of E2-X subcomplex (initial velocities measured in 15s period). Since that corresponded to the number of protein X rather than E2 subunits, protein X may contribute to the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of the phosphatase. Since protein X also contains a lipoyl moiety, it may also contribute to NADH inhibition of the phosphatase.

  1. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  2. Biogeochemical drivers of phosphatase activity in salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Joana; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Although nitrogen has become a major concern for wetlands scientists dealing with eutrophication problems, phosphorous represents another key element, and consequently its biogeochemical cycling has a crucial role in eutrophication processes. Microbial communities are a central component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes on coastal systems, since most of the processes in sediments are microbial-mediated due to enzymatic action, including the mineralization of organic phosphorus carried out by acid phosphatase activity. In the present work, the authors investigate the biogeochemical sediment drivers that control phosphatase activities. Authors also aim to assess biogeochemical factors' influence on the enzyme-mediated phosphorous cycling processes in salt marshes. Plant rhizosediments and bare sediments were collected and biogeochemical features, including phosphatase activities, inorganic and organic phosphorus contents, humic acids content and pH, were assessed. Acid phosphatase was found to give the highest contribution for total phosphatase activity among the three pH-isoforms present in salt marsh sediments, favored by acid pH in colonized sediments. Humic acids also appear to have an important role inhibiting phosphatase activity. A clear relation of phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorous was also found. The data presented reinforces the role of phosphatase in phosphorous cycling.

  3. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  4. Structural basis of protein phosphatase 2A stable latency

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Stanevich, Vitali; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Kong, Mei; Watkins, Guy R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Sengupta, Rituparna; Xing, Yongna

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac) is stabilized in a latent form by α4, a regulatory protein essential for cell survival and biogenesis of all PP2A complexes. Here we report the structure of α4 bound to the N-terminal fragment of PP2Ac. This structure suggests that α4 binding to the full-length PP2Ac requires local unfolding near the active site, which perturbs the scaffold subunit binding site at the opposite surface via allosteric relay. These changes stabilize an inactive conformation of PP2Ac and convert oligomeric PP2A complexes to the α4 complex upon perturbation of the active site. The PP2Ac–α4 interface is essential for cell survival and sterically hinders a PP2A ubiquitination site, important for the stability of cellular PP2Ac. Our results show that α4 is a scavenger chaperone that binds to and stabilizes partially folded PP2Ac for stable latency, and reveal a mechanism by which α4 regulates cell survival, and biogenesis and surveillance of PP2A holoenzymes. PMID:23591866

  5. Redox and zinc signalling pathways converging on protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Zinc ions, though redox-inert, have either pro-antioxidant or pro-oxidant functions at critical junctures in redox metabolism and redox signalling. They are released from cells and in cells, e.g. from metallothionein, a protein that transduces redox signals into zinc signals (1). The released zinc ions inhibit enzymes such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), key regulatory enzymes of cellular phosphorylation signalling. The Ki(Zn) value for inhibition of receptor PTPB is 21pM (2). The binding is about as tight as the binding of zinc to zinc metalloenzymes and suggests tonic zinc inhibition. PTP1-B (PTPN1), an enzyme regulating the insulin and leptin receptors and involved in cancer and diabetes pathobiochemistry, has a Ki(Zn) value of about 5nM (3). Zinc ions bind to the enzyme in the closed conformation when additional metal-binding ligands are brought into the vicinity of the active site. In contrast, redox reactions target cysteines in the active sites of PTPs in the open conformation. This work provides a molecular basis how hydrogen peroxide and free zinc ions generated by growth factor signalling stimulate phosphorylation signalling differentially. (Supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council UK, grant BB/K001442/1.). PMID:26461422

  6. Par-4: A New Activator of Myosin Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Vetterkind, Susanne; Lee, Eunhee; Sundberg, Eric; Poythress, Ransom H.; Tao, Terence C.; Preuss, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) is a key regulator of myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation, a process essential for motility, apoptosis, and smooth muscle contractility. Although MP inhibition is well studied, little is known about MP activation. We have recently demonstrated that prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 modulates vascular smooth muscle contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that Par-4 regulates MP activity directly. We show, by proximity ligation assays, surface plasmon resonance and coimmunoprecipitation, that Par-4 interacts with the targeting subunit of MP, MYPT1. Binding is mediated by the leucine zippers of MYPT1 and Par-4 and reduced by Par-4 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Par-4 leads to increased phosphatase activity of immunoprecipitated MP, whereas small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous Par-4 significantly decreases MP activity and increases MYPT1 phosphorylation. LC20 phosphorylation assays demonstrate that overexpression of Par-4 reduces LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast, a phosphorylation site mutant, but not wild-type Par-4, interferes with zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK)-mediated MP inhibition. We conclude from our results Par-4 operates through a “padlock” model in which binding of Par-4 to MYPT1 activates MP by blocking access to the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, and inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 by ZIPK requires “unlocking” of Par-4 by phosphorylation and displacement of Par-4 from the MP complex. PMID:20130087

  7. Protein Phosphatase-1 regulates Rift Valley fever virus replication.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26801627

  8. An immunochemical approach to detect oxidized protein tyrosine phosphatases using a selective C-nucleophile tag.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Francisco J; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-24

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial regulators of signal transduction and function as antagonists towards protein tyrosine kinases to control reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating fundamental physiological processes. Growing evidence has supported the notion that reversible oxidative inactivation of the catalytic cysteine residue in protein tyrosine phosphatases serves as an oxidative post-translational modification that regulates its activity to influence downstream signaling by promoting phosphorylation and induction of the signaling cascade. The oxidation of cysteine to the sulfenic acid is often transient and difficult to detect, thus making it problematic in understanding the role that this oxidative post-translational modification plays in redox-biology and pathogenesis. Several methods to detect cysteine oxidation in biological systems have been developed, though targeted approaches to directly detect oxidized phosphatases are still lacking. Herein we describe the development of a novel immunochemical approach to directly profile oxidized phosphatases. This immunochemical approach consists of an antibody designed to recognize the conserved sequence of the PTP active site (VHCDMDSAG) harboring the catalytic cysteine modified with dimedone (CDMD), a nucleophile that chemoselectively reacts with cysteine sulfenic acids to form a stable thioether adduct. Additionally, we provide biochemical and mass spectrometry workflows to be used in conjugation with this newly developed immunochemical approach to assist in the identification and quantification of basal and oxidized phosphatases. PMID:26757830

  9. Enzymatic and Functional Analysis of a Protein Phosphatase, Pph3, from Myxococcus xanthus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshio; Mori, Yumi; Ina, Youhei; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    A protein phosphatase, designated Pph3, from Myxococcus xanthus showed the enzymatic characteristics of PP2C-type serine/threonine protein phosphatases, which are metal ion-dependent, okadaic acid-insensitive protein phosphatases. The pph3 mutant under starvation conditions formed immature fruiting bodies and reduced sporulation. PMID:21398555

  10. Identification of a selective small-molecule inhibitor series targeting the eyes absent 2 (Eya2) phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Aaron B; Dehdashti, Seameen J; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Li, Xueni; Ford, Heide L; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Eya proteins are essential coactivators of the Six family of homeobox transcription factors and also contain a unique protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase family of phosphatases. The phosphatase activity of Eya is important for a subset of Six1-mediated transcription, making this a unique type of transcriptional control. It is also responsible for directing cells to the repair instead of apoptosis pathway upon DNA damage. Furthermore, the phosphatase activity of Eya is critical for transformation, migration, invasion, and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibitors of the Eya phosphatase activity may be antitumorigenic and antimetastatic, as well as sensitize cancer cells to DNA damage-inducing therapies. In this article, we identified a previously unknown chemical series using high-throughput screening that inhibits the Eya2 phosphatase activity with IC(50)s ranging from 1.8 to 79 µM. Compound activity was confirmed using an alternative malachite green assay and H2AX, a known Eya substrate. Importantly, these Eya2 phosphatase inhibitors show specificity and do not significantly inhibit several other cellular phosphatases. Our studies identify the first selective Eya2 phosphatase inhibitors that can potentially be developed into chemical probes for functional studies of Eya phosphatase or into anticancer drugs in the future. PMID:22820394

  11. Identification of a non-purple tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase: an evolutionary link to Ser/Thr protein phosphatases?

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, Kieran S; Huber, Thomas; Cassady, A Ian; Weber, Jane; Robinson, Jodie; Burrows, Allan; Kelly, Gregory; Guddat, Luke W; Hume, David A; Schenk, Gerhard; Flanagan, Jack U

    2008-01-01

    Background Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAcPs), also known as purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), are a family of binuclear metallohydrolases that have been identified in plants, animals and fungi. The human enzyme is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of bone-related diseases. TRAcPs can occur as a small form possessing only the ~35 kDa catalytic domain, or a larger ~55 kDa form possessing both a catalytic domain and an additional N-terminal domain of unknown function. Due to its role in bone resorption the 35 kDa TRAcP has become a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. Findings A new human gene product encoding a metallohydrolase distantly related to the ~55 kDa plant TRAcP was identified and characterised. The gene product is found in a number of animal species, and is present in all tissues sampled by the RIKEN mouse transcriptome project. Construction of a homology model illustrated that six of the seven metal-coordinating ligands in the active site are identical to that observed in the TRAcP family. However, the tyrosine ligand associated with the charge transfer transition and purple color of TRAcPs is replaced by a histidine. Conlusion The gene product identified here may represent an evolutionary link between TRAcPs and Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Its biological function is currently unknown but is unlikely to be associated with bone metabolism. PMID:18771593

  12. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  13. MALDI mass sequencing and biochemical characterization of Setaria cervi protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Rai, Reeta; Singh, Neetu; Elesela, Srikanth; Tiwari, Savitri; Rathaur, Sushma

    2013-01-01

    A 30-kDa acid phosphatase with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity was identified in Setaria cervi (ScPTP). The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using three-step column chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis of purified ScPTP yielded a total of eight peptides matching most closely to phosphoprotein phosphatase of Ricinus communis (RcPP). A hydrophilicity plot of RcPP revealed the presence of these peptides in the hydrophilic region, suggesting their antigenic nature. The substrate specificity of ScPTP with ortho-phospho-L-tyrosine and inhibition with sodium orthovanadate and ammonium molybdate affirmed it as a protein tyrosine phosphatase. ScPTP was also found to be tartrate resistant. The Km and Vmax were 6.60 mM and 83.3 μM/ml/min, respectively, with pNPP and 8.0 mM and 111 μM/ml/min, respectively, with ortho-phospho-L-tyrosine as the substrate. The Ki value with sodium orthovanadate was calculated to be 16.10 mM. Active site modification with DEPC, EDAC and pHMB suggested the presence of histidine, cysteine and aspartate at its active site. Thus, on the basis of MALDI-TOF and biochemical studies, it was confirmed that purified acid phosphatase is a PTP. PMID:23052758

  14. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:17615669

  15. Cellular Biochemistry Methods for Investigating Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Ahmed, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a family of proteins that play critical roles in cellular signaling and influence many aspects of human health and disease. Although a wealth of information has been collected about PTPs since their discovery, many questions regarding their regulation and function still remain. Critical Issues: Of particular importance are the elucidation of the biological substrates of individual PTPs and understanding of the chemical and biological basis for temporal and spatial resolution of PTP activity within a cell. Recent Advances: Drawing from recent advances in both biology and chemistry, innovative approaches have been developed to study the intracellular biochemistry and physiology of PTPs. We provide a summary of PTP-tailored techniques and approaches, emphasizing methodologies to study PTP activity within a cellular context. We first provide a discussion of methods for identifying PTP substrates, including substrate-trapping mutants and synthetic peptide libraries for substrate selectivity profiling. We next provide an overview of approaches for monitoring intracellular PTP activity, including a discussion of mechanistic-based probes, gel-based assays, substrates that can be used intracellularly, and assays tied to cell growth. Finally, we review approaches used for monitoring PTP oxidation, a key regulatory pathway for these enzymes, discussing the biotin switch method and variants of this approach, along with affinity trapping techniques and probes designed to detect PTP oxidation. Future Directions: Further development of approaches to investigate the intracellular PTP activity and functions will provide specific insight into their mechanisms of action and control of diverse signaling pathways. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2160–2178. PMID:24294920

  16. Human and rat hepatocyte toxicity and protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity of naturally occurring desmethyl-microcystins and nodularins.

    PubMed

    Ufelmann, Helena; Krüger, Thomas; Luckas, Bernd; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-03-11

    Contamination of water, foods and food supplements by various genera of cyanobacteria is a serious health problem worldwide for humans and animals, largely due to the toxic effects of microcystins (MCs) and nodularin (NOD), a group of hepatotoxic cyclic peptides. The toxins occur in variable structures resulting in more than 90 different MCs and 8 different NODs, many of them not having been investigated for their toxic potency. Potent MCs such as MC-LR have been shown to elicit their hepatotoxic potency via inhibition of hepatic protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A leading to over-phosphorylation of vital cellular proteins. This mechanism of action is also thought to be responsible for the long term tumor promoting action of certain MCs and NOD in the liver. Here, we report on the isolation of certain MCs and NOD as well as a number of their desmethylated derivatives from algae bloom. Subsequently, we determined the cytotoxicity of these compounds in isolated primary human and rat hepatocytes in culture. In parallel experiments, we analyzed the inhibitory potency of these congeners on PP1 and 2A using commercially available enzymes. We found in primary rat hepatocytes that MC-LR, -YR and NOD were cytotoxic, namely in the 10 to >50 nM range, while MC-RR was not. The desmethylated congeners of MC-LR, -YR, and NOD were equally or more-toxic as/than their fully methylated counterparts. In primary human hepatocytes we could show that MC-LR, NOD and the desmethylated variants [³Asp]MC-LR, [⁷Dha]MC-LR and [¹Asp]NOD were cytotoxic in the 20 to >600 nM range. Inhibition data with human, bovine and rabbit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were roughly in accordance with the cytotoxicity findings in human and rat hepatocytes, i.e. desmethylation had no pronounced effects on the inhibitory potencies. Thus, a variety of naturally occurring desmethylated MC and NOD congeners have to be considered as being at least as toxic as the corresponding fully methylated derivatives. PMID

  17. Leishmania mexicana: promastigotes and amastigotes secrete protein phosphatases and this correlates with the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Montaño, A R; Ortiz-Lozano, D M; Rojas-Bernabé, A; Wilkins-Rodriguez, A A; Torres-Guerrero, H; Mondragón-Flores, R; Mondragón-Gonzalez, R; Becker, I; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, L; Aguirre-Garcia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase activity of Leishmania spp. has been shown to deregulate the signalling pathways of the host cell. We here show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes secrete proteins with phosphatase activity to the culture medium, which was higher in the Promastigote Secretion Medium (PSM) as compared with the Amastigote Secretion Medium (ASM) and was not due to cell lysis, since parasite viability was not affected by the secretion process. The biochemical characterization showed that the phosphatase activity present in PSM was higher in dephosphorylating the peptide END (pY) INASL as compared with the peptide RRA (pT)VA. In contrast, the phosphatase activity in ASM showed little dephosphorylating capacity for both peptides. Inhibition assays demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of both PSM and ASM was sensible only to protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors. An antibody against a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) of Leishmania major cross-reacted with a 44·9 kDa molecule in different cellular fractions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes, however, in PSM and ASM, the antibody recognized a protein about 70 kDa. By electron microscopy, the PP2C was localized in the flagellar pocket of amastigotes. PSM and ASM induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-10 in human macrophages. PMID:27220404

  18. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  19. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  20. Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) Regulatory Subunits ParA and PabA Orchestrate Septation and Conidiation and Are Essential for PP2A Activity in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guo-wei; Jiang, Ping; Qiao, Wei-ran; Zhang, Yuan-wei; Wei, Wen-fan

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major intracellular protein phosphatase that regulates multiple aspects of cell growth and metabolism. Different activities of PP2A and subcellular localization are determined by its regulatory subunits. Here we identified and characterized the functions of two protein phosphatase regulatory subunit homologs, ParA and PabA, in Aspergillus nidulans. Our results demonstrate that ParA localizes to the septum site and that deletion of parA causes hyperseptation, while overexpression of parA abolishes septum formation; this suggests that ParA may function as a negative regulator of septation. In comparison, PabA displays a clear colocalization pattern with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained nuclei, and deletion of pabA induces a remarkable delayed-septation phenotype. Both parA and pabA are required for hyphal growth, conidiation, and self-fertilization, likely to maintain normal levels of PP2A activity. Most interestingly, parA deletion is capable of suppressing septation defects in pabA mutants, suggesting that ParA counteracts PabA during the septation process. In contrast, double mutants of parA and pabA led to synthetic defects in colony growth, indicating that ParA functions synthetically with PabA during hyphal growth. Moreover, unlike the case for PP2A-Par1 and PP2A-Pab1 in yeast (which are negative regulators that inactivate the septation initiation network [SIN]), loss of ParA or PabA fails to suppress defects of temperature-sensitive mutants of the SEPH kinase of the SIN. Thus, our findings support the previously unrealized evidence that the B-family subunits of PP2A have comprehensive functions as partners of heterotrimeric enzyme complexes of PP2A, both spatially and temporally, in A. nidulans. PMID:25280816

  1. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  2. A Bioassay for Lafora Disease and Laforin Glucan Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Amanda R.; Johnson, Mary Beth; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V.; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lafora disease is a rare yet invariably fatal form of progressive neurodegenerative epilepsy resulting from mutations in the phosphatase laforin. Several therapeutic options for Lafora disease patients are currently being explored, and these therapies would benefit from a biochemical means of assessing functional laforin activity following treatment. To date, only clinical outcomes such as decreases in seizure frequency and severity have been used to indicate success of epilepsy treatment. However, these qualitative measures exhibit variability and must be assessed over long periods of time. In this work, we detail a simple and sensitive bioassay that can be used for the detection of functional endogenous laforin from human and mouse tissue. Design and methods We generated antibodies capable of detecting and immunoprecipitating endogenous laforin. Following laforin immunoprecipitation, laforin activity was assessed via phosphatase assays using para-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and a malachite green-based assay specific for glucan phosphatase activity. Results We found that antibody binding to laforin does not impede laforin activity. Furthermore, the malachite green-based glucan phosphatase assay used in conjunction with a rabbit polyclonal laforin antibody was capable of detecting endogenous laforin activity from human and mouse tissue. Importantly, this assay discriminated between laforin activity and other phosphatases. Conclusions The bioassay that we have developed utilizing laforin antibodies and an assay specific for glucan phosphatase activity could prove valuable in the rapid detection of functional laforin in patients to which novel Lafora disease therapies have been administered. PMID:24012855

  3. Protein phosphatase 2A is expressed in response to colony-stimulating factor 1 in macrophages and is required for cell cycle progression independently of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, N J; Moss, S T; Csar, X F; Ward, A C; Hamilton, J A

    1999-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is required for the development of monocytes/macrophages from progenitor cells and for the survival and activation of mature macrophages. The receptor for CSF-1 is the product of the c-fms proto-oncogene, which, on binding ligand, can stimulate a mitogenic response in the appropriate cells. To investigate which genes are regulated in response to CSF-1-stimulation in murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMM), we employed mRNA differential display reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR to identify cDNA species induced by CSF-1. Both Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed the increased expression of one of the cDNA species identified as coding for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an observation not previously reported during the response to a growth factor. To determine the significance of the increased expression of PP2A in response to CSF-1, the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid (OA) was added to CSF-1-treated BMM and found to inhibit DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis with flow cytometry in the presence of OA led to the novel conclusion that PP2A activity is critical for CSF-1-driven BMM cell cycle progression in both early G1 and S phases. Surprisingly, in the light of previous studies with other cells, the PP2A-dependent proliferation could be dissociated from activation by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in macrophages because OA did not affect either the basal or CSF-1-induced ERK activity in BMM. Two-dimensional SDS/PAGE analysis of lysates of 32P-labelled BMM, which had been treated with CSF-1 in the presence or absence of OA, identified candidate substrates for PP2A. PMID:10215588

  4. Probing Mechanistic Similarities between Response Regulator Signaling Proteins and Haloacid Dehalogenase Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Starbird, Chrystal A; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Response regulator signaling proteins and phosphatases of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily share strikingly similar folds, active site geometries, and reaction chemistry. Proteins from both families catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from a substrate to one of their own aspartyl residues, and subsequent hydrolysis of the phosphoprotein. Notable differences include an additional Asp that functions as an acid/base catalyst and an active site well-structured prior to phosphorylation in HAD phosphatases. Both features contribute to reactions substantially faster than those for response regulators. To investigate mechanisms underlying the functional differences between response regulators and HAD phosphatases, we characterized five double mutants of the response regulator CheY designed to mimic HAD phosphatases. Each mutant contained the extra Asp paired with a phosphatase-inspired substitution to potentially position the Asp properly. Only CheY DR (Arg as the anchor) exhibited enhanced rates of both autophosphorylation with phosphoramidate and autodephosphorylation compared to those of wild-type CheY. Crystal structures of CheY DR complexed with MoO4(2-) or WO4(2-) revealed active site hydrogen bonding networks similar to those in HAD·substrate complexes, with the extra Asp positioned for direct interaction with the leaving group (phosphorylation) or nucleophile (dephosphorylation). However, CheY DR reaction kinetics did not exhibit the pH sensitivities expected for acid/base catalysis. Biochemical analysis indicated CheY DR had an enhanced propensity to adopt the active conformation without phosphorylation, but a crystal structure revealed unphosphorylated CheY DR was not locked in the active conformation. Thus, the enhanced reactivity of CheY DR reflected partial acquisition of catalytic and structural features of HAD phosphatases. PMID:25928369

  5. Association of Protein Phosphatase PPM1G With Alcohol Use Disorder and Brain Activity During Behavioral Control in a Genome-Wide Methylation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Barbara; Nymberg, Charlotte; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Wong, Cybele P.; Carvalho, Fabiana M.; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Macare, Christine; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J.; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Bakalkin, Georgy; Mill, Jonathan; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Rose, Richard J.; Yan, Jia; Aliev, Fazil; Dick, Danielle; Kaprio, Jaakko; Desrivières, Sylvane; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective The genetic component of alcohol use disorder is substantial, but monozygotic twin discordance indicates a role for nonheritable differences that could be mediated by epigenetics. Despite growing evidence associating epigenetics and psychiatric disorders, it is unclear how epigenetics, particularly DNA methylation, relate to brain function and behavior, including drinking behavior. Method The authors carried out a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation of 18 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for alcohol use disorder and validated differentially methylated regions. After validation, the authors characterized these differentially methylated regions using personality trait assessment and functional MRI in a sample of 499 adolescents. Results Hypermethylation in the 3′-protein-phosphatase-1G (PPM1G) gene locus was associated with alcohol use disorder. The authors found association of PPM1G hypermethylation with early escalation of alcohol use and increased impulsiveness. They also observed association of PPM1G hypermethylation with increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in the right subthalamic nucleus during an impulsiveness task. Conclusions Overall, the authors provide first evidence for an epigenetic marker associated with alcohol consumption and its underlying neurobehavioral phenotype. PMID:25982659

  6. Purification and characterization of a protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase in an anoxia tolerant animal.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1996-05-01

    A protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase (PK) in vitro was purified and characterized from the foot muscle of the anoxia tolerant gastropod mollusc Busycon canaliculatum. Purification involved three steps: negative chromatography through Blue Dextran and CM Sephadex, affinity chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and gel exclusion chromatography on Sephacryl S-400. Pyruvate kinase phosphatase (PK-Pase) activity was monitored by following changes in PK I50 values for L-alanine that had previously been linked to changes in the degree of PK phosphorylation. The purified PK-Pase gave a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 41 +/- 1 kdaltons. Isoelectric focusing analysis showed that the PK-Pase had an isoelectric point of 4.2 +/- 0.1. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme was a Type 2C protein phosphatase with a pH optimum of 6.5. Maximal activity required the presence of magnesium ions (KM = 7.9 +/- 0.6 microM) although high concentrations of Mg2+ were inhibitory (I50 = 2.3 +/- 0.4 mM). The protein phosphatase activity was not affected by either spermine, cAMP, cGMP, potassium phosphate, tartrate, NaF, HgCl2, citrate or concentrations of CaCl2 less than 10 mM. The enzyme could also use ATP, ADP, and GTP as substrates. PMID:8739044

  7. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  8. Laforin, a protein with many faces: glucan phosphatase, adapter protein, et alii.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Matthew S; Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Sanz, Pascual

    2013-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is a rare, fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of glycogen-like inclusions in the cytoplasm of cells from most tissues of affected patients. One hundred years after the first description of these inclusions, the molecular bases underlying the processes involved in LD physiopathology are finally being elucidated. The main cause of the disease is related to the activity of two proteins, the dual-specificity phosphatase laforin and the E3-ubiquitin ligase malin, which form a functional complex. Laforin is unique in humans, as it is composed of a carbohydrate-binding module attached to a cysteine-based catalytic dual-specificity phosphatase domain. Laforin directly dephosphorylates glycogen, but other proteinaceous substrates, if they exist, have remained elusive. Recently, an emerging set of laforin-binding partners apart from malin have been described, suggestive of laforin roles unrelated to its catalytic activity. Further investigations based on different transgenic mouse models have shown that the laforin-malin complex is also involved in other cellular processes, such as response to endoplasmic reticulum stress and misfolded protein clearance by the lysosomal pathway. However, controversial data and some missing links still make it difficult to assess the concrete relationship between glycogen deregulation and neuronal damage leading to the fatal symptoms observed in LD patients, such as myoclonic seizures and epilepsy. Consequently, clinical treatments are far from being achieved. In the present review, we focus on the knowledge of laforin biology, not only as a glucan phosphatase, but also as an adaptor protein involved in several physiological pathways. PMID:22364389

  9. A New Fluorescence-Based Method Identifies Protein Phosphatases Regulating Lipid Droplet Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L.; Madeira, Juliana B.; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Montero-Lomeli, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    In virtually every cell, neutral lipids are stored in cytoplasmic structures called lipid droplets (LDs) and also referred to as lipid bodies or lipid particles. We developed a rapid high-throughput assay based on the recovery of quenched BODIPY-fluorescence that allows to quantify lipid droplets. The method was validated by monitoring lipid droplet turnover during growth of a yeast culture and by screening a group of strains deleted in genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. In both tests, the fluorimetric assay showed high sensitivity and good agreement with previously reported data using microscopy. We used this method for high-throughput identification of protein phosphatases involved in lipid droplet metabolism. From 65 yeast knockout strains encoding protein phosphatases and its regulatory subunits, 13 strains revealed to have abnormal levels of lipid droplets, 10 of them having high lipid droplet content. Strains deleted for type I protein phosphatases and related regulators (ppz2, gac1, bni4), type 2A phosphatase and its related regulator (pph21 and sap185), type 2C protein phosphatases (ptc1, ptc4, ptc7) and dual phosphatases (pps1, msg5) were catalogued as high-lipid droplet content strains. Only reg1, a targeting subunit of the type 1 phosphatase Glc7p, and members of the nutrient-sensitive TOR pathway (sit4 and the regulatory subunit sap190) were catalogued as low-lipid droplet content strains, which were studied further. We show that Snf1, the homologue of the mammalian AMP-activated kinase, is constitutively phosphorylated (hyperactive) in sit4 and sap190 strains leading to a reduction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In conclusion, our fast and highly sensitive method permitted us to catalogue protein phosphatases involved in the regulation of LD metabolism and present evidence indicating that the TOR pathway and the SNF1/AMPK pathway are connected through the Sit4p-Sap190p pair in the control of lipid droplet biogenesis. PMID:21060891

  10. The ceramide-activated protein phosphatase Sit4p controls lifespan, mitochondrial function and cell cycle progression by regulating hexokinase 2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, António Daniel; Pereira, Clara; Osório, Hugo; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Costa, Vítor

    2016-06-17

    Sit4p is the catalytic subunit of a ceramide-activated PP2A-like phosphatase that regulates cell cycle, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan in yeast. In this study, we show that hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p) is hyperphosphorylated in sit4Δ mutants grown in glucose medium by a Snf1p-independent mechanism and Hxk2p-S15A mutation suppresses phenotypes associated with SIT4 deletion, namely growth arrest at G1 phase, derepression of mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 resistance and lifespan extension. Consistently, the activation of Sit4p in isc1Δ mutants, which has been associated with premature aging, leads to Hxk2p hypophosphorylation, and the expression of Hxk2p-S15E increases the lifespan of isc1Δ cells. The overall results suggest that Hxk2p functions downstream of Sit4p in the control of cell cycle, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress resistance and chronological lifespan. PMID:27163342

  11. Phosphatase activity of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pácová, Z; Kocur, M

    1978-10-01

    1115 strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were tested for phosphatase activity by a conventional plate method and a microtest. The microtest was devised to allow results to be read after 4 h cultivation. Phosphatase activity was found in wide range of species and strains. Besides staphylococci, where the test for phosphatase is successfully used, it may be applied as one of the valuable tests for the differentiation of the following species: Bacillus cereus, B. licheniformis, Aeromonas spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Actinobacillus spp., Pasteurella spp., Xanthomonas spp., Flavobacterium spp., Alteromonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas maltophilia, Ps. cepacia, and some other species of Pseudomonas. The species which gave uniformly negative phosphatase reaction were as follows: Staph. saprophyticus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. PMID:216188

  12. The Arabidopsis AtPP2CA Protein Phosphatase Inhibits the GORK K+ Efflux Channel and Exerts a Dominant Suppressive Effect on Phosphomimetic-activating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Cécile; Boeglin, Martin; Moreau, Bertrand; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Szponarski, Wojciech; Dauzat, Myriam; Michard, Erwan; Gaillard, Isabelle; Chérel, Isabelle

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of the GORK (Guard Cell Outward Rectifying) Shaker channel mediating a massive K(+) efflux in Arabidopsis guard cells by the phosphatase AtPP2CA was investigated. Unlike the gork mutant, the atpp2ca mutants displayed a phenotype of reduced transpiration. We found that AtPP2CA interacts physically with GORK and inhibits GORK activity in Xenopus oocytes. Several amino acid substitutions in the AtPP2CA active site, including the dominant interfering G145D mutation, disrupted the GORK-AtPP2CA interaction, meaning that the native conformation of the AtPP2CA active site is required for the GORK-AtPP2CA interaction. Furthermore, two serines in the GORK ankyrin domain that mimic phosphorylation (Ser to Glu) or dephosphorylation (Ser to Ala) were mutated. Mutations mimicking phosphorylation led to a significant increase in GORK activity, whereas mutations mimicking dephosphorylation had no effect on GORK. In Xenopus oocytes, the interaction of AtPP2CA with "phosphorylated" or "dephosphorylated" GORK systematically led to inhibition of the channel to the same baseline level. Single-channel recordings indicated that the GORK S722E mutation increases the open probability of the channel in the absence, but not in the presence, of AtPP2CA. The dephosphorylation-independent inactivation mechanism of GORK by AtPP2CA is discussed in relation with well known conformational changes in animal Shaker-like channels that lead to channel opening and closing. In plants, PP2C activity would control the stomatal aperture by regulating both GORK and SLAC1, the two main channels required for stomatal closure. PMID:26801610

  13. PrpE, a PPP protein phosphatase from Bacillus subtilis with unusual substrate specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Iwanicki, Adam; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Pierechod, Marcin; Séror, Simone J; Obuchowski, Michał

    2002-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive bacterium with a relatively large number of protein phosphatases. Previous studies have shown that some Ser/Thr phosphatases play an important role in the life cycle of this bacterium [Losick and Stragier (1992) Nature (London) 355, 601-604; Yang, Kang, Brody and Price (1996) Genes Dev. 10, 2265-2275]. In this paper, we report the biochemical properties of a putative, previously uncharacterized phosphatase, PrpE, belonging to the PPP family. This enzyme shares homology with other PPP phosphatases as well as with symmetrical diadenosine tetraphosphatases related to ApaH (symmetrical Ap(4)A hydrolase) from Escherichia coli. A His-tagged recombinant PrpE was purified from E. coli and shown to have Ni(2+)-dependent and okadaic acid-resistant phosphatase activity against a synthetic phosphorylated peptide and hydrolase activity against diadenosine 5',5"'-tetraphosphate. Unexpectedly, PrpE was able to remove phosphate from phosphotyrosine, but not from phosphothreonine or phosphoserine. PMID:12059787

  14. Protein phosphatase 2C dephosphorylates and inactivates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Sue M.; Berger, Herbert A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    cAMP-dependent phosphorylation activates the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in epithelia. However, the protein phosphatase (PP) that dephosphorylates and inactivates CFTR in airway and intestinal epithelia, two major sites of disease, is not certain. We found that in airway and colonic epithelia, neither okadaic acid nor FK506 prevented inactivation of CFTR when cAMP was removed. These results suggested that a phosphatase distinct from PP1, PP2A, and PP2B was responsible. Because PP2C is insensitive to these inhibitors, we tested the hypothesis that it regulates CFTR. We found that PP2Cα is expressed in airway and T84 intestinal epithelia. To test its activity on CFTR, we generated recombinant human PP2Cα and found that it dephosphorylated CFTR and an R domain peptide in vitro. Moreover, in cell-free patches of membrane, addition of PP2Cα inactivated CFTR Cl− channels; reactivation required readdition of kinase. Finally, coexpression of PP2Cα with CFTR in epithelia reduced the Cl− current and increased the rate of channel inactivation. These results suggest that PP2C may be the okadaic acid-insensitive phosphatase that regulates CFTR in human airway and T84 colonic epithelia. It has been suggested that phosphatase inhibitors could be of therapeutic value in cystic fibrosis; our data suggest that PP2C may be an important phosphatase to target. PMID:9380758

  15. Possible protein phosphatase inhibition by bis(hydroxyethyl) sulfide, a hydrolysis product of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the natural vesicant cantharidin was shown to bind exclusively to and inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse tissue extracts (Li and Casida (1992) Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 11867-11870). To explore the generality of this effect in vesicant action, we measured the protein serinelthreonine phosphatase activity in mouse liver cytosol (in the form of the okadaic acid inhibitable increment of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) phosphatase activity) in the presence of aqueous sulfur mustard or its hydrolysis product, bis(hydroxyethyl)sulfide (TDG). Sulfur mustard inhibited p-NPP hydrolysis. However, inhibition correlated with the time elapsed between thawing and the addition of mustard to the enzyme preparation, not with concentration. TDG exhibited a direct, concentration-related inhibition of p-NPP hydrolysis between 30 and 300 1LM. We conclude that sulfur mustard also has an inhibitory effect on protein serinelthreonine phosphatases. However, the inhibition is an effect of its non-alkykating hydrolysis product TDG, not of sulfur mustard itself.

  16. The Baculovirus Uses a Captured Host Phosphatase to Induce Enhanced Locomotory Activity in Host Caterpillars

    PubMed Central

    Katsuma, Susumu; Koyano, Yasue; Kang, WonKyung; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Kamita, Shizuo George; Shimada, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus is a classic example of a parasite that alters the behavior or physiology of its host so that progeny transmission is maximized. Baculoviruses do this by inducing enhanced locomotory activity (ELA) that causes the host caterpillars to climb to the upper foliage of plants. We previously reported that this behavior is not induced in silkworms that are infected with a mutant baculovirus lacking its protein tyrosine phosphatase (ptp) gene, a gene likely captured from an ancestral host. Here we show that the product of the ptp gene, PTP, associates with baculovirus ORF1629 as a virion structural protein, but surprisingly phosphatase activity associated with PTP was not required for the induction of ELA. Interestingly, the ptp knockout baculovirus showed significantly reduced infectivity of larval brain tissues. Collectively, we show that the modern baculovirus uses the host-derived phosphatase to establish adequate infection for ELA as a virion-associated structural protein rather than as an enzyme. PMID:22496662

  17. Positive Regulation of TRAF6-Dependent Innate Immune Responses by Protein Phosphatase PP1-γ

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-yuan; Nguyen, Quy T.; Maestre, Ana M.; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Secundino, Ismael; De Jesus, Paul D.; König, Renate; Simon, Viviana; Nizet, Victor; MacLeod, Graham; Varmuza, Susannah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Chanda, Sumit K.

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune sensors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) differentially utilize adaptor proteins and additional molecular mediators to ensure robust and precise immune responses to pathogen challenge. Through a gain-of-function genetic screen, we identified the gamma catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-γ) as a positive regulator of MyD88-dependent proinflammatory innate immune activation. PP1-γ physically interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6, and enhances the activity of TRAF6 towards itself and substrates such as IKKγ, whereas enzymatically inactive PP1-γ represses these events. Importantly, these activities were found to be critical for cellular innate responses to pathogen challenge and microbial clearance in both mouse macrophages and human monocyte lines. These data indicate that PP1-γ phosphatase activity regulates overall TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase function and promotes NF-κB-mediated innate signaling responses. PMID:24586659

  18. Decoding signals for membrane protein assembly using alkaline phosphatase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, K; Ehrmann, M; Beckwith, J

    1991-01-01

    We have used genetic methods to investigate the role of the different domains of a bacterial cytoplasmic membrane protein, MalF, in determining its topology. This was done by analyzing the effects of MalF topology of deleting various domains of the protein using MalF-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins. Our results show that the cytoplasmic domains of the protein are the pre-eminent topogenic signals. These domains contain information that determines their cytoplasmic location and, thus, the orientation of the membrane spanning segments surrounding them. Periplasmic domains do not appear to have equivalent information specifying their location and membrane spanning segments do not contain information defining their orientation in the membrane. The strength of cytoplasmic domains as topogenic signals varies, correlated with the density of positively charged amino acids within them. Images PMID:1915262

  19. DL-Buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine affects intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, A; Alisio, A; Díaz de Barboza, G; Baudino, V; Tolosa de Talamoni, N

    2001-06-01

    The susceptibility of intestinal alkaline phosphatase to DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine was investigated in chicks fed a commercial diet. The results show that DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine produced inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity. This effect showed dose- and time-dependency and it was caused by either in vivo DL-buthionine-S,R- sulfoximine administration or in vitro DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine incubation with villus tip enterocytes. DL-Buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine did not act directly on intestinal alkaline phosphatase but it provoked glutathione depletion which led to changes in the redox state of the enterocyte as shown by the production of free hydroxyl radicals and an incremental increase in the carbonyl content of proteins. The reversibility of the buthionine sulfoximine effect on intestinal alkaline phosphatase was proved by addition of glutathione monoester to the duodenal loop. PMID:11423381

  20. Peptide Microarrays for Real-Time Kinetic Profiling of Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity of Recombinant Phosphatases and Phosphatases in Lysates of Cells or Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Hovestad-Bijl, Liesbeth; van Ameijde, Jeroen; Pijnenburg, Dirk; Hilhorst, Riet; Liskamp, Rob; Ruijtenbeek, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A high-throughput method for the determination of the kinetics of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in a microarray format is presented, allowing real-time monitoring of the dephosphorylation of a 3-nitro-phosphotyrosine residue. The 3-nitro-phosphotyrosine residue is incorporated in potential PTP substrates. The peptide substrates are immobilized onto a porous surface in discrete spots. After dephosphorylation by a PTP, a 3-nitrotyrosine residue is formed that can be detected by a specific, sequence-independent antibody. The rate of dephosphorylation can be measured simultaneously on 12 microarrays, each comprising three concentrations of 48 clinically relevant peptides, using 1.0-5.0 μg of protein from a cell or tissue lysate or 0.1-2.0 μg of purified phosphatase. The data obtained compare well with solution phase assays involving the corresponding unmodified phosphotyrosine substrates. This technology, characterized by high-throughput (12 assays in less than 2 h), multiplexing and low sample requirements, facilitates convenient and unbiased investigation of the enzymatic activity of the PTP enzyme family, for instance by profiling of PTP substrate specificities, evaluation of PTP inhibitors and pinpointing changes in PTP activity in biological samples related to diseases. PMID:27514800

  1. Potential Role for Purple Acid Phosphatase in the Dephosphorylation of Wall Proteins in Tobacco Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaida, Rumi; Serada, Satoshi; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi; Neumetzler, Lutz; Pauly, Markus; Sampedro, Javier; Zarra, Ignacio; Hayashi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takako S.

    2010-01-01

    It is not yet known whether dephosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by phosphatases occurs in the apoplastic space. In this study, we found that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) purple acid phosphatase could dephosphorylate the phosphoryl residues of three apoplastic proteins, two of which were identified as α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase. The dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of recombinant α-xylosidase resulted in a decrease and an increase in its activity, respectively, when xyloglucan heptasaccharide was used as a substrate. Attempted overexpression of the tobacco purple acid phosphatase NtPAP12 in tobacco cells not only decreased the activity levels of the glycosidases but also increased levels of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the apoplast during the exponential phase. We suggest that purple acid phosphatase controls the activity of α-xylosidase and β-glucosidase, which are responsible for the degradation of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the cell walls. PMID:20357138

  2. REG1 binds to protein phosphatase type 1 and regulates glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, J; Carlson, M

    1995-01-01

    Protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) is encoded by GLC7, an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The GLC7 phosphatase is required for glucose repression and appears to function antagonistically to the SNF1 protein kinase. Previously, we characterized a mutation, glc7-T152K, that relieves glucose repression but does not interfere with the function of GLC7 in glycogen metabolism. We proposed that the mutant GLC7T152K phosphatase is defective in its interaction with a regulatory subunit that directs participation of PP1 in the glucose repression mechanism. Here, we present evidence that REG1, a protein required for glucose repression, is one such regulatory subunit. We show that REG1 is physically associated with GLC7. REG1 interacts with GLC7 strongly and specifically in the two-hybrid system, and REG1 and GLC7 fusion proteins co-immunoprecipitate from cell extracts. Moreover, overexpression of a REG1 fusion protein suppresses the glc7-T152K mutant defect in glucose repression. This and other genetic evidence indicate that the two proteins function together in regulating glucose repression. These results suggest that REG1 is a regulatory subunit of PP1 that targets its activity to proteins in the glucose repression regulatory pathway. Images PMID:8846786

  3. Protein Phosphatase-1α Interacts with and Dephosphorylates Polycystin-1

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Stephen C.; Puri, Sanjeev; Wallace, Darren P.; Calvet, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Polycystin signaling is likely to be regulated by phosphorylation. While a number of potential protein kinases and their target phosphorylation sites on polycystin-1 have been identified, the corresponding phosphatases have not been extensively studied. We have now determined that polycystin-1 is a regulatory subunit for protein phosphatase-1α (PP1α). Sequence analysis has revealed the presence of a highly conserved PP1-interaction motif in the cytosolic, C-terminal tail of polycystin-1; and we have shown that transfected PP1α specifically co-immunoprecipitates with a polycystin-1 C-tail construct. To determine whether PP1α dephosphorylates polycystin-1, a PKA-phosphorylated GST-polycystin-1 fusion protein was shown to be dephosphorylated by PP1α but not by PP2B (calcineurin). Mutations within the PP1-binding motif of polycystin-1, including an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD)-associated mutation, significantly reduced PP1α-mediated dephosphorylation of polycystin-1. The results suggest that polycystin-1 forms a holoenzyme complex with PP1α via a conserved PP1-binding motif within the polycystin-1 C-tail, and that PKA-phosphorylated polycystin-1 serves as a substrate for the holoenzyme. PMID:22675472

  4. Disruption of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) function in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase that plays a major role in the development of synaptic plasticity. Recent findings have implicated STEP in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, Huntington’s disease, stroke/ischemia, and stress-related psychiatric disorders. In these disorders, STEP protein expression levels and activity are dysregulated, contributing to the cognitive deficits that are present. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings on STEP, discuss how STEP expression and activity are maintained during normal cognitive function, and how disruptions in STEP activity contribute to a number of illnesses. PMID:25218562

  5. Histone II-A stimulates glucose-6-phosphatase and reveals mannose-6-phosphatase activities without permeabilization of liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    St-Denis, J F; Annabi, B; Khoury, H; van de Werve, G

    1995-01-01

    The effect of histone II-A on glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase activities was investigated in relation to microsomal membrane permeability. It was found that glucose-6-phosphatase activity in histone II-A-pretreated liver microsomes was stimulated to the same extent as in detergent-permeabilized microsomes, and that the substrate specificity of the enzyme for glucose 6-phosphate was lost in histone II-A-pretreated microsomes, as [U-14C]glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis was inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate and [U-14C]mannose 6-phosphate hydrolysis was increased. The accumulation of [U-14C]glucose from [U-14C]glucose 6-phosphate into untreated microsomes was completely abolished in detergent-treated vesicles, but was increased in histone II-A-treated microsomes, accounting for the increased glucose-6-phosphatase activity, and demonstrating that the microsomal membrane was still intact. The stimulation of glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase activities by histone II-A was found to be reversed by EGTA. It is concluded that the effects of histone II-A on glucose-6-phosphatase and mannose-6-phosphatase are not caused by the permeabilization of the microsomal membrane. The measurement of mannose-6-phosphatase latency to evaluate the intactness of the vesicles is therefore inappropriate. PMID:7646448

  6. Tailoring a low-molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase into an efficient reporting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Shenzhen Graduate School of Peking University, Shenzhen 518055

    2009-05-15

    Fusion reporter methods are important tools for biology and biotechnology. An ideal reporter protein in a fusion system should have little effects on its fusion partner and provide an easy and accurate readout. Therefore, a small monomeric protein with high activity for detection assays often has advantages as a reporter protein. For this purpose, we have tailored the human B-form low-molecular-weight phosphotyrosyl phosphatase (HPTP-B) to increase its general applicability as a potent reporter protein. With the aim to eliminate interference from cysteine residues in the native HPTP-B, combined with a systematic survey of N- and C-terminal truncated variants, a series of cysteine to serine mutations were introduced, which allowed isolation of an engineered soluble protein with suitable biophysical properties. When we deleted both the first six residues and the last two residues, we still obtained a soluble mutant protein with correct folding and similar activity with wild-type protein. This mutant with two cysteine to serine mutations, HPTP-B{sup N{sub {Delta}}6-C{sub {Delta}}2-C90S-C109S}, has good potential as an optimal reporter.

  7. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  8. Gossypol inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity at multiple sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcineurin, the calcium/calmodulin dependant serine/threonine phosphatase is the target for the immunosuppressant drugs FK506 and cyclosporine A. These calcineurin inhibitors each require an immunophilin protein cofactor. Gossypol, a polyphenol produced by the cotton plant, inhibits calcineurin, ...

  9. Reactivity of Cdc25 phosphatase at low pH and with thiophosphorylated protein substrate.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Johannes

    2005-08-01

    Cdc25s, dual-specificity phosphatases that dephosphorylate and activate cyclin-dependent kinases, are important regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Herein, we probe the protonation state of the phosphate on the protein substrate of Cdc25 by pH-dependent studies and thiosubstitution. We have extended the useable range of pH for this enzyme substrate pair by using high concentrations of glycerol under acidic conditions. Using the protein substrate, we find a slope of 2 for the acidic side of the bell-shaped pH-rate profile, as found with other protein tyrosine phosphatases. Using thiophosphorylated protein substrate, we find no change in the basic side of the pH-rate profile, despite a large reduction in activity as measured by kcat/Km (0.18%) or kcat (0. 11%). In contrast, the acidic side of the profile changes shows a slope of 1, consistent with the 1.5 pH unit shift associated with thiosubstitution. Thus, Cdc25, like other protein phosphatases, uses a dianionic phosphorylated substrate. PMID:16023486

  10. Identification of protein phosphatases dephosphorylating mRNP proteins from cryptobiotic gastrulae of the brine shrimp A. salina.

    PubMed

    Thoen, C; Van Hove, L; Cohen, P; Slegers, H

    1985-08-30

    In the cytosol of A. salina cryptobiotic gastrulae at least five protein phosphatases active on phosphorylase a have been detected by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Only two of these enzymes (PP-X and PP-Y) are active in mRNP dephosphorylation. Both enzymes are insensitive to inhibitor-1 and -2 and stimulation of enzymatic activity (2.5-fold with PP-X and 6.5-fold with PP-Y) can be accomplished by ethanol treatment of the native enzymes, or freeze-thawing in the presence of 1.7% (v/v) 2-mercaptoethanol. These properties allow PP-X and PP-Y to be classified as type-2A enzymes according to the nomenclature of Cohen. This paper is the first report of protein phosphatases capable of dephosphorylating mRNP proteins. PMID:2994667

  11. A novel strategy for the development of selective active-site inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like proteins islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2beta).

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Paul G; Peters, Günther H; Andersen, Henrik Sune; Hendriks, Wiljan; Møller, Niels Peter H

    2003-01-01

    Islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2beta) are atypical members of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family that are characterized by a lack of activity against conventional PTP substrates. The physiological role(s) of these proteins remain poorly defined, although recent studies indicate that IA-2 may be involved in granule trafficking and exocytosis. To further understand their function, we have embarked upon developing low-molecular-mass inhibitors of IA-2 and IA-2beta. Previously, we have shown that a general PTP inhibitor, 2-(oxalylamino)benzoic acid (OBA), can be developed into highly selective and potent inhibitors of PTP1B. However, since wild-type IA-2 and IA-2beta lack conventional PTP activity, a novel strategy was designed whereby catalytically active species were generated by 'back-mutating' key non-consensus catalytic region residues to those of PTP1B. These mutants were then used as tools with which to test the potency and selectivity of OBA and a variety of its derivatives. Catalytically competent IA-2 and IA-2beta species were generated by 'back-mutation' of only three key residues (equivalent to Tyr(46), Asp(181) and Ala(217) using the human PTP1B numbering) to those of PTP1B. Importantly, enzyme kinetic analyses indicated that the overall fold of both mutant and wild-type IA-2 and IA-2beta was similar to that of classic PTPs. In particular, one derivative of OBA, namely 7-(1,1-dioxo-1 H -benzo[ d ]isothiazol-3-yloxymethyl)-2-(oxalylamino)-4,7-dihydro-5 H -thieno[2,3- c ]pyran-3 -carboxylic acid ('Compound 6 ' shown in the main paper), which inhibited IA-2beta((S762Y/Y898P/D933A)) (IA-2beta in which Ser(762) has been mutated to tyrosine, Tyr(898) to proline, and Asp(933) to alanine) with a K (i) value of approximately 8 microM, appeared ideal for future lead optimization. Thus molecular modelling of this classical, competitive inhibitor in the catalytic site of wild-type IA-2beta identified two residues (Ser(762) and Asp

  12. Genome-wide review of transcriptional complexity in mouse protein kinases and phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alistair RR; Taylor, Darrin F; Crowe, Mark L; Chalk, Alistair M; Waddell, Nic J; Kolle, Gabriel; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Kodzius, Rimantas; Katayama, Shintaro; Wells, Christine; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Grimmond, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternative transcripts of protein kinases and protein phosphatases are known to encode peptides with altered substrate affinities, subcellular localizations, and activities. We undertook a systematic study to catalog the variant transcripts of every protein kinase-like and phosphatase-like locus of mouse . Results By reviewing all available transcript evidence, we found that at least 75% of kinase and phosphatase loci in mouse generate alternative splice forms, and that 44% of these loci have well supported alternative 5' exons. In a further analysis of full-length cDNAs, we identified 69% of loci as generating more than one peptide isoform. The 1,469 peptide isoforms generated from these loci correspond to 1,080 unique Interpro domain combinations, many of which lack catalytic or interaction domains. We also report on the existence of likely dominant negative forms for many of the receptor kinases and phosphatases, including some 26 secreted decoys (seven known and 19 novel: Alk, Csf1r, Egfr, Epha1, 3, 5,7 and 10, Ephb1, Flt1, Flt3, Insr, Insrr, Kdr, Met, Ptk7, Ptprc, Ptprd, Ptprg, Ptprl, Ptprn, Ptprn2, Ptpro, Ptprr, Ptprs, and Ptprz1) and 13 transmembrane forms (four known and nine novel: Axl, Bmpr1a, Csf1r, Epha4, 5, 6 and 7, Ntrk2, Ntrk3, Pdgfra, Ptprk, Ptprm, Ptpru). Finally, by mining public gene expression data (MPSS and microarrays), we confirmed tissue-specific expression of ten of the novel isoforms. Conclusion These findings suggest that alternative transcripts of protein kinases and phosphatases are produced that encode different domain structures, and that these variants are likely to play important roles in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:16507138

  13. Dual 4- and 5-phosphatase activities regulate SopB-dependent phosphoinositide dynamics to promote bacterial entry.

    PubMed

    Piscatelli, Heather L; Li, Menghan; Zhou, Daoguo

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella are able to invade non-phagocytic cells such as intestinal epithelial cells by modulating the host actin cytoskeleton to produce membrane ruffles. Two type III effector proteins SopB and SopE play key roles to this modulation. SopE is a known guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) capable of activating Rac1 and CDC42. SopB is a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase promoting membrane ruffles and invasion of Salmonella through undefined mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that the 4-phosphatase activity of SopB is required for PtdIns-3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) accumulation and SopB-mediated invasion. We show here that both the 4-phosphatase as well as the 5-phosphatase activities of SopB are essential in ruffle formation and subsequent invasion. We found that the 5-phosphatase activity of SopB is likely responsible for generating PtdIns-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2 ) and subsequent recruitment of sorting nexin 9 (SNX9), an actin modulating protein. Intriguingly, the 4-phosphatase activity is responsible for the dephosphorylation of PtdIns(3,4)P2 into PtdIns(3)P. Alone, neither activity is sufficient for ruffling but when acting in conjunction with one another, the 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activities led to SNX9-mediated ruffling and Salmonella invasion. This work reveals the unique ability of bacterial effector protein SopB to utilize both its 4- and 5-phosphatase activities to regulate phosphoinositide dynamics to promote bacterial entry. PMID:26537021

  14. Antiapoptotic activity of Akt is down-regulated by Ca2+ in myocardiac H9c2 cells. Evidence of Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of protein phosphatase 2Ac.

    PubMed

    Yasuoka, Chie; Ihara, Yoshito; Ikeda, Satoshi; Miyahara, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Takahito; Kohno, Shigeru

    2004-12-01

    Cell survival signaling of the Akt/protein kinase B pathway was influenced by a change in the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) for over 2 h via the regulation of a Ser/Thr phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2Ac (PP2Ac), in rat myocardiac H9c2 cells. Akt was down-regulated when [Ca2+]i was elevated by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, but was up-regulated when it was suppressed by 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester (BAPTA-AM), a cell permeable Ca2+ chelator. The inactivation of Akt was well correlated with the susceptibility to oxidant-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. To investigate the mechanism of the Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Akt via the regulation of PP2A, we examined the transcriptional regulation of PP2Acalpha in H9c2 cells with Ca2+ modulators. Transcription of the PP2Acalpha gene was increased by thapsigargin but decreased by BAPTA-AM. The promoter activity was examined and the cAMP response element (CRE) was found responsible for the Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of PP2Acalpha. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CRE-binding protein increased with thapsigargin but decreased with BAPTA-AM. A long term change of [Ca2+]i regulates PP2Acalpha gene transcription via CRE, resulting in a change in the activation status of Akt leading to an altered susceptibility to apoptosis. PMID:15375154

  15. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Protein Phosphatase 5 from the Cantharidin-Producing Blister Beetle, Epicauta chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi’en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases which has been recognized in regulation of diverse cellular processes. A cDNA fragment encoding PP5 (EcPP5) was cloned and characterized from the cantharidin-producing blister beetle, E. chinensis. EcPP5 contains an open reading frame of 1500 bp that encodes a protein of 56.89 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 88% and 68% identities to the PP5 of Tribolium castaneum and humans, respectively. Analysis of the primary sequence shows that EcPP5 has three TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) motifs at its N-terminal region and contains a highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. RT-PCR reveals that EcPP5 is expressed in all developmental stages and in different tissues. The recombinant EcPP5 (rEcPP5) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein exhibited phosphatase activity towards pNPP (p-nitrophenyl phosphate) and phosphopeptides, and its activity can be enhanced by arachidonic acid. In vitro inhibition study revealed that protein phosphatase inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall, inhibited its activity. Further, protein phosphatase activity of total soluble protein extract from E. chinensis adults could be impeded by these inhibitors suggesting there might be some mechanism to protect this beetle from being damaged by its self-produced cantharidin. PMID:24351830

  16. The protein phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A stimulates chemokine production by human synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N J; Watson, M L; Westwick, J

    1995-01-01

    Cultured human synovial fibroblasts express mRNA for the chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES), when stimulated with IL-1 or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Calyculin A, a potent type 1/2A protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, was used to examine the role of protein phosphatases in the regulation of chemokine gene expression. Calyculin A (1 nM) mimicked IL-1 by inducing IL-8 and MCP-1 mRNA expression in synovial cells. IL-8 mRNA was induced over a similar time period (1-6 h) in response to IL-1 or calyculin A, whereas MCP-1 mRNA was induced more rapidly (1-2 h) by calyculin A than by IL-1 (4-6 h). Expression of RANTES mRNA occurred in response to TNF alpha, but could not be induced by stimulation with calyculin A alone. These results suggest that inhibition of protein phosphatase type 1/2A may have a differential role in the regulation of the expression of each of the chemokine genes. Synovial fibroblasts also secreted IL-8 and IL-6 peptide when stimulated with either IL-1/TNF alpha or calyculin A. The amount of IL-8 and IL-6 peptide produced in response to calyculin A was significantly increased above that produced by untreated synovial cells, though it was much less than the amount induced by IL-1 or TNF alpha. Calyculin A also acted synergistically with IL-1 or TNF alpha to cause a 2-fold potentiation of IL-1- or TNF alpha-induced IL-8 mRNA and peptide and RANTES mRNA expression. These results suggest that although inhibition of a protein phosphatase may be able to regulate the magnitude of IL-1-induced chemokine gene expression, the IL-1 signal transduction pathway involves components in addition to phosphatase inhibition, possibly including the activation of a protein kinase, the action of which may be opposed by a protein phosphatase inhibited by calyculin A. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  17. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC. PMID:25461266

  18. The Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulatory Subunit B56γ Mediates Suppression of T Cell Receptor (TCR)-induced Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Rebecca; Becker, Michael S.; Brechmann, Markus; Mock, Thomas; Arnold, Rüdiger; Krammer, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB is an important transcription factor in the immune system, and aberrant NF-κB activity contributes to malignant diseases and autoimmunity. In T cells, NF-κB is activated upon TCR stimulation, and signal transduction to NF-κB activation is triggered by a cascade of phosphorylation events. However, fine-tuning and termination of TCR signaling are only partially understood. Phosphatases oppose the role of kinases by removing phosphate moieties. The catalytic activity of the protein phosphatase PP2A has been implicated in the regulation of NF-κB. PP2A acts in trimeric complexes in which the catalytic subunit is promiscuous and the regulatory subunit confers substrate specificity. To understand and eventually target NF-κB-specific PP2A functions it is essential to define the regulatory PP2A subunit involved. So far, the regulatory PP2A subunit that mediates NF-κB suppression in T cells remained undefined. By performing a siRNA screen in Jurkat T cells harboring a NF-κB-responsive luciferase reporter, we identified the PP2A regulatory subunit B56γ as negative regulator of NF-κB in TCR signaling. B56γ was strongly up-regulated upon primary human T cell activation, and B56γ silencing induced increased IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα phosphorylation upon TCR stimulation. B56γ silencing enhanced NF-κB activity, resulting in increased NF-κB target gene expression including the T cell cytokine IL-2. In addition, T cell proliferation was increased upon B56γ silencing. These data help to understand the physiology of PP2A function in T cells and the pathophysiology of diseases involving PP2A and NF-κB. PMID:24719332

  19. Phosphatase activity of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus PTP is dispensable for enhanced locomotory activity in B. mori larvae.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Baculovirus-induced enhanced locomotory activity (ELA) is not induced in caterpillars infected with a mutant Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) or Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) lacking a functional protein tyrosine phosphatase gene (ptp). Previous studies suggest that the PTP proteins from BmNPV and AcMNPV act in different ways to induce ELA, i.e., BmNPV PTP is utilized as a virion structural component, whereas AcMNPV PTP requires its phosphatase activity. Here, I generated and characterized two new BmNPV mutants expressing enzymatically inactive PTP proteins and confirmed that the phosphatase activity of PTP is not required for ELA induction in BmNPV-infected B. mori larvae. PMID:26550695

  20. Deletion of conserved protein phosphatases reverses defects associated with mitochondrial DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Garipler, Görkem; Mutlu, Nebibe; Lack, Nathan A; Dunn, Cory D

    2014-01-28

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by signaling pathways sensitive to extracellular conditions and to the internal environment of the cell. Therefore, treatments for disease caused by mutation of mtDNA may emerge from studies of how signal transduction pathways command mitochondrial function. We have examined the role of phosphatases under the control of the conserved α4/Tap42 protein in cells lacking a mitochondrial genome. We found that deletion of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) or of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) protects cells from the reduced proliferation, mitochondrial protein import defects, lower mitochondrial electrochemical potential, and nuclear transcriptional response associated with mtDNA damage. Moreover, PP2A or PP6 deletion allows viability of a sensitized yeast strain after mtDNA loss. Interestingly, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of the mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase was required for the full benefits of PP6 deletion and also for proliferation of otherwise wild-type cells lacking mtDNA. Our work highlights the important role that nutrient-responsive signaling pathways can play in determining the response to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24474773

  1. A cluster of protein kinases and phosphatases modulated in fetal Down syndrome (trisomy 21) brain.

    PubMed

    Weitzdoerfer, Rachel; Toran, Nuria; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Pollak, Arnold; Dierssen, Mara; Lubec, Gert

    2015-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) is the most frequent cause of mental retardation with major cognitive and behavioral deficits. Although a series of aberrant biochemical pathways has been reported, work on signaling proteins is limited. It was, therefore, the aim of the study to test a selection of protein kinases and phosphatases known to be essential for memory and learning mechanisms in fetal DS brain. 12 frontal cortices from DS brain were compared to 12 frontal cortices from controls obtained at legal abortions. Proteins were extracted from brains and western blotting with specific antibodies was carried out. Primary results were used for networking (IntAct Molecular Interaction Database) and individual predicted pathway components were subsequently quantified by western blotting. Levels of calcium-calmodulin kinase II alpha, transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 as well as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were reduced in cortex of DS subjects and network generation pointed to interaction between PTEN and the dendritic spine protein drebrin that was subsequently determined and reduced levels were observed. The findings of reduced levels of cognitive-function-related protein kinases and the phosphatase may be relevant for interpretation of previous work and may be useful for the design of future studies on signaling in DS brain. Moreover, decreased drebrin levels may point to dendritic spine abnormalities. PMID:25740605

  2. Integrative Transcriptome Profiling of Cognitive Aging and Its Preservation through Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, C. Sehwan; Valomon, Amandine; Welzl, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been reported to delay or restore age-related cognitive deficits, however, a mechanism to account for the cause and progression of normal cognitive decline and its preservation by environmental enrichment is lacking. Using genome-wide SAGE-Seq, we provide a global assessment of differentially expressed genes altered with age and environmental enrichment in the hippocampus. Qualitative and quantitative proteomics in naïve young and aged mice was used to further identify phosphorylated proteins differentially expressed with age. We found that increased expression of endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibitors in aged mice may be characteristic of long-term environmental enrichment and improved cognitive status. As such, hippocampus-dependent performances in spatial, recognition, and associative memories, which are sensitive to aging, were preserved by environmental enrichment and accompanied by decreased protein phosphatase activity. Age-associated phosphorylated proteins were also found to correspond to the functional categories of age-associated genes identified through transcriptome analysis. Together, this study provides a comprehensive map of the transcriptome and proteome in the aging brain, and elucidates endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibition as a potential means through which environmental enrichment may ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:26102285

  3. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  4. Human cytomegalovirus carries serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and a host-cell derived PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, S; Turowski, P; Picard, L; Goris, J; Landini, M P; Topilko, A; Hemmings, B; Bessia, C; Garcia, A; Virelizier, J L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. When studying hyper-immediate-early events after contact between CMV virions and the cell membrane, we observed a hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins within 10 min. This can be explained in part by our finding that purified CMV contains serine/threonine protein phosphatase activities. Biochemical analyses indicate that this protein phosphatase activity has all characteristics of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A). Specifically, PP1 accounts for approximately 30% and PP2A accounts for the remaining 70% of the phosphorylase phosphatase activity found. CMV produced in astrocytoma cells stably expressing an amino-terminally tagged PP2A catalytic subunit contained tagged enzyme, thus demonstrating the cellular origin of CMV-associated PP2A. PP2A is specifically found inside the virus, associated with the nucleocapsid fraction. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of purified virus revealed the presence of the catalytic subunits of PP2A and PP1. Furthermore, the catalytic subunit of PP2A appears to be complexed to the regulatory subunits PR65 and PR55, which is also the most abundant configuration of this enzyme found in the host cells. Incubation of virus with okadaic acid before contact of CMV with cells prevented hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins, thus demonstrating the role of CMV-associated phosphatases in this phenomenon. CMV can thus transport an active enzyme from one cell to another. PMID:8627658

  5. Protein Phosphatase 2A Mediates Oxidative Stress Induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chong-xin; Lv, Bo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases, which is characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and fragility fractures. Age-related oxidative stress is highly associated with impaired osteoblastic dysfunctions and subsequent osteoporosis. In osteoblasts (bone formation cells), reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated and further cause lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA lesions, leading to osteoblastic dysfunctions, dysdifferentiations, and apoptosis. Although much progress has been made, the mechanism responsible for oxidative stress induced cellular alternations and osteoblastic toxicity is still not fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein phosphatase in mammalian cells, mediates oxidative stress induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our results showed that lipid peroxidation products (4-HNE) may induce dramatic oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and apoptosis in osteoblasts. These oxidative stress responses may ectopically activate PP2A phosphatase activity, which may be mediated by inactivation of AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid might partly prevent osteoblastic apoptosis under oxidative conditions. These findings may reveal a novel mechanism to clarify the role of oxidative stress for osteoblastic apoptosis and provide new possibilities for the treatment of related bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. PMID:26538836

  6. Protein Phosphatase 2A Mediates Oxidative Stress Induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chong-xin; Lv, Bo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases, which is characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and fragility fractures. Age-related oxidative stress is highly associated with impaired osteoblastic dysfunctions and subsequent osteoporosis. In osteoblasts (bone formation cells), reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated and further cause lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA lesions, leading to osteoblastic dysfunctions, dysdifferentiations, and apoptosis. Although much progress has been made, the mechanism responsible for oxidative stress induced cellular alternations and osteoblastic toxicity is still not fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein phosphatase in mammalian cells, mediates oxidative stress induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our results showed that lipid peroxidation products (4-HNE) may induce dramatic oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and apoptosis in osteoblasts. These oxidative stress responses may ectopically activate PP2A phosphatase activity, which may be mediated by inactivation of AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid might partly prevent osteoblastic apoptosis under oxidative conditions. These findings may reveal a novel mechanism to clarify the role of oxidative stress for osteoblastic apoptosis and provide new possibilities for the treatment of related bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. PMID:26538836

  7. Chasing Phosphoarginine Proteins: Development of a Selective Enrichment Method Using a Phosphatase Trap*

    PubMed Central

    Trentini, Débora Broch; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging post-translational protein modification implicated in the bacterial stress response. Although early reports suggested that arginine phosphorylation also occurs in higher eukaryotes, its overall prevalence was never studied using modern mass spectrometry methods, owing to technical difficulties arising from the acid lability of phosphoarginine. As shown recently, the McsB and YwlE proteins from Bacillus subtilis function as a highly specific protein arginine kinase and phosphatase couple, shaping the phosphoarginine proteome. Using a B. subtilis ΔywlE strain as a source for arginine-phosphorylated proteins, we were able to adapt mass spectrometry (MS) protocols to the special chemical properties of the arginine modification. Despite this progress, the analysis of protein arginine phosphorylation in eukaryotes is still challenging, given the great abundance of serine/threonine phosphorylations that would compete with phosphoarginine during the phosphopeptide enrichment procedure, as well as during data-dependent MS acquisition. We thus set out to establish a method for the selective enrichment of arginine-phosphorylated proteins as an initial step in the phosphoproteomic analysis. For this purpose, we developed a substrate-trapping mutant of the YwlE phosphatase that retains binding affinity toward arginine-phosphorylated proteins but cannot hydrolyze the captured substrates. By testing a number of active site substitutions, we identified a YwlE mutant (C9A) that stably binds to arginine-phosphorylated proteins. We further improved the substrate-trapping efficiency by impeding the oligomerization of the phosphatase mutant. The engineered YwlE trap efficiently captured arginine-phosphorylated proteins from complex B. subtilis ΔywlE cell extracts, thus facilitating identification of phosphoarginine sites in the large pool of cellular protein modifications. In conclusion, we present a novel tool for the selective enrichment and

  8. Prostatic acid phosphatase is the main acid phosphatase with 5'-ectonucleotidase activity in the male mouse saliva and regulates salivation.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Quintero, Ileana B; Kipar, Anja; Herrala, Annakaisa M; Pulkka, Anitta E; Saarinen, Lilli; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Vihko, Pirkko

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that in addition to the well-known secreted isoform of prostatic acid phosphatase (sPAP), a transmembrane isoform exists (TMPAP) that interacts with snapin (a SNARE-associated protein) and regulates the endo-/exocytic pathways. We have also shown that PAP has 5'-ectonucleotidase and thiamine monophosphatase activity and elicits antinociceptive effects in mouse models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Therefore, to determine the physiological role of PAP in a typical exocrine organ, we studied the submandibular salivary gland (SMG) of PAP(-/-) and wild-type C57BL/6J mice by microarray analyses, microRNA sequencing, activity tests, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical and physiological analyses of saliva. We show that PAP is the main acid phosphatase in the wild-type male mouse saliva, accounting for 50% of the total acid phosphatase activity, and that it is expressed only in the granular convoluted tubules of the SMGs, where it is the only 5'-ectonucleotidase. The lack of PAP in male PAP(-/-) mice was associated with a significant increase in the salivation volume under secretagogue stimulation, overexpression of genes related to cell proliferation (Mki67, Aurkb, Birc5) and immune response (Irf7, Cxcl9, Ccl3, Fpr2), and upregulation of miR-146a in SMGs. An increased and sustained acinar cell proliferation was detected without signs of glandular hyperplasia. Our results indicate that in PAP(-/-) mice, SMG homeostasis is maintained by an innate immune response. Additionally, we suggest that in male mice, PAP via its 5'-ectonucleotidase activity and production of adenosine can elicit analgesic effects when animals lick their wounds. PMID:24717577

  9. Sodium selenate retards epileptogenesis in acquired epilepsy models reversing changes in protein phosphatase 2A and hyperphosphorylated tau.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-Jie; Zheng, Ping; Wright, David K; Dezsi, Gabi; Braine, Emma; Nguyen, Thanh; Corcoran, Niall M; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Mayo, Jamie N; Hudson, Matthew; Shultz, Sandy R; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-07-01

    There are no treatments in clinical practice known to mitigate the neurobiological processes that convert a healthy brain into an epileptic one, a phenomenon known as epileptogenesis. Downregulation of protein phosphatase 2A, a protein that causes the hyperphosphorylation of tau, is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases commonly associated with epilepsy, such as Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury. Here we used the protein phosphatase 2A activator sodium selenate to investigate the role of protein phosphatase 2A in three different rat models of epileptogenesis: amygdala kindling, post-kainic acid status epilepticus, and post-traumatic epilepsy. Protein phosphatase 2A activity was decreased, and tau phosphorylation increased, in epileptogenic brain regions in all three models. Continuous sodium selenate treatment mitigated epileptogenesis and prevented the biochemical abnormalities, effects which persisted after drug withdrawal. Our studies indicate that limbic epileptogenesis is associated with downregulation of protein phosphatase 2A and the hyperphosphorylation of tau, and that targeting this mechanism with sodium selenate is a potential anti-epileptogenic therapy. PMID:27289302

  10. Association of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase activity with the cytosolic pyruvate kinase of germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1991-12-01

    The procedure of Malhotra and Kayastha ([1990] Plant Physiology 93: 194-200) for the purification to homogeneity of a phosphoenolpyruvate-specific alkaline phosphatase (PEP phosphatase) from germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) was followed. Although a higher specific activity of 1.4 micromoles pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein was obtained, the final preparation was less than 10% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Attempts to further purify the enzyme resulted in loss of activity. The partially purified enzyme contained significant pyruvate kinase activity (0.13 micromole pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein) when assayed at pH 7.2, but not at pH 8.5. The PEP phosphatase activity of the final preparation exhibited hysteresis; a lag time of 5 to 6 minutes was required before a steady-state reaction rate was attained. A western blot of the final preparation revealed an immunoreactive 57 kilodalton polypeptide when probed with monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared against germinating castor bean cytosolic pyruvate kinase. No antigenic cross-reaction of the final preparation was observed with antibodies against castor bean leucoplast pyruvate kinase, or black mustard PEP-specific acid phosphatase. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation resulted in a single PEP phosphatase activity band; when this band was excised and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting, a 57 kilodalton silver-staining polypeptide was obtained that strongly cross-reacted with the anti-(cytosolic pyruvate kinase) immunoglobulin G. It is suggested that mung bean PEP-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is due to cytosolic pyruvate kinase, in which pyruvate and ortho-phosphate are formed in the absence of ADP. PMID:16668551

  11. Association of Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphatase Activity with the Cytosolic Pyruvate Kinase of Germinating Mung Beans 1

    PubMed Central

    Podestá, Florencio E.; Plaxton, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure of Malhotra and Kayastha ([1990] Plant Physiology 93: 194-200) for the purification to homogeneity of a phosphoenolpyruvate-specific alkaline phosphatase (PEP phosphatase) from germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) was followed. Although a higher specific activity of 1.4 micromoles pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein was obtained, the final preparation was less than 10% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Attempts to further purify the enzyme resulted in loss of activity. The partially purified enzyme contained significant pyruvate kinase activity (0.13 micromole pyruvate produced per minute per milligram protein) when assayed at pH 7.2, but not at pH 8.5. The PEP phosphatase activity of the final preparation exhibited hysteresis; a lag time of 5 to 6 minutes was required before a steady-state reaction rate was attained. A western blot of the final preparation revealed an immunoreactive 57 kilodalton polypeptide when probed with monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared against germinating castor bean cytosolic pyruvate kinase. No antigenic cross-reaction of the final preparation was observed with antibodies against castor bean leucoplast pyruvate kinase, or black mustard PEP-specific acid phosphatase. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation resulted in a single PEP phosphatase activity band; when this band was excised and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting, a 57 kilodalton silver-staining polypeptide was obtained that strongly cross-reacted with the anti-(cytosolic pyruvate kinase) immunoglobulin G. It is suggested that mung bean PEP-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is due to cytosolic pyruvate kinase, in which pyruvate and ortho-phosphate are formed in the absence of ADP. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668551

  12. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes. PMID:25423142

  13. Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) Is a Post-Translational Regulator of the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Wendt, Sabrina; Schnell, Anna; Kramer, Achim; Mansuy, Isabelle M.; Albrecht, Urs

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate the timing of important biological processes. Interconnected transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops based on a set of clock genes generate and maintain these rhythms with a period of about 24 hours. Many clock proteins undergo circadian cycles of post-translational modifications. Among these modifications, protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating activity, stability and intracellular localization of clock components. Several protein kinases were characterized as regulators of the circadian clock. However, the function of protein phosphatases, which balance phosphorylation events, in the mammalian clock mechanism is less well understood. Here, we identify protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as regulator of period and light-induced resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. Down-regulation of PP1 activity in cells by RNA interference and in vivo by expression of a specific inhibitor in the brain of mice tended to lengthen circadian period. Moreover, reduction of PP1 activity in the brain altered light-mediated clock resetting behavior in mice, enhancing the phase shifts in either direction. At the molecular level, diminished PP1 activity increased nuclear accumulation of the clock component PER2 in neurons. Hence, PP1, may reduce PER2 phosphorylation thereby influencing nuclear localization of this protein. This may at least partially influence period and phase shifting properties of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:21712997

  14. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects. PMID:26592247

  15. Low-frequency stimulation induces a durable long-term depression in young adult hyperthyroid rats: the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Burak; Bitiktaş, Soner; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Suer, Cem

    2016-06-15

    Long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) are cellular mechanisms of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. We have previously shown that adult hyperthyroid rats showed a delay in the acquisition of a place learning task and attenuated long-term potentiation. However, changes in LTD in hyperthyroidism remain unclear. Rats were administered 0.2 mg/kg/day of L-thyroxine for 21 days starting at postnatal day 40 to induce hyperthyroidism. LTD was induced in the dentate gyrus using low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the perforant pathway. The mRNA expressions of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were evaluated using a quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. In control rats, a standard LFS protocol induced a slight depression of the population spike (PS) amplitude during the induction phase of LTD (76±13% vs. baseline), but a small potentiation of the PS amplitude was observed in the early (107±18%) and late (111±20%) phases of LTD. Interestingly, in the hyperthyroid rats, the same LFS protocol induced a reliable LTD in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus as evidenced by a marked depression in the PS amplitude during the induction (54±6% vs. baseline) and the early phases (56±8%) of LTD. Elevated mRNA levels of p38-MAPK and PP1 were observed in the hippocampus of the LFS-treated hyperthyroid rats compared with the hippocampus of the vehicle-treated hyperthyroid rats. No significant change in p38-MAPK or PP1 mRNA expression was observed in the euthyroid rats. The present study shows that a standard LFS protocol can induce a durable depression of synaptic strength and an upregulation of PP1 and p38-MAPK mRNA in hyperthyroid rats. We conclude that hyperthyroidism can induce molecular changes associated with degeneration of the hippocampus. The relationship between the levels of thyroid hormone and dementia requires further investigation. PMID:27128724

  16. Effects of organic dairy manure amendment on soil phosphatase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy production is increasing in the U.S. due to concerns over environmental, human, and animal health. It is well known that the application of livestock manure to soil can influence enzyme activities involved in nutrient cycling and soil fertility, such as soil phosphatases; however, orga...

  17. Control of Sty1 MAPK activity through stabilisation of the Pyp2 MAPK phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Katarzyna M; Hartmuth, Sonya; Perera, David; Stansfield, Peter; Petersen, Janni

    2013-08-01

    In all eukaryotes tight control of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity plays an important role in modulating intracellular signalling in response to changing environments. The fission yeast MAPK Sty1 (also known as Spc1 or Phh1) is highly activated in response to a variety of external stresses. To avoid segregation of damaged organelles or chromosomes, strong Sty1 activation transiently blocks mitosis and cell division until such stresses have been dealt with. MAPK phosphatases dephosphorylate Sty1 to reduce kinase activity. Therefore, tight control of MAPK phosphatases is central for stress adaptation and for cell division to resume. In contrast to Pyp1, the fission yeast Pyp2 MAPK phosphatase is under environmental control. Pyp2 has a unique sequence (the linker region) between the catalytic domain and the N-terminal MAPK-binding site. Here we show that the Pyp2 linker region is a destabilisation domain. Furthermore, the linker region is highly phosphorylated to increase Pyp2 protein stability and this phosphorylation is Sty1 dependent. Our data suggests that Sty1 activation promotes Pyp2 phosphorylation to increase the stability of the phosphatase. This MAPK-dependent Pyp2 stabilisation allows cells to attenuate MAPK signalling and resume cell division, once stresses have been dealt with. PMID:23690545

  18. The Nuclear Envelope Protein, LAP1B, Is a Novel Protein Phosphatase 1 Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana; Rebelo, Sandra; Van Kleeff, Paula J. M.; Kim, Connie E.; Dauer, William T.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding proteins are quintessential regulators, determining substrate specificity and defining subcellular localization and activity of the latter. Here, we describe a novel PP1 binding protein, the nuclear membrane protein lamina associated polypeptide 1B (LAP1B), which interacts with the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA. The PP1 binding domain in LAP1B was here identified as the REVRF motif at amino acids 55-59. The LAP1B:PP1 complex can be immunoprecipitated from cells in culture and rat cortex and the complex was further validated by yeast co-transformations and blot overlay assays. PP1, which is enriched in the nucleus, binds to the N-terminal nuclear domain of LAP1B, as shown by immunocolocalization and domain specific binding studies. PP1 dephosphorylates LAP1B, confirming the physiological relevance of this interaction. These findings place PP1 at a key position to participate in the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia and related nuclear envelope-based diseases. PMID:24116158

  19. Methods to monitor classical protein-tyrosine phosphatase oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Karisch, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2, act as intracellular second messengers in many signaling pathways. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are now believed to be important targets of ROS. PTPs contain a conserved catalytic cysteine with an unusually low pKa. This property allows PTPs to execute nucleophilic attack on substrate phosphotyrosyl residues, but also renders them highly susceptible to oxidation. Reversible oxidation, which inactivates PTPs, is emerging as an important cellular regulatory mechanism and might contribute to human diseases, including cancer. Given their potential toxicity, it seems likely that ROS generation is highly controlled within cells to restrict oxidation to those PTPs that must be inactivated for signaling to proceed. Thus, identifying ROS-inactivated PTPs could be tantamount to finding the PTP(s) that critically regulate a specific signaling pathway. This article provides an overview of the methods currently available to identify and quantify PTP oxidation and outlines future challenges in redox signaling. PMID:22577968

  20. Reduced expression of PNUTS leads to activation of Rb-phosphatase and caspase-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Gabriel; Sherry, Tara C; Krucher, Nancy A

    2008-06-01

    There is abundant evidence that Retinoblastoma (Rb) activity is important in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Reversible phosphorylation of the Rb protein that is carried out by cyclin dependent kinases and Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates its functions. A PP1 interacting protein, PNUTS (Phosphatase Nuclear Targeting Subunit) is proposed to be a regulator of Rb phosphorylation. In this study, PNUTS knockdown in MCF7, SKA and HCT116 cancer cells causes a reduction in viability due to increased apoptosis. However, normal cells (MCF10A breast and CCD-18Co colon) do not exhibit reduced viability when PNUTS expression is diminished. PNUTS knockdown has no effect in Rb-null Saos-2 cells. However, when Rb is stably expressed in Saos-2 cells, PNUTS knockdown reduces cell number. Knockdown of PNUTS in p53-/- HCT116 cells indicates that p53 is dispensable for the induction of apoptosis. Loss of PNUTS expression results in increased Rb-phosphatase activity and Rb dephosphorylation. E2F1 dissociates from Rb in cells depleted of PNUTS and the resulting apoptosis is dependent on caspase-8. These results indicate that Rb phosphorylation state can be manipulated by targeting Rb phosphatase activity and suggest that PNUTS may be a potential target for therapeutic pro-apoptotic strategies. PMID:18360108

  1. Structure of Human Dual Specificity Protein Phosphatase 23, VHZ, Enzyme-Substrate/Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in mitogenic signal transduction and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Dual specificity protein phosphatase 23 (DUSP23) or VHZ mediates dephosphorylation of phospho-tyrosyl (pTyr) and phospho-seryl/threonyl (pSer/pThr) residues in specific proteins. In vitro, it can dephosphorylate p44ERK1 but not p54SAPK-{beta} and enhance activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Human VHZ, the smallest of the catalytically active protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) reported to date (150 residues), is a class I Cys-based PTP and bears the distinctive active site signature motif HCXXGXXRS(T). We present the crystal structure of VHZ determined at 1.93 angstrom resolution. The polypeptide chain adopts the typical a{beta}a PTP fold, giving rise to a shallow active site cleft that supports dual phosphorylated substrate specificity. Within our crystals, the Thr-135-Tyr-136 from a symmetry-related molecule bind in the active site with a malate ion, where they mimic the phosphorylated TY motif of the MAPK activation loop in an enzyme-substrate/product complex. Analyses of intermolecular interactions between the enzyme and this pseudo substrate/product along with functional analysis of Phe-66, Leu-97, and Phe-99 residues provide insights into the mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis in VHZ.

  2. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  4. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  5. Structural Mechanism of Demethylation and Inactivation of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.; Stock, J.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a role in many biological processes. Reversible carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit is an essential regulatory mechanism for its function. Demethylation and negative regulation of PP2A is mediated by a PP2A-specific methylesterase PME-1, which is conserved from yeast to humans. However, the underlying mechanism of PME-1 function remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structures of PME-1 by itself and in complex with a PP2A heterodimeric core enzyme. The structures reveal that PME-1 directly binds to the active site of PP2A and that this interaction results in the activation of PME-1 by rearranging the catalytic triad into an active conformation. Strikingly, these interactions also lead to inactivation of PP2A by evicting the manganese ions that are required for the phosphatase activity of PP2A. These observations identify a dual role of PME-1 that regulates PP2A activation, methylation, and holoenzyme assembly in cells.

  6. Protein phosphatase 2C is involved in the cAMP-dependent ciliary control in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Munenori; Sasaki, Jun-Ya; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Forward swimming of the Triton-extracted model of Paramecium is stimulated by cAMP. Backward swimming of the model induced by Ca(2+) is depressed by cAMP. Cyclic AMP and Ca(2+) act antagonistically in setting the direction of the ciliary beat. Some ciliary axonemal proteins from Paramecium caudatum are phosphorylated in a cAMP-dependent manner. In the presence of cAMP, axonemal 29- and 65-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by endogenous A-kinase in vitro. These phosphoproteins, however, were not dephosphorylated after in vitro phosphorylation, presumably because of the low endogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase activity associated with isolated axonemes. We purified the protein phosphatase that specifically dephosphorylated the 29- and 65-kDa phosphoproteins from Paramecium caudatum. The molecular weight of the protein phosphatase was 33 kDa. The protein phosphatase had common characteristics as protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). The characteristics of the protein phosphatase were the same as those of the PP2C from Paramecium tetraurelia (PtPP2C) [Grothe et al., 1998: J. Biol. Chem. 273:19167-19172]. We concluded that the phosphoprotein phosphatase is the PP2C from Paramecium caudatum (PcPP2C). The PcPP2C markedly accelerated the backward swimming of the Triton-extracted model in the presence of Ca(2+). On the other hand, the PcPP2C slightly depressed the forward swimming speed. This indicates that the PP2C plays a role in the cAMP-dependent regulation of ciliary movement in Paramecium caudatum through dephosphorylation of 29- and/or 65-kDa regulatory phosphoproteins by terminating the action of cAMP. PMID:12529856

  7. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  8. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  9. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, John B; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E

    2016-08-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces. PMID:26895212

  10. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, John B.; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces. PMID:26895212

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (PTP alpha) knockout mice show deficits in Morris water maze learning, decreased locomotor activity, and decreases in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Matthew R; Ponniah, Sathivel; Wang, Dennis Z-M; Doetschman, Thomas; Vorhees, Charles V; Pallen, Catherine J

    2003-09-12

    Receptor PTPalpha is a widely expressed transmembrane enzyme enriched in brain. PTPalpha knockout (PTPalpha(-/-)) mice are viable and display no gross abnormalities. Brain and embryo derived fibroblast src and fyn activity is reduced to <50% in PTPalpha(-/-) mice. These protein kinases are implicated in multiple aspects of neuronal development and function. However, the effect of the loss of function of the PTPalpha gene on behavior has yet to be investigated. PTPalpha(-/-) and WT mice were tested for anxiety, swimming ability, spatial learning, cued learning, locomotor activity, and novel object recognition (NOR). PTPalpha(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from WT in swimming ability, cued learning and novel object recognition. Knockout mice showed decreased anxiety without an increase in head dips and stretch-attend movements. During Morris water maze (MWM) learning, PTPalpha(-/-) mice had increased latencies to reach the goal compared to WT on acquisition, but no memory deficit on probe trials. On reversal learning, knockout mice showed no significant effects. PTPalpha(-/-) mice showed decreased exploratory locomotor activity, but responded normally to a challenge dose of D-methamphetamine. The data suggest that PTPalpha serves a regulatory function in learning and other forms of neuroplasticity. PMID:12932834

  12. Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor-mediated macrophage differentiation in myeloid cells: a role for tyrosine 559-dependent protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, K A; Wilson, N J; Marks, D C; Beecroft, T L; Whitty, G A; Hamilton, J A; Csar, X F

    2001-01-01

    M1 myeloid cells transfected with the wild-type (WT) colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor (CSF-1R; M1/WT cells) undergo CSF-1-dependent macrophage differentiation. By mutation studies, we have provided prior evidence that tyrosine 559 in the CSF-1R cytoplasmic domain governs the Src-dependent differentiation pathway. Further components of this pathway were then sought. We report that the extent of CSF-1-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and the associated loss of its activity were reduced in M1 cells transfected with the CSF-1R with a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation at position 559 (M1/559 cells), compared with the corresponding responses in CSF-1-treated M1/WT cells. This evidence for an involvement of a reduction in PP2A activity in the differentiation process was supported by the restoration of the defect in the CSF-1-mediated differentiation of M1/559 cells by the addition of the PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid. It was also found that the degree of activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities by CSF-1 was reduced in M1/559 cells, suggesting their involvement in the differentiation process. These data suggest that PP2A and ERK form part of the Src-dependent signal-transduction cascade governing CSF-1-mediated macrophage differentiation in M1 cells. PMID:11513742

  13. Co-expression of protein tyrosine kinases EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Tu, Pham Ngoc; Wang, Yamin; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-02-28

    The regulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is mediated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and is essential for cellular homeostasis. Coexpression of PTKs with PTPs in Pichia pastoris was used to facilitate the expression of active PTKs by neutralizing their apparent toxicity to cells. In this study, the gene encoding phosphatase PTP1B with or without a blue fluorescent protein or peroxisomal targeting signal 1 was cloned into the expression vector pAG32 to produce four vectors. These vectors were subsequently transformed into P. pastoris GS115. The tyrosine kinases EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ were expressed from vector pPIC3.5K and were fused with a His-tag and green fluorescent protein at the N-terminus. The two plasmids were transformed into P. pastoris with or without PTP1B, resulting in 10 strains. The EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ fusion proteins were purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. In the recombinant P. pastoris, the PTKs co-expressed with PTP1B exhibited higher kinase catalytic activity than did those expressing the PTKs alone. The highest activities were achieved by targeting the PTKs and PTP1B into peroxisomes. Therefore, the EGFR-2 and PDGFRβ fusion proteins expressed in P. pastoris may be attractive drug screening targets for anticancer therapeutics. PMID:24248091

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatases expression during development of mouse superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Horvat-Bröcker, Andrea; Illes, Sebastian; Zaremba, Angelika; Knyazev, Piotr; Ullrich, Axel; Faissner, Andreas

    2009-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators of different processes during development of the central nervous system. However, expression patterns and potential roles of PTPs in the developing superior colliculus remain poorly investigated. In this study, a degenerate primer-based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach was used to isolate seven different intracellular PTPs and nine different receptor-type PTPs (RPTPs) from embryonic E15 mouse superior colliculus. Subsequently, the expression patterns of 11 PTPs (TC-PTP, PTP1C, PTP1D, PTP-MEG2, PTP-PEST, RPTPJ, RPTPε, RPTPRR, RPTPσ, RPTPκ and RPTPγ) were further analyzed in detail in superior colliculus from embryonic E13 to postnatal P20 stages by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Each of the 11 PTPs exhibits distinct spatiotemporal regulation of mRNAs and proteins in the developing superior colliculus suggesting their versatile roles in genesis of neuronal and glial cells and retinocollicular topographic mapping. At E13, additional double-immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of PTPs in collicular nestin-positive neural progenitor cells and RC-2-immunoreactive radial glia cells, indicating the potential functional importance of PTPs in neurogenesis and gliogenesis. PMID:19727691

  15. Identification of putative negative regulators of yeast signaling through a screening for protein phosphatases acting on cell wall integrity and mating MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Sacristán-Reviriego, Almudena; Martín, Humberto; Molina, María

    2015-04-01

    The lack of signaling through MAPK pathways leads to a defective cellular response to the corresponding stimulus, but an improper hyperactivation of these routes results in deleterious effects as well. Protein phosphorylation is an activating modification for signal transmission through components of MAPK pathways and thus, protein phosphatases are key negative regulators of these cellular routes by limiting excessive signaling activity. However, in contrast to most of the protein kinases operating in MAPK pathways, protein phosphatases usually exhibit redundancy and promiscuity, which has limited the identification of their function. In order to identify new putative phosphatases operating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAPK signaling, we have taken advantage of growth inhibition promoted by overproduction of constitutively active components of the mating and cell wall integrity (CWI) pathways to perform a screen with a collection of 43 protein phosphatases or phosphatase-regulatory proteins. The phosphatases able to alleviate the induced growth inhibition when overproduced were further studied by testing their capacity to downregulate expression of mating and CWI responsive promoters and the consequences of their removal on MAPK signaling. Epistasis analysis placed the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase Ppq1 as a regulator of the mating MAPK module downstream the MAPKKK Ste11. The dual specificity phosphatase Yvh1 was found to be important for the maintenance of cell wall integrity and appropriate signaling through the CWI pathway. Moreover, we have found that Ptc2 and Ptc4 bind to the CWI MAPK Slt2. Together with known phosphatases of the mating and CWI pathway, as Msg5 or Ptp2, other putative negative regulators of both pathways that came up in the screening were Ptc2, Oca2 and Ptp1. We show that Ptp1 physically interacts with Slt2 and the mating MAPK Fus3. Elimination of Ptp1 results in increased signaling through these pathways, suggesting that this tyrosine

  16. Functional analysis of TPM domain containing Rv2345 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies its phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Avni; Eniyan, Kandasamy; Sinha, Swati; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Bajpai, Urmi

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causal agent of tuberculosis, the second largest infectious disease. With the rise of multi-drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, serious challenge lies ahead of us in treating the disease. The availability of complete genome sequence of Mtb has improved the scope for identifying new proteins that would not only further our understanding of biology of the organism but could also serve to discover new drug targets. In this study, Rv2345, a hypothetical membrane protein of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, which is reported to be a putative ortholog of ZipA cell division protein has been assigned function through functional annotation using bioinformatics tools followed by experimental validation. Sequence analysis showed Rv2345 to have a TPM domain at its N-terminal region and predicted it to have phosphatase activity. The TPM domain containing region of Rv2345 was cloned and expressed using pET28a vector in Escherichia coli and purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. The purified TPM domain was tested in vitro and our results confirmed it to have phosphatase activity. The enzyme activity was first checked and optimized with pNPP as substrate, followed by using ATP, which was also found to be used as substrate by the purified protein. Hence sequence analysis followed by in vitro studies characterizes TPM domain of Rv2345 to contain phosphatase activity. PMID:25782739

  17. Structure of thermotoga maritima stationary phase survival protein SurE : a novel acid phosphatase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.-G; Skarina, T.; Katz, J. E.; Khachatryan, A; Vyas, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Clarke, S.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. of California; Clinical Genomics Centre /Proteomics, Univ. Health Network

    2001-11-01

    Background: The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase {sigma} subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants. Results: The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 Angstroms. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5-6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and intersubunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability. Conclusions: The structure of SurE provided information about the protein's fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  18. Structural and Mechanistic Characterization of L-Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from the PHP Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghodge, Swapnil V.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    l-Histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-histidinol phosphate to L-histidinol and inorganic phosphate, the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of L-histidine. HPP from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) family of proteins possesses a trinuclear active site and a distorted (β/α)7-barrel protein fold. This group of enzymes is closely related to the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The mechanism of phosphomonoester bond hydrolysis by the PHP family of HPP enzymes was addressed. Recombinant HPP from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis that was expressed in Escherichia coli contained a mixture of iron and zinc in the active site and had a catalytic efficiency of ~103 M−1 s−1. Expression of the protein under iron-free conditions resulted in the production of enzyme with a two orders of magnitude improvement in catalytic efficiency and a mixture of zinc and manganese in the active site. Solvent isotope and viscosity effects demonstrated that proton transfer steps and product dissociation steps are not rate-limiting. X-ray structures of HPP were determined with sulfate, L-histidinol/phosphate, and a complex of L-histidinol and arsenate bound in the active site. These crystal structures and the catalytic properties of variants were used to identify the structural elements required for catalysis and substrate recognition by the HPP family of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily. PMID:23327428

  19. Protein Phosphatase 1ß Limits Ring Canal Constriction during Drosophila Germline Cyst Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Bayat, Vafa; Bellen, Hugo J.; Tan, Change

    2013-01-01

    Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw), a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT). This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well. PMID:23936219

  20. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  1. Isolation of Human Mitotic Protein Phosphatase Complexes: Identification of a Complex between Protein Phosphatase 1 and the RNA Helicase Ddx21

    PubMed Central

    De Wever, Veerle; Lloyd, David C.; Nasa, Isha; Nimick, Mhairi; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Gourlay, Robert; Morrice, Nick; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2012-01-01

    Metazoan mitosis requires remodelling of sub-cellular structures to ensure proper division of cellular and genetic material. Faults often lead to genomic instability, cell cycle arrests and disease onset. These key structural changes are under tight spatial-temporal and post-translational control, with crucial roles for reversible protein phosphorylation. The phosphoprotein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A are paramount for the timely execution of mitotic entry and exit but their interaction partners and substrates are still largely unresolved. High throughput, mass-spectrometry based studies have limited sensitivity for the detection of low-abundance and transient complexes, a typical feature of many protein phosphatase complexes. Moreover, the limited timeframe during which mitosis takes place reduces the likelihood of identifying mitotic phosphatase complexes in asynchronous cells. Hence, numerous mitotic protein phosphatase complexes still await identification. Here we present a strategy to enrich and identify serine/threonine protein phosphatase complexes at the mitotic spindle. We thus identified a nucleolar RNA helicase, Ddx21/Gu, as a novel, direct PP1 interactor. Furthermore, our results place PP1 within the toposome, a Topoisomerase II alpha (TOPOIIα) containing complex with a key role in mitotic chromatin regulation and cell cycle progression, possibly via regulated protein phosphorylation. This study provides a strategy for the identification of further mitotic PP1 partners and the unravelling of PP1 functions during mitosis. PMID:22761809

  2. Novel 2,7-Substituted (S)-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic Acids: Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Partial Agonists with Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Otake, Kazuya; Azukizawa, Satoru; Takeda, Shigemitsu; Fukui, Masaki; Kawahara, Arisa; Kitao, Tatsuya; Shirahase, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A novel series of 2,7-substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were synthesized and biologically evaluated. (S)-2-(2-Furylacryloyl)-7-[2-(2-methylindane-2-yl)-5-methyloxazol-4-yl]methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid tert-butylamine salt (13jE) was identified as a potent human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-selective agonist (EC50=85 nM) and human protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) inhibitor (IC50=1.0 µM). Compound 13jE partially activated PPARγ, but not PPARα or PPARδ, and antagonized farglitazar, a full PPARγ agonist. Cmax after the oral administration of 13jE at 10 mg/kg was 28.6 µg/mL (53 µM) in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Repeated administration of 13jE and rosiglitazone for 14 d at 10 mg/kg/d decreased plasma glucose and triglyceride levels significantly in male KK-A(y) mice. Rosiglitazone, but not 13jE, significantly increased the plasma volume and liver weight. In conclusion, 13jE showed stronger hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects and weaker hemodilution and hepatotoxic effects than rosiglitazone, suggesting that its safer efficacy may be due to its partial PPARγ agonism and PTP-1B inhibition. PMID:26633022

  3. Structure of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Fan, E.; Yu, J.; Strack, S.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular physiology. The PP2A holoenzyme consists of a heterodimeric core enzyme, which comprises a scaffolding subunit and a catalytic subunit, and a variable regulatory subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of the heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B'/B56/PR61. Surprisingly, the B'/PR61 subunit has a HEAT-like (huntingtin-elongation-A subunit-TOR-like) repeat structure, similar to that of the scaffolding subunit. The regulatory B'/B56/PR61 subunit simultaneously interacts with the catalytic subunit as well as the conserved ridge of the scaffolding subunit. The carboxyterminus of the catalytic subunit recognizes a surface groove at the interface between the B'/B56/PR61 subunit and the scaffolding subunit. Compared to the scaffolding subunit in the PP2A core enzyme, formation of the holoenzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced conformational rearrangements. This structure reveals significant ramifications for understanding the function and regulation of PP2A.

  4. Structure and Configuration of Phosphoeleganin, a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitor from the Mediterranean Ascidian Sidnyum elegans.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Concetta; Luciano, Paolo; Aiello, Anna; Vitalone, Rocco; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Li, Jia; Guo, Yue-W; Menna, Marialuisa

    2016-04-22

    A new phosphorylated polyketide, phosphoeleganin (1), has been isolated from the Mediterranean ascidian Sidnyum elegans. Its structure and configuration have been determined by extensive use of 2D NMR and microscale chemical degradation and/or derivatization. Phosphoeleganin (1) inhibited the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity. PMID:27064611

  5. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  6. Myristoylation of the Dual Specificity Phosphatase JSP1 is necessary for its Activation of JNK Signaling and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwertassek, Ulla; Buckley, Deirdre A.; Xu, Chong-Feng; Lindsay, Andrew J.; McCaffrey, Mary W.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Activation of the c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is implicated in a number of important physiological processes, from embryonic morphogenesis to cell survival and apoptosis. JNK stimulatory phosphatase 1 (JSP1) is a member of the dual specificity phosphatase subfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). In contrast to other dual specificity phosphatases, which catalyze inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, expression of JSP1 activates JNK-mediated signaling. JSP1 (and its relative DUSP15) are unique among members of the PTP family in that they contain a potential myristoylation site at the N-terminus (MGNGMXK). In this study, we investigated whether JSP1 was myristoylated and examined the functional consequences of myristoylation. Using mass spectrometry, we showed that wild type JSP1, but not a JSP1 mutant in which glycine 2 was mutated to alanine (JSP1-G2A), was myristoylated in cells. Abrogation of myristoylation did not impair the intrinsic phosphatase activity of JSP1, but changed the subcellular localization of the enzyme. Compared to wild type, the ability of non-myristoylated JSP1 to induce JNK activation and phosphorylation of the transcription factor c-JUN was attenuated. Upon expression of wild type JSP1, a subpopulation of cells, with highest levels of the phosphatase, was induced to float off the dish and undergo apoptosis. In contrast, cells expressing similar levels of JSP1-G2A remained attached, further highlighting that the myristoylation mutant was functionally compromised. PMID:20553486

  7. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  8. The DUSP26 phosphatase activator adenylate kinase 2 regulates FADD phosphorylation and cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Lee, Ho-June; Oh, Yumin; Choi, Seon-Guk; Hong, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Song-Yi; Choi, Ji-Woo; Su Hwang, Deog; Kim, Key-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Zhang, Jianke; Youn, Hyun-Jo; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-02-01

    Adenylate kinase 2 (AK2), which balances adenine nucleotide pool, is a multi-functional protein. Here we show that AK2 negatively regulates tumour cell growth. AK2 forms a complex with dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) phosphatase and stimulates DUSP26 activity independently of its AK activity. AK2/DUSP26 phosphatase protein complex dephosphorylates fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) and regulates cell growth. AK2 deficiency enhances cell proliferation and induces tumour formation in a xenograft assay. This anti-growth function of AK2 is associated with its DUSP26-stimulating activity. Downregulation of AK2 is frequently found in tumour cells and human cancer tissues showing high levels of phospho-FADDSer194. Moreover, reconstitution of AK2 in AK2-deficient tumour cells retards both cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. Consistent with this, AK2+/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit enhanced cell proliferation with a significant alteration in phospho-FADDSer191. These results suggest that AK2 is an associated activator of DUSP26 and suppresses cell proliferation by FADD dephosphorylation, postulating AK2 as a negative regulator of tumour growth.

  9. Polymerized collagen inhibits fibroblast proliferation via a mechanism involving the formation of a beta1 integrin-protein phosphatase 2A-tuberous sclerosis complex 2 complex that suppresses S6K1 activity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong; Nho, Richard; Kleidon, Jill; Kahm, Judy; Henke, Craig A

    2008-07-18

    Polymerized type I collagen suppresses fibroblast proliferation. Previous studies have implicated inhibition of fibroblast proliferation with polymerized collagen-mediated suppression of S6K1, but the molecular mechanism of the critical negative feedback loop has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that polymerized collagen suppresses G(1)/S phase transition and fibroblast proliferation by a novel mechanism involving the formation of a beta1 integrin-protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) complex that represses S6K1 activity. In response to fibroblast interaction with polymerized collagen, beta1 integrin forms a complex with PP2A that targets TSC2 as a substrate. PP2A represses the level of TSC2 phosphorylation and maintains TSC2 in an activated state. Activated TSC2 negatively regulates the downstream kinase S6K1 and inhibits G(1)/S transit. Knockdown of TSC2 enables fibroblasts to overcome the anti-proliferative properties of polymerized collagen. Furthermore, we show that this reduction in TSC2 and S6K1 phosphorylation occurs largely independent of Akt. Although S6K1 activity was markedly suppressed by polymerized collagen, we found that minimal changes in Akt activity occurred. We demonstrate that up-regulation of Akt by overexpression of constitutively active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p110 subunit had minor effects on TSC2 and S6K1 phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate that polymerized collagen represses fibroblast proliferation by a mechanism involving the formation of a beta1 integrin-PP2A-TSC2 complex that negatively regulates S6K1 and inhibits G(1)/S phase transition. PMID:18487611

  10. Identification of the Interaction Sites of Inhibitor-3 for Protein Phosphatase-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifang; Qi, Zhiqing; Gao, Yan; Lee, Ernest Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitor-3 is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1, with an IC50 in the nanomolar range for the inhibition of the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a. Human Inhibitor-3 possesses a putative protein phosphatase-1 binding motif, 39KKVEW43. We provide direct evidence that this sequence is involved in PP1 interaction by examining the effects of site-directed mutations of Inhibitor-3 on its ability to inhibit protein phosphatase-1. A second interaction site whose deletion led to loss of inhibitory potency was identified between residues 65–77. The existence of two interaction sites is consistent with the high inhibitory potency of Inhibitor-3, and with current models for other inhibitor and targeting proteins that interact with protein phosphatase-1 with high affinity. PMID:18951879

  11. The parathyroid hormone-related protein is secreted during the osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells and inhibits the alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of DLX3.

    PubMed

    Klingelhöffer, C; Reck, A; Ettl, T; Morsczeck, C

    2016-08-01

    The dental follicle is involved in tooth eruption and it expresses a great amount of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). PTHrP as an extracellular protein is required for a multitude of different regulations of enchondral bone development and differentiation of bone precursor cells and of the development of craniofacial tissues. The dental follicle contains also precursor cells (DFCs) of the periodontium. Isolated DFCs differentiate into periodontal ligament cells, alveolar osteoblast and cementoblasts. However, the role of PTHrP during the human periodontal development remains elusive. Our study evaluated the influence of PTHrP on the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs under in vitro conditions for the first time. The PTHrP protein was highly secreted after 4days of the induction of the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs with dexamethasone (2160.5pg/ml±345.7SD. in osteogenic differentiation medium vs. 315.7pg/ml±156.2SD. in standard cell culture medium; Student's t Test: p<0.05 (n=3)). We showed that the supplementation of the osteogenic differentiation medium with PTHrP inhibited the alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of the transcription factor DLX3, but the depletion of PTHrP did not support the differentiation of DFCs. Previous studies have shown that Indian Hedgehog (IHH) induces PTHrP and that PTHrP, in turn, inhibits IHH via a negative feedback loop. We showed that SUFU (Suppressor Of Fused Homolog) was not regulated during the osteogenic differentiation in DFCs. So, neither the hedgehog signaling pathway induced PTHrP nor PTHrP suppressed the hedgehog signaling pathway during the osteogenic differentiation in DFCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that PTHrP regulates independently of the hedgehog signaling pathway the osteogenic differentiated in DFCs. PMID:27368119

  12. Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 4 Regulates STAT5 Protein Stability and Helper T Cell Polarization*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Chan, Yi-Chiao; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Immune responses are critically regulated by the functions of CD4 helper T cells. Based on their secreted cytokines, helper T cells are further categorized into different subsets like Treg or Th17 cells, which suppress or promote inflammatory responses, respectively. Signals from IL-2 activate the transcription factor STAT5 to promote Treg but suppress Th17 cell differentiation. Our previous results found that the deficiency of a dual-specificity phosphatase, DUSP4, induced STAT5 hyper-activation, enhanced IL-2 signaling, and increased T cell proliferation. In this report, we examined the effects of DUSP4 deficiency on helper T cell differentiation and STAT5 regulation. Our in vivo data showed that DUSP4 mice were more resistant to the induction of autoimmune encephalitis, while in vitro differentiations revealed enhanced iTreg and reduced Th17 polarization in DUSP4-deficient T cells. To study the cause of this altered helper T cell polarization, we performed luciferase reporter assays and confirmed that, as predicted by our previous report, DUSP4 over-expression suppressed the transcription factor activity of STAT5. Surprisingly, we also found that DUSP4-deficient T but not B cells exhibited elevated STAT5 protein levels, and over-expressed DUSP4 destabilized STAT5 in vitro; moreover, this destabilization required the phosphatase activity of DUSP4, and was insensitive to MG132 treatment. Finally, domain-mapping results showed that both the substrate-interacting and the phosphatase domains of DUSP4 were required for its optimal interaction with STAT5, while the coiled-coil domain of STAT5 appeared to hinder this interaction. Our data thus provide the first genetic evidence that DUSP4 is important for helper T cell development. In addition, they also help uncover the novel, DUSP4-mediated regulation of STAT5 protein stability. PMID:26710253

  13. Protein Phosphatase 2A as a Therapeutic Target in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Pippa, Raffaella; Odero, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous malignant disorder of hematopoietic progenitor cells in which several genetic and epigenetic aberrations have been described. Despite progressive advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of this disease, the outcome for most patients is poor. It is, therefore, necessary to develop more effective treatment strategies. Genetic aberrations affecting kinases have been widely studied in AML; however, the role of phosphatases remains underexplored. Inactivation of the tumor-suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is frequent in AML patients, making it a promising target for therapy. There are several PP2A inactivating mechanisms reported in this disease. Deregulation or specific post-translational modifications of PP2A subunits have been identified as a cause of PP2A malfunction, which lead to deregulation of proliferation or apoptosis pathways, depending on the subunit affected. Likewise, overexpression of either SET or cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, is a recurrent event in AML that impairs PP2A activity, contributing to leukemogenesis progression. Interestingly, the anticancer activity of several PP2A-activating drugs (PADs) depends on interaction/sequestration of SET. Preclinical studies show that pharmacological restoration of PP2A activity by PADs effectively antagonizes leukemogenesis, and that these drugs have synergistic cytotoxic effects with conventional chemotherapy and kinase inhibitors, opening new possibilities for personalized treatment in AML patients, especially in cases with SET-dependent inactivation of PP2A. Here, we review the role of PP2A as a druggable tumor suppressor in AML. PMID:27092295

  14. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barry J.; Wang Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  15. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  16. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  17. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) co-localizes with receptor activator of NF-KB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1)-positive vesicles in rat osteoblasts and osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Solberg, L B; Stang, E; Brorson, S-H; Andersson, G; Reinholt, F P

    2015-02-01

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is well known as an osteoclast marker; however, a recent study from our group demonstrated enhanced number of TRAP + osteocytes as well as enhanced levels of TRAP located to intracellular vesicles in osteoblasts and osteocytes in experimental osteoporosis in rats. Such vesicles were especially abundant in osteoblasts and osteocytes in cancellous bone as well as close to bone surface and intracortical remodeling sites. To further investigate TRAP in osteoblasts and osteocytes, long bones from young, growing rats were examined. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy displayed co-localization of TRAP with receptor activator of NF-KB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in hypertrophic chondrocytes and diaphyseal osteocytes with Pearson's correlation coefficient ≥0.8. Transmission electron microscopy showed co-localization of TRAP and RANKL in lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) + vesicles in osteoblasts and osteocytes supporting the results obtained by confocal microscopy. Recent in vitro data have demonstrated OPG as a traffic regulator for RANKL to LAMP1 + secretory lysosomes in osteoblasts and osteocytes, which seem to serve as temporary storage compartments for RANKL. Our in situ observations indicate that TRAP is located to RANKL-/OPG-positive secretory lysosomes in osteoblasts and osteocytes, which may have implications for osteocyte regulation of osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25201349

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase α in the Dorsomedial Striatum Promotes Excessive Ethanol-Drinking Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ben Hamida, Sami; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wang, Jun; Wu, Su; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kharazia, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that excessive ethanol drinking activates Fyn in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) (Wang et al., 2010; Gibb et al., 2011). Ethanol-mediated Fyn activation in the DMS leads to the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, to the enhancement of the channel's activity, and to the development and/or maintenance of ethanol drinking behaviors (Wang et al., 2007, 2010). Protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα) is essential for Fyn kinase activation (Bhandari et al., 1998), and we showed that ethanol-mediated Fyn activation is facilitated by the recruitment of PTPα to synaptic membranes, the compartment where Fyn resides (Gibb et al., 2011). Here we tested the hypothesis that PTPα in the DMS is part of the Fyn/GluN2B pathway and is thus a major contributor to the neuroadaptations underlying excessive ethanol intake behaviors. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated PTPα knockdown in the DMS reduces excessive ethanol intake and preference in rodents. Importantly, no alterations in water, saccharine/sucrose, or quinine intake were observed. Furthermore, downregulation of PTPα in the DMS of mice significantly reduces ethanol-mediated Fyn activation, GluN2B phosphorylation, and ethanol withdrawal-induced long-term facilitation of NMDAR activity without altering the intrinsic features of DMS neurons. Together, these results position PTPα upstream of Fyn within the DMS and demonstrate the important contribution of the phosphatase to the maladaptive synaptic changes that lead to excessive ethanol intake. PMID:24005290

  19. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  20. Analysis of Protein Phosphatase-1 and Aurora Protein Kinase Suppressors Reveals New Aspects of Regulatory Protein Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anuprita; Cannon, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) controls many processes in eukaryotic cells. Modulation of mitosis by reversing phosphorylation of proteins phosphorylated by aurora protein kinase is a critical function for PP1. Overexpression of the sole PP1, Glc7, in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is lethal. This work shows that lethality requires the function of Glc7 regulatory proteins Sds22, Reg2, and phosphorylated Glc8. This finding shows that Glc7 overexpression induced cell death requires a specific subset of the many Glc7-interacting proteins and therefore is likely caused by promiscuous dephosphorylation of a variety of substrates. Additionally, suppression can occur by reducing Glc7 protein levels by high-copy Fpr3 without use of its proline isomerase domain. This divulges a novel function of Fpr3. Most suppressors of GLC7 overexpression also suppress aurora protein kinase, ipl1, temperature-sensitive mutations. However, high-copy mutant SDS22 genes show reciprocal suppression of GLC7 overexpression induced cell death or ipl1 temperature sensitivity. Sds22 binds to many proteins besides Glc7. The N-terminal 25 residues of Sds22 are sufficient to bind, directly or indirectly, to seven proteins studied here including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein, Bub3. These data demonstrate that Sds22 organizes several proteins in addition to Glc7 to perform functions that counteract Ipl1 activity or lead to hyper Glc7 induced cell death. These data also emphasize that Sds22 targets Glc7 to nuclear locations distinct from Ipl1 substrates. PMID:23894419

  1. Tor proteins and protein phosphatase 2A reciprocally regulate Tap42 in controlling cell growth in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y; Broach, J R

    1999-01-01

    Tor proteins, homologous to DNA-dependent protein kinases, participate in a signal transduction pathway in yeast that regulates protein synthesis and cell wall expansion in response to nutrient availability. The anti-inflammatory drug rapamycin inhibits yeast cell growth by inhibiting Tor protein signaling. This leads to diminished association of a protein, Tap42, with two different protein phosphatase catalytic subunits; one encoded redundantly by PPH21 and PPH22, and one encoded by SIT4. We show that inactivation of either Cdc55 or Tpd3, which regulate Pph21/22 activity, results in rapamycin resistance and that this resistance correlates with an increased association of Tap42 with Pph21/22. Furthermore, we show Tor-dependent phosphorylation of Tap42 both in vivo and in vitro and that this phosphorylation is rapamycin sensitive. Inactivation of Cdc55 or Tpd3 enhances in vivo phosphorylation of Tap42. We conclude that Tor phosphorylates Tap42 and that phosphorylated Tap42 effectively competes with Cdc55/Tpd3 for binding to the phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit. Furthermore, Cdc55 and Tpd3 promote dephosphorylation of Tap42. Thus, Tor stimulates growth-promoting association of Tap42 with Pph21/22 and Sit4, while Cdc55 and Tpd3 inhibit this association both by direct competition and by dephosphorylation of Tap42. These results establish Tap42 as a target of Tor and add further refinement to the Tor signaling pathway. PMID:10329624

  2. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module[S

    PubMed Central

    Halaszovich, Christian R.; Leitner, Michael G.; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N.; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A.; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P2. In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1’s endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals. PMID:22896666

  3. The Phosphatase Ptc7 Induces Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis by Activating the Hydroxylase Coq7 in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; González-Mariscal, Isabel; Pomares-Viciana, Teresa; Padilla-López, Sergio; Ballesteros, Manuel; Vazquez-Fonseca, Luis; Gandolfo, Pablo; Brautigan, David L.; Navas, Placido; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The study of the components of mitochondrial metabolism has potential benefits for health span and lifespan because the maintenance of efficient mitochondrial function and antioxidant capacity is associated with improved health and survival. In yeast, mitochondrial function requires the tight control of several metabolic processes such as coenzyme Q biosynthesis, assuring an appropriate energy supply and antioxidant functions. Many mitochondrial processes are regulated by phosphorylation cycles mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases. In this study, we determined that the mitochondrial phosphatase Ptc7p, a Ser/Thr phosphatase, was required to regulate coenzyme Q6 biosynthesis, which in turn activated aerobic metabolism and enhanced oxidative stress resistance. We showed that Ptc7p phosphatase specifically activated coenzyme Q6 biosynthesis through the dephosphorylation of the demethoxy-Q6 hydroxylase Coq7p. The current findings revealed that Ptc7p is a regulator of mitochondrial metabolism that is essential to maintain proper function of the mitochondria by regulating energy metabolism and oxidative stress resistance. PMID:23940037

  4. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F.; Mori Sequeiros García, M. Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M.; Orlando, Ulises D.; Mele, Pablo G.; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the “classical” protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  5. Assays to Measure PTEN Lipid Phosphatase Activity In Vitro from Purified Enzyme or Immunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers. It is essential for regulating diverse biological processes and through its lipid phosphatase activity regulates the PI 3-Kinase signaling pathway. Sensitive phosphatase assays are employed to study the catalytic activity of PTEN against phospholipid substrates. Here we describe protocols to assay PTEN lipid phosphatase activity using either purified enzyme (purified PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) or PTEN immunopurified from tissues or cultured cells (cellular IP PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) against vesicles containing radiolabeled PIP3 substrate. PMID:27514802

  6. Regulation of Protein Phosphatase 1I by Cdc25C-associated Kinase 1 (C-TAK1) and PFTAIRE Protein Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Platholi, Jimcy; Federman, Anna; Detert, Julia A.; Heerdt, Paul; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1I (PP-1I) is a major endogenous form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1) that consists of the core catalytic subunit PP-1c and the regulatory subunit inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphorylation of the Thr-72 residue of I-2 is required for activation of PP-1I. We studied the effects of two protein kinases identified previously in purified brain PP-1I by mass spectrometry, Cdc25C-associated kinase 1 (C-TAK1) and PFTAIRE (PFTK1) kinase, for their ability to regulate PP-1I. Purified C-TAK1 phosphorylated I-2 in reconstituted PP-1I (PP-1c·I-2) on Ser-71, which resulted in partial inhibition of its ATP-dependent phosphatase activity and inhibited subsequent phosphorylation of Thr-72 by the exogenous activating kinase GSK-3. In contrast, purified PFTK1 phosphorylated I-2 at Ser-86, a site known to potentiate Thr-72 phosphorylation and activation of PP-1I phosphatase activity by GSK-3. These findings indicate that brain PP-1I associates with and is regulated by the associated protein kinases C-TAK1 and PFTK1. Multisite phosphorylation of the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP-1I leads to activation or inactivation of PP-1I through bidirectional modulation of Thr-72 phosphorylation, the critical activating residue of I-2. PMID:25028520

  7. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    The overall objective of this project is to examine the activity of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO4 3- as a means to detoxify radionuclides and heavy metals. An experimental approach was designed to determine the extent of phosphatase activity in bacteria previously isolated from contaminated subsurface soils collected at the ERSP Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. Screening of 135 metal resistant isolates for phosphatase activity indicated the majority (75 of 135) exhibited a phosphatase-positive phenotype. During this phase of the project, a PCR based approach has also been designed to assay FRC isolates for the presence of one or more classes of the characterized non-specific acid phophastase (NSAP) genes likely to be involved in promoting U(VI) precipitation. Testing of a subset of Pb resistant (Pbr) Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella strains indicated 4 of the 9 Pbr isolates exhibited phosphatase phenotypes suggestive of the ability to bioprecipitate U(VI). Two FRC strains, a Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 and a Bacillus sp. strain Y9-2, were further characterized. The Rahnella sp. exhibited enhanced phosphatase activity relative to the Bacillus sp. Whole-cell enzyme assays identified a pH optimum of 5.5, and inorganic phosphate accumulated in pH 5.5 synthetic groundwater (designed to mimic FRC conditions) incubations of both strains in the presence of a model organophosphorus substrate provided as the sole C and P source. Kinetic experiments showed that these two organisms can grow in the presence of 200 μM dissolved uranium and that Rahnella is much more efficient in precipitating U(VI) than Bacillus sp. The

  8. Discovery and optimization of sulfonyl acrylonitriles as selective, covalent inhibitors of protein phosphatase methylesterase-1.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Zuhl, Andrea M; Speers, Anna E; Wolfe, Monique R; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2011-07-28

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogues of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class. PMID:21639134

  9. Discovery and Optimization of Sulfonyl Acrylonitriles as Selective, Covalent Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase Methylesterase-1

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Zuhl, Andrea M.; Speers, Anna E.; Wolfe, Monique R.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogs of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class. PMID:21639134

  10. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase: Multifaceted functions of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Santi, Alice; Mugnaioni, Camilla; Toti, Alessandra; Camici, Guido; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Originally identified as a low molecular weight acid phosphatase, LMW-PTP is actually a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts on many phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins that are primarily involved in signal transduction. Differences in sequence, structure, and substrate recognition as well as in subcellular localization in different organisms enable LMW-PTP to exert many different functions. In fact, during evolution, the LMW-PTP structure adapted to perform different catalytic actions depending on the organism type. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of group 1 and 4 capsules, but it is also a virulence factor in pathogenic strains. In yeast, LMW-PTPs dephosphorylate immunophilin Fpr3, a peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase member of the protein chaperone family. In humans, LMW-PTP is encoded by the ACP1 gene, which is composed of three different alleles, each encoding two active enzymes produced by alternative RNA splicing. In animals, LMW-PTP dephosphorylates a number of growth factor receptors and modulates their signalling processes. The involvement of LMW-PTP in cancer progression and in insulin receptor regulation as well as its actions as a virulence factor in a number of pathogenic bacterial strains may promote the search for potent, selective and bioavailable LMW-PTP inhibitors. PMID:27421795

  11. Kinetic isotope effects in the characterization of catalysis by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Alvan C

    2015-11-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:25840000

  12. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  13. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  14. Phosphacan and Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β Expression Mediates Deafferentation-Induced Synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2009-01-01

    This study documents the spatial and temporal expression of three structurally related chondroitin sulfated proteoglycans (CSPGs) during synaptic regeneration induced by brain injury. Using the unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion model of adaptive synaptogenesis, we documented mRNA and protein profiles of phosphacan and its two splice variants, full length receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ) and the short transmembrane receptor form (sRPTPβ), at 2, 7, and 15 d postlesion. We report that whole hippocampal sRPTPβ protein and mRNA are persistently elevated over the first two weeks after UEC. As predicted, this transmembrane family member was localized adjacent to synaptic sites in the deafferented neuropil and showed increased distribution over that zone following lesion. By contrast, whole hippocampal phosphacan protein was not elevated with deafferentation, however, its mRNA was increased during the period of sprouting and synapse formation (7d). When the zone of synaptic reorganization was sampled using molecular layer/granule cell (ML/GCL) enriched dissections, we observed an increase in phosphacan protein at 7d, concurrent with the observed hippocampal mRNA elevation. Immunohistochemistry also showed a shift in phosphacan distribution from granule cell bodies to the deafferented ML at 2 and 7d postlesion. Phosphacan and sRPTPβ were not co-localized with glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), suggesting that reactive astrocytes were not a major source of either proteoglycan. While transcript for the developmentally prominent full length RPTPβ was also increased at 2 and 15d, its protein was not detected in our adult samples. These results indicate that phosphacan and RPTPβ splice variants participate in both the acute degenerative and long-term regenerative phases of reactive synaptogenesis. These results suggest that increase in the transmembrane sRPTPβ tyrosine phosphatase activity is critical to this plasticity, and that local elevation of

  15. A redox-regulated chloroplast protein phosphatase binds to starch diurnally and functions in its accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Lubomir N; Dominguez-Solis, Jose R; Allary, Anne-Laure; Buchanan, Bob B; Luan, Sheng

    2006-06-20

    Starch is the ultimate storage molecule formed in the photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide by chloroplasts. Starch accumulates during the day and is degraded at night to intermediates that are exported to heterotrophic organs. The mechanism by which diurnal cycles control the transitory biosynthesis and degradation of chloroplast starch has long remained a mystery. We now report evidence that a dual-specificity protein phosphatase, DSP4, binds to starch granules during the day and dissociates at night. Disruption of the DSP4 gene resulted in a dramatic increase in the level of starch in mutant Arabidopsis plants. Moreover, although composition was apparently unchanged, the morphology of the starch granule was significantly altered compared to the wild type counterpart. Two regulatory factors linked to light (i.e., pH and redox status) changed both the activity and the starch-binding capacity of DSP4. The results further revealed that DSP4 represents a major fraction of granule-bound phosphatase activity during the day but not at night. Our study suggests that DSP4 acts as a bridge between light-induced redox changes and protein phosphorylation in the regulation of starch accumulation. PMID:16772378

  16. Phosphorylation of the Drosophila Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel Is Regulated by the Phototransduction Cascade and Involves Several Protein Kinases and Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Voolstra, Olaf; Bartels, Jonas-Peter; Oberegelsbacher, Claudia; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a cardinal role in regulating cellular processes in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of proteins is controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases. We previously reported the light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel at multiple sites. TRP generates the receptor potential upon stimulation of the photoreceptor cell by light. An eye-enriched protein kinase C (eye-PKC) has been implicated in the phosphorylation of TRP by in vitro studies. Other kinases and phosphatases of TRP are elusive. Using phosphospecific antibodies and mass spectrometry, we here show that phosphorylation of most TRP sites depends on the phototransduction cascade and the activity of the TRP ion channel. A candidate screen to identify kinases and phosphatases provided in vivo evidence for an involvement of eye-PKC as well as other kinases and phosphatases in TRP phosphorylation. PMID:24040070

  17. A Unique Protein Phosphatase with Kelch-Like Domains (PPKL) in Plasmodium Modulates Ookinete Differentiation, Motility and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, David J. P.; Szöőr, Balázs; Wickstead, Bill; Carroll, Paula L.; Ramakrishnan, Chandra; Brady, Declan; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Straschil, Ursula; Solyakov, Lev; Green, Judith L.; Sinden, Robert E.; Tobin, Andrew B.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tewari, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation (catalysed by kinases and phosphatases, respectively) are post-translational modifications that play key roles in many eukaryotic signalling pathways, and are often deregulated in a number of pathological conditions in humans. In the malaria parasite Plasmodium, functional insights into its kinome have only recently been achieved, with over half being essential for blood stage development and another 14 kinases being essential for sexual development and mosquito transmission. However, functions for any of the plasmodial protein phosphatases are unknown. Here, we use reverse genetics in the rodent malaria model, Plasmodium berghei, to examine the role of a unique protein phosphatase containing kelch-like domains (termed PPKL) from a family related to Arabidopsis BSU1. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the family of BSU1-like proteins including PPKL is encoded in the genomes of land plants, green algae and alveolates, but not in other eukaryotic lineages. Furthermore, PPKL was observed in a distinct family, separate to the most closely-related phosphatase family, PP1. In our genetic approach, C-terminal GFP fusion with PPKL showed an active protein phosphatase preferentially expressed in female gametocytes and ookinetes. Deletion of the endogenous ppkl gene caused abnormal ookinete development and differentiation, and dissociated apical microtubules from the inner-membrane complex, generating an immotile phenotype and failure to invade the mosquito mid-gut epithelium. These observations were substantiated by changes in localisation of cytoskeletal tubulin and actin, and the micronemal protein CTRP in the knockout mutant as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence. Finally, increased mRNA expression of dozi, a RNA helicase vital to zygote development was observed in ppkl− mutants, with global phosphorylation studies of ookinete differentiation from 1.5–24 h post-fertilisation indicating major changes in the first

  18. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  19. Racemosin C, a novel minor bisindole alkaloid with protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory activity from the green alga Caulerpa racemosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Liu, Ding-Quan; Liang, Tong-Jun; Li, Jia; Liu, Ai-Hong; Yang, Peng; Lin, Kun; Yu, Xiao-Qing; Guo, Yue-Wei; Mao, Shui-Chun; Wang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A novel minor bisindole alkaloid, racemosin C (1), characterized by a naturally unprecedented 8-hydroxy-2,4,6-cyclooctatrienone ring fused with two indole systems, was isolated from the green alga Caulerpa racemosa, together with one known related metabolite, caulersin (2). The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, and by comparison with the data of related known compounds. A plausible biosynthetic pathway of 1 was proposed. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited significant PTP1B inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 5.86 ± 0.57 and 7.14 ± 1.00 μM, respectively, compared with the positive control oleanolic acid (IC50 = 3.03 ± 0.20 μM). On the basis of the data obtained, the Caulerpa bisindole alkaloids may be considered as a new class of PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:25296343

  20. The investigation of Mitogen-Activated Protein kinase Phosphatase-1 as a potential pharmacological target in non-small cell lung carcinomas, assisted by non-invasive molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasiveness and metastasis are the most common characteristics of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and causes of tumour-related morbidity and mortality. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signalling pathways have been shown to play critical roles in tumorigenesis. However, the precise pathological role(s) of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in different cancers has been controversial such that the up-regulation of MKP-1 in different cancers does not always correlate to a better prognosis. In this study, we showed that the induction of MKP-1 lead to a significant retardation of proliferation and metastasis in NSCLC cells. We also established that rosiglitazone (a PPARγ agonist) elevated MKP-1 expression level in NSCLC cells and inhibited tumour metastasis. Methods Both wildtype and dominant negative forms of MKP-1 were constitutively expressed in NSCLC cell line H441GL. The migration and invasion abilities of these cells were examined in vitro. MKP-1 modulating agents such as rosiglitazone and triptolide were used to demonstrate MKP-1's role in tumorigenesis. Bioluminescent imaging was utilized to study tumorigenesis of MKP-1 over-expressing H441GL cells and anti-metastatic effect of rosiglitazone. Results Over-expression of MKP-1 reduced NSCLC cell proliferation rate as well as cell invasive and migratory abilities, evident by the reduced expression levels of MMP-2 and CXCR4. Mice inoculated with MKP-1 over-expressing H441 cells did not develop NSCLC while their control wildtype H441 inoculated littermates developed NSCLC and bone metastasis. Pharmacologically, rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonist appeared to induce MKP-1 expression while reduce MMP-2 and CXCR4 expression. H441GL-inoculated mice receiving daily oral rosiglitazone treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of bone metastasis when compared to mice receiving sham treatment. We found that rosiglitazone treatment

  1. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26547960

  2. Family of receptor-linked protein tyrosine phosphatases in humans and Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, M.; Krueger, N.X.; Saito, H. ); Tsai, A.Y.M. )

    1989-11-01

    To understand the regulation of cell proliferation by tyrosine phosphorylation, characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases is essential. The human genes LCA (leukocyte common antigen) and LAR encode putative receptor-linked PTPases. By using consensus sequence probes, two additional receptor-linked PTPase genes, DLAR and DPTP, were isolated from Drosophila melanogaster. The extra-cellular segments of both DLAR and DPTP are composed of multiple immunoglobulin-like domains and fibronectin type III-like domains. The cytoplasmic region of DLAR and DPTP, as well as human LCA and LAR, are composed of two tandemly repeated PTPase domains. PTPase activities of immunoprecipitated LCA and LAR were demonstrated by measuring the release of phosphate from a {sup 32}P-labeled (Tyr(P))peptide. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains of LCA, LAR, DLAR, and DPTP, expressed in Escherichia coli, have PTPase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that a conserved cysteine residue is essential for PTPase activity.

  3. Archaeal protein kinases and protein phosphatases: insights from genomics and biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation has long been considered a recent addition to Nature's regulatory arsenal. Early studies indicated that this molecular regulatory mechanism existed only in higher eukaryotes, suggesting that protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation had emerged to meet the particular signal-transduction requirements of multicellular organisms. Although it has since become apparent that simple eukaryotes and even bacteria are sites of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the perception widely persists that this molecular regulatory mechanism emerged late in evolution, i.e. after the divergence of the contemporary phylogenetic domains. Only highly developed cells, it was reasoned, could afford the high 'overhead' costs inherent in the acquisition of dedicated protein kinases and protein phosphatases. The advent of genome sequencing has provided an opportunity to exploit Nature's phylogenetic diversity as a vehicle for critically examining this hypothesis. In tracing the origins and evolution of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the members of the Archaea, the so-called 'third domain of life', will play a critical role. Whereas several studies have demonstrated that archaeal proteins are subject to modification by covalent phosphorylation, relatively little is known concerning the identities of the proteins affected, the impact on their functional properties, or the enzymes that catalyse these events. However, examination of several archaeal genomes has revealed the widespread presence of several ostensibly 'eukaryotic' and 'bacterial' protein kinase and protein phosphatase paradigms. Similar findings of 'phylogenetic trespass' in members of the Eucarya (eukaryotes) and the Bacteria suggest that this versatile molecular regulatory mechanism emerged at an unexpectedly early point in development of 'life as we know it'. PMID:12444920

  4. Molecular mechanism of ERK dephosphorylation by striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Li, Kang-shuai; Su, Jing; Chen, Lai-Zhong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Wang, Hong-Mei; Gong, Zheng; Cui, Guo-Ying; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Kai; Yao, Wei; Xin, Tao; Li, Min-Yong; Xiao, Kun-Hong; An, Xiao-fei; Huo, Yuqing; Xu, Zhi-gang; Sun, Jin-Peng; Pang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is an important regulator of neuronal synaptic plasticity, and its abnormal level or activity contributes to cognitive disorders. One crucial downstream effector and direct substrate of STEP is extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), which has important functions in spine stabilisation and action potential transmission. The inhibition of STEP activity toward phospho-ERK has the potential to treat neuronal diseases, but the detailed mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of phospho-ERK by STEP is not known. Therefore, we examined STEP activity toward pNPP, phospho-tyrosine-containing peptides, and the full-length phospho-ERK protein using STEP mutants with different structural features. STEP was found to be a highly efficient ERK tyrosine phosphatase that required both its N-terminal regulatory region and key residues in its active site. Specifically, both KIM and KIS of STEP were required for ERK interaction. In addition to the N-terminal KIS region, S245, hydrophobic residues L249/L251, and basic residues R242/R243 located in the KIM region were important in controlling STEP activity toward phospho-ERK. Further kinetic experiments revealed subtle structural differences between STEP and HePTP that affected the interactions of their KIMs with ERK. Moreover, STEP recognised specific positions of a phospho-ERK peptide sequence through its active site, and the contact of STEP F311 with phospho-ERK V205 and T207 were crucial interactions. Taken together, our results not only provide the information for interactions between ERK and STEP, but will also help in the development of specific strategies to target STEP-ERK recognition, which could serve as a potential therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:24117863

  5. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    PubMed

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception. PMID:26270590

  6. Alterations in the Interactome of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase Type-1 in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, David Y.; Lebesgue, Nicolas; Beavers, David L.; Alsina, Katherina M.; A. Damen, J. Mirjam; Voigt, Niels; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, yet current pharmacological treatments are limited. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase type-1 (PP1), a major phosphatase in the heart, consists of a catalytic subunit (PP1c) and a large set of regulatory (R)-subunits that confer localization and substrate specificity to the holoenzyme. Previous studies suggest that PP1 is dysregulated in AF, but the mechanisms are unknown. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that PP1 is dysregulated in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) at the level of its R-subunits. METHODS Cardiac lysates were coimmunoprecipitated with anti-PP1c antibody followed by mass spectrometry–based, quantitative profiling of associated R-subunits. Subsequently, label-free quantification (LFQ) was used to evaluate altered R-subunit–PP1c interactions in PAF patients. R-subunits with altered binding to PP1c in PAF were further studied using bioinformatics, Western blotting (WB), immunocytochemistry, and coimmunoprecipitation. RESULTS A total of 135 and 78 putative PP1c interactors were captured from mouse and human cardiac lysates, respectively, including many previously unreported interactors with conserved PP1c docking motifs. Increases in binding were found between PP1c and PPP1R7, cold-shock domain protein A (CSDA), and phosphodiesterase type-5A (PDE5A) in PAF patients, with CSDA and PDE5A being novel interactors validated by bioinformatics, immunocytochemistry, and coimmunoprecipitation. WB confirmed that these increases in binding cannot be ascribed to their changes in global protein expression alone. CONCLUSIONS Subcellular heterogeneity in PP1 activity and downstream protein phosphorylation in AF may be attributed to alterations in PP1c–R-subunit interactions, which impair PP1 targeting to proteins involved in electrical and Ca2+ remodeling. This represents a novel concept in AF pathogenesis and may provide more specific drug

  7. Monitoring protein phosphatase 1 isoform levels as a marker for cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Amador, Fátima Camões; Henriques, Ana Gabriela; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; da Cruz E Silva, Edgar F

    2004-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism regulating many biological functions, and abnormal protein phosphorylation can have a devastating impact on cellular control mechanisms, including a contributing role in neurodegenerative processes. Hence, many promising novel drug development strategies involve targeting protein phosphorylation systems. In this study, we demonstrate that various cellular stresses relevant to neurodegeneration can specifically affect the protein expression levels of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). PP1 levels were altered upon exposure of PC12 and COS-1 cells to aluminium, Abeta peptides, sodium azide, and even heat shock. Particularly interesting, given PP1's involvement in aging and neurodegeneration, was the consistent decrease in PP1gamma(1) levels in response to stress agents. In fact, alterations in the expression levels of PP1 appear to correspond to an early response of stress induction, that is, before alterations in heat shock proteins can be detected. Our data suggest that monitoring PP1 isoform expression could constitute a useful diagnostic tool for cellular stress, possibly even neurodegeneration. Additionally, our results strengthen the rationale for signal transduction therapeutics and indicate that altering the specific activity of PP1 either directly or by targeting its regulatory proteins may be a useful therapeutic development strategy for the future. PMID:15113600

  8. Alkaline phosphatase activity in normal and inflamed dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C; Tripodi, D; Di Stilio, M; Piattelli, A

    2001-03-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) seems to be important in the formation of mineralized tissues. High levels of ALP have been demonstrated in dental pulp cells. In the present study ALP activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis, and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic ALP control values for the normal healthy pulps were 110.96+/-20.93. In the reversible pulpitis specimens the ALP activity increased almost eight times to 853.6+/-148.27. In the irreversible pulpitis specimens the values decreased sharply to 137.15+/-21.28 and were roughly equivalent to those seen in normal healthy pulps. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and reversible pulpitis vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of ALP in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:11487147

  9. A Phosphatase Activity of Sts-1 Contributes to the Suppression of TCR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailik,A.; Ford, B.; Keller, J.; Chen, Y.; Nassar, N.; Carpino, N.

    2007-01-01

    Precise signaling by the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for a proper immune response. To ensure that T cells respond appropriately to antigenic stimuli, TCR signaling pathways are subject to multiple levels of regulation. Sts-1 negatively regulates signaling pathways downstream of the TCR by an unknown mechanism(s). Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 is a phosphatase that can target the tyrosine kinase Zap-70 among other proteins. The X-ray structure of the Sts-1 C terminus reveals that it has homology to members of the phosphoglycerate mutase/acid phosphatase (PGM/AcP) family of enzymes, with residues known to be important for PGM/AcP catalytic activity conserved in nature and position in Sts-1. Point mutations that impair Sts-1 phosphatase activity in vitro also impair the ability of Sts-1 to regulate TCR signaling in T cells. These observations reveal a PGM/AcP-like enzyme activity involved in the control of antigen receptor signaling.

  10. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bunin, Anna; Sisirak, Vanja; Ghosh, Hiyaa S; Grajkowska, Lucja T; Hou, Z Esther; Miron, Michelle; Yang, Cliff; Ceribelli, Michele; Uetani, Noriko; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L; Häcker, Hans; Staudt, Louis M; Green, Peter H; Bhagat, Govind; Reizis, Boris

    2015-08-18

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS) is expressed specifically on pDCs. Surface PTPRS was rapidly downregulated after pDC activation, and only PTPRS(-) pDCs produced IFN-α. Antibody-mediated PTPRS crosslinking inhibited pDC activation, whereas PTPRS knockdown enhanced IFN response in a pDC cell line. Similarly, murine Ptprs and the homologous receptor phosphatase Ptprf were specifically co-expressed in murine pDCs. Haplodeficiency or DC-specific deletion of Ptprs on Ptprf-deficient background were associated with enhanced IFN response of pDCs, leukocyte infiltration in the intestine and mild colitis. Thus, PTPRS represents an evolutionarily conserved pDC-specific inhibitory receptor, and is required to prevent spontaneous IFN production and immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. PMID:26231120

  11. Regulation of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Signaling by Leukocyte Common Antigen-related (LAR) Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase: A Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Study.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Adil R; Patel, Trushar R; Creese, Andrew J; Tomlinson, Michael G; Hellberg, Carina; Heath, John K; Hotchin, Neil A; Cunningham, Debbie L

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways are reliant on protein phosphorylation events that are controlled by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activity. Although kinases have been extensively studied, the role of phosphatases in controlling specific cell signaling pathways has been less so. Leukocyte common antigen-related protein (LAR) is a member of the LAR subfamily of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs). LAR is known to regulate the activity of a number of receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). To gain insight into the signaling pathways regulated by LAR, including those that are PDGF-dependent, we have carried out the first systematic analysis of LAR-regulated signal transduction using SILAC-based quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic techniques. We haveanalyzed differential phosphorylation between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and MEFs in which the LAR cytoplasmic phosphatase domains had been deleted (LARΔP), and found a significant change in abundance of phosphorylation on 270 phosphosites from 205 proteins because of the absence of the phosphatase domains of LAR. Further investigation of specific LAR-dependent phosphorylation sites and enriched biological processes reveal that LAR phosphatase activity impacts on a variety of cellular processes, most notably regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of putative upstream kinases that may play an intermediary role between LAR and the identified LAR-dependent phosphorylation events has revealed a role for LAR in regulating mTOR and JNK signaling. PMID:27074791

  12. A study on the effects of linker flexibility on acid phosphatase PhoC-GFP fusion protein using a novel linker library.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziliang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Fusion strategy has been widely used to construct artificial multifunction proteins. The flexibility or rigidity of linkers between two fused partners is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. By combining the flexible unit GGGGS (F) and rigid unit EAAAK (R), ten linkers consisting of five elementary units that cover the fully rigid RRRRR linker to the fully flexible FFFFF linker were used to construct acid phosphatase-green fluorescence protein fusion protein (PhoC-GFP). By varying the linker flexibility in PhoC-GFPs, the relative specific activity of phosphotransferase and phosphatase varied from ∼19.0% to 100% and ∼9.35% to 100%, respectively. There exists an optimal linker capable of achieving the highest phosphotransferase/phosphatase activity and GFP fluorescence intensity. We found that the highest activities were achieved neither with the rigid RRRRR linker nor with the flexible FFFFF linker, but with the FFFRR linker. Linker flexibility could adjust the activity ratio between phosphotransferase and phosphatase and varied between ∼30% to 100%. PhoC-GFP with FRRRR linker achieved the highest relative specific phosphotransferase activity/relative specific phosphatase activity (T/P) value. Our results show that applying a linker library with controllable flexibility to the fusion proteins will be an efficient way to adjust the function of fusion enzymes. PMID:26777244

  13. The Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B from the Fruits of Melaleuca leucadendron

    PubMed Central

    Saifudin, Azis; Lallo, Subehan Ab; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) is a kind of fruit used as Indonesian medicinal component and recorded in Jamu (tonic made of medical herbs) prescription records for the diabetes treatment. Its methanol extract exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.05 μg/mL, while it is the same value with positive control RK-682. Objective: To isolate the chemical constituents of M. leucadendron and to evaluate their activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Further, determine their toxicity potential against T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Materials and Methods: Methanol extract was fractionated using silica column chromatography, and the obtained fraction was purified using Sephadex 20-LH. The structure of isolated compounds was identified based on 1H and 13Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. Furthermore, the compounds were examined against PTP1B and TCPTP. Results: Methanol extract of M. leucadendron (Myrtaceae) afforded two triterpenes: Betulinic acid and ursolic acid in high quantities. Both compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PTP1B inhibition with IC50 value of 1.5 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively (positive control RK-682, IC50 = 2.05 μg/mL). Their activity toward TCPTP, on the other hand, were at 2.4 and 3.1 μg/mL, respectively. Based on this purification work, betulinic acid and ursolic acid presented 7.6% and 2.4%, respectively, as markedly M. leucadendron most potential for betulinic acid source among Indonesian plants. The result should have demonstrated that the antidiabetes of M. dendron could be through the inhibition of PTP1B. SUMMARY Melaleuca leucadendron is a good source for ursolic acid.Confirming traditional use for type II diabetes via PTP1B inhibition. PMID:27114690

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Šmidák, Roman; Mayer, Rupert Laurenz; Bileck, Andrea; Gerner, Christopher; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2016-04-15

    A series of protein kinases and phosphatases (PKPs) have been linked to contextual fear conditioning (cFC) but information is mainly derived from immunochemical studies. It was therefore decided to use an explorative label-free quantitative proteomics approach to concomitantly determine PKPs in hippocampi of mice in the individual phases of cFC. C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups: three training groups representing the acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases of cFC and a foot shock control group. Using this approach we identified 32 protein kinases or phosphatases/phosphatase subunits with significantly changed protein levels in one or more training groups as compared to foot shock control. These include members of PKP signalling modules of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP3K10, RAF1, KSR2), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKIIα, DAPK1), protein kinase C (PRKCD) and protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B(3) previously implicated in various learning paradigms. In addition, our analysis showed protein kinases WNK1, LYN, VRK1, ABL1, CDK4, CDKL3, SgK223 and ADCK1, and protein phosphatases PTPRF, ACP1, DNAJC6, SSH2 and UBASH3B that have not been directly linked to fear memory processes so far. Determination of PKPs in the individual cFC phases represents a valuable resource for interpretation of previous and design of future studies on PKPs in memory mechanisms. PMID:26748257

  15. Protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) binds within the oligomerization domain of striatin and regulates the phosphorylation and activation of the mammalian Ste20-Like kinase Mst3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Striatin, a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) B-type regulatory subunit, is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that has recently been linked to several diseases including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), which causes symptoms ranging from headaches to stroke. Striatin association with the PP2A A/C (structural subunit/catalytic subunit) heterodimer alters PP2A substrate specificity, but targets and roles of striatin-associated PP2A are not known. In addition to binding the PP2A A/C heterodimer to form a PP2A holoenzyme, striatin associates with cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) protein, the mammalian Mps one binder (MOB) homolog, Mob3/phocein, the mammalian sterile 20-like (Mst) kinases, Mst3, Mst4 and STK25, and several other proteins to form a large signaling complex. Little is known about the molecular architecture of the striatin complex and the regulation of these sterile 20-like kinases. Results To help define the molecular organization of striatin complexes and to determine whether Mst3 might be negatively regulated by striatin-associated PP2A, a structure-function analysis of striatin was performed. Two distinct regions of striatin are capable of stably binding directly or indirectly to Mob3--one N-terminal, including the coiled-coil domain, and another more C-terminal, including the WD-repeat domain. In addition, striatin residues 191-344 contain determinants necessary for efficient association of Mst3, Mst4, and CCM3. PP2A associates with the coiled-coil domain of striatin, but unlike Mob3 and Mst3, its binding appears to require striatin oligomerization. Deletion of the caveolin-binding domain on striatin abolishes striatin family oligomerization and PP2A binding. Point mutations in striatin that disrupt PP2A association cause hyperphosphorylation and activation of striatin-associated Mst3. Conclusions Striatin orchestrates the regulation of Mst3 by PP2A. It binds Mst3 likely as a dimer with CCM3 via residues lying between

  16. Molecular Insights into the Fungus-Specific Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase Z1 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily; Choy, Meng S.; Petrényi, Katalin; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Dombrádi, Viktor; Peti, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Candida is one of the most common causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Because candidemia is associated with high mortality rates and because the incidences of multidrug-resistant Candida are increasing, efforts to identify novel targets for the development of potent antifungals are warranted. Here, we describe the structure and function of the first member of a family of protein phosphatases that is specific to fungi, protein phosphatase Z1 (PPZ1) from Candida albicans. We show that PPZ1 not only is active but also is as susceptible to inhibition by the cyclic peptide inhibitor microcystin-LR as its most similar human homolog, protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α [GLC7 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae]). Unexpectedly, we also discovered that, despite its 66% sequence identity to PP1α, the catalytic domain of PPZ1 contains novel structural elements that are not present in PP1α. We then used activity and pulldown assays to show that these structural differences block a large subset of PP1/GLC7 regulatory proteins from effectively binding PPZ1, demonstrating that PPZ1 does not compete with GLC7 for its regulatory proteins. Equally important, these unique structural elements provide new pockets suitable for the development of PPZ1-specific inhibitors. Together, these studies not only reveal why PPZ1 does not negatively impact GLC7 activity in vivo but also demonstrate that the family of fungus-specific phosphatases—especially PPZ1 from C. albicans—are highly suitable targets for the development of novel drugs that specifically target C. albicans without cross-reacting with human phosphatases. PMID:27578752

  17. N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine 6-phosphate is a specific inhibitor of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Board, M

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the C-1-substituted glucose-analogue N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc) is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and stimulates the inactivation of this enzyme by GP phosphatase. In addition to its effects on GP, 1-GlcNAc also prevents the glucose-led activation of glycogen synthase (GS) in whole hepatocytes. Such an effect on GS was thought to be due to the formation of 1-GlcNAc-6-P by the action of glucokinase within the hepatocyte [Board, Bollen, Stalmans, Kim, Fleet and Johnson (1995) Biochem. J. 311, 845-852]. To investigate this possibility further, a pure preparation of 1-GlcNAc-6-P was synthesized. The effects of the phosphorylated glucose analogue on the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), the enzyme responsible for dephosphorylation and activation of GS, are reported. During the present study, 1-GlcNAc-6-P inhibited the activity of the glycogen-bound form of PP1, affecting both the GSb phosphatase and GPa phosphatase activities. A level of 50% inhibition of GSb phosphatase activity was achieved with 85 microM 1-GlcNAc-6-P in the absence of Glc-6-P and with 135 microM in the presence of 10 mM Glc-6-P. At either Glc-6-P concentration, 500 microM 1-GlcNAc-6-P completely inhibited activity. The Glc-6-P stimulation of the GPa phosphatase activity of PP1 was negated by 1-GlcNAc-6-P but there was no inhibition of the basal rate in the absence of Glc-6-P. 1-GlcNAc-6-P inhibition was specific for the glycogen-bound form of PP1 and did not inhibit the GSb phosphatase activity of the cytosolic form of the enzyme. The present work explains our previous observations on the inactivating effects on GS of incubating whole hepatocytes with 1-GlcNAc. These observations have their basis in the inhibition of glycogen-bound PP1 by 1-GlcNAc-6-P. A novel inhibitor of PP1, specific for the glycogen-bound form of the enzyme, is presented. PMID:9371733

  18. Fcp1 phosphatase controls Greatwall kinase to promote PP2A-B55 activation and mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Della Monica, Rosa; Visconti, Roberta; Cervone, Nando; Serpico, Angela Flavia; Grieco, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, progression through mitosis is driven by a protein phosphorylation wave. This wave namely depends on an activation-inactivation cycle of cyclin B-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1 while activities of major protein phosphatases, like PP1 and PP2A, appear directly or indirectly repressed by Cdk1. However, how Cdk1 inactivation is coordinated with reactivation of major phosphatases at mitosis exit still lacks substantial knowledge. We show here that activation of PP2A-B55, a major mitosis exit phosphatase, required the phosphatase Fcp1 downstream Cdk1 inactivation in human cells. During mitosis exit, Fcp1 bound Greatwall (Gwl), a Cdk1-stimulated kinase that phosphorylates Ensa/ARPP19 and converts these proteins into potent PP2A-B55 inhibitors during mitosis onset, and dephosphorylated it at Cdk1 phosphorylation sites. Fcp1-catalyzed dephosphorylation drastically reduced Gwl kinase activity towards Ensa/ARPP19 promoting PP2A-B55 activation. Thus, Fcp1 coordinates Cdk1 and Gwl inactivation to derepress PP2A-B55, generating a dephosphorylation switch that drives mitosis progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10399.001 PMID:26653855

  19. Structural basis for the glucan phosphatase activity of Starch Excess4

    PubMed Central

    Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Taylor, Adam O.; Pace, Rachel M.; Meekins, David A.; Guo, Hou-Fu; Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Living organisms utilize carbohydrates as essential energy storage molecules. Starch is the predominant carbohydrate storage molecule in plants while glycogen is utilized in animals. Starch is a water-insoluble polymer that requires the concerted activity of kinases and phosphatases to solubilize the outer surface of the glucan and mediate starch catabolism. All known plant genomes encode the glucan phosphatase Starch Excess4 (SEX4). SEX4 can dephosphorylate both the starch granule surface and soluble phosphoglucans and is necessary for processive starch metabolism. The physical basis for the function of SEX4 as a glucan phosphatase is currently unclear. Herein, we report the crystal structure of SEX4, containing phosphatase, carbohydrate-binding, and C-terminal domains. The three domains of SEX4 fold into a compact structure with extensive interdomain interactions. The C-terminal domain of SEX4 integrally folds into the core of the phosphatase domain and is essential for its stability. The phosphatase and carbohydrate-binding domains directly interact and position the phosphatase active site toward the carbohydrate-binding site in a single continuous pocket. Mutagenesis of the phosphatase domain residue F167, which forms the base of this pocket and bridges the two domains, selectively affects the ability of SEX4 to function as a glucan phosphatase. Together, these results reveal the unique tertiary architecture of SEX4 that provides the physical basis for its function as a glucan phosphatase. PMID:20679247

  20. Structural basis for the glucan phosphatase activity of Starch Excess4

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Taylor, Adam O.; Pace, Rachel M.; Meekins, David A.; Guo, Hou-Fu; Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S.

    2010-11-12

    Living organisms utilize carbohydrates as essential energy storage molecules. Starch is the predominant carbohydrate storage molecule in plants while glycogen is utilized in animals. Starch is a water-insoluble polymer that requires the concerted activity of kinases and phosphatases to solubilize the outer surface of the glucan and mediate starch catabolism. All known plant genomes encode the glucan phosphatase Starch Excess4 (SEX4). SEX4 can dephosphorylate both the starch granule surface and soluble phosphoglucans and is necessary for processive starch metabolism. The physical basis for the function of SEX4 as a glucan phosphatase is currently unclear. Herein, we report the crystal structure of SEX4, containing phosphatase, carbohydrate-binding, and C-terminal domains. The three domains of SEX4 fold into a compact structure with extensive interdomain interactions. The C-terminal domain of SEX4 integrally folds into the core of the phosphatase domain and is essential for its stability. The phosphatase and carbohydrate-binding domains directly interact and position the phosphatase active site toward the carbohydrate-binding site in a single continuous pocket. Mutagenesis of the phosphatase domain residue F167, which forms the base of this pocket and bridges the two domains, selectively affects the ability of SEX4 to function as a glucan phosphatase. Together, these results reveal the unique tertiary architecture of SEX4 that provides the physical basis for its function as a glucan phosphatase.

  1. Specific inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 identified by high-throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Klaus; Grosskopf, Stefanie; Lum, Ching Tung; Würtele, Martin; Röder, Nadine; von Kries, Jens Peter; Rosario, Marta; Rademann, Jörg; Birchmeier, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 is a positive regulator of growth factor signaling. Gain-of-function mutations in several types of leukemia define Shp2 as a bona fide oncogene. We performed a high-throughput in silico screen for small-molecular-weight compounds that bind the catalytic site of Shp2. We have identified the phenylhydrazonopyrazolone sulfonate PHPS1 as a potent and cell-permeable inhibitor, which is specific for Shp2 over the closely related tyrosine phosphatases Shp1 and PTP1B. PHPS1 inhibits Shp2-dependent cellular events such as hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF)-induced epithelial cell scattering and branching morphogenesis. PHPS1 also blocks Shp2-dependent downstream signaling, namely HGF/SF-induced sustained phosphorylation of the Erk1/2 MAP kinases and dephosphorylation of paxillin. Furthermore, PHPS1 efficiently inhibits activation of Erk1/2 by the leukemia-associated Shp2 mutant, Shp2-E76K, and blocks the anchorage-independent growth of a variety of human tumor cell lines. The PHPS compound class is therefore suitable for further development of therapeutics for the treatment of Shp2-dependent diseases. PMID:18480264

  2. Essential, Overlapping and Redundant Roles of the Drosophila Protein Phosphatase 1α and 1β Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Gross, Sascha; Bennett, Daimark; Alphey, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Protein serine/threonine phosphatase type 1 (PP1) has been found in all eukaryotes examined to date and is involved in the regulation of many cellular functions, including glycogen metabolism, muscle contraction, and mitosis. In Drosophila, four genes code for the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1c), three of which belong to the PP1α subtype. PP1β9C (flapwing) encodes the fourth PP1c gene and has a specific and nonredundant function as a nonmuscle myosin phosphatase. PP1α87B is the major form and contributes ∼80% of the total PP1 activity. We describe the first mutant alleles of PP1α96A and show that PP1α96A is not an essential gene, but seems to have a function in the regulation of nonmuscle myosin. We show that overexpression of the PP1α isozymes does not rescue semilethal PP1β9C mutants, whereas overexpression of either PP1α96A or PP1β9C does rescue a lethal PP1α87B mutant combination, showing that the lethality is due to a quantitative reduction in the level of PP1c. Overexpression of PP1β9C does not rescue a PP1α87B, PP1α96A double mutant, suggesting an essential PP1α-specific function in Drosophila. PMID:17513890

  3. Expression, prognostic significance and mutational analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Kontandreopoulou, Elina; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Roumelioti, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria; Kyriazopoulou, Lydia; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Vaiopoulos, George; Variami, Eleni; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Athina Viniou, Nora

    2016-05-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 dephosphorylates BCR-ABL1, thereby serving as a potential control mechanism of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity. Pathways regulating SHP-1 expression, which could be exploited in the therapeutics of TKI-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), remain unknown. Moreover, the questions of whether there is any kind of SHP-1 deregulation in CML, contributing to disease initiation or evolution, as well as the question of prognostic significance of SHP-1, have not been definitively answered. This study shows moderately lower SHP-1 mRNA expression in chronic phase CML patients in comparison to healthy individuals and no change in SHP-1 mRNA levels after successful TKI treatment. Mutational analysis of the aminoterminal and phosphatase domains of SHP-1 in patients did not reveal genetic lesions. This study also found no correlation of SHP-1 expression at diagnosis with response to treatment, although a trend for lower SHP-1 expression was noted in the very small non-responders' group of the 3-month therapeutic milestone. PMID:26373709

  4. Inhibition of Setaria cervi protein tyrosine phosphatases by Phenylarsine oxide: A proteomic and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Wadhawan, Mohit; Tiwari, Savitri; Kumar, Ranjeet; Rathaur, Sushma

    2016-07-01

    Phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor significantly decreased the motility and viability of Setaria cervi ultimately leading to its death. The PTP activity present in the cytosolic and detergent soluble fractions as well as on surface of these parasites was significantly inhibited by PAO. A marked alteration in protein spots abundance after proteomic analysis showed 14 down-regulated and 9 upregulated spots in the treated parasites as compared to the control. The PTP inhibition led to increase in the cytosolic and mitochondrial calpain activity in these parasites. PAO also blocked the ATP generation in the parasite depicted by reduced activity of phosphoglycerate kinase and expression of enolase. An increased ROS level, induced lipid peroxidation/protein carbonyl formation and decreased activity of different antioxidant enzymes like thioredoxin reductase, glutathione reductase and glutathione transferases was also observed in the PAO treated parasites. PAO, thus disturbs the overall homeostasis of the filarial parasite by inhibiting PTPs. Thereby suggesting that these molecules could be used as a good chemotherapeutic target for lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26965172

  5. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  6. Functional Analysis of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatases in Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amand, Mathieu; Erpicum, Charlotte; Gilles, Christine; Noël, Agnès; Rahmouni, Souad

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic perspectives targeting angiogenesis in cancer stimulated an intense investigation of the mechanisms triggering and governing angiogenic processes. Several publications have highlighted the importance of typical dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) or MKPs in endothelial cells and their role in controlling different biological functions implicated in angiogenesis such as migration, proliferation, apoptosis, tubulogenesis, and cell adhesion. However, among atypical DSPs, the only one investigated in angiogenesis was DUSP3. We recently identified this DSP as a new key player in endothelial cells and angiogenesis. In this chapter we provide with detailed protocols and models used to investigate the role of DUSP3 in endothelial cells and angiogenesis. We start the chapter with an overview of the role of several DSPs in angiogenesis. We continue with providing a full description of a highly efficient transfection protocol to deplete DUSP3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in the primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We next describe the major assays used to investigate different processes involved in angiogenesis such as tube formation assay, proliferation assay and spheroids sprouting assay. We finish the chapter by validating our results in DUSP3-knockout mice using in vivo angiogenesis assays such as Matrigel plug and Lewis lung carcinoma cell subcutaneous xenograft model followed by anti-CD31 immunofluorescence and ex vivo aortic ring assay. All methods described can be adapted to other phosphatases and signaling molecules. PMID:27514814

  7. Cellular Casein Kinase 2 and Protein Phosphatase 2A Modulate Replication Site Assembly of Bluetongue Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    A number of cytoplasmic replicating viruses produce cytoplasmic inclusion bodies or protein aggregates; however, a hallmark of viruses of the Reoviridae family is that they utilize these sites for purposes of replication and capsid assembly, functioning as viral assembly factories. Here we have used bluetongue virus (BTV) as a model system for this broad family of important viruses to understand the mechanisms regulating inclusion body assembly. Newly synthesized viral proteins interact with sequestered viral RNA molecules prior to capsid assembly and double-stranded RNA synthesis within viral inclusion bodies (VIBs). VIBs are predominantly comprised of a BTV-encoded non-structural protein 2 (NS2). Previous in vitro studies indicated that casein kinase 2 (CK2) mediated the phosphorylation of NS2, which regulated the propensity of NS2 to form larger aggregates. Using targeted pharmacological reagents, specific mutation in the viral genome by reverse genetics and confocal microscopy, here we demonstrate that CK2 activity is important for BTV replication. Furthermore, we show that a novel host cell factor, protein phosphatase 2A, is involved in NS2 dephosphorylation and that, together with CK2, it regulates VIB morphology and virus replication. Thus, these two host enzymes influence the dynamic nature of VIB assembly/disassembly, and these concerted activities may be relevant to the assembly and the release of these cores from VIBs. PMID:27226558

  8. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors--Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  9. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors—Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  10. Restricted Protein Phosphatase 2A Targeting by Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Shuda, Masahiro; Camacho, Carlos J.; Gamper, Armin M.; Thant, Mamie; Chang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is a newly discovered human cancer virus encoding a small T (sT) oncoprotein. We performed MCV sT FLAG-affinity purification followed by mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis, which identified several protein phosphatases (PP), including PP2A A and C subunits and PP4C, as potential cellular interacting proteins. PP2A targeting is critical for the transforming properties of nonhuman polyomaviruses, such as simian virus 40 (SV40), but is not required for MCV sT-induced rodent cell transformation. We compared similarities and differences in PP2A binding between MCV and SV40 sT. While SV40 sT coimmunopurified with subunits PP2A Aα and PP2A C, MCV sT coimmunopurified with PP2A Aα, PP2A Aβ, and PP2A C. Scanning alanine mutagenesis at 29 sites across the MCV sT protein revealed that PP2A-binding domains lie on the opposite molecular surface from a previously described large T stabilization domain (LSD) loop that binds E3 ligases, such as Fbw7. MCV sT-PP2A interactions can be functionally distinguished by mutagenesis from MCV sT LSD-dependent 4E-BP1 hyperphosphorylation and viral DNA replication enhancement. MCV sT has a restricted range for PP2A B subunit substitution, inhibiting only the assembly of B56α into the phosphatase holoenzyme. In contrast, SV40 sT inhibits the assembly of B55α, B56α and B56ε into PP2A. We conclude that MCV sT is required for Merkel cell carcinoma growth, but its in vitro transforming activity depends on LSD interactions rather than PP2A targeting. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus is a newly discovered human cancer virus that promotes cancer, in part, through expression of its small T (sT) oncoprotein. Animal polyomavirus sT oncoproteins have been found to cause experimental tumors by blocking the activities of a group of phosphatases called protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Our structural analysis reveals that MCV sT also displaces the B subunit of PP2A to inhibit PP2A activity. MCV sT, however, only

  11. Chemostat Culture of Escherichia coli K-12 Limited by the Activity of Alkaline Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    King, Stagg L.; Francis, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The growth-limiting reaction of a chemostat culture of Escherichia coli K-12 was the hydrolysis of β-glycerophosphate by alkaline phosphatase. The culture was buffered at pH 5.2 where alkaline phosphatase was unable to supply phosphate to the cell at a rate sufficient to sustain the maximum rate of growth. Alkaline phosphatase activity in this system is discussed in terms of the so-called Flip-Flop mechanism. PMID:240310

  12. Enhancing Potato System Sustainability: Crop Rotation Impacts on Soil Phosphatase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a species with a low efficiency of acquiring soil P. Rotation crops may potentially influence P uptake by potato by increasing soil organic acids, phosphatase activity, and microbial biomass. However, this kind of information is very limited. We measured the activities of acid phosphatase,...

  13. Crystal Structures of Protein Phosphatase-1 Bound to Nodularin-R and Tautomycin: A Novel Scaffold for Structure Based Drug Design of Serine/threonine Phosphatase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelker, M.; Page, R; Peti, W

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 occurs in all tissues and regulates many pathways, ranging from cell-cycle progression to carbohydrate metabolism. Many naturally occurring, molecular toxins modulate PP1 activity, though the exact mechanism of this differential regulation is not understood. A detailed elucidation of these interactions is crucial for understanding the cellular basis of phosphatase function and signaling pathways but, more importantly, they can serve as the basis for highly specific therapeutics, e.g. against cancer. We report the crystal structures of PP1 in complex with nodularin-R at 1.63 {angstrom} and tautomycin at 1.70 {angstrom} resolution. The PP1:nodularin-R complex was used to demonstrate the utility of our improved PP1 production technique, which produces highly active, soluble PP1. Tautomycin is one of the few toxins that reportedly preferentially binds PP1> PP2A. Therefore, the PP1:tautomycin structure is the first complex structure with a toxin with preferred PP1 specificity. Furthermore, since tautomycin is a linear non-peptide-based toxin, our reported structure will aid the design of lead compounds for novel PP1-specific pharmaceuticals.

  14. Active-site remodelling in the bifunctional fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Say, Rafael F; Lü, Wei; Fuchs, Georg; Einsle, Oliver

    2011-10-27

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) aldolase/phosphatase is a bifunctional, thermostable enzyme that catalyses two subsequent steps in gluconeogenesis in most archaea and in deeply branching bacterial lineages. It mediates the aldol condensation of heat-labile dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to FBP, as well as the subsequent, irreversible hydrolysis of the product to yield the stable fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) and inorganic phosphate; no reaction intermediates are released. Here we present a series of structural snapshots of the reaction that reveal a substantial remodelling of the active site through the movement of loop regions that create different catalytic functionalities at the same location. We have solved the three-dimensional structures of FBP aldolase/phosphatase from thermophilic Thermoproteus neutrophilus in a ligand-free state as well as in complex with the substrates DHAP and FBP and the product F6P to resolutions up to 1.3 Å. In conjunction with mutagenesis data, this pinpoints the residues required for the two reaction steps and shows that the sequential binding of additional Mg(2+) cations reversibly facilitates the reaction. FBP aldolase/phosphatase is an ancestral gluconeogenic enzyme optimized for high ambient temperatures, and our work resolves how consecutive structural rearrangements reorganize the catalytic centre of the protein to carry out two canonical reactions in a very non-canonical type of bifunctionality. PMID:21983965

  15. Probing the target-specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatases with biarsenical probes

    PubMed Central

    Pomorski, Adam; Adamczyk, Justyna; Bishop, Anthony C.; Krężel, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Selective control of enzyme activity is critical for elucidating the roles of specific proteins in signaling pathways. One potential means for developing truly target-specific inhibitors involves the use of protein engineering to sensitize a target enzyme to inhibition by a small molecule that does not inhibit homologous wild-type enzymes. Previously, it has been shown that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) can be sensitized to inhibition by a biarsenical probe, FlAsH-EDT2, which inhibits PTP activity by specifically binding to cysteine residues that have been introduced into catalytically important regions. In the present study, we developed an array of biarsenical probes, some newly synthesized and some previously reported, to investigate for the first time the structure-activity relationships for PTP inhibition by biarsenicals. Our data show that biarsenical probes which contain substitutions at the 2′ and 7′ positions are more effective than FlAsH-EDT2 at inhibiting sensitized PTPs. The increased potency of 2′,7′-substituted probes was observed when PTPs were assayed with both para-nitrophenylphosphate and phosphopeptide PTP substrates and at multiple probe concentrations. The data further indicate that the enhanced inhibitory properties are the result of increased binding affinity between the 2′,7′-substituted biarsenical probes and sensitized PTPs. In addition we provide previously unknown physicochemical and stability data for various biarsenical probes. PMID:25460004

  16. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei; Sakamoto, Akira; Zhang, Yan Fang; Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  17. Involvement of protein phosphatases in the destabilization of methamphetamine-associated contextual memory.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Jung; Huang, Chien-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Hua; Gean, Po-Wu

    2016-09-01

    Destabilization refers to a memory that becomes unstable when reactivated and is susceptible to disruption by amnestic agents. Here we delineated the cellular mechanism underlying the destabilization of drug memory. Mice were conditioned with methamphetamine (MeAM) for 3 d, and drug memory was assessed with a conditioned place preference (CPP) protocol. Anisomycin (ANI) was administered 60 min after the CPP retrieval to disrupt reconsolidation. We found that destabilization of MeAM CPP after the application of ANI was blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801 and the NR2B antagonist ifenprodil (IFN) but not by the NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). In addition, decrease in the phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine845 (p-GluR1-Ser845), decrease in spine density, and a reduction in the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) were reversed after the MK-801 treatment. The effect of ANI on destabilization was prevented by the protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin, CaN) inhibitors cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK-506 and the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitors calyculin A (CA) and okadaic acid (OA). These results suggest that memory destabilization involves the activation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, which in turn allows the influx of Ca(2+) Increased intracellular Ca(2+) stimulates CaN, leading to the dephosphorylation and inactivation of inhibitor 1 and the activation of PP1. PP1 then dephosphorylates p-GluR1-Ser845 to elicit AMPA receptor (AMPAR) endocytosis and destabilization of the drug memory. PMID:27531839

  18. A RP-UFLC Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: Focus on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2).

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Dairou, Julien; Mathieu, Cécile; Guidez, Fabien; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Cools, Jan; Chomienne, Christine; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in numerous signaling pathways and dysfunctions of certain of these enzymes have been linked to several human diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. PTPN2 is a PTP mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells and involved in growth factor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Loss of function analyses in patients with mutation/deletion of the PTPN2 gene and knock-out mouse models indicate that PTPN2 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell malignancies and as a regulator of inflammation and immunity. The use of sensitive and quantitative assays is of prime importance to better characterize the biochemical properties of PTPN2 and its biological roles. We report a highly sensitive non-radioactive assay that allows the measurement of the activity of purified PTPN2 and of endogenous PTPN2 immunoprecipitated on agarose beads. The assay relies on separation and quantitation by reverse-phase ultra fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) of a fluorescein-labeled phosphotyrosine peptide substrate derived from the sequence of STAT1. The applicability and reliability of this approach is supported by kinetic and mechanistic studies using PTP inhibitors. More broadly, our PTPN2 assay provides the basis for the design of flexible methods for the measurement of other PTPs. PMID:26040922

  19. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of a Protein-Serine/Threonine Phosphatase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi TAG11

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Bianca; Frey, Gerhard; Swanson, Ronald V.; Mathur, Eric J.; Stetter, K. O.

    1998-01-01

    An open reading frame coding for a putative protein-serine/threonine phosphatase was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi TAG11 and named Py-PP1. Py-PP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified from inclusion bodies, and biochemically characterized. The phosphatase gene is part of an operon which may provide, for the first time, insight into a physiological role for archaeal protein phosphatases in vivo. PMID:9696747

  20. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  1. Targeted redox inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 by Nox4 regulates eIF2α-mediated stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Santos, Celio X C; Hafstad, Anne D; Beretta, Matteo; Zhang, Min; Molenaar, Chris; Kopec, Jola; Fotinou, Dina; Murray, Thomas V; Cobb, Andrew M; Martin, Daniel; Zeh Silva, Maira; Anilkumar, Narayana; Schröder, Katrin; Shanahan, Catherine M; Brewer, Alison C; Brandes, Ralf P; Blanc, Eric; Parsons, Maddy; Belousov, Vsevelod; Cammack, Richard; Hider, Robert C; Steiner, Roberto A; Shah, Ajay M

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorylation of translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) attenuates global protein synthesis but enhances translation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and is a crucial evolutionarily conserved adaptive pathway during cellular stresses. The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) deactivates this pathway whereas prolonging eIF2α phosphorylation enhances cell survival. Here, we show that the reactive oxygen species-generating NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox4) is induced downstream of ATF4, binds to a PP1-targeting subunit GADD34 at the endoplasmic reticulum, and inhibits PP1 activity to increase eIF2α phosphorylation and ATF4 levels. Other PP1 targets distant from the endoplasmic reticulum are unaffected, indicating a spatially confined inhibition of the phosphatase. PP1 inhibition involves metal center oxidation rather than the thiol oxidation that underlies redox inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases. We show that this Nox4-regulated pathway robustly enhances cell survival and has a physiologic role in heart ischemia-reperfusion and acute kidney injury. This work uncovers a novel redox signaling pathway, involving Nox4-GADD34 interaction and a targeted oxidative inactivation of the PP1 metal center, that sustains eIF2α phosphorylation to protect tissues under stress. PMID:26742780

  2. Arabidopsis DELLA Protein Degradation Is Controlled by a Type-One Protein Phosphatase, TOPP4

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Guo, Xiaola; Yue, Jing; Huang, Yan; Xu, Xiufei; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a class of important phytohormones regulating a variety of physiological processes during normal plant growth and development. One of the major events during GA-mediated growth is the degradation of DELLA proteins, key negative regulators of GA signaling pathway. The stability of DELLA proteins is thought to be controlled by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Up to date, no phosphatase involved in this process has been identified. We have identified a dwarfed dominant-negative Arabidopsis mutant, named topp4-1. Reduced expression of TOPP4 using an artificial microRNA strategy also resulted in a dwarfed phenotype. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicated that TOPP4 regulates GA signal transduction mainly via promoting DELLA protein degradation. The severely dwarfed topp4-1 phenotypes were partially rescued by the DELLA deficient mutants rga-t2 and gai-t6, suggesting that the DELLA proteins RGA and GAI are required for the biological function of TOPP4. Both RGA and GAI were greatly accumulated in topp4-1 but significantly decreased in 35S-TOPP4 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. Further analyses demonstrated that TOPP4 is able to directly bind and dephosphorylate RGA and GAI, confirming that the TOPP4-controlled phosphorylation status of DELLAs is associated with their stability. These studies provide direct evidence for a crucial role of protein dephosphorylation mediated by TOPP4 in the GA signaling pathway. PMID:25010794

  3. Overexpression, purification, and characterization of SHPTP1, a Src homology 2-containing protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D; Neel, B G; Walsh, C T

    1993-01-01

    A protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48) containing two Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, SHPTP1, was previously identified in hematopoietic and epithelial cells. By placing the coding sequence of the PTPase behind a bacteriophage T7 promoter, we have overexpressed both the full-length enzyme and a truncated PTPase domain in Escherichia coli. In each case, the soluble enzyme was expressed at levels of 3-4% of total soluble E. coli protein. The recombinant proteins had molecular weights of 63,000 and 45,000 for the full-length protein and the truncated PTPase domain, respectively, as determined by SDS/PAGE. The recombinant enzymes dephosphorylated p-nitrophenyl phosphate, phosphotyrosine, and phosphotyrosyl peptides but not phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, or phosphoseryl peptides. The enzymes showed a strong dependence on pH and ionic strength for their activity, with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.3 for the full-length enzyme and the catalytic domain, respectively, and an optimal NaCl concentration of 250-300 mM. The recombinant PTPases had high Km values for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and exhibited non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for phosphotyrosyl peptides. Images PMID:8430079

  4. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Enhances Interferon Signaling in Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Stanley, William J; Litwak, Sara A; Quah, Hong Sheng; Tan, Sih Min; Kay, Thomas W H; Tiganis, Tony; de Haan, Judy B; Thomas, Helen E; Gurzov, Esteban N

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the result of an autoimmune assault against the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells, where chronic local inflammation (insulitis) leads to β-cell destruction. T cells and macrophages infiltrate into islets early in T1D pathogenesis. These immune cells secrete cytokines that lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and T-cell invasion and activation. Cytokine-signaling pathways are very tightly regulated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to prevent excessive activation. Here, we demonstrate that pancreata from NOD mice with islet infiltration have enhanced oxidation/inactivation of PTPs and STAT1 signaling compared with NOD mice that do not have insulitis. Inactivation of PTPs with sodium orthovanadate in human and rodent islets and β-cells leads to increased activation of interferon signaling and chemokine production mediated by STAT1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this exacerbated STAT1 activation-induced cell death in islets was prevented by overexpression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 or inactivation of the BH3-only protein Bim. Together our data provide a mechanism by which PTP inactivation induces signaling in pancreatic islets that results in increased expression of inflammatory genes and exacerbated insulitis. PMID:25732191

  5. B'-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Goedele N

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B' family of the regulatory subunits. B'-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B' subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein-protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B', which when mutated render B' incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  6. Spinophilin directs Protein Phosphatase 1 specificity by blocking substrate binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Michael J.; Dancheck, Barbara; Critton, David A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The serine/threonine Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) dephosphorylates hundreds of key biological targets. PP1 associates with ≥200 regulatory proteins to form highly specific holoenzymes. These regulatory proteins target PP1 to its point of action within the cell and prime its enzymatic specificity for particular substrates. However, how they direct PP1’s specificity is not understood. Here we show that spinophilin, a neuronal PP1 regulator, is entirely unstructured in its unbound form and binds PP1, through a folding-upon-binding mechanism, in an elongated fashion, blocking one of PP1’s three putative substrate binding sites, without altering its active site. This mode of binding is sufficient for spinophilin to restrict PP1’s activity toward a model substrate in vitro, without affecting its ability to dephosphorylate its neuronal substrate GluR1. Thus, our work provides the molecular basis for the ability of spinophilin to dictate PP1 substrate specificity. PMID:20305656

  7. Role of protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor-1 in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Persoulla; Hajjar, Roger J.; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2009-01-01

    The type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1) is a critical negative regulator of Ca2+ cycling and contractility in the cardiomyocyte. In particular, it mediates restoration of cardiac function to basal levels, after β-adrenergic stimulation, by dephosphorylating key phospho-proteins. PP1 is a holoenzyme comprised of its catalytic and auxiliary subunits. These regulatory proteins dictate PP1's subcellular localization, substrate specificity and activity. Amongst them, inhibitor-1 is of particular importance since it has been implicated as an integrator of multiple neurohormonal pathways, which finely regulate PP1 activity, at the level of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In fact, perturbations in the regulation of PP1 by inhibitor-1 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure, suggesting that inhibitor-1-based therapeutic interventions may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in the failing heart. This review will discuss the current views on the role of inhibitor-1 in cardiac physiology, its possible contribution to cardiac disease and its potential as a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:19481088

  8. Identification and characterization of novel membrane-bound PRL protein tyrosine phosphatases from Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Yadav, Smita; Rathaur, Sushma

    2015-11-01

    A significant amount of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity was detected in the detergent-soluble membrane-bound fraction of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite. The membrane-bound PTP activity was significantly inhibited when the adult parasites were exposed to compounds having antifilarial activity like aspirin and SK7 as well as phenylarsine oxide, a specific PTP inhibitor suggesting that this activity is stress regulated. Further, this enzyme was purified as a single protein of apparently 21 kDa using two different chromatographic techniques. The MALDI-MS/MS analysis of its peptides showed closest match with protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (Aedes aegypti). This purified enzyme (named as PRL) showed maximum activity at pH 5.5/37 °C and hydrolysed para nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP) at the highest rate followed by O-P-L-tyrosine and O-P-L-threonine. It showed significant inhibition by specific inhibitors of PTP such as sodium orthovanadate, phenylarsine oxide and ammonium molybdate and was activated by dithiothreitol (DTT). The active site modification studies suggested involvement of cysteine, arginine, histidine and aspartic acid in the catalytic activity of PRL. The activity of S. cervi PRL was also found to be resistant towards the external oxidative stress. Thus, S. cervi PRL could be taken as a potential target for the management of human lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26341797

  9. Protein phosphatases PP2A, PP4 and PP6: mediators and regulators in development and responses to environmental cues.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Cathrine; Kataya, Amr R A; Heidari, Behzad; Creighton, Maria T; Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Ginbot, Zekarias; Jonassen, Else M

    2014-12-01

    The three closely related groups of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP2A, PP4 and PP6 are conserved throughout eukaryotes. The catalytic subunits are present in trimeric and dimeric complexes with scaffolding and regulatory subunits that control activity and confer substrate specificity to the protein phosphatases. In Arabidopsis, three scaffolding (A subunits) and 17 regulatory (B subunits) proteins form complexes with five PP2A catalytic subunits giving up to 255 possible combinations. Three SAP-domain proteins act as regulatory subunits of PP6. Based on sequence similarities with proteins in yeast and mammals, two putative PP4 regulatory subunits are recognized in Arabidopsis. Recent breakthroughs have been made concerning the functions of some of the PP2A and PP6 regulatory subunits, for example the FASS/TON2 in regulation of the cellular skeleton, B' subunits in brassinosteroid signalling and SAL proteins in regulation of auxin transport. Reverse genetics is starting to reveal also many more physiological functions of other subunits. A system with key regulatory proteins (TAP46, TIP41, PTPA, LCMT1, PME-1) is present in all eukaryotes to stabilize, activate and inactivate the catalytic subunits. In this review, we present the status of knowledge concerning physiological functions of PP2A, PP4 and PP6 in Arabidopsis, and relate these to yeast and mammals. PMID:24810976

  10. Fluorescence labelling of phosphatase activity in digestive glands of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Płachno, B J; Adamec, L; Lichtscheidl, I K; Peroutka, M; Adlassnig, W; Vrba, J

    2006-11-01

    A new ELF (enzyme labelled fluorescence) assay was applied to detect phosphatase activity in glandular structures of 47 carnivorous plant species, especially Lentibulariaceae, in order to understand their digestive activities. We address the following questions: (1) Are phosphatases produced by the plants and/or by inhabitants of the traps? (2) Which type of hairs/glands is involved in the production of phosphatases? (3) Is this phosphatase production a common feature among carnivorous plants or is it restricted to evolutionarily advanced species? Our results showed activity of the phosphatases in glandular structures of the majority of the plants tested, both from the greenhouse and from sterile culture. In addition, extracellular phosphatases can also be produced by trap inhabitants. In Utricularia, activity of phosphatase was detected in internal glands of 27 species from both primitive and advanced sections and different ecological groups. Further positive reactions were found in Genlisea, Pinguicula, Aldrovanda, Dionaea, Drosera, Drosophyllum, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus. In Utricularia and Genlisea, enzymatic secretion was independent of stimulation by prey. Byblis and Roridula are usually considered as "proto-carnivores", lacking digestive enzymes. However, we found high activity of phosphatases in both species. Thus, they should be classified as true carnivores. We suggest that the inflorescence of Byblis and some Pinguicula species might also be an additional "carnivorous organ", which can trap a prey, digest it, and finally absorb available nutrients. PMID:16865659

  11. Regulatory protein phosphorylation in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A PP2C-type phosphatase serves to dephosphorylate HPr(Ser-P).

    PubMed

    Halbedel, Sven; Busse, Julia; Schmidl, Sebastian R; Stülke, Jörg

    2006-09-01

    Among the few regulatory events in the minimal bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the phosphorylation of the HPr phosphocarrier protein of the phosphotransferase system. In the presence of glycerol, HPr is phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent manner by the HPr kinase/phosphorylase. The role of the latter enzyme was studied by constructing a M. pneumoniae hprK mutant defective in HPr kinase/phosphorylase. This mutant strain no longer exhibited HPr kinase activity but, surprisingly, still had phosphatase activity toward serine-phosphorylated HPr (HPr(Ser-P)). An inspection of the genome sequence revealed the presence of a gene (prpC) encoding a presumptive protein serine/threonine phosphatase of the PP2C family. The phosphatase PrpC was purified and its biochemical activity in HPr(Ser-P) dephosphorylation demonstrated. Moreover, a prpC mutant strain was isolated and found to be impaired in HPr(Ser-P) dephosphorylation. Homologues of PrpC are present in many bacteria possessing HPr(Ser-P), suggesting that PrpC may play an important role in adjusting the cellular HPr phosphorylation state and thus controlling the diverse regulatory functions exerted by the different forms of HPr. PMID:16857667

  12. Negative regulation of HER2 signaling by the PEST-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase BDP1.

    PubMed

    Gensler, Miriam; Buschbeck, Marcus; Ullrich, Axel

    2004-03-26

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) mediates a variety of complex cellular functions and in case of deregulation can contribute to pathophysiological processes. A tight and finely tuned control of RTK activity is therefore critical for the cell. We investigated the role of the PEST-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase BDP1 in the regulation of HER2, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family of RTKs. Here we demonstrate that HER2 signaling is highly sensitive to BDP1 activity. Overexpression of BDP1 inhibited ligand-induced activation of HER2 but not that of the closely related EGFR. On the other hand, suppression of endogenous BDP1 expression increased the phosphorylation state of HER2. In addition, BDP1 was able to interfere with downstream signaling events by inhibiting the phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Gab1 and reducing mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Supported by the finding that BDP1 is coexpressed with HER2 in breast cancer cells, we suggest that BDP1 is an important regulator of HER2 activity and thus the first protein-tyrosine phosphatase shown to be involved in HER2 signal attenuation. PMID:14660651

  13. Transcriptional responses to cantharidin a protein phosphatase inhibitor in Arabidopsis thaliana reveal the involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cantharidin is a natural compound isolated from the blister beetle (Epicauta spp.). It is a very potent inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PPP, especially PP2A and PP4. Protein phosphatases and kinases maintain a sensitive balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of ...

  14. Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in San Francisco and Monterey Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.

    2002-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient utilized by all living organisms, and has been recognized as a limiting nutrient in some oceanic systems (Cotner et al., 1997; Karl et al., 1995; Michaels et al., 1996; Wu et al., 2000). However, relatively little is known about the extent of P limitation in natural environments, how P limitation varies spatially and temporally, and what determines how and when P becomes limiting (Benitez-Nelson, 2000). A more direct estimate of the degree of P limitation in a variety of oceanic systems is needed to better understand P cycling and dynamics within the ocean and how these have and will change in response to global climate and environmental perturbation. Accordingly, the objective this study is to assess the P-status of marine planktonic communities in Monterey and San Francisco Bays using the activity of alkaline phosphatase in the water column. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the most widely used enzyme that marine organisms use to hydrolize organic P compounds to biologically available orthophosphate. Accordingly it is expected that in areas where P is a limiting nutrient organisms will produce and release more AP to seawater so they can utilize the dissolved and particulate organic P compounds. Indeed it has been suggested that the AP activity is a reliable indicator of P-availability to planktonic communities (Ammerman and Azam, 1985; Cotner and Wetzel, 1991; Hong et al., 1998). High enzyme activities indicate low dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) availability while low levels suggest that DIP supply satisfies the community P-demand. This study examines AP activity in San Francisco and Monterey Bays over a 12 month period, from November, 2001 through November, 2002 using two enzyme assays. The study encompasses data from a three-station transect in Monterey Bay, at depths ranging from 0-60 meters. The stations range from coastal waters to open ocean depths of several thousand meters. In San Francisco Bay, surface water from

  15. Deficiency of AMPK in CD8+ T cells suppresses their anti-tumor function by inducing protein phosphatase-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Enyu; Zhang, Yuwen; Zhu, Ganqian; Hao, Jiaqing; Persson, Xuan-Mai T.; Egilmez, Nejat K.; Suttles, Jill; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have linked AMPK, a major metabolic sensor coordinating of multiple cellular functions, to tumor development and progression. However, the exact role of AMPK in tumor development is still controversial. Here we report that activation of AMPK promotes survival and anti-tumor function of T cells, in particular CD8+ T cells, resulting in superior tumor suppression in vivo. While AMPK expression is dispensable for T cell development, genetic deletion of AMPK promotes T cell death during in vitro activation and in vivo tumor development. Moreover, we demonstrate that protein phosphatases are the key mediators of AMPK-dependent effects on T cell death, and inhibition of phosphatase activity by okadaic acid successfully restores T cell survival and function. Altogether, our data suggest a novel mechanism by which AMPK regulates protein phosphatase activity in control of survival and function of CD8+ T cells, thereby enhancing their role in tumor immunosurveillance. PMID:25760243

  16. Relationship between phosphorus forms and phosphatase activity in soils amended with poultry manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Up to 80% of the phosphorus (P) in poultry manure (PM) can be present in organic forms that require mineralization via phosphatase enzymes prior to plant utilization. To determine the correlation between soil P distribution and phosphatase activity we sequentially extracted two Maine soils amended...

  17. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  18. An Essential Role for Inhibitor-2 Regulation of Protein Phosphatase-1 in Synaptic Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Altimimi, Haider F.; Hou, Hailong; Petralia, Ronald S.; Xu, Bo; Stellwagen, David

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) activity is important for many calcium-dependent neuronal functions including Hebbian synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. PP1 activity is necessary for the induction of long-term depression, whereas downregulation of PP1 activity is required for the normal induction of long-term potentiation. However, how PP1 is activated is not clear. Moreover, it is not known whether PP1 plays a role in homeostatic synaptic scaling, another form of synaptic plasticity which functions to reset the neuronal firing rate in response to chronic neuronal activity perturbations. In this study, we found that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is phosphorylated at serine 43 (S43) in rat and mouse cortical neurons in response to bicuculine application. Expression of I-2 phosphorylation-blocking mutant I-2 (S43A) blocked the dephosphorylation of GluA2 at serine 880, AMPA receptor trafficking, and synaptic downscaling induced by bicuculline application. Our data suggest that the phosphorylation of I-2 at S43 appears to be mediated by L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light-chain kinase. Our work thus reveals a novel calcium-induced PP1 activation pathway critical for homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:23825423

  19. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) expression predicts a favorable clinical outcome in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Elzagheid, Adam; Birkman, Eva-Maria; Avoranta, Tuulia; Kytölä, Ville; Korkeila, Eija; Syrjänen, Kari; Westermarck, Jukka; Sundström, Jari

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for high mortality. So far, there is lack of markers capable of predicting which patients are at risk of aggressive course of the disease. Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) inhibitor proteins have recently gained interest as markers of more aggressive disease in certain cancers. Here, we report the role of PP2A inhibitor PME-1 in CRC. PME-1 expression was assessed from a rectal cancer patient cohort by immunohistochemistry, and correlations were performed for various clinicopathological variables and patient survival. Rectal cancer patients with higher cytoplasmic PME-1 protein expression (above median) had less recurrences (P = 0.003, n = 195) and better disease-free survival (DFS) than the patients with low cytoplasmic PME-1 protein expression (below median). Analysis of PPME-1 mRNA expression from TCGA dataset of colon and rectal adenocarcinoma (COADREAD) patient cohort confirmed high PPME1 expression as an independent protective factor predicting favorable overall survival (OS) (P = 0.005, n = 396) compared to patients with low PPME1 expression. CRC cell lines were used to study the effect of PME-1 knockdown by siRNA on cell survival. Contrary to other cancer types, PME-1 inhibition in CRC cell lines did not reduce the viability of cells or the expression of active phosphorylated AKT and ERK proteins. In conclusion, PME-1 expression predicts for a favorable outcome of CRC patients. The unexpected role of PME-1 in CRC in contrast with the oncogenic role of PP2A inhibitor proteins in other malignancies warrants further studies of cancer-specific function for each of these proteins. PMID:26377365

  20. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  1. The 1.35 A resolution structure of the phosphatase domain of the suppressor of T cell receptor signaling protein in complex with sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Jakoncic, J.; Sondgeroth, B.; Carpino, N.; Nassar, N.

    2010-04-19

    The suppressor of T-cell signaling (Sts) proteins are multidomain proteins that negatively regulate the signaling of membrane-bound receptors, including the T-cell receptor (TCR) and the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR). They contain at their C-terminus a 2H-phosphatase homology (PGM) domain that is responsible for their protein tyrosine phosphatase activity. Here, the crystal structure of the phosphatase domain of Sts-1, Sts-1PGM, was determined at pH 4.6. The asymmetric unit contains two independent molecules and each active site is occupied by a sulfate ion. Each sulfate is located at the phosphate-binding site and makes similar interactions with the catalytic residues. The structure suggests an explanation for the lower Michaelis-Menten constants at acidic pH.

  2. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Wu, C. H.; Beazley, M. J.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Taillefert, M.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons development. Due to the scale of environmental contamination, in situ sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides remain the most cost-effective strategy for remediation. We are currently investigating a remediation approach that utilizes periplasmic and extracellular microbial phosphatase activity of soil bacteria capable promoting in situ uranium phosphate sequestration. Our studies focus on the contaminated soils from the DOE Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. We have previously demonstrated that ORFRC strains with phosphatase-positive phenotypes were capable of promoting the precpitation of >95% U(VI) as a low solubility phosphate mineral during growth on glycerol phosphate as a sole carbon and phosphorus source. Here we present culture-independent soil slurry studies aimed at understanding microbial community dynamics resulting from exogenous organophosphate additions. Soil slurries containing glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and nitrate as the sole C, P and N sources were incubated under oxic growth conditions at pH 5.5 or pH 6.8. Following treatments, total DNA was extracted and prokaryotic diversity was assessed using high-density 16S oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G2P required 36 days to accumulate 4.8mM and 2.2 mM phosphate, respectively. In contrast, treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G3P accumulated 8.9 mM and 8.7 mM phosphate, respectively, after 20 days. A total of 2120 unique taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families were detected among all treatment conditions. The phyla that significantly (P<0.05) increased in abundance relative to incubations lacking organophosphate amendments included: Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Members from the classes Bacteroidetes

  3. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A.; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  4. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Kay, Steve A; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-09-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  5. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vieira, Sandra I.; Esteves, Sara L. C.; Silva, Joana V.; Freitas, Maria João; Brauns, Ann-Kristin; Luers, Georg; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs). In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4) that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM) RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier. PMID:23789093

  6. Probing the origins of catalytic discrimination between phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis: comparative analysis of alkaline phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, the ability of enzymes to catalyze multiple reactions, provides an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the origins of catalysis and substrate specificity. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) catalyzes both phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis reactions with a ∼10(10)-fold preference for phosphate monoester hydrolysis, despite the similarity between these reactions. The preponderance of formal positive charge in the AP active site, particularly from three divalent metal ions, was proposed to be responsible for this preference by providing stronger electrostatic interactions with the more negatively charged phosphoryl group versus the sulfuryl group. To test whether positively charged metal ions are required to achieve a high preference for the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction, the catalytic preference of three protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which do not contain metal ions, were measured. Their preferences ranged from 5 × 10(6) to 7 × 10(7), lower than that for AP but still substantial, indicating that metal ions and a high preponderance of formal positive charge within the active site are not required to achieve a strong catalytic preference for phosphate monoester over sulfate monoester hydrolysis. The observed ionic strength dependences of kcat/KM values for phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis are steeper for the more highly charged phosphate ester with both AP and the PTP Stp1, following the dependence expected based on the charge difference of these two substrates. However, the dependences for AP were not greater than those of Stp1 and were rather shallow for both enzymes. These results suggest that overall electrostatics from formal positive charge within the active site is not the major driving force in distinguishing between these reactions and that substantial discrimination can be attained without metal ions. Thus, local properties of the active site, presumably including multiple positioned dipolar

  7. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  8. Unbiased identification of substrates of protein tyrosine phosphatase ptp-3 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Bose, Anjun K; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-06-01

    The leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases has three members in humans - PTPRF, PTPRD and PTPRS - that have been implicated in diverse processes including embryonic development, inhibition of cell growth and axonal guidance. Mutations in the LAR family are associated with developmental defects such as cleft palate as well as various cancers including breast, neck, lung, colon and brain. Although this family of tyrosine phosphatases is important for many developmental processes, little is known of their substrates. This is partially due to functional redundancy within the LAR family, as deletion of a single gene in the LAR family does not have an appreciable phenotype, but a dual knockout is embryonically lethal in mouse models. To circumvent the inability to knockout multiple members of the LAR family in mouse models, we used a knockout of ptp-3, which is the only known ortholog of the LAR family in Caenorhabditis elegans and allows for the study of the LAR family at the organismal level. Using SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, we identified 255 putative substrates of ptp-3, which included four of the nine known annotated substrates of the LAR family. A motif analysis of the identified phosphopeptides allowed for the determination of sequences that appear to be preferentially dephosphorylated. Finally, we discovered that kinases were overrepresented in the list of identified putative substrates and tyrosine residues whose phosphorylation is known to increase kinase activity were dephosphorylated by ptp-3. These data are suggestive of ptp-3 as a potential negative regulator of several kinase families, such as the mitogen activated kinases (MAPKs), and multiple tyrosine kinases including FER, MET, and NTRK2. PMID:27067626

  9. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Controls Responses to Aversive Stimuli: Implication for Ethanol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents. PMID:25992601

  10. Beyond the Dopamine Receptor: Regulation and Roles of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Walaas, Sven Ivar; Hemmings, Hugh Caroll; Greengard, Paul; Nairn, Angus Clark

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important modulatory role in the central nervous system, helping to control critical aspects of motor function and reward learning. Alteration in normal dopaminergic neurotransmission underlies multiple neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Modulation of dopamine-regulated signaling pathways is also important in the addictive actions of most drugs of abuse. Our studies over the last 30 years have focused on the molecular actions of dopamine acting on medium spiny neurons, the predominant neurons of the neostriatum. Striatum-enriched phosphoproteins, particularly dopamine and adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32), regulator of calmodulin signaling (RCS), and ARPP-16, mediate pleiotropic actions of dopamine. Notably, each of these proteins, either directly or indirectly, regulates the activity of one of the three major subclasses of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, respectively. For example, phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 by protein kinase A results in potent inhibition of PP1, leading to potentiation of dopaminergic signaling at multiple steps from the dopamine receptor to the nucleus. The discovery of DARPP-32 and its emergence as a critical molecular integrator of striatal signaling will be discussed, as will more recent studies that highlight novel roles for RCS and ARPP-16 in dopamine-regulated striatal signaling pathways. PMID:21904525

  11. Thr-161 phosphorylation of monomeric Cdc2. Regulation by protein phosphatase 2C in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Veronique; Poulhe, Robert; Cayla, Xavier; Dessauge, Frederic; Karaiskou, Anthi; Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, Rene

    2002-08-01

    Fully grown Xenopus oocyte is arrested at prophase I of meiosis. Re-entry into meiosis depends on the activation of MPF (M-phase promoting factor or cyclin B.Cdc2 complex), triggered by progesterone. The prophase-arrested oocyte contains a store of Cdc2. Most of the protein is present as a monomer whereas a minor fraction, called pre-MPF, is found to be associated with cyclin B. Activation of Cdc2 depends on two key events: cyclin binding and an activating phosphorylation on Thr-161 residue located in the T-loop. To get new insights into the regulation of Thr-161 phosphorylation of Cdc2, monomeric Cdc2 was isolated from prophase oocytes. Based on its activation upon cyclin addition and detection by an antibody directed specifically against Cdc2 phosphorylated on Thr-161, we show for the first time that the prophase oocyte contains a significant amount of monomeric Cdc2 phosphorylated on Thr-161. PP2C, a Mg2+-dependent phosphatase, negatively controls Thr-161 phosphorylation of Cdc2. The unexpected presence of a population of free Cdc2 already phosphorylated on Thr-161 could contribute to the generation of the Cdc2 kinase activity threshold required to initiate MPF amplification. PMID:12036957

  12. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease. PMID:27525888

  13. Regulation of Beclin 1 Protein Phosphorylation and Autophagy by Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Death-associated Protein Kinase 3 (DAPK3).

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nobuyuki; Usui, Tatsuya; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2016-05-13

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation system that is involved in cell survival and activated in various diseases, including cancer. Beclin 1 is a central scaffold protein that assembles components for promoting or inhibiting autophagy. Association of Beclin 1 with its interacting proteins is regulated by the phosphorylation of Beclin 1 by various Ser/Thr kinases, but the Ser/Thr phosphatases that regulate these phosphorylation events remain unknown. Here we identify Ser-90 in Beclin 1 as a regulatory site whose phosphorylation is markedly enhanced in cells treated with okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Beclin 1 Ser-90 phosphorylation is induced in skeletal muscle tissues isolated from starved mice. The Beclin 1 S90A mutant blocked starvation-induced autophagy. We found association of PP2A B55α with Beclin 1, which dissociate by starvation. We also found that death-associated protein kinase 3 directly phosphorylates Beclin 1 Ser-90. We propose that physiological regulation of Beclin 1 Ser-90 phosphorylation by PP2A and death-associated protein kinase 3 controls autophagy. PMID:26994142

  14. Lack of relationship between activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and calcium or phosphate absorption.

    PubMed

    Asteggiano, C; Tolosa, N; Pereira, R; Moreno, J; Cañas, F

    1981-01-01

    The effects of vitamin D3 and the aqueous extract of Solanum malacoxylon on intestinal alkaline phosphatase and tissue phosphate content were studied on rachitic chicks treated with large doses of ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1 diphosphonate (EHDP). The EHDP treatment blocks the increase of intestinal calcium or phosphate absorption induced by the vitamin D3, while it has no effects on the rise of intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity or the increment in tissue phosphate content. The lack of correlation between the increment of alkaline phosphatase and that of Ca or phosphate absorption in vitamin D3 plus EHDP treated chicks excludes a participation of the alkaline phosphatase in the mechanism of Ca or P intestinal absorption. The Ca or phosphorus absorption are elicited specifically by 1,25-(OH)2-D3, while alkaline phosphatase activity and phosphate tissue concentration respond to a broader spectrum of stimuli. PMID:6316731

  15. Phenylarsine oxide and vanadate: apparent paradox of inhibition of protein phosphotyrosine phosphatases in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Elberg, G; Shechter, Y

    1996-07-24

    Vanadate mimics, whereas phenylarsine oxide (PAO) antagonizes, the effects of insulin in rat adipocytes. Both vanadate and PAO are documented inhibitors of protein-phosphotyrosine phosphatases. The relationship between the inhibition of 'inhibitory' PTPase and 'stimulatory' PTPase has been studied here in primary rat adipocytes. Low concentrations of PAO (IC50 = 0.6-2.0 microM) blocked the stimulating effects of insulin, vanadate and pervanadate on hexose uptake and glucose metabolism. Inhibition of isoproterenol-mediating lipolysis by vanadate and insulin was not blocked by PAO. The activating effects of okadaic acid on hexose uptake and glucose metabolism, which occur at points downstream to tyrosine phosphorylation, were also not blocked by PAO. Subsequent studies suggested that the PAO-sensitive PTPase comprises a minute fraction of the total adipocytic PTPase activity. To identify its location we applied procedures involving fractionations and activation of non-receptor adipocytic protein tyrosine kinase by PAO and vanadate in cell free assays. We found that the 'inhibitory' PTPase is exclusively associated with the membrane fraction whereas the 'stimulatory' PTPases are present in both the cytosolic and plasma membrane compartments. We next searched for markers, possibly associated with PAO-dependent desensitization and found that several proteins became phosphorylated on tyrosine moieties in the supernatant of PAO but not in vanadate pretreated adipocytes. In summary, we propose the presence of a minute, plasma membrane associated PTPase in primary rat adipocytes, inhibition of which arrests the activation of glucose metabolism. In contrast, inhibition of all the other cellular adipose PTPases, ultimately activates rather than inhibits these same bioeffects. PMID:8703991

  16. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Negatively Impacts Host Defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lei; Xie, Zhongping; Li, Hua; Pang, Zheng; Junkins, Robert D; Tremblay, Michel L; Chen, Xiaochun; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in immune-compromised individuals. Mechanisms governing immune responses to P. aeruginosa infection remain incompletely defined. Herein, we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is a critical negative regulator in P. aeruginosa infection. PTP1B-deficient mice display greatly enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced disease scores, which are accompanied by increased neutrophil infiltration and cytokine production. Interestingly, PTP1B deficiency mainly up-regulates the production of interferon-stimulated response elements-regulated cytokines and chemokines, including chemokine ligand 5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted), CXCL10 (interferon γ-inducible protein 10), and interferon-β production. Further studies reveal that PTP1B deficiency leads to increased interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) expression and activation. These findings demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism of the immune response to P. aeruginosa infection through PTP1B-IRF7 interaction. This novel PTP1B-IRF7-interferon-stimulated response elements pathway may have broader implications in Toll-like receptor-mediated innate immunity. PMID:27105736

  17. B′-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Goedele N.

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B′ family of the regulatory subunits. B′-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B′ subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein–protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B′, which when mutated render B′ incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  18. The Protein Phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Twins stabilizes Plk4 to induce centriole amplification

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, Christopher W.; Klebba, Joey E.; Buster, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Centriole duplication is a tightly regulated process that must occur only once per cell cycle; otherwise, supernumerary centrioles can induce aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) activity initiates centriole duplication and is regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Throughout interphase, Plk4 autophosphorylation triggers its degradation, thus preventing centriole amplification. However, Plk4 activity is required during mitosis for proper centriole duplication, but the mechanism stabilizing mitotic Plk4 is unknown. In this paper, we show that PP2A (Protein Phosphatase 2ATwins) counteracts Plk4 autophosphorylation, thus stabilizing Plk4 and promoting centriole duplication. Like Plk4, the protein level of PP2A’s regulatory subunit, Twins (Tws), peaks during mitosis and is required for centriole duplication. However, untimely Tws expression stabilizes Plk4 inappropriately, inducing centriole amplification. Paradoxically, expression of tumor-promoting simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (ST), a reported PP2A inhibitor, promotes centrosome amplification by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that ST actually mimics Tws function in stabilizing Plk4 and inducing centriole amplification. PMID:21987638

  19. Characterization of the effect of TIMAP phosphorylation on its interaction with protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Czikora, István; Kim, Kyung-mi; Kása, Anita; Bécsi, Bálint; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Erdodi, Ferenc; Csortos, Csilla

    2011-07-01

    TIMAP, TGF-β inhibited, membrane-associated protein, is highly abundant in endothelial cells (EC). We have shown earlier the involvement of TIMAP in PKA-mediated ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) dephosphorylation as part of EC barrier protection by TIMAP (Csortos et al., 2008). Emerging data demonstrate the regulatory role of TIMAP on protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity. We provide here evidence for specific interaction (K(a) = 1.80 × 10(6) M(-1)) between non-phosphorylated TIMAP and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1c) by surface plasmon resonance based binding studies. Thiophosphorylation of TIMAP by PKA, or sequential thiophosphorylation by PKA and GSK3β slightly modifies the association constant for the interaction of TIMAP with PP1c and decreases the rate of dissociation. However, dephosphorylation of phospho-moesin substrate by PP1cβ is inhibited to different extent in the presence of non- (~60% inhibition), mono- (~50% inhibition) or double-thiophosphorylated (<10% inhibition) form of TIMAP. Our data suggest that double-thiophosphorylation of TIMAP has minor effect on its binding ability to PP1c, but considerably attenuates its inhibitory effect on the activity of PP1c. PKA activation by forskolin treatment of EC prevented thrombin evoked barrier dysfunction and ERM phosphorylation at the cell membrane (Csortos et al., 2008). With the employment of specific GSK3β inhibitor it is shown here that PKA activation is followed by GSK3β activation in bovine pulmonary EC and both of these activations are required for the rescuing effect of forskolin in thrombin treated EC. Our results suggest that the forskolin induced PKA/GSK3β activation protects the EC barrier via TIMAP-mediated decreasing of the ERM phosphorylation level. PMID:21466834

  20. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  1. Phosphatidic acid inhibits blue light-induced stomatal opening via inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 [corrected].

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Stomata open in response to blue light under a background of red light. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-dependent stomatal opening, an effect essential for promoting stomatal closure in the daytime to prevent water loss. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets of this inhibition in the blue light signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we report that phosphatidic acid (PA), a phospholipid second messenger produced by ABA in guard cells, inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a positive regulator of blue light signaling, and PA plays a role in stimulating stomatal closure in Vicia faba. Biochemical analysis revealed that PA directly inhibited the phosphatase activity of the catalytic subunit of V. faba PP1 (PP1c) in vitro. PA inhibited blue light-dependent stomatal opening but did not affect red light- or fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening. PA also inhibited blue light-dependent H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, PA did not inhibit the autophosphorylation of phototropins, blue light receptors for stomatal opening. Furthermore, 1-butanol, a selective inhibitor of phospholipase D, which produces PA via hydrolysis of phospholipids, diminished the ABA-induced inhibition of blue light-dependent stomatal opening and H(+) pumping. We also show that hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, which are intermediates in ABA signaling, inhibited the blue light responses of stomata and that 1-butanol diminished these inhibitions. From these results, we conclude that PA inhibits blue light signaling in guard cells by PP1c inhibition, accelerating stomatal closure, and that PP1 is a cross talk point between blue light and ABA signaling pathways in guard cells. PMID:20498335

  2. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  3. EKPD: a hierarchical database of eukaryotic protein kinases and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbo; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Gao, Tianshun; Pan, Zhicheng; Yang, Qing; Guo, Anyuan; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We present here EKPD (http://ekpd.biocuckoo.org), a hierarchical database of eukaryotic protein kinases (PKs) and protein phosphatases (PPs), the key molecules responsible for the reversible phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in almost all aspects of biological processes. As extensive experimental and computational efforts have been carried out to identify PKs and PPs, an integrative resource with detailed classification and annotation information would be of great value for both experimentalists and computational biologists. In this work, we first collected 1855 PKs and 347 PPs from the scientific literature and various public databases. Based on previously established rationales, we classified all of the known PKs and PPs into a hierarchical structure with three levels, i.e. group, family and individual PK/PP. There are 10 groups with 149 families for the PKs and 10 groups with 33 families for the PPs. We constructed 139 and 27 Hidden Markov Model profiles for PK and PP families, respectively. Then we systematically characterized ∼50,000 PKs and >10,000 PPs in eukaryotes. In addition, >500 PKs and >400 PPs were computationally identified by ortholog search. Finally, the online service of the EKPD database was implemented in PHP + MySQL + JavaScript. PMID:24214991

  4. Redox Modulation of PTEN Phosphatase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide and Bisperoxidovanadium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Uk; Hahne, Gernot; Hanske, Jonas; Bange, Tanja; Bier, David; Rademacher, Christoph; Hennig, Sven; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-11-01

    PTEN is a dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase. As one of the central tumor suppressors, a thorough regulation of its activity is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. The precise implications of PTEN inhibition by reactive oxygen species (e.g. H2 O2 ) and the subsequent structural consequences remain elusive. To study the effects of PTEN inhibition, bisperoxidovanadium (bpV) complexes serve as important tools with the potential for the treatment of nerve injury or cardiac ischemia. However, their mode of action is unknown, hampering further optimization and preventing therapeutic applications. Based on protein crystallography, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular basis of PTEN inhibition by H2O2 and bpV complexes. We show that both molecules inhibit PTEN via oxidative mechanisms resulting in the formation of the same intramolecular disulfide, therefore enabling the reactivation of PTEN under reductive conditions. PMID:26418532

  5. Redox Modulation of PTEN Phosphatase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide and Bisperoxidovanadium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Uk; Hahne, Gernot; Hanske, Jonas; Bange, Tanja; Bier, David; Rademacher, Christoph; Hennig, Sven; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase. As one of the central tumor suppressors, a thorough regulation of its activity is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. The precise implications of PTEN inhibition by reactive oxygen species (e.g. H2O2) and the subsequent structural consequences remain elusive. To study the effects of PTEN inhibition, bisperoxidovanadium (bpV) complexes serve as important tools with the potential for the treatment of nerve injury or cardiac ischemia. However, their mode of action is unknown, hampering further optimization and preventing therapeutic applications. Based on protein crystallography, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular basis of PTEN inhibition by H2O2 and bpV complexes. We show that both molecules inhibit PTEN via oxidative mechanisms resulting in the formation of the same intramolecular disulfide, therefore enabling the reactivation of PTEN under reductive conditions. PMID:26418532

  6. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src. PMID:24395787

  7. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  8. The Streptococcus pyogenes orphan protein tyrosine phosphatase, SP-PTP, possesses dual specificity and essential virulence regulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Kant, Sashi; Agarwal, Shivani; Pancholi, Preeti; Pancholi, Vijay

    2015-08-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. GAS lacks a gene encoding tyrosine kinase but contains one encoding tyrosine phosphatase (SP-PTP). Thus, GAS is thought to lack tyrosine phosphorylation, and the physiological significance of SP-PTP is, therefore, questionable. Here, we demonstrate that SP-PTP possesses dual phosphatase specificity for Tyr- and Ser/Thr-phosphorylated GAS proteins, such as Ser/Thr kinase (SP-STK) and the SP-STK-phosphorylated CovR and WalR proteins. Phenotypic analysis of GAS mutants lacking SP-PTP revealed that the phosphatase activity per se positively regulates growth, cell division and the ability to adhere to and invade host cells. Furthermore, A549 human lung cells infected with GAS mutants lacking SP-PTP displayed increased Ser-/Thr-/Tyr-phosphorylation. SP-PTP also differentially regulates the expression of ∼50% of the total GAS genes, including several virulence genes potentially through the two-component regulators, CovR, WalR and PTS/HPr regulation of Mga. Although these mutants exhibit attenuated virulence, a GAS mutant overexpressing SP-PTP is hypervirulent. Our study provides the first definitive evidence for the presence and importance of Tyr-phosphorylation in GAS and the relevance of SP-PTP as an important therapeutic target. PMID:25939957

  9. Combining recombinant ribonuclease U2 and protein phosphatase for RNA modification mapping by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Houser, Whitney M; Butterer, Annika; Addepalli, Balasubrahmanym; Limbach, Patrick A

    2015-06-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) mapping of modified nucleosides onto RNA sequences is limited by RNase availability. A codon-optimized gene for RNase U2, a purine selective RNase with preference for adenosine, has been designed for overexpression using Escherichia coli as the host. Optimal expression conditions were identified enabling generation of milligram-scale quantities of active RNase U2. RNase U2 digestion products were found to terminate in both 2',3'-cyclic phosphates and 3'-linear phosphates. To generate a homogeneous 3'-linear phosphate set of products, an enzymatic approach was investigated. Bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase was identified as the optimal enzyme for hydrolyzing cyclic phosphates from RNase U2 products. The compatibility of this enzymatic approach with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) RNA modification mapping was then demonstrated. RNase U2 digestion followed by subsequent phosphatase treatment generated nearly 100% 3'-phosphate-containing products that could be characterized by LC-MS/MS. In addition, bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase can be used to introduce (18)O labels within the 3'-phosphate of digestion products when incubated in the presence of H2(18)O, allowing prior isotope labeling methods for mass spectrometry to include digestion products from RNase U2. PMID:25797349

  10. Scapinin, the Protein Phosphatase 1 Binding Protein, Enhances Cell Spreading and Motility by Interacting with the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Junji; Arata, Toshiaki; Taniguchi, Shunichiro

    2009-01-01

    Scapinin, also named phactr3, is an actin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding protein, which is expressed in the adult brain and some tumor cells. At present, the role(s) of scapinin in the brain and tumors are poorly understood. We show that the RPEL-repeat domain of scapinin, which is responsible for its direct interaction with actin, inhibits actin polymerization in vitro. Next, we established a Hela cell line, where scapinin expression was induced by tetracycline. In these cells, expression of scapinin stimulated cell spreading and motility. Scapinin was colocalized with actin at the edge of spreading cells. To explore the roles of the RPEL-repeat and PP1-binding domains, we expressed wild-type and mutant scapinins as fusion proteins with green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Cos7 cells. Expression of GFP-scapinin (wild type) also stimulated cell spreading, but mutation in the RPEL-repeat domain abolished both the actin binding and the cell spreading activity. PP1-binding deficient mutants strongly induced cell retraction. Long and branched cytoplasmic processes were developed during the cell retraction. These results suggest that scapinin enhances cell spreading and motility through direct interaction with actin and that PP1 plays a regulatory role in scapinin-induced morphological changes. PMID:19158953

  11. Activation of signal transduction in platelets by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate (vanadyl hydroperoxide).

    PubMed Central

    Pumiglia, K M; Lau, L F; Huang, C K; Burroughs, S; Feinstein, M B

    1992-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor pervanadate (vanadyl hydroperoxide) stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation 29-fold more than did thrombin in intact and saponin-permeabilized platelets. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation preceded, or was coincident with, a fall in PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, production of PtdIns(3,4)P2 and phosphatidic acid, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, stimulation of protein kinase C-dependent protein phosphorylation, secretion of dense and alpha-granules, increased actin polymerization, shape change and aggregation which required fibrinogen and was mediated by increased surface expression of GPIIb-IIIa. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor RG 50864 totally prevented induction of tyrosine phosphorylation by pervanadate, as well as all other responses measured; in contrast, the inactive structural analogue, tyrphostin #1, had no effect. Dense-granule secretion induced by pervanadate required protein kinase C activity; however, aggregation and alpha-granule secretion were independent of protein kinase C. In saponin-permeabilized platelets pervanadate and thrombin stimulated phospholipase C activity by GTP-independent and GTP-dependent mechanisms respectively. We conclude that PTPases are important regulators of signal transduction in platelets. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1530576

  12. A novel antimicrobial protein isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) shares homology with an acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Yuan, Fenghua; Gao, Yin; Liang, Chenggang; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Changling; He, Liyuan

    2003-12-01

    The nucleotide and amino acids sequences for AP(1) will appear in the GenBank(R) and NCBI databases under accession number AY297449. A novel antimicrobial protein (AP(1)) was purified from leaves of the potato ( Solanum tuberosum, variety MS-42.3) with a procedure involving ammonium sulphate fractionation, molecular sieve chromatography with Sephacryl S-200 and hydrophobic chromatography with Butyl-Sepharose using a FPLC system. The inhibition spectrum investigation showed that AP(1) had good inhibition activity against five different strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from potato or other crops, and two fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria solani from potato. The full-length cDNA encoding AP(1) has been successfully cloned by screening a cDNA expression library of potato with an anti-AP(1) antibody and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. Determination of the nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of an open reading frame encoding 343 amino acids. At the C-terminus of AP(1) there is an ATP-binding domain, and the N-terminus exhibits 58% identity with an/the acid phosphatase from Mesorhizobium loti. SDS/PAGE and Western blotting analysis suggested that the AP(1) gene can be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and recognized by an antibody against AP(1). Also the expressed protein showed an inhibition activity the same as original AP(1) protein isolated from potato. We suggest that AP(1) most likely belongs to a new group of proteins with antimicrobial characteristics in vitro and functions in relation to phosphorylation and energy metabolism of plants. PMID:12927022

  13. Downscaling Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in a Subtropical Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted by downscaling study to understand phosphorus (P)-deficient status of different plankton and the role of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in subtropical Feitsui Reservoir. Results from field survey showed that bulk APA (1.6~95.2 nM h-1) was widely observed in the epilimnion (0~20 m) with an apparent seasonal variations, suggesting that plankton in the system were subjected to P-deficient seasonally. Mixed layer depth (an index of phosphate availability) is the major factor influencing the variation of bulk APA and specific APA (124~1,253 nmol mg C-1 h-1), based on multiple linear regression analysis. Size-fractionated APA assays showed that picoplankton (size 0.2~3 um) contributed most of the bulk APA in the system. In addition, single-cell APA detected by enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) assay indicated that heterotrophic bacteria are the major contributors of APA. Thus, we can infer that bacteria play an important role in accelerating P-cycle within P-deficient systems. Light/nutrient manipulation bioassays showed that bacterial growth was directly controlled by phosphate, while picocyanobacterial growth is controlled by light and can out-compete bacteria under P-limited condition with the aid of light. Further analysis revealed that the strength of summer typhoon is a factor responsible for the inter-annual variability of bulk and specific APA. APA study demonstrated the episodic events (e.g. strong typhoon and extreme precipitation) had significant influence on APA variability in sub-tropical to tropical aquatic ecosystems. Hence, the results herein will allow future studies on monitoring typhoon disturbance (intensity and frequency) as well as the APA of plankton during summer-to-autumn in subtropical systems.

  14. Mycobacterial Ser/Thr protein kinases and phosphatases: physiological roles and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Wehenkel, Annemarie; Bellinzoni, Marco; Graña, Martin; Duran, Rosario; Villarino, Andrea; Fernandez, Pablo; Andre-Leroux, Gwénaëlle; England, Patrick; Takiff, Howard; Cerveñansky, Carlos; Cole, Stewart T; Alzari, Pedro M

    2008-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a major regulation mechanism of fundamental biological processes, not only in eukaryotes but also in bacteria. A growing body of evidence suggests that Ser/Thr phosphorylation play important roles in the physiology and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis. This pathogen uses 'eukaryotic-like' Ser/Thr protein kinases and phosphatases not only to r