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Sample records for active psii reaction

  1. Role of Carotenoids in Photosystem II (PSII) Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braslavsky, Silvia E.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2012-11-01

    A photoprotection mechanism operative in closed reaction centers (RCs) is proposed, where-as a consequence of the negative charge on the quinone QA-triplet 3Chl is formed by the radical pair mechanism on the accessory Chl of the normally inactive D2 branch where it can be subsequently quenched by the spatially close β-carotene in the D2 branch. Whereas β-carotene in the D1 branch is more than 17 Å away from the accessory D1-chlorophyll ({Chl_accD_1)} and, therefore, cannot quench the Chl triplet, the D2-carotene is only 13.2 Å away from {Chl_accD_2} . We propose that the D2 branch becomes active in electron transfer and thus plays a photoprotective role when the intact RCs are closed under high photon fluence conditions. This interpretation allows combining many seemingly inconsistent observations in the literature and reveals the so far "elusive" RC triplet quenching mechanism in PSII. Based on laser-induced optoacoustic studies, an important structural role is assigned to the β-carotene in the D1 branch, i.e., this carotene ensures a rigid structure.

  2. Femtosecond spectroscopy on PSII reaction centers: New results

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Wasielewski, M.R.; Govindjee; Seibert, M.

    1995-12-31

    Time evolution of transient absorption changes excited by pumping Photosystem II (PSII) RCs at 683 nm (where P680 absorbs) or 665 nm (where RC antenna pigments absorb) and probing at 544 nm elicited a rapid increase in absorption within the time of the pump pulse, and, subsequently, three distinct kinetic components representing decreases in absorption: A fast component with {tau}s on the order of 1--3 ps, an intermediate one with {tau}s of 10--25 ps, and a slow one with {tau}s ranging from 50--100 ps. The amplitudes of the three bleach components versus pump energy are linear up to 250 nJ at both pump wavelengths. Between 250 nJ and 1 {mu}J the amplitudes continue to increase but at a lesser slope. Zero-crossing times increase with increasing pump energy from a minimum of about 10 ps at 683 nm excitation and 20 ps at 665 nm excitation. ZCTs provide a convenient way of comparing from laboratory to laboratory the actual pump intensity seen by a sample. Whereas the amplitudes of the three kinetic components increase with pump energy, there does not seem to be a consistent change in the relative percentage of the three components over the pump energy range investigated. However, the percentage of intermediate time component appears greater, and the lifetimes of all three components increase somewhat when pumping at 665 nm vs. 683 nm. To examine this point, we obtained transient absorption spectra of PSII RCs at 500 ps and 1 ps after low energy pump pulses at 665 nm and 683 nm. At 500 ps, transient absorption spectra in the 500-nm to 600-nm range are independent of pump wavelength. This indicates that energy transfer from antenna pigments, absorbing at 665 nm, to P680 is close to 100% efficient. On the other hand, at short time there is a substantial difference in the spectra generated by the two pump wavelengths.

  3. Recombinant Clostridium difficile toxin fragments as carrier protein for PSII surface polysaccharide preserve their neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria R; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Cappelletti, Emilia; Tontini, Marta; Nilo, Alberto; Proietti, Daniela; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-04-22

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive bacterium and is the most commonly diagnosed cause of hospital-associated and antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Despite the emergence of epidemic C. difficile strains having led to an increase in the incidence of the disease, a vaccine against this pathogen is not currently available. C. difficile strains produce two main toxins (TcdA and TcdB) and express three highly complex cell-surface polysaccharides (PSI, PSII and PSIII). PSII is the more abundantly expressed by most C. difficile ribotypes offering the opportunity of the development of a carbohydrate-based vaccine. In this paper, we evaluate the efficacy, in naive mice model, of PSII glycoconjugates where recombinant toxins A and B fragments (TcdA_B2 and TcdB_GT respectively) have been used as carriers. Both glycoconjugates elicited IgG titers anti-PSII although only the TcdB_GT conjugate induced a response comparable to that obtained with CRM197. Moreover, TcdA_B2 and TcdB_GT conjugated to PSII retained the ability to elicit IgG with neutralizing activity against the respective toxins. These results are a crucial proof of concept for the development of glycoconjugate vaccines against C. difficile infection (CDI) that combine different C. difficile antigens to potentially prevent bacterial colonization of the gut and neutralize toxin activity.

  4. Carbonic anhydrase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membrane and fragments enriched with PSI or PSII.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Rudenko, Natalia N; Mudrik, Vilen A; Fedorchuk, Tat'yana P; Ivanov, Boris N

    2011-12-01

    The procedure of isolating the thylakoids and the thylakoid membrane fragments enriched with either photosystem I or photosystem II (PSI- and PSII-membranes) from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was developed. It differed from the one used with pea and spinach in durations of detergent treatment and centrifugation, and in concentrations of detergent and Mg(2+) in the media. Both the thylakoid and the fragments preserved carbonic anhydrase (CA) activities. Using nondenaturing electrophoresis followed by detection of CA activity in the gel stained with bromo thymol blue, one low molecular mass carrier of CA activity was found in the PSI-membranes, and two carriers, a low molecular mass one and a high molecular mass one, were found in the PSII-membranes. The proteins in the PSII-membranes differed in their sensitivity to acetazolamide (AA), a specific CA inhibitor. AA at 5 × 10(-7) M inhibited the CA activity of the high molecular mass protein but stimulated the activity of the low molecular mass carrier in the PSII-membranes. At the same concentration, AA moderately inhibited, by 30%, the CA activity of PSI-membranes. CA activity of the PSII-membranes was almost completely suppressed by the lipophilic CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide at 10(-9) M, whereas CA activity of the PSI-membranes was inhibited by this inhibitor even at 5 × 10(-7) M just the same as for AA. The observed distribution of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes from A. thaliana was close to the one found in the membranes of pea, evidencing the general pattern of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes of C3-plants.

  5. Effect of light intensity on the degree of ammonia toxicity on PSII activity of Arthrospira platensis and Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Markou, Giorgos; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2016-09-01

    Herein the effect of increasing light intensity on the degree of ammonia toxicity and its impact on the photosynthetic performance of Arthrospira and Chlorella was investigated using Chl fluorescence as a technique to characterize their photosystem II (PSII) activity. The results revealed that the increase of light intensity amplifies the ammonia toxicity on PSII. Chl fluorescence transients shown that at a given free ammonia (FA) concentration (100mg-N/L), the photochemistry potential decreased by increasing light intensity. The inhibition of the PSII was not reversible either by re-incubating the cells under dark or under decreased FA concentration. Moreover, the decrease of photochemical and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of fluorescence suggest that ammonia toxicity decreases the open available PSII centers, as well the inability of PSII to transfer the generated electrons beyond QA. The collapse of NPQ suggests that ammonia toxicity inhibits the photoprotection mechanism(s) and hence renders PSII more sensitive to photoinhibition.

  6. Effect of leaf dehydration duration and dehydration degree on PSII photochemical activity of papaya leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meijun; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Fan, Xingli; Cheng, Dandan

    2014-09-01

    Although the effect of dehydration on photosynthetic apparatus has been widely studied, the respective effect of dehydration duration and dehydration degree was neglected. This study showed that, when leaves dehydrated in air, the PSII activities of leaves decreased with the decline of leaf relative water content (RWC). Unexpectedly, when leaves dehydrated to same RWC, the decreases in Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm were lower in leaves dehydrating at 43 °C than those at 25 °C. However, to reach the same RWC, leaves dehydrating at 43 °C experienced 1/6 of the dehydration duration for leaves dehydrating at 25 °C. To distinguish the respective effect of dehydration degree and dehydration duration on photosynthetic apparatus, we studied the PSII activities of leaves treated with different concentration of PEG solutions. Increasing dehydration degree aggravated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with the same dehydration duration, while prolonging the dehydration duration also exacerbated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with identical dehydration degree. With the same dehydration degree and duration, high temperature enhanced the decrease of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in the leaves. When leaves dehydrated in air, the effect of high temperature was underestimated due to reduction of dehydration duration. The results demonstrated that, dehydration degree and duration both play important roles in damage to photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, under combined stresses, the effects of dehydration degree and duration on plants should be considered comprehensively, otherwise, partial or incorrect results may be obtained.

  7. Enhanced excision repair and lack of PSII activity contribute to higher UV survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells in dark.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Vishalsingh R; Vyawahare, Aniket; Bhattacharjee, Swapan K; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells are known to differentiate their responses to stress depending up on the light conditions. We observed that UVC sensitive phenotype of light grown asynchronous Chlamydomonas reinhardtii culture (Light culture: LC) can be converted to relatively resistant form by transfer to dark condition (Dark culture: DC) before UVC exposure. The absence of photosystem II (PSII) function, by either atrazine treatment in wild type or in D1 (psbA) null mutant, conferred UV protection even in LC. We provide an indirect support for involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling by showing higher UV survival on exposures to mild dose of H2O2 or Methyl Viologen. Circadian trained culture also showed a rhythmic variation in UV sensitivity in response to alternating light-dark (12 h:12 h) entrainment, with maximum UV survival at the end of 12 h dark and minimum at the end of 12 h light. This rhythm failed to maintain in "free running" conditions, making it a non-circadian phenotype. Moreover, atrazine strongly inhibited rhythmic UV sensitivity and conferred a constitutively high resistance, without affecting internal circadian rhythm marker expression. Dampening of UV sensitivity rhythm in Thymine-dimer excision repair mutant (cc-888) suggested the involvement of DNA repair in this phenomenon. DNA excision repair (ER) assays in cell-free extracts revealed that dark incubated cells exhibit higher ER compared to those growing in light, underscoring the role of ER in conferring differential UV sensitivity in dark versus light incubation. We suggest that multiple factors such as ROS changes triggered by differences in PSII activity, concomitant with differential ER efficiency collectively contribute to light-dark (12 h: 12 h) rhythmicity in C. reinhardtii UV sensitivity.

  8. Toxic effects of mercury on PSI and PSII activities, membrane potential and transthylakoid proton gradient in Microsorium pteropus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Chang, Fengqin; Wang, Shuzhi

    2013-10-05

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the top toxic metals in environment and it poses a great risk to organisms. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effects of Hg(2+) on energy conversion of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), membrane potential and proton gradient of Microsorium pteropus (an aquatic plant species). Contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, quantum yield and electron transfer of PSI and PSII of M. pteropus exposed to various concentrations of Hg(2+) were measured. With increasing Hg(2+) concentration, quantum yield and electron transport of PSI [Y(I) and ETR(I)] and PSII [Y(II) and ETR(II)] decreased whereas limitation of donor side of PSI [Y(ND)] increased. At ⩾165μgL(-1) Hg(2+), quantum yield of non-light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching in PSII [Y(NO)] significantly increased but quantum yield of light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching [Y(NPQ)] decreased. Membrane potential (Δψ) and proton gradient (ΔpH) of M. pteropus were reduced significantly at 330μg L(-1) Hg(2+) compared to control. Mercury exposure affected multiple sites in PSII and PSI of M. pteropus.

  9. Polyclonal antibodies against the TLA1 protein also recognize with high specificity the D2 reaction center protein of PSII in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Mautusi; Dewez, David; García-Cerdán, Jose Gines; Melis, Anastasios

    2012-04-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii DNA-insertional transformant truncated light-harvesting antenna 1 (tla1) mutant, helped identify the novel TLA1 gene (GenBank Accession # AF534570-71) as an important genetic determinant in the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis. Down-regulation in the amount of the TLA1 23 kDa protein in the cell resulted in smaller chlorophyll antenna size for both photosystems (in Tetali et al. Planta 225:813-829, 2007). Specific polyclonal antibodies, raised against the recombinant TLA1 protein, showed a cross-reaction with the predicted 23 kDa TLA1 protein in C. reinhardtii protein extracts, but also showed a strong cross-reaction with a protein band migrating to 28.5 kDa. Questions of polymorphism, or posttranslational modification of the TLA1 protein were raised as a result of the unexpected 28.5 kDa cross-reaction. Work in this paper aimed to elucidate the nature of the unexpected 28.5 kDa cross-reaction, as this was deemed to be important in terms of the functional role of the TLA1 protein in the regulation of the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis. Immuno-precipitation of the 28.5 kDa protein, followed by LC-mass spectrometry, showed amino acid sequences ascribed to the psbD/D2 reaction center protein of PSII. The common antigenic determinant between TLA1 and D2 was shown to be a stretch of nine conserved amino acids V-F-L(V)LP-GNAL in the C-terminus of the two proteins, constituting a high antigenicity "GNAL" domain. Antibodies raised against the TLA1 protein containing this domain recognized both the TLA1 and the D2 protein. Conversely, antibodies raised against the TLA1 protein minus the GNAL domain specifically recognized the 23 kDa TLA1 protein and failed to recognize the 28.5 kDa D2 protein. D2 antibodies raised against an oligopeptide containing this domain also cross-reacted with the TLA1 protein. It is concluded that the 28.5 kDa cross-reaction of C. reinhardtii protein extracts with antiTLA1 antibodies is due to

  10. Determination of the PSI/PSII ratio in living plant cells at room temperature by spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgass, Kirstin; Zell, Martina; Maurino, Veronica G.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2011-02-01

    Leaf cells of living plants exhibit strong fluorescence from chloroplasts, the reaction centers of photosynthesis. Mutations in the photosystems change their structure and can, thus, be monitored by recording the fluorescence spectra of the emitted chlorophyll light. These measurements have, up to now, mostly been carried out at low temperatures (77 K), as these conditions enable the differentiation between the fluorescence of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII). In contrast, at room temperature, energy transfer processes between the various photosynthetic complexes result in very similar fluorescence emissions, which mainly consist of fluorescence photons emitted by PSII hindering a discrimination based on spectral ROIs (regions of interest). However, by statistical analysis of high resolution fluorescence spectra recorded at room temperature, it is possible to draw conclusions about the relative PSI/PSII ratio. Here, the possibility of determining the relative PSI/PSII ratio by fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated in living maize plants. Bundle-sheath chloroplasts of mature maize plants have a special morphologic characteristic; they are agranal, or exhibit only rudimentary grana, respectively. These chloroplasts are depleted in PSII activity and it could be shown that PSII is progressively reduced during leaf differentiation. A direct comparison of PSII activity in isolated chloroplasts is nearly impossible, since the activity of PSII in both mesophyll- and bundle-sheath chloroplasts decays with time after isolation and it takes significantly longer to isolate bundle-sheath chloroplasts. Considering this fact the measurement of PSI/PSII ratios with the 77K method, which includes taking fluorescence spectra from a diluted suspension of isolated chloroplasts at 77K, is questionable. These spectra are then used to analyze the distribution of energy between PSI and PSII. After rapid cooling to 77K secondary biochemical influences, which attenuate the

  11. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in Pinus mugo needles growing at elevated stands in the mountains, and their photochemical efficiency of PSII.

    PubMed

    Miszalski, Zbigniew; Libik, Marta; Surówka, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2005-08-01

    Pinus mugo needles were sampled at different altitudes (1420, 1590 and 1920 m a.s.l.) to analyse levels of oxidative stress and changes in maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that almost all superoxide dismutase activity represented Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and only 4-6% represents Mn superoxide dismutase. In extracts from plants sampled at 1590 and 1920 m a.s.l., lower activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase was found. Comparing these data with immunoblots, it can be concluded that the differences in superoxide dismutase activity was related to protein amount. In needles from higher altitudes, a decrease in catalase activity was detected, as opposed to the protein amount, which was higher in needles from the higher stands. Considering the decrease in catalase and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase activities in needles collected at 1590 and 1920 m a.s.l., we suggest that higher levels of oxidative stress may induce changes in photochemical efficiency of PSII.

  12. Differential response of chloride binding sites to elevated temperature: a comparative study in spinach thylakoids and PSII-enriched membranes.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Arjun; Jajoo, Anjana; Bharti, Sudhakar; Mohanty, Prasanna

    2007-01-01

    A study of heat effects was performed in thylakoids and photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes isolated from spinach in relation to Cl(-)-induced activation of PSII catalyzed oxygen evolution and the retention of Cl(-) in the PSII complex. For this, Cl(-)-sufficient membranes and low-Cl(-) membranes were used. The presence of Cl(-) in the reaction medium did accelerate oxygen evolution, which remained unaffected by heat treatment up to 40 degrees C in PSII membranes and up to 42.5 degrees C in thylakoids. Heat resistance of Cl(-)-induced activation of oxygen evolution was found to be independent of the presence of 'bound Cl(-)' in the preparations. However, the functional stability of the PSII complex during heat treatment showed a marked dependence on the presence of bound Cl(-) in PSII. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of manganese (Mn) release per reaction center/Y (D) (+) showed that there was little loss of Mn(2+) up to 42 degrees C in our preparations, although the PSII activity was significantly lowered. These observations together with data from steady state chlorophyll a fluorescence imply that the site of action of Cl(-) causing direct activation of oxygen evolution was different from the site of primary heat damage. A differential response of chloride binding sites to heat stress was observed. The high-affinity (tightly bound, slow exchanging) site of chloride is affected earlier ( approximately 37 degrees C) while low-affinity (loosely bound, fast exchanging) site gets affected at higher temperatures (42.5 degrees C in thylakoids and 40 degrees C in the case of PSII-enriched membranes).

  13. Regulation of excitation energy transfer in diatom PSII dimer: How does it change the destination of excitation energy?

    PubMed

    Yokono, Makio; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Energy transfer dynamics in dimeric photosystem II (PSII) complexes isolated from four diatoms, Chaetoceros gracilis, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are examined. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were conducted in the range of 0-80ns. Delayed fluorescence spectra showed a clear difference between PSII monomer and PSII dimer isolated from the four diatoms. The difference can be interpreted as reflecting suppressed energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer for efficient energy trapping at the reaction center. The observation was especially prominent in C. gracilis and T. pseudonana. The pathways seem to be suppressed under a low pH condition in isolated PSII complexes from C. gracilis, and excitation energy may be quenched with fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein (FCP) that was closely associated with PSII in C. gracilis. The energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer may play a role in excitation energy regulation in diatoms.

  14. [Effects of exogenous nitric oxide on highbush blueberry PSII photochemical activity and antioxidant system under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-rong; Meng, Yan-ling; Sun, Yang; Liu, Qing-zhong

    2010-10-01

    Taking the test tube 'Duke' highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) seedlings having been transplanted to the field for 6 months as test materials, this paper studied the effects of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on their growth, PS II photochemical activity, and antioxidant system under high temperature stress. Applying 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mmol x L(-1) of exogenous sodium nitroprusside (SNP) could alleviate the decrease of maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), actual photochemical efficiency under light (phi PS II), photochemical quench (q(P)), and nonphotochemical quench (NPQ) caused by high temperature, and prevented the damage of high temperature on photosynthetic apparatus. Comparing with the control, treatments NO decreased the leaf membrane permeability and MDA content, increased the SOD and CAT activities significantly, and promoted proline accumulation. Appropriate concentration SNP could significantly alleviate the damage of high temperature stress on highbush blueberry seedlings, and 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP had the most satisfactory effect.

  15. Quality control of PSII: behavior of PSII in the highly crowded grana thylakoids under excessive light.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Kai, Suguru; Ohnishi, Atsuki; Tsumura, Nodoka; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Hori, Haruka; Morita, Noriko; Ishikawa, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The grana thylakoids of higher plant chloroplasts are crowded with PSII and the associated light-harvesting complexes (LHCIIs). They constitute supercomplexes, and often form semi-crystalline arrays in the grana. The crowded condition of the grana may be necessary for efficient trapping of excitation energy by LHCII under weak light, but it might hinder proper movement of LHCII necessary for reversible aggregation of LHCII in the energy-dependent quenching of Chl fluorescence under moderate high light. When the thylakoids are illuminated with extreme high light, the reaction center-binding D1 protein of PSII is photodamaged, and the damaged protein migrates to the grana margins for degradation and subsequent repair. In both moderate and extreme high-light conditions, fluidity of the thylakoid membrane is crucial. In this review, we first provide an overview of photoprotective processes, then discuss changes in membrane fluidity and mobility of the protein complexes in the grana under excessive light, which are closely associated with photoprotection of PSII. We hypothesize that reversible aggregation of LHCII, which is necessary to avoid light stress under moderate high light, and swift turnover of the photodamaged D1 protein under extreme high light are threatened by irreversible protein aggregation induced by reactive oxygen species in photochemical reactions.

  16. Quality Control of PSII: Behavior of PSII in the Highly Crowded Grana Thylakoids Under Excessive Light

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Kai, Suguru; Ohnishi, Atsuki; Tsumura, Nodoka; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Hori, Haruka; Morita, Noriko; Ishikawa, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The grana thylakoids of higher plant chloroplasts are crowded with PSII and the associated light-harvesting complexes (LHCIIs). They constitute supercomplexes, and often form semi-crystalline arrays in the grana. The crowded condition of the grana may be necessary for efficient trapping of excitation energy by LHCII under weak light, but it might hinder proper movement of LHCII necessary for reversible aggregation of LHCII in the energy-dependent quenching of Chl fluorescence under moderate high light. When the thylakoids are illuminated with extreme high light, the reaction center-binding D1 protein of PSII is photodamaged, and the damaged protein migrates to the grana margins for degradation and subsequent repair. In both moderate and extreme high-light conditions, fluidity of the thylakoid membrane is crucial. In this review, we first provide an overview of photoprotective processes, then discuss changes in membrane fluidity and mobility of the protein complexes in the grana under excessive light, which are closely associated with photoprotection of PSII. We hypothesize that reversible aggregation of LHCII, which is necessary to avoid light stress under moderate high light, and swift turnover of the photodamaged D1 protein under extreme high light are threatened by irreversible protein aggregation induced by reactive oxygen species in photochemical reactions. PMID:24610582

  17. The STN8 kinase-PBCP phosphatase system is responsible for high-light-induced reversible phosphorylation of the PSII inner antenna subunit CP29 in rice.

    PubMed

    Betterle, Nico; Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Rosa, Anthony; Wu, Guangxi; Bassi, Roberto; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of thylakoid light-harvesting proteins is a mechanism to compensate for unbalanced excitation of photosystem I (PSI) versus photosystem II (PSII) under limiting light. In monocots, an additional phosphorylation event on the PSII antenna CP29 occurs upon exposure to excess light, enhancing resistance to light stress. Different from the case of the major LHCII antenna complex, the STN7 kinase and its related PPH1 phosphatase were proven not to be involved in CP29 phosphorylation, indicating that a different set of enzymes act in the high-light (HL) response. Here, we analyze a rice stn8 mutant in which both PSII core proteins and CP29 phosphorylation are suppressed in HL, implying that STN8 is the kinase catalyzing this reaction. In order to identify the phosphatase involved, we produced a recombinant enzyme encoded by the rice ortholog of AtPBCP, antagonist of AtSTN8, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. The recombinant protein was active in dephosphorylating P-CP29. Based on these data, we propose that the activities of the OsSTN8 kinase and the antagonistic OsPBCP phosphatase, in addition to being involved in the repair of photo-damaged PSII, are also responsible for the HL-dependent reversible phosphorylation of the inner antenna CP29.

  18. The PSII-S protein of higher plants: a new type of pigment-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Funk, C; Schröder, W P; Napiwotzki, A; Tjus, S E; Renger, G; Andersson, B

    1995-09-05

    An intrinsic 22 kDa protein of photosystem II has been shown to possess high sequence homology with the CAB gene products, but differs from these proteins by an additional putative fourth transmembrane helix. This protein, designated PSII-S in accordance with the assignment of the name psbS to its gene, has been isolated by nonionic detergents and preparative isoelectric focusing in this study. The isolated PSII-S protein was shown to bind 5 chlorophyll molecules (a and b) per protein unit and also several different kinds of carotenoids. The room temperature absorption spectrum of the Qy transition of the chlorophylls bound to the isolated protein is characterized by a broad band with a maximum at 671 nm. The 77 K fluorescence spectrum exhibits a peak at 672 nm. A single photon counting technique was applied to resolve the room temperature decay kinetics of the first excited singlet states in the chlorophyll ensemble of the PSII-S protein. The data can be satisfactorily described by triexponential kinetics with lifetimes of tau 1 = 1.8 ns, tau 2 = 4.4 ns, and tau 3 = 6.1 ns and normalized amplitudes of 0.09, 0.60, and 0.31, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra suggest that, in contrast to LHCII, virtually no pigment coupling exists in the PSII-S protein. Two copies of the PSII-S protein were found per PSII in spinach thylakoids. It displays an unusually extreme lateral heterogeneity, since the PSII beta centers located in the stroma exposed thylakoid regions contained only residual amounts of the PSII-S protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway protects plants against photoinhibition by alleviating inhibition of the repair of photodamaged PSII through preventing formation of reactive oxygen species in Rumex K-1 leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Xue, Zhong-Cai; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Xiang-Long; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the mitochondrial AOX (alternative oxidase) pathway alleviates photoinhibition in Rumex K-1 leaves. Inhibition of the AOX pathway decreased the initial activity of NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82, NADP-MDH) and the pool size of photosynthetic end electron acceptors, resulting in an over-reduction of the photosystem I (PSI) acceptor side. The over-reduction of the PSI acceptor side further inhibited electron transport from the photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers to the PSII acceptor side as indicated by an increase in V(J) (the relative variable fluorescence at J-step), causing an imbalance between photosynthetic light absorption and energy utilization per active reaction center (RC) under high light, which led to the over-excitation of the PSII reaction centers. The over-reduction of the PSI acceptor side and the over-excitation of the PSII reaction centers enhanced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which inhibited the repair of the photodamaged PSII. However, the inhibition of the AOX pathway did not change the level of photoinhibition under high light in the presence of the chloroplast D1 protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, indicating that the inhibition of the AOX pathway did not accelerate the photodamage to PSII directly. All these results suggest that the AOX pathway plays an important role in the protection of plants against photoinhibition by minimizing the inhibition of the repair of the photodamaged PSII through preventing the over-production of ROS.

  20. Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This report focuses on the following research accomplishments: Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution; Photodamage of Mn-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of photoinactivation of primary reactions; The photoassembly of the PSII (Mn){sub 4}cluster is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and DCIP; The natural product sorgoleone inhibits electron transfer at the Q{sub A}/Q{sub B} site of PSII; and Photodamages of Ca{sup 2+}-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of inactivation of donor side reactions.

  1. Fluorescence kinetics of PSII crystals containing Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) in the oxygen evolving complex.

    PubMed

    van Oort, Bart; Kargul, Joanna; Maghlaoui, Karim; Barber, James; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2014-02-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment-protein complex which converts sunlight energy into chemical energy by catalysing the process of light-driven oxidation of water into reducing equivalents in the form of protons and electrons. Three-dimensional structures from x-ray crystallography have been used extensively to model these processes. However, the crystal structures are not necessarily identical to those of the solubilised complexes. Here we compared picosecond fluorescence of solubilised and crystallised PSII core particles isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The fluorescence of the crystals is sensitive to the presence of artificial electron acceptors (K3Fe(CN)3) and electron transport inhibitors (DCMU). In PSII with reaction centres in the open state, the picosecond fluorescence of PSII crystals and solubilised PSII is indistinguishable. Additionally we compared picosecond fluorescence of native PSII with PSII in which Ca(2) in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) is biosynthetically replaced by Sr(2+). With the Sr(2+) replaced OEC the average fluorescence decay slows down slightly (81ps to 85ps), and reaction centres are less readily closed, indicating that both energy transfer/trapping and electron transfer are affected by the replacement.

  2. Characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, George D.; Cotton, Therese M.; Zhou, Chengli; Gaul, Dale; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael

    1993-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra were obtained for the reaction center complexes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RC) and from photosystem II (PSII) of spinach, adsorbed on Ag and Au surfaces. These preliminary results demonstrate the considerable potential of this technique for selectively exciting resonance Raman scattering from reaction center components within their distinct absorption bands. Because of the high sensitivity afforded by SERRS, spectra could be measured from a single monolayer of reaction centers adsorbed on a metal surface. The surface-sensitivity provides new information indicating the topology of the PSII reaction center 47 kD light-harvesting protein complex. The activity of the PSII reaction center complex adsorbed on metal surfaces was monitored by photochemical reduction of cyt b-559. Measurement of fluorescence emission was shown to be a new and sensitive method for monitoring the structural and functional integrity of the PSII reaction center complex on the metal surface.

  3. Overexpressed Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Act Synergistically to Protect the Repair of PSII during Photoinhibition in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Sae-Tang, Penporn; Hihara, Yukako; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-09-01

    The repair of PSII under strong light is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and these ROS are efficiently scavenged by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In the present study, we generated transformants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that overexpressed an iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803; a highly active catalase (VktA) from Vibrio rumoiensis; and both enzymes together. Then we examined the sensitivity of PSII to photoinhibition in the three strains. In cells that overexpressed either Fe-SOD or VktA, PSII was more tolerant to strong light than it was in wild-type cells. Moreover, in cells that overexpressed both Fe-SOD and VktA, PSII was even more tolerant to strong light. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was similar in all three transformant strains and in wild-type cells, suggesting that the overexpression of these ROS-scavenging enzymes might not protect PSII from photodamage but might protect the repair of PSII. Under strong light, intracellular levels of ROS fell significantly, and the synthesis de novo of proteins that are required for the repair of PSII, such as the D1 protein, was enhanced. Our observations suggest that overexpressed Fe-SOD and VktA might act synergistically to alleviate the photoinhibition of PSII by reducing intracellular levels of ROS, with resultant protection of the repair of PSII from oxidative inhibition.

  4. Novel Characteristics of Photodamage to PSII in a High-Light-Sensitive Symbiodinium Phylotype.

    PubMed

    Karim, Widiastuti; Seidi, Azadeh; Hill, Ross; Chow, Wah S; Minagawa, Jun; Hidaka, Michio; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2015-06-01

    Dinoflagellates from the genus Symbiodinium form symbiotic relationships with many marine invertebrates, including reef-building corals. Symbiodinium is genetically diverse, and acquiring suitable Symbiodinium phylotypes is crucial for the host to survive in habitat environments, such as high-light conditions. The sensitivity of Symbiodinium to high light differs among Symbiodinium phylotypes, but the mechanism that controls light sensitivity has not yet been fully resolved. In the present study using high-light-tolerant and -sensitive Symbiodinium phylotypes, we examined what determines sensitivity to high light. In growth experiments under different light intensities, Symbiodinium CS-164 (clade B1) and CCMP2459 (clade B2) were identified as high-light-tolerant and -sensitive phylotypes, respectively. Measurements of the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) and the maximum photosynthetic oxygen production rate after high-light exposure demonstrated that CCMP2459 is more sensitive to photoinhibition of PSII than CS-164, and tends to lose maximum photosynthetic activity faster. Measurement of photodamage to PSII under light of different wavelength ranges demonstrated that PSII in both Symbiodinium phylotypes was significantly more sensitive to photodamage under shorter wavelength regions of light spectra (<470 nm). Importantly, PSII in CCMP2459, but not CS-164, was also sensitive to photodamage under the regions of light spectra around 470-550 and 630-710 nm, where photosynthetic antenna proteins of Symbiodinium have light absorption peaks. This finding indicates that the high-light-sensitive CCMP2459 has an extra component of photodamage to PSII, resulting in higher sensitivity to high light. Our results demonstrate that sensitivity of PSII to photodamage differs among Symbiodinium phylotypes and this determines their sensitivity to high light.

  5. Rate Constants of PSII Photoinhibition and its Repair, and PSII Fluorescence Parameters in Field Plants in Relation to their Growth Light Environments.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kazunori; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nakaji, Masayoshi; Kanel, Dhana Raj; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The extent of photoinhibition of PSII is determined by a balance between the rate of photodamage to PSII and that of repair of the damaged PSII. It has already been indicated that the rate constants of photodamage (kpi) and repair (krec) of the leaves differ depending on their growth light environment. However, there are no studies using plants in the field. We examined these rate constants and fluorescence parameters of several field-grown plants to determine inter-relationships between these values and the growth environment. The kpi values were strongly related to the excess energy, EY, of the puddle model and non-regulated energy dissipation, Y(NO), of the lake model, both multiplied by the photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) level during the photoinhibitory treatment. In contrast, the krec values corrected against in situ air temperature were very strongly related to the daily PPFD level. The plants from the fields showed higher NPQ than the chamber-grown plants, probably because these field plants acclimated to stronger lightflecks than the averaged growth PPFD. Comparing chamber-grown plants and the field plants, we showed that kpi is determined by the incident light level and the photosynthetic capacities such as in situ rate of PSII electron transport and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) [e.g. Y(NO)×PPFD] and that krec is mostly determined by the growth light and temperature levels.

  6. Effect Of Calcium Chelators on the Formation and Oxidation of the Slowly Relaxing Reduced Plastoquinone Pool in Calcium-Depleted PSII Membranes. Investigation of the F0 Yield

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Davletshina, L. N.; Bulychev, A. A.; Ivanov, I. I.; Seibert, M.; Rubin, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    The F{sub 0} fluorescence yield in intact photosystem II (PSII), Ca-depleted PSII (PSII(-Ca/NaCl)), and Mn-depleted PSII membranes was measured before and after dim light treatment (1-2 min), using flash-probe fluorescence and fluorescence induction kinetic measurements. The value of F{sub 0} after the light treatment (F{sup '}{sub 0}) was larger than F{sub 0} in dark-adapted PSII membranes and depended on the appearance of the slowly relaxing, reduced plastoquinone pool (t{sub 1/2} = 4 min) formed during preillumination, which was not totally reoxidized before the F{sup '}{sub 0} measurement. In PSII(-Ca/NaCl) such a pool also appeared, but the F{sup '}{sub 0} yield was even higher than in intact PSII membranes. In Mn-depleted PSII membranes, the pool did not form. Interestingly, the yield of F{sup '}{sub 0} in Ca-depleted PSII membranes prepared using chelators (EGTA and citrate) or containing 5 mM EGTA was significantly lower than in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples prepared without chelators. These data indicate that chelators inhibit the reduction of QA and QB and formation of the slowly relaxing plastoquinone pool, or alternatively they increase the rate of its oxidation. Such an effect can be explained by coordination of the chelator molecule to the Mn cluster in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes, rather than different amounts of residual Ca{sup 2+} in the membranes (with or without the chelator), since the remaining oxygen-evolving activity ({approx}15%) in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples did not depend on the presence of the chelator. Thus, chelators of calcium cations not only have an effect on the EPR properties of the S2 state in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples, but can also influence the PSII properties determining the rate of plastoquinone pool reduction and/or oxidation. The effect of some toxic metal cations (Cd, Cu, Hg) on the formation of the slowly relaxing pool in PSII membranes was also studied.

  7. Acclimation of tobacco leaves to high light intensity drives the plastoquinone oxidation system--relationship among the fraction of open PSII centers, non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence and the maximum quantum yield of PSII in the dark.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Chikahiro; Amako, Katsumi; Shiraishi, Naomasa; Sugimoto, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    Responses of the reduction-oxidation level of plastoquinone (PQ) in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) system of chloroplasts to growth light intensity were evaluated in tobacco plants. Plants grown in low light (150 micromol photons m-2 s-1) (LL plants) were exposed to a high light intensity (1,100 micromol photons m-2 s-1) for 1 d. Subsequently, the plants exposed to high light (LH plants) were returned back again to the low light condition: these plants were designated as LHL plants. Both LH and LHL plants showed higher values of non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence (NPQ) and the fraction of open PSII centers (qL), and lower values of the maximum quantum yield of PSII in the dark (Fv/Fm), compared with LL plants. The dependence of qL on the quantum yield of PSII [Phi(PSII)] in LH and LHL plants was higher than that in LL plants. To evaluate the effect of an increase in NPQ and decrease in Fv/Fm on qL, we derived an equation expressing qL in relation to both NPQ and Fv/Fm, according to the lake model of photoexcitation of the PSII reaction center. As a result, the heat dissipation process, shown as NPQ, did not contribute greatly to the increase in qL. On the other hand, decreased Fv/Fm did contribute to the increase in qL, i.e. the enhanced oxidation of PQ under photosynthesis-limited conditions. Thylakoid membranes isolated from LH plants, having high qL, showed a higher tolerance against photoinhibition of PSII, compared with those from LL plants. We propose a 'plastoquinone oxidation system (POS)', which keeps PQ in an oxidized state by suppressing the accumulation of electrons in the PET system in such a way as to regulate the maximum quantum yield of PSII.

  8. Effects of different elevated CO2 concentrations on chlorophyll contents, gas exchange, water use efficiency, and PSII activity on C3 and C4 cereal crops in a closed artificial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minjuan; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Dong, Chen; Hui, Liu; Guanghui, Liu; Liu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Although terrestrial CO2 concentrations [CO2] are not expected to reach 1000 μmol mol(-1) (or ppm) for many decades, CO2 levels in closed systems such as growth chambers and greenhouses can easily exceed this concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems (LSS) in space can exceed 10,000 ppm (1 %). In order to understand how photosynthesis in C4 plants may respond to elevated CO2, it is necessary to determine if leaves of closed artificial ecosystem grown plants have a fully developed C4 photosynthetic apparatus, and whether or not photosynthesis in these leaves is more responsive to elevated [CO2] than leaves of C3 plants. To address this issue, we evaluated the response of gas exchange, water use efficiency, and photosynthetic efficiency of PSII by soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr., 'Heihe35') of a typical C3 plant and maize (Zea mays L., 'Susheng') of C4 plant under four CO2 concentrations (500, 1000, 3000, and 5000 ppm), which were grown under controlled environmental conditions of Lunar Palace 1. The results showed that photosynthetic pigment by the C3 plants of soybean was more sensitive to elevated [CO2] below 3000 ppm than the C4 plants of maize. Elevated [CO2] to 1000 ppm induced a higher initial photosynthetic rate, while super-elevated [CO2] appeared to negate such initial growth promotion for C3 plants. The C4 plant had the highest ETR, φPSII, and qP under 500-3000 ppm [CO2], but then decreased substantially at 5000 ppm [CO2] for both species. Therefore, photosynthetic down-regulation and a decrease in photosynthetic electron transport occurred by both species in response to super-elevated [CO2] at 3000 and 5000 ppm. Accordingly, plants can be selected for and adapt to the efficient use of elevated CO2 concentration in LSS.

  9. Industrial process driven system requirements for PSII applications

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.

    1997-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a room temperature, plasma-based surface enhancement technology which is being commercialized through the efforts of a group of companies. A number of issues are critical to the successful design and operation of a commercial PSII system. These include overall vacuum system design, plasma source requirements and plasma-target interaction considerations, pulsed, high voltage sub-system (typically referred to as modulator) requirements, and target requirements and limitations. Critical system components are outlined and overall system design will be briefly covered.

  10. PSII photochemistry in vegetative buds and needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) probed by OJIP chlorophyll a fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Katanić, Zorana; Atić, Lejla; Ferhatović, Dž; Cesar, Vera; Lepeduš, H

    2012-06-01

    Vegetative buds represent developmental stage of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) needles where chloroplast biogenesis and photosynthetic activity begin. We used the analyses of polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence rise (OJIP) to compare photosystem II (PSII) functioning in vegetative buds and fully photosynthetically active mature current-year needles. Considerably decreased performance index (PIABS) in vegetative buds compared to needles pointed to their low photosynthetic efficiency. Maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) in buds was slightly decreased but above limited value for functionality indicating that primary photochemistry of PSII is not holdback of vegetative buds photosynthetic activity. The most significant difference observed between investigated developmental stages was accumulation of reduced primary quinine acceptor of PSII (QA-) in vegetative buds, as a result of its limited re-oxidation by passing electrons to secondary quinone acceptor, QB. We suggest that reduced electron transfer from QA- to QB could be the major limiting factor of photosynthesis in vegetative buds.

  11. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. Results In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks). During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII) activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Conclusions Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within the young germling, the

  12. PSI showed higher tolerance to Sb(V) than PSII due to stimulation of cyclic electron flow around PSI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhi; Pan, Xiangliang; Zhang, Daoyong

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the effects of Sb(V) on the physiological characteristics of cyanobacteria was still limited. In the present study, responses of photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII), cyclic electron flow (CEF), and interphotosystem electron transport of Microcystis aeruginosa to 5-100 mg/l Sb(V) were synchronously measured using the Dual-PAM-100. 5 mg/l Sb (V) significantly inhibited PSII activity, but had no significant effects on PSI activity. At higher concentrations of Sb(V), the quantum yield and electron transport of PSI were less affected compared to PSII. The ratio of Y(II)/Y(I) significantly decreased with increasing Sb(V) concentration. It decreased from 0.7 for control to 0.4 for 100 mg/l Sb(V)-treated cells, indicating that the change of the distribution of quantum yields between two photosystems and more serious inhibition of PSII under stress of Sb(V) compared to PSI. CEF was activated associated with the inhibition of linear electron flow after exposure to Sb(V). The contribution of Y(CEF) to the quantum yield and activity of PSI increased with increasing Sb(V) concentrations. The cyclic electron transport rate made a significant contribution to electron transport rate of PSI, especially at high Sb(V) concentration (100 mg/l) and high illumination (above 555 μmol photons/m(2)/s). The stimulation of CEF was essential for the higher tolerance of PSI than PSII to Sb(V).

  13. Rice photosynthetic productivity and PSII photochemistry under nonflooded irrigation.

    PubMed

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  14. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation. PMID:24741364

  15. Decoupling of the processes of molecular oxygen synthesis and electron transport in Ca2+-depleted PSII membranes.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Extraction of Ca(2+) from the O(2)-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) membranes with 2 M NaCl in the light (PSII(-Ca/NaCl)) results in 90% inhibition of the O(2)-evolution reaction. However, electron transfer from the donor to acceptor side of PSII, measured as the reduction of the exogenous acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) under continuous light, is inhibited by only 30%. Thus, calcium extraction from the OEC inhibits the synthesis of molecular O(2) but not the oxidation of a substrate we term X, the source of electrons for DCIP reduction. The presence of electron transfer across PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was demonstrated using fluorescence induction kinetics, a method that does not require an artificial acceptor. The calcium chelator, EGTA (5 mM), when added to PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes, does not affect the inhibition of O(2) evolution by NaCl but does inhibit DCIP reduction up to 92% (the reason why electron transport in Ca(2+)-depleted materials has not been noticed before). Another chelator, sodium citrate (citrate/low pH method of calcium extraction), also inhibits both O(2) evolution and DCIP reduction. The role of all buffer components (including bicarbonate and sucrose) as possible sources of electrons for PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was investigated, but only the absence of chloride anions strongly inhibited the rate of DCIP reduction. Substitution of other anions for chloride indicates that Cl(-) serves its well-known role as an OEC cofactor, but it is not substrate X. Multiple turnover flash experiments have shown a period of four oscillations of the fluorescence yield (both the maximum level, F(max), and the fluorescence level measured 50 s after an actinic flash in the presence of DCMU) in native PSII membranes, reflecting the normal function of the OEC, but the absence of oscillations in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples. Thus, PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples do not evolve O(2) but do transfer electrons from the donor to acceptor sides and exhibit a

  16. Clostridium difficile carbohydrates: glucan in spores, PSII common antigen in cells, immunogenicity of PSII in swine and synthesis of a dual C. difficile-ETEC conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Lisa; Boncheff, Alexander G; Ma, Zuchao; Chen, Yu-Han; Wakeford, Terra; Friendship, Robert M; Rosseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott; Chu, Michele; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Monteiro, Mario A

    2012-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for severe diarrhea in humans that may cause death. Spores are the infectious form of C. difficile, which germinate into toxin-producing vegetative cells in response to bile acids. Recently, we discovered that C. difficile cells possess three complex polysaccharides (PSs), named PSI, PSII, and PSIII, in which PSI was only associated with a hypervirulent ribotype 027 strain, PSII was hypothesized to be a common antigen, and PSIII was a water-insoluble polymer. Here, we show that (i) C. difficile spores contain, at least in part, a D-glucan, (ii) PSI is not a ribotype 027-unique antigen, (iii) common antigen PSII may in part be present as a low molecular weight lipoteichoic acid, (iv) selective hydrolysis of PSII yields single PSII repeat units, (v) the glycosyl diester-phosphate linkage affords high flexibility to PSII, and (vi) that PSII is immunogenic in sows. Also, with the intent of creating a dual anti-diarrheal vaccine against C. difficile and enterotoxin Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections in humans, we describe the conjugation of PSII to the ETEC-associated LTB enterotoxin.

  17. Zwitterion Modulation of O2-Evolving Activity of Cyanobacterial Photosystem II†

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Gözde; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only enzyme in nature that can catalyze the challenging catalytic photooxidation of H2O into 4 protons, 4 electrons, and O2. Slowing down turnover of the O2-evolving complex (OEC) is a plausible approach to gain mechanistic information on the reaction. However, modulating the kinetics of the reaction without perturbing the active site is a challenge. In this study, it is shown that the steady-state activity of cyanobacterial PSII is inhibited by small zwitterions, such as glycine betaine and β-alanine. We show that the binding of zwitterions is non-denaturing, highly reversible and results in the decrease of the rate of catalytic turnover by ~ 50% in the presence of excess zwitterion. Control measurements of photoinduced electron transfer in O2-inactive PSII show that the inhibition by zwitterions is the result of a specific decrease in the rate of catalytic turnover of the OEC. Recovery of activity upon addition of an exogenous proton carrier (HCO3−) provides evidence that proton-transfer pathways, thought to be essential for the relay of protons from the OEC to the lumen, are affected. Interestingly, no inhibition is observed for spinach PSII, suggesting that zwitterions act specifically by binding to the extrinsic proteins on the lumenal side of PSII, which differ significantly between plants and cyanobacteria, to slow proton transfer on the electron donor side of PSII. PMID:20707325

  18. Site energies of active and inactive pheophytins in the reaction center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Acharya, K; Neupane, B; Zazubovich, V; Sayre, R T; Picorel, R; Seibert, M; Jankowiak, R

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin a (Pheo a) within the D1 protein (Pheo(D1)), while Pheo(D2) (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q(y)-states of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986 - 998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364 - 12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo(D1) is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo(D2) (~677.5 nm) and Chl(D1) (~680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo(D2)-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q(y) absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472 - 11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664 - 1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) (including the corresponding Q(x) transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo(D1) is genetically replaced with chlorophyll a (Chl a). We show that the Q(x)-/Q(y)-region site energies of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) are ~545/680 nm and ~541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment [Jankowiak et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 8803 - 8814]. The latter values should be used to model excitonic

  19. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  20. Solar UV-B effects on PSII performance in Betula nana are influenced by PAR level and reduced by EDU: results of a 3-year experiment in the High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Albert, Kristian R; Mikkelsen, Teis N; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Arndal, Marie F; Boesgaard, Kristine; Michelsen, Anders; Bruhn, Dan; Schmidt, Niels M

    2012-07-01

    The long-term and diurnal responses of photosystem II (PSII) performance to near-ambient UV-B radiation were investigated in High Arctic Betula nana. We conducted an UV exclusion experiment with five replicated blocks consisting of open control (no filter), photosynthetic active radiation and UV-B transparent filter control (Teflon), UV-B-absorbing filter (Mylar) and UV-AB-absorbing filter (Lexan). Ethylenediurea (EDU), a chemical normally used to protect plants against ozone injury, was sprayed on the leaves both in the field and in an additional laboratory study to investigate if EDU mitigated the effects of UV-B. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves were used for analysis of OJIP test parameters. Near-ambient UV-B radiation reduced across season maximum quantum yield (TR(o) /ABS = F(v) /F(m)), approximated number of active PSII reaction center (RC/ABS) and the performance index (PI(ABS)), despite improved leaf screening against UV-B with higher content of UV-B-absorbing compounds and a lower specific leaf area. EDU application counteracted the negative impact of UV-B on TR(o) /ABS, RC/ABS and PI(ABS) . This indicates that the mechanisms behind UV-B and ozone damage share some common features. The midday depression was present in all treatments, but TR(o) /ABS and PI(ABS) were persistently lower in near-ambient UV-B compared to UV-B reduction. The recovery phase was particularly impaired in near-ambient UV-B and interactive effects between treatment × hour raised TR(o) /ABS, RC/ABS and PI(ABS) higher in reduced UV-B compared to near-ambient UV-B. This demonstrates current solar UV-B to reduce the PSII performance both on a daily as well as a seasonal basis in this High Arctic species.

  1. Production of reactive oxygen species in decoupled, Ca(2+)-depleted PSII and their use in assigning a function to chloride on both sides of PSII.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Extraction of Ca(2+) from the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII) in the absence of a chelator inhibits O2 evolution without significant inhibition of the light-dependent reduction of the exogenous electron acceptor, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) on the reducing side of PSII. The phenomenon is known as "the decoupling effect" (Semin et al. Photosynth Res 98:235-249, 2008). Extraction of Cl(-) from Ca(2+)-depleted membranes (PSII[-Ca]) suppresses the reduction of DCPIP. In the current study we investigated the nature of the oxidized substrate and the nature of the product(s) of the substrate oxidation. After elimination of all other possible donors, water was identified as the substrate. Generation of reactive oxygen species HO, H2O2, and O 2 (·-) , as possible products of water oxidation in PSII(-Ca) membranes was examined. During the investigation of O 2 (·-) production in PSII(-Ca) samples, we found that (i) O 2 (·-) is formed on the acceptor side of PSII due to the reduction of O2; (ii) depletion of Cl(-) does not inhibit water oxidation, but (iii) Cl(-) depletion does decrease the efficiency of the reduction of exogenous electron acceptors. In the absence of Cl(-) under aerobic conditions, electron transport is diverted from reducing exogenous acceptors to reducing O2, thereby increasing the rate of O 2 (·-) generation. From these observations we conclude that the product of water oxidation is H2O2 and that Cl(-) anions are not involved in the oxidation of water to H2O2 in decoupled PSII(-Ca) membranes. These results also indicate that Cl(-) anions are not directly involved in water oxidation by the Mn cluster in the native PSII membranes, but possibly provide access for H2O molecules to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and/or facilitate the release of H(+) ions into the lumenal space.

  2. PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membrane by coarse-grained simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei; Smit, Berend

    2015-03-12

    Green plant photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) in the stacked grana regions of thylakoid membranes can self-organize into various PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with crystalline or fluid-like supramolecular structures to adjust themselves with external stimuli such as high/low light and temperatures, rendering tunable solar light absorption spectrum and photosynthesis efficiencies. However, the mechanisms controlling the PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations remain elusive. In this work, we constructed a coarse-grained (CG) model of the thylakoid membrane including lipid molecules and a PSII-LHCII supercomplex considering association/dissociation of moderately bound-LHCIIs. The CG interaction between CG beads were constructed based on electron microscope (EM) experimental results, and we were able to simulate the PSII-LHCII supramolecular organization of a 500 × 500 nm(2) thylakoid membrane, which is compatible with experiments. Our CGMD simulations can successfully reproduce order structures of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes under various protein packing fractions, free-LHCII:PSII ratios, and temperatures, thereby providing insights into mechanisms leading to PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membranes.

  3. Similarities and differences in global gene expression profiles between herbicide- and pathogen-induced PSII inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogens, and photosynthesis inhibiting herbicides, can both damage photosystem II (PSII), causing it to be highly sensitive to damage by light energy, and to release high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This photoinhibition of PSII could possibly be the source of the strong oxidativ...

  4. Effects of blue light deficiency on acclimation of light energy partitioning in PSII and CO2 assimilation capacity to high irradiance in spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryo; Ohashi-Kaneko, Keiko; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro; Kurata, Kenji

    2008-04-01

    Blue light effects on the acclimation of energy partitioning characteristics in PSII and CO2 assimilation capacity in spinach to high growth irradiance were investigated. Plants were grown hydroponically in different light treatments that were a combination of two light qualities and two irradiances,i.e. white light and blue-deficient light at photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFDs) of 100 and 500 micromol m(-2) s(-1). The CO2 assimilation rate, the quantum efficiency of PSII(PhiPSII) and thermal dissipation activity (F(v)/F(m)-F'(v)/F'(m)) in young, fully expanded leaves were measured under 1,600 micromol m(-2) s(-1) white light. The CO2 assimilation rate and (PhiPSII) were higher, while F(v)/F(m)-F'(v)/F'(m) was lower in plants grown under high irradiance than in plants grown under low irradiance. These responses were observed irrespective of the presence or absence of blue light during growth. The extent of the increase in the CO2 assimilation rate and PhiPSII and the decrease in F(v)/F(m)-F'(v)/F'(m) by high growth irradiance was smaller under blue light-deficient conditions. These results indicate that blue light helps to boost the acclimation responses of energy partitioning in PSII and CO2 assimilation to high irradiance. Similarly, leaf N, Cyt f and Chl contents per unit leaf area increased by high growth irradiance, and the extent of the increment in leaf N, Cyt f and Chl was smaller under blue light-deficient conditions. Regression analysis showed that the differences in energy partitioning in PSIIand CO2 assimilation between plants grown under high white light and high blue-deficient light were closely related to the difference in leaf N.

  5. A chlorophyll fluorescence analysis of photosynthetic efficiency, quantum yield and photon energy dissipation in PSII antennae of Lactuca sativa L. leaves exposed to cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of cinnamic acid (CA) on growth, biochemical and physiological responses of Lactuca sativa L. CA (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mM) treatments decreased plant height, root length, leaf and root fresh weight, but it did not affect the leaf water status. CA treatment (1.5 mM) significantly reduced F(v), F(m), photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) and quantum yield of PSIIPSII) photochemistry in L. sativa. The photochemical fluorescence quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were reduced after treatment with 1.5 mM CA. Fraction of photon energy absorbed by PS II antennae trapped by "open" PS II reaction centers (P) was reduced by CA (1.5 mM) while, portion of absorbed photon energy thermally dissipated (D) and photon energy absorbed by PSII antennae and trapped by "closed" PSII reaction centers (E) was increased. Carbon isotope composition ratios (δ(13)C) was less negative (-27.10) in CA (1.5 mM) treated plants as compared to control (-27.61). Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) and ratio of intercellular CO(2) concentration (ci/ca) from leaf to air were also less in CA treated plants. CA (1.5 mM) also decreased the leaf protein contents of L. sativa as compared to control.

  6. New rubrolide analogues as inhibitors of photosynthesis light reactions.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Jodieh O S; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Ramos, Gabriela Álvarez; Varejão, Eduardo V V; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2015-04-01

    Natural products called rubrolides have been investigated as a model for the development of new herbicides that act on the photosynthesis apparatus. This study comprises a comprehensive analysis of the photosynthesis inhibitory ability of 27 new structurally diverse rubrolide analogues. In general, the results revealed that the compounds exhibited efficient inhibition of the photosynthetic process, but in some cases low water solubility may be a limiting factor. To elucidate their mode of action, the effects of the compounds on PSII and PSI, as well as their partial reaction on chloroplasts and the chlorophyll a fluorescence transients were measured. Our results showed that some of the most active rubrolide analogues act as a Hill reaction inhibitors at the QB level by interacting with the D1 protein at the reducing side of PSII. All of the active analogues follow Tice's rule of 5, which indicates that these compounds present physicochemical properties suitable for herbicides.

  7. Intraspecific Variation in Pinus Pinaster PSII Photochemical Efficiency in Response to Winter Stress and Freezing Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Corcuera, Leyre; Gil-Pelegrin, Eustaquio; Notivol, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    As part of a program to select maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) genotypes for resistance to low winter temperatures, we examined variation in photosystem II activity by chlorophyll fluorescence. Populations and families within populations from contrasting climates were tested during two consecutive winters through two progeny trials, one located at a continental and xeric site and one at a mesic site with Atlantic influence. We also obtained the LT50, or the temperature that causes 50% damage, by controlled freezing and the subsequent analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in needles and stems that were collected from populations at the continental trial site. P. pinaster showed sensitivity to winter stress at the continental site, during the colder winter. The combination of low temperatures, high solar irradiation and low precipitation caused sustained decreases in maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), quantum yield of non-cyclic electron transport (ΦPSII) and photochemical quenching (qP). The variation in photochemical parameters was larger among families than among populations, and population differences appeared only under the harshest conditions at the continental site. As expected, the environmental effects (winter and site) on the photochemical parameters were much larger than the genotypic effects (population or family). LT50 was closely related to the minimum winter temperatures of the population's range. The dark-adapted Fv/Fm ratio discriminated clearly between interior and coastal populations. In conclusion, variations in Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, qP and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in response to winter stress were primarily due to the differences between the winter conditions and the sites and secondarily due to the differences among families and their interactions with the environment. Populations from continental climates showed higher frost tolerance (LT50) than coastal populations that typically experience mild winters. Therefore, LT50, as

  8. Intraspecific variation in Pinus pinaster PSII photochemical efficiency in response to winter stress and freezing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Corcuera, Leyre; Gil-Pelegrin, Eustaquio; Notivol, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    As part of a program to select maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) genotypes for resistance to low winter temperatures, we examined variation in photosystem II activity by chlorophyll fluorescence. Populations and families within populations from contrasting climates were tested during two consecutive winters through two progeny trials, one located at a continental and xeric site and one at a mesic site with Atlantic influence. We also obtained the LT₅₀, or the temperature that causes 50% damage, by controlled freezing and the subsequent analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in needles and stems that were collected from populations at the continental trial site.P. pinaster showed sensitivity to winter stress at the continental site, during the colder winter. The combination of low temperatures, high solar irradiation and low precipitation caused sustained decreases in maximal photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)), quantum yield of non-cyclic electron transport (Φ(PSII)) and photochemical quenching (qP). The variation in photochemical parameters was larger among families than among populations, and population differences appeared only under the harshest conditions at the continental site. As expected, the environmental effects (winter and site) on the photochemical parameters were much larger than the genotypic effects (population or family). LT₅₀ was closely related to the minimum winter temperatures of the population's range. The dark-adapted F(v)/F(m) ratio discriminated clearly between interior and coastal populations.In conclusion, variations in F(v)/F(m), Φ(PSII), qP and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in response to winter stress were primarily due to the differences between the winter conditions and the sites and secondarily due to the differences among families and their interactions with the environment. Populations from continental climates showed higher frost tolerance (LT₅₀) than coastal populations that typically experience mild winters

  9. A Light-Activated Reaction Manifold.

    PubMed

    Hiltebrandt, Kai; Elies, Katharina; D'hooge, Dagmar R; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-06-08

    We introduce an efficient reaction manifold where the rate of a thermally induced ligation can be controlled by a photonic field via two competing reaction channels. The effectiveness of the reaction manifold is evidenced by following the transformations of macromolecular chain termini via high-resolution mass spectrometry and subsequently by selective block copolymer formation. The light-controlled reaction manifold consists of a so-called o-quinodimethane species, a photocaged diene, that reacts in the presence of light with suitable enes in a Diels-Alder reaction and undergoes a transformation into imines with amines in the absence of light. The chemical selectivity of the manifold is controlled by the amount of ene present in the reaction and can be adjusted from 100% imine formation (0% photo product) to 5% imine formation (95% photo product). The reported light-controlled reaction manifold is highly attractive because a simple external field is used to switch the selectivity of specific reaction channels.

  10. The protective mechanisms of CaHSP26 in transgenic tobacco to alleviate photoinhibition of PSII during chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Meifang; Ji, Lusha; Yang, Xinghong; Meng, Qingwei; Guo, Shangjing

    2012-11-01

    A known sweet pepper cDNA clone, CaHSP26 encoding the chloroplast-localized small heat shock protein (CPsHSP), was isolated and introduced into tobacco plants. It has been reported that CaHSP26 is a member of the CPsHSP gene family related to extreme temperature tolerance in plants. In the present work, the transcripts were detected in the transgenic tobacco lines. The actual quantum yield of photosynthesis (ΦPSII), non-photochemical quenching, and stomatal conductance (gs) in the transgenic lines overexpressing CaHSP26 were higher than those in the wild-type plants under a range of photosynthetic photon flux density during chilling stress. Electron microscopic analysis showed that the transgenic line (L1) had larger size of stomata to lessen stomatal limitation. The activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were also higher in the transgenic lines than those in wild-type plants. Additionally, a significant increase in cis-unsaturated fatty acid contents was observed in transgenic lines due to lower temperatures. These results suggested that CaHSP26 protein plays an important role in protection of PSII by maintaining the antioxidative enzyme activities to avoid or mitigate photooxidation and increasing the fluidity of the thylakoid membrane during chilling stress under low irradiance. Key message CaHSP26 protein protects PSII by maintaining the antioxidative enzyme activities to avoid or mitigate photooxidation and increases the fluidity of the thylakoid membrane during chilling stress under low irradiance.

  11. C-terminal processing of reaction center protein D1 is essential for the function and assembly of photosystem II in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yufen; Fu, Aigen; Hou, Xin; McDonald, Kent; Buchanan, Bob B.; Huang, Weidong; Luan, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein D1 is synthesized as a precursor (pD1) with a short C-terminal extension. The pD1 is processed to mature D1 by carboxyl-terminal peptidase A to remove the C-terminal extension and form active protein. Here we report functional characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding D1 C-terminal processing enzyme (AtCtpA) in the chloroplast thylakoid lumen. Recombinant AtCtpA converted pD1 to mature D1 and a mutant lacking AtCtpA retained all D1 in precursor form, confirming that AtCtpA is solely responsible for processing. As with cyanobacterial ctpa, a knockout Arabidopsis atctpa mutant was lethal under normal growth conditions but was viable with sucrose under low-light conditions. Viable plants, however, showed deficiencies in PSII and thylakoid stacking. Surprisingly, unlike its cyanobacterial counterpart, the Arabidopsis mutant retained both monomer and dimer forms of the PSII complexes that, although nonfunctional, contained both the core and extrinsic subunits. This mutant was also essentially devoid of PSII supercomplexes, providing an unexpected link between D1 maturation and supercomplex assembly. A knock-down mutant expressing about 2% wild-type level of AtCtpA showed normal growth under low light but was stunted and accumulated pD1 under high light, indicative of delayed C-terminal processing. Although demonstrating the functional significance of C-terminal D1 processing in PSII biogenesis, our study reveals an unsuspected link between D1 maturation and PSII supercomplex assembly in land plants, opening an avenue for exploring the mechanism for the association of light-harvesting complexes with the PSII core complexes. PMID:24043802

  12. Allelochemical stress inhibits growth, leaf water relations, PSII photochemistry, non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, and heat energy dissipation in three C3 perennial species

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effect of two allelochemicals, benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA) and cinnamic acid (CA), on different physiological and morphological characteristics of 1-month-old C3 plant species (Dactylis glomerata, Lolium perenne, and Rumex acetosa) was analysed. BOA inhibited the shoot length of D. glomerata, L. perenne, and R. acetosa by 49%, 19%, and 19% of the control. The root length of D. glomerata, L. perenne, and R. acetosa growing in the presence of 1.5 mM BOA and CA was decreased compared with the control. Both allelochemicals (BOA, CA) inhibited leaf osmotic potential (LOP) in L. perenne and D. glomerata. In L. perenne, Fv/Fm decreased after treatment with BOA (1.5 mM) while CA (1.5 mM) also significantly reduced Fv/Fm in L. perenne. Both allelochemicals decreased ΦPSII in D. glomerata and L. perenne within 24 h of treatment, while in R. acetosa, ΦPSII levels decreased by 72 h following treatment with BOA and CA. There was a decrease in qP and NPQ on the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth days after treatment with BOA in D. glomerata, while both allelochemicals reduced the qP level in R. acetosa. There was a gradual decrease in the fraction of light absorbed by PSII allocated to PSII photochemistry (P) in R. acetosa treated with BOA and CA. The P values in D. glomerata were reduced by both allelochemicals and the portion of absorbed photon energy that was thermally dissipated (D) in D. glomerata and L. perenne was decreased by BOA and CA. Photon energy absorbed by PSII antennae and trapped by ‘closed’ PSII reaction centres (E) was decreased after CA exposure in D. glomerata. BOA and CA (1.5 mM concentration) decreased the leaf protein contents in all three perennial species. This study provides new understanding of the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action of BOA and CA in one perennial dicotyledon and two perennial grasses. The acquisition of such knowledge may ultimately provide a rational and scientific basis for the design of safe

  13. "JCE" Classroom Activity #111: Redox Reactions in Three Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves, Edgardo L. Ortiz; Barreto, Reizelie; Medina, Zuleika

    2012-01-01

    This activity introduces students to the concept of reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. To help students obtain a thorough understanding of redox reactions, the concept is explored at three levels: macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. In this activity, students perform hands-on investigations of the three levels as they work at different…

  14. Chloroplast movement provides photoprotection to plants by redistributing PSII damage within leaves.

    PubMed

    Davis, Phillip A; Hangarter, Roger P

    2012-09-01

    Plants use light to fix carbon through the process of photosynthesis but light also causes photoinhibition, by damaging photosystem II (PSII). Plants can usually adjust their rate of PSII repair to equal the rate of damage, but under stress conditions or supersaturating light-intensities damage may exceed the rate of repair. Light-induced chloroplast movements are one of the many mechanisms plants have evolved to minimize photoinhibition. We found that chloroplast movements achieve a measure of photoprotection to PSII by altering the distribution of photoinhibition through depth in leaves. When chloroplasts are in the low-light accumulation arrangement a greater proportion of PSII damage occurs near the illuminated surface than for leaves where the chloroplasts are in the high-light avoidance arrangement. According to our findings chloroplast movements can increase the overall efficiency of leaf photosynthesis in at least two ways. The movements alter light profiles within leaves to maximize photosynthetic output and at the same time redistribute PSII damage throughout the leaf to reduce the amount of inhibition received by individual chloroplasts and prevent a decrease in photosynthetic potential.

  15. Efficient Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion using Spinach Photosystem II (PSII) in Lipid Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki M; Shen, Min; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2015-04-01

    The need for clean, renewable energy has fostered research into photovoltaic alternatives to silicon solar cells. Pigment-protein complexes in green plants convert light energy into chemical potential using redox processes that produce molecular oxygen. Here, we report the first use of spinach protein photosystem II (PSII) core complex in lipid films in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents were generated from PSII in a ∼2 μm biomimetic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) film on a pyrolytic graphite (PG) anode with PSII embedded in multiple lipid bilayers. The photocurrent was ∼20 μA cm(-2) under light intensity 40 mW cm(-2). The PSII-DMPC anode was used in a photobiofuel cell with a platinum black mesh cathode in perchloric acid solution to give an output voltage of 0.6 V and a maximum output power of 14 μW cm(-2). Part of this large output is related to a five-unit anode-cathode pH gradient. With catholytes at higher pH or no perchlorate, or using an MnO2 oxygen-reduction cathode, the power output was smaller. The results described raise the possibility of using PSII-DMPC films in small portable power conversion devices.

  16. Surface-Activated Coupling Reactions Confined on a Surface.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-10-20

    Chemical reactions may take place in a pure phase of gas or liquid or at the interface of two phases (gas-solid or liquid-solid). Recently, the emerging field of "surface-confined coupling reactions" has attracted intensive attention. In this process, reactants, intermediates, and products of a coupling reaction are adsorbed on a solid-vacuum or a solid-liquid interface. The solid surface restricts all reaction steps on the interface, in other words, the reaction takes place within a lower-dimensional, for example, two-dimensional, space. Surface atoms that are fixed in the surface and adatoms that move on the surface often activate the surface-confined coupling reactions. The synergy of surface morphology and activity allow some reactions that are inefficient or prohibited in the gas or liquid phase to proceed efficiently when the reactions are confined on a surface. Over the past decade, dozens of well-known "textbook" coupling reactions have been shown to proceed as surface-confined coupling reactions. In most cases, the surface-confined coupling reactions were discovered by trial and error, and the reaction pathways are largely unknown. It is thus highly desirable to unravel the mechanisms, mechanisms of surface activation in particular, of the surface-confined coupling reactions. Because the reactions take place on surfaces, advanced surface science techniques can be applied to study the surface-confined coupling reactions. Among them, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are the two most extensively used experimental tools. The former resolves submolecular structures of individual reactants, intermediates, and products in real space, while the latter monitors the chemical states during the reactions in real time. Combination of the two methods provides unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the reaction pathways. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical modeling. In particular, density

  17. On the possibility of negative activation energies in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants for model reacting systems was studied to understand some recent experimental measurements which imply the existence of negative activation energies. A collision theory model and classical trajectory calculations are used to demonstrate that the reaction probability can vary inversely with collision energy for bimolecular reactions occurring on attractive potential energy surfaces. However, this is not a sufficient condition to ensure that the rate constant has a negative temperature dependence. On the basis of these calculations, it seems unlikely that a true bimolecular reaction between neutral molecules will have a negative activation energy.

  18. Strategies for psbA gene expression in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants: from transcription to PSII repair.

    PubMed

    Mulo, Paula; Sakurai, Isamu; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    The Photosystem (PS) II of cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants is prone to light-induced inactivation, the D1 protein being the primary target of such damage. As a consequence, the D1 protein, encoded by the psbA gene, is degraded and re-synthesized in a multistep process called PSII repair cycle. In cyanobacteria, a small gene family codes for the various, functionally distinct D1 isoforms. In these organisms, the regulation of the psbA gene expression occurs mainly at the level of transcription, but the expression is fine-tuned by regulation of translation elongation. In plants and green algae, the D1 protein is encoded by a single psbA gene located in the chloroplast genome. In chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the psbA gene expression is strongly regulated by mRNA processing, and particularly at the level of translation initiation. In chloroplasts of higher plants, translation elongation is the prevalent mechanism for regulation of the psbA gene expression. The pre-existing pool of psbA transcripts forms translation initiation complexes in plant chloroplasts even in darkness, while the D1 synthesis can be completed only in the light. Replacement of damaged D1 protein requires also the assistance by a number of auxiliary proteins, which are encoded by the nuclear genome in green algae and higher plants. Nevertheless, many of these chaperones are conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the specific features and fundamental differences of the psbA gene expression and the regeneration of the PSII reaction center protein D1 in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Photosystem II.

  19. Stereo and regioselectivity in ''Activated'' tritium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenkaufer, R.L.E.; Hembree, W.C.; Wolf, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the stereo and positional selectivity of the microwave discharge activation (MDA) method, the tritium labeling of several amino acids was undertaken. The labeling of L-valine and the diastereomeric pair L-isoleucine and L-alloisoleucine showed less than statistical labeling at the ..cap alpha..-amino C-H position mostly with retention of configuration. Labeling predominated at the single ..beta.. C-H tertiary (methyne) position. The labeling of L-valine and L-proline with and without positive charge on the ..cap alpha..-amino group resulted in large increases in specific activity (greater than 10-fold) when positive charge was removed by labeling them as their sodium carboxylate salts. Tritium NMR of L-proline labeled both as its zwitterion and sodium salt showed also large differences in the tritium distribution within the molecule. The distribution preferences in each of the charge states are suggestive of labeling by an electrophilic like tritium species(s). 16 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Reduced glutamine synthetase activity plays a role in control of photosynthetic responses to high light in barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Brestic, Marian; Zivcak, Marek; Olsovska, Katarina; Shao, Hong-Bo; Kalaji, Hazem M; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The chloroplastic glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) activity was previously shown to be the limiting step of photorespiratory pathway. In our experiment, we examined the photosynthetic high-light responses of the GS2-mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with reduced GS activity, in comparison to wild type (WT). The biophysical methods based on slow and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction, P700 absorbance, and gas exchange measurements were employed. Despite the GS2 plants had high basal fluorescence (F0) and low maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), the CO2 assimilation rate, the PSII and PSI actual quantum yields were normal. On the other hand, in high light conditions the GS2 had much higher non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), caused both by enhanced capacity of energy-dependent quenching and disconnection of PSII antennae from reaction centers (RC). GS2 leaves also maintained the PSII redox poise (QA(-)/QA total) at very low level; probably this was reason why the observed photoinhibitory damage was not significantly above WT. The analysis of fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction uncovered in GS2 leaves substantially lower RC to antenna ratio (RC/ABS), low PSII/PSI ratio (confirmed by P700 records) as well as low PSII excitonic connectivity.

  1. Involvement of Abscisic Acid in PSII Photodamage and D1 Protein Turnover for Light-Induced Premature Senescence of Rice Flag Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fubiao; Liu, Jianchao; Chen, Minxue; Zhou, Lujian; Li, Zhaowei; Zhao, Qian; Pan, Gang; Zaidi, Syed-Hassan-Raza; Cheng, Fangmin

    2016-01-01

    D1 protein in the PSII reaction center is the major target of photodamage, and it exhibits the highest turnover rate among all the thylakoid proteins. In this paper, rice psf (premature senescence of flag leaves) mutant and its wild type were used to investigate the genotype-dependent alteration in PSII photo-damage and D1 protein turnover during leaf senescence and its relation to ABA accumulation in senescent leaves. The symptom and extent of leaf senescence of the psf mutant appeared to be sunlight-dependent under natural field condition. The psf also displayed significantly higher levels of ABA accumulation in senescent leaves than the wild type. However, the premature senescence lesion of psf leaves could be alleviated by shaded treatment, concomitantly with the strikingly suppressed ABA level in the shaded areas of flag leaves. The change in ABA concentration contributed to the regulation of shade-delayed leaf senescence. The participation of ABA in the timing of senescence initiation and in the subsequent rate of leaf senescence was closely associated with PSII photodamage and D1 protein turnover during leaf senescence, in which the transcriptional expression of several key genes (psbA, psbB, psbC and OsFtsH2) involved in D1 protein biosynthesis and PSII repair cycle was seriously suppressed by the significantly increased ABA level. This response resulted in the low rate of D1 protein synthesis and impaired repair recovery in the presence of ABA. The psf showed evidently decreased D1 protein amount in the senescent leaves. Both the inhibition of de novo synthesized D1 protein and the slow rate of proteolytic removal for the photodamaged D1 protein was among the most crucial steps for the linkage between light-dependent leaf senescence and the varying ABA concentration in psf mutant leaves. OsFtsH2 transcriptional expression possibly played an important role in the regulation of D1 protein turnover and PSII repair cycle in relation to ABA mediated leaf

  2. Ferromagnetic manganese "cubes": from PSII to single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Ross; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Prescimone, Alessandro; Siczek, Milosz; Lis, Tadeusz; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K; Milios, Constantinos J

    2010-05-28

    The reaction of Mn(O₂CMe)₂·2H₂O with Me-saoH₂ (Me-saoH₂ = 2-hydroxyphenylethanone oxime) in MeCN forms the complex [Mn(III)₄(Me-sao)₄(Me-saoH)₄] (1) in good yields. Replacing Me-saoH₂ with Naphth-saoH₂ (Naphth-saoH₂ = 2-hydroxy-1-napthaldoxime) in the presence of CH₃ONa forms the complex [Mn(III)₄(Naphth-sao)₄(Naphth-saoH)₄] (2) in low yields, while the reaction between Mn(ClO₄)₂·6H₂O, Et-saoH₂ (Et-saoH₂= 2-hydroxypropiophenone oxime) and NBu₄OH in MeCN gives the complex [Mn(III)₄(Et-sao)₄(Et-saoH)₄] (3) in moderate yields. All three tetrametallic cages exclusively contain Mn(III) centres arranged in a "cube"-like topology, in which the metal centres are connected by -N-O(oximate) groups. The magnetic properties of 1-3 are near identical, revealing the presence of only ferromagnetic interactions between the metal ions leading to high-spin ground states of S = 8. The complexes display frequency dependent out-of-phase signals in ac susceptibility studies and, in the case of 1 single-molecule magnetism has been observed by means of single-crystal hysteresis loop measurements.

  3. Femtosecond activation of reactions and the concept of nonergodic molecules

    PubMed

    Diau; Herek; Kim; Zewail

    1998-02-06

    The description of chemical reaction dynamics often assumes that vibrational modes are well coupled (ergodic) and redistribute energy rapidly with respect to the course of the reaction. To experimentally probe nonergodic, nonstatistical behavior, studies of a series of reactions induced by femtosecond activation for molecules of varying size but having the same reaction coordinates [CH2 - (CH2)n-2 - C = Odagger --> products, with n = 4, 5, 6, and 10] were performed. Comparison of the experimental results with theoretical electronic structure and rate calculations showed a two to four orders of magnitude difference, indicating that the basic assumption of statistical energy redistribution is invalid. These results suggest that chemical selectivity can be achieved with femtosecond activation even at very high energies.

  4. Cyclic electron flow may provide some protection against PSII photoinhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemaa; Xiao, Yi; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Previously we have shown that a quick down-regulation in PSI activity compares to that of PSII following short-term heat stress for two rice groups including C4023 and Q4149, studied herein. These accessions were identified to have different natural capacities in driving cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI; i.e., low CEF (lcef) and high CEF (hcef) for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these two lines have different mechanisms of protecting photosystem II from photodamage under heat stress. We observed a stepwise alteration in the shape of Chl a fluorescence induction (OJIP) with increasing temperature treatment. The effect of 44°C treatment on the damping in Chl a fluorescence was more pronounced in C4023 than in Q4149. Likewise, we noted a disruption in the I-step, a decline in the Fv due to a strong damping in the Fm, and a slight increase in the F0. Normalized data demonstrated that the I-step seems more susceptible to 44°C in C4023 than in Q4149. We also measured the redox states of plastocyanin (PC) and P700 by monitoring the transmission changes at 820nm (I820), and observed a disturbance in the oxidation/reduction kinetics of PC and P700. The decline in the amplitude of their oxidation was shown to be about 29% and 13% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The electropotential component (Δφ) of ms-DLE appeared more sensitive to temperature stress than the chemical component (ΔpH), and the impact of heat was more evident and drastic in C4023 than in Q4149. Under heat stress, we noticed a concomitant decline in the primary photochemistry of PSII as well as in both the membrane energization process and the lumen protonation for both accessions, and it is evident that heat affects these parameters more in C4023 than in Q4149. All these data suggest that higher CET can confer higher photoprotection to PSII in rice lines, which can be a desirable trait during rice breeding, especially in the context of a "warming

  5. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  6. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernández, Julio M

    2009-06-01

    The effect of mechanical force on the free-energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by nucleophiles in a bimolecular substitution reaction (S(N)2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity 'switch' at ∼500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an S(N)2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force-induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in S(N)2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule.

  7. Singlet Oxygen Production by PSII Under Light Stress: Mechanism, Detection and the Protective role of β-Carotene

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Alison

    2014-01-01

    In this review, I outline the indirect evidence for the formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) obtained from experiments with the isolated PSII reaction center complex. I also review the methods we used to measure singlet oxygen directly, including luminescence at 1,270 nm, both steady state and time resolved. Other methods we used were histidine-catalyzed molecular oxygen uptake (enabling 1O2 yield measurements), and dye bleaching and difference absorption spectroscopy to identify where quenchers of 1O2 can access this toxic species. We also demonstrated the protective behavior of carotenoids bound within Chl–protein complexes which bring about a substantial amount of 1O2 quenching within the reaction center complex. Finally, I describe how these techniques have been used and expanded in research on photoinhibition and on the role of 1O2 as a signaling molecule in instigating cellular responses to various stress factors. I also discuss the current views on the role of 1O2 as a signaling molecule and the distance it might be able to travel within cells. PMID:24566536

  8. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides.

  9. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  10. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  11. Efficient Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion using Spinach Photosystem II (PSII) in Lipid Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki M; Shen, Min; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2015-01-01

    The need for clean, renewable energy has fostered research into photovoltaic alternatives to silicon solar cells. Pigment–protein complexes in green plants convert light energy into chemical potential using redox processes that produce molecular oxygen. Here, we report the first use of spinach protein photosystem II (PSII) core complex in lipid films in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents were generated from PSII in a ∼2 μm biomimetic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) film on a pyrolytic graphite (PG) anode with PSII embedded in multiple lipid bilayers. The photocurrent was ∼20 μA cm−2 under light intensity 40 mW cm−2. The PSII–DMPC anode was used in a photobiofuel cell with a platinum black mesh cathode in perchloric acid solution to give an output voltage of 0.6 V and a maximum output power of 14 μW cm−2. Part of this large output is related to a five-unit anode–cathode pH gradient. With catholytes at higher pH or no perchlorate, or using an MnO2 oxygen-reduction cathode, the power output was smaller. The results described raise the possibility of using PSII–DMPC films in small portable power conversion devices. PMID:25969807

  12. Properties of ion implanted Ti-6Al-4V processed using beamline and PSII techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Woodring, J.S.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.M.; Williams, J.M.; Poker, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    The surface of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy has been modified using beamline implantation of boron. In separate experiments, Ti64 has been implanted with nitrogen using a plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique utilizing either ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}), or their combinations as the source of nitrogen ions. Beamline experiments have shown the hardness of the N-implanted surface saturates at a dose level of {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2} at {approximately} 10 GPa. The present work makes comparisons of hardness and tribological tests of (1) B implantation using beamline techniques, and (2) N implanted samples using ammonia and/or nitrogen gas in a PSII process. The results show that PSII using N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} gives similar hardness as N implantation using a beamline process. The presence of H in the Ti alloy surface does not affect the hardness of the implanted surface. Boron implantation increased the surface hardness by as much as 2.5x at the highest dose level. Wear testing by a pin-on-disk method indicated that nitrogen implantation reduced the wear rate by as much as 120x, and boron implantation reduced the wear rate by 6.5x. Increased wear resistance was accompanied by a decreased coefficient of friction.

  13. Detection of hydrogen peroxide in Photosystem II (PSII) using catalytic amperometric biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Kumar, Aditya; Suzuki, Makoto; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Sugai, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Pospíšil, Pavel; Tada, Mika; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is known to be generated in Photosystem II (PSII) via enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. Detection of H2O2 by different spectroscopic techniques has been explored, however its sensitive detection has always been a challenge in photosynthetic research. During the recent past, fluorescence probes such as Amplex Red (AR) has been used but is known to either lack specificity or limitation with respect to the minimum detection limit of H2O2. We have employed an electrochemical biosensor for real time monitoring of H2O2 generation at the level of sub-cellular organelles. The electrochemical biosensor comprises of counter electrode and working electrodes. The counter electrode is a platinum plate, while the working electrode is a mediator based catalytic amperometric biosensor device developed by the coating of a carbon electrode with osmium-horseradish peroxidase which acts as H2O2 detection sensor. In the current study, generation and kinetic behavior of H2O2 in PSII membranes have been studied under light illumination. Electrochemical detection of H2O2 using the catalytic amperometric biosensor device is claimed to serve as a promising technique for detection of H2O2 in photosynthetic cells and subcellular structures including PSII or thylakoid membranes. It can also provide a precise information on qualitative determination of H2O2 and thus can be widely used in photosynthetic research. PMID:26528319

  14. A new mathematical solution for predicting char activation reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rafsanjani, H.H.; Jamshidi, E.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The differential conservation equations that describe typical gas-solid reactions, such as activation of coal chars, yield a set of coupled second-order partial differential equations. The solution of these coupled equations by exact analytical methods is impossible. In addition, an approximate or exact solution only provides predictions for either reaction- or diffusion-controlling cases. A new mathematical solution, the quantize method (QM), was applied to predict the gasification rates of coal char when both chemical reaction and diffusion through the porous char are present. Carbon conversion rates predicted by the QM were in closer agreement with the experimental data than those predicted by the random pore model and the simple particle model. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diurnal and developmental changes in energy allocation of absorbed light at PSII in field-grown rice.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Satoshi; Uebayashi, Nozomu; Tazoe, Youshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiro; Homma, Koki; Sato, Fumihiko; Endo, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The allocation of absorbed light energy in PSII to electron transport and heat dissipation processes in rice grown under waterlogged conditions was estimated with the lake model of energy transfer. With regard to diurnal changes in energy allocation, the peak of the energy flux to electron transport, J(PSII), occurred in the morning and the peak of the energy flux to heat dissipation associated with non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence, J(NPQ), occurred in the afternoon. With regard to seasonal changes in energy allocation, J(PSII) in the rapidly growing phase was greater than that in the ripening phase, even though the leaves of rice receive less light in the growing phase than in the ripening period in Japan. This seasonal decrease in J(PSII) was accompanied by an increase in J(NPQ). One of the reasons for the lower J(PSII) in the ripening phase might be a more sever afternoon suppression of J(PSII). To estimate energy dissipation due to photoinhibition of PSII, J(NPQ) was divided into J(fast), which is associated with fast-recovering NPQ mainly due to qE, and J(slow), which is mainly due to photoinhibition. The integrated daily energy loss by photoinhibiton was calculated to be about 3-8% of light energy absorption in PSII. Strategies for the utilization of light energy adopted by rice are discussed. For example, very efficient photosynthesis under non-saturating light in the rapidly growing phase is proposed.

  16. LHCSR3 affects de-coupling and re-coupling of LHCII to PSII during state transitions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Thomas; Na, Chae Sun

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms have to tolerate rapid changes in light intensity, which is facilitated by non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and involves modification of energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes (LHC) to the photosystem reaction centres. NPQ includes dissipating excess light energy to heat (qE) and the reversible coupling of LHCII to photosystems (state transitions/qT), which are considered separate NPQ mechanisms. In the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the LHCSR3 protein has a well characterised role in qE. Here, it is shown in the npq4 mutant, deficient in LHCSR3, that energy coupling to photosystem II (PSII) more akin to qT is also disrupted, but no major differences in LHC phosphorylation or LHC compositions were found in comparison to wild-type cells. The qT of wild-type cells possessed two kinetically distinguishable phases, with LHCSR3 participating in the more rapid (<2 min) phase. This LHCSR3-mediated qT was sensitive to physiological levels of H2O2, which accelerated qE induction, revealing a way that may help C. reinhardtii tolerate a sudden increase in light intensity. Overall, a clear mechanistic overlap between qE and qT is shown. PMID:28233792

  17. PSII manganese cluster: protonation of W2, O5, O4 and His337 in the S1 state explored by combined quantum chemical and electrostatic energy computations.

    PubMed

    Robertazzi, Arturo; Galstyan, Artur; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2014-08-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane-bound protein complex that oxidizes water to produce energized protons, which are used to built up a proton gradient across the thylakoidal membrane in the leafs of plants. This light-driven reaction is catalyzed by withdrawing electrons from the Mn₄CaO₅-cluster (Mn-cluster) in four discrete oxidation steps [S₁-(S₄/S₀)] characterized in the Kok-cycle. In order to understand in detail the proton release events and the subsequent translocation of such energized protons, the protonation pattern of the Mn-cluster need to be elucidated. The new high-resolution PSII crystal structure from Umena, Kawakami, Shen, and Kamiya is an excellent basis to make progress in solving this problem. Following our previous work on oxidation and protonation states of the Mn-cluster, in this work, quantum chemical/electrostatic calculations were performed in order to estimate the pKa of different protons of relevant groups and atoms of the Mn-cluster such as W2, O4, O5 and His337. In broad agreement with previous experimental and theoretical work, our data suggest that W2 and His337 are likely to be in hydroxyl and neutral form, respectively, O5 and O4 to be unprotonated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: Keys to Produce Clean Energy.

  18. Arabidopsis plants lacking PsbQ and PsbR subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex show altered PSII super-complex organization and short-term adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Pavesi, Andrea; Kater, Martin M; Antonacci, Alessia; Tadini, Luca; Pribil, Mathias; Schneider, Anja; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Aro, Eva-Mari; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex of eukaryotic photosystem II (PSII) consists of four extrinsic subunits, PsbO (33 kDa), PsbP (23 kDa), PsbQ (17 kDa) and PsbR (10 kDa), encoded by seven nuclear genes, PsbO1 (At5g66570), PsbO2 (At3g50820), PsbP1 (At1g06680), PsbP2 (At2g30790), PsbQ1 (At4g21280), PsbQ2 (At4g05180) and PsbR (At1g79040). Using Arabidopsis insertion mutant lines, we show that PsbP1, but not PsbP2, is essential for photoautotrophic growth, whereas plants lacking both forms of PsbQ and/or PsbR show normal growth rates. Complete elimination of PsbQ has a minor effect on PSII function, but plants lacking PsbR or both PsbR and PsbQ are characterized by more pronounced defects in PSII activity. Gene expression and immunoblot analyses indicate that accumulation of each of these proteins is highly dependent on the presence of the others, and is controlled at the post-transcriptional level, whereas PsbO stability appears to be less sensitive to depletion of other subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex. In addition, comparison of levels of the PSII super-complex in wild-type and mutant leaves reveals the importance of the individual subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex for the supramolecular organization of PSII and their influence on the rate of state transitions.

  19. Trichloramine Removal with Activated Carbon Is Governed by Two Reductive Reactions: A Theoretical Approach with Diffusion-Reaction Models.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ikekame, Shohei; Sakuma, Miki; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2017-04-06

    Mechanisms underlying trichloramine removal with activated carbon treatment were proven by batch experiments and theoretical analysis with diffusion-reaction models. The observed values of trichloramine and free chlorine were explained only by the model in which (1) both trichloramine and free chlorine were involved as reactants, (2) the removals of reactants were affected both by the intraparticle diffusion and by the reaction with activated carbon, and (3) trichloramine decomposition was governed by two distinct reductive reactions. One reductive reaction was expressed as a first-order reaction: the reductive reaction of trichloramine with the basal plane of PAC, which consists of graphene sheets. The other reaction was expressed as a second-order reaction: the reductive reaction of trichloramine with active functional groups located on the edge of the basal plane. Free chlorine competitively reacted with both the basal plane and the active functional groups. The fact that the model prediction succeeded even in experiments with different activated carbon doses, with different initial trichloramine concentrations, and with different sizes of activated carbon particles clearly proved that the mechanisms described in the model were reasonable for explaining trichloramine removal with activated carbon treatment.

  20. Activity of formylphosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Smithers, G.W.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1986-05-01

    Formylphosphate (FP), a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase, was synthesized from formylfluoride and Pi. Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR showed that FP is very unstable with a half-life of 48 min at 20/sup 0/C and pH 7. At pH 7 hydrolysis occurs with O-P bond cleavage as shown by /sup 18/O incorporation from /sup 18/O-H/sub 2/O into Pi. The substrate activity of FP was tested in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. MgATP + H/sub 4/folate + HCOO/sup -/ in equilibrium MgADP + Pi +N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate FP supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate is produced from H/sub 4/-folate and FP but only if ADP is present, and ATP is produced from FP and ADP but only if H/sub 4/folate is present. The requirements for H/sub 4/folate in the synthesis of ATP from ADP and FP and for ADP in the synthesis of N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate from FP and H/sub 4/folate, are consistent with past kinetic and isotope exchange studies which showed that the reaction proceeds by a sequential mechanism and that all three substrates must be present for any reaction to occur.

  1. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  2. Nucleotides as nucleophiles: reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An earlier study of the reaction of phosphoimidazolide activated nucleosides (ImpN) in aqueous phosphate buffers indicated two modes of reaction of the phosphate monoanion and dianion. The first mode is catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's which leads to imidazole and nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. The second represents a nucleophilic substitution of the imidazole to yield the nucleoside 5'-diphosphate. This earlier study thus served as a model for the reaction of ImpN with nucleoside monophosphates (pN) because the latter can be regarded as phosphate derivatives. In the present study we investigated the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, in the presence of pN (N = guanosine, adenosine and uridine) in the range 6.9 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 7.7. We observed that pN's do act as nucleophiles to form NppG, and as general base to enhance the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in 2-MeImpG, i.e. pN show the same behavior as inorganic phosphate. The kinetic analysis yields the following rate constants for the dianion pN2-: knpN = 0.17 +/- 0.02 M-1 h-1 for nucleophilic attack and khpN = 0.11 +/- 0.07 M-1 h-1 for general base catalysis of the hydrolysis. These rate constants which are independent of the nucleobase compare with kp.2 = 0.415 M-1 h-1 and khp2. = 0.217 M-1 h-1 for the reactions of HPO4(2-). In addition, this study shows that under conditions where pN presumably form stacks, the reaction mechanism remains unchanged although in quantitative terms stacked pN are somewhat less reactive. Attack by the 2'-OH and 3'-OH groups of the ribose moiety in amounts greater than or equal to 1% is not observed; this is attributed to the large difference in nucleophilicity in the neutral pH range between the phosphate group and the ribose hydroxyls. This nucleophilicity rank is not altered by stacking.

  3. Light energy allocation at PSII under field light conditions: how much energy is lost in NPQ-associated dissipation?

    PubMed

    Endo, Tsuyoshi; Uebayashi, Nozomu; Ishida, Satoshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiro; Sato, Fumihiko

    2014-08-01

    In the field, plants are exposed to fluctuating light, where photosynthesis occurs under conditions far from a steady state. Excess energy dissipation associated with energy quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (qE) functions as an efficient photo-protection mechanism in photosystem II. PsbS is an important regulator of qE, especially for the induction phase of qE. Beside the regulatory energy dissipation, some part of energy is lost through relaxation of excited chlorophyll molecules. To date, several models to quantify energy loss through these dissipative pathways in PSII have been proposed. In this short review, we compare and evaluate these models for PSII energy allocation when they are applied to non-steady state photosynthesis. As a case study, an investigation on energy allocation to qE-associated dissipation at PSII under non-steady state photosynthesis using PsbS-deficient rice transformants is introduced. Diurnal and seasonal changes in PSII energy allocation in rice under natural light are also presented. Future perspective of studies on PSII energy allocation is discussed.

  4. Taste-active maillard reaction products: the "tasty" world of nonvolatile maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    This study was done to obtain greater insight into the structures and sensory activities of those tastants that are not present in foods per se, but are generated during food processing by Maillard-type reactions from carbohydrates and amino acids and thus remain unknown. In order to rank the tastants according to their relative taste impact and to identify the key tastants generated during thermal food processing, the so-called taste dilution analysis (TDA), which uses the human tongue as a biosensor for tastants, was applied to heated, intensely bitter tasting binary mixtures of glucose or xylose and proline or alanine, respectively. This screening technique led to the identification of previously unknown taste compounds, among which intensely bitter tastants such as quinizolate and homoquinizolate, a pungent-tasting pyranopyranone, cyclopentenone derivatives exhibiting a physiological cooling effect, as well as a taste-enhancing pyridinium betaine named alapyridaine will be presented.

  5. The effect of backbone constraints: the case of water oxidation by the oxygen-evolving complex in PSII.

    PubMed

    Siegbahn, Per E M

    2011-12-09

    The procedure for fixing atoms of amino acid residues in cluster model calculations on enzymes is reviewed. Examples from recent calculations on photosystem II (PSII) and Mo,Cu-dependent CO dehydrogenase are given. In this context, the cluster model work on finding a mechanism for O-O bond formation and a structure of the oxygen-evolving complex in PSII is also reviewed. In that work, fixing certain atoms played an important role. The main part of the present study concerns the mechanism in PSII using models based on the new high-resolution (1.9 Å) X-ray structure, which is compared to that using the old, theoretically suggested, structure. It is concluded that the mechanism remains the same, with a similar barrier height. Finally, a connection between the OEC structure and Mn,Ca-containing minerals is also briefly discussed.

  6. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng; Yang Shengchun; You Hongjun; Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  7. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  8. Specific modulation of protein activity by using a bioorthogonal reaction.

    PubMed

    Warner, John B; Muthusamy, Anand K; Petersson, E James

    2014-11-24

    Unnatural amino acids with bioorthogonal reactive groups have the potential to provide a rapid and specific mechanism for covalently inhibiting a protein of interest. Here, we use mutagenesis to insert an unnatural amino acid containing an azide group (Z) into the target protein at positions such that a "click" reaction with an alkyne modulator (X) will alter the function of the protein. This bioorthogonally reactive pair can engender specificity of X for the Z-containing protein, even if the target is otherwise identical to another protein, allowing for rapid target validation in living cells. We demonstrate our method using inhibition of the Escherichia coli enzyme aminoacyl transferase by both active-site occlusion and allosteric mechanisms. We have termed this a "clickable magic bullet" strategy, and it should be generally applicable to studying the effects of protein inhibition, within the limits of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

  9. Activation of stratospheric chlorine by reactions in liquid sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.A.; MacKenzie, A.R. ); Mueller, R.H.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors discuss activation mechanisms for chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, based on laboratory measurements for the solubility and reaction rates of HOCl and HCl in H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions, as found on aerosols in the stratosphere. Their interest is in the impact of the large increase in aerosol loading in the stratosphere in the winter on 1991-92 due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. While laboratory data is not available for the temperature range close to 190 K, they argue that should the solubility and hydrolysis rates be high enough, this excess aerosol density could have contributed a significant additional amount of reactive chlorine to the stratosphere.

  10. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of −20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of −0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  11. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  12. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  13. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  14. Excitation energy transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in the PSI core or the PSII core under conditions mimicking state transitions.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Lucyna M; Dinc, Emine; Croce, Roberta; Dekker, Jan P

    2016-06-01

    The efficient use of excitation energy in photosynthetic membranes is achieved by a dense network of pigment-protein complexes. These complexes fulfill specific functions and interact dynamically with each other in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here, we studied how in the intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C.r.) the lack of the photosystem I (PSI) core or the photosystem II (PSII) core affects these interactions. To that end the mutants F15 and M18 (both PSI-deficient) and FUD7 (PSII-deficient) were incubated under conditions known to promote state transitions in wild-type. The intact cells were then instantly frozen to 77K and the full-spectrum time-resolved fluorescence emission of the cells was measured by means of streak camera. In the PSI-deficient mutants excitation energy transfer (EET) towards light-harvesting complexes of PSI (Lhca) occurs in less than 0.5 ns, and fluorescence from Lhca decays in 3.1 ns. Decreased trapping by PSII and increased fluorescence of Lhca upon state 1 (S1)→state 2 (S2) transition appears in the F15 and less in the M18 mutant. In the PSII-deficient mutant FUD7, quenched (0.5 ns) and unquenched (2 ns) light-harvesting complexes of PSII (LHCII) are present in both states, with the quenched form more abundant in S2 than in S1. Moreover, EET of 0.4 ns from the remaining LHCII to PSI increases upon S1→S2 transition. We relate the excitation energy kinetics observed in F15, M18 and FUD7 to the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants under S1 and S2 conditions.

  15. DOE Final report [A genetic analysis of the lumenal proteins of the PSII O{sub 2} evolving complex of cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Louis A.

    2001-03-01

    The primary objectives of this proposal were a better understanding of the structure and function of the Mn-stabilizing (MSP) in two cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142. In addition, the author was interested in analysis of the other cyanobacteria lumenal PSII proteins, cyt c{sub 550} and the 12 kDa protein. The experimentation involved analysis of targeted random mutagenesis of the genes encoding the three proteins, especially in psbO, the gene encoding MSP. This required mutant screening with a digital imaging spectrometer. Knockout mutants of the other two lumenal proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 were also constructed. In addition, photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution in Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142, a nitrogen-fixing strain that regulates the activity of nitrogenase and photosynthesis in a temporal fashion, was analyzed.

  16. Light-induced gradual activation of photosystem II in dark-grown Norway spruce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Stolárik, Tibor; Nosek, Lukáš; Kouřil, Roman; Ilík, Petr

    2016-06-01

    Gymnosperms, unlike angiosperms, are able to synthesize chlorophyll and form photosystems in complete darkness. Photosystem I (PSI) formed under such conditions is fully active, but photosystem II (PSII) is present in its latent form with inactive oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In this work we have studied light-induced gradual changes in PSII function in dark-grown cotyledons of Norway spruce (Picea abies) via the measurement of chlorophyll a fluorescence rise, absorption changes at 830 nm, thermoluminescence glow curves (TL) and protein analysis. The results indicate that in dark-grown cotyledons, alternative reductants were able to act as electron donors to PSII with inactive OEC. Illumination of cotyledons for 5 min led to partial activation of PSII, which was accompanied by detectable oxygen evolution, but still a substantial number of PSII centers remained in the so called PSII-Q(B)-non-reducing form. Interestingly, even 24 h long illumination was not sufficient for the full activation of PSII centers. This was evidenced by a weak attachment of PsbP protein and the absence of PsbQ protein in PSII particles, the absence of PSII supercomplexes, the suboptimal maximum yield of PSII photochemistry, the presence of C band in TL curve and also the presence of up-shifted Q band in TL in DCMU-treated cotyledons. This slow light-induced activation of PSII in dark-grown cotyledons could contribute to the prevention of PSII overexcitation before the light-induced increase in PSI/PSII ratio allows effective operation of linear electron flow.

  17. Dynamic Mechanical Responses of Arabidopsis Thylakoid Membranes during PSII-Specific Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Casper H.; Brooks, Matthew D.; Li, Tai-De; Grob, Patricia; Kemalyan, Gigi; Nogales, Eva; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Remodeling of thylakoid membranes in response to illumination is an important process for the regulation of photosynthesis. We investigated the thylakoid network from Arabidopsis thaliana using atomic force microscopy to capture dynamic changes in height, elasticity, and viscosity of isolated thylakoid membranes caused by changes in illumination. We also correlated the mechanical response of the thylakoid network with membrane ultrastructure using electron microscopy. We find that the elasticity of the thylakoid membranes increases immediately upon PSII-specific illumination, followed by a delayed height change. Direct visualization by electron microscopy confirms that there is a significant change in the packing repeat distance of the membrane stacks in response to illumination. Although experiments with Gramicidin show that the change in elasticity depends primarily on the transmembrane pH gradient, the height change requires both the pH gradient and STN7-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of LHCII. Our studies indicate that lumen expansion in response to illumination is not simply a result of the influx of water, and we propose a dynamic model in which protein interactions within the lumen drive these changes. PMID:24806918

  18. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling.

    PubMed

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-21

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004)]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  19. Activated by Combined Magnrtic Field Gravitropic Reaction Reply on Nanodose of Biologicaly Active Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadezhda; Bogatina, Nina

    The new science direction nanotechnologies initiated a big jump in the pharmacology and medicine. This leads to the big development of homeopathy. The most interest appeared while investigating of the reaction of biological object on the nano dose of iologically substances. The changing of concentration (in nmol/l) of biologically active material is also possible during weak energy action. For instance, weak combined magnetic field may change a little the concentration of ions that are oriented parallel to the external magnetic field and, by the analogy with said above, lead to the similar effects. Simple estimations give the value for the threshold to the magnetic field by two orders smaller than the geomagnetic field. By this investigation we wanted to understand whether the analogy in the action of nano dose of biologically active substances and weak combined magnetic field presents and whether the action of one of these factors may be replaced by other one. The effect of one of biologically active substances NPA (Naphtyl-Phtalame Acid) solution with the concentration 0.01 mol/l on the gravitropic reaction of cress roots was investigated. It was shown that its effect was the inhibition of cress roots gravitropic reaction. The same inhibition was achieved by the combined magnetic field action on the cress roots, germinated in water. The alternative component of the combined magnetic field coincided formally with the cyclotron frequency of NPA ions. So the analogy in the action of nano dose of biologically active substances and weak combined magnetic field was shown. The combined magnetic field using allows to decrease sufficiently the dose of biologically active substances. This fact can be of great importance in pharmacy and medicine.

  20. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  1. Temperature-sensitive PSII: a novel approach for sustained photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    The need for energy and the associated burden are ever growing. It is crucial to develop new technologies for generating clean and efficient energy for society to avoid upcoming energetic and environmental crises. Sunlight is the most abundant source of energy on the planet. Consequently, it has captured our interest. Certain microalgae possess the ability to capture solar energy and transfer it to the energy carrier, H2. H2 is a valuable fuel, because its combustion produces only one by-product: water. However, the establishment of an efficient biophotolytic H2 production system is hindered by three main obstacles: (1) the hydrogen-evolving enzyme, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, is highly sensitive to oxygen; (2) energy conversion efficiencies are not economically viable; and (3) hydrogen-producing organisms are sensitive to stressful conditions in large-scale production systems. This study aimed to circumvent the oxygen sensitivity of this process with a cyclic hydrogen production system. This approach required a mutant that responded to high temperatures by reducing oxygen evolution. To that end, we randomly mutagenized the green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to generate mutants that exhibited temperature-sensitive photoautotrophic growth. The selected mutants were further characterized by their ability to evolve oxygen and hydrogen at 25 and 37 °C. We identified four candidate mutants for this project. We characterized these mutants with PSII fluorescence, P700 absorbance, and immunoblotting analyses. Finally, we demonstrated that these mutants could function in a prototype hydrogen-producing bioreactor. These mutant microalgae represent a novel approach for sustained hydrogen production.

  2. An Interactive Classroom Activity Demonstrating Reaction Mechanisms and Rate-Determining Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Laura D.; Keller, Steven W.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive classroom activity that includes two-step reaction of unwrapping and eating chocolate candies is described which brings not only the reaction intermediate, but also the reactants and products into macroscopic view. The qualitative activation barriers of both steps can be adjusted independently.

  3. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation.

  4. Effects of acute O3 stress on PSII and PSI photochemistry of sensitive and resistant snap bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), probed by prompt chlorophyll "a" fluorescence and 820 nm modulated reflectance.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Strasser, Reto J; Bussotti, Filippo; Manes, Fausto

    2015-12-01

    The response of PSII and PSI photochemistry to acute ozone (O3) stress was tested in a "model plant system", namely the O3 sensitive (S156) and O3 resistant (R123) genotype pairs of Phaseolus vulgaris L., during a phenological phase of higher O3 sensitivity (pod formation). The modulation of the photosynthetic activity during O3 stress was analysed by measuring gas exchanges, Prompt Fluorescence (PF, JIP-test) and 820 nm Modulated Reflectance (MR), a novel techniques which specifically detects the changes in the redox state of P700 and plastocyanin. The results showed that, coherently with genotypic-specific O3 sensitivity, the response of the two snap bean genotypes differed for the intensity and time of onset of the considered physiological changes. In fact, despite leaf injury and gas exchanges reduction appeared concurrently in both genotypes, S156 showed a PSII down regulation already after the first day of fumigation (DOF), and an enhancement of Cyclic Electron Flow of PSI after the second DOF, whereas R123 showed only slight adjustments until the third DOF, when the activity of both photosystems was down-regulated. Despite these differences, it is possible to distinguish in both genotypes an early O3 response of the photochemical apparatus, involving PSII only, and a following response, in which PSI activity and content are also modulated. The measurement of the MR signal, performed simultaneously with the PF measurements and the JIP-test analysis, has allowed a better understanding of the role that PSI plays in the O3 stress response of the S156/R123 model plant system.

  5. Photosynthetic Reaction Centers as Active Molecular Electronic Components. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-13

    lauryl dimethylarnine oxide (LDAO). This is followed by final purification by ion-exchange chromatography. Typical media are DEAE-Sephacel with an...producing improved forms of subtilisin which is widely used in laundry detergents. Other more direct routes to stabilizing the protein structure...purified reaction centers will allow us to eliminate the extraction steps in the purification procedure which are associated with removing the antenna

  6. Phosphorylation of the synthetic hexasaccharide repeating unit is essential for the induction of antibodies to Clostridium difficile PSII cell wall polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Roberto; Romano, Maria R; Berti, Francesco; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Tontini, Marta; Danieli, Elisa; Cappelletti, Emilia; Cakici, Osman S; Swennen, Erwin; Pinto, Vittoria; Brogioni, Barbara; Proietti, Daniela; Galeotti, Cesira L; Lay, Luigi; Monteiro, Mario A; Scarselli, Maria; Costantino, Paolo

    2012-08-17

    Clostridium difficile is emerging worldwide as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The negatively charged PSII polysaccharide has been found in different strains of C. difficile and, thereby, represents an important target molecule for a possible carbohydrate-based vaccine. In order to identify a synthetic fragment that after conjugation to a protein carrier could be able to induce anti-PSII antibodies, we exploited a combination of chemical synthesis with immunochemistry, confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and solid state NMR. We demonstrate that the phosphate group is crucial in synthetic glycans to mimic the native PSII polysaccharide; both native PSII and a phosphorylated synthetic hexasaccharide repeating unit conjugated to CRM(197) elicit comparable immunogenic responses in mice. This finding can aid design and selection of carbohydrate antigens to be explored as vaccine candidates.

  7. Effects of reaction time variability and age on brain activity during Stroop task performance.

    PubMed

    Tam, Angela; Luedke, Angela C; Walsh, Jeremy J; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-09-01

    Variability in reaction time during task performance may reflect fluctuations in attention and cause reduced performance in goal-directed tasks, yet it is unclear whether the mechanisms behind this phenomenon change with age. Using fMRI, we tested young and cognitively healthy older adults with the Stroop task to determine whether aging affects the neural mechanisms underlying intra-individual reaction time variability. We found significant between-group differences in BOLD activity modulated by reaction time. In older adults, longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in frontoparietal attentional areas, while in younger adults longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in default mode network areas. Our results suggest that the neural correlates of reaction time variability change with healthy aging, reinforcing the concept of functional plasticity to maintain high cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

  8. Expression of a highly active catalase VktA in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 alleviates the photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Haruhiko; Noda, Akiko; Hayashi, Hidenori; Nagano, Takanori; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2013-11-01

    The repair of photosystem II (PSII) after photodamage is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species-such as H2O2, which is abundantly produced during the photoinhibition of PSII. In the present study, we generated a transformant of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that expressed a highly active catalase, VktA, which is derived from a facultatively psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio rumoiensis, and examined the effect of expression of VktA on the photoinhibition of PSII. The activity of PSII in transformed cells declined much more slowly than in wild-type cells when cells were exposed to strong light in the presence of H2O2. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was the same in the two lines of cells, suggesting that the repair of PSII was protected by the expression of VktA. The de novo synthesis of the D1 protein, which is required for the repair of PSII, was activated in transformed cells under the same stress conditions. Similar protection of the repair of PSII in transformed cells was also observed under strong light at a relatively low temperature. Thus, the expression of the highly active catalase mitigates photoinhibition of PSII by protecting protein synthesis against damage by H2O2 with subsequent enhancement of the repair of PSII.

  9. Identification of general linear relationships between activation energies and enthalpy changes for dissociation reactions at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Michaelides, Angelos; Liu, Z-P; Zhang, C J; Alavi, Ali; King, David A; Hu, P

    2003-04-02

    The activation energy to reaction is a key quantity that controls catalytic activity. Having used ab inito calculations to determine an extensive and broad ranging set of activation energies and enthalpy changes for surface-catalyzed reactions, we show that linear relationships exist between dissociation activation energies and enthalpy changes. Known in the literature as empirical Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relationships, we identify and discuss the physical origin of their presence in heterogeneous catalysis. The key implication is that merely from knowledge of adsorption energies the barriers to catalytic elementary reaction steps can be estimated.

  10. Gold catalysts for pure hydrogen production in the water-gas shift reaction: activity, structure and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Burch, Robbie

    2006-12-21

    The production of hydrogen containing very low levels of carbon monoxide for use in polymer electrolyte fuel cells requires the development of catalysts that show very high activity at low temperatures where the equilibrium for the removal of carbon monoxide using the water-gas shift reaction is favourable. It has been claimed that oxide-supported gold catalysts have the required high activity but there is considerable uncertainty in the literature about the feasibility of using these catalysts under real conditions. By comparing the activity of gold catalysts with that of platinum catalysts it is shown that well-prepared gold catalysts are significantly more active than the corresponding platinum catalysts. However, the method of preparation and pre-treatment of the gold catalysts is critical and activity variations of several orders of magnitude can be observed depending on the methods chosen. It is shown that an intimate contact between gold and the oxide support is important and any preparative procedure that does not generate such an interaction, or any subsequent treatment that can destroy such an interaction, may result in catalysts with low activity. The oxidation state and structure of active gold catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction is shown to comprise gold primarily in a zerovalent metallic state but in intimate contact with the support. This close contact between small metallic gold particles and the support may result in the "atoms" at the point of contact having a net charge (most probably cationic) but the high activity is associated with the presence of metallic gold. Both in situ XPS and XANES appear unequivocal on this point and this conclusion is consistent with similar measurements on gold catalysts even when used for CO oxidation. In situ EXAFS measurements under water gas shift conditions show that the active form of gold is a small gold cluster in intimate contact with the oxide support. The importance of the gold/oxide interface is

  11. The dual effects of Maillard reaction and enzymatic hydrolysis on the antioxidant activity of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Oh, N S; Lee, H A; Lee, J Y; Joung, J Y; Lee, K B; Kim, Y; Lee, K W; Kim, S H

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the enhanced effects on the biological characteristics and antioxidant activity of milk proteins by the combination of the Maillard reaction and enzymatic hydrolysis. Maillard reaction products were obtained from milk protein preparations, such as whey protein concentrates and sodium caseinate with lactose, by heating at 55°C for 7 d in sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The Maillard reaction products, along with untreated milk proteins as controls, were hydrolyzed for 0 to 3h with commercial proteases Alcalase, Neutrase, Protamex, and Flavorzyme (Novozymes, Bagsværd, Denmark). The antioxidant activity of hydrolyzed Maillard reaction products was determined by reaction with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt, their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, and the ability to reduce ferric ions. Further characteristics were evaluated by the o-phthaldialdehyde method and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The degree of hydrolysis gradually increased in a time-dependent manner, with the Alcalase-treated Maillard reaction products being the most highly hydrolyzed. Radical scavenging activities and reducing ability of hydrolyzed Maillard reaction products increased with increasing hydrolysis time. The combined products of enzymatic hydrolysis and Maillard reaction showed significantly greater antioxidant activity than did hydrolysates or Maillard reaction products alone. The hydrolyzed Maillard reaction products generated by Alcalase showed significantly higher antioxidant activity when compared with the other protease products and the antioxidant activity was higher for the whey protein concentrate groups than for the sodium caseinate groups. These findings indicate that Maillard reaction products, coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis, could act as potential antioxidants in the pharmaceutical, food, and dairy industries.

  12. Reprint of PSII manganese cluster: protonation of W2, O5, O4 and His337 in the S1 state explored by combined quantum chemical and electrostatic energy computations.

    PubMed

    Robertazzi, Arturo; Galstyan, Artur; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2014-09-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane-bound protein complex that oxidizes water to produce energized protons, which are used to built up a proton gradient across the thylakoidal membrane in the leafs of plants. This light-driven reaction is catalyzed by withdrawing electrons from the Mn₄CaO₅-cluster (Mn-cluster) in four discrete oxidation steps [S₁-(S₄/S₀)] characterized in the Kok-cycle. In order to understand in detail the proton release events and the subsequent translocation of such energized protons, the protonation pattern of the Mn-cluster need to be elucidated. The new high-resolution PSII crystal structure from Umena, Kawakami, Shen, and Kamiya is an excellent basis to make progress in solving this problem. Following our previous work on oxidation and protonation states of the Mn-cluster, in this work, quantum chemical/electrostatic calculations were performed in order to estimate the pKa of different protons of relevant groups and atoms of the Mn-cluster such as W2, O4, O5 and His337. In broad agreement with previous experimental and theoretical work, our data suggest that W2 and His337 are likely to be in hydroxyl and neutral form, respectively, O5 and O4 to be unprotonated. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  13. An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

  14. Ligand-free Heck reaction: Pd(OAc)2 as an active catalyst revisited.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Yang, Zhi

    2003-09-19

    Palladium acetate was shown to be an extremely active catalyst for the Heck reaction of aryl bromides. Both the base and the solvent were found to have a fundamental influence on the efficiency of the reaction, with K(3)PO(4) and N,N-dimethylacetamide being the optimal base and solvent, respectively.

  15. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-03-01

    Interquinone QA‑ → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions.

  16. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-01-01

    Interquinone QA− → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions. PMID:28300167

  17. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose-Ammonia Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose-ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose-ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  18. [Effects of photoperiod on photosynthesis and PSII performance in peach during dormancy induction].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Mei; Tan, Qiu-Ping; Gao, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Xiu-De; Li, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Long-day and short-day photoperiods were set artificially, with natural condition as the control, to examine photosynthetic parameters and chlorophyll fluorescence transient kinetics of 6-year-old 'Chunjie' peach cultivar (Prunus persica cv. Chunjie), and to investigate the effects of photoperiod on photosynthesis of the northern deciduous fruit trees. The tree advanced into the dormancy induction period under the short-day condition, and delayed under the long-day condition. In the dormancy induction period, the leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) decreased, and the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) increased, suggesting that the Pn decreased because of non-stomatal limitation. Maximum quantum yield for primary photochemistry (PhiPo, or Fv/Fm), potential activity (Fv/Fo), probability that a trapped exciton moved an electron into the electron transport chain beyond Q(A)-(Psi(o)) and performance index on absorption basis (Pl(ABS)) decreased in the dormancy induction period, suggesting that the electron transport capacity of photosynthetic electron transport chain was inhibited, possibly due to the damage to downstream electron transport chain (after Q(A)- acceptor) of PS II reaction center. Long-day photoperiod improved Pn in the dormancy induction period, and reduced the range of decline in PI(ABS) and the injured degree of photosystem. Short-day photoperiod deepened and accelerated the damage to photosynthetic apparatus significantly. The induced effect of photoperiod was associated with the dormancy processes.

  19. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  1. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  2. Detection of herbicide effects on pigment composition and PSII photochemistry in Helianthus annuus by Raman spectroscopy and chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Hodaňová, Petra; Rapantová, Barbora; Klem, Karel

    2017-01-05

    The effects of herbicides from three mode-of-action groups - inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (carfentrazone-ethyl), inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (mesotrione, clomazone, and diflufenican), and inhibitors of acetolactate synthase (amidosulfuron) - were studied in sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus). Raman spectroscopy, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, and UV screening of ChlF were combined to evaluate changes in pigment composition, photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, and non-photochemical quenching in plant leaves 6d after herbicide application. The Raman signals of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophyll were evaluated and differences in their intensity ratios were observed. Strongly augmented relative content of phenolic compounds was observed in the case of amidosulfuron-treated plants, with a simultaneous decrease in the chlorophyll/carotenoid intensity ratio. The results were confirmed by in vivo measurement of flavonols using UV screening of ChlF. Herbicides from the group of carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitors significantly decreased both the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII and non-photochemical quenching as determined by ChlF. Resonance Raman imaging (mapping) data with high resolution (150,000-200,000 spectra) are presented, showing the distribution of carotenoids in H. annuus leaves treated by two of the herbicides acting as inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (clomazone or diflufenican). Clear signs were observed that the treatment induced carotenoid depletion within sunflower leaves. The depletion spatial pattern registered differed depending on the type of herbicide applied.

  3. Overexpression of zeaxanthin epoxidase gene enhances the sensitivity of tomato PSII photoinhibition to high light and chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Fang, Wei; Han, Han; Sui, Na; Li, Bin; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2008-03-01

    A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) zeaxanthin epoxidase gene (LeZE) was isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence of LeZE showed high identities with zeaxanthin epoxidase in other plant species. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA accumulation of LeZE in the wild-type (WT) was not induced by light and temperature but regulated by the diurnal rhythm. The sense transgenic plants were obtained under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S-CaMV). Northern and western blot analysis confirmed that sense LeZE was transferred into the tomato genome and overexpressed. The ratio of (A + Z)/(V + A + Z) and the values of non-photochemical quenching were lower in transgenic plants than in WT plants under high light and chilling stress with low irradiance. The O(2) evolution rate and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in transgenic plants decreased more quickly during both stresses and recovered slower than that in WT under optimal conditions. These results suggested that overexpression of LeZE impaired the function of the xanthophyll cycle and aggravated PSII photoinhibition in tomato under high light and chilling stress.

  4. Detection of herbicide effects on pigment composition and PSII photochemistry in Helianthus annuus by Raman spectroscopy and chlorophyll a fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítek, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Hodaňová, Petra; Rapantová, Barbora; Klem, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The effects of herbicides from three mode-of-action groups - inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (carfentrazone-ethyl), inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (mesotrione, clomazone, and diflufenican), and inhibitors of acetolactate synthase (amidosulfuron) - were studied in sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus). Raman spectroscopy, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, and UV screening of ChlF were combined to evaluate changes in pigment composition, photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, and non-photochemical quenching in plant leaves 6 d after herbicide application. The Raman signals of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophyll were evaluated and differences in their intensity ratios were observed. Strongly augmented relative content of phenolic compounds was observed in the case of amidosulfuron-treated plants, with a simultaneous decrease in the chlorophyll/carotenoid intensity ratio. The results were confirmed by in vivo measurement of flavonols using UV screening of ChlF. Herbicides from the group of carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitors significantly decreased both the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII and non-photochemical quenching as determined by ChlF. Resonance Raman imaging (mapping) data with high resolution (150,000-200,000 spectra) are presented, showing the distribution of carotenoids in H. annuus leaves treated by two of the herbicides acting as inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (clomazone or diflufenican). Clear signs were observed that the treatment induced carotenoid depletion within sunflower leaves. The depletion spatial pattern registered differed depending on the type of herbicide applied.

  5. Up-regulation of photoprotection and PSII-repair gene expression by irradiance in the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Park, Seunghye; Polle, Juergen E W; Melis, Anastasios; Lee, Taek Kyun; Jin, Eonseon

    2006-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina is an attractive model organism for studying photoacclimation responses and the photosystem II (PSII) damage and repair process in the photosynthetic apparatus. Irradiance during cell growth defines both the photoacclimation and the PSII repair status of the cells. To identify genes specific to these processes, a cDNA library was created from irradiance-stressed D. salina. From the cDNA library, 1112 randomly selected expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were analyzed. Because ESTs constitute the expressed part of the genome, the strategy of randomly sequencing cDNA clones at their 5'-ends allowed us to obtain information about the transcript level of numerous genes in light-stressed D. salina. The results of a BLASTX search performed on the obtained total set of ESTs showed that approximately 1% of the ESTs could be assigned to genes coding for proteins that are known to be up-regulated in response to high-light stress. Specifically, after 48 h of high-light exposure of the cells, an increase in the expression level of antioxidant genes, such as Fe-SOD and APX, was observed, as well as elevated levels of the Cbr transcript, a light-harvesting Chl-protein homolog. Further, the ATP-dependent Clp protease gene was also up-regulated in D. salina cells after 48 h of exposure to high light. The results provide initial insight into the global gene regulation process in response to irradiance.

  6. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004), 10.1080/08927020412331294869]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  7. Substrate activation for O2 reactions by oxidized metal centers in biology.

    PubMed

    Pau, Monita Y M; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-11-20

    The uncatalyzed reactions of O(2) (S = 1) with organic substrates (S = 0) are thermodynamically favorable but kinetically slow because they are spin-forbidden and the one-electron reduction potential of O(2) is unfavorable. In nature, many of these important O(2) reactions are catalyzed by metalloenzymes. In the case of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes, either Fe(II) or Fe(III) can play the catalytic role in these spin-forbidden reactions. Whereas the ferrous enzymes activate O(2) directly for reaction, the ferric enzymes activate the substrate for O(2) attack. The enzyme-substrate complex of the ferric intradiol dioxygenases exhibits a low-energy catecholate to Fe(III) charge transfer transition that provides a mechanism by which both the Fe center and the catecholic substrate are activated for the reaction with O(2). In this Perspective, we evaluate how the coupling between this experimentally observed charge transfer and the change in geometry and ligand field of the oxidized metal center along the reaction coordinate can overcome the spin-forbidden nature of the O(2) reaction.

  8. Analysis of ground reaction force and electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius muscle during double support.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Santos, Rubim; Oliveira, Francisco P M; Carvalho, Paulo; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms associated with energy expenditure during gait have been extensively researched and studied. According to the double-inverted pendulum model energy expenditure is higher during double support, as lower limbs need to work to redirect the centre of mass velocity. This study looks into how the ground reaction force of one limb affects the muscle activity required by the medial gastrocnemius of the contralateral limb during step-to-step transition. Thirty-five subjects were monitored as to the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of one limb and the ground reaction force of the contralateral limb during double support. After determination of the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), a moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the dominant leg and the vertical (Fz) and anteroposterior (Fy) components of ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg (r = 0.797, p < 0.000 1; r = -0.807, p < 0.000 1). A weak and moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the non-dominant leg and the Fz and Fy of the dominant leg, respectively (r = 0.442, p = 0.018; r = -0.684 p < 0.000 1). The results obtained suggest that during double support, ground reaction force is associated with the electromyographic activity of the contralateral medial gastrocnemius and that there is an increased dependence between the ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg and the electromyographic activity of the dominant medial gastrocnemius.

  9. Catalytic activation of carbohydrates as formaldehyde equivalents for Stetter reaction with enones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmin; Xing, Chong; Tiwari, Bhoopendra; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2013-06-05

    We disclose the first catalytic activation of carbohydrates as formaldehyde equivalents to generate acyl anions as one-carbon nucleophilic units for a Stetter reaction. The activation involves N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage of carbohydrates via a retro-benzoin-type process to generate the acyl anion intermediates. This Stetter reaction constitutes the first success in generating formal formaldehyde-derived acyl anions as one-carbon nucleophiles for non-self-benzoin processes. The renewable nature of carbohydrates, accessible from biomass, further highlights the practical potential of this fundamentally interesting catalytic activation.

  10. ACTIVE: a program to calculate and plot reaction rates from ANISN calculated fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    The ACTIVE code calculates spatial heating rates, tritium production rates, neutron reaction rates, and energy spectra from particle fluxes calculated by ANISN. ACTIVE has a variety of input options including the capability to plot all calculated spatial distributions. The code was primarily designed for use with fusion first wall/blanket systems, but could be applied to any one-dimensional problem.

  11. Mechanism of a C-H bond activation reaction in room-temperature alkane solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, S.E.; Yang, H.; Asplund, M.C.

    1997-10-10

    Chemical reactions that break alkane carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds are normally carried out under conditions of high temperature and pressure because these bonds are extremely strong ({approx} 100 kilocalories per mole), but certain metal complexes can activate C-H bonds in alkane solution under the mild conditions of room temperature and pressure. Time-resolved infrared experiments probing the initial femtosecond dynamics through the nano- and microsecond kinetics to the final stable products have been used to generate a detailed picture of the C-H activation reaction. Structures of all of the intermediates involved in the reaction of Tp*Rh(CO){sub 2} (Tp* = HB-Pz{sub 3}*, Pz* = 3,5-di-methylpyrazolyl) in alkane solution have been identified and assigned, and energy barriers for each reaction step from solvation to formation of the final alkyl hydride product have been estimated from transient lifetimes. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  12. The mechanism of a C-H Bond Activation reaction in roomtemperature alkane solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Steven E.; Yang, Haw; Asplund, Matthew C.; Lian, T.; McNamara, B.K.; Kotz, K.T.; Yeston, J.S.; Wilkens, M.; Frei, H.; Bergman,Robert G.; Harris, C.B.

    1997-07-31

    Chemical reactions that break alkane carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds are normally carried out under conditions of high temperature and pressure because these bonds are extremely strong ({approx}100 kilocalories per mole), but certain metal complexes can activate C-H bonds in alkane solution under the mild conditions of room temperature and pressure. Time-resolved infrared experiments probing the initial femtosecond dynamics through the nano- and microsecond kinetics to the final stable products have been used to generate a detailed picture of the C-H activation reaction. Structures of all of the intermediates involved in the reaction of Tp*Rh(CO)2 (Tp* = HB-Pz3*, Pz* = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) in alkane solution have been identified and assigned, and energy barriers for each reaction step from solvation to formation of the final alkylhydride product have been estimated from transient lifetimes.

  13. Solvent-Induced Reversal of Activities between Two Closely Related Heterogeneous Catalysts in the Aldol Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Kapil; Althaus, Stacey M; Peeraphatdit, Chorthip; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Trewyn, Brian G; Pruski, Marek; Slowing, Igor I

    2013-01-11

    The relative rates of the aldol reaction catalyzed by supported primary and secondary amines can be inverted by 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the use of hexane or water as a solvent. Our analyses suggest that this dramatic shift in the catalytic behavior of the supported amines does not involve differences in reaction mechanism, but is caused by activation of imine to enamine equilibria and stabilization of iminium species. The effects of solvent polarity and acidity were found to be important to the performance of the catalytic reaction. This study highlights the critical role of solvent in multicomponent heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  14. Organocatalytic Michael and Friedel-Crafts reactions in enantioselective synthesis of biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltsev, O. V.; Beletskaya, Irina P.; Zlotin, Sergei G.

    2011-11-01

    Recent applications of organocatalytic Michael and Friedel-Crafts reactions in enantioselective synthesis of biologically active compounds: natural products, pharmaceutical agents and plant protection agents are reviewed. The key mechanisms of stereoinduction, types of organocatalysts and reagents used in these reactions are considered. The material is classified according to the type of newly formed bonds incorporating the asymmetric carbon atom, and the information for the most numerous C-C coupling reactions is systematized according to the natures of the electrophile and the nucleophile. The bibliography includes 433 references. Dedicated to Academician O M Nefedov on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  15. Acridine orange staining reaction as an index of physiological activity in Escherichia coli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Singh, A.; Byun, S.; Callis, P. R.; Williams, S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption that the acridine orange (AO) color reaction may be used as an index of physiological activity was investigated in laboratory grown Escherichia coli. Spectrofluorometric observations of purified nucleic acids, ribosomes and the microscopic color of bacteriophage-infected cells stained with AO confirmed the theory that single-stranded nucleic acids emit orange to red fluorescence while those that are double-stranded fluoresce green in vivo. Bacteria growing actively in a rich medium could be distinguished from cells in stationary phase by the AO reaction. Cells from log phase appeared red, whereas those in stationary phase were green. However, this differentiation was not seen when the bacteria were grown in a minimal medium or when a variation of the staining method was used. Also, shifting bacteria in stationary phase to starvation conditions rapidly changed their AO staining reaction. Boiling and exposure to lethal concentrations of azide and formalin resulted in stationary-phase cells that appeared red after staining but bacteria killed with chlorine remained green. These findings indicate that the AO staining reaction may be suggestive of physiological activity under defined conditions. However, variables in staining and fixation procedures as well as uncertainties associated with mixed bacterial populations in environmental samples may produce results that are not consistent with the classical interpretation of this reaction. The importance of validating the putative physiological implications of this staining reaction is stressed.

  16. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions. PMID:25424639

  17. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  18. Modeling of the D1/D2 proteins and cofactors of the photosystem II reaction center: implications for herbicide and bicarbonate binding.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, J.; Subramaniam, S.; Govindjee

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was generated based on homology with the anoxygenic purple bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis, for which the X-ray crystallographic structures are available. The model was constructed with an alignment of D1 and D2 sequences with the L and M subunits of the bacterial reaction center, respectively, and by using as a scaffold the structurally conserved regions (SCRs) from bacterial templates. The structurally variant regions were built using a novel sequence-specific approach of searching for the best-matched protein segments in the Protein Data Bank with the "basic local alignment search tool" (Altschul SF, Gish W, Miller W, Myers EW, Lipman DJ, 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410), and imposing the matching conformational preference on the corresponding D1 and D2 regions. The structure thus obtained was refined by energy minimization. The modeled D1 and D2 proteins contain five transmembrane alpha-helices each, with cofactors (4 chlorophylls, 2 pheophytins, 2 plastoquinones, and a non-heme iron) essential for PSII primary photochemistry embedded in them. A beta-carotene, considered important for PSII photoprotection, was also included in the model. Four different possible conformations of the primary electron donor P680 chlorophylls were proposed, one based on the homology with the bacterial template and the other three on existing experimental suggestions in literature. The P680 conformation based on homology was preferred because it has the lowest energy. Redox active tyrosine residues important for P680+ reduction as well as residues important for PSII cofactor binding were analyzed. Residues involved in interprotein interactions in the model were also identified. Herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) was also modeled in the plastoquinone QB binding niche using the

  19. Complete inactivation of photosynthetic activity during desiccation and rapid recovery by rehydration in the aerial microalga Trentepohlia jolithus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Li, Y; Liu, J

    2016-11-01

    Aerial microalgae are more exposed to harsh and rapidly changing environmental conditions, including desiccation and radiation. Under high light, aerial algae in the desiccated state would be highly subject to photodamage. Therefore, aerial algae need effective protective mechanisms to dissipate excess excitation energy. In this study, the changes in photosynthetic behaviors during desiccation and after rehydration in Trentepohlia jolithus were confirmed using chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transient, allowing determination of the photoprotection mechanisms of this aerial alga. The filaments of T. jolithus cells at 25% relative air humidity (RH) are significantly shrunken compared with those at 100% and 87% RH, decreasing the surface area for light absorption. At 25% RH, the shape and intensity of the OJIP transient disappeared, but recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. Compared with 100% RH, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (φPo ), phenomenological energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/CSm) and active PSII reaction centers (RCs) at 25% RH decreased significantly, the specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) increased significantly, but the specific energy fluxes for trapping (TRo/RC) at 25% RH did not change. These parameters at 25% RH recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. These results suggest that the efficiency of PSII light absorption and activities of PSII RCs were reversibly down-regulated in desiccated T. jolithus, which may be a special adaptive mechanism for the survivability of aerial microalgae in habitats with rapidly changing water availability.

  20. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical force is a distinct and usually less explored way to activate chemical reaction because it can deform the reacting molecules along a well-defined direction of the reaction coordinate. However, the effect of mechanical force on the free- energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is still largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by some reducing agents in a bimolecular substitution reaction (so-called SN2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity ``switch'' at 500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an SN2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force- induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in SN2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule. References: S. Garcia-Manyes, J. Liang, R. Szoszkiewicz, T-L. Kuo and J. M. Fernandez, Nature Chemistry, 1, 236-242, 2009.

  1. Further insights into the mechanism of the reaction of activated bleomycin with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Marina S.; Liu, Lei V.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a glycopeptide anticancer drug that effectively carries out single- and double-stranded DNA cleavage. Activated BLM (ABLM), a low-spin ferric-hydroperoxide, BLM–FeIII–OOH, is the last intermediate detected before DNA cleavage. We have previously shown through experiments and DFT calculations that both ABLM decay and reaction with H atom donors proceed via direct H atom abstraction. However, the rate of ABLM decay had been previously found, based on indirect methods, to be independent of the presence of DNA. In this study, we use a circular dichroism (CD) feature unique to ABLM to directly monitor the kinetics of ABLM reaction with a DNA oligonucleotide. Our results show that the ABLM + DNA reaction is appreciably faster, has a different kinetic isotope effect, and has a lower Arrhenius activation energy than does ABLM decay. In the ABLM reaction with DNA, the small normal kH/kD ratio is attributed to a secondary solvent effect through DFT vibrational analysis of reactant and transition state (TS) frequencies, and the lower Ea is attributed to the weaker bond involved in the abstraction reaction (C–H for DNA and N–H for the decay in the absence of DNA). The DNA dependence of the ABLM reaction indicates that DNA is involved in the TS for ABLM decay and thus reacts directly with BLM–FeIII–OOH instead of its decay product. PMID:18757754

  2. Assessment of DFT methods for computing activation energies of Mo/W-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Hui

    2015-10-13

    Using high level ab initio coupled cluster calculations as reference, the performances of 15 commonly used density functionals (DFs) on activation energy calculations for typical Mo/W-mediated reactions have been systematically assessed for the first time in this work. The selected representative Mo/W-mediated reactions cover a wide range from enzymatic reactions to organometallic reactions, which include Mo-catalyzed aldehyde oxidation (aldehyde oxidoreductase), Mo-catalyzed dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reduction (DMSO reductase), W-catalyzed acetylene hydration (acetylene hydratase), Mo/W-mediated olefin metathesis, Mo/W-mediated olefin epoxidation, W-mediated alkyne metathesis, and W-mediated C-H bond activation. Covering both Mo- and W-mediated reactions, four DFs of B2GP-PLYP, M06, B2-PLYP, and B3LYP are uniformly recommended with and without DFT empirical dispersion correction. Among these four DFs, B3LYP is notably improved in performance by DFT empirical dispersion correction. In addition to the absolute value of calculation error, if the trend of DFT results is also a consideration, B2GP-PLYP, B2-PLYP, and M06 keep better performance than other functionals tested and constitute our final recommendation of DFs for both Mo- and W-mediated reactions.

  3. In Situ Imidazole Activation of Ribonucleotides for Abiotic RNA Oligomerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcar, Bradley T.; Jawed, Mohsin; Shah, Hari; McGown, Linda B.

    2015-06-01

    The hypothesis that RNA played a significant role in the origin of life requires effective and efficient abiotic pathways to produce RNA oligomers. The most successful abiotic oligomerization reactions to date have utilized high-energy, modified, or pre-activated ribonucleotides to generate strands of RNA up to 50-mers in length. In spite of their success, these modifications and pre-activation reactions significantly alter the ribonucleotides in ways that are highly unlikely to have occurred on a prebiotic Earth. This research seeks to address this problem by exploring an aqueous based method for activating the canonical ribonucleotides in situ using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and imidazole. The reactions were run with and without a montmorillonite clay catalyst and compared to reactions that used ribonucleotides that were pre-activated with imidazole. The effects of pH and ribonucleotide concentration were also investigated. The results demonstrate the ability of in situ activation of ribonucleotides to generate linear RNA oligomers in solution, providing an alternative route to produce RNA for use in prebiotic Earth scenarios.

  4. Activation Strain Analysis of SN2 Reactions at C, N, O, and F Centers.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2017-02-02

    Fundamental principles that determine chemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms are the very foundation of chemistry and many related fields of science. Bimolecular nucleophilic substitutions (SN2) are among the most common and therefore most important reaction types. In this report, we examine the trends in the SN2 reactions with respect to increasing electronegativity of the reaction center by comparing the well-studied backside SN2 Cl(-) + CH3Cl with similar Cl(-) substitutions on the isoelectronic series with the second period elements N, O, and F in place of C. Relativistic (ZORA) DFT calculations are used to construct the gas phase reaction potential energy surfaces (PES), and activation strain analysis, which allows decomposition of the PES into the geometrical strain and interaction energy, is employed to analyze the observed trends. We find that SN2@N and SN2@O have similar PES to the prototypical SN2@C, with the well-defined reaction complex (RC) local minima and a central barrier, but all stationary points are, respectively, increasingly stable in energy. The SN2@F, by contrast, exhibits only a single-well PES with no barrier. Using the activation strain model, we show that the trends are due to the interaction energy and originate mainly from the decreasing energy of the empty acceptor orbital (σ*A-Cl) on the reaction center A in the order of C, N, O, and F. The decreasing steric congestion around the central atom is also a likely contributor to this trend. Additional decomposition of the interaction energy using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory provides further support for this explanation, as well as suggesting electrostatic energy as the primary reason for the distinct single-well PES profile for the FCl reaction.

  5. Activation Strain Analysis of SN2 Reactions at C, N, O, and F Centers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental principles that determine chemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms are the very foundation of chemistry and many related fields of science. Bimolecular nucleophilic substitutions (SN2) are among the most common and therefore most important reaction types. In this report, we examine the trends in the SN2 reactions with respect to increasing electronegativity of the reaction center by comparing the well-studied backside SN2 Cl– + CH3Cl with similar Cl– substitutions on the isoelectronic series with the second period elements N, O, and F in place of C. Relativistic (ZORA) DFT calculations are used to construct the gas phase reaction potential energy surfaces (PES), and activation strain analysis, which allows decomposition of the PES into the geometrical strain and interaction energy, is employed to analyze the observed trends. We find that SN2@N and SN2@O have similar PES to the prototypical SN2@C, with the well-defined reaction complex (RC) local minima and a central barrier, but all stationary points are, respectively, increasingly stable in energy. The SN2@F, by contrast, exhibits only a single-well PES with no barrier. Using the activation strain model, we show that the trends are due to the interaction energy and originate mainly from the decreasing energy of the empty acceptor orbital (σ*A–Cl) on the reaction center A in the order of C, N, O, and F. The decreasing steric congestion around the central atom is also a likely contributor to this trend. Additional decomposition of the interaction energy using Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory provides further support for this explanation, as well as suggesting electrostatic energy as the primary reason for the distinct single-well PES profile for the FCl reaction. PMID:28045531

  6. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  7. Ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary

    2011-07-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine quantitatively ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch, and to determine relationships between knee valgus and muscle activations, ball velocity and muscle activation as well as ball velocity and ground reaction forces. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship between degree of knee valgus and muscle activation, a direct relationship between ground reaction forces and ball velocity, and non-stride leg muscle activations and ball velocity. Ten female windmill softball pitchers (age 17.6 ± 3.47 years, stature 1.67 ± 0.07 m, weight 67.4 ± 12.2 kg) participated. Dependent variables were ball velocity, surface electromyographic (sEMG), kinematic, and kinetic data while the participant was the independent variable. Stride foot contact reported peak vertical forces of 179% body weight. There were positive relationships between ball velocity and ground reaction force (r = 0.758, n = 10, P = 0.029) as well as ball velocity and non-stride leg gluteus maximus (r = 0.851, n = 10, P = 0.007) and medius (r = 0.760, n = 10, P = 0.029) muscle activity, while there was no notable relationship between knee valgus and muscle activation. As the windmill softball pitcher increased ball velocity, her vertical ground reaction forces also increased. Proper conditioning of the lumbopelvic-hip complex, including the gluteals, is essential for injury prevention. From the data presented, it is evident that bilateral strength and conditioning of the gluteal muscle group is salient in the windmill softball pitch as an attempt to decrease incidence of injury.

  8. The activity of nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys as electrode materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Immanuel; Sellschopp, Kai; Tegel, Marcus; Rauscher, Thomas; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In view of alkaline water electrolysis, the activities for the hydrogen evolution reaction of nanocrystalline Fe-based electrode materials were investigated and compared with the activities of polycrystalline Fe and Ni. Electrochemical methods were used to elucidate the overpotential value, the charge transfer resistance and the double layer capacity. Structural properties of the electrode surface were determined with SEM, XRD and XPS analyses. Thus, a correlation between electrochemical and structural parameters was found. In this context, we report on a cyclic voltammetric activation procedure which causes a significant increase of the surface area of Fe-based electrodes leading to a boost in effective activity of the activated electrodes. It was found that the intrinsic activity of activated Fe-based electrodes is very high due to the formation of a nanocrystalline surface layer. In contrast, the activation procedure influences only the intrinsic activity of the Ni electrodes without the formation of a porous surface layer.

  9. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  10. Cross-section studies of relativistic deuteron reactions on copper by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Závorka, L.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.

    2015-02-01

    The cross-sections of relativistic deuteron reactions on natural copper were studied in detail by means of activation method. The copper foils were irradiated during experiments with the model spallation targets in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The irradiation of activation samples was performed by beams in the energy range from 1 to 8 GeV. Residual nuclides were measured by the gamma spectrometry. While the EXFOR database contains sets of data for relativistic proton reactions, data for deuteron reactions in this energy range are almost missing. Lack of such experimental cross-section values prevents the use of copper foils from beam integral monitoring. For this reason our experiments focused on their measurement and completely new data were obtained in the energy region where no experimental data have been available so far. The copper monitors with their low sensitivity to fast neutrons will contribute to improvement of the beam integral determination during accelerator-driven system studies.

  11. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  12. Time-resolved FTIR studies provide activation free energy, activation enthalpy and activation entropy for GTPase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2004-12-01

    GTPases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP and P i, play a key role in the regulation of many biological processes. In this work, we quantify the activation parameters ΔG0∗,ΔH0∗andΔS0∗ for the hydrolysis reaction of GTP in water, in water with Mg 2+ ions and in Ras. Ras belongs to the superfamily of small GTPases (guanine nucleotide-binding proteins; GNBPs). Surprisingly, we find that in all cases, the activation energy consists mainly of enthalpic contributions. Additionally, the small entropic contributions in water and in Ras are similar, so that ΔΔ S* is close to 0. Thus the entropic contributions are only minor in GTPase catalysis and the enthalpic contributions from electrostatic interactions are key to the catalysis. The protein induced change in charge distribution of GTP can be monitored by time-resolved difference FTIR spectroscopy. For Ras the main effect due to protein binding is a charge shift towards the β-phosphate of GTP. This seems to have the main contribution to the catalytic mechanism. Because the G-domain of Ras is highly conserved in GNBPs, we propose that the finding here holds for all GNBPs.

  13. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  14. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  15. Versatility of biological non-heme Fe(II) centers in oxygen activation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, Elena G; Lipscomb, John D

    2009-01-01

    Oxidase and oxygenase enzymes allow the use of relatively unreactive O2 in biochemical reactions. Many of the mechanistic strategies employed in nature for this key reaction are represented within the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad family of non-heme Fe(II) containing enzymes. The open face of the metal coordination sphere opposite the three endogenous ligands participates directly in the reaction chemistry. Here, data from several studies are presented showing that reductive O2 activation within this family is initiated by substrate (and in some cases co-substrate or cofactor) binding, which then allows coordination of O2 to the metal. From this starting point, both the O2 activation process and the reactions with substrates diverge broadly. The reactive species formed in these reactions have been proposed to encompass four oxidation states of iron and all forms of reduced O2 as well as several of the reactive oxygen species that derive from O–O bond cleavage. PMID:18277980

  16. B-H bond activation using an electrophilic metal complex: insights into the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2013-01-07

    A highly electrophilic ruthenium center in the [RuCl(dppe)(2)][OTf] complex brings about the activation of the B-H bond in ammonia borane (H(3)N·BH(3), AB) and dimethylamine borane (Me(2)HN·BH(3), DMAB). At room temperature, the reaction between [RuCl(dppe)(2)][OTf] and AB or DMAB results in trans-[RuH(η(2)-H(2))(dppe)(2)][OTf], trans-[RuCl(η(2)-H(2))(dppe)(2)][OTf], and trans-[RuH(Cl)(dppe)(2)], as noted in the NMR spectra. Mixing the ruthenium complex and AB or DMAB at low temperature (198/193 K) followed by NMR spectral measurements as the reaction mixture was warmed up to room temperature allowed the observation of various species formed enroute to the final products that were obtained at room temperature. On the basis of the variable-temperature multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies of these two reactions, the mechanistic insights for B-H bond activation were obtained. In both cases, the reaction proceeds via an η(1)-B-H moiety bound to the metal center. The detailed mechanistic pathways of these two reactions as studied by NMR spectroscopy are described.

  17. Substrate activity of synthetic formyl phosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1987-06-30

    Formyl phosphate, a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.3), was synthesized from formyl fluoride and inorganic phosphate, and the product was characterized by /sup 31/P, /sup 1/H, and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR indicates that formyl phosphate is particularly labile, with a half-life of 48 min in a buffered neutral solution at 20 /sup 0/C. At pH 7, hydrolysis occurs with P-O bond cleavage, as demonstrated by /sup 18/O incorporation from H/sub 2//sup 18/O into P/sub i/, while at pH 1 and pH 13 hydrolysis occurs with C-O bond cleavage. The substrate activity of formyl phosphate was tested in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. Formyl phosphate supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formyltetrahydrofolate is produced from tetrahydrofolate and formyl phosphate in a reaction mixture that contains enzyme, Mg(II), and ADP, and ATP is produced from formyl phosphate and ADP with enzyme, Mg(II), and tetrahydrofolate present. The requirements for ADP and for tetrahydrofolate as cofactors in these reactions are consistent with previous steady-state kinetic and isotope exchange studies, which demonstrated that all substrate subsites must be occupied prior to catalysis. The k/sub cat/ values for both the forward and reverse directions, with formyl phosphate as the substrate, are much lower than those for the normal forward and reverse reactions. Kinetic analysis of the formyl phosphate supported reactions indicates that the low steady-state rates observed for the synthetic intermediate are most likely due to the sequential nature of the normal reaction.

  18. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  19. Hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles as highly active electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooyoung; Sher Shah, Selim Arif; Yoo, Pil J.; Lim, Byungkwon

    2017-04-01

    This letter describes an aqueous-phase synthetic route to hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2) nanoparticles and their conversion into crystalline ones via a thermal annealing process. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize hydrous and crystalline RuO2 nanoparticles. The hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles exhibited higher activity for hydrogen evolution reaction than commercial Pt catalyst, while the crystalline RuO2 nanoparticles showed better performance for oxygen evolution reaction than IrO2 catalyst. With these hydrous and crystalline RuO2 catalysts, we were able to achieve highly efficient overall electrochemical water splitting.

  20. Time-temperature-transformation curves in chemical reactions regulated by cytoskeletal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2012-02-01

    Efficient and reproducible construction of signaling and sorting complexes, both on the surface and within the living cell, is contingent on local regulation of biochemical reactions by the cellular milieu with active components. We have recently proposed that in many cases this spatiotemporal regulation can be mediated by interaction with components of the dynamic cytoskeleton, where the interplay between active contractility and remodeling of the cytoskeleton results in transient focusing of passive molecules to form clusters, leading to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In this presentation, we discuss the implications of actin dynamics by introducing an ``effective temperature,'' which can work as a regulatory parameter for signaling replacing the details of actin dynamics. We show this in time-temperature-transformation plots, with the proposed ``effective temperature'' as a parameter, which paves way for discussion of active chemical thermodynamics.

  1. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  2. Activation cross sections for reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons on natural tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Junhua; Tuo Fei; Kong Xiangzhong

    2009-05-15

    Cross sections for (n,2n), (n,p), (n,n{sup '}{alpha}), (n,t), (n,d{sup '}), and (n,{alpha}) reactions have been measured on tantalum isotopes at the neutron energies of 13.5 to 14.7 MeV using the activation technique. Data are reported for the following reactions: {sup 181}Ta(n,2n){sup 180}Ta{sup g}, {sup 181}Ta(n,p){sup 181}Hf, {sup 181}Ta(n,n{sup '}{alpha}){sup 177}Lu{sup m}, {sup 181}Ta(n,t){sup 179}Hf{sup m2}, {sup 181}Ta(n,d{sup '}){sup 180}Hf{sup m}, and {sup 181}Ta(n,{alpha}){sup 178}Lu{sup m}. The neutron fluences were determined using the monitor reaction {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na. Results were discussed and compared with the previous works.

  3. Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Imanaka, K.; Ashida, C.; Takashima, H.; Imajo, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-04-01

    Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue was studied on the transplanted MM46 tumor of female C3H/He mice after radiotherapy. MM46 tumor cells were inoculated into the right hind paws of mice. On the 5th day, irradiation with the dose irradiated tumor tissue (2000 rad on the fifth day), were injected into the left hind paws of the tumor-bearing mice. Effectiveness of this active specific immunotherapy against tumor was evaluated by the regression of tumor and survival rate of mice. Tumor was markedly regressed and survival rate was significantly increased by the active specific immunitherapy.

  4. Merging Structural Information from X-ray Crystallography, Quantum Chemistry, and EXAFS Spectra: The Oxygen-Evolving Complex in PSII.

    PubMed

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Rossini, Emanuele; Galstyan, Artur; Dau, Holger; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2016-10-12

    Structural data of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII) determined by X-ray crystallography, quantum chemistry (QC), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses are presently inconsistent. Therefore, a detailed study of what information can be gained about the OEC through a comparison of QC and crystallographic structure information combined with the information from range-extended EXAFS spectra was undertaken. An analysis for determining the precision of the atomic coordinates of the OEC by QC is carried out. OEC model structures based on crystallographic data that are obtained by QC from different research groups are compared with one another and with structures obtained by high-resolution crystallography. The theory of EXAFS spectra is summarized, and the application of EXAFS spectra to the experimental determination of the structure of the OEC is detailed. We discriminate three types of parameters entering the formula for the EXAFS spectrum: (1) model-independent, predefined, and fixed; (2) model-dependent that can be computed or adjusted; and (3) model-dependent that must be adjusted. The information content of EXAFS spectra is estimated and is related to the precision of atomic coordinates and resolution power to discriminate different atom-pair distances of the OEC. It is demonstrated how a precise adjustment of atomic coordinates can yield a nearly perfect representation of the experimental OEC EXAFS spectrum, but at the expense of overfitting and losing the knowledge of the initial OEC model structure. Introducing a novel type of penalty function, it is shown that moderate adjustment of atomic coordinates to the EXAFS spectrum limited by constraints avoids overfitting and can be used to validate different OEC model structures. This technique is used to identify the OEC model structures whose computed OEC EXAFS spectra agree best with the measured spectrum. In this way, the most likely S-state and protonation pattern

  5. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  6. The Biginelli reaction with an imidazolium-tagged recyclable iron catalyst: kinetics, mechanism, and antitumoral activity.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Luciana M; Guido, Bruna C; Nobrega, Catharine C; Corrêa, José R; Silva, Rafael G; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio C; Neto, Brenno A D

    2013-03-25

    The present work describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of a new ion-tagged iron catalyst. The catalyst was employed in the Biginelli reaction with impressive performance. High yields have been achieved when the reaction was carried out in imidazolium-based ionic liquids (BMI⋅PF6, BMI⋅NTf2, and BMI⋅BF4), thus showing that the ionic-liquid effects play a role in the reaction. Moreover, the ion-tagged catalyst could be recovered and reused up to eight times without any noticeable loss in activity. Mechanistic studies performed by using high-resolution electrospray-ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass (HR-EI-QTOF) spectrometry and kinetic experiments indicate only one reaction pathway and rule out the other two possibilities under the development conditions. The theoretical calculations are in accordance with the proposed mechanism of action of the iron catalyst. Finally, the 37 dihydropyrimidinone derivatives, products of the Biginelli reaction, had their cytotoxicity evaluated in assays against MCF-7 cancer cell linages with encouraging results of some derivatives, which were virtually non-toxic against healthy cell linages (fibroblasts).

  7. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical force can deform the reacting molecules along a well-defined direction of the reaction coordinate. However, the effect of mechanical force on the free-energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is still largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule AFM force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by some reducing agents in a bimolecular substitution reaction (so-called SN2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity ``switch'' at 500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an SN2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force-induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in SN2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule. References: Sergi Garcia-Manyes, Jian Liang, Robert Szoszkiewicz, Tzu-Ling Kuo and Julio M. Fernandez, Nature Chemistry, 1, 236-242, 2009.

  8. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  9. Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

    1998-09-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

  10. Functional aspects of the photosynthetic light reactions in heat stressed Arabidopsis deficient in digalactosyl-diacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemâa; Govindachary, Sridharan; Ammar, Saïda; Bouzid, Sadok; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Plants are often submitted, in their natural environment, to various abiotic stresses such as heat stress. However, elevated temperature has a detrimental impact on overall plant growth and development. We have examined the physiological response of the dgd1-2 and dgd1-3 Arabidopsis mutants lacking 30-40% of digalactosyl-diacylglycerol (DGDG) exposed to heat constraint. These mutants, which grow similarly to wild type under normal conditions, were previously reported to be defective in basal thermotolerance as measured by cotyledon development. However their functional properties were not described. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and absorbance changes at 820nm were used to monitor photosystem II (PSII) and PSI activity, respectively. It was observed that both mutants have similar photosystem activities with some differences. The mutants were less able to use near saturation light energy and elicited higher rates of cyclic PSI electron flow compare to wild type. Arabidopsis leaves exposed to short-term (5min) mild (40°C) or strong (44°C) heat treatment have shown a decline in the operating effective quantum yield of PSII and in the proportion of active PSI reaction centers. However, cyclic PSI electron flow was enhanced. The establishment of the energy-dependent non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence was accelerated but its decline under illumination was inhibited. Furthermore, heat stress affected the process implicated in the redistribution of light excitation energy between the photosystems known as the light state transitions. All the effects of heat stress mentioned above were more intense in the mutant leaves with dgd1-3 being even more susceptible. The decreased DGDG content of the thylakoid membranes together with other lipid changes are proposed to influence the thermo-sensitivity of the light reactions of photosynthesis towards heat stress.

  11. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-03-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling.

  12. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A.; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling. PMID:28378014

  13. Synergy among manganese, nitrogen and carbon to improve the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Wang, Hui; Ji, Shan; Key, Julian; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-04-01

    A highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction, manganese modified glycine derivative-carbon (Mn-CNx), is synthesized by a two-step carbonizing process. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to characterize structure and morphology of the catalysts. Electrochemical tests show that Mn-CNx has higher catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction than CNx derived glycine and Mn modified Vulcan carbon. Moreover, the half-wave potential of Mn-CNx is only 12 mV lower than that of commercial Pt/C. Mn-CNx also has excellent durability to methanol crossover in alkaline solution, and thus provides a promising low cost, non-precious metal cathode catalyst for fuel cells.

  14. [Generalization of activation reaction extinction during consecutive stimulation of different parts of the brain].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Andreeva, V N

    1978-01-01

    The process of extinction of the brain activation reactions ("arousal") was studied in chronic experiments on cats with implanted electrodes during repeated electrical stimulation of alternated points in the cortex and in the brain stem reticular formation. Extinction of the reactions achieved by stimulation of one point resulted in the loss of excitability both at this point and in other activating structures at different levels of the brain. The sequence of stimulated structures was of no importance. A possibility is suggested of development of a generalized inhibition in the neural net of the non-specific reticular system of the brain which may be inciated in any point of this system: in the brain stem, in the thalamus or in the cortex.

  15. Reaction of active uranium and thorium with aromatic carbonyls and pinacols in hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, B.E.; Rieke, R.D.

    1988-02-01

    Highly reactive uranium and thorium metal powders have been prepared by reduction of the anhydrous metal(IV) chlorides in hydrocarbon solvents. The reduction employs the crystalline hydrocarbon-soluble reducing agent ((TMEDA)Li)/sub 2/(Nap) (TMEDA = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine, Nap = naphthalene). The resulting active metal powders have been shown to be extremely reactive with oxygen-containing compounds and have been used in the reductive coupling of aromatic ketones giving tetra-arylethylenes. Reactions with pinacols have given some mechanistic insight into the ketone coupling reaction. These finely divided metal powders activate very weakly acidic C-H bonds forming metal hydrides, which can be transferred to organic substrates.

  16. Integral Equation Calculation of Solvent Activation Free Energies for Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-04

    6. AUTHOR(S) P.P. Schmidt Indrani Bhattacharya- Kodali and Gregory Voth 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AODRESS(ES) 8. PERIORMING ORGANIZATION...13. ABSTRACT (Maimum 200 words) The extended reference interaction site method (RISM) integral equation theory is applied to calculate the solvent...Integral Equation Calculation of Solvent Activation Free Energies for Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions Indrani Bhattacharya- Kodali and Gregory A. Voth

  17. Boosting oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activities with layered perovskite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengjie; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Zhenbao; Shao, Zongping; Ciucci, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    Layered PrBaMn2O5+δ (H-PBM) was simply prepared by annealing pristine Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in H2. The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activities are remarkably enhanced by employing H-PBM. The improvement can be ascribed to the introduction of additional oxygen vacancies, an optimized eg filling of Mn ions, and the facile incorporation of oxygen into layered H-PBM.

  18. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA-graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N; Kemp, K Christian; Le, Nhien H; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2-4 nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2 nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ≤1.4 nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA-graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA-graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA-graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries.

  19. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on characteristics of EMG activity underlying reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Hatice; Summerfield, Christopher; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) on characteristics of electromyographic (EMG) activity of the agonist muscle in 8 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients were examined during STN-DBS (ON), and 30 minutes after switching off both stimulators (OFF). They were asked to make a ballistic movement in paradigms of simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) tasks. Onset of movement (MOVonset) was measured as the latency of the initial displacement from baseline of the signal from an accelerometer attached to the dorsum of the hand. In the associated EMG activity, recorded from wrist extensor muscles, we measured onset latency (EMGonset), size of the first EMG burst (EMGsize), and number of EMG bursts (EMGbursts) counted between EMGonset and task execution. MOVonset and EMGonset were significantly shorter in ON than in OFF conditions in CRT. EMGsize was larger, EMGbursts were reduced, and peak of the acceleration profile was larger in ON compared with OFF conditions in both SRT and CRT. Our results indicate that STN-DBS induces a significant improvement in motor performance of reaction time tasks in PD patients. Such improvement is associated with a change in features of the EMG activity suggesting an increase in the excitability of the motor pathways engaged in ballistic movements.

  20. Nanoporous and highly active silicon carbide supported CeO₂-catalysts for the methane oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Claudia; Biemelt, Tim; Lohe, Martin R; Rümmeli, Mark H; Kaskel, Stefan

    2014-01-29

    CeOx @SiO2 nanoparticles are used for the first time for the generation of porous SiC materials with tailored pore diameter in the mesopore range containing encapsulated and catalytically active CeO2 nanoparticles. The nanocasting approach with a preceramic polymer and subsequent pyrolysis is performed at 1300 °C, selective leaching of the siliceous part results in CeOx /SiC catalysts with remarkable characteristics like monodisperse, spherical pores and specific surface areas of up to 438 m(2) ·g(-1) . Porous SiC materials are promising supports for high temperature applications. The catalysts show excellent activities in the oxidation of methane with onset temperatures of the reaction 270 K below the onset of the homogeneous reaction. The synthesis scheme using core-shell particles is suited to functionalize silicon carbide with a high degree of stabilization of the active nanoparticles against sintering in the core of the template even at pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 °C rendering the novel synthesis principle as an attractive approach for a wide range of catalytic reactions.

  1. (100) facets of γ-Al2O3: the active surfaces for alcohol dehydration reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-05-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol, and methanol dehydration reaction were studied on γ-Al2O3 in order to identify the catalytic active sites for alcohol dehydration reactions. Two high temperature (> 473 K) desorption features were observed following ethanol adsorption. Samples calcined at T≤473 K displayed a desorption feature in the 523-533 K temperature range, while those calcined at T ≥ 673 K showed a single desorption feature at 498 K. The switch from the high to low temperature ethanol desorption correlated well with the dehydroxylation of the (100) facets of γ-Al2O3 that was predicted at 550 K DFT calculations. Theoretical DFT simulations of the mechanism of dehydration. on clean and hydroxylated γ-Al2O3(100) surfaces, find that a concerted elimination of ethylene from an ethanol molecule chemisorbed at an Al3+ pentacoordinated site is the rate limiting step for catalytic cycle on both surfaces. Furthermore, titration of the pentacoordinate Al3+ sites on the (100) facets of γ-Al2O3 by BaO completely turned off the methanol dehydration reaction activity. These results unambiguously demonstrate that only the (100) facets on γ-Al2O3 are the catalytic active surfaces for alcohol dehydration.

  2. Rapamycin protects neurons from brain contusion-induced inflammatory reaction via modulation of microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QI; XIE, DUJIANG; PAN, SHIYONG; XU, WEIJUN

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory reaction is important in secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Rapamycin has been demonstrated as a neuroprotective agent in a mouse model of TBI, however, there is a lack of data regarding the effects of rapamycin on the inflammatory reaction following TBI. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the effects of treatment with rapamycin on inflammatory reactions and examine the possible involvement of microglial activation following TBI. Male imprinting control region mice were randomly divided into four groups: Sham group (n=23), TBI group (n=23), TBI + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group (n=31) and TBI + rapamycin group (n=31). Rapamycin was dissolved in DMSO (50 mg/ml) and injected 30 min after TBI (2 mg/Kg; intraperitoneally). A weight-drop model of TBI was induced, and the brain tissues were harvested 24 h after TBI. The findings indicated that the administration of rapamycin following TBI was associated with decreased levels of activated microglia and neuron degeneration at the peri-injury site, reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased neurobehavioral function, possibly mediated by inactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The results of the present study offer novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of rapamycin, possibly involving the modulation of microglial activation. PMID:26458361

  3. Psychophysiological reactions during active and passive stress coping following smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hasenfratz, M; Bättig, K

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 9 days' smoking abstinence on psychophysiological stress reactions. The subjects were 40 female smokers; 20 of them intended to give up smoking in the course of the study, whereas the remaining 20 had no such intention. A first session was carried out before, a second and a third during days 3 and 9 of abstinence. The nonabstainers were tested at corresponding intervals. Each session consisted of a 30-min stress-coping phase with relaxation phases before and after. While performing a rapid information processing task (RIP) the subjects had to sustain electrical shocks which were, according to instructions, but not in fact, either avoidable (active coping) or not (passive coping). Generally, the active coping instruction produced greater responses to the RIP task than did the passive coping instruction for heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure but not for finger pulse amplitude, thus resembling a beta-adrenergic stimulation. RIP processing rate was not affected, but the response rate (total of hits and commission errors) was greater during active than during passive coping. However, none of these stress reactions differed between abstainers and nonabstainers. On the other hand, both heart rate and the craving to smoke decreased significantly in the abstainer group across the 9 days. Thus, it is concluded that a deprivation of 1 h, 3 or 9 days has no differential effect on physiological stress reactions.

  4. Biological and chemical assessment of antioxidant activity of sugar-lysine model maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Kitts, David D; Hu, Chun

    2005-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) is often associated with increased stability and shelf life of food systems vulnerable to oxidation reactions. In this study, nondialyzed, high-molecular weight (HMW = >3500 Da) MRPs were recovered from three model sugar-lysine (glucose-lysine, Glc-Lys; fructose-lysine, Fru-Lys; and ribose-lysine, Rib-Lys) reactions, heated at 121 degrees C for one hour. Samples were characterized by UV and fluorescence spectra and assessed for antioxidant activity using both standard chemical methods (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl [DPPH] and oxygen radical absorbing capacity [ORAC]). In addition, biochemical (e.g., cell culture for intracellular oxidation in RAW264.7 cells and protection against metal ion-induced cytotoxicity in C3H/10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblast cells) assays were used. Patterns of change for fluorescence and multiple colorimetric parameters corresponded to the recovery yield of HMW MRPs and indicated that Rib was more (P < 0.05) reactive than Glc, which in turn was greater (P < 0.05) than Fru. These characteristics of rate of browning did not parallel the significant (P < 0.05) antioxidant activity noted for different sugar-derived HMW MRPs to scavenge DPPH radical, or exhibit total antioxidant activity using the ORAC (e.g., 800-1000 micromol Trolox/gm MRP) method. Antioxidant activity of Glc-, Fru-, and Rib-Lys HMW-MRPs (50 microg/mL) produced protection (P < 0.05) against both H2O2- and AAPH-induced intracellular oxidation reactions in cultured RAW 264.7 cells. Metal chelating activity of all three sugar-derived HMW MRPs (0.01% w/v) was attributed to similar protection (P < 0.05) against Fe2+ and Cu2+-induced cytotoxicity in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The reducing activity of all three HMW-MRPs indicated the potential for prooxidant activity that could explain enhanced cytotoxicity of Fe3+ in cultured cells.

  5. "Click" reaction mediated synthesis of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone derivatives and evaluation of their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Pavan Kumar, Ch; Devi, A; Ashok Yadav, P; Rao Vadaparthi, R; Shankaraiah, G; Sowjanya, P; Jain, Nishant; Suresh Babu, K

    2016-11-01

    As part of pharmacological-phytochemical integrated studies on medicinal plants from Indian flora, costunolide (1) and dehydrocostus lactone (2), were isolated as major phytochemicals from Saussurea lappa, a plant traditionally used in different Asian systems of medicine. A series of 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles conjugates were synthesized through diastereo selective Michael addition followed by regioselective Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions. All these triazolyl derivatives (5a-5j) & (7a-7j) were well characterized using modern spectroscopic techniques and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of five human cancerous celllines. The results indicated that all the analogs displayed moderate cytotoxic activity.

  6. A new method to determine optimum temperature and activation energies for enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, M; Miłek, J

    2016-08-01

    A new method for determination of the optimum temperature and activation energies based on an idea of the average rate of enzymatic reaction has been developed. A mathematical model describing the effect of temperature on a dimensionless activity for enzyme deactivation following the first-order kinetics has been derived. The necessary condition for existence of the function extreme of the optimal temperature has been applied in the model. The developed method has been verified using the experimental data for inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus.

  7. Energy-Related Small Molecule Activation Reactions: Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reactions Catalyzed by Porphyrin- and Corrole-Based Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Lai, Wenzhen; Cao, Rui

    2017-02-22

    Globally increasing energy demands and environmental concerns related to the use of fossil fuels have stimulated extensive research to identify new energy systems and economies that are sustainable, clean, low cost, and environmentally benign. Hydrogen generation from solar-driven water splitting is a promising strategy to store solar energy in chemical bonds. The subsequent combustion of hydrogen in fuel cells produces electric energy, and the only exhaust is water. These two reactions compose an ideal process to provide clean and sustainable energy. In such a process, a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) during water splitting, and an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as a fuel cell cathodic reaction are key steps that affect the efficiency of the overall energy conversion. Catalysts play key roles in this process by improving the kinetics of these reactions. Porphyrin-based and corrole-based systems are versatile and can efficiently catalyze the ORR, OER, and HER. Because of the significance of energy-related small molecule activation, this review covers recent progress in hydrogen evolution, oxygen evolution, and oxygen reduction reactions catalyzed by porphyrins and corroles.

  8. Hollow Structured Micro/Nano MoS₂ Spheres for High Electrocatalytic Activity Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Song, Haili; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Tan, Yinghua; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-03-02

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted extensive attention as a non-noble metal electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Controlling the skeleton structure at the nanoscale is paramount to increase the number of active sites at the surface. However, hydrothermal synthesis favors the presence of the basal plane, limiting the efficiency of catalytic reaction. In this work, perfect hollow MoS2 microspheres capped by hollow MoS2 nanospheres (hH-MoS2) were obtained for the first time, which creates an opportunity for improving the HER electrocatalytic performance. Benefiting from the controllable hollow skeleton structure and large exposed edge sites, high-efficiency HER activity was obtained for stacked MoS2 thin shells with a mild degree of disorder, proving the presence of rich active sites and the validity of the combined structure. In general, the obtained hollow micro/nano MoS2 nanomaterial exhibits optimized electrocatalytic activity for HER with onset overpotential as low as 112 mV, low Tafel slope of 74 mV decade(-1), high current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at η = 214 mV, and high TOF of 0.11 H2 s(-1) per active site at η = 200 mV.

  9. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  10. Testing biological activity of model Maillard reaction products: studies on gastric smooth muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Argirova, Mariana D; Stefanova, Iliyana D; Krustev, Athanas D; Turiiski, Valentin I

    2010-03-01

    Water-soluble Maillard reaction products obtained from five different model systems were investigated for their effects upon the mechanical activity of rat gastric smooth muscle. Most of the total Maillard reaction products applied at concentration of 1.5 mg/ml evoked contractions; among them the product obtained from arginine and glucose (Arg-Glc) produced the most powerful contractions. The product obtained from glycine and ascorbic acid (Gly-AsA) was the only one that brought about relaxation response. The high molecular weight fractions (>3,500 Da) isolated from the reaction systems Arg-Glc and Gly-AsA demonstrated effects similar in type and amplitude to those evoked by non-fractioned reaction products. The results obtained suggest that moieties of molecules acting upon the muscle tonus originate mainly from lysine and arginine residues; that these structures are available in both low and high molecular pools in similar concentrations, and most likely these fragments act upon membrane-located cellular structures involved in calcium transport.

  11. Discovery of true electrochemical reactions for ultrahigh catalyst mass activity in water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Jingke; Kang, Zhenye; Retterer, Scott T.; Cullen, David A.; Toops, Todd J.; Green, Johney B.; Mench, Matthew M.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan

    2016-11-18

    Better understanding of true electrochemical reaction behaviors in electrochemical energy devices has long been desired. It has been assumed so far that the reactions occur across the entire catalyst layer (CL), which is designed and fabricated uniformly with catalysts, conductors of protons and electrons, and pathways for reactants and products. By introducing a state-of-the-art characterization system, a thin, highly tunable liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL), and an innovative design of electrochemical proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs), the electrochemical reactions on both microspatial and microtemporal scales are revealed for the first time. Surprisingly, reactions occur only on the CL adjacent to good electrical conductors. On the basis of these findings, new CL fabrications on the novel LGDLs exhibit more than 50 times higher mass activity than conventional catalyst-coated membranes in PEMECs. In conclusion, this discovery presents an opportunity to enhance the multiphase interfacial effects, maximizing the use of the catalysts and significantly reducing the cost of these devices.

  12. Discovery of true electrochemical reactions for ultrahigh catalyst mass activity in water splitting

    DOE PAGES

    Mo, Jingke; Kang, Zhenye; Retterer, Scott T.; ...

    2016-11-18

    Better understanding of true electrochemical reaction behaviors in electrochemical energy devices has long been desired. It has been assumed so far that the reactions occur across the entire catalyst layer (CL), which is designed and fabricated uniformly with catalysts, conductors of protons and electrons, and pathways for reactants and products. By introducing a state-of-the-art characterization system, a thin, highly tunable liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL), and an innovative design of electrochemical proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs), the electrochemical reactions on both microspatial and microtemporal scales are revealed for the first time. Surprisingly, reactions occur only on the CL adjacent tomore » good electrical conductors. On the basis of these findings, new CL fabrications on the novel LGDLs exhibit more than 50 times higher mass activity than conventional catalyst-coated membranes in PEMECs. In conclusion, this discovery presents an opportunity to enhance the multiphase interfacial effects, maximizing the use of the catalysts and significantly reducing the cost of these devices.« less

  13. Discovery of true electrochemical reactions for ultrahigh catalyst mass activity in water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jingke; Kang, Zhenye; Retterer, Scott T.; Cullen, David A.; Toops, Todd J.; Green, Johney B.; Mench, Matthew M.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of true electrochemical reaction behaviors in electrochemical energy devices has long been desired. It has been assumed so far that the reactions occur across the entire catalyst layer (CL), which is designed and fabricated uniformly with catalysts, conductors of protons and electrons, and pathways for reactants and products. By introducing a state-of-the-art characterization system, a thin, highly tunable liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL), and an innovative design of electrochemical proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs), the electrochemical reactions on both microspatial and microtemporal scales are revealed for the first time. Surprisingly, reactions occur only on the CL adjacent to good electrical conductors. On the basis of these findings, new CL fabrications on the novel LGDLs exhibit more than 50 times higher mass activity than conventional catalyst-coated membranes in PEMECs. This discovery presents an opportunity to enhance the multiphase interfacial effects, maximizing the use of the catalysts and significantly reducing the cost of these devices. PMID:28138516

  14. Detection of septic transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions by active and passive surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Xiao, Wenbin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Good, Caryn E; Maitta, Robert W; Jacobs, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Septic transfusion reactions (STRs) resulting from transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets are a major hazard of platelet transfusion despite recent interventions. Active and passive surveillance for bacterially contaminated platelets was performed over 7 years (2007-2013) by culture of platelet aliquots at time of transfusion and review of reported transfusion reactions. All platelet units had been cultured 24 hours after collection and released as negative. Five sets of STR criteria were evaluated, including recent AABB criteria; sensitivity and specificity of these criteria, as well as detection by active and passive surveillance, were determined. Twenty of 51,440 platelet units transfused (0.004%; 389 per million) were bacterially contaminated by active surveillance and resulted in 5 STRs occurring 9 to 24 hours posttransfusion; none of these STRs had been reported by passive surveillance. STR occurred only in neutropenic patients transfused with high bacterial loads. A total of 284 transfusion reactions (0.55%) were reported by passive surveillance. None of these patients had received contaminated platelets. However, 6 to 93 (2.1%-32.7%) of these 284 reactions met 1 or more STR criteria, and sensitivity of STR criteria varied from 5.1% to 45.5%. These results document the continued occurrence of bacterial contamination of platelets resulting in STR in neutropenic patients, failure of passive surveillance to detect STR, and lack of specificity of STR criteria. These findings highlight the limitations of reported national STR data based on passive surveillance and the need to implement further measures to address this problem such as secondary testing or use of pathogen reduction technologies.

  15. Two-step mechanism of photodamage to photosystem II: step 1 occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex and step 2 occurs at the photochemical reaction center.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Norikazu; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Takahashi, Shunichi; Higashi, Shoichi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Murata, Norio

    2005-06-14

    Under strong light, photosystem II (PSII) of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is inactivated, and this phenomenon is called photoinhibition. In a widely accepted model, photoinhibition is induced by excess light energy, which is absorbed by chlorophyll but not utilized in photosynthesis. Using monochromatic light from the Okazaki Large Spectrograph and thylakoid membranes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus, we observed that UV and blue light inactivated the oxygen-evolving complex much faster than the photochemical reaction center of PSII. These observations suggested that the light-induced damage was associated with a UV- and blue light-absorbing center in the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII. The action spectrum of the primary event in photodamage to PSII revealed the strong effects of UV and blue light and differed considerably from the absorption spectra of chlorophyll and thylakoid membranes. By contrast to the photoinduced inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex in untreated thylakoid membranes, red light efficiently induced inactivation of the PSII reaction center in Tris-treated thylakoid membranes, and the action spectrum resembled the absorption spectrum of chlorophyll. Our observations suggest that photodamage to PSII occurs in two steps. Step 1 is the light-induced inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex. Step 2, occurring after step 1 is complete, is the inactivation of the PSII reaction center by light absorbed by chlorophyll. We confirmed our model by illumination of untreated thylakoid membranes with blue and UV light, which inactivated the oxygen-evolving complex, and then with red light, which inactivated the photochemical reaction center.

  16. Zn2+-stimulation of sperm capacitation and of the acrosome reaction is mediated by EGFR activation.

    PubMed

    Michailov, Yulia; Ickowicz, Debbi; Breitbart, Haim

    2014-12-15

    Extracellular zinc regulates cell proliferation via the MAP1 kinase pathway in several cell types, and has been shown to act as a signaling molecule. The testis contains a relatively high concentration of Zn(2+), required in both the early and late stages of spermatogenesis. Despite the clinical significance of this ion, its role in mature sperm cells is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized the role of Zn(2+) in sperm capacitation and in the acrosome reaction. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ZnR of the GPR39 type in sperm cells. We previously demonstrated the presence of active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in sperm, its possible transactivation by direct activation of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and its involvement in sperm capacitation and in the acrosome reaction (AR). We show here that Zn(2+) activates the EGFR during sperm capacitation, which is mediated by activation of trans-membrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC), protein kinase A (PKA), and the tyrosine kinase, Src. Moreover, the addition of Zn(2+) to capacitated sperm caused further stimulation of EGFR and phosphatydil-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation, leading to the AR. The stimulation of the AR by Zn(2+) also occurred in the absence of Ca(2+) in the incubation medium, and required the tmAC, indicating that Zn(2+) activates a GPCR. The AR stimulated by Zn(2+) is mediated by GPR39 receptor, PKA, Src and the EGFR, as well as the EGFR down-stream effectors PI3K, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC). These data support a role for extracellular zinc, acting through the ZnR, in regulating multiple signaling pathways in sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction.

  17. Molybdenum phosphosulfide: an active, acid-stable, earth-abundant catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Kibsgaard, Jakob; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2014-12-22

    Introducing sulfur into the surface of molybdenum phosphide (MoP) produces a molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) catalyst with superb activity and stability for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic environments. The MoP|S catalyst reported herein exhibits one of the highest HER activities of any non-noble-metal electrocatalyst investigated in strong acid, while remaining perfectly stable in accelerated durability testing. Whereas mixed-metal alloy catalysts are well-known, MoP|S represents a more uncommon mixed-anion catalyst where synergistic effects between sulfur and phosphorus produce a high-surface-area electrode that is more active than those based on either the pure sulfide or the pure phosphide. The extraordinarily high activity and stability of this catalyst open up avenues to replace platinum in technologies relevant to renewable energies, such as proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers and solar photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting cells.

  18. A water activity control system for enzymatic reactions in organic media.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Anna E V; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Mattiasson, Bo

    2007-06-01

    A water activity control system for enzymatic synthesis in organic media, for litre-scale reactors has been constructed. Water activity, a(w), is a key factor when using enzymes in non-conventional media and the optimum value varies for different enzymes. The control system consists of a water activity sensor in the headspace of a jacketed glass reactor (equipped with narrow steel tubes to introduce air), gas-washing bottles containing blue silica gel (a(w)=0) and water (a(w)=1), a PC to monitor water activity and a programmable logic controller (PLC) to control the water activity. The system was evaluated by adjusting water activity in the medium, with a deviation from the set point of less than +/-0.05. Synthesis of cetyl palmitate, under controlled water activity and catalysed by two different lipase preparations, namely, Novozym 435 (immobilised Candida antarctica lipase B) and immobilised Candida rugosa lipase, were also performed. Novozym 435 catalyses reactions very well at extremely low water activity while C. rugosa lipase shows low activity for a(w)<0.5.

  19. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; ...

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  20. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  1. Method for Determining the Activation Energy Distribution Function of Complex Reactions by Sieving and Thermogravimetric Measurements.

    PubMed

    Bufalo, Gennaro; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2016-01-14

    A method for studying the kinetics of thermal degradation of complex compounds is suggested. Although the method is applicable to any matrix whose grain size can be measured, herein we focus our investigation on thermogravimetric analysis, under a nitrogen atmosphere, of ground soft wheat and ground maize. The thermogravimetric curves reveal that there are two well-distinct jumps of mass loss. They correspond to volatilization, which is in the temperature range 298-433 K, and decomposition regions go from 450 to 1073 K. Thermal degradation is schematized as a reaction in the solid state whose kinetics is analyzed separately in each of the two regions. By means of a sieving analysis different size fractions of the material are separated and studied. A quasi-Newton fitting algorithm is used to obtain the grain size distribution as best fit to experimental data. The individual fractions are thermogravimetrically analyzed for deriving the functional relationship between activation energy of the degradation reactions and the particle size. Such functional relationship turns out to be crucial to evaluate the moments of the activation energy distribution, which is unknown in terms of the distribution calculated by sieve analysis. From the knowledge of moments one can reconstruct the reaction conversion. The method is applied first to the volatilization region, then to the decomposition region. The comparison with the experimental data reveals that the method reproduces the experimental conversion with an accuracy of 5-10% in the volatilization region and of 3-5% in the decomposition region.

  2. Catalyst activation, deactivation, and degradation in palladium-mediated Negishi cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Böck, Katharina; Feil, Julia E; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2015-03-27

    Pd-mediated Negishi cross-coupling reactions were studied by a combination of kinetic measurements, electrospray-ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, (31)P NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The kinetic measurements point to a rate-determining oxidative addition. Surprisingly, this step seems to involve not only the Pd catalyst and the aryl halide substrate, but also the organozinc reagent. In this context, the ESI-mass spectrometric observation of heterobimetallic Pd-Zn complexes [L2 PdZnR](+) (L=S-PHOS, R=Bu, Ph, Bn) is particularly revealing. The inferred presence of these and related neutral complexes with a direct Pd-Zn interaction in solution explains how the organozinc reagent can modulate the reactivity of the Pd catalyst. Previous theoretical calculations by González-Pérez et al. (Organometallics- 2012, 31, 2053) suggest that the complexation by the organozinc reagent lowers the activity of the Pd catalyst. Presumably, a similar effect also causes the rate decrease observed upon addition of ZnBr2 . In contrast, added LiBr apparently counteracts the formation of Pd-Zn complexes and restores the high activity of the Pd catalyst. At longer reaction times, deactivation processes due to degradation of the S-PHOS ligand and aggregation of the Pd catalyst come into play, thus further contributing to the appreciable complexity of the title reaction.

  3. Reaction layers and mechanisms for a Ti-activated braze on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. J.; Hosking, F. M.; Headley, T. J.; Hlava, P. F.; Yost, F. G.

    2003-12-01

    A study was conducted to understand the wetting phenomena observed in brazing of a Ti-containing active filler metal on sapphire substrates. The goal of the study was to understand the interfacial reactions that permit wetting of commercial Ag-Cu-Ti active filler metal to pure alumina, despite the lower thermodynamic stability of TiO2 relative to Al2O3. Based upon transmission electron microscope, electron microprobe, and Auger analyses, it is proposed that two coupled reactions and diffusion of reactants take place. The oxides TiO, Ti2O, and Cu3Ti3O were observed at the braze/ceramic interface. It is suggested that the complex oxide Cu3Ti3O grows at its interface with TiO, and the oxide TiO is produced by reaction of Ti and sapphire and is subsequently consumed at its interface with Cu3Ti3O. It is also suggested that Ti2O forms from Ti and TiO while cooling from the brazing cycle.

  4. Computational Studies of CO2 Activation via Photochemical Reactions with Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Patterson, Eric; Hatch, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Reactions between CO2 and reduced sulfur compounds (RSC) - H2S and CH3SH - were investigated using ground and excited state density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster (CC) methods to explore possible RSC oxidation mechanisms and CO2 activation mechanisms in the atmospheric environment. Ground electronic state calculations at the CR-CC(2,3)/6-311+G(2df,2p)//CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) level show proton transfer as a limiting step in the reduction of CO2 with activation energies of 49.64 and 47.70 kcal/mol, respectively, for H2S and CH3SH. On the first excited state surface, CR-EOMCC(2,3)/6-311+G(2df,2p)//CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) calculations reveal that energies of <250 nm are needed to form H2S-CO2 and CH3SH-CO2 complexes allowing facile hydrogen atom transfer. Once excited, all reaction intermediates and transition states are downhill energetically showing either C-H or C-S bond formation in the excited state whereas only C-S bond formation was found in the ground state. Environmental implications of these data are discussed with a focus on tropospheric reactions between CO2 and RSC, as well as potential for carbon sequestration using photocatalysis. PMID:22920727

  5. Active Target-Time Projection Chambers for Reactions Induced by Rare Isotope Beams: Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Great progress in experimental sensitivity has been attained by increase in rare isotope beam intensities and by the development of new high efficiency detectors. It is now possible to study reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron to proton ratios. Application of Active Target-Time Projection Chambers to this domain of physics will be illustrated by experiments performed with existing detectors. The NSCL is developing an Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) to be used to study reactions induced by rare isotope beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Facility (NSCL) and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The AT-TPC counter gas acts as both a target and detector, allowing investigations of fusion, isobaric analog states, cluster structure of light nuclei and transfer reactions to be conducted without significant loss in resolution due to the thickness of the target. The high efficiency and low threshold of the AT-TPC will allow investigations of fission barriers and giant resonances with fast fragmentation rare isotope beams. This detector type needs typically a large number of electronic channels (order of magnitude 10,000) and a high speed DAQ. A reduced size prototype detector with prototype electronics has been realized and used in several experiments. A short description of other detectors of this type under development will be given.

  6. Origins of the Unfavorable Activation and Reaction Energies of 1-Azadiene Heterocycles Compared to 2-Azadiene Heterocycles in Diels-Alder Reactions.

    PubMed

    Fell, Jason S; Martin, Blanton N; Houk, K N

    2017-02-17

    The reactivities of butadiene, cyclopentadiene, furan, thiophene, pyrrole, and their 1-aza- and 2-aza-derivatives in Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and fumaronitrile were investigated with density functional theory (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p)). The activation free energies for the Diels-Alder reactions of cyclic 1-azadienes are 10-14 kcal mol(-1) higher than those of cyclic 2-azadienes, and the reaction free energies are 17-20 kcal mol(-1) more endergonic. The distortion/interaction model shows that the increased activation energies of cyclic 1-azadienes originate from increased transition state distortion energies and unfavorable interaction energies, arising from addition to the nitrogen terminus of the C═N bond.

  7. Tunable catalytic activity of solid solution metal-organic frameworks in one-pot multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Gándara, Felipe; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this research is to establish how metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of more than one metal in equivalent crystallographic sites (solid solution MOFs) exhibit catalytic activity, which is tunable by virtue of the metal ions ratio. New MOFs with general formula [InxGa1-x(O2C2H4)0.5(hfipbb)] were prepared by the combination of Ga and In. They are isostructural with their monometal counterparts, synthesized with Al, Ga, and In. Differences in their behavior as heterogeneous catalysts in the three-component, one pot Strecker reaction illustrate the potential of solid solution MOFs to provide the ability to address the various stages involved in the reaction mechanism.

  8. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  9. Impact of active phase chemical composition and dispersity on catalytic behavior in PROX reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Paneva, D.; Todorova, S.; Kolev, H.; Shopska, M.; Yordanova, I.; Mitov, I.

    2014-04-01

    Iron and iron-platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon have been successfully synthesized by wet impregnation method and low-temperature treatment in inert atmosphere. The content of the supported phases corresponds to 10 wt % Fe and 0.5 wt % Pt. Four catalytic samples were synthesized: Sample A—activated carbon impregnated with Fe nitrate; Sample B—activated carbon impregnated with Pt salt; Sample C—activated carbon impregnated consequently with Fe and Pt salts; Sample D—activated carbon impregnated simultaneously with Fe and Pt salts. The as-prepared materials were characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The spectra show that the activated carbon support and the preparation procedure give rise to the synthesis of isolated metal Pt ions and ultradispersed Fe and Pt oxide species. Probably the presence of different functional groups of activated carbon gives rise to registered very high dispersion of loaded species on support. The catalytic tests were carried out in PROX reaction. A lower activity of bimetallic Pt-Fe samples was explained with the increase in surface oxygen species as a result of predomination of iron oxide on the support leading to the increase in selectivity to the H2 oxidation. Partial agglomeration of supported iron oxide phase was registered after catalytic tests.

  10. Quantification of Cyclic Ground Reaction Force Histories During Daily Activity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental studies of bone remodeling suggest that bone density and structure are influenced by local cyclic skeletal tissue stress and strain histories. Estimation of long-term loading histories in humans is usually achieved by assessment of physical activity level by questionnaires, logbooks, and pedometers, since the majority of lower limb cyclic loading occurs during walking and running. These methods provide some indication of the mechanical loading history, but fail to consider the true magnitude of the lower limb skeletal forces generated by various daily activities. These techniques cannot account for individual gait characteristics, gait speed, and unpredictable high loading events that may influence bone mass significantly. We have developed portable instrumentation to measure and record the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRFz) during normal daily activity. This equipment allows long-term quantitative monitoring of musculoskeletal loads, which in conjunction with bone mineral density assessments, promises to elucidate the relationship between skeletal stresses and bone remodeling.

  11. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  12. Ru complexes of Hoveyda–Grubbs type immobilized on lamellar zeolites: activity in olefin metathesis reactions

    PubMed Central

    Žilková, Naděžda; Kubů, Martin; Mazur, Michal; Bastl, Zdeněk; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalysts with cationic tags on NHC ligands were linker-free immobilized on the surface of lamellar zeolitic supports (MCM-22, MCM-56, MCM-36) and on mesoporous molecular sieves SBA-15. The activity of prepared hybrid catalysts was tested in olefin metathesis reactions: the activity in ring-closing metathesis of citronellene and N,N-diallyltrifluoroacetamide decreased in the order of support MCM-22 ≈ MCM-56 > SBA-15 > MCM-36; the hybrid catalyst based on SBA-15 was found the most active in self-metathesis of methyl oleate. All catalysts were reusable and exhibited low Ru leaching (<1% of Ru content). XPS analysis revealed that during immobilization ion exchange between Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalyst and zeolitic support occurred in the case of Cl− counter anion; in contrast, PF6 − counter anion underwent partial decomposition. PMID:26664629

  13. Acid activated montmorillonite as catalysts in methyl esterification reactions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Zatta, Leandro; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Wypych, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of acid activated montmorillonite in the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) is reported. Standard Montmorillonite (MMT) type STx-1 provided by the Clay Mineral Society repository was activated using phosphoric, nitric and sulphuric acids under different conditions and the resulting materials were characterized and evaluated as catalysts in the methyl esterification of lauric acid. Blank reactions carried out in the absence of any added catalyst presented conversions of 32.64, 69.79 and 79.23%, for alcohol:lauric acid molar ratios of 60:1, 12:1 and 6:1, respectively. In the presence of the untreated clay and using molar ratios of 12:1 and 6:1 with 12% of catalyst, conversions of 70.92 and 82.30% were obtained, respectively. For the acid activated clays, conversions up to 93.08% of lauric acid to methyl laurate were obtained, much higher than those observed for the thermal conversion or using untreated montmorillonite. Relative good correlations were observed between the catalytic activity and the development of acid sites and textural properties of the resulting materials. Therefore, a simple acid activation was able to improve the catalytic activity and produce clay catalysts that are environmental friendly, cost effective, noncorrosive and reusable.

  14. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  15. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  16. Hydroxyl radical reactions and the radical scavenging activity of β-carboline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Galisteo, Juan

    2015-04-01

    β-Carbolines are bioactive pyridoindole alkaloids occurring in foods, plants and the human body. Their activity as hydroxyl radical (OH) scavengers is reported here by using three different methods: deoxyribose degradation, hydroxylation of benzoate and hydroxylation of 2'-deoxyguanosine to give 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as assessed by RP-HPLC (MS). Fenton reactions (Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) plus H2O2) were used for OH generation, and the radical increased in the presence of ascorbic acid or 6-hydroxydopamine as pro-oxidants. β-Carbolines were scavengers of OH in the three assays and in the presence of pro-oxidants. Tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acids were active against the hydroxylation of 2'-deoxyguanosine. β-Carbolines reacted with hydroxyl radicals (OH) affording hydroxy-β-carbolines, whereas tetrahydro-β-carbolines gave oxidative and degradation products. On the basis of IC50 and reaction rates (k), β-carbolines (norharman and harman), and tetrahydro-β-carbolines (tetrahydro-β-carboline, 1-methyltetrahydro-β-carboline and pinoline) were good OH radical scavengers and their activity was comparable to that of the indole, melatonin, which is an effective hydroxyl radical scavenger and antioxidant.

  17. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  18. Highly active Pd-on-magnetite nanocatalysts for aqueous phase hydrodechlorination reactions.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Heike; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2009-05-01

    Nanoscale catalyst particles are already in focus as excellent tools in catalytic processes and intensive research is currently optimizing their performance. As known from nanosized metal particles, nanocatalysts have the potential of very high reaction rates due to their high specific surface areas and low mass transfer restrictions. In this study, we generated extremely active palladium catalysts on the basis of colloidal magnetic carriers. The most active catalyst contains only traces of Pd (0.15 wt %) on nanomagnetite as carrier. Pd-on-magnetite was successfully tested in batch experiments for the hydrodechlorination (HDC) of the chlorohydrocarbons trichloroethene (TCE) and chlorobenzene. For the HDC of TCE, second-order rate coefficients of approximately 1.6 x 10(4) L g(-1) min(-1) were measured. Such high activities have never been described before for Pd-containing catalysts in aqueous phase HDC reactions. The ferrimagnetism of the carrier enables a separation of the nanocatalyst from the treated water by means of magnetic separation. This allows the catalyst to be reused several times, which is an important advantage compared to other nanoscale catalytic systems such as pure Pd or Pd-on-Au colloids.

  19. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-07

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  20. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  1. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; ...

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  2. Synthesis of highly active and dual-functional electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Geng; Xu, Guangran; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Gong, Xia; Zheng, Dafang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qin

    2016-12-01

    The promising Pt-based ternary catalyst is crucial for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to improving catalytic activity and durability for both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a facile strategy is used for the synthesis ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities catalysts. The ternary RuMPt alloys exhibit enhanced specific and mass activity, positive half-wave potential, and long-term stability, compared with binary Pt-based alloy and the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which is attributed to the high electron density and upshifting of the d-band center for Pt atoms, and synergistic catalytic effects among Pt, M, and Ru atoms by introducing a transition metal. Impressively, the ternary RuCoPt catalyst exhibits superior mass activity (801.59 mA mg-1) and positive half-wave potential (0.857 V vs. RHE) towards MOR and ORR, respectively. Thus, the RuMPt nanocomposite is a very promising material to be used as dual electrocatalyst in the application of PEMFCs.

  3. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  4. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; ...

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  5. Gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids as active catalysts for Suzuki reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Fan, Xiaobin; Qi, Junjie; Ji, Junyi; Wang, Shulan; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2010-10-15

    Graphene was successfully modified with gold nanoparticles in a facile route by reducing chloroauric acid in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, which is used as both a surfactant and reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate for the first time that the gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids can act as efficient catalysts for the Suzuki reaction in water under aerobic conditions. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids was influenced by the size of the gold nanoparticles.

  6. Metal-Organic Frameworks derivatives for improving the catalytic activity of CO oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenlan; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Pengfei; Zhang, Suoying; Zhou, Weiqiang; Li, Hongfeng; Zhang, Tao; Li, Linjie; Lu, Xiaohua; Wu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Weina; Huo, Fengwei

    2017-03-15

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based derivatives have attracted an increasing interest in various research fields. However, most of reported papers mainly focused on the pristine MOFs-based derivatives, and researches on the functional MOFs-based derivatives composites are rare. Here, a simple strategy was reported to design the functional MOFs based derivatives composites by the encapsulation of the metal nanoparticles (MNPs) in MOFs matrixes (MNPs@MOFs) and the high-temperature calcination of MNPs@MOFs composites. The as-prepared MNPs@metal oxide composites with the hierarchical pore structure exhibited excellent catalytic activity and high stability for CO oxidation reaction.

  7. Selective molecular recognition, C-H bond activation, and catalysis in nanoscale reaction vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Leung, Dennis H.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2004-11-27

    Supramolecular chemistry represents a way to mimic enzyme reactivity by using specially designed container molecules. We have shown that a chiral self-assembled M{sub 4}L{sub 6} supramolecular tetrahedron can encapsulate a variety of cationic guests, with varying degrees of stereoselectivity. Reactive iridium guests can be encapsulated and the C-H bond activation of aldehydes occurs, with the host cavity controlling the ability of substrates to interact with the metal center based upon size and shape. In addition, the host container can act as a catalyst by itself. By restricting reaction space and preorganizing the substrates into reactive conformations, it accelerates the sigmatropic rearrangement of enammonium cations.

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  9. Benzylic Phosphates in Friedel-Crafts Reactions with Activated and Unactivated Arenes: Access to Polyarylated Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Pallikonda, Gangaram; Chakravartya, Manab

    2016-03-04

    Easily reachable electron-poor/rich primary and secondary benzylic phosphates are suitably used as substrates for Friedel-Crafts benzylation reactions with only 1.2 equiv activated/deactivated arenes (no additional solvent) to access structurally and electronically diverse polyarylated alkanes with excellent yields and selectivities at room temperature. Specifically, diversely substituted di/triarylmethanes are generated within 2-30 min using this approach. A wide number of electron-poor polyarylated alkanes are easily accomplished through this route by just tuning the phosphates.

  10. Hydrogen-bond-assisted activation of allylic alcohols for palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gumrukcu, Yasemin; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-03-01

    We report direct activation of allylic alcohols using a hydrogen-bond-assisted palladium catalyst and use this for alkylation and amination reactions. The novel catalyst comprises a palladium complex based on a functionalized monodentate phosphoramidite ligand in combination with urea additives and affords linear alkylated and aminated allylic products selectively. Detailed kinetic analysis show that oxidative addition of the allyl alcohol is the rate-determining step, which is facilitated by hydrogen bonds between the alcohol, the ligand functional group, and the additional urea additive.

  11. An Ode to PSII

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firooznia, Fardad

    2009-01-01

    Many instructors of biology have noted the usefulness of hands-on exercises that require building and using a model or role-playing in helping students to visualize and understand abstract concepts better. In the author's introductory courses, he has resorted to role-playing and biological "plays" to help students visualize more abstract subjects…

  12. Chemiluminescence assay of lipase activity using a synthetic substrate as proenhancer for luminol chemiluminescence reaction.

    PubMed

    Ichibangase, Tomoko; Ohba, Yoshihito; Kishikawa, Naoya; Nakashima, Kenichiro; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2004-01-01

    A novel chemiluminescence (CL) assay method for lipase (triacylglycerol lipase, E.C.3.1.1.3) activity was developed by using the lauric acid ester of 2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-diphenylimidazole (HDI) as a substrate. The method is based on the enhanced CL reaction of luminol-hydrogen peroxide-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with HDI that is liberated from the substrate by enzymatic hydrolysis. To simplify the assay procedure, both the hydrolysis of the substrate and the enhanced CL reaction were performed in the same reaction mixture. Lipases from Candida cylindracea and porcine pancreas were successfully determined with the detection limits (blank signal + 3 SD) of 0.05 and 50.0 mU/tube, respectively. The method is simple and rapid, permitting the completion of single assay within 5 min. The reproducibilities obtained with replicate assays were relative standard deviations (RSDs) of <=> 4.7% for within-day and <=> 6.0% for between-day assays.

  13. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-10-01

    For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over alloy electrocatalysts, the understanding of how the atomic arrangement of the metal species in the nanocatalysts is responsible for the catalytic enhancement is challenging for achieving better design and tailoring of nanoalloy catalysts. This paper reports results of an investigation of the atomic structures and the electrocatalytic activities of ternary and binary nanoalloys, aiming at revealing a fundamental insight into the unique atomic-scale structure-electrocatalytic activity relationship. PtIrCo catalyst and its binary counterparts (PtCo and PtIr) are chosen as a model system for this study. The effect of thermochemical treatment temperature on the atomic-scale structure of the catalysts was examined as a useful probe to the structure-activity correlation. The structural characterization of the binary and ternary nanoalloy catalysts was performed by combining surface sensitive techniques such as XPS and 3D atomic ordering sensitive techniques such as high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis (HE-XRD/PDFs) and computer simulations. The results show that the thermal treatment temperature tunes the nanoalloy’s atomic and chemical ordering in a different way depending on the chemical composition, leading to differences in the nanoalloy’s mass and specific activities. A unique structural tunability of the atomic ordering in a platinum-iridium-cobalt nanoalloy has been revealed for enhancing greatly the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction, which has significant implication for rational design and nanoengineering of advanced catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

  14. Activity Trends of Binary Silver Alloy Nanocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Fuyi; Zhang, Nan; Lei, Yimin; Jin, Yachao; Qaseem, Adnan; Johnston, Roy L

    2017-02-02

    The electrocatalytic activity of Pt-based alloys exhibits a strong dependence on their electronic structures, but a relationship between electronic structure and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in Ag-based alloys is still not clear. Here, a vapor deposition based approach is reported for the preparation of Ag75 M25 (M = Cu, Co, Fe, and In) and Agx Cu100-x (x = 0, 25, 45, 50, 55, 75, 90, and 100) nanocatalysts and their electronic structures are determined by valence band spectra. The relationship of the d-band center and ORR activity exhibits volcano-shape behaviors, where the maximum catalytic activity is obtained for Ag75 Cu25 alloys. The ORR enhancement of Ag75 Cu25 alloys originates from the 0.12 eV upshift in d-band center relative to pure Ag, which is different from the downshift in the d-band center in Pt-based alloys. The activity trend for these Ag75 M25 alloys is in the order of Ag75 Cu25 > Ag75 Fe25 > Ag75 Co25 . These results provide an insight to understand the activity and stability enhancement of Ag75 Cu25 and Ag50 Cu50 catalysts by alloying.

  15. Impact of thermal processing and the Maillard reaction on the basophil activation of hazelnut allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Cucu, Tatiana; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Bridts, Chris; Devreese, Bart; Ebo, Didier

    2012-05-01

    Food allergy, an abnormal immunological response due to sensitization to a food component, has become an important health problem, especially in industrialized countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of thermal processing and glycation on the basophil activation by hazelnut proteins using a basophil activation test. Patients with systemic allergic reactions (SR; n=6) to hazelnut as well as patients with an isolated oral allergy syndrome (OAS; n=4) were investigated. Thermal processing of hazelnut proteins either in the presence or absence of wheat proteins did not result in major changes in the stimulatory activity of the basophils for patients with SR or OAS. For the patients with OAS, incubation of hazelnut proteins with glucose led to complete depletion of the stimulatory activity of the basophils. An increase in stimulatory activity of the basophils for two out of six patients with SR was observed. For the other four patients slight or complete abolition of the stimulatory activity was observed. These results indicate that some patients with SR to hazelnut are at risk when exposed to hazelnut proteins, even in processed foods.

  16. Activation of organozinc reagents with t-Bu-P4 base for transition metal-free catalytic SN2' reaction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Ueno, Masahiro; Naka, Hiroshi; Kondo, Yoshinori

    2008-08-28

    The t-Bu-P4 base was found to be an excellent catalyst for activating organozinc reagents and was used to promote the S(N)2' reaction of alpha,beta-unsaturated esters bearing a gamma-chloride using various organozinc reagents: these reactions proceeded in high yields with excellent chemo-and regioselectivity.

  17. Strong counteranion effects on the catalytic activity of cationic silicon Lewis acids in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenji; Akiyama, Ryuto; Sawamura, Masaya

    2005-12-08

    [chemical reaction: see text]. A toluene-coordinated silyl borate, [Et3Si(toluene)]B(C6F5)4, demonstrated catalytic activities significantly higher than those of Me3SiOTf and Me3SiNTf2 in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

  18. Synchronizing Substrate Activation Rates in Multicomponent Reactions with Metal-Organic Framework Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2016-05-04

    A study on the influence of the cation coordination number, number of Lewis acid centers, concurrent existence of Lewis base sites, and structure topology on the catalytic activity of six new indium MOFs, has been carried out for multicomponent reactions (MCRs). The new indium polymeric frameworks, namely [In8 (OH)6 (popha)6 (H2 O)4 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-16), [In(popha)(2,2'-bipy)]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-17), [In3 (OH)3 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-18), [In2 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)2 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-19), [In(OH)(Hpopha)]⋅0.5 (1,7-phen) (InPF-20), and [In(popha)(1,10-phen)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-21) (InPF=indium polymeric framework, H3 popha=5-(4-carboxy-2-nitrophenoxy)isophthalic acid, phen=phenanthroline, bipy=bipyridine), have been hydrothermally obtained by using both conventional heating (CH) and microwave (MW) procedures. These indium frameworks show efficient Lewis acid behavior for the solvent-free cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds, the one pot Passerini 3-component (P-3CR) and the Ugi 4-component (U-4CR) reactions. In addition, InPF-17 was found to be a highly reactive, recyclable, and environmentally benign catalyst, which allows the efficient synthesis of α-aminoacyl amides. The relationship between the Lewis base/acid active site and the catalytic performance is explained by the 2D seven-coordinated indium framework of the catalyst InPF-17. This study is an attempt to highlight the main structural and synthetic factors that have to be taken into account when planning a new, effective MOF-based heterogeneous catalyst for multicomponent reactions.

  19. Rationalizing the Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Two-Dimensional Hydrogenated Silicene and Germanene.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Caroline J; Chakraborty, Sudip; Anversa, Jonas; Baierle, Rogério J; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-20

    We have undertaken first-principles electronic structure calculations to show that the chemical functionalization of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene (silicane) and germanene (germanane) can become a powerful tool to increase the photocatalytic water-splitting activity. Spin-polarized density functional theory within the GGA-PBE and HSE06 types of exchange correlation functionals has been used to obtain the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicane and germanane functionalized with a series of nonmetals (N, P, and S), alkali metals (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline-earth metals (Mg and Ca). The surface-adsorbate interaction between the functionalized systems with H2 and O2 molecules that leads to envisaged hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity has been determined.

  20. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  1. Redox activity of surface oxygen anions in oxygen-deficient perovskite oxides during electrochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, David N; Machala, Michael L; Bluhm, Hendrik; Chueh, William C

    2015-01-19

    Surface redox-active centres in transition-metal oxides play a key role in determining the efficacy of electrocatalysts. The extreme sensitivity of surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Here we report the direct observation of surface redox processes by surface-sensitive, operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy using thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxides as model electrodes for elevated-temperature oxygen incorporation and evolution reactions. In contrast to the conventional view that the transition metal cations are the dominant redox-active centres, we find that the oxygen anions near the surface are a significant redox partner to molecular oxygen due to the strong hybridization between oxygen 2p and transition metal 3d electronic states. We propose that a narrow electronic state of significant oxygen 2p character near the Fermi level exchanges electrons with the oxygen adsorbates. This result highlights the importance of surface anion-redox chemistry in oxygen-deficient transition-metal oxides.

  2. Reaction rate, activation energy, and detection limit for the reaction of 5-furoylquinoline-3-carboxaldehyde with neurotransmitters in artificial cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Chen, Z; Dovichi, N J

    2000-04-28

    The fluorogenic reagent 5-furoylquinoline-3-carboxaldehyde (FQ) has proven valuable in the analysis of proteins and small neurotransmitters. We monitored the reaction rate between this reagent and five neurotransmitters at 40 degrees and 65 degrees C in artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The reactions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The activation energy for the reaction of FQ was 10.6, 10.7, 22.0, 31.4, and 34.4 kJ mol(-1) for alanine, taurine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamine, and glutamic acid, respectively. At 65 degrees C, the reaction rate was quite similar for alanine, taurine, glutamine, and glutamic acid (1.8 x 10(-3) s(-1)) but was twice as fast for GABA. A reaction time of nearly 1 h was required to quantitatively convert these neurotransmitters to their fluorescent products at 65 degrees C. Detection limits for the labeled neurotransmitters were 10(-9)-10(-8) M, which corresponded to 0.3-7 amol injected onto the capillary.

  3. Effect Of Reaction Environments On The Reactivity Of PCB (2-Chlorobiphenyl) Over Activated Carbon Impregnated With Palladized Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-...

  4. Effective synthesis of optically active trifluoromethyldiazirinyl homophenylalanine and aroylalanine derivatives with the Friedel-Crafts reaction in triflic acid.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Ryo; Murai, Yuta; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2009-06-01

    The Friedel-Crafts reaction with 3-(3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirine and optically active N-TFA-Asp(Cl)-OMe in triflic acid afforded homophenylalanine derivatives without any loss of the optical purity.

  5. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  6. Investigating {sup 13}C+{sup 12}C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chesneanu, Daniela Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-24

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the “Horia Hulubei” National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the {sup 12}C+{sup 13}C reaction at beam energies E{sub lab}= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C over a wide energy range. A {sup 13}C beam with intensities 0.5–2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with {sup 24}Na from the {sup 12}C({sup 13}C,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from {sup 24}Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for E{sub lab} = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1–3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure {sup 12}C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β–γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  7. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  8. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Park, Gu-Gon

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities compared to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.

  9. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; ...

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  10. Timing of cortical excitability changes during the reaction time of movements superimposed on tonic motor activity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Cyril; Lavoie, Brigitte A; Barbeau, Hugues; Capaday, Charles

    2004-12-01

    Seated subjects were instructed to react to an auditory cue by simultaneously contracting the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of each ankle isometrically. Focal transcranial magnetic stimulation of the leg area of the motor cortex (MCx) was used to determine the time course of changes in motor-evoked potential amplitude (MEP) during the reaction time (RT). In one condition the voluntary contraction was superimposed on tonic EMG activity maintained at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction. In the other condition the voluntary contraction was made starting from rest. MEPs in the TA contralateral to the stimulation coil were evoked at various times during the RT in each condition. These were compared to the control MEPs evoked during tonic voluntary activity or with the subject at rest. The RT was measured trial by trial from the EMG activity of the TA ipsilateral to the magnetic stimulus, taking into account the nearly constant time difference between the two sides. The MEPs became far greater than control MEPs during the RT (mean = 332%, SD = 44 %, of control MEPs, P < 0.001) without any measurable change in the background level of EMG activity. The onset of this facilitation occurred on average 12.80 ms (SD = 7.55 ms) before the RT. There was no difference in the onset of facilitation between the two conditions. Because MEPs were facilitated without a change in the background EMG activity, it is concluded that this facilitation is specifically due to an increase of MCx excitability just before voluntary muscle activation. This conclusion is further reinforced by the observation that MEPs evoked by near-threshold anodal stimuli to the MCx were not facilitated during the RT, in contrast to those evoked by near-threshold transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, several observations in the present and previous studies indicate that MEP amplitude may be more sensitive to alpha-motoneuron activity than to motor cortical neuron activity, an idea that has important

  11. Superior long-term activity for a Pt-Re alloy compared to Pt in methanol oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Audrey S.; Xie, Kangmin; Monnier, John R.; Chen, Donna A.

    2017-03-01

    Pt-Re bimetallic catalysts have shown enhanced activity compared to pure Pt for reactions involving oxidation, but the origins of this improved activity are not fully understood. Methanol oxidation on a Pt-Re alloy surface and pure Pt foil was studied in a microreactor coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. For reaction at 60 °C, the Pt-Re alloy surface exhibits superior long-term activity over a 24 h reaction period compared to pure Pt. The initial activity of Pt is 10-15% higher than on Pt-Re; however, the Pt surface gradually loses activity after 10 h online, whereas the activity of Pt-Re does not diminish. Post-reaction XPS shows that more carbon accumulates on the Pt than on Pt-Re, and the improved long-term activity is attributed to a greater ability of Pt-Re to oxidize the carbonaceous intermediates that eventually poison active sites. Both Pt and Pt-Re surfaces have almost no activity for methanol oxidation until a minimum coverage of oxygen is achieved from O2 dissociation. A comparison with methanol oxidation studies on Pt and Pt-Re in a pressure regime that is 150 times lower than in this work demonstrates that more carbon and less oxygen accumulate on the surfaces during reaction at the lower pressures.

  12. Indirect determination of Li via 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced by neutrons from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Reddy, G. L. N.; Rao, Pritty; Verma, Rakesh; Ramana, J. V.; Vikramkumar, S.; Raju, V. S.

    2012-03-01

    An indirect method to determine Li by 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced in a high purity Ge (detector) crystal by neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a typical particle-induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy experimental set-up is described. Performed with proton beams of energies in excess of 1.88 MeV, the threshold energy (Eth) of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, the determination involves the activity measurement of 75mGe isotope that has a half-life of 47.7 s and decays with the emission of 139 keV γ-rays. Rapidity, selectivity and sensitivity down to ppm levels are the attractive features of the method. It is a suitable alternative to 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction based PIGE technique in the analyses of matrices that contain light elements such as Be, B, F, Na and Al in significant proportions. Interferences can arise from elements, for example V and Ti, that have Eth ⩽ 1.88 MeV for (p,n) reaction. In the case of elements such as Cu, Mo which have with Eth > 1.88 MeV, the incident proton beam energy can be judiciously selected to avoid or minimize an interference. The method, under optimized irradiation conditions, does not entail a risk of neutron stimulated degradation of the performance of the detector. Besides analytical purposes, the measurement of the 75mGe activity can serve as a powerful tool to monitor even low (˜25 n/cm2 s) thermal neutron fluxes.

  13. Photosynthetic activity of vascular bundles in Plantago media leaves.

    PubMed

    Miszalski, Zbigniew; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Silina, Ekaterina; Dymova, Olga; Golovko, Tamara; Kornas, Andrzej; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthetic processes in the leaf lamina and midribs of Plantago media were investigated using plants grown in high light (HL) or low light (LL) conditions. The fluorescence parameters, which indicate photochemical/photosynthetic activity, were different in HL and LL grown plants, but no major differences between lamina and midribs were found. An OJIP test (chlorophyll a fluorescence transient induction) of LL grown plants, indicative of the chloroplast electron transport chain, also showed both tissues to be similar. In HL plants, a partial blockage of electron flow between QA (the primary plastoquinone electron acceptor of PSII) and QB (the secondary plastoquinone acceptor of PSII) was found, and this was less visible in midribs. The effective dissipation of quantum energy per reaction center (DI0/RC) was similar in both tissues of HL grown plants, while in the midribs of LL leaves, this process seemed to be less effective. Measurements of (13)C discrimination showed that the midrib tissues of LL and HL leaves effectively used β-carboxylation products to accumulate their biomass. Thus, the well protected activity of electron transport in midribs with their limited capacity to fix CO2 from the air may indicate the involvement of this tissue in β-carboxylation, transport or signaling. Carbon accumulated in roots showed a lower (13)C discrimination value (more negative) than the values observed in lamina. This could indicate that roots are supplied with assimilates mostly during the light phase of the day cycle with intensive C3 photosynthesis.

  14. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups.

  15. Kinetics and activation thermodynamics of methane monooxygenase compound Q formation and reaction with substrates.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2000-11-07

    The transient kinetics of formation and decay of the reaction cycle intermediates of the Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalytic cycle are studied as a function of temperature and substrate type and deuteration. Kinetic evidence is presented for the existence of three intermediates termed compounds O, P, and P forming after the addition of O(2) to diferrous MMO hydroxylase (H(r)) and before the formation of the reactive intermediate compound Q. The Arrhenius plots for these reactions are linear and independent of substrate concentration and type, showing that substrate does not participate directly in the oxygen activation phase of the catalytic cycle. Analysis of the transient kinetic data revealed only small changes relative to the weak optical spectrum of H(r) for any of these intermediates. In contrast, large changes in the 430 nm spectral region are associated with the formation of Q. The decay reaction of Q exhibits an apparent first-order concentration dependence for all substrates tested, and the observed rate constant depends on the substrate type. The kinetics of the decay reaction of Q yield a nonlinear Arrhenius plot when methane is the substrate, and the rates in both segments of the plot increase linearly with methane concentration. Together these observations suggest that at least two reactions with a methane concentration dependence, and perhaps two methane molecules, are involved in the decay process. When CD(4) is used as the substrate, a large isotope effect and a linear Arrhenius plot are observed. Analogous plots for all other MMO substrates tested (e.g., ethane) are linear, and no isotope effect for deuterated analogues is observed. This demonstrates that a step other than C-H bond breaking is rate limiting for alternative MMO substrates. A two step Q decay mechanism is proposed that provides an explanation for the lack of an isotope effect for alternative MMO substrates and the fact that rate of oxidation of

  16. Steroid-Derived Naphthoquinoline Asphaltene Model Compounds: Hydriodic Acid Is the Active Catalyst in I2-Promoted Multicomponent Cyclocondensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Matthias; Scott, David E; Scherer, Alexander; Hampel, Frank; Hamilton, Robin J; Gray, Murray R; Tykwinski, Rik R; Stryker, Jeffrey M

    2015-12-04

    A multicomponent cyclocondensation reaction between 2-aminoanthracene, aromatic aldehydes, and 5-α-cholestan-3-one has been used to synthesize model asphaltene compounds. The active catalyst for this reaction has been identified as hydriodic acid, which is formed in situ from the reaction of iodine with water, while iodine is not a catalyst under anhydrous conditions. The products, which contain a tetrahydro[4]helicene moiety, are optically active, and the stereochemical characteristics have been examined by VT-NMR and VT-CD spectroscopies, as well as X-ray crystallography.

  17. Ni- and Mn-Promoted Mesoporous Co3O4: A Stable Bifunctional Catalyst with Surface-Structure-Dependent Activity for Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqiao; Ren, Zheng; Chen, Sheng-Yu; Meng, Yongtao; Biswas, Sourav; Nandi, Partha; Elsen, Heather A; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-08-17

    Efficient bifunctional catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are highly desirable due to their wide applications in fuel cells and rechargeable metal air batteries. However, the development of nonprecious metal catalysts with comparable activities to noble metals is still challenging. Here we report a one-step wet-chemical synthesis of Ni-/Mn-promoted mesoporous cobalt oxides through an inverse micelle process. Various characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirm the successful incorporation of Ni and Mn leading to the formation of Co-Ni(Mn)-O solid solutions with retained mesoporosity. Among these catalysts, cobalt oxide with 5% Ni doping demonstrates promising activities for both ORR and OER, with an overpotential of 399 mV for ORR (at -3 mA/cm(2)) and 381 mV (at 10 mA/cm(2)) for OER. Furthermore, it shows better durability than precious metals featuring little activity decay throughout 24 h continuous operation. Analyses of cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and O2-temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD) reveal that redox activity of Co(3+) to Co(4+) is crucial for OER performance, while the population of surface oxygen vacancies and surface area determine ORR activities. The comprehensive investigation of the intrinsic active sites for ORR and OER by correlating different physicochemical properties to the electrochemical activities is believed to provide important insight toward the rational design of high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR and OER reactions.

  18. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  19. PdCu@Pd Nanocube with Pt-like Activity for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Feng; Guo, Si-Xuan; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Jiantai

    2017-02-27

    The electronic properties of metal surfaces can be modulated to weaken the binding energy of adsorbed H-intermediates on the catalyst surface, thus enhancing catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Here we first prepare PdCu alloy nanocubes (NCs) by coreduction of Cu(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate) and Na2PdCl4 in the presence of oleylamine (OAm) and trioctylphosphine (TOP). The PdCu NC coated glassy carbon electrode is then anodized at a constant potential of 0.51 V vs Ag/AgCl at room temperature in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution for 10 s, which converts PdCu NCs into core@shell PdCu@Pd NCs that show much enhanced Pt-like activity for the HER and much more robust durability. The improvements in surface property and HER activity are rationalized based on strain and ligand effects that enhance the activity of the edge-exposed Pd atoms on core@shell PdCu@Pd structure. This work opens up a new perspective for simultaneously reducing metal Pd cost and achieving excellent performance toward the HER.

  20. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-04-20

    In this project, we have employed a systematic approach to develop active, selective, and stable catalyst materials for important electrochemical reactions involving energy conversion. In particular, we have focused our attention on developing active catalyst materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). HER: We have synthesized and investigated several highly active and acid stable non-precious metal HER catalysts, including: [Mo3S13]2- nanoclusters (Nature Chemistry, 2014) and molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) (Angewandte Chemie, 2014). We have also aimed to engineer these catalyst formulations in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for fundamental studies of water electrolysis at high current densities, approximately 1 A/cm2 (ChemSusChem, 2015). We furthermore investigated transition metal phosphide (TMP) catalysts for HER by a combined experimental–theoretical approach (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). By synthesizing different TMPs and comparing experimentally determined HER activities with the hydrogen adsorption free energies, ΔGH, calculated by density functional theory, we showed that the TMPs follow a volcano relationship for the HER. Using our combined experimental–theoretical model, we predicted that the mixed metal TMP, Fe0.5Co0.5P, should have a near-optimal ΔGH. We synthesized several mixtures of Co and Fe phosphides alloys and confirmed that Fe0.5Co0.5P exhibits the highest HER activity of the investigated TMPs (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). The understanding gained as to how to improve catalytic activity for the HER, particularly for non-precious metal materials, is important to DOE targets for sustainable H2 production. OER: We have developed a SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst for acidic conditions (submitted, 2016). The Sr

  1. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ˙CH2OO˙ concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  2. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  3. Large steric effect in the substitution reaction of amines with phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleosides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Stronach, M. W.; Ketner, R. J.; Hurley, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Aliphatic amines react with phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine (ImpN) by replacing the imidazole group. The kinetics of reaction of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with glycine ethyl ester, glycinamide, 2-methoxyethylamine, n-butylamine, morpholine, dimethylamine (Me2NH), ethylmethylamine (EtNHMe), diethylamine (Et2NH), pyrrolidine, and piperidine were determined in water at 37 degrees C. With primary amines, a plot of the logarithm of the rate constant for attack by the amine on the protonated substrate, log kSH(A), versus the pKa of the amine exhibits a good linear correlation with a Bronsted slope, beta nuc = 0.48. Most of the secondary amines tested react with slightly higher reactivity than primary amines of similar pKa. Interestingly, some secondary amines show substantially lower reactivity than might be expected: EtNHMe reacts about eight times, and Et2NH at least 100 times, more slowly than Me2NH although all three amines are of similar basicity. For comparison, the kinetics of reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphoimidazolide (ImpG) and cytidine 5'-phosphoimidazolide (ImpC) were determined with Me2NH, EtNHMe, and Et2NH, and similar results were obtained. These results establish that the increased steric hindrance observed with the successive addition of ethyl groups are not due to any special steric requirements imposed by the guanosine or the methyl on the 2-methylimidazole leaving group of 2-MeImpG. It is concluded that addition of ethyl and, perhaps, groups larger than ethyl dramatically increases the kinetic barrier for addition of aliphatic secondary amines to the P-N bond of ImpN. This study supports the observation that the primary amino groups on the natural polyamines are at least 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than the secondary amino groups in the reaction with ImpN.

  4. Microstructure and Interfacial Reactions During Active Metal Brazing of Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laik, A.; Shirzadi, A. A.; Tewari, R.; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T.; Dey, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    Microstructural evolution and interfacial reactions during active metal vacuum brazing of Ti (grade-2) and stainless steel (SS 304L) using a Ag-based alloy containing Cu, Ti, and Al was investigated. A Ni-depleted solid solution layer and a discontinuous layer of (Ni,Fe)2TiAl intermetallic compound formed on the SS surface and adjacent to the SS-braze alloy interface, respectively. Three parallel contiguous layers of intermetallic compounds, CuTi, AgTi, and (Ag,Cu)Ti2, formed at the Ti-braze alloy interface. The diffusion path for the reaction at this interface was established. Transmission electron microscopy revealed formation of nanocrystals of Ag-Cu alloy of size ranging between 20 and 30 nm in the unreacted braze alloy layer. The interdiffusion zone of β-Ti(Ag,Cu) solid solution, formed on the Ti side of the joint, showed eutectoid decomposition to lamellar colonies of α-Ti and internally twinned (Cu,Ag)Ti2 intermetallic phase, with an orientation relationship between the two. Bend tests indicated that the failure in the joints occurred by formation and propagation of the crack mostly along the Ti-braze alloy interface, through the (Ag,Cu)Ti2 phase layer.

  5. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  6. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    PubMed

    Raff, Jonathan D; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L; Gordon, Mark S; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-08-18

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NO(y)) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO(2), HNO(3), N(2)O(5) and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NO(y) onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO(2) or N(2)O(5) on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO(2) in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist.

  7. Photodamage to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II by visible light.

    PubMed

    Zavafer, Alonso; Cheah, Mun Hon; Hillier, Warwick; Chow, Wah Soon; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2015-11-12

    Light damages photosynthetic machinery, primarily photosystem II (PSII), and it results in photoinhibition. A new photodamage model, the two-step photodamage model, suggests that photodamage to PSII initially occurs at the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) by light energy absorbed by manganese and that the PSII reaction center is subsequently damaged by light energy absorbed by photosynthetic pigments due to the limitation of electrons to the PSII reaction center. However, it is still uncertain whether this model is applicable to photodamage to PSII under visible light as manganese absorbs visible light only weakly. In the present study, we identified the initial site of photodamage to PSII upon illumination of visible light using PSII membrane fragments isolated from spinach leaves. When PSII samples were exposed to visible light in the presence of an exogenous electron acceptor, both PSII total activity and the PSII reaction centre activity declined due to photodamage. The supplemental addition of an electron donor to the PSII reaction centre alleviated the decline of the reaction centre activity but not the PSII total activity upon the light exposure. Our results demonstrate that visible light damages OEC prior to photodamage to the PSII reaction center, consistent with two-step photodamage model.

  8. Photodamage to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II by visible light

    PubMed Central

    Zavafer, Alonso; Cheah, Mun Hon; Hillier, Warwick; Chow, Wah Soon; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Light damages photosynthetic machinery, primarily photosystem II (PSII), and it results in photoinhibition. A new photodamage model, the two-step photodamage model, suggests that photodamage to PSII initially occurs at the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) by light energy absorbed by manganese and that the PSII reaction center is subsequently damaged by light energy absorbed by photosynthetic pigments due to the limitation of electrons to the PSII reaction center. However, it is still uncertain whether this model is applicable to photodamage to PSII under visible light as manganese absorbs visible light only weakly. In the present study, we identified the initial site of photodamage to PSII upon illumination of visible light using PSII membrane fragments isolated from spinach leaves. When PSII samples were exposed to visible light in the presence of an exogenous electron acceptor, both PSII total activity and the PSII reaction centre activity declined due to photodamage. The supplemental addition of an electron donor to the PSII reaction centre alleviated the decline of the reaction centre activity but not the PSII total activity upon the light exposure. Our results demonstrate that visible light damages OEC prior to photodamage to the PSII reaction center, consistent with two-step photodamage model. PMID:26560020

  9. [Mechanisms of in vivo suppressive effect of togaviridae and bunyaviridae on the activity of effectors of graft vs host reaction].

    PubMed

    Khozinskiĭ, V V; Semenov, B F

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on mice demonstrated the ability of 3 flaviviruses and 1 bunyavirus to suppress the activity of the effectors of the graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. The conditions of the suppression of the primary immunological recognition were shown to differ in infections caused by different viruses. In experimental flavivirus infections caused by Langat, dengue 2 or yellow fever (strain 17D) viruses T-suppressor cells were activated, and their activity was realized only in respect to syngeneic or semisyngeneic target cells. In mice infected with Tahyna virus (a bunyavirus) no suppressor cells capable of suppressing the activity of the effectors of the GVH reaction were detected. The suppression of this reaction, not linked with the activity of the detected T-suppressor cells, was observed in the Langat virus infection under conditions of bilateral incompatibility when both the donor and the recipient were infected.

  10. Driving reactions: Surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry using hydroxide melts and RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Todd Lawrence

    1997-11-01

    This thesis explores several techniques for surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry. The two major issues addressed are the use of a solution-based molten hydroxide system to increase the rate of reactant diffusion over that in the solid state, and the use of an RF plasma to break bonds in gaseous reactants for subsequent reaction with a solid. Part I describes the use of molten alkali metal hydroxides as a low-temperature solvent system for both electrodeposition and precipitation of high valent copper oxides. Cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the effects of various reaction conditions on copper dissolved in the melts, including copper activity, temperature, and atmosphere composition. The results of this study indicate that copper oxide phases become less soluble at higher copper activities, temperatures, and pHsb2O values. Also, the Cu(II)/Cu(III) redox wave, important for the electrodeposition of cuprate phases with high copper formal oxidation states, is observed below 300sp°C in air and at 350sp°C in dry argon. NaCuOsb2 was electrodeposited under constant current conditions. Iodometric titrations and annealing studies indicate that NaCuOsb2 is oxygen deficient and tends to lose additional oxygen on heating. The hydroxide method was also successful in the deposition of thin films of superconducting EuBasb2Cusb4Osb8 on SrTiOsb3 substrates. The films were found to be superconducting with a Tsbc of 75 K in the absence of annealing. In Part II, the idea of circumventing activation energy barriers is applied to the problem of environmentally harmful perfluorocarbons (PFCs). Mass spectrometry was used to determine the PFC emissions from two semiconductor manufacturing processes: oxide etch and post-CVD chamber clean. Because of radical recombination to thermodynamically stable species, most of the PFCs used in these processes are emitted to the atmosphere. A prototype abatement device which uses an RF plasma to provide the activation energy

  11. Endotoxin-induced coagulation reactions and phenoloxidase activity modulation in Sudanonautes africanus hemolymph fractions.

    PubMed

    Salawu, Musa Oyewole; Oloyede, Oyelola Bukoye

    2011-01-01

    Sudanonautes africanus is a freshwater crab local to Nigeria and West Africa that has no documentation of its innate immunity reactions. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) on coagulation and on phenoloxidase (PO) activity in the hemolymph fractions of S. africanus. The hemolymph from each of 10 live crabs was obtained by carapace puncture and then fractionated into plasma and hemocytes. The hemocytes were then processed and then fractionated into hemocyte lysate (HL), hemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), and hemocyte lysate debris (HLD). In one study, each fraction was then incubated with a fixed level of LPS in the presence or absence of exogenous calcium (Ca(2+)) ion. In another study, the LPS concentration was varied in order to study its effect on protein coagulation when an optimal ratio mixture of plasma:HLS was present as well as on PO activity in the plasma and HLS fractions. The results of the first set of studies demonstrated that a presence of Ca(2+) in the LPS-induced clotting reactions was essential. The next set of studies showed that a 7:1 plasma:HLS mixture yielded a higher level of coagulation than any other ratio tested in the presence of 1 EU LPS/ml. When this same plasma:HLS mixture ratio was used to ascertain the effect of varying LPS level on coagulation, the response trended higher up to a dose of 3.0 EU/ml., and decreased thereafter until 7 EU/ml. As expected based on the effect of LPS on PO activation, an increasing presence of LPS led to a general trend increase in activity of the enzyme in the plasma fraction; however, the effect was moreover inhibitory in the HLS fraction. From the results here, we conclude that protein coagulation is an important response, along with increased PO activity, that could manifest in Sudanonautes africanus after exposure to 'free' LPS or select LPS-bearing organisms in their environment.

  12. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER.

  13. Interfacial reaction between cubic boron nitride and Ti during active brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. F.; Xu, J. H.; Fu, Y. C.; Xiao, B.; Su, H. H.; Xu, H. J.

    2006-06-01

    Thermodynamic and reaction process analyses were performed to understand the joining characteristic during high temperature brazing between cubic boron nitride (CBN) grit and a silver-base filler alloy containing Ti as an active element. Experimental information on the microstructure of the brazed joint, the composition of the interface, and the shape of the compounds formed on the surface of the grit was obtained by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray, and x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that Ti in the molten filler alloy facilitated good wetting between the solid CBN crystals and braze filler alloy. The transition layer formed by the interaction of TiN and TiB2 was one of the key factors in joining the CBN and steel substrate.

  14. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ∝ intensity(n), with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors.

  15. The Olefin Metathesis Reactions Combined with Organo-Iron Arene Activation Towards Dendrimers, and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astruc, Didier; Martinez, Victor

    The subjects treated in the two lectures of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) summer course are (1) the combination of arene activation and perfunctionalization using organo-iron chemistry with olefin metathesis incuding metathesis of dendritic polyolefin molecules; (2) the synthesis of metallodendritic benzylidene complexes that catalyse ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) under ambient conditions and the formation of dendritic stars; (3) the use of stoichiometric and catalytic electron-transfer processes with standard reservoirs of electrons (reductants) or electron holes (oxidants) iron complexes to achieve noteworthy metathesis reactions or synthesize compounds that are useful in metathesis. Only the two first topics are treated in this chapter, and interested readers can find references concerning the third aspect called in the introduction and subsequently cited in the reference list.

  16. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  17. Meso-structured platinum thin films: active and stable electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Kibsgaard, Jakob; Gorlin, Yelena; Chen, Zhebo; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2012-05-09

    Improving both the activity and the stability of the cathode catalyst in platinum-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells is a key technical challenge. Here, we synthesize a high surface area meso-structured Pt thin film that exhibits higher specific activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than commercial carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/C). An accelerated stability test demonstrates that the meso-structured Pt thin film also displays significantly enhanced stability as compared to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Our study reveals the origin of the high turnover frequency (TOF), and excellent durability is attributed to the meso-structure, which yields a morphology with fewer undercoordinated Pt sites than Pt/C nanoparticles, a key difference with substantial impact to the surface chemistry. The improved catalyst activity and stability could enable the development of a high-performance gas diffusion electrode that is resistant to corrosion even under the harsh conditions of start-up, shut-down, and/or hydrogen starvation.

  18. Enhancing oxygen reduction reaction activity of Pt-shelled catalysts via subsurface alloying.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Daojian; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yu, Haiyan

    2014-10-14

    Despite remarkable efforts have been put into the field of Pt-shelled catalysts containing an atomically thin Pt surface layer for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the last decade, further development of new Pt-shelled catalysts is still necessary. Here, a new set of Pt-shelled catalysts by subsurface alloying with early transition metals such as Mn and Fe is predicted to be a good candidate for the ORR by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Trends in oxygen reduction activity of Pt-alloy catalysts are determined with calculations of oxygen binding by using the slab and cluster models. It is found that the subsurface alloys by the incorporation of submonolayer M (M = Mn and Fe) into Pt(111) in the slab model result in the enhancement of ORR activity, compared with the well-known Pt(111)-skin-M, pure Pt, and Pt3M alloy catalysts. For the cluster model, the Pt12Mn and Pt12Fe clusters are also found to be the optimal catalysts for the ORR. It is expected that this work can open up new opportunities for enhancing the ORR activity of Pt-alloy catalysts by subsurface alloying.

  19. Non-precious metal electrocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Bivens, AP; Myint, M; Zhuang, ZB; Forest, RV; Fang, QR; Chen, JG; Yan, YS

    2014-05-01

    A ternary metallic CoNiMo catalyst is electrochemically deposited on a polycrystalline gold (Au) disk electrode using pulse voltammetry, and characterized for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity by temperature-controlled rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The catalyst exhibits the highest HOR activity among all non-precious metal catalysts (e.g., 20 fold higher than Ni). At a sufficient loading, the CoNiMo catalyst is expected to outperform Pt and thus provides a promising low cost pathway for alkaline or alkaline membrane fuel cells. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and parallel H-2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on structurally much simpler model alloy systems show a trend that CoNiMo has a hydrogen binding energy (HBE) similar to Pt and much lower than Ni, suggesting that the formation of multi-metallic bonds modifies the HBE of Ni and is likely a significant contributing factor for the enhanced HOR activity.

  20. Tuning the Interfacial Activity of Mesoporous Silicas for Biphasic Interface Catalysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fen; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Fengwei; Ren, Xiaomin; Yang, Hengquan

    2017-03-08

    Interface-active particle materials that are able to assemble at the oil/water interface so as to stabilize droplets, are gaining unprecedented interest due to the intriguing applications in catalysis and materials synthesis, etc. In contrast to these potential applications, this kind of materials are still limited and cannot meet some particular demands of practical utilizations such as rationally designed interfacial activity and high stability against concentrated salts. In this contribution, interface-active mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSS@CxZy) are synthesized through simultaneous incorporation of extremely hydrophilic zwitterionic moiety and hydrophobic octyl moiety in the shell. The textural properties of these materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen sorption. The successful decoration of these functionalities in the shell is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), (13)C nuclear cross-polar magnetic resonance ((13)C CP/MAS NMR), and (29)Si nuclear cross-polar magnetic resonance ((29)Si CP/MAS NMR). The prepared mesoporous silicas exhibit tunable interfacial activity, so that oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) Pickering emulsions can be easily obtained by varying the molar fraction of these two functionalities. The MSS@CxZy-stabilized Pickering emulsions exhibit high stability to coalescence even at 6.0 M NaCl and have relatively low surface coverage of droplets due to electrostatic repulsion, which is normally difficult to obtain for conventional particles. Interestingly, such interface-active mesoporous silicas can also carry polyoxometalate that is hosted in the nanopore to assemble at the oil/water interface and thus efficiently promotes biphasic epoxidation reactions without any external stirring, exemplifying an innovative application of theses developed mesoporous silicas.

  1. Taste-Active Maillard Reaction Products in Roasted Garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Junichiro; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    In order to gain first insight into candidate Maillard reaction products formed upon thermal processing of garlic, mixtures of glucose and S-allyl-l-cysteine, the major sulfur-containing amino acid in garlic, were low-moisture heated, and nine major reaction products were isolated. LC-TOF-MS, 1D/2D NMR, and CD spectroscopy led to their identification as acortatarin A (1), pollenopyrroside A (2), epi-acortatarin A (3), xylapyrroside A (4), 5-hydroxymethyl-1-[(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furanyl)methyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carbalde-hyde (5), 3-(allylthio)-2-(2-formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)propanoic acid (6), (4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-3,4-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (7), (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-[(4R)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl]propanoic acid (8), and (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-((4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl)propanoic acid (9). Among the Maillard reaction products identified, compounds 5-9 have not previously been published. The thermal generation of the literature known spiroalkaloids 1-4 is reported for the first time. Sensory analysis revealed a bitter taste with thresholds between 0.5 and 785 μmol/kg for 1-5 and 7-9. Compound 6 did not show any intrinsic taste (water) but exhibited a strong mouthfullness (kokumi) enhancing activity above 186 μmol/kg. LC-MS/MS analysis showed 1-9 to be generated upon pan-frying of garlic with the highest concentration of 793.7 μmol/kg found for 6, thus exceeding its kokumi threshold by a factor of 4 and giving evidence for its potential taste modulation activity in processed garlic preparations.

  2. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize

  3. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  4. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the 103Rh(d,x) 100,101,103Pd, 100g,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103gRu reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  5. Automatic Activity and Reaction Time in Relation to Extraversion and Behavioral Impulsivity in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, Theodore P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Forty-five children and adolescents had skin conductance recorded during a presentation of tones and a reaction time test and were assessed for extraversion. Found that extraversion was negatively correlated with skin conductance response magnitudes to all stimuli--somewhat more strongly for reaction-time stimuli--and with reaction time. (HTH)

  6. Cytophotometric analysis of reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver, heart muscle and tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, C J; Vogels, I M

    1989-01-01

    Reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in cryostat sections of rat liver, tracheal epithelium and heart muscle were monitored by continuous measurement of formazan formation by cytophotometry at room temperature. Incubation media contained polyvinyl alcohol as tissue protectant and Tetranitro BT as final electron acceptor. Control media lacked either substrate or substrate and coenzyme. Controls were also performed by adding malonate (a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase), pyruvate (a non-competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase), oxalate (a competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase) or N-ethylmaleimide (a blocker of SH groups). A specific malonate-sensitive linear test minus control response for succinate dehydrogenase activity was obtained in liver (1.6 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) and tracheal epithelium (0.8 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) but not in heart muscle. All variations in the incubation conditions tested did not result in a linear test minus control response in the latter tissue. Because the reaction was sensitive to malonate, it was concluded that the initial reaction rate was the specific rate of succinate dehydrogenase activity in heart muscle (9.1 mumol H2 cm-3 min-1). Test minus control reactions for lactate dehydrogenase activity were distinctly non-linear for all tissues tested. This appeared to be due to product inhibition by pyruvate generated during the reaction and therefore it was concluded that the appropriate control reaction was the test reaction in the presence of 20 mM pyruvate. The initial rate of the test minus this control was the true rate of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The lactate dehydrogenase activity thus found in liver parenchyma was 5.0 mumol of H2 generated per cm3 liver tissue per min.

  7. An unusual nickel-copper-mediated alkyne homocoupling reaction for the active-template synthesis of [2]rotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Crowley, James D; Goldup, Stephen M; Gowans, Nicholas D; Leigh, David A; Ronaldson, Vicki E; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2010-05-05

    We report on an unusual Ni-/Cu-mediated alkyne homocoupling reaction, directed through the cavity of a bidentate macrocyclic ligand by chelated metal ions to furnish [2]rotaxanes in excellent (up to 95%) yields. This is the first active metal template reaction to employ an octahedral coordination geometry metal ion, Ni(II), and the study provides some interesting mechanistic insights into the mixed bimetallic reaction mechanism. The mixed-metal catalyst system was discovered serendipitously when Cu(I) was added to a Ni(II)-catalyzed alkyne homocoupling reaction in an attempt to facilitate chloride-acetylide ligand exchange. The role of Cu(I) in the reaction is, in fact, quite different from that originally intended. The effectiveness of having both nickel and copper present can be rationalized by the nature of a pi-activated, sigma-bonded, bimetallic intermediate in which the substitution of Ni(II) for one Cu(I) ion in the classic bimetallic Glaser reaction mechanism apparently aids reductive elimination of the acetylide ligands. The system may prove useful for the development of general mixed-metal protocols for catalytic alkyne coupling reactions as well as being a highly effective route to rotaxanes with bis-acetylene threads, which are potentially useful for materials applications (insulated molecular wires) and in molecular machines (rigid, nonfolding axles).

  8. Synthesis of Active Hexafluoroisopropyl Benzoates through a Hydrogen-Bond-Enabled Palladium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Alkoxycarbonylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2017-03-13

    A Pd(II) -catalyzed ortho C-H alkoxycarbonylation reaction of aryl silanes toward active hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP) benzoate esters has been developed. This efficient reaction features high selectivity and good functional-group tolerance. Notably, given the general nature of the silyl-tethered directing group, this method delivers products bearing two independently modifiable sites. NMR studies reveal the presence of hydrogen bonding between HFIP and a pyrimidine nitrogen atom of the directing group, and it is thought to be crucial for the success of this alkoxycarbonylation reaction.

  9. SYNTHESIS, REACTIONS, AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SOME TRIAZINE DERIVATIVES CONTAINING SULFA DRUG MOIETIES.

    PubMed

    Aly, M R E; Gobouri, A A; Abdel Hafez, S H; Saad, H A

    2015-01-01

    Thienyl-triazine-sulphonamide conjugates were prepared from their precursor amines using triethyl orthoformate or ethyl chloroformate as cross coupling reagents. The progress of these reactions was investigated by spectral (IR, NMR, MS) and microanalytical techniques. The synthesized compounds were in vitro screened for antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, and anticancer activity. 4-[({[3-Mercapto-5-oxo-6-[2-(2-thienyl)yinyl]-1,2,4-triazin- 4(5H)-yl]imino}methyl)amino]-benzenesulfonamide turned out to be a powerful antibacterial agent, while all the compounds prepared were inactive against fungal species tested. 4-{[({8-Cyano-4-oxo-3-[2-(2-thienyl)vinyl- 4H,8H-[1,2,4]triazino[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazin-7-yl}amino)(ethoxy)methyl]amino}benzenesulfonamide displayed in vitro promising cytotoxicity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell line with concurrent attenuation of malonodinitrile and it was unique among other compounds being unable to increase glutathione S-transferase and reduced glutathione S-transferase activities. This compound exhibited also good antioxidant properties that together with its cytotoxicity nominated it for further investigation in cancer research.

  10. Solvation mechanisms of nedocromil sodium from activation energy and reaction enthalpy measurements of dehydration and dealcoholation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Alison C; McColm, Ian J; Harness, J Barrie

    2002-04-01

    Two independent athermal methods of analysis have been used to determine the activation energies associated with the dehydration of nedocromil sodium hydrates. For the highest temperature reaction, monohydrate to the anhydrate, the differences in the measured activation energies indicate a three-dimensional nucleation mechanism in the bulk of the crystal with subsequent three-dimensional anhydrate crystal growth. The number of critical nuclei varies inversely with heating rate. Measured enthalpy values for successive removal of water molecules at 31.7 +/- 1.0, 91.3 +/- 0.8, and 193 +/- 0.6 degrees C are the same, within experimental error, at 21.6 +/- 2.6 kJ (mol H(2)O)(-1), as determined from differential thermal analysis traces. This result implies that an earlier concept of "strong" and "weak" water binding is not relevant and temperatures at which H(2)O molecules are removed is related to nucleation effects and not bond energies. The low temperature shoulder on the 91.3 degrees C peak is identified as an effect arising from open pan analysis conditions. The appearance of "transient" peaks in the conditioning stage of nedocromil sodium trihydrate thermal analysis experiments have been investigated and an explanation based on the presence of alcoholates [(NS)(4) small middle dot 5CH(3)OH, (NS)(5) small middle dot 9C(2)H(5)OH, and (NS)(2) small middle dot C(3)H(7)OH] in the preparations is proposed.

  11. Exploration of the Role of Heat Activation in Enhancing Serpentine Carbon Sequestration Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvy, M.J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Diefenbacher, J.; Bearat, H.; Wolf, G.

    2005-03-29

    As compared with other candidate carbon sequestration technologies, mineral carbonation offers the unique advantage of permanent disposal via geologically stable and environmentally benign carbonates. The primary challenge is the development of an economically viable process. Enhancing feedstock carbonation reactivity is key. Heat activation dramatically enhances aqueous serpentine carbonation reactivity. Although the present process is too expensive to implement, the materials characteristics and mechanisms that enhance carbonation are of keen interest for further reducing cost. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) of the serpentine mineral lizardite was used to isolate a series of heat-activated materials as a function of residual hydroxide content at progressively higher temperatures. Their structure and composition are evaluated via TGA/DTA, X-ray powder diffraction (including phase analysis), and infrared analysis. The meta-serpentine materials that were observed to form ranged from those with longer range ordering, consistent with diffuse stage-2 like interlamellar order, to an amorphous component that preferentially forms at higher temperatures. The aqueous carbonation reaction process was investigated for representative materials via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Magnesite was observed to form directly at 15 MPa CO{sub 2} and at temperatures ranging from 100 to 125 C. Carbonation reactivity is generally correlated with the extent of meta-serpentine formation and structural disorder.

  12. Prediction of ground reaction forces and moments during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fluit, R; Andersen, M S; Kolk, S; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-07-18

    Inverse dynamics based simulations on musculoskeletal models is a commonly used method for the analysis of human movement. Due to inaccuracies in the kinematic and force plate data, and a mismatch between the model and the subject, the equations of motion are violated when solving the inverse dynamics problem. As a result, dynamic inconsistency will exist and lead to residual forces and moments. In this study, we present and evaluate a computational method to perform inverse dynamics-based simulations without force plates, which both improves the dynamic consistency as well as removes the model׳s dependency on measured external forces. Using the equations of motion and a scaled musculoskeletal model, the ground reaction forces and moments (GRF&Ms) are derived from three-dimensional full-body motion. The method entails a dynamic contact model and optimization techniques to solve the indeterminacy problem during a double contact phase and, in contrast to previously proposed techniques, does not require training or empirical data. The method was applied to nine healthy subjects performing several Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and evaluated with simultaneously measured force plate data. Except for the transverse ground reaction moment, no significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the mean predicted and measured GRF&Ms for almost all ADLs. The mean residual forces and moments, however, were significantly reduced (P>0.05) in almost all ADLs using our method compared to conventional inverse dynamic simulations. Hence, the proposed method may be used instead of raw force plate data in human movement analysis using inverse dynamics.

  13. Improving the electrocatalytic performance of carbon nanotubes for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction by KOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Jiang, Yingqiao; Meng, Wei; Zhou, Huizhu; Wang, Ling; He, Zhangxing

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was activated by KOH treatment at high temperature and investigated as catalyst for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the oxygen-containing groups can be introduced on CNTs by KOH activation. The mass transfer of vanadium ions can be accelerated by chemical etching by KOH activation and improved wettability due to the introduction of hydrophilic groups. The electrochemical properties of VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction can be enhanced by introduced oxygen-containing groups as active sites. The sample treated at 900 °C with KOH/CNTs mass ratio of 3:1 (CNTs-3) exhibits the highest electrocatalytic activity for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction. The cell using CNTs-3 as positive catalyst demonstrates the smallest electrochemical polarization, the highest capacity and efficiency among the samples. Using KOH-activated CNTs-3 can increase the average energy efficiency of the cell by 4.4%. This work suggests that KOH-activated CNTs is a low-cost, efficient and promising catalyst for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction for VRFB system.

  14. Changes during leaf expansion of ΦPSII temperature optima in Gossypium hirsutum are associated with the degree of fatty acid lipid saturation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Trent D; Chastain, Daryl R; Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D; Choinski, John S

    2014-03-15

    In this project, we hypothesize that cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) leaf temperature and the responses of leaf photosynthesis to temperature will change as the leaves expand and that differences between young and mature leaves will be associated with the proportion of saturated fatty acids in thylakoid and other membrane lipids. To that end, we studied main stem leaves obtained from plants growing in a temperature controlled greenhouse and at different times in the field season. We found that young leaves (∼5d old) had higher mid day temperatures, lower stomatal conductance and higher thermal optima as measured by ΦPSII temperature curves than did more mature leaves (∼13d old). Young leaves also had significant differences in fatty acid saturation with the warmer, young leaves having a higher proportion of palmitic acid (16:0) and lower linoleic acid (18:3) in total lipid extracts and higher 16:0 and lower palmitoleic acid (16:1) in the chloroplast membrane phosphoglycerides, digalactosyldiacylglycerol (in the greenhouse) and phosphatidylglycerol when compared with cooler, more mature leaves. Later in the growing season, leaf temperature, stomatal conductance and ΦPSII temperature curves for young and more mature leaves were similar and the proportion of 16:0 fatty acids decreased and 16:1 increased in phosphatidylglycerol. We conclude that changes in temperature as cotton leaves expand leads to alterations in the fatty acid composition of thylakoid and other membranes and, consequently, influence photosynthesis/temperature responses.

  15. Titanium cobalt nitride supported platinum catalyst with high activity and stability for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yonghao; Zhan, Guohe; Fu, Zhenggao; Pan, Zhanchang; Xiao, Chumin; Wu, Shoukun; Chen, Chun; Hu, Guanghui; Wei, Zhigang

    2015-06-01

    We describe a facile route to the development of novel robust non-carbon titanium cobalt nitride (Ti0.9Co0.1N) used as a support for Pt, and the catalyst exhibits high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). XRD and TEM results show that the synthesized Ti0.9Co0.1N is formed as a single-phase solid solution with high purity. The XPS measurements verified the strong metal/support interaction between Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and the Ti0.9Co0.1N support. Most importantly, Ti0.9Co0.1N supported Pt catalyst (Pt/Ti0.9Co0.1N) exhibits a much higher mass activity and durability than that of the commercial JM Pt/C electrocatalyst for ORR. The accelerated durability test (ADT) reveals that the novel Ti0.9Co0.1N support can dramatically enhance the durability of the catalyst and maintain the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) of Pt. Pt/Ti0.9Co0.1N shows great improvement in ECSA preservation, with only 35% of the initial ECSA drop even after 10 000 ADT cycles. The experimental data indicate that the electronic structure of Pt can be modified by Co doping, and there exists a strong interaction between Pt and the Ti0.9Co0.1N support, both of them are playing an important role in improving the activity and durability of the Pt/Ti0.9Co0.1N catalyst.

  16. Regional Planning: Focus on the Toronto-Centered Plan, Implications and Reactions. Instructional Activities Series IA/S-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, William S.

    This activity is one of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary-grade level described in SO 009 140. This activity is a report or case study which looks at the implications, problems, and reactions to a regional comprehensive plan to regulate growth patterns in a 15,000 square-mile area of Toronto,…

  17. Primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Toon, S. ); Govindjee ); O'Neil, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. )

    1992-08-24

    Primary charge-separation in isolated bacterial reaction center (RC) complex occurs in 2.8 ps at room temperature and 0.7--1.2 ps at 10 K. Because of similarities between the bacterial and photosystem II (PSII) RCs, it has been of considerable interest to obtain analogous charge-separation rates in the higher plant system. Our previous femtosecond transient absorption studies used PSII RC material stabilized with PEG or by exchanging dodecyl maltoside (DM) for Triton in the isolation procedure. These materials gave charge-separation 1/e times of 3.0 [plus minus] 0.6 ps at 4[degree]C and 1.4[plus minus] 0.2 ps at 15 K based on the risetime of transient absorption kinetics at 820 nm. These values were thought to represent the time required for formation of the P680[sup +]-Pheo[sup [minus

  18. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C-H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2016-01-01

    Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C-H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C-H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C-H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C-H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied.

  19. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  20. Digallane with redox-active diimine ligand: dualism of electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Chudakova, Valentina A; Bazyakina, Natalia L; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy V; Fukin, Georgy K

    2014-05-19

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1), which consists of redox-active ligand 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene (dpp-Bian), has been studied. The reaction of 1 with I2 proceeds via one-electron oxidation of each of two dpp-Bian ligands to a radical-anionic state and affords complex (dpp-Bian)IGa-GaI(dpp-Bian) (2). Dissolution of complex 2 in pyridine (Py) gives monomeric compound (dpp-Bian)GaI(Py) (3) as a result of a solvent-induced intramolecular electron transfer from the metal-metal bond to the dpp-Bian ligands. Treatment of compound 3 with B(C6F5)3 leads to removal of pyridine and restores compound 2. The reaction of compound 1 with 3,6-di-tert-butyl-ortho-benzoquinone (3,6-Q) proceeds with oxidation of all the redox-active centers in 1 (the Ga-Ga bond and two dpp-Bian dianions) and results in mononuclear catecholate (dpp-Bian)Ga(Cat) (4) (Cat = [3,6-Q](2-)). Treatment of 4 with AgBF4 gives a mixture of [(dpp-Bian)2Ag][BF4] (5) and (dpp-Bian)GaF(Cat) (6), which both consist of neutral dpp-Bian ligands. The reduction of benzylideneacetone (BA) with 1 generates the BA radical-anions, which dimerize, affording (dpp-Bian)Ga-(BA-BA)-Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). In this case the Ga-Ga bond remains unchanged. Within 10 min at 95 °C in solution compound 7 undergoes transformation to paramagnetic complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(BA-BA) (8) and metal-free compound C36H40N2 (9). The latter is a product of intramolecular addition of the C-H bond of one of the iPr groups to the C═N bond in dpp-Bian. Diamagnetic compounds 3, 5, 6, and 9 have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and paramagnetic complexes 2, 4, 7, and 8 by ESR spectroscopy. Molecular structures of 2-7 and 9 have been established by single-crystal X-ray analysis.

  1. Estimation of the outer-sphere contribution to the activation volume for electron exchange reactions using the mean spherical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hideo D.; Swaddle, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    The outer-sphere contribution to the volume of activation of homogeneous electron exchange reactions is estimated for selected solvents on the basis of the mean spherical approximation (MSA), and the calculated values are compared with those estimated by the Strank-Hush-Marcus (SHM) theory and with activation volumes obtained experimentally for the electron exchange reaction between tris(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)ruthenium(III) and -(II) in acetone, acetonitrile, methanol and chloroform. The MSA treatment, which recognizes the molecular nature of the solvent, does not improve significantly upon the continuous-dielectric SHM theory, which represents the experimental data adequately for the more polar solvents.

  2. Isothermal activation of Mo2O5(2+)-ZSM-5 precursors during methane reactions: effects of reaction products on structural evolution and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Lacheen, Howard S; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-02-07

    The dynamics of carburization of Mo-oxo precursors exchanged onto H-ZSM-5 strongly influence initial induction periods and steady-state rates during catalytic pyrolysis of CH4 to alkenes and arenes at 900-1000 K. The effects of co-reactants and of activating conditions were examined by on-line time-resolved mass spectrometric analysis of effluent streams using rigorous analyses to account for equilibrium effects on measured rates. Ethene co-reactants and the larger hydrocarbons to which it converts on acid sites in H-ZSM-5 led to much faster carburization of exchanged (Mo2O5)(5+) dimers and to shorter induction periods than with pure CH4 reactants, but steady-state pyrolysis rates were unchanged, indicating that CH4 and C2H4 form similar MoCx clusters during carburization of exchanged Mo-oxo precursors. H2 treatment at 973 K before CH4 reactions led to reduction of Mo(6+) species to Mo(4+), which carburize faster than (Mo2O5)(5+) precursors during initial contact with CH4. This H2 pretreatment or the use of CH4-H2 reactant mixtures did not influence steady-state pyrolysis rates, once contributions from reverse reactions were taken into account. With pure CH4 streams, (Mo2O5)(5+)-ZSM-5 converts to active MoCx clusters within zeolite channels via autocatalytic processes, in which higher hydrocarbons, initially formed during initial conversion of MoOx to MoCx structures, lead to faster carburization of downstream catalyst sections. Concurrently, H2O and CO2 formed during this incipient carburization of exchanged (Mo2O5)(5+) and unexchanged MoO3 present in trace amounts inhibit and even prevent carburization and lengthen activation periods. Activation protocols with C2H4 were also successful in the activation of more refractory high-valent metal-oxo species, such as WOx and VOx, exchanged onto H-ZSM-5. The formation of active carbide structures occurred in less than 300 s, instead of 4 ks and 16 ks for VOx and WOx samples, respectively, in pure CH4 reactants. These

  3. Characteristics and antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products from psicose-lysine and fructose-lysine model systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Guan, Yuping; Sun, Yuanxia

    2011-04-01

    D-Psicose, an epimer of D-fructose isomerized at C-3 position, is a rare ketohexose that is thought to be beneficial for obese people and diabetic patients as a noncaloric sweetener. In the present study, model Maillard reaction products were obtained from D-psicose (or D-fructose) and L-lysine heating at 120 °C up to 8 h with the initial pH 9.0. The changes in pH, UV-vis absorbance, and free amino groups during the reaction were detected. Moreover, the antioxidant potential of the Maillard reaction products at different intervals was investigated. Although there was almost no difference in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity, the Maillard reaction products from psicose performed better than that from fructose in the radical-scavenging activity of 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and 1, 1,-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl. The reducing power of the Maillard reaction products from psicose was also stronger than that from fructose. These results indicated that psicose played an effective role in the Maillard reaction and its Maillard reaction products could act as potential antioxidants in food industry.

  4. Activation of surface oxygen sites on an iridium-based model catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis; Demortiere, Arnaud; Saubanere, Matthieu; Dachraoui, Walid; Duchamp, Martial; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of prime importance in multiple energy storage devices; however, deeper mechanistic understanding is required to design enhanced electrocatalysts for the reaction. Current understanding of the OER mechanism based on oxygen adsorption on a metallic surface site fails to fully explain the activity of iridium and ruthenium oxide surfaces, and the drastic surface reconstruction observed for the most active OER catalysts. Here we demonstrate, using La2LiIrO6 as a model catalyst, that the exceptionally high activity found for Ir-based catalysts arises from the formation of active surface oxygen atoms that act as electrophilic centres for water to react. Moreover, with the help of transmission electron microscopy, we observe drastic surface reconstruction and iridium migration from the bulk to the surface. Therefore, we establish a correlation between surface activity and surface stability for OER catalysts that is rooted in the formation of surface reactive oxygen.

  5. Pt monolayer coating on complex network substrate with high catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Ma, Qiang; Zi, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xuejie; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    A deposition process has been developed to fabricate a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a large-surface-area three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate using a buffer layer (Ag or Au) strategy. The quartz crystal microbalance, current density analysis, cyclic voltammetry integration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and the deposition can be controlled to a single atomic layer thickness. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a 3D bulk substrate with complex fine structures; all prior literature reported on submonolayer or incomplete-monolayer coating. A thin underlayer of Ag or Au is found to be necessary to cover a very reactive Ni substrate to ensure complete-monolayer Pt coverage; otherwise, only an incomplete monolayer is formed. Moreover, the Pt monolayer is found to work as well as a thick Pt film for catalytic reactions. This development may pave a way to fabricating a high-activity Pt catalyst with minimal Pt usage. PMID:26601247

  6. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  7. Active nutation control of an asymmetric spacecraft using an axial reaction wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmohamadi Ousaloo, Hamed

    2016-12-01

    The focus of this paper is to develop a control scheme for overcoming the nutational motion of an asymmetric spin satellite regardless of its spin-to-transverse inertia ratio using a single reaction wheel mounted along the desired spin axis. In this strategy the basic Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is acted on the precession angle error and, moreover, Lyapunov stability is applied for creating positive spin rate using proper precession command. A Monte Carlo type approach is used to verify the stability for various inertia ratios. The control system makes use of only angular velocity of wheel and spacecraft angular rates to stabilize spin. This active nutation controller globally and asymptotically stabilizes the spacecraft about a revolute motion and provides automatically logical recovery of desired positive spin from any initial state. This straightforward attitude recovery technique does not require accurate estimates of spacecraft inertias and various simulation results demonstrate that stability is not affected by various inertia ratios. Numerical simulations confirm that the approach has typically robust performance.

  8. Antioxidant Activity of Magnolol and Honokiol: Kinetic and Mechanistic Investigations of Their Reaction with Peroxyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Zotova, Julija; Baschieri, Andrea; Valgimigli, Luca

    2015-11-06

    Magnolol and honokiol, the bioactive phytochemicals contained in Magnolia officinalis, are uncommon antioxidants bearing isomeric bisphenol cores substituted with allyl functions. We have elucidated the chemistry behind their antioxidant activity by experimental and computational methods. In the inhibited autoxidation of cumene and styrene at 303 K, magnolol trapped four peroxyl radicals, with a kinh of 6.1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) in chlorobenzene and 6.0 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile, and honokiol trapped two peroxyl radicals in chlorobenzene (kinh = 3.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) and four peroxyl radicals in acetonitrile (kinh = 9.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Their different behavior arises from a combination of intramolecular hydrogen bonding among the reactive OH groups (in magnolol) and of the OH groups with the aromatic and allyl π-systems, as confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Comparison with structurally related 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbiphenyl-4,4'-diol, 2-allylphenol, and 2-allylanisole allowed us to exclude that the antioxidant behavior of magnolol and honokiol is due to the allyl groups. The reaction of the allyl group with a peroxyl radical (C-H hydrogen abstraction) proceeds with rate constant of 1.1 M(-1) s(-1) at 303 K. Magnolol and honokiol radicals do not react with molecular oxygen and produce no superoxide radical under the typical settings of inhibited autoxidations.

  9. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  10. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE.

  11. Reactivity Descriptors for the Activity of Molecular MN4 Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zagal, José H; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-11-14

    Similarities are established between well-known reactivity descriptors of metal electrodes for their activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the reactivity of molecular catalysts, in particular macrocyclic MN4 metal complexes confined to electrode surfaces. We show that there is a correlation between the M(III) /M(II) redox potential of MN4 chelates and the M-O2 binding energies. Specifically, the binding energy of O2 (and other O species) follows the M(III) -OH/M(II) redox transition for MnN4 and FeN4 chelates. The ORR volcano plot for MN4 catalysts is similar to that for metal catalysts: catalysts on the weak binding side (mostly CoN4 chelates) yield mainly H2 O2 as the product, with an ORR onset potential independent of the pH value on the NHE scale (and therefore pH-dependent on the RHE scale); catalysts on the stronger binding side yield H2 O as the product with the expected pH-dependence on the NHE scale. The suggested descriptors also apply to heat-treated pyrolyzed MN4 catalysts.

  12. Synthesis, reactions and biological activity of some new bis-heterocyclic ring compounds containing sulphur atom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The derivatives of thieno[2,3-b]thiophene belong to a significant category of heterocyclic compounds, which have shown a wide spectrum of medical and industrial application. Results A new building block with two electrophilic center of thieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives 2 has been reported by one-pot reaction of diketone derivative 1 with Br2/AcOH in excellent yield. A variety of heteroaromatics having bis(1H-imidazo[1,2a] benzimidazole), bis(1H-imidazo[1,2-b][1,2,4]triazole)-3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives, dioxazolo-, dithiazolo-, and 1H-imidazolo-3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives as well pyrrolo, thiazolo -3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives have been designed, synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for their biological activity. Compounds 3–9 showed good bioassay result. These new derivatives were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against PC-3 cell lines, in vitro antioxidant potential and β-glucuronidase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Compound 3 (IC50 = 56.26 ± 3.18 μM) showed a potent DPPH radical scavenging antioxidant activity and found to be more active than standard N-acetylcystein (IC50 = 105.9 ± 1.1 μM). Compounds 8a (IC50 = 13.2 ± 0.34 μM) and 8b (IC50 = 14.1 ± 0.28 μM) found as potent inhibitor of α-glucusidase several fold more active than the standard acarbose (IC50 = 841 ± 1.73 μM). Most promising results were obtained in β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibition assay. Compounds 5 (IC50 = 0.13 ± 0.019 μM), 6 (IC50 = 19.9 ± 0.285 μM), 8a (IC50 = 1.2 ± 0.0785 μM) and 9 (IC50 = 0.003 ± 0.09 μM) showed a potent inhibition of β-glucuronidase. Compound 9 was found to be several hundred fold more active than standard D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (IC50 = 45.75 ± 2.16 μM). Conclusions Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological activity of a series of

  13. Conversion of photosystem II dimer to monomers during photoinhibition is tightly coupled with decrease in oxygen-evolving activity in the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Narikawa, Rei; Enami, Isao; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2016-12-01

    The rapid turnover of photosystem II (PSII) in diatoms is thought to be at an exceptionally high rate compared with other oxyphototrophs; however, its molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the photodamage and repair processes of PSII in the marine centric diatom Chaetoceros gracilis incubated at 30 or 300 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in the presence of a de novo protein-synthesis inhibitor. When de novo protein synthesis was blocked by chloramphenicol (Cm), oxygen-evolving activity gradually decreased even at 30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) and could not be detected at 12 h. PSII inactivation was enhanced by higher illumination. Using Cm-treated cells, the conversion of PSII dimer to monomers was observed by blue native PAGE. The rate of PSII monomerization was very similar to that of the decrease in oxygen-evolving activity under both light conditions. Immunological detection of D1 protein in the Cm-treated cells showed that the rate of D1 degradation was slower than that of the former two events, although it was more rapid than that observed in other oxyphototrophs. Thus, the three accelerated events, especially PSII monomerization, appear to cause the unusually high rate of PSII turnover in diatoms.

  14. Intramolecular long-distance nucleophilic reactions as a rapid fluorogenic switch applicable to the detection of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Baba, Reisuke; Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-03-16

    Long-distance intramolecular nucleophilic reactions are promising strategies for the design of fluorogenic probes to detect enzymatic activity involved in lysine modifications. However, such reactions have been challenging and hence have not been established. In this study, we have prepared fluorogenic peptides that induce intramolecular reactions between lysine nucleophiles and electrophiles in distal positions. These peptides contain a lysine and fluorescence-quenched fluorophore with a carbonate ester, which triggers nucleophilic transesterification resulting in fluorogenic response. Transesterification occurred under mild aqueous conditions despite the presence of a long nine-amino-acid spacer between the lysine and fluorophore. In addition, one of the peptides showed the fastest reaction kinetics with a half-life time of 3.7 min. Furthermore, the incorporation of this fluorogenic switch into the probes allowed rapid fluorogenic detection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. These results indicate that the transesterification reaction has great potential for use as a general fluorogenic switch to monitor the activity of lysine-targeting enzymes.

  15. Specific inflammatory response of Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria) after bacterial injection causes tissue reaction and enzymatic activity alteration.

    PubMed

    Trapani, M R; Parisi, M G; Parrinello, D; Sanfratello, M A; Benenati, G; Palla, F; Cammarata, M

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms was marked by adaptations to protect against pathogens. The mechanisms for discriminating the ''self'' from ''non-self" have evolved into a long history of cellular and molecular strategies, from damage repair to the co-evolution of host-pathogen interactions. We investigated the inflammatory response in Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) following injection of substances that varied in type and dimension, and observed clear, strong and specific reactions, especially after injection of Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus. Moreover, we analyzed enzymatic activity of protease, phosphatase and esterase, showing how the injection of different bacterial strains alters the expression of these enzymes and suggesting a correlation between the appearance of the inflammatory reaction and the modification of enzymatic activities. Our study shows for the first time, a specific reaction and enzymatic responses following injection of bacteria in a cnidarian.

  16. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) reaction cross section using the activation method

    SciTech Connect

    Perdikakis, G.; Papadopoulos, C.T.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Patronis, N.; Lagoyannis, A.; Spyrou, A.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Kalyva, G.; Kossionides, S.; Karamanis, D.

    2006-06-15

    In the context of the n{sub T}OF Collaboration, the measurement of the cross section of the reaction {sup 241}Am(n,2n){sup 240}Am, has been performed, for the first time at neutron energies from 8.8 to 11.4 MeV, by the activation method, relative to the {sup 27}Al(n,a){sup 24}Na reaction reference cross section. The monoenergetic neutron beam was produced at the 5.5 MV TANDEM accelerator of NCSR ''Demokritos,'' by means of the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction, using a deuterium filled gas cell. The radioactive target consisted of a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am source enclosed in a Pb container. After the end of the irradiation, the activity induced by the neutron beam at the target and reference, was measured off-line by a 56% relative efficiency, HPGe detector.

  17. Analysis of the novel benzylsuccinate synthase reaction for anaerobic toluene activation based on structural studies of the product.

    PubMed

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M

    1998-10-01

    Recent studies of anaerobic toluene catabolism have demonstrated a novel reaction for anaerobic hydrocarbon activation: the addition of the methyl carbon of toluene to fumarate to form benzylsuccinate. In vitro studies of the anaerobic benzylsuccinate synthase reaction indicate that the H atom abstracted from the toluene methyl group during addition to fumarate is retained in the succinyl moiety of benzylsuccinate. Based on structural studies of benzylsuccinate formed during anaerobic, in vitro assays with denitrifying, toluene-mineralizing strain T, we now report the following characteristics of the benzylsuccinate synthase reaction: (i) it is highly stereospecific, resulting in >95% formation of the (+)-benzylsuccinic acid enantiomer [(R)-2-benzyl-3-carboxypropionic acid], and (ii) active benzylsuccinate synthase does not contain an abstracted methyl H atom from toluene at the beginning or at the end of a catalytic cycle.

  18. Non-innocent additives in a palladium(II)-catalyzed C-H bond activation reaction: insights into multimetallic active catalysts.

    PubMed

    Anand, Megha; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Schaefer, Henry F

    2014-04-16

    The role of a widely employed additive (AgOAc) in a palladium acetate-catalyzed ortho-C-H bond activation reaction has been examined using the M06 density functional theory. A new hetero-bimetallic Pd-(μ-OAc)3-Ag is identified as the most likely active species. This finding could have far-reaching implications with respect to the notion of the active species in palladium catalysis in the presence of other metal salt additives.

  19. A density functional study on the effect of the zeolite cavity on its catalytic activity: The dehydrogenation and cracking reactions of isobutane over HZSM-5 and HY zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milas, Ivan; Chaer Nascimento, Marco Antonio

    2006-02-01

    The dehydrogenation and cracking reactions of isobutane over HZMS-5 and HY were studied at the DFT level of calculation to verify the influence of the cavity on the energetics and mechanism of the reactions. The zeolites were represented by the 20T and 32T clusters, respectively. The results indicate that the reactions follow the same mechanism in both zeolites but the activation energies are reduced by ˜10 kcal/mol relative to the values with smaller clusters. Activation energies for the dehydrogenation reactions were similar in both zeolites, but for the cracking reaction in HY, the activation energy is ˜5 kcal/mol higher than in HZSM-5.

  20. A novel DNA deletion-ligation reaction catalyzed in vitro by a developmentally controlled activity from Tetrahymena cells.

    PubMed

    Robinson, E K; Cohen, P D; Blackburn, E H

    1989-09-08

    Developmentally controlled genomic deletion-ligations occur during ciliate macronuclear differentiation. We have identified a novel activity in Tetrahymena cell-free extracts that efficiently catalyzes a specific set of intramolecular DNA deletion-ligation reactions. When synthetic DNA oligonucleotide substrates were used, all the deletion-ligation products resembled those formed in vivo in that they resulted from deletions between pairs of short direct repeats. The reaction is ATP-dependent, salt-sensitive, and strongly influenced by the oligonucleotide substrate sequence. The deletion-ligation activity has an apparent size of 200-500 kd, no nuclease-sensitive component, and is highly enriched in cells developing new macronuclei. The temperature inactivation profile of the activity parallels the temperature lethality profile specific for Tetrahymena cells developing new macronuclei. We suggest that this deletion-ligation activity carries out the genomic deletions in developing macronuclei in vivo.

  1. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity for water-splitting reaction of nanocrystalline mesoporous titania prepared by hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Jitputti, Jaturong; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Yoshikawa, Susumu

    2007-05-15

    Nanocrystalline mesoporous TiO{sub 2} was synthesized by hydrothermal method using titanium butoxide as starting material. XRD, SEM, and TEM analyses revealed that the synthesized TiO{sub 2} had anatase structure with crystalline size of about 8 nm. Moreover, the synthesized titania possessed a narrow pore size distribution with average pore diameter and high specific surface area of 215 m{sup 2}/g. The photocatalytic activity of synthesized TiO{sub 2} was evaluated with photocatalytic H{sub 2} production from water-splitting reaction. The photocatalytic activity of synthesized TiO{sub 2} treated with appropriate calcination temperature was considerably higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} (Ishihara ST-01). The utilization of mesoporous TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst with high crystallinity of anatase phase promoted great H{sub 2} production. Furthermore, the reaction temperature significantly influences the water-splitting reaction. - Graphical abstract: Nanocrystalline mesoporous TiO{sub 2} was synthesized by hydrothermal method. The physical properties of the synthesized TiO{sub 2} were thoroughly studied in relation to its photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution from water-splitting reaction. It was found that the photocatalytic activity of synthesized TiO{sub 2} treated with appropriate calcination temperature was considerably higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} (Ishihara ST-01)

  2. Computation of Accurate Activation Barriers for Methyl-Transfer Reactions of Sulfonium and Ammonium Salts in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Acevedo, Orlando; Jorgensen, William L; Houk, K N

    2007-05-01

    The energetics of methyl-transfer reactions from dimethylammonium, tetramethylammonium, and trimethylsulfonium to dimethylamine were computed with density functional theory, MP2, CBS-QB3, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Monte Carlo methods. At the CBS-QB3 level, the gas-phase activation enthalpies are computed to be 9.9, 15.3, and 7.9 kcal/mol, respectively. MP2/6-31+G(d,p) activation enthalpies are in best agreement with the CBS-QB3 results. The effects of aqueous solvation on these reactions were studied with polarizable continuum model, generalized Born/surface area (GB/SA), and QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations utilizing free-energy perturbation theory in which the PDDG/PM3 semiempirical Hamiltonian for the QM and explicit TIP4P water molecules in the MM region were used. In the aqueous phase, all of these reactions proceed more slowly when compared to the gas phase, since the charged reactants are stabilized more than the transition structure geometries with delocalized positive charges. In order to obtain the aqueous-phase activation free energies, the gas-phase activation free energies were corrected with the solvation free energies obtained from single-point conductor-like polarizable continuum model and GB/SA calculations for the stationary points along the reaction coordinate.

  3. Particle size dependence on oxygen reduction reaction activity of electrodeposited TaO(x) catalysts in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Cha, Dongkyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2014-01-21

    The size dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction activity was studied for TaO(x) nanoparticles electrodeposited on carbon black for application to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Compared with a commercial Ta2O5 material, the ultrafine oxide nanoparticles exhibited a distinctively high onset potential different from that of the bulky oxide particles.

  4. The Davis-Beirut Reaction: a novel entry into 2H-indazoles and indazolones. Recent biological activity of indazoles.

    PubMed

    Haddadin, Makhluf J; Conrad, Wayne E; Kurth, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    A novel, easy method for the syntheses of richly diversified 2H-indazoles and indazolones, called the Davis-Beirut reaction, and other recent 2H-indazole synthetic routes are briefly reviewed. An update on the biological activity of indazoles is also surveyed.

  5. The First Example of Nickel-Catalyzed Silyl-Heck Reactions: Direct Activation of Silyl Triflates Without Iodide Additives

    PubMed Central

    McAtee, Jesse R.; Martin, Sara E. S.; Cinderella, Andrew P.; Reid, William B.; Johnson, Keywan A.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, nickel-catalyzed silyl-Heck reactions are reported. Using simple phosphine-supported nickel catalysts, direct activation of silyl triflates has been achieved. These results contrast earlier palladium-catalyzed systems, which require iodide additives to activate silyl-triflates. These nickel-based catalysts exhibit good functional group tolerance in the preparation of vinyl silanes, and unlike earlier systems, allows for the incorporation of trialkylsilanes larger than Me3Si. PMID:24914247

  6. Diverted organic synthesis (DOS): accessing a new, natural product inspired, neurotrophically active scaffold through an intramolecular Pauson-Khand reaction.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Goverdhan; Samineni, Ramesh; Srihari, Pabbaraja; Reddy, R Gajendra; Chakravarty, Sumana

    2012-09-14

    Drawing inspiration from the impressive neurotrophic activity exhibited by the natural product paecilomycine A, we have designed a new natural product-like scaffold employing an intramolecular Pauson-Khand reaction. Several compounds based on the new designer scaffold exhibited promising neurotrophic activity and are worthy of further biological evaluation. Our findings also highlight the importance of a DOS strategy in creating useful therapeutical leads.

  7. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K

    2013-11-07

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd(2+) complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd(0)-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.

  8. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  9. IL-21 reduces immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mouse skin by suppressing mast cell activation or IgE production.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Katoh, Norito

    2011-07-01

    IL-21 regulates activation, proliferation, and differentiation of various immune cells. We have previously shown that exogenous IL-21 administration reduces allergic reactions in mouse models of anaphylaxis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of IL-21 in allergic cutaneous reactions remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of IL-21 in a mouse model of the IgE-mediated cutaneous immediate hypersensitivity reaction (IHR). We also investigated the mechanism of IL-21-induced regulation of allergic cutaneous reactions. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) injection and challenged by injecting OVA intradermally into the ears, with intraperitoneal administration of recombinant murine (rm)IL-21 during the sensitization period or after completion of sensitization. After challenge, IL-21-untreated allergic mice developed biphasic responses characterized by early-phase and late-phase reactions. The biphasic reactions were significantly reduced by rmIL-21 treatment during sensitization or after completion of sensitization. Administration of rmIL-21 during sensitization reduced the cutaneous IHR by suppressing allergen-specific IgE production. In contrast, administration of rmIL-21 after completion of sensitization did not decrease serum levels of allergen-specific IgE, but significantly suppressed mast cell degranulation in skin. These results suggest that the regulatory effects of IL-21 on the cutaneous IHR involve suppression of allergen-specific IgE production or mast cell degranulation.

  10. A highly active and magnetically recoverable tris(triazolyl)-Cu(I) catalyst for alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Etienne, Laetitia; Echeverria, María; Moya, Sergio; Astruc, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticle-supported tris(triazolyl)-CuBr, with a diameter of approximately 25 nm measured by TEM spectroscopy, has been easily prepared, and its catalytic activity was evaluated in the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. In initial experiments, 0.5 mol % loading successfully promoted the CuAAC reaction between benzyl azide and phenylacetylene, in water at room temperature (25 °C). During this process, the iron oxide nanoparticle-supported tris(triazolyl)-CuBr displayed good monodispersity, excellent recoverability, and outstanding reusability. Indeed, it was simply collected and separated from the reaction medium by using an external magnet, then used for another five catalytic cycles without significant loss of catalytic activity. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis for the first cycle revealed that the amount of copper leached from the catalyst into the reaction medium is negligible (1.5 ppm). The substrate scope has been examined, and it was found that the procedure can be successfully extended to various organic azides and alkynes and can also be applied to the one-pot synthesis of triazoles, through a cascade reaction involving benzyl bromides, alkynes, and sodium azide. In addition, the catalyst was shown to be an efficient CuAAC catalyst for the synthesis of allyl- and TEG-ended (TEG=triethylene glycol) 27-branch dendrimers.

  11. Activation of Two Sequential H-transfers in the Thymidylate Synthase Catalyzed Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Zahidul; Strutzenberg, Timothy S.; Ghosh, Ananda K.; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) catalyzes the de novo biosynthesis of thymidylate, a precursor for DNA, and is thus an important target for chemotherapeutics and antibiotics. Two sequential C-H bond cleavages catalyzed by TSase are of particular interest: a reversible proton abstraction from the 2′-deoxy-uridylate substrate, followed by an irreversible hydride transfer forming the thymidylate product. QM/MM calculations of the former predicted a mechanism where the abstraction of the proton leads to formation of a novel nucleotide-folate intermediate that is not covalently bound to the enzyme (Wang, Z.; Ferrer, S.; Moliner, V.; Kohen, A. Biochemistry 2013, 52, 2348–2358). Existence of such intermediate would hold promise as a target for a new class of drugs. Calculations of the subsequent hydride transfer predicted a concerted H-transfer and elimination of the enzymatic cysteine (Kanaan, N.; Ferrer, S.; Marti, S.; Garcia-Viloca, M.; Kohen, A.; Moliner, V. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 6692–6702). A key to both C-H activations is a highly conserved arginine (R166) that stabilizes the transition state of both H-transfers. Here we test these predictions by studying the R166 to lysine mutant of E. coli TSase (R166K) using intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence to assess effects of the mutation on both chemical steps. The findings confirmed the predictions made by the QM/MM calculations, implicate R166 as an integral component of both reaction coordinates, and thus provide critical support to the nucleotide-folate intermediate as a new target for rational drug design. PMID:26576323

  12. Synergistic activation of the Diels-Alder reaction by an organic catalyst and substituents: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2009-04-07

    Density functional theory (DFT), using the hybrid functionals B3LYP and B2PLYP, has been employed to investigate the activation of the acrolein-butadiene Diels-Alder reaction, mediated by a thiourea catalyst. Effects due to electron-donating groups (EDGs) on the diene, as well as electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) on the dienophile, have also been studied. Organic catalysts such as thioureas are known to lower the activation energy through hydrogen-bonding to the carbonyl oxygen, in a way that mimics the oxyanion holes of hydrolytic enzymes. EDGs and EWGs were found to further activate the reaction, and the catalyst showed a synergistic behavior towards the EDGs. Polar solvents were found to reduce the overall activation energy, but also the relative catalytic effect of the thiourea, in accordance with experimental studies. The substituent-mediated reactions displayed more asynchronous transition structures with lower activation energy, which led us to investigate the possibility of an alternative two-step, Michael-type route, similar to what has been found in macrophomate synthase. Although the concerted Diels-Alder route was found to be favored over the Michael route, the calculated activation energy difference is less than 1 kcal mol(-1), which suggests that the two mechanisms compete, and could be responsible for the particular stereochemical outcome of an experiment.

  13. Activation energies of pericyclic reactions: performance of DFT, MP2, and CBS-QB3 methods for the prediction of activation barriers and reaction energetics of 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, and revised activation enthalpies for a standard set of hydrocarbon pericyclic reactions.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Houk, K N

    2005-10-27

    Activation barriers and reaction energetics for the three main classes of 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, including nine different reactions, were evaluated with the MPW1K and B3LYP density functional methods, MP2, and the multicomponent CBS-QB3 method. The CBS-QB3 values were used as standards for 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition activation barriers and reaction energetics, and the density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 methods were benchmarked against these values. The MPW1K/6-31G* method and basis set performs best for activation barriers, with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) value of 1.1 kcal/mol. The B3LYP/6-31G* method and basis set performs best for reaction enthalpies, with a MAD value of 2.4 kcal/mol, while the MPW1K method shows large errors for reaction energetics. The MP2 method gives the expected systematic underestimation of barriers. Concerted and nearly synchronous transition structures are predicted by all DFT and MP2 methods. Also reported are revised estimated 0 K experimental activation enthalpies for a standard set of hydrocarbon pericyclic reactions and updated comparisons to experiment for DFT, ab initio, and multicomponent methods. B3LYP and MPW1K methods with MAD values of 1.5 and 2.1 kcal/mol, respectively, fortuitously outperform the multicomponent CBS-QB3 method, which has a MAD value of 2.3. The MAD value of the O3LYP functional improves to 2.4 kcal/mol from the previously reported 3.0 kcal/mol.

  14. The physiological links of the increased photosystem II activity in moderately desiccated Porphyra haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) to the cyclic electron flow during desiccation and re-hydration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Niu, Jianfeng; Chen, Weizhou; Wang, Guangce; Xie, Xiujun; Pan, Guanghua; Gu, Wenhui; Zhu, Daling

    2013-09-01

    Photosynthetic electron flow changed considerably during desiccation and re-hydration of the intertidal macroalgae Porphyra haitanensis. Activities of both photosystem (PSI) and photosystem (PSII) increased significantly at moderate desiccation levels. Whereas PSII activity was abolished at an absolute water content (AWC) <24 %, PSI remained active with progressive decreases in AWC to values as low as 16 %. This result suggested that cyclic electron flow around PSI was still active after inactivation of linear electron flow following severe desiccation. Moreover, the PSI activity was restored more rapidly than that of PSII upon re-hydration. Pretreatment of the blades with 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) suppressed PSII activity following desiccation to an AWC of ~16 % AWC. Cyclic electron flow around PSI decreased markedly in blades pretreated with DCMU than in blades without pretreatment of DCMU during re-hydration in seawater containing DCMU. All results suggested that the activity of PSII under desiccation conditions plays an important role in the operation of cyclic electron flow during desiccation and its recovery during re-hydration. Therefore, we proposed the PSII activity during desiccation could eventually lead to the accumulation of NADPH, which could serve as electron donor for P700(+) and promote its recovery during re-hydration, thereby favoring the operation of cyclic electron flow.

  15. Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tubuxin, Bayaer; Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Ginnan, Yusaku; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    This paper illustrates the possibility of measuring chlorophyll (Chl) content and Chl fluorescence parameters by the solar-induced Chl fluorescence (SIF) method using the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle, and compares the results with the standard measurement methods. A high-spectral resolution HR2000+ and an ordinary USB4000 spectrometer were used to measure leaf reflectance under solar and artificial light, respectively, to estimate Chl fluorescence. Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. ‘Sven’ (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated. The Chl fluorescence yields of ΦF 686nm/ΦF 760nm ratios obtained from both methods correlated well with the Chl content (steady-state solar light: R2 = 0.73; artificial light: R2 = 0.94). The SIF method was less accurate for Chl content estimation when Chl content was high. The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R2 = 0.84). A new methodology is then presented to estimate photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) from the SIF measurements, which was verified against the standard Chl fluorescence measurement method (pulse-amplitude modulated method). The high coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.74) between the ΦPSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology. PMID:26071530

  16. Exogenous calcium alleviates photoinhibition of PSII by improving the xanthophyll cycle in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) leaves during heat stress under high irradiance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sha; Wang, Fang; Guo, Feng; Meng, Jing-Jing; Li, Xin-Guo; Dong, Shu-Ting; Wan, Shu-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Peanut is one of the calciphilous plants. Calcium (Ca) serves as a ubiquitous central hub in a large number of signaling pathways. The effect of exogenous calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] (6 mM) on the dissipation of excess excitation energy in the photosystem II (PSII) antenna, especially on the level of D1 protein and the xanthophyll cycle in peanut plants under heat (40°C) and high irradiance (HI) (1 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) stress were investigated. Compared with the control plants [cultivated in 0 mM Ca(NO3)2 medium], the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in Ca(2+)-treated plants showed a slighter decrease after 5 h of stress, accompanied by higher non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), higher expression of antioxidative genes and less reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Meanwhile, higher content of D1 protein and higher ratio of (A+Z)/(V+A+Z) were also detected in Ca(2+)-treated plants under such stress. These results showed that Ca(2+) could help protect the peanut photosynthetic system from severe photoinhibition under heat and HI stress by accelerating the repair of D1 protein and improving the de-epoxidation ratio of the xanthophyll cycle. Furthermore, EGTA (a chelant of Ca ion), LaCl3 (a blocker of Ca(2+) channel in cytoplasmic membrane), and CPZ [a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist] were used to analyze the effects of Ca(2+)/CaM on the variation of (A+Z)/(V+A+Z) (%) and the expression of violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE). The results indicated that CaM, an important component of the Ca(2+) signal transduction pathway, mediated the expression of the VDE gene in the presence of Ca to improve the xanthophyll cycle.

  17. Human sperm acrosome reaction-initiating activity associated with the human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Siiteri, J E; Dandekar, P; Meizel, S

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the detection and partial characterization of preovulatory human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cell-associated activity capable of initiating the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. Fragments of preovulatory human cumulus (cells plus extracellular matrix) were washed 3 times, incubated for 24 hr and the spent media and washes assayed for their ability to initiate the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. AR activity was present in the first two washes but not the third wash; however, AR activity was recovered in the spent medium after 3 X-washed fragments were incubated for 24 hr under conditions which maintained the viability of the cumulus cells. The spent media of preovulatory human mural granulosa cells contained AR-initiating activity after 1-3, 3-6, and 6-9 days of culture. The properties of the AR activity present in spent media of human cumulus fragments included resistance to loss of activity during treatment with pronase; resistance to loss of activity during treatment with chondroitinase ABC or bacterial hyaluronidase; heat stability after overnight incubation; lack of extraction by chloroform-methanol; an apparent molecular weight (MW) of 50,000, as determined by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography; conversion to a lower apparent MW activity by incubation with pronase. These properties are also characteristic of a fraction derived by Sephadex G-75 chromatography of preovulatory human follicular fluid which also has been shown to stimulate the human sperm acrosome reaction in vitro. The AR activity from spent media of human mural granulosa cells is also found in a 50,000 MW Sephadex G-75 fraction. We propose that the sources of the 50,000 MW human follicular fluid AR activity are the cumulus oophorus and the mural granulosa cells.

  18. Optimal control of a Cope rearrangement by coupling the reaction path to a dissipative bath or a second active mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chenel, A.; Meier, C.; Dive, G.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2015-01-14

    We compare the strategy found by the optimal control theory in a complex molecular system according to the active subspace coupled to the field. The model is the isomerization during a Cope rearrangement of Thiele’s ester that is the most stable dimer obtained by the dimerization of methyl-cyclopentadienenylcarboxylate. The crudest partitioning consists in retaining in the active space only the reaction coordinate, coupled to a dissipative bath of harmonic oscillators which are not coupled to the field. The control then fights against dissipation by accelerating the passage across the transition region which is very wide and flat in a Cope reaction. This mechanism has been observed in our previous simulations [Chenel et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 11273 (2012)]. We compare here, the response of the control field when the reaction path is coupled to a second active mode. Constraints on the integrated intensity and on the maximum amplitude of the fields are imposed limiting the control landscape. Then, optimum field from one-dimensional simulation cannot provide a very high yield. Better guess fields based on the two-dimensional model allow the control to exploit different mechanisms providing a high control yield. By coupling the reaction surface to a bath, we confirm the link between the robustness of the field against dissipation and the time spent in the delocalized states above the transition barrier.

  19. Surface-Limited Synthesis of Pt Nanocluster Decorated Pd Hierarchical Structures with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity toward Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Cao, Guojian; Huang, Qingli; Ma, Yanxia; Wan, Sheng; Zhao, Hong; Li, Na; Sun, Xia; Yin, Fujun

    2015-08-12

    Exploring superior catalysts with high catalytic activity and durability is of significant for the development of an electrochemical device involving the oxygen reduction reaction. This work describes the synthesis of Pt-on-Pd bimetallic heterogeneous nanostructures, and their high electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Pt nanoclusters with a size of 1-2 nm were generated on Pd nanorods (NRs) through a modified Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) process free of potential control and a subsequent surface-limited redox reaction. The Pt nanocluster decorated Pd nanostructure with a ultralow Pt content of 1.5 wt % exhibited a mass activity of 105.3 mA mg(-1) (Pt-Pd) toward ORR, comparable to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst but 4 times higher than that of carbon supported Pd NRs. More importantly, the carbon supported Pt-on-Pd catalyst displays relatively small losses of 16% in electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and 32% in mass activity after 10 000 potential sweeps, in contrast to respective losses of 46 and 64% for the commercial Pt/C catalyst counterpart. The results demonstrated that Pt decoration might be an efficient way to improve the electrocatalytic activity of Pd and in turn allow Pd to be a promising substitution for commercial Pt catalyst.

  20. Inhibition of photosystems I and II activities in salt stress-exposed Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum).

    PubMed

    Zaghdoudi, Maha; Msilini, Najoua; Govindachary, Sridharan; Lachaâl, Mokhtar; Ouerghi, Zeineb; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-10-05

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) seedlings were exposed to increasing NaCl concentrations in the growth medium to examine the effect of salt stress on the electron transport reactions of photosynthesis. Activities of both photosystem II (PSII), measured by chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosystem I (PSI), measured by P700 photooxidation, were decreased by salt stress. The inhibition proceeded in a two step manner. At the lower salt concentrations used and shorter exposition periods, electron transfer between the quinone acceptors of PSII, Q(A) and Q(B), was strongly retarded as shown by an increased amplitude of the OJ phase of the OJIP chlorophyll fluorescence induction traces and slowed chlorophyll fluorescence relaxation kinetics following a single turn-over flash. The above indicated a disturbance of the Q(B) binding site likely associated with the first step of photoinhibition. In the second step, strong photoinhibition was observed as manifested by increased F(0) values, declined F(v)/F(0) and loss of photoactive P700.

  1. Primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Toon, S.; Govindjee; O`Neil, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1992-08-24

    Primary charge-separation in isolated bacterial reaction center (RC) complex occurs in 2.8 ps at room temperature and 0.7--1.2 ps at 10 K. Because of similarities between the bacterial and photosystem II (PSII) RCs, it has been of considerable interest to obtain analogous charge-separation rates in the higher plant system. Our previous femtosecond transient absorption studies used PSII RC material stabilized with PEG or by exchanging dodecyl maltoside (DM) for Triton in the isolation procedure. These materials gave charge-separation 1/e times of 3.0 {plus_minus} 0.6 ps at 4{degree}C and 1.4{plus_minus} 0.2 ps at 15 K based on the risetime of transient absorption kinetics at 820 nm. These values were thought to represent the time required for formation of the P680{sup +}-Pheo{sup {minus}} state. Recent results of Hastings et al. obtained at high data acquisition rates and low flash intensities, suggest that the Pheo{sup {minus}} state may form more slowly. In light of this work, we have carried out additional time domain studies of both electron transport and energy transfer phenomena in stabilized DM PSII RCs at room temperature. We used a 1-kHz repetition rate femtosecond transient absorption spectrometer with a 200 fs instrumental time resolution and compared the results with those obtained by others using frequency domain hole-burning techniques.

  2. The effects of arm movement on reaction time in patients with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Marzieh; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Maroufi, Nader; Ahmadi, Amir; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Emrani, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myofascial pain syndrome is a significant source of mechanical pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arm movement on reaction time in females with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. Methods: In this interventional study, a convenience sample of fifteen women with one active MTP, fifteen women with one latent MTP in the upper trapezius, and fifteen normal healthy women were participated. Participants were asked to stand for 10 seconds in an erect standing position. Muscle reaction times were recorded including anterior deltoid (AD), cervical paraspinal (CP) lumbar paraspinal (LP), both of upper trapezius (UT), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and medial head of gastrocnemius (GcM). Participants were asked to flex their arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA Test. Results: There was significant differences in motor time and reaction time between active and control groups (p< 0.05) except for GcM. There was no significant difference in motor time between active and passive groups except for UT without MTP and SCM (p< 0.05). Also, there were no significant differences in motor times between latent MTP and control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in premotor times between the three groups. Conclusion: The present study shows that patients with active MTP need more time to react to stimulus, but patients with latent MTP are similar to healthy subjects in the reaction time. Patients with active MTP had less compatibility with environmental stimulations, and they responded to a specific stimulation with variability in Surface Electromyography (SEMG). PMID:26913258

  3. Extension of activation cross section data of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhodium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-11-01

    In the frame of the systematical study of light ion induced nuclear reactions activation cross sections for deuteron induced reactions on monoisotopic 103Rh were extended to 50 MeV incident energy. Excitation functions were measured in the 49.8-36.6 MeV energy range for the 103Rh(d,xn)100,101Pd, 103Rh(d,pxn)99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103Rh(d,x)97,103Ru reactions by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and off-line high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental results are compared to our previous results and to the theoretical predictions in the TENDL-2014 library (TALYS 1.6 code).

  4. Monocatenary, branched, double-headed, and bolaform surface active carbohydrate esters via photochemical thiol-ene/-yne reactions.

    PubMed

    Boyère, Cédric; Broze, Guy; Blecker, Christophe; Jérôme, Christine; Debuigne, Antoine

    2013-10-18

    An original and versatile method for the synthesis of a range of novel mannose-based surfactants was developed via metal-free photo-induced thiol-ene/-yne 'click' reactions. This light-mediated hydrothiolation reaction involving a thiolated mannose was successfully applied to terminal and internal alkenes, dienes, and alkynes, leading to monocatenary, branched, double-headed, and bolaform amphiphilic carbohydrate esters, respectively. A surface activity study showed that these new compounds possess valuable properties and display specific behavior at the air-water interface. It also demonstrated the greater flexibility of the thioether moiety in the spacer of the surfactants produced via a thiol-ene reaction in comparison with the triazole heterocyclic rings in similar glucose-based surfactants synthesized elsewhere by the alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar addition.

  5. On-demand electrochemical activation of the click reaction on self-assembled monolayers on gold presenting masked acetylene groups.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inseong; Kim, Young-Kwan; Min, Dal-Hee; Lee, SangWook; Yeo, Woon-Seok

    2011-10-26

    We report on a new surface modification method for grafting a "dynamic" property for on-demand activation of the click reaction. Our approach utilizes the acetylene group masked with dicobalt hexacarbonyl, Co(2)(CO)(6), which is not reactive toward the click reaction. Electrochemical treatment reveals the acetylene group on the selected region, which is then used as a chemical handle for surface functionalization via the click reaction with an azide-containing molecule. Electrochemical and chemical conversions on the surface were verified by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We have demonstrated immobilization of an azide-modified RGD peptide and promotion of cell adhesion/migration to the region of electrochemical induction.

  6. Activation cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on silver in the 33-50MeV energy range.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2017-02-01

    Excitation functions were measured for the (nat)Ag(d,x)(105,104)Cd, (110)(m,108m,106m,105g,104g)Ag and (101)Pd, (105,101m)Rh reactions over the energy range 33-50MeV by using the stacked foil activation technique and subsequent high-resolution gamma-spectrometry. We present the first experimental cross section data above 40MeV for all of these reactions and the first experimental cross section data for (nat)Ag(d,x)(108m,104g)Ag and (105,103)Rh. The experimental data are compared with results of the model calculations performed with the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D theoretical nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS code results as available in the TENDL-2014 and -2015 on-line libraries.

  7. Novel sesquiterpenes from Schisandra grandiflora: isolation, cytotoxic activity and synthesis of their triazole derivatives using "click" reaction.

    PubMed

    Poornima, B; Siva, Bandi; Shankaraiah, G; Venkanna, A; Nayak, V Lakshma; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Venkat Rao, C; Babu, K Suresh

    2015-03-06

    Phytochemical investigation of hexane extract from the fruits of Schisandra grandiflora afforded three novel sesquiterpenes (1-3) along with the three known compounds (4-6). The structures of these isolates were determined by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data (1D, 2D NMR). Further, a series of triazole analogues of 3 and 4 were prepared using "Click" reaction protocol. The reaction scheme involving one-carbon homologation of 3 and 4 using the Bestmann-Ohira reagent followed by regioselective Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of various azides leading to the formation of triazole analogues (20a-20k &21a-21c) which is being reported for the first time. All the triazole products were characterized using spectral data analysis. The anti-proliferative activity of the isolates and the synthetic analogues were studied against Hela (Cervical cancer), A549 (Lung cancer), DU-145 (Prostate cancer), MCF-7 (Breast cancer) and B-16 (Mouse melanoma) cancer cell lines.

  8. Adduct Formation, B-H Activation and Ring Expansion at Room Temperature from Reactions of HBcat with NHCs.

    PubMed

    Würtemberger-Pietsch, Sabrina; Schneider, Heidi; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2016-09-05

    We report the reactions of catecholborane (HBcat; 1) with unsaturated and saturated NHCs as well as CAAC(Me) . Mono-NHC adducts of the type HBcat⋅NHC (NHC=nPr2 Im, iPr2 Im, iPr2 Im(Me) , and Dipp2 Im) were obtained by stoichiometric reactions of HBcat with the unsaturated NHCs. The reaction of CAAC(Me) with HBcat yielded the B-H activated product CAAC(Me) (H)Bcat via insertion of the carbine-carbon atom into the B-H bond. The saturated NHC Dipp2 SIm reacted in a 2:2 ratio yielding an NHC ring-expanded product at room temperature forming a six-membered -B-C=N-C=C-N- ring via C-N bond cleavage and further migration of the hydrides from two HBcat molecules to the former carbene-carbon atom.

  9. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Activation/C–C Cross-Coupling Reactions: Versatility and Practicality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Engle, Keary M.; Wang, Dong-Hui; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, palladium-catalyzed C–H activation/C–C bond forming reactions have emerged as promising new catalytic transformations; however, development in this field is still at an early stage compared to the state of the art in cross-coupling reactions using aryl and alkyl halides. This Review begins with a brief introduction of four extensively investigated modes of catalysis for forming C–C bonds from C–H bonds: Pd(II)/Pd(0), Pd(II)/Pd(IV), Pd(0)/Pd(II)/Pd(IV) and Pd(0)/Pd(II) catalysis. More detailed discussion is then directed towards the recent development of Pd(II)-catalyzed coupling of C–H bonds with organometallic reagents through a Pd(II)/Pd(0) catalytic cycle. Despite much progress made to date, improving the versatility and practicality of this new reaction remains a tremendous challenge. PMID:19557755

  10. Modeling of catalytically active metal complex species and intermediates in reactions of organic halides electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, Anton S; Kolotilov, Sergey V; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Eremenko, Igor L; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2015-02-28

    The results of quantum chemical modeling of organic and metal-containing intermediates that occur in electrocatalytic dehalogenation reactions of organic chlorides are presented. Modeling of processes that take place in successive steps of the electrochemical reduction of representative C1 and C2 chlorides - CHCl3 and Freon R113 (1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane) - was carried out by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). It was found that taking solvation into account using an implicit solvent model (conductor-like screening model, COSMO) or considering explicit solvent molecules gave similar results. In addition to modeling of simple non-catalytic dehalogenation, processes with a number of complexes and their reduced forms, some of which were catalytically active, were investigated by DFT. Complexes M(L1)2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, L1H = Schiff base from 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde and the hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), Ni(L2) (H2L2 is the Schiff base from salicylaldehyde and 1,2-ethylenediamine, known as salen) and Co(L3)2Cl2, representing a fragment of a redox-active coordination polymer [Co(L3)Cl2]n (L3 is the dithioamide of 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid), were considered. Gradual changes in electronic structure in a series of compounds M(L1)2 were observed, and correlations between [M(L1)2](0) spin-up and spin-down LUMO energies and the relative energies of the corresponding high-spin and low-spin reduced forms, as well as the shape of the orbitals, were proposed. These results can be helpful for determination of the nature of redox-processes in similar systems by DFT. No specific covalent interactions between [M(L1)2](-) and the R113 molecule (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) were found, which indicates that M(L1)2 electrocatalysts act rather like electron transfer mediators via outer-shell electron transfer. A relaxed surface scan of the adducts {M(L1)2·R113}(-) (M = Ni or Co) versus the distance between the

  11. EEG reactions of the human brain in the gradient magnetic field zone of the active geological fault (pilot study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobachenko, S. V.; Shitov, A. V.; Grigorjev, P. E.; Sokolov, M. V.; Zubrilkin, A. I.; Vypiraylo, D. N.; Solovjev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of the functional state of a person within the zone of an active geological fault characterized by abnormal spatial distribution of the magnetic- field vector values. It is shown that these geophysical modifications have a pronounced effect on the fluctuations of the electrical activity of the human brain. When the person gets into a zone with abnormal levels of gradient magnetic field in the absence of any subjective sensations, a nonspecific orientation activation reaction is observed, which is characterized by a significant increase in the levels of peak performance in key functional EEG frequency bands.

  12. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by these materials.

  13. In situ measurement of activation energy for pyrolysis of ethanol as a first reaction in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohga, Yosuke; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2015-10-01

    Using a quadrupole mass spectrometer we measured the activation energy of ethanol decomposition with various catalysts. In order to quantitatively evaluate the catalysts we subtracted their effect from that of the catalyst-free pyrolysis. As a result we derived the activation energies using iron, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum catalysts. These metals are typical catalysts in carbon nanotube synthesis, with two of them usually mixed empirically. This empirical preparation and use of catalysts is consistent with our results. Among these catalysts, iron reduced the activation energy most. Conversely, cobalt achieved a reduction of only 0.3 eV compared to the catalyst-free reaction.

  14. Supervisors' attitudes and skills for active listening with regard to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinate workers.

    PubMed

    Mineyama, Sachiko; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Takao, Soshi; Nishiuchi, Kyoko; Kawakami, Norito

    2007-03-01

    We investigated whether supervisors' listening attitudes and skills were related to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among their subordinates. The subjects included 41 male supervisors and their immediate subordinates (n=203). The supervisors completed a short version of the Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS) consisting of two subscales: Listening Attitude and Listening Skill for Active Listening. The subordinates rated working conditions and their psychological stress reactions using selected scales of the Job Content Questionnaire and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill reported a more favorable psychological stress reaction than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Skill reported higher worksite support than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude reported higher job control than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude. A supervisor's listening attitude and skill appeared to affect psychological stress reactions predominantly among male subordinates than among female subordinates. Psychological stress reactions were lower among younger subordinates who worked under supervisors with high listening skill, while no statistically difference was observed among older subordinates. These findings suggest that a supervisor's listening attitude and skill have an effect on working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinates and that the effects vary according to the subordinates' sex and age.

  15. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Rundberg, R.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Boswell, M.; Klein, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the first observation of tertiary reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons produced in compressed deuterium and tritium filled capsules using the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. RIF neutrons are produced by third-order, out of equilibrium ("in-flight") fusion reactions, initiated by primary fusion products. The rate of RIF reactions is dependent upon the range of the elastically scattered fuel ions and therefore a diagnostic of Coulomb physics within the plasma. At plasma temperatures of ˜5 keV, the presence of neutrons with kinetic energies greater than 15 MeV is a unique signature for RIF neutron production. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a threshold of 15.0 MeV, and a unique decay scheme making it a suitable diagnostic for observing RIF neutrons. RIF neutron production is quantified by the ratio of 167Tm/168Tm observed in a 169Tm foil, where the reaction 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm samples the primary neutron fluence. Averaged over 4 implosions1-4 at the NIF, the 167Tm/168Tm ratio is measured to be 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10-5, leading to an average ratio of RIF to primary neutron ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10-4. These ratios are consistent with the predictions for charged particle stopping in a quantum degenerate plasma.

  16. A biocompatible in vivo ligation reaction and its application for noninvasive bioluminescent imaging of protease activity in living mice.

    PubMed

    Godinat, Aurélien; Park, Hyo Min; Miller, Stephen C; Cheng, Ke; Hanahan, Douglas; Sanman, Laura E; Bogyo, Matthew; Yu, Allen; Nikitin, Gennady F; Stahl, Andreas; Dubikovskaya, Elena A

    2013-05-17

    The discovery of biocompatible reactions had a tremendous impact on chemical biology, allowing the study of numerous biological processes directly in complex systems. However, despite the fact that multiple biocompatible reactions have been developed in the past decade, very few work well in living mice. Here we report that D-cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazoles can selectively react with each other in vivo to generate a luciferin substrate for firefly luciferase. The success of this "split luciferin" ligation reaction has important implications for both in vivo imaging and biocompatible labeling strategies. First, the production of a luciferin substrate can be visualized in a live mouse by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and furthermore allows interrogation of targeted tissues using a "caged" luciferin approach. We therefore applied this reaction to the real-time noninvasive imaging of apoptosis associated with caspase 3/7. Caspase-dependent release of free D-cysteine from the caspase 3/7 peptide substrate Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-D-Cys (DEVD-(D-Cys)) allowed selective reaction with 6-amino-2-cyanobenzothiazole (NH(2)-CBT) in vivo to form 6-amino-D-luciferin with subsequent light emission from luciferase. Importantly, this strategy was found to be superior to the commercially available DEVD-aminoluciferin substrate for imaging of caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, the split luciferin approach enables the modular construction of bioluminogenic sensors, where either or both reaction partners could be caged to report on multiple biological events. Lastly, the luciferin ligation reaction is 3 orders of magnitude faster than Staudinger ligation, suggesting further applications for both bioluminescence and specific molecular targeting in vivo.

  17. Surface Structure Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Co3O4 Anchored on Graphene Sheets toward Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junwu; Kuang, Qin; Yang, Shihe; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic activity is primarily a surface phenomenon, however, little is known about Co3O4 nanocrystals in terms of the relationship between the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and surface structure, especially when dispersed on a highly conducting support to improve the electrical conductivity and so to enhance the catalytic activity. Herein, we report a controllable synthesis of Co3O4 nanorods (NR), nanocubes (NC) and nano-octahedrons (OC) with the different exposed nanocrystalline surfaces ({110}, {100}, and {111}), uniformly anchored on graphene sheets, which has allowed us to investigate the effects of the surface structure on the ORR activity. Results show that the catalytically active sites for ORR should be the surface Co2+ ions, whereas the surface Co3+ ions catalyze CO oxidation, and the catalytic ability is closely related to the density of the catalytically active sites. These results underscore the importance of morphological control in the design of highly efficient ORR catalysts. PMID:23892418

  18. Reactivity and regioselectivity in reactions of methyl and ethyl azides with cyclooctynes: activation strain model and energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    de S Vilhena, Felipe; de M Carneiro, José Walkimar

    2017-01-01

    The structures and energies for the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of methyl and ethyl azides with some cyclooctynes and dibenzocyclooctynes were computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. The activation strain model (ASM) and quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory were used to investigate the reactivity and regiochemistry in these reactions. The energy decomposition analysis (EDA) was used to identify the intrinsic electronic factor that lead to the preferential formation of 1,7-regiochemistry products. The reactivity order agrees with formation of more synchronous transition states and lower distortion energies. For the reaction of N3Met with azacyclooctyne, the 1,7-regiochemistry preference is attributed to a lower FMO gap and a higher contribution of the polarization term of the interaction energy than for the 1,8-transition state. For the reaction with aza-dibenzocyclooctyne, the 1,7-preference is due to a lower strain energy and a more pronounced contribution of the exchange term of the interaction energy. Graphical Abstract In the reactions between methyl and ethyl azides with azacyclooctynes the regiochemistry is governed by the intrinsic electronic factors.

  19. Increased metabolic activity detected by FLIM in human breast cancer cells with desmoplastic reaction: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natal, Rodrigo de Andrade; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bondarik, Caroline; Mendonça, Guilherme R.; Derchain, Sophie F.; Lima, Carmen P.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Sarian, Luís. O.; Vassallo, José

    2015-07-01

    Introduction: In breast cancer (BC), desmoplastic reaction, assembled primarily by fibroblasts, is associated with unfavorable prognosis, but the reason of this fact remains still unclear. In this context, nonlinear optics microscopy, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), has provided advancement in cellular metabolism research. In this paper, our purpose is to differentiate BC cells metabolism with or without contact to desmoplastic reaction. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded samples were used at different points of hematoxylin stained sections. Methodology: Sections from 14 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma were analyzed with FLIM methodology to NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetime on a Confocal Upright LSM780 NLO device (Carl Zeiss AG, Germany). Quantification of the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence intensity was evaluated by SPC Image software (Becker &Hickl) and ImageJ (NIH), respectively. Optical redox ratio was calculated by dividing the FAD fluorescence intensity by NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity. Data value for FLIM measurements and fluorescence intensities were calculated using Wilcoxon test; p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BC cells in contact with desmoplastic reaction presented a significantly lower NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, optical redox ratio was also lower in these tumor cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that contact of BC cells with desmoplastic reaction increase their metabolic activity, which might explain the adverse prognosis of cases associated with higher peritumoral desmoplastic reaction.

  20. Intramolecular C-N bond activation and ring-expansion reactions of N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras; Berthel, Johannes H J; Radius, Udo

    2015-01-19

    Intramolecular ring-expansion reactions (RER) of the N-heterocyclic carbene 1,3-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene were observed upon vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoexcitation. Similarly to RERs reported in the solvent phase, for the reaction of NHCs with main-group-element hydrides, hydrogen transfer to the NHC carbon atom is the crucial initial step. In an ionization-mediated protonation, 1,3-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene forms an imidazolium ion, which is the rate-limiting step on the pathway to two six-membered ring products, namely, methylpyrimidinium and -pyrazinium ions. To unravel the reaction path, we have used imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with VUV synchrotron radiation, as well as high-level composite method calculations. Similarities and differences between the mechanism in the gas phase and in the condensed phase are discussed.

  1. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, E.P.

    1980-02-01

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, /sup 80/Br, /sup 82m/Br + /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 128/I, /sup 130/I, and /sup 130m/I + /sup 130/I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation to determine the role of hot atom kinetic energy, halogen atom, enantioner structure, steric effects and phase on the extent of substitution by retention of configuration or by Walden inversion. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace element determinations in biological systems was continued.

  2. [EEG and fMRI reactions of a healthy brain at active and passive movements by a leading hand].

    PubMed

    Boldyreva, G N; Sharova, E V; Zhavoronkova, L A; Cheliapina, M V; Dubrovskaia, L P; Simonova, O A; Smirnov, A S; Troshina, E M; Kornienko, V N

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical (EEG) and hemodynamic (fMRI) responses of cerebral reactions to active and passive movements by the right hand were analyzed in 17 right-handed healthy persons. Individual and averaged fMRI and EEG data was analyzed. The main cortex fMRI responses (sensorimotor cortex of the contralateral, left hemisphere) were topographically similar during both active and passive movements. This fact allows us to recommend the usage of the passive movement paradigm for the mapping of the motor areas in patients with movement disorders. Including in reactive process of cerebellum and subcortical structures at passive movements was more variability than active ones. FMRI-reactions at passive movements were characterized more individual variability than during active ones at the expense of diversity of cerebellum and subcortical structures answers. The EEG analysis revealed that at both passive and active movements there is a coherence increase in the high-frequency alpha-ban in left central-frontal area of the left, activated hemisphere. The power-frequency changes of the EEG parameters during active and passive movements were primarily shown in a frequency increase and the desynchronization of the beta-band. Consistency with the topography of the fMRI response was not found.

  3. An iridium-mediated C-H activation/CO2-carboxylation reaction of 1,1-bisdiphenylphosphinomethane.

    PubMed

    Langer, Jens; Fabra, María José; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Görls, Helmar; Oro, Luis A; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2010-09-07

    The reaction of 1,1-bisdiphenylphosphinomethane (dppm, 4 eq.) with [IrCl(coe)(2)](2) results in a solvent dependent equilibrium from which the complexes [IrCl(dppm)(dppm-H)(H)] (1) and [Ir(dppm)(2)]Cl (2) were isolated. When 2 is dissolved in methanol, [IrCl(dppm)(2)(H)][OCH(3)] (4) is formed as dominant species in solution. The C-H activation reaction which leads to 1 and 4 can be suppressed by adding an additional dppm ligand per iridium center resulting in the formation of [Ir(dppm)(3)]Cl (5). If the reaction of dppm with [IrX(coe)(2)](2) (X = Cl, I) is performed under an atmosphere of CO(2) the complexes [IrX(dppm)(H){(Ph(2)P)(2)C-COOH}] (6: X = Cl; 7: X = I) are formed by a CH activation/CO(2) carboxylation sequence. The reaction of 6 with NH(4)PF yields [IrCl(dppm)(2)(H)]PF(6).(10). Additionally the lithium compounds [Li(dme)(2)(dppm-H)] (3) and [Li(dme){(Ph(2)P)(2)CHCOO}](2) (8) were prepared for comparison. The molecular structures of the compounds 1, 3, 5, 7, 8 and of the related iridium complex [IrCl(dppm)(2)(H)]I (11) are reported.

  4. A few molecules of zeaxanthin per reaction centre of photosystem II permit effective thermal dissipation of light energy in photosystem II of a poikilohydric moss.

    PubMed

    Bukhov, N G; Kopecky, J; Pfündel, E E; Klughammer, C; Heber, U

    2001-04-01

    The relationship between thermal dissipation of light energy (as indicated by the quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence), zeaxanthin availability and protonation reactions was investigated in the moss Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus (Hedw.) Warnst. In the absence of zeaxanthin and actinic illumination, acidification by 20% CO2 in air was incapable of quenching basal, so-called F0 fluorescence either in the moss or in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves. However, 1-s light pulses given either every 40, 60 or 200 s increased thermal dissipation as indicated by F0 and Fm quenching in the presence of 20% CO2 in air in the moss, but not in spinach while reaction centres of photosystem II (PSII) were photochemically open. In the moss, a few short light pulses, which were separated by prolonged dark times, were sufficient to raise zeaxanthin levels in the presence of 20% CO2 in air. Simultaneously, quantum efficiency of charge separation in PSII was decreased. Increasing the CO2 concentration beyond 20% further decreased quantum efficiency even in the absence of short light pulses. Under conditions optimal for fluorescence quenching, one molecule of zeaxanthin per reaction centre of PSII was sufficient to decrease quantum efficiency of charge separation in PSII by 50%. Thus, in combination with a protonation reaction, one molecule of zeaxanthin was as efficient at capturing excitation energy as a photochemically open reaction centre. The data are discussed in relation to the interaction between zeaxanthin and thylakoid protonation, which enables effective thermal dissipation of light energy in the antennae of PSII in the moss but not in higher plants when actinic illumination is absent.

  5. High-Temperature Sensitivity and Its Acclimation for Photosynthetic Electron Transport Reactions of Desert Succulents 1

    PubMed Central

    Chetti, Mahadev B.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increases in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60°C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3°C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3°C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30°C/20°C, treatment at 50°C caused these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30°C/20°C to 45°C/35°C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3°C to 8°C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45°C/35°C plants treated at 60°C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plant so far reported. PMID:16665562

  6. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron transport reactions of desert succulents.

    PubMed

    Chetti, M B; Nobel, P S

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increases in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60 degrees C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3 degrees C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3 degrees C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30 degrees C/20 degrees C, treatment at 50 degrees C caused these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30 degrees C/20 degrees C to 45 degrees C/35 degrees C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3 degrees C to 8 degrees C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45 degrees C/35 degrees C plants treated at 60 degrees C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plant so far reported.

  7. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    SciTech Connect

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  8. Effect of photosystem I inactivation on chlorophyll a fluorescence induction in wheat leaves: Does activity of photosystem I play any role in OJIP rise?

    PubMed

    Zivcak, Marek; Brestic, Marian; Kunderlikova, Kristyna; Olsovska, Katarina; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation of the fast chlorophyll a fluorescence induction is still a subject of continuing discussion. One of the contentious issues is the influence of photosystem I (PSI) activity on the kinetics of the thermal JIP-phase of OJIP rise. To demonstrate this influence, we realized a series of measurements in wheat leaves subjected to PSI photoinactivation by the sequence of red saturation pulses (15,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for 0.3 s, every 10 s) applied in darkness. Such a treatment led to a moderate decrease of maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (by ~8%), but a strong decrease of the number of oxidizable PSI (by ~55%), which considerably limited linear electron transport and CO2 assimilation. Surprisingly, the PSI photoinactivation had low effects on OJIP kinetics of variable fluorescence. In particular, the amplitude of variable fluorescence of IP-step (ΔVIP), which has been considered to be a measure of PSI content, was not decreased, despite the low content of photooxidizable PSI. On the other hand, the slower relaxation of chlorophyll fluorescence after saturation pulse as well as the results of the double-hit method suggest that PSI inactivation treatment led to an increase of the fraction of QB-nonreducing PSII reaction centers. Our results somewhat challenge the mainstream interpretations of JIP-thermal phase, and at least suggest that the IP amplitude cannot serve to estimate reliably the PSI content or the PSI to PSII ratio. Moreover, these results recommend the use of the novel method of PSI inactivation, which might help clarify some important issues needed for the correct understanding of the OJIP fluorescence rise.

  9. A fluorescence-based coupling reaction for monitoring the activity of recombinant human NAD synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Michael E; Kuhn, Eric; Mallender, William D; Pullen, Lester; Li, Ping; Parsons, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    NAD synthetase is responsible for the conversion of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. This reaction provides a biosynthetic route of the coenzyme and, thus, a source of cellular reducing equivalents. Alterations in the oxidative reductive potential of the cell have been implicated as a contributing factor in many disease states. Thus, this enzyme represents a new class of potential drug targets, and, hence, our efforts were focused upon developing a robust assay for utilization in a high throughput screen. Toward that end, we describe a coupled enzyme assay format for the measurement of recombinant human NAD synthetase by employing lactate dehydrogenase in a cycling/amplification reaction linked ultimately to the fluorescence generation of resorufin from resazurin via diaphorase. We present kinetics of the reaction of NAD synthetase in the coupled assay format, optimization conditions, and inhibition of the reaction by gossypol [1,1',6,6',7,7'-hexahydroxy-3,3'-dimethyl-5,5'-bis(1-methylethyl)-[2,2'- binaphthalene]-8,8'-dicarboxaldehyde] and illustrate the robustness of the assay by demonstrating 384-well microtiter plate uniformity statistics. Collectively, our results show that the assay method is both robust and well suited for this class of enzymes involved in the NAD+ biosynthetic pathway.

  10. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  11. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    PubMed Central

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date. PMID:25788358

  12. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore » structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  13. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  14. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  15. Reaction kinetics and product distributions in photoelectrochemical cells. Report on research activities, March 15, 1991--March 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, C.A.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor/liquid junction solar cells, also called photoelectrochemical cells (PEC), represent a versatile way to use solar energy. Photon energy can be used to make electricity and chemical fuels or can be used as an alternative to thermal activation energy in photocatalytic cells. Two fundamental processes associated with photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion were investigated experimentally: (i) Reactions of `hot` electrons, and (ii) Electrode kinetics at 2-dimensional materials.

  16. Palladium-catalyzed C-H activation/intramolecular amination reaction: a new route to 3-aryl/alkylindazoles.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Kiyofumi; Saito, Tadataka; Katsuno, Mika; Sakamoto, Takao; Hiroya, Kou

    2007-07-19

    A method for the catalytic C-H activation of hydrazone compounds followed by intramolecular amination is described. It requires the use of a catalytic amount of Pd(OAc)2 in the presence of Cu(OAc)2 and AgOCOCF3, which efficiently effects the cyclization to afford variously substituted indazoles. The reactions proceed under relatively mild conditions and thus tolerate a variety of functional groups, including alkoxycarbonyl and cyano groups and halogen atoms.

  17. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  18. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  19. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  20. Effect of NaCl Salts on the Activation Energy of Excited-State Proton Transfer Reaction of Coumarin 183.

    PubMed

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Kim, Sangin; Park, Sungnam

    2015-12-17

    Coumarin 183 (C183) was used as a photoacid to study excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Here, we studied the effect of ions on the ESPT of C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions using a steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method. The acid dissociation equilibrium of excited-state C183 and the activation energy for the ESPT of C183 were determined as a function of NaCl concentration. The change in the equilibrium constant was found to be correlated with the solvation energy of deprotonated C183. Frequency-resolved TCSPC signals measured at several temperatures were analyzed by using a global fitting analysis method which enabled us to extract all the rate constants involving the ESPT reaction and the spectra of individual species. The activation energy for the ESPT reaction of C183 was highly dependent on NaCl concentration. Quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate the local hydrogen-bond (H-bond) configurations around C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions. It was found that the activation energy for the ESPT was determined by the local H-bond configurations around C183 which were significantly influenced by the dissolved ions.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature.

  2. Light piping driven photosynthesis in the soil: Low-light adapted active photosynthetic apparatus in the under-soil hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Sárvári, Éva; Solti, Ádám; Czégény, Gyula; Hideg, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Bóka, Károly; Böddi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic activity was identified in the under-soil hypocotyl part of 14-day-old soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Magnum) cultivated in pots under natural light-dark cycles. Electron microscopic, proteomic and fluorescence kinetic and imaging methods were used to study the photosynthetic apparatus and its activity. Under-soil shoots at 0-2cm soil depth featured chloroplasts with low grana and starch grains and with pigment-protein compositions similar to those of the above-soil green shoot parts. However, the relative amounts of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes were higher; in addition a PIP-type aquaporin protein was identified in the under-soil thylakoids. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction measurements showed that the above- and under-soil hypocotyl segments had similar photochemical yields at low (10-55μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) light intensities. However, at higher photon flux densities the electron transport rate decreased in the under-soil shoot parts due to inactivation of the PSII reaction centers. These properties show the development of a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus driven by light piping of the above-soil shoot. The results of this paper demonstrate that the classic model assigning source and sink functions to above- and under-soil tissues is to be refined, and a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus in under-soil bean hypocotyls is capable of contributing to its own carbon supply.

  3. Mechanism and Stereoselectivity in an Asymmetric N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Monika; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-11-18

    The mechanism and origin of stereoinduction in a chiral N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalyzed C-C bond activation of cyclobutenone has been established using B3LYP-D3 density functional theory computations. The activation of cyclobutenone as an NHC-bound vinyl enolate and subsequent reaction with the electrophilic sulfonyl imine leads to the lactam product. The most preferred stereocontrolling transition state exhibits a number of noncovalent interactions rendering additional stabilization. The computed enantio- and diastereoselectivities are in good agreement with the previous experimental observations.

  4. A convenient method for experimental determination of yields and isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions measured by the activation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, D.; Dobreva, E.; Nenov, N.; Todorov, V.

    1995-02-01

    A generalized exact formula is derived for a determination of the experimental isomeric ratio in any incident particle activation. For the particular case, when the activity of the ground state results from the simultaneous decay of both states and can be conveniently measured, the appropriate modification of this formula is evaluated and applied to six photonuclear reactions induced by 43 MeV bremsstrahlung. The experimental isomeric yield ratios of (γ, 3n) 110m,gIn; (γ, p) (γ, pn), (γ, 2n2p) 117m,gIn; (γ, n) 164m,gHo and (γ, 3n) 162m,gHo are deduced.

  5. Photosynthetic carbon reduction and carbon oxidation cycles are the main electron sinks for photosystem II activity during a mild drought.

    PubMed

    Cornic, Gabriel; Fresneau, Chantal

    2002-06-01

    Stomatal closure can explain the inhibition of net CO2 uptake by a leaf subjected to a mild drought: the photosynthetic apparatus appears resistant to lack of water. Changes in both the water content of leaves maintained in a constant environment and the ambient CO2 molar fraction during measurements on well-hydrated leaves lead to similar effects on net CO2 uptake and whole chain electron transport as estimated by leaf chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. In particular, it is shown that photosystem II (PSII) functioning and its regulation are not qualitatively changed during desiccation and that the variations in PSII photochemistry can simply be understood by changes in substrate availability in this condition. Moreover, an analysis of the literature shows that when inhibition of net CO2 uptake by C3 leaves under drought (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Helianthus annus L. and Solanum tuberosum L.) was lower than 80 %, elevated CO2 completely restored the photosynthetic capacity. The CO2 molar fraction in the chloroplasts declines as stomata close in drying leaves. As a consequence, in C3 plants, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate oxygenation increases and becomes the main sink for photosynthetic electrons. Depending on the prevailing photon flux density, the O2 uptake through photorespiratory activity can entirely replace carbon dioxide as an electron acceptor, or not. The rate of the Mehler reaction remains low and unchanged during desiccation. However, drought could also involve CO2-sensitive modification of the photosynthetic metabolism depending on plant growth conditions and possibly also on plant species.

  6. Gold-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization of 1,5-Allenynes via Dual Activation of an Ene Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon; Morganelli, Philip; Luzung, Michael R.; Houk, K. N.; Toste, F. Dean

    2010-01-01

    A tris-triphenylphosphinegold oxonium tetrafluoroborate, [(Ph3PAu)3O]BF4, catalyzes the rearrangement of 1,5-allenynes to produce cross-conjugated trienes. Experimental and computational evidence shows that the ene reaction proceeds through a unique nucleophilic addition of an allene double bond to a cationic phosphinegold(I) complexed phosphinegold(I) acetylide, followed by a 1,5-hydrogen shift. PMID:18327944

  7. Diels–Alder reactions in confined spaces: the influence of catalyst structure and the nature of active sites for the retro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cantín, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diels–Alder cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and p-benzoquinone has been studied in the confined space of a pure silica zeolite Beta and the impact on reaction rate due to the concentration effect within the pore and diffusion limitations are discussed. Introduction of Lewis or Brønsted acid sites on the walls of the zeolite strongly increases the reaction rate. However, contrary to what occurs with mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41), Beta zeolite does not catalyse the retro-Diels–Alder reaction, resulting in a highly selective catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction. PMID:27829925

  8. Light activates the reaction of bacteriorhodopsin aspartic acid-115 with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    SciTech Connect

    Renthal, R.; Cothran, M.; Espinoza, B.; Wall, K.A.; Bernard, M.

    1985-07-30

    Conditions for a light-induced reaction between the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and bacteriorhodopsin in Triton X-100 micelles were previously reported. The authors have now located the DCCD site in the bacteriorhodopsin amino acid sequence. ( UC)DCCD-bacteriorhodopsin was cleaved with CNBr. The resulting peptides were purified by gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). One major UC peptide (50%) and two minor fractions were obtained. Amino acid analysis and sequence analysis showed that the major fraction contained residues 69-118. This region includes six carboxyl side chains. The major UC peptide was also subjected to pepsin hydrolysis. HPLC analysis of the product gave only a single major radioactive subfragment. Amino acid analysis of the peptic peptide showed that it contained residues 110-118. The only carboxyl side chain in this region is Asp-115. Thus, the authors conclude that Asp-115 is the major DCCD site. The light sensitivity of this reaction suggests that Asp-115 becomes more exposed or that its environment becomes more acidic during proton pumping. The DCCD reaction blue-shifts the retinal chromophore. Such a result would be expected if Asp-115 is the negative point charge predicted to be near the cyclohexene ring of retinal.

  9. Activation parameters for cyclohexene oxygenation by an oxoiron(IV) porphyrin pi-cation radical complex: entropy control of an allylic hydroxylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akihiro; Kurahashi, Takuya; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2007-08-06

    Activation parameters for epoxidation and allylic hydroxylation reactions of cyclohexene with FeIVO(TMP)*+Cl (1) were determined. Within the experimental temperature range, the epoxidation reaction was enthalpy-controlled (i.e., DeltaH > -TDeltaS), while the allylic hydroxylation reaction was entropy-controlled (i.e., -TDeltaS > DeltaH). An unexpectedly large contribution of the entropy term for the allylic hydroxylation reaction indicated that the free energy of activation, DeltaG, rather than the activation energy, Ea, should be used to discuss the reaction mechanism and chemoselectivity. The results of this study bring caution to previous density functional theory studies, in which the reaction mechanism and chemoselectivity are evaluated from calculated Ea.

  10. Selected phytotoxins and organic extracts from endophytic fungus Edenia gomezpompae as light reaction of photosynthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Macías-Rubalcava, Martha Lydia; Ruiz-Velasco Sobrino, María Emma; Meléndez-González, Claudio; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2014-09-05

    In a search for natural herbicides, we investigated the action mechanism of the naphthoquinone spiroketals, isolated from the endophytic fungus Edenia gomezpompae: preussomerins EG1 (1) and EG4 (2), and palmarumycins CP17 (3), and CP2 (4) on the photosynthesis light reactions. The naphthoquinone spiroketals 1-4 inhibited the ATP synthesis in freshly lysed spinach thylakoids from water to MV, and they also inhibited the non-cyclic electron transport in the basal, phosphorylating and uncoupled conditions from water to MV. Therefore, they act as Hill reaction inhibitors. The results suggested that naphthoquinone spiroketals 1-4 have two interactions and inhibition site on the PSII electron transport chain. The first one involves the water splitting enzyme inhibition; and, the second on the acceptor site of PSII in a similar way that herbicide Diuron, studied by polaroghaphy and corroborated by fluorescence of the chlorophyll a of PSII. The culture medium and mycelium organic extracts from four morphological variants of E. gomezpompae were phytotoxic, and the culture medium extracts were more potent than mycelium extracts. They also act as Hill reaction inhibitors.

  11. Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction-dependent fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yushu; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-03-15

    Sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity is beneficial for evaluating the repairing process of DNA lesions. Here, toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TSDR)-dependent fluorescent strategy was constructed for sensitive detection of UDG activity. A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe with two uracil bases and a trigger sequence were designed. A hairpin probe with toehold domain was designed, and a reporter probe was also designed. Under the action of UDG, two uracil bases were removed from ssDNA probe, generating apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. Then, the AP sites could inhibit the TSDR between ssDNA probe and hairpin probe, leaving the trigger sequence in ssDNA probe still free. Subsequently, the trigger sequence was annealed with the reporter probe, initiating the polymerization and nicking amplification reaction. As a result, numerous G-quadruplex (G4) structures were formed, which could bind with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) to generate enhanced fluorescent signal. In the absence of UDG, the ssDNA probe could hybridize with the toehold domain of the hairpin probe to initiate TSDR, blocking the trigger sequence, and then the subsequent amplification reaction would not occur. The proposed strategy was successfully implemented for detecting UDG activity with a detection limit of 2.7×10(-5)U/mL. Moreover, the strategy could distinguish UDG well from other interference enzymes. Furthermore, the strategy was also applied for detecting UDG activity in HeLa cells lysate with low effect of cellular components. These results indicated that the proposed strategy offered a promising tool for sensitive quantification of UDG activity in UDG-related function study and disease prognosis.

  12. Transition Metal‐Promoted V2CO2 (MXenes): A New and Highly Active Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chongyi; Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Developing alternatives to precious Pt for hydrogen production from water splitting is central to the area of renewable energy. This work predicts extremely high catalytic activity of transition metal (Fe, Co, and Ni) promoted two‐dimensional MXenes, fully oxidized vanadium carbides (V2CO2), for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The first‐principle calculations show that the introduction of transition metal can greatly weaken the strong binding between hydrogen and oxygen and engineer the hydrogen adsorption free energy to the optimal value ≈0 eV by choosing the suitable type and coverage of the promoters as well as the active sites. Strain engineering on the performance of transition metal promoted V2CO2 further reveals that the excellent HER activities can maintain well while those poor ones can be modulated to be highly active. This study provides new possibilities for cost‐effective alternatives to Pt in HER and for the application of 2D MXenes. PMID:27980992

  13. Transition Metal-Promoted V2CO2 (MXenes): A New and Highly Active Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chongyi; Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Chen, Qian; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-11-01

    Developing alternatives to precious Pt for hydrogen production from water splitting is central to the area of renewable energy. This work predicts extremely high catalytic activity of transition metal (Fe, Co, and Ni) promoted two-dimensional MXenes, fully oxidized vanadium carbides (V2CO2), for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The first-principle calculations show that the introduction of transition metal can greatly weaken the strong binding between hydrogen and oxygen and engineer the hydrogen adsorption free energy to the optimal value ≈0 eV by choosing the suitable type and coverage of the promoters as well as the active sites. Strain engineering on the performance of transition metal promoted V2CO2 further reveals that the excellent HER activities can maintain well while those poor ones can be modulated to be highly active. This study provides new possibilities for cost-effective alternatives to Pt in HER and for the application of 2D MXenes.

  14. Differential accumulation of photosynthetic proteins regulates diurnal photochemical adjustments of PSII in common fig (Ficus carica L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Mlinarić, Selma; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Skendrović Babojelić, Martina; Cesar, Vera; Lepeduš, Hrvoje

    2017-02-01

    Molecular processes involved in photosystem II adaptation of woody species to diurnal changes in light and temperature conditions are still not well understood. Regarding this, here we investigated differences between young and mature leaves of common fig (Ficus carica L.) in photosynthetic performance as well as accumulation of the main photosynthetic proteins: light harvesting complex II, D1 protein and Rubisco large subunit. Investigated leaf types revealed different adjustment mechanisms to keep effective photosynthesis. Rather stable diurnal accumulation of light harvesting complex II in mature leaves enabled efficient excitation energy utilization (negative L-band) what triggered faster D1 protein degradation at high light. However, after photoinhibition, greater accumulation of D1 during the night enabled them faster recovery. So, the most photosynthetic parameters, as the maximum quantum yield for primary photochemistry, electron transport and overall photosynthetic efficiency in mature leaves successfully restored to their initial values at 1a.m. Reduced connectivity of light harvesting complexes II to its reaction centers (positive L-band) in young leaves increased dissipation of excess light causing less pressure to D1 and its slower degradation. Decreased electron transport in young leaves, due to reduced transfer beyond primary acceptor QA(-) most probably additionally induced degradation of Rubisco large subunit what consequently led to the stronger decrease of overall photosynthetic efficiency in young leaves at noon.

  15. Psychosocial versus physiological stress – meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kogler, Lydia; Mueller, Veronika I.; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Gur, Ruben C.; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  16. Evidence that protons can be the active catalysts in Lewis acid mediated hetero-Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Tobias C; Yu, Jin-Quan; Spencer, Jonathan B

    2004-01-23

    The mechanism of Lewis acid catalysed hetero-Michael addition reactions of weakly basic nucleophiles to alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones was investigated. Protons, rather than metal ions, were identified as the active catalysts. Other mechanisms have been ruled out by analyses of side products and of stoichiometric enone-catalyst mixtures and by the use of radical inhibitors. No evidence for the involvement of pi-olefin-metal complexes or for carbonyl-metal-ion interactions was obtained. The reactions did not proceed in the presence of the non-coordinating base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine. An excellent correlation of catalytic activities with cation hydrolysis constants was obtained. Different reactivities of mono- and dicarbonyl substrates have been rationalised. A (1)H NMR probe for the assessment of proton generation was established and Lewis acids have been classified according to their propensity to hydrolyse in organic solvents. Brønsted acid-catalysed conjugate addition reactions of nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and carbon nucleophiles are developed and implications for asymmetric Lewis acid catalysis are discussed.

  17. A structured three-dimensional polymer electrolyte with enlarged active reaction zone for Li–O2 batteries

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet-Mercier, Nadège; Wong, Raymond A.; Thomas, Morgan L.; Dutta, Arghya; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Yogi, Chihiro; Ohta, Toshiaki; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-01-01

    The application of conventional solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) to lithium-oxygen (Li–O2) batteries has suffered from a limited active reaction zone due to thick SPE and subsequent lack of O2 gas diffusion route in the positive electrode. Here we present a new design for a three-dimensional (3-D) SPE structure, incorporating a carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode, adapted for a gas-based energy storage system. The void spaces in the porous CNT/SPE film allow an increased depth of diffusion of O2 gas, providing an enlarged active reaction zone where Li+ ions, O2 gas, and electrons can interact. Furthermore, the thin SPE layer along the CNT, forming the core/shell nanostructure, aids in the smooth electron transfer when O2 gas approaches the CNT surface. Therefore, the 3-D CNT/SPE electrode structure enhances the capacity in the SPE-based Li–O2 cell. However, intrinsic instability of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) of the SPE matrix to superoxide (O2·−) and high voltage gives rise to severe side reactions, convincing us of the need for development of a more stable electrolyte for use in this CNT/SPE design. PMID:25410536

  18. Effect of reaction parameters on photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of zinc sulfide nanosphere synthesized by hydrothermal route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, T. Inakhunbi; Samanta, Dhrubajyoti; Tiwari, Archana; Chatterjee, Somenath

    2017-01-01

    Zinc Sulfide (ZnS) nanospheres have been synthesized using amino acid, L-Histidine as a capping agent by hydrothermal method. The as prepared ZnS have been characterised using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Photoluminescence (PL), Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy (XPS). Effect of reaction parameters on particle size has been investigated. The morphology and size of the ZnS can be tuned based on the reaction parameters. ZnS nanosphere with a particle size of 5 nm is obtained when the reaction parameters are kept at 120 °C for 3 h. The PL of ZnS shows multiple defect emissions arising from interstitials/vacancies. Particle size of ZnS nanoparticles plays an important role in determining the photo catalytic activity. A chronological study on synthesis of ZnS nanosphere and its photo catalytic activity under the sunlight are discussed here, which reveals the photo degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) upto 87% as observed with ZnS nanosphere having a particle size of 5 nm.

  19. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites.

  20. Boron-doped graphene as promising support for platinum catalyst with superior activity towards the methanol electrooxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongrong; Du, Chunyu; An, Meichen; Du, Lei; Tan, Qiang; Liu, Chuntao; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2015-12-01

    We report the synthesis of boron-doped graphene by thermally annealing the mixture of graphene oxide and boric acid, and its usage as the support of Pt catalyst towards the methanol oxidation reaction. The composition, structure and morphology of boron-doped graphene and its supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/BG) are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is revealed that boron atoms are doped into graphene network in the form of BC2O and BCO2 bonds, which lead to the increase in defect sites and facilitate the subsequent deposition of Pt nanoparticles. Therefore, the Pt/BG catalyst presents smaller particle size and narrower size distribution than the graphene supported Pt (Pt/G) catalyst. When evaluated as the electrocatalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction, the Pt/BG catalyst exhibits excellent electrochemical activity and stability demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests. The enhanced activity is mainly ascribed to the electronic interaction between boron-doped graphene and Pt nanoparticles, which lowers the d-band center of Pt and thus weakens the absorption of the poisoning intermediate CO. Our work provides an alternative approach of improving the reaction kinetics for the oxidation of small organic molecules.

  1. Study on the multiple mechanisms underlying the reaction between hydroxyl radical and phenolic compounds by qualitative structure and activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Ren, Jie; Li, Yuanzong; Chang, Wenbao; Chen, Zhida

    2002-12-01

    The activity-structure relationships (ASR) of phenolic compounds as hydroxyl-radical scavengers have mostly been studied and discussed with regard to their iron-chelating and hydrogen-donation properties in Fenton-type system, but extensive elucidation of multiple mechanisms underlying the hydroxyl radical scavenging reaction is out of obtaining up to now. In the present paper, a series of phenolic compounds was studied for their reactivity with hydroxyl radical by computed chemistry and deoxyribose degradation assay. The rate constant (K(S)), an index dependent markedly on the reaction mechanism and intrinsic reactivity of antioxidants, was found to have good correlation with hydroxyl O-H bond strength (DeltaH(f)), electron-donating ability (ionization potential approximated by HOMO energy level), enthalpy of single electron transfer (E(a)), and spin distribution of phenoxyl radicals (Ds(r)) after H-abstraction. Moreover, the theoretical parameters were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that multiple mechanisms co-exist in the hydroxyl-radical-scavenging reaction and interact with each other. Multi-linear regression analysis indicated that, in addition to H-atom transfer, electron transfer process and stability of the resulted phenoxyl radicals also significantly influence the reactivity of quenching hydroxyl radicals. The QSAR model so established here was based on the elucidation of the complex molecular mechanisms, and may reasonably predict the antioxidant activity using simple experimental and calculated parameters.

  2. Reaction between lawsone and aminophenol derivatives: Synthesis, characterization, molecular structures and antiproliferative activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathawate, Laxmi; Joshi, Pranya V.; Dash, Tapan Kumar; Pal, Sanjima; Nikalje, Milind; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Puranik, Vedavati G.; Konkimalla, V. Badireenath; Salunke-Gawali, Sunita

    2014-10-01

    Reaction between two bioreductive reactants lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-napthoquinone) and derivatives 2-aminophenol without catalyst is reported. The reaction between lawsone and 4-chloro-2-aminophenol leads to formation of red colored major product 1A:[2-[(5-chloro-hydroxyphenyl)amino]naphthalene-1,4-dione] and fluorescent orange colored minor compound 1B:[10-chloro-benzo[α]phenoxazine-5-one]. Molecular structure of 1A and 1B were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Two mechanisms were proposed to the formation of red 1A and 1B. ‘Ortho-para’ tautomeric equilibrium was observed in DMSO-d6 solution in 1A, which was revealed by 1H, 13C NMR and LC-MS studies. Molecules of 1A formed dimers via Nsbnd H⋯O interaction and polymeric chain of dimers was formed by Osbnd H⋯O interactions. Cl⋯Cl interactions were observed between the polymeric chains of dimers in 1A. Molecules of 1B show Cl⋯N interaction. Antiproliferative properties is studied for 1A-5A compounds (obtained by the reaction of lawsone with 2-amino-4-methylphenol;2A, 2-aminophenol;3A, 3-aminophenol;4A and 4-aminophenol;5A) and evaluated against two cancer cell lines, THP1 (human monocytic leukemia cells) and COLO205 (colorectal adenocarcinoma) and one normal cell line, HEK293T (human embryonic kidney). The values of 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of compounds 1A-5A was determined using XTT assay. The cytotoxic effects of compounds 2A and 3A were observed against COLO205 and compounds 4A and 5A on THP1 were observed to be higher in comparison to their effect on HEK293T cell lines.

  3. CCN1 induces hepatic ductular reaction through integrin αvβ₅-mediated activation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Chen, Chih-Chiun; Alpini, Gianfranco; Lau, Lester F

    2015-05-01

    Liver cholestatic diseases, which stem from diverse etiologies, result in liver toxicity and fibrosis and may progress to cirrhosis and liver failure. We show that CCN1 (also known as CYR61), a matricellular protein that dampens and resolves liver fibrosis, also mediates cholangiocyte proliferation and ductular reaction, which are repair responses to cholestatic injury. In cholangiocytes, CCN1 activated NF-κB through integrin αvβ5/αvβ3, leading to Jag1 expression, JAG1/NOTCH signaling, and cholangiocyte proliferation. CCN1 also induced Jag1 expression in hepatic stellate cells, whereupon they interacted with hepatic progenitor cells to promote their differentiation into cholangiocytes. Administration of CCN1 protein or soluble JAG1 induced cholangiocyte proliferation in mice, which was blocked by inhibitors of NF-κB or NOTCH signaling. Knock-in mice expressing a CCN1 mutant that is unable to bind αvβ5/αvβ3 were impaired in ductular reaction, leading to massive hepatic necrosis and mortality after bile duct ligation (BDL), whereas treatment of these mice with soluble JAG1 rescued ductular reaction and reduced hepatic necrosis and mortality. Blockade of integrin αvβ5/αvβ3, NF-κB, or NOTCH signaling in WT mice also resulted in defective ductular reaction after BDL. These findings demonstrate that CCN1 induces cholangiocyte proliferation and ductular reaction and identify CCN1/αvβ5/NF-κB/JAG1 as a critical axis for biliary injury repair.

  4. Understanding the role of gold nanoparticles in enhancing the catalytic activity of manganese oxides in water oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Hao; Li, Weikun; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M; Kriz, David; Genz, Nina; Guild, Curtis; Ressler, Thorsten; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-02-16

    The Earth-abundant and inexpensive manganese oxides (MnOx) have emerged as an intriguing type of catalysts for the water oxidation reaction. However, the overall turnover frequencies of MnOx catalysts are still much lower than that of nanostructured IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate that doping MnOx polymorphs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can result in a strong enhancement of catalytic activity for the water oxidation reaction. It is observed that, for the first time, the catalytic activity of MnOx/AuNPs catalysts correlates strongly with the initial valence of the Mn centers. By promoting the formation of Mn(3+) species, a small amount of AuNPs (<5%) in α-MnO2/AuNP catalysts significantly improved the catalytic activity up to 8.2 times in the photochemical and 6 times in the electrochemical system, compared with the activity of pure α-MnO2.

  5. Antioxidant activity of minimally processed red chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) evaluated in xanthine oxidase-, myeloperoxidase-, and diaphorase-catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Lavelli, Vera

    2008-08-27

    Minimally processed red chicory products (Cichorium intybus L. var. silvestre) were studied for their polyphenol content and antioxidant activity evaluated by using the synthetic 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)hydrazyl radical and three model reactions catalyzed by relevant enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species, namely, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, and diaphorase. Products were analyzed at the time of production and after storage at 4 degrees C within either a gas permeable film or a gas barrier film. The antioxidant activity and contents of hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonoids decreased by less than 20% during storage of the minimally processed red chicory products. Total phenolics were significantly correlated with the antioxidant activity evaluated with both the synthetic radical and the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. On a molar basis, red chicory phenolics were as efficient as the reference compound Trolox in scavenging the synthetic radical. However, red chicory phenolics had a much higher inhibitory activity than Trolox in the model enzymatic systems.

  6. Bimolecular reactions of activated species: An analysis of problematic HC(O)C(O) chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Robin J.; Robertson, Struan H.; Blitz, Mark A.; Seakins, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the importance of non-thermal bimolecular association chemistry. Recently a fully reversible method for incorporating any number of such non-thermal reactions into a single master equation has been developed (Green and Robertson, 2014) [10]. Using this methodology experimental results for the system: (1) (CHO)2 + OH → HC(O)C(O) + H2O, (2) HC(O)C(O) → HCO + CO, (3) HC(O)C(O) + O2 → OH + CO + CO2, are modeled, reproducing the temperature and pressure dependence of the OH yield. An issue remains as to how to model energy partition into HC(O)C(O).

  7. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  8. A relevant enzyme in granulomatous reaction, active matrix metalloproteinase-9, found in bovine Echinococcus granulosus hydatid cyst wall and fluid.

    PubMed

    Marco, M; Baz, A; Fernandez, C; Gonzalez, G; Hellman, U; Salinas, G; Nieto, A

    2006-12-01

    In addition to the ability of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) to degrade components of the extracellular matrix and their involvement in pathology-related processes of tissue remodeling, they were recently reported to enhance inflammation by activation of proinflammatory cytokines, or their release from the cell surface. In the work reported here, proteolytic activity previously found for hydatid cysts was further characterized as MMP-9. Active host MMP-9 was found in walls and fluids of bovine hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus in the environment of granulomatous reaction. Pooled walls and fluids of hydatid cysts obtained from infected cattle were processed. Strong proteolytic activity was detected by zymography. The proteolytic fraction was purified by anion exchange and gelatin-agarose affinity chromatography. Major proteinases of the purified fraction were subjected to mass spectrometry and their identities were further confirmed by Western blotting using commercial anti-human MMP-9 monoclonal antibodies. Two proteinases were characterized as latent and active forms of host MMP-9. Using the same antibody for immunoblot, activity was localized, in paraffin-embedded sections of the parasite and the local host environment, to epithelioid and giant multinucleated cells. It is proposed here that MMP-9 is secreted by specialized host cells of monocytic lineage (epithelioid/giant cells) as an effector, in an attempt to digest the persistent foreign body. In vivo activation of MMP-9 suggests its involvement in inflammatory reaction and in the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells to the cyst. However, E. granulosus can deal efficiently with MMP-9. Research is suggested into possible immune evasion mechanisms, including the secretion of an inhibitory molecule.

  9. Sea urchin-like cobalt-iron phosphide as an active catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Garcia, Adriana; Su, Dong; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-02-01

    Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER.Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08763e

  10. Structures of lipoyl synthase reveal a compact active site for controlling sequential sulfur insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jenny E; Hiscox, Martyn J; Dinis, Pedro C; Fox, Stephen J; Iliopoulos, Andreas; Hussey, James E; Sandy, James; Van Beek, Florian T; Essex, Jonathan W; Roach, Peter L

    2014-11-15

    Lipoyl cofactors are essential for living organisms and are produced by the insertion of two sulfur atoms into the relatively unreactive C-H bonds of an octanoyl substrate. This reaction requires lipoyl synthase, a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme superfamily. In the present study, we solved crystal structures of lipoyl synthase with two [4Fe-4S] clusters bound at opposite ends of the TIM barrel, the usual fold of the radical SAM superfamily. The cluster required for reductive SAM cleavage conserves the features of the radical SAM superfamily, but the auxiliary cluster is bound by a CX4CX5C motif unique to lipoyl synthase. The fourth ligand to the auxiliary cluster is an extremely unusual serine residue. Site-directed mutants show this conserved serine ligand is essential for the sulfur insertion steps. One crystallized lipoyl synthase (LipA) complex contains 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), a breakdown product of SAM, bound in the likely SAM-binding site. Modelling has identified an 18 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) deep channel, well-proportioned to accommodate an octanoyl substrate. These results suggest that the auxiliary cluster is the likely sulfur donor, but access to a sulfide ion for the second sulfur insertion reaction requires the loss of an iron atom from the auxiliary cluster, which the serine ligand may enable.

  11. Catalytically active polymers obtained by molecular imprinting and their application in chemical reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, O

    2001-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a way of creating polymers bearing artificial receptors. It allows the fabrication of highly selective plastics by polymerizing monomers in the presence of a template. This technique primarily had been developed for the generation of biomimetic materials to be used in chromatographic separation, in extraction approaches and in sensors and assays. Beyond these applications, in the past few years molecular imprinting has become a tool for producing new kinds of catalysts. For catalytic applications, the template must be chosen, so that it is structurally comparable with the transition state (a transition state analogue, TSA) of a reaction, or with the product or substrate. The advantage of using these polymeric catalysts is obvious: the backbone withstands more aggressive conditions than a bio material could ever survive. Results are presented showing the applicability of a molecularly imprinted catalyst in different kinds of chemical reactors. It is demonstrated that the catalysts can be utilized not only in batch but also in continuously driven reactors and that their performance can be improved by means of chemical reaction engineering.

  12. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2007-07-20

    The generality of Lewis base catalyzed, Lewis acid mediated, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions has been investigated. The combination of silicon tetrachloride and chiral phosphoramides is a competent catalyst for highly selective additions of a variety of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-, 1,3-diketone-, and alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates to aldehydes. These reactions provided high levels of gamma-site selectivity for a variety of substitution patterns on the dienyl unit. Both ketone- and morpholine amide-derived dienol ethers afforded high enantio- and diastereoselectivity in the addition to conjugated aldehydes. Although alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-derived dienolate did not react with aliphatic aldehydes, alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates underwent addition at reasonable rates affording high yields of vinylogous aldol product. The enantioselectivities achieved with the morpholine derived-dienolate in the addition to aliphatic aldehydes was the highest afforded to date with the silicon tetrachloride-chiral phosphoramide system. Furthermore, the ability to cleanly convert the morpholine amide to a methyl ketone was demonstrated.

  13. Influence of Active Site Conformations on the Hydride Transfer step of the Thymidylate Synthase Reaction Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Kohen, Amnon; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    The hydride transfer from C6 of tetrahydrofolate to the reaction’s exocyclic methylene-dUMP intermediate is the rate limiting step in thymidylate synthase (TSase) catalysis. This step has been studied by means of QM/MM Molecular Dynamics simulations to generate the corresponding free energy surfaces. The use of two different initial X-ray structures has allowed exploring different conformational spaces and exploring the existence of chemical paths with not only different reactivities, but also different reaction mechanisms. The results confirm that this chemical conversion takes place preferentially via a concerted mechanism where the hydride transfer is conjugated to thiol-elimination from the product. The findings also confirm the labile character of the substrate-enzyme covalent bond established between the C6 of the nucleotide substrate and a conserved cysteine residue. The calculations also reproduce and rationalize a normal H/T 2° kinetic isotope effect measured for that step. From a computational point of view, the results demonstrate that the use of an incomplete number of coordinates to describe the real reaction coordinate can render biased results. PMID:25868526

  14. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 2. Limiting parameters of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-08-31

    The final stages in the development of a branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) are analysed. Approximate expressions are derived to calculate the limiting parameters of the chain reaction: the final degree of iodide decomposition, the maximum concentration of excited iodine atoms, the time of its achievement, and concentrations of singlet oxygen and iodide at that moment. The limiting parameters, calculated by using these expressions for a typical composition of the active medium of a pulsed COIL, well coincide with the results of numerical calculations. (active media)

  15. Electrochemical activity of some different iron polyphthalocyanines for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreja, Ludwik; Dabrowski, Roman

    The electrochemical activity of iron polyphthalocyanines (pPcFe) synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) or tetracyanobenzene (TCB) and dicyan It was found that pPcFe derived from PMDA has the highest activity and that the temperature dependences of electrical conductivity in vacuum and oxygen

  16. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic α-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER.

  17. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by thesemore » materials.« less

  18. Mechanism of the Iron(II)-Catalyzed Hydrosilylation of Ketones: Activation of Iron Carboxylate Precatalysts and Reaction Pathways of the Active Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bleith, Tim; Gade, Lutz H

    2016-04-13

    A detailed mechanistic study of the catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones with the highly active and enantioselective iron(II) boxmi complexes as catalysts (up to >99% ee) was carried out to elucidate the pathways for precatalyst activation and the mechanism for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. Carboxylate precatalysts were found to be activated by reduction of the carboxylate ligand to the corresponding alkoxide followed by entering the catalytic cycle for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. An Eyring-type analysis of the temperature dependence of the enantiomeric ratio established a linear relationship of ln(S/R) and T(-1), indicating a single selectivity-determining step over the whole temperature range from -40 to +65 °C (ΔΔG(‡)sel, 233 K = 9 ± 1 kJ/mol). The rate law as well as activation parameters for the rate-determining step were derived and complemented by a Hammett analysis, radical clock experiments, kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements (kH/kD = 3.0 ± 0.2), the isolation of the catalytically active alkoxide intermediate, and DFT-modeling of the whole reaction sequence. The proposed reaction mechanism is characterized by a rate-determining σ-bond metathesis of an alkoxide complex with the silane, subsequent coordination of the ketone to the iron hydride complex, and insertion of the ketone into the Fe-H bond to regenerate the alkoxide complex.

  19. [Changes in the phasic activity of neuron microsystems of the somatosensory cortex of the cat during extinction of activation reactions to unreinforced stimuli].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Panteleev, S S; Kalinina, N M; Chukova, S V

    1986-01-01

    In chronic experiments on cats, three-phasic responses of neuronal microsystems in the cortical somatic area I were studied during habituation of the EEG activation reactions. Repeated stimuli of different modalities were used: electrical pulses to the forepaw, sounds, direct stimulation of the mesencephalic RF. Simultaneously with the extinction of EEG activation reactions, the three-phasic responses of the multiunit activity (MUA) also became progressively extinct: the 1st phase of primary excitation--only a little, the 2nd phase (inhibitory)--greatly, as well as the 3rd phase--the phase of secondary excitation (if it existed at the beginning). The MUA responses to all stimuli show that these neuronal microsystems are polysensory. Relatively to the nonspecific activating RF macrosystem, the investigated neuronal microsystems are autonomous because their two functionally opposed response phases--the 1st excitatory and the 2nd inhibitory--occur against the monotonous excitatory background of the EEG activation. But in some way the neuronal microsystems are connected with the RF-system because of the parallel development of the extinction process.

  20. Chemical characteristics and enhanced hepatoprotective activities of Maillard reaction products derived from milk protein-sugar system.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Su; Young Lee, Ji; Lee, Hyun Ah; Joung, Jae Yeon; Shin, Yong Kook; Kim, Sae Hun; Kim, Younghoon; Lee, Kwang Won

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics, antioxidative properties, and hepatoprotective effects of Maillard reaction products (MRP) from milk protein reacted with sugars. The MRP were obtained from milk protein, whey protein concentrates and sodium caseinate, using 2 types of sugars, lactose and glucose, by heating the mixture at 55°C for 7d in a sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Changes in the chemical modification of the milk protein were monitored by measuring the protein-bound carbonyls and PAGE protein profiles. The results showed that the amount of protein-bound carbonyls increased after Maillard reaction (MR). In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis indicated a formation of high-molecular weight complexes through MR. The modification sites induced by MR of milk protein were monitored by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic-digested gel spots of MRP. As a result, modification and their localization in AA sequence of MRP was identified. Also, the MRP showed higher antioxidant activities than the intact milk protein, and they reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production and inhibited the depletion of the reduced glutathione concentrations in the HepG2 cells. In particular, glucose-sodium caseinate MRP showed the highest biological activities among all MRP. Therefore, these results suggest that the MRP from milk protein reacting with sugars possess effective antioxidant activity and have a protective ability against oxidative damage.

  1. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  2. Theoretical Study on Highly Active Bifunctional Metalloporphyrin Catalysts for the Coupling Reaction of Epoxides with Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Miyazaki, Ray; Maeda, Chihiro; Ema, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    Highly active bifunctional metalloporphyrin catalysts were developed for the coupling reaction of epoxides with CO2 to produce cyclic carbonates. The bifunctional catalysts have both quaternary ammonium halide groups and a metal center. To elucidate the roles of these catalytic groups, DFT calculations were performed. Control reactions using tetrabutylammonium halide as a catalyst were also investigated for comparison. In the present article, the results of our computational studies are overviewed. The computational results are consistent with the experimental data and are useful for elucidating the structure-activity relationship. The key features responsible for the high catalytic activity of the bifunctional catalysts are as follows: 1) the cooperative action of the halide anion (nucleophile) and the metal center (Lewis acid); 2) the near-attack conformation, leading to the efficient opening of the epoxide ring in the rate-determining step; and 3) the conformational change of the quaternary ammonium cation to stabilize various anionic species generated during catalysis, in addition to the robustness (thermostability) of the catalysts.

  3. C/H{sub 2}O reaction under supercritical conditions and their repercussions in the preparation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, F.; Senchez-Montero, M.J.; Izquierdo, C.

    2007-09-15

    Two chars prepared by carbonization of oak wood and anthracite were used to perform a comparative study of the gasification with supercritical water (SCW) and with steam. This work reports the effects of the type of char, the activating agent, temperature, flow rate, and particle size employed on the kinetics, mechanism of reaction, and the characteristics of the activated carbons obtained. The results show that the reactivity of the two chars is much higher with SCW than with steam. Although this increase can be explained in terms of the greater penetration of SCW and diffusional effects in the pore structure of the chars, some aspects suggest a possible change in the mechanism of reaction favored by the formation of clusters in SCW. The evolution of porosity was also found to differ when the char was gasified with SCW and with steam, being governed strongly by the starting material. When the oak char was activated with SCW, the smallest microporosity was broadened from the very first moments due to its very open pore structure, providing carbons with larger micropores and some mesoporosity. In contrast, in the case of the anthracite char, with a narrower pore structure, the evolution of the porosity was slower and less uniform, favoring external gasification of the particle. Accordingly, the carbons had a broader distribution of micropores, and mesoporosity was scarce.

  4. Effect of cerium on photosynthetic pigments and photochemical reaction activity in soybean seedling under ultraviolet-B radiation stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Zhang, Guangsheng; Zhou, Qing

    2011-09-01

    Effects of cerium (Ce) on photosynthetic pigments and photochemical reaction activity in soybean (Glycine max L.) under ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation stress were studied under laboratory conditions. UV-B radiation caused the decrease in chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, Hill reaction activity, photophosphorylation rate and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. Ce (III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate UV-B-induced inhibition to these photosynthetic parameters because values of these photosynthetic parameters in Ce (III) + UV-B treatment were obviously higher than those with UV-B treatment alone. Dynamic changes of the above photosynthetic parameters show that Ce (III) could slow down the decrease rate of these photosynthetic parameters during a 5-day UV-B radiation and quicken the restoration during recovery period. The final restoration degree of five parameters mentioned above in leaves exposed to low level of UV-B radiation (0.15 W m(2)) was higher than that exposed to high level (0.45 W m(2)). Correlating net photosynthetic rate with other four parameters, we found that the regulating mechanisms Ce (ΠΙ) on photosynthesis under various level of UV-B radiation were not the same. The protective effects of Ce (III) on photosynthesis in plants were influenced by the intensity of UV-B radiation.

  5. [Single and Network Neuron Activity of Subthalamic Nucleus at Impulsive and Delayed (Self-Control) Reactions in Choice Behavior].

    PubMed

    Sidorina, V V; Gerasimova, Yu A; Kuleshova, E P; Merzhanova, G Kh

    2015-01-01

    During our experiments on cats was investigated the subthalamic neuron activity at different types of behavior in case of reinforcement choice depending on its value and availability. In chronic experiences the multiunit activity in subthalamic nucleus (STN) and orbitofrontal cortex (FC) has been recorded. Multiunit activity was analyzed over frequency and network properties of spikes. It was shown, that STN neurons reaction to different reinforcements and conditional stimulus at short- or long-delay reactions was represented by increasing or decreasing of frequency of single neurons. However the same STN neu- rons responded with increasing of frequency of single neuron during expectation of mix-bread-meat and decreasing--during the meat expectation. It has been revealed, that the number of STN interneuron interactions was authentic more at impulsive behavior than at self-control choice of behavior. The number of interactions between FC and STN neurons within intervals of 0-30 Ms was authentic more at display impulsive than during self-control behavior. These results suppose that FC and STN neurons participate in integration of reinforcement estimation; and distinctions in a choice of behavior are defined by the local and distributed interneuron interactions of STN and FC.

  6. Kinetic study on Michael-type reactions of β-nitrostyrenes with cyclic secondary amines in acetonitrile: transition-state structures and reaction mechanism deduced from negative enthalpy of activation and analyses of LFERs.

    PubMed

    Um, Ik-Hwan; Kang, Ji-Sun; Park, Jong-Yoon

    2013-06-07

    A kinetic study is reported for the Michael-type reactions of X-substituted β-nitrostyrenes (1a-j) with a series of cyclic secondary amines in MeCN. The plots of pseudo-first-order rate constant k(obsd) vs [amine] curve upward, indicating that the reactions proceed through catalyzed and uncatalyzed routes. The dissection of k(obsd) into Kk2 and Kk3 (i.e., the rate constants for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed routes, respectively) revealed that Kk3 is much larger than Kk2, implying that the reactions proceed mainly through the catalyzed route when [amine] > 0.01 M. Strikingly, the reactivity of β-nitrostyrene (1g) toward piperidine decreases as the reaction temperature increases. Consequently, a negative enthalpy of activation is obtained, indicating that the reaction proceeds through a relatively stable intermediate. The Brønsted-type plots for the reactions of 1g are linear with β(nuc) = 0.51 and 0.61, and the Hammett plots for the reactions of 1a-j are also linear with ρX = 0.84 and 2.10 for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed routes, respectively. The reactions are concluded to proceed through six-membered cyclic transition states for both the catalyzed and uncatalyzed routes. The effects of the substituent X on reactivity and factors influencing β(nuc) and ρX obtained in this study are discussed.

  7. Activity and Durability of Iridium Nanoparticles in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Rasimick, Brian; Ngo, Chilan; ...

    2016-07-15

    Unsupported iridium (Ir) nanoparticles, that serve as standard oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in acidic electrolyzers, were investigated for electrochemical performance and durability in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells. Fixed potential holds and potential cycling were applied to probe the durability of Ir nanoparticles, and performance losses were found to be driven by particle growth (coarsening) at moderate potential (1.4 to 1.6 V) and Ir dissolution at higher potential (>/=1.8 V). Several different commercially available samples were evaluated and standardized conditions for performance comparison are reported. In conclusion, the electrocatalyst RDE results have also been compared to results obtained formore » performance and durability in electrolysis cells.« less

  8. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  9. Neutrons in the low-background Ge-detector vicinity estimated from different activation reactions.

    PubMed

    Jovančević, N; Krmar, M

    2011-03-01

    Neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muons in a detector shield and other surrounding materials can be captured or scattered by different nuclei in subsequent reactions. The gamma photons emitted after nuclear capture or scattering from produced Ge isotopes are used to estimate the neutron flux. If a bulk sample measured in some low background gamma spectroscopy system contains hydrogen, a high energy photon (of energy 2223keV) emitted in the process of deuterium production can be used to estimate the flux of thermal neutrons. Results obtained from the interaction of neutrons with H as well as with some Ge isotopes are computed and compared in this paper. The passive lead shield in a detector system is a source of a significant fraction of the gamma radiation induced by capture and inelastic scattering of neutrons. We also used gamma lines emitted by several Pb isotopes to estimate the neutron flux near a detector.

  10. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  11. Activity and Durability of Iridium Nanoparticles in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Rasimick, Brian; Ngo, Chilan; Neyerlin, K. C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Xu, Hui; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2016-07-15

    Unsupported iridium (Ir) nanoparticles, that serve as standard oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in acidic electrolyzers, were investigated for electrochemical performance and durability in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells. Fixed potential holds and potential cycling were applied to probe the durability of Ir nanoparticles, and performance losses were found to be driven by particle growth (coarsening) at moderate potential (1.4 to 1.6 V) and Ir dissolution at higher potential (>/=1.8 V). Several different commercially available samples were evaluated and standardized conditions for performance comparison are reported. In conclusion, the electrocatalyst RDE results have also been compared to results obtained for performance and durability in electrolysis cells.

  12. C-H activation reactions as useful tools for medicinal chemists.

    PubMed

    Caro-Diaz, Eduardo J E; Urbano, Mariangela; Buzard, Daniel J; Jones, Robert M

    2016-11-15

    In recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of reports describing synthetic methods that utilize catalytic sp(3) and sp(2) C-H bond activation. Many have emerged as powerful synthetic tools for accessing biologically active motifs. Indeed, application to C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation, provides new directives for the construction of new pharmaceutical entities. Herein, we highlight some recent novel C-H activation processes that exemplify the utility of these transformations in medicinal chemistry.

  13. [Effects of chronic Semax administration on exploratory activity and emotional reaction in white rats].

    PubMed

    Vilenskiĭ, D A; Levitskaia, N G; Andreeva, L A; Alfeeva, L Iu; Kamenskiĭ, A A; Miasoedov, N F

    2007-06-01

    Effects of chronic intranasal administration of ACTH(4-10) analog Semax (MEHFPGP) on exploratory activity, anxiety level, and depression-like behaviour were studied in white rats. The peptide was injected daily in dose 0.05 mg/kg during 10 or 14 days. It was shown that chronic Semax administration at 1-2 weeks induced anxiolytic and antidepressant effects but did not influenced the exploratory activity in non-stressogenic environment. The Semax effects may be the results of activation of the brain serotoninergic system as well as increased BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus.

  14. Surface chemistry of Au/TiO2: Thermally and photolytically activated reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotov, Dimitar A.; Morris, John R.

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating particle size dependence to the physical, photophysical, and chemical properties of gold has motivated thousands of studies focused on exploring the ability of supported gold nanoparticles to catalyze chemical transformations. In particular, titanium dioxide-supported gold (Au/TiO2) nanoparticles may provide the right combination of electronic structure, structural dynamics, and stability to affect catalysis in important practical applications from environmental remediation to selective hydrogenation to carbon monoxide oxidation. Harnessing the full potential of Au/TiO2 will require a detailed atomic-scale understanding of the thermal and photolytic processes that accompany chemical conversion. This review describes some of the unique properties exhibited by particulate gold before delving into how those properties affect chemistry on titania supports. Particular attention is given first to thermally driven reactions on single crystal system. This review then addresses nanoparticulate samples in an effort begin to bridge the so-called materials gap. Building on the foundation provided by the large body of work in the field of thermal catalysis, the review describes new research into light-driven catalysis on Au/TiO2. Importantly, the reader should bear in mind throughout this review that thermal chemistry and thermal effects typically accompany photochemistry. Distinguishing between thermally-driven stages of a reaction and photo-induced steps remains a significant challenge, but one that experimentalists and theorists are beginning to decipher with new approaches. Finally, a summary of several state-of-the-art studies describes how they are illuminating new frontiers in the quest to exploit Au/TiO2 as an efficient catalyst and low-energy photocatalyst.

  15. Crystalline/amorphous Ni/NiO core/shell nanosheets as highly active electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaodong; Tian, Lihong; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Novel crystalline/amorphous core/shell Ni/NiO nanosheets have shown a high electrocatalytic activity in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In 1 M KOH, they display an HER current of 5 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 110 mV with a good stability. It is proposed that their excellent HER performance is achieved through the synergistic effect between the Ni core and the amorphous NiO shell, where the Ni core can reduce the resistance and the amorphous NiO shell can accelerate both Volmer and Heyrovsky processes to drive HER at low overpotentials.

  16. Dipeptide vinyl sultams: synthesis via the Wittig-Horner reaction and activity against papain, falcipain-2 and Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Valente, Cláudia; Guedes, Rita C; Moreira, Rui; Iley, Jim; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2006-08-01

    The synthesis of phosphonate derivatives of N-phenyl- and N-benzyl-gamma- and delta-sultams, and their application in the Wittig-Horner reaction with N-Boc-L-phenylalanine aldehyde to afford E- and Z-isomers, are described. These compounds were further processed to provide five dipeptide vinyl sultams, which were found to be inactive against papain at concentrations up to 50 microM. In contrast, vinyl sultams demonstrated weak activity against recombinant falcipain-2 and Plasmodium falciparum W2.

  17. Interfacial Reaction-Driven Formation of Silica Carbonate Biomorphs with Subcellular Topographical Features and Their Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Zhao, Xiaobing; Möller, Marco; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-10-28

    We report the interfacial reaction-driven formation of micro/nanostructured strontium carbonate (SrCO3) biomorphs with subcellular topographical features on strontium zinc silicate (Sr2ZnSi2O7) biomedical coatings and explore their potential use in bone tissue engineering. The resulting SrCO3 crystals build a well-integrated scaffold surface that not only prevents burst release of ions from the coating but also presents nanotopographical features similar to cellular filopodia. The surface with biomorphic crystals enhances osteoblast adhesion, upregulates the alkaline phosphatase activity, and increases collagen production, highlighting the potential of the silica carbonate biomorphs for tissue regeneration.

  18. Click reaction based synthesis, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activities of new 1,2,3-triazoles.

    PubMed

    El Sayed Aly, Mohamed Ramadan; Saad, Hosam Ali; Mohamed, Mosselhi Abdelnabi Mosselhi

    2015-07-15

    Three-motif pharmacophoric models 20a-e and 21-25 were prepared in good yields by CuAAC of two azido substrates 2 and 11 with seven terminal acetylenic derivatives including chalcones 17a-e, theophylline 18 and cholesterol 19. The structure of these compounds was elucidated by NMR, MS, IR spectroscopy and micro analyses. This series was screened as antimicrobial and cytotoxic agents in vitro. Most derivatives showed appreciable antibacterial activity, but they displayed weak cytotoxic, and antifungal activities. Notably, conjugate 25 (cream of the crop) was found to be more active than Ampicillin against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and showed appreciable antifungal and cytotoxic activities as well.

  19. Thermal 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azomethine imines with active esters.

    PubMed

    He, Liwenze; Liu, Lin; Han, Runfeng; Zhang, Weiwei; Xie, Xingang; She, Xuegong

    2016-07-12

    An efficient method for the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azomethine imines with active esters under thermal conditions has been described in good to high yields. This method offers a straightforward pathway to synthesize bioactive pyrazolidinones.

  20. Measurements of activation reaction rates in transverse shielding concrete exposed to the secondary particle field produced by intermediate energy heavy ions on an iron target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Morev, M. N.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2012-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions were measured inside a 60-cm thick concrete pile placed at the lateral position of a thick (stopping length) iron target that was bombarded with heavy ions, 400 MeV/u C and 800 MeV/u Si. Foils of aluminum and gold, as well as gold, tungsten and manganese covered with cadmium were inserted at various locations in the concrete pile to serve as activation detectors. Features of reaction rate distribution, such as the shape of the reaction rate profile, contribution of the neutrons from intra-nuclear cascade and that from evaporation to the activation reactions are determined by the analysis of measured reaction rates. The measured reaction rates were compared with those calculated with radiation transport simulation codes, FLUKA and PHITS, to verify their capability to predict induced activity. The simulated reaction rates agree with the experimental results within a factor of three in general. However, systematic discrepancies between simulated reaction rates and measured reaction rates attributed to the neutron source terms are observed.

  1. The Reaction of Oxygen-Nitrogen Mixtures with Granular Activated Carbons Below the Spontaneous Ignition Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-14

    number) Activated carbon Oxidation of charcoals with 02 Spontaneous ignition temperature Anonialous desorption of CO and CO2 20. VTRACT (Conlnue on...that desorbed as CO or CO2. An example of the temperature control is shown (Figure 7) for the coconut shell charcoal (G-210) in 100% oxygen in which...and Flammability 2, 141-156 (1971). (5) "Standard Test for Ignition Temperature of Granular Activated Carbon ’’, American Society of Testing Materials

  2. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  3. Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Adil, Syed Farooq; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2014-06-28

    Green synthesis of nanomaterials finds the edge over chemical methods due to its environmental compatibility. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) using an aqueous solution of Pulicaria glutinosa, a plant widely found in a large region of Saudi Arabia, as a bioreductant. The as-prepared Pd NPs were characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The hydroxyl groups of the plant extract (PE) molecules were found mainly responsible for the reduction and growth of Pd NPs. FT-IR analysis confirmed the dual role of the PE, both as a bioreductant as well as a capping ligand, which stabilizes the surface of Pd NPs. The crystalline nature of the Pd NPs was identified using XRD analysis which confirmed the formation of a face-centered cubic structure (JCPDS: 87-0641, space group: Fm3m (225)). Furthermore, the as-synthesized Pd NPs demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction monitored using GC confirmed that the reaction completes in less than 5 minutes.

  4. Active Site Structures in Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Cobalt Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yingdan; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-12-07

    The catalytic mechanism and the nature of active sites are revealed for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with new non-noble-metal nitrogen-doped carbon-supported transition-metal catalysts (metal-N-C catalyst). Specifically, new nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt catalysts (Co-N-C catalysts) are made by pyrolyzing various ratios of the nitrogen-atom rich heterocycle compound, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium dicyanamide (EMIM-dca) and cobalt salt (Co(NO3)2). The ORR activity (JK at 0.8 V vs RHE, in 0.1 M KOH solution) of a typical catalyst in this family, Co15-N-C800, is 8.25 mA/mg, which is much higher than the ORR activity values of N-C catalysts (0.41 mA/mg). The active site in the catalyst is found to be the Co-N species, which is most likely in the form of Co2N. Metallic cobalt (Co) particles, Co3C species, and N-C species are not catalytically active sites, nor do these moieties interact with the Co-N active sites during the catalysis of the ORR. Increasing the Co salt content during the synthesis favors the formation of Co-N active sites in the final catalyst. Higher pyrolysis temperatures (e.g., a temperature higher than 800 °C) do not favor the formation of the Co-N active sites, but cause the formed Co-N active sites to decompose, which, therefore, leads to a lower catalytic activity. This reveals that the control of the parameters that affect the final structure is critical to catalyst performance and, therefore, the effective development of high-performance heteroatom-doped non-noble-metal ORR catalysts.

  5. Formation of DEG5 and DEG8 complexes and their involvement in the degradation of photodamaged photosystem II reaction center D1 protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuwu; Peng, Lianwei; Guo, Jinkui; Chi, Wei; Ma, Jinfang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2007-04-01

    The widely distributed DEGP proteases play important roles in the degradation of damaged and misfolded proteins. Arabidopsis thaliana contains 16 DEGP-like proteases, four of which are located in the chloroplast. Here, we show that DEG5 and DEG8 form a hexamer in the thylakoid lumen and that recombinant DEG8 is proteolytically active toward both a model substrate (beta-casein) and photodamaged D1 protein of photosystem II (PSII), producing 16-kD N-terminal and 18-kD C-terminal fragments. Inactivation of DEG5 and DEG8 resulted in increased sensitivity to photoinhibition. Turnover of newly synthesized D1 protein in the deg5 deg8 double mutant was impaired, and the degradation of D1 in the presence of the chloroplast protein synthesis inhibitor lincomycin under high-light treatment was slowed in the mutants. Thus, DEG5 and DEG8 are important for efficient turnover of the D1 protein and for protection against photoinhibition in vivo. The deg5 deg8 double mutant showed increased photosensitivity and reduced rates of D1 degradation compared with single mutants of deg5 and deg8. A 16-kD N-terminal degradation fragment of the D1 protein was detected in wild-type plants but not in the deg5 deg8 mutant following in vivo photoinhibition. Therefore, our results suggest that DEG5 and DEG8 have a synergistic function in the primary cleavage of the CD loop of the PSII reaction center protein D1.

  6. Paired Ig-Like Type 2 Receptor-Derived Agonist Ligands Ameliorate Inflammatory Reactions by Downregulating β1 Integrin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Jin; Lim, Dongyoung; Yoo, Yeon Ho; Park, Eun-Ji; Lee, Sun-Hee; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Lee, Yong-Ki; Park, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Daejoong; Park, Kyeong Han; Hahn, Jang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor (PILR) family consists of two functionally opposite members, inhibitory PILRα and activating PILRβ receptors. PILRs are widely expressed in various immune cells and interact with their ligands, especially CD99 expressed on activated T cells, to participate in immune responses. Here we investigated whether PILR-derived agonists inhibit β1 integrin activity as ligands for CD99. PILR-derived peptides as well as PILR-Fc fusion proteins prevented cell adhesion to fibronectin through the regulation of β1 integrin activity. Especially, PILRpep3, a representative 3-mer peptide covering the conserved motifs of the PILR extracellular domain, prevented the clustering and activation of β1 integrin by dephosphorylating FAK and vinculin, which are major components of focal adhesion. In addition, PILRpep3 inhibited transendothelial migration of monocytes as well as endothelial cell tube formation. Furthermore, upon intraperitoneal injection of PILRpep3 into mice with collagen-induced arthritis, the inflammatory response of rheumatoid arthritis was strongly suppressed. Taken together, these results suggest that PILR-derived agonist ligands may prevent the inflammatory reactions of rheumatoid arthritis by activating CD99. PMID:27306643

  7. Sustained High Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Activity in the Sperm of Obese Males Impairs the Sperm Acrosome Reaction*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Qipeng; Xu, Binqiang; Jiang, Xiaohong; Dai, Yutian; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of a causal link between male obesity and subfertility or infertility has been demonstrated previously. However, the mechanism underlying this link is incompletely understood. Here, we report that sustained high protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity in sperm of obese donors plays an essential role in coupling male obesity and subfertility or infertility. First, PTP1B level and activity were significantly higher in sperm from ob/ob mice than in wild-type littermates. High PTP1B level and activity in sperm was also observed in obese patients compared with non-obese donors. The enhanced sperm PTP1B level and activity in ob/ob mice and obese patients correlated with a defect of the sperm acrosome reaction (AR). Second, treating sperm from male ob/ob mice or obese men with a specific PTP1B inhibitor largely restored the sperm AR. Finally, blockade of sperm AR by enhanced PTP1B activity in male ob/ob mice or obese men was due to prolonged dephosphorylation of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor by PTP1B, leading to the inability to reassemble the trans-SNARE complexes, which is a critical step in sperm acrosomal exocytosis. In summary, our study demonstrates for the first time that a sustained high PTP1B level or activity in the sperm of obese donors causes a defect of sperm AR and that PTP1B is a novel potential therapeutic target for male infertility treatment. PMID:24519936

  8. Age-related increases in right frontal activation during task switching are mediated by reaction time and white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z; Hakun, J G; Johnson, N F; Gold, B T

    2014-10-10

    Age-related increases in right frontal cortex activation are a common finding in the neuroimaging literature. However, neurocognitive factors contributing to right frontal over-recruitment remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the influence of age-related reaction time (RT) slowing and white matter (WM) microstructure reductions as potential explanatory factors for age-related increases in right frontal activation during task switching. Groups of younger (N=32) and older (N=33) participants completed a task switching paradigm while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed, and rested while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed. Two right frontal regions of interest (ROIs), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and insula, were selected for further analyses from a common network of regions recruited by both age groups during task switching. Results demonstrated age-related activation increases in both ROIs. In addition, the older adult group showed longer RT and decreased fractional anisotropy in regions of the corpus callosum with direct connections to the fMRI ROIs. Subsequent mediation analyses indicated that age-related increases in right insula activation were mediated by RT slowing and age-related increases in right DLPFC activation were mediated by WM microstructure. Our results suggest that age-related RT slowing and WM microstructure declines contribute to age-related increases in right frontal activation during cognitive task performance.

  9. Bimolecular recombination reactions: K-adiabatic and K-active forms of the bimolecular master equations and analytic solutions.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2016-03-28

    Expressions for a K-adiabatic master equation for a bimolecular recombination rate constant krec are derived for a bimolecular reaction forming a complex with a single well or complexes with multiple well, where K is the component of the total angular momentum along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination product. The K-active master equation is also considered. The exact analytic solutions, i.e., the K-adiabatic and K-active steady-state population distribution function of reactive complexes, g(EJK) and g(EJ), respectively, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active master equation cases using properties of inhomogeneous integral equations (Fredholm type). The solutions accommodate arbitrary intermolecular energy transfer models, e.g., the single exponential, double exponential, Gaussian, step-ladder, and near-singularity models. At the high pressure limit, the krec for both the K-adiabatic and K-active master equations reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high pressure limit expressions). Ozone and its formation from O + O2 are known to exhibit an adiabatic K. The ratio of the K-adiabatic to the K-active recombination rate constants for ozone formation at the high pressure limit is calculated to be ∼0.9 at 300 K. Results on the temperature and pressure dependence of the recombination rate constants and populations of O3 will be presented elsewhere.

  10. [Reaction of NO with metal oxides and urea supported on activated carbons at low temperature].

    PubMed

    Cui, Hua-Fei; Li, Cai-Ting; Lu, Pei; Peng, Dun-Liang; Guo, Jing; Chen, Ling

    2010-11-01

    The catalysts were prepared by activated carbon fiber (ACF) loaded different contents of NiO and NiO-CeO2, Urea was loaded on the prepared catalysts as reductant. The experiments of selective catalytic reductions (SCR) of NO were carried out from 30 to 120 degrees C. The experiments of SEM, BET and XRD of the samples were also carried out selectively to study the catalysts properties, respectively. The experimental results showed that the loaded mass fraction of NiO could greatly affect the catalytic activity of the catalysts. 10% NiO catalyst activity and activity stability were both higher than that of the others, and it could yield about 50% removal efficiency of NO at 90 degrees C. With the loaded mass increasing, the catalytic activity was obviously decreased. And furthermore, the catalyst of 5% NiO-5% CeO2/ACF had the best catalytic activities on SCR NO and stability among the prepared NiO-CeO2/ACF catalysts, and its NO removal efficiency was over 55% at 110 degrees C. When the loaded mass increased, the similar phenomenon was observed, which was due to the decreasing of specific surface area of the catalysts. The metal oxides, loaded on ACF, were the catalytic centers in this study. Moreover, 5% CeO2-5% NiO/ACF had the highest catalytic activity than 10% CeO2/ACF and 10% NiO/ ACF. Therefore, there should be synergistic effect between CeO2 and NiO. Finally, the catalytic mechanism of SCR on NO at low temperature was discussed.

  11. Pressure-induced perturbation on the active site of beta-amylase monitored from the sulfhydryl reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Mitani, D; Kunugi, S

    2001-05-22

    We investigated the pressure effect on the conformation of beta-amylase by monitoring the chemical reaction of the unpaired cysteine. Sweet potato beta-amylase is composed of four identical subunits, each of which contains six cysteine residues. These residues are inert to 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) in the native state due to steric hindrance. With the increase of the pressure from 0.1 to 400 MPa, the reactivity of one cysteine out of six residues was enhanced. We have identified that the reacted cysteine residue was Cys345 by the chemical cleavage at the reacted site. The reaction kinetics of Cys345 were pseudo-first-order, and the apparent rate constant was increased from 0.001 to 0.05 min(-)(1) with the increase of pressure from 100 to 400 MPa. The activation volume of the reaction rate was calculated as -24 +/- 2 mL/mol from the slope of the logarithmic plot of the pressure dependence of the rate constant. Hysteresis was not evident in the change of intrinsic fluorescence during the cycle of compression and decompression between 0.1 and 400 MPa, indicating that the tetramer does not dissociate under high pressure. This indicates that the enhancement of the reactivity of Cys345 was caused by the perturbation of local conformation under high pressure. The reaction of Cys345 was also enhanced by low concentrations of GuHCl, suggesting the significant role of hydration-driven fluctuation in the pressure-induced enhancement of the reactivity.

  12. Oxidative photoredox-catalytic activation of aliphatic nucleophiles for C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Emanuela; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-12-01

    In the light you will find the road (Led Zeppelin): Visible-light photoredox catalysis leads the way in overcoming the reactivity limitations of alkyl nucleophiles in cross-coupling reactions. Iridium-triggered oxidative photoredox activation of alkyltrifluoroborate or carboxylic acids affords alkyl radicals, which undergo nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

  13. The extrinsic PsbO protein modulates the oxidation/reduction rate of the exogenous Mn cation at the high-affinity Mn-binding site of Mn-depleted PSII membranes.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Podkovirina, Tatiana E; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B

    2015-08-01

    The oxidation of exogenous Mn(II) cations at the high-affinity (HA) Mn-binding site in Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membranes with or without the presence of the extrinsic PsbO polypeptide was studied by EPR. The six-lines EPR spectrum of Mn(II) cation disappears in the absence of the PsbO protein in membranes under illumination, but there was no effect when PSII preparations bound the PsbO protein. Our study demonstrates that such effect is determined by significant influence of the PsbO protein on the ratio between the rates of Mn oxidation and reduction at the HA site when the membranes are illuminated.

  14. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media. PMID:26310526

  15. Effect of total sleep deprivation on reaction time and waking EEG activity in man.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, I; Ramos, J; Arce, C; Guevara, M A; Corsi-Cabrera, M

    1995-06-01

    Nine paid volunteers were sleep deprived over a period of 40 hours. Every 2 hours during total sleep deprivation (TSD) and after recovery sleep, oral temperature (OT), reaction time (RT) in a vigilance task and electroencephalogram (EEG) with eyes open and closed (C3, C4, T3 and T4) were recorded. Ten artifact-free samples from each condition were Fourier transformed. Absolute power was calculated for six bands. Analyses of variance with deprivation and time of day as factors showed the following significant results: 1) TSD induced an increase in RT, of theta power in all derivations, of beta power in both centrals and a decrease of alpha power with eyes closed; OT was not affected. 2) All bands showed a peak of power at 1800 hours, 2 hours in advance of the OT acrophase at 2000 hours. All variables recovered baseline values after 1 night of sleep. Significant linear correlations of hours of wakefulness with EEG and RT, and of EEG power with OT and RT, were observed. The present findings show a linear increase in EEG power and RT with TSD, and a diurnal oscillation of EEG power, which is independent of TSD.

  16. Entamoeba histolytica: an ecto-phosphatase activity regulated by oxidation-reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    de Sá Pinheiro, Ana Acacia; Amazonas, Juliana Natal; de Souza Barros, Fernanda; De Menezes, Lúcia Feitosa; Batista, Evander J O; Silva, Edward Felix; De Souza, Wanderley; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-04-01

    In this work, an ecto-phosphatase activity of Entamoeba histolytica was characterized using intact cells. This activity presented the following biochemical characteristics: (i) it hydrolyzes p-NPP with V(max) of 8.00+/-0.22 nmol p-NP x h(-1) x 10(-5) cells and K(m) of 2.68+/-0.25 mM; (ii) it is inhibited by acid phosphatase inhibitors, such as sodium molybdate (K(i)=1.70+/-0.24 microM) and sodium fluoride (K(i)=0.25+/-0.02 mM); (iii) it also showed high sensitivity to phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitors, such as sodium orthovanadate (K(i)=1.07+/-0.14 microM), bpV-PHEN (K(i)=0.38+/-0.02 microM) and mpV-PIC (K(i)=0.39+/-0.04 microM). Zn(2+), an oxidizing agent, decreased the enzymatic activity in 50%. DTT and GSH, two reducing agents, enhanced the activity twofold. The non-invasive E. histolytica and free-living E. moshkovskii were less efficient in hydrolyzing p-NPP than the pathogenic E. histolytica suggesting that this enzyme could represent a virulence marker for this cell.

  17. Palladium networks decorated by cuprous oxide for remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic activity of methanol oxidation reaction with high CO-tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Ying, Ye; Pan, Yuxia; Li, Mengzhu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yiping; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2016-10-01

    The CuO nanorods (NRs) are prepared with the help of inositol hexakisphosphate which serves as a binding agent and stabilizer. We have successfully fabricated Cu2O-decorated palladium networks (Cu2O/Pd Networks) by using such CuO NRs as reaction beds. Transmission electron microscopy images show that Cu2O/Pd network is composed of small and irregular fused nanoparticles with an average size of about 10 nm. Electrochemical results depict that the as-synthesized catalyst exhibits 2-fold higher activity for methanol oxidation than the commercially available 20% Pd/C catalyst and Pd black catalyst. Furthermore, CO-tolerance is also remarkably enhanced due to the presence of Cu2O. Such highly active, low-cost, and superiorly CO-tolerant catalysts of Cu2O/Pd Networks will open up a new avenue for direct methanol fuel cells.

  18. Surface spectators and their role in relationships between activity and selectivity of the oxygen reduction reaction in acid environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ciapina, Eduardo G.; Lopes, Pietro P.; Subbaraman, Ram; Ticianelli, Edson A.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Strmcnik, Dusan; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2015-11-01

    We use the rotating ring disk (RRDE) method to study activity-selectivity relationships for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt(111) modified by various surface coverages of adsorbed CNad (ΘCNad). The results demonstrate that small variations in ΘCNad have dramatic effect on the ORR activity and peroxide production, resulting in “volcano-like” dependence with an optimal surface coverage of ΘCNad = 0.3 ML. These relationships can be simply explained by balancing electronic and ensemble effects of co-adsorbed CNad and adsorbed spectator species from the supporting electrolytes, without the need for intermediate adsorption energy arguments. Although this study has focused on the Pt(111)-CNad/H2SO4 interface, the results and insight gained here are invaluable for controlling another dimension in the properties of electrochemical interfaces.

  19. Titanium oxynitride interlayer to influence oxygen reduction reaction activity and corrosion stability of Pt and Pt-Ni alloy.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Zahiri, Beniamin; Kohandehghan, Alireza; Karpuzov, Dimitre; Lotfabad, Elmira Memarzadeh; Li, Zhi; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2015-01-01

    A key advancement target for oxygen reduction reaction catalysts is to simultaneously improve both the electrochemical activity and durability. To this end, the efficacy of a new highly conductive support that comprises of a 0.5 nm titanium oxynitride film coated by atomic layer deposition onto an array of carbon nanotubes has been investigated. Support effects for pure platinum and for a platinum (50 at %)/nickel alloy have been considered. Oxynitride induces a downshift in the d-band center for pure platinum and fundamentally changes the platinum particle size and spatial distribution. This results in major enhancements in activity and corrosion stability relative to an identically synthesized catalyst without the interlayer. Conversely, oxynitride has a minimal effect on the electronic structure and microstructure, and therefore, on the catalytic performance of platinum-nickel. Calculations based on density functional theory add insight with regard to compositional segregation that occurs at the alloy catalyst-support interface.

  20. Electrochemical fabrication of platinum nanoflakes on fulleropyrrolidine nanosheets and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Li-Xia

    2015-07-01

    Pyridine-functionalized fulleropyrrolidine nanosheets are prepared by a fast reprecipitation method under ultrasonication, and used as a novel nanostructured support materials to fabricate Pt catalyst nanoflakes by a simple electrodeposition approach. The as-prepared novel Pt-fullerene hybrid catalyst (Pt/PyC60) exhibits much enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction compared to the unsupported Pt nanoflakes and commercial Pt/C. The introduction of nanostructured fulleropyrrolidine as new support materials not only increases the electrochemically active surface area of catalyst, but also significantly improves the long-term stability. This will contribute to developing functionalized fullerenes as new nanostructured support materials for advanced electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  1. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  2. Assessment of Maillard reaction evolution, prebiotic carbohydrates, antioxidant activity and α-amylase inhibition in pulse flours.

    PubMed

    Moussou, Nadia; Corzo-Martínez, Marta; Sanz, María Luz; Zaidi, Farid; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the quality of bean, chickpea, fava beans, lentil and pea flours from Algeria has been evaluated. Maillard reaction (MR) indicators, modifications in the carbohydrate and protein fractions, antioxidant activity and α-amylase inhibitor of raw, toasted and stored samples were evaluated. Fava beans, beans and peas showed higher content of raffinose family oligosaccharides while chickpeas and lentils showed higher polyol content. Toasting and storage caused slightly change in pulse quality; MR showed slight losses of lysine but increased antioxidant activity. Moreover, inhibition of α-amylase was slightly augmented during processing; this could increase the undigested carbohydrates that reach the colon, modulating the glycemic response. These results point out the suitability of these flours for preparing high-quality foodstuffs intended for a wide spectrum of the population, including hyperglycemic and gluten intolerant individuals.

  3. Novel molybdenum disulfide nanosheets-decorated polyaniline: Preparation, characterization and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shuangshuang; He, Ping; Feng, Wanru; Li, Lian; Zhang, Guangli; Chen, Jingchao; Dong, Faqin; He, Huichao

    2016-04-01

    Novel molybdenum disulfide nanosheets-decorated polyaniline (MoS2/PANI) was synthesized and investigated as an efficient catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Compared with MoS2, MoS2/PANI nanocomposites exhibited higher catalytic activity and lower Tafel slope for HER in H2SO4 solution. The amount of 19 wt% PANI for coupling with MoS2 resulted in a high current density of 80 mA cm-2 at 400 mV (vs. RHE). In addition, the optimal MoS2/PANI nanocomposite showed impressive long-term stability even after 500 cycles. The enhanced catalytic activity of MoS2/PANI nanocomposites was primarily ascribed to the effective electron transport channels of PANI and the increase of electrochemically accessible surface area in composite materials, which was advantageous to facilitate the charge transfer at catalyst/electrolyte interface.

  4. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, Yijing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  5. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-23

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  6. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  7. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  8. Dexmedetomidine attenuates inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice by activating cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yueping; Wang, Yaoqi; Ning, Qiaoqing; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Chunzhi; Zhao, Wenxiang; Jing, Guangjian; Wang, Qianqian

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is a highly selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is widely used for sedation in intensive care units and in clinical anesthesia. Dex has also been shown to possess anti-inflammatory benefits. However, the underlying mechanism by which Dex relieves the inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects and possible mechanism of Dex on the sepsis-induced lung inflammatory response in mice. Sepsis was induced in mice models through the intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The preemptive administration of Dex substantially abated sepsis-induced pulmonary edema, pulmonary histopathological changes, and NF-κB p65 activity. The production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) at both the mRNA and protein levels was also reduced. Moreover, these effects were significantly blocked by the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt). α-Bgt aggravated pulmonary edema and pulmonary histopathological changes, as well as increased NF-κB p65 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The overall results demonstrate that Dex inhibits the LPS-induced inflammatory reaction in the lung tissues of septic mice partly through the α7nAChR-dependent cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  9. Ultrasonic-assisted Kabachnik-Fields reaction for rapid fabrication of AIE-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Long, Zi; Liu, Meiying; Jiang, Ruming; Zeng, Guangjiang; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Wan, Yiqun; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FNPs) have been extensively explored for fluorescence "turn-on" bio-imaging applications with the unique advantages over conventional FNPs. Transformation of AIE-active molecules into FNPs can greatly expand their biomedical application potential. Here we reported a novel "one-pot" strategy for fabricating AIE-active FNPs through an ultrasonic-assisted, catalysts-free and solvent-free Kabachnik-Fields (KF) reaction for the first time. The KF reaction can be completed within 10min to generate AIE-active PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs through mixing polyethylenimine and aldehyde group containing AIE dyes and diethyl phosphate. These PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectroscopy etc. The cell uptake behavior as well as cell viability of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs was examined to evaluate their potential for biomedical application. We demonstrated that the amphiphilic α-aminophosphonate polymers could self-assemble into PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs in aqueous solution and showed excellent water dispersibility. TEM image shows the size of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs is 100-200nm. More importantly, the PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs emit strong green fluorescence and desirable biocompatibility, making them very suitable for biomedical applications. Finally, thus smart FNPs design together with their excellent performance will open a new avenue in the development of FNPs for following biological processes such as carcinogenesis.

  10. Inhibition and activation of enzymes. The effect of a modifier on the reaction rate and on kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Fontes, R; Ribeiro, J M; Sillero, A

    2000-01-01

    A combined analysis of enzyme inhibition and activation is presented, based on a rapid equilibrium model assumption in which one molecule of enzyme binds one molecule of substrate (S) and/or one molecule of a modifier X. The modifier acts as activator (essential or non-essential), as inhibitor (total or partial), or has no effect on the reaction rate (v), depending on the values of the equilibrium constants, the rate constants of the limiting velocity steps, and the concentration of substrate ([S]). Different possibilities have been analyzed from an equation written to emphasize that v = f([X]) is, in general and at a fixed [S], a hyperbolic function. Formulas for Su (the value of [S], different from zero, at which v is unaffected by the modifier) and v(su) (v at that particular [S]) were deduced. In Lineweaver-Burk plots, the straight lines related to different [X] generally cross in a point (P) with coordinates (Su, v(su)). In certain cases, point P is located in the first quadrant which implies that X acts as activator, as inhibitor, or has no effect, depending on [S]. Furthermore, we discuss: (1) the apparent Vmax and Km displayed by the enzyme in different situations; (2) the degree of effect (inhibition or activation) observed at different concentrations of substrate and modifier; (3) the concept of Ke, a parameter that depends on the concentration of substrate and helps to evaluate the effect of the modifier: it equals the value of [X] at which the increase or decrease in the reaction rate is half of that achieved at saturating [X]. Equations were deduced for the general case and for particular situations, and used to obtain computer-drawn graphs that are presented and discussed. Formulas for apparent Vmax, Km and Ke have been written in a way making it evident that these parameters can be expressed as pondered means.

  11. Electrochemical Dealloying of PdCu3 Nanoparticles to Achieve Pt-like Activity for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Jana, Rajkumar; Bhim, Anupam; Bothra, Pallavi; Pati, Swapan K; Peter, Sebastian C

    2016-10-20

    Manipulating the d-band center of the metal surface and hence optimizing the free energy of hydrogen adsorption (ΔGH ) close to the optimal adsorption energy (ΔGH =0) for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), is an efficient strategy to enhance the activity for HER. Herein, we report a oleylamine-mediated (acting as the solvent, stabilizer, and reducing agent) strategy to synthesize intermetallic PdCu3 nanoparticles (NPs) without using any external reducing agent. Upon electrochemical cycling, PdCu3 transforms into Pd-rich PdCu (ΔGH =0.05 eV), exhibiting remarkably enhanced activity (with a current density of 25 mA cm(-2) at ∼69 mV overpotential) as an alternative to Pt for HER. The first-principle calculation suggests that formation of low coordination number Pd active sites alters the d-band center and hence optimal adsorption of hydrogen, leading to enhanced activity. This finding may provide guidelines towards the design and development of Pt-free highly active and robust electrocatalysts.

  12. Development of a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry-based assay to detect asparaginyl endopeptidase activity in biological fluids

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Gray, Oliver J.; Parker, Catriona; Holland, Mark; Williamson, Andrew J.K.; Pierce, Andrew; Unwin, Richard D.; Krishnan, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Cancer Biomarkers have the capability to improve patient outcomes. They have potential applications in diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of disease progression and measuring response to treatment. This type of information is particularly useful in the individualisation of treatment regimens. Biomarkers may take many forms but considerable effort has been made to identify and quantify proteins in biological fluids. However, a major challenge in measuring protein in biological fluids, such as plasma, is the sensitivity of the assay and the complex matrix of proteins present. Furthermore, determining the effect of proteases in disease requires measurement of their activity in biological fluids as quantification of the protein itself may not provide sufficient information. To date little progress has been made towards monitoring activity of proteases in plasma. The protease asparaginyl endopeptidase has been implicated in diseases such as breast cancer, leukaemia and dementia. Here we describe a new approach to sensitively and in a targeted fashion quantify asparaginyl endopeptidase activity in plasma using a synthetic substrate peptide protected from nonspecific hydrolysis using D-amino acids within the structure. Our selected reaction monitoring approach enabled asparaginyl endopeptidase activity to be measured in human plasma with both a high dynamic range and sensitivity. This manuscript describes a paradigm for future development of assays to measure protease activities in biological fluids as biomarkers of disease. PMID:27683124

  13. Effect of edge structure on the activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in MoS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lili; Li, Xiuyan; Xu, Li-Chun; Liu, Ruiping; Yang, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was carried out to investigate the effect of edge structure on the catalytic activity and electronic properties of MoS2 nanoribbons for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). There are two stable configurations of MoS2 nanoribbons, MoS2NR-L and MoS2NR-R, with an energy barrier of 0.035 eV. Four hydrogen adsorbed configurations are obtained by adsorbing the hydrogen atom at the different adsorption sites of two configurations. By calculating the Gibbs free energy and exchange current densities, it is found that these four adsorbed configurations have varied catalytic activity for HER, which demonstrates that location of edge atoms has significantly effect on the catalytic activity for HER. The optimization in HER activities originates from the suitable binding between hydrogen atom and S atom, corresponding to that Gibbs free energy is close to zero. Our results signify that the edge structures play a key role on the HER activity in MoS2 nanoribbons.

  14. Electro-activation of sweet defatted whey: Impact on the induced Maillard reaction products and bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kareb, Ourdia; Gomaa, Ahmed; Champagne, Claude P; Jean, Julie; Aïder, Mohammed

    2017-04-15

    Electro-activation was used to add value to sweet defatted whey. This study aimed to investigate and to characterize the bioactive compounds formed under different electro-activation conditions by molecular and proteomic approaches. The effects of electric current intensity (400, 500 or 600mA) and whey concentration (7, 14 or 21% (w/v)) as a function of the electro-activation time (0, 15, 30 or 45min) were evaluated. The targeted dependent variables were the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs), protein hydrolysates and glycated compounds. It was shown that the MRPs derived from electro-activated whey at a concentration of 14% had the highest potential of biological activity. SDS-PAGE analyses indicated the formation of hydrolysates and glycated compounds with different molecular weight distributions. FTIR indicated the predominance of intermediate MRPs, such as the Schiff base compounds. LC-MS/MS and proteomics analysis showed the production of multi-functional bioactive peptides due to the hydrolysis of whey proteins.

  15. [Biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from clinical Bacteroides fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with limulus amoebocyte lysate].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Alicja; Górska, Paulina; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Łuczak, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from clinical Bacterioides fragilis strains isolated in Poland by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides were extracted from nine clinical B. fragilis strains by the procedure of Westphal and Jann (1965). Crude LPS preparations were purified with ultracentrifugation. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit). Tests were performed according to the recommendations of the producer (Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). E. coli O55:B5 LPS and LPS preparations from reference B. fragilis strains were applied to compare the results of examinations. Activities of endotoxins from clinical B. fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Among endotoxins of clinical B. fragilis strains the most active was the preparation from strain cultured in the case of pancreatic ulcer (B. fragilis 80/81 LPS). Lipopolysaccharides of examined B. fragilis strains were less active in BET test than E. coli O55:B5 LPS.

  16. Modified transition state theory and negative apparent activation energies of simple metathesis reactions: application to the reaction CH3 + HBr --> CH4 + Br.

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, Lev N; Peng, Jingping; Marshall, Paul

    2006-03-09

    A modified transition state theory (MTST) has been developed for gas-phase reactions with "negative barriers". The theory was applied to the reactions CH3 + HBr(DBr) --> CH4(CH3D) + Br (1a, 1b), which exhibit negative temperature dependences. Accurate ab initio calculations performed with coupled cluster theory extrapolated to the complete basis set limit revealed a transition state located at -2.3 kJ mol(-1) relative to the ground state of the reactants (in reaction 1a), as well as a shallow bound complex. The negative temperature dependence, the absolute values of the rate constant, and the isotope substitution effect are reproduced with good accuracy (10%), without any adjustment or fitting parameters. Analytical expressions are presented for MTST including angular momentum conservation, centrifugal barriers and tunneling. This analysis uses information about the possibly loose entrance barrier and the transition state but does not invoke a statistical intermediate complex.

  17. /sup 125/I-Fibrin deposition in contact sensitivity reactions in the mouse. Sensitivity of the assay for quantitating reactions after active or passive sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Mekori, Y.A.; Dvorak, H.F.; Galli, S.J.

    1986-03-15

    The clotting associated with delayed hypersensitivity (DH) responses in the mouse by sensitizing the animals to the contactant oxazolone (Ox), and then administering /sup 125/I-guinea pig fibrinogen i.v. 10 to 30 min before antigen challenge 5 days later. Early (4 to 8 hr) contact sensitivity (CS) responses in immunized mice were barely detectable by three conventional measures of CS, but the total /sup 125/I-cpm in ears challenged with hapten was 3.6 to 4.5 x that in control ears challenged with vehicle alone; moreover, the amount of urea-insoluble cpm (cross-linked /sup 125/I-fibrin-associated cpm) in the reactions to Ox was 6.5-fold to 8.2-fold that present in the control reactions. In 24 hr reactions that were near peak intensity by measurements of ear swelling, ear weight ratios, and ratios of /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine-labeled leukocyte infiltration, the cpm in antigen-challenged ears exceeded that in control ears by 13-fold to 53-fold. In addition, antigen-challenged ears contained 27 to 300 x the urea-insoluble cpm present in control ears. /sup 125/I-Fibrin deposition was not a specific characteristic of CS reactions, because a small amount of urea-insoluble reactivity was also detected in some reactions to Ox in native mice. Nevertheless, the assay was exquisitely sensitive and readily detected quantitative differences between the immunologically specific and nonspecific reactions at very early intervals after challenge or with suboptimal doses of antigen.

  18. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-09

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER.

  19. Comparisons between abiotic nitration and biotransformation reactions of phenolic micropollutants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Kevin S; Wick, Arne; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of selected phenolic substances was investigated during biological wastewater treatment. A main emphasis was put on the relevance of abiotic processes leading to toxic nitrophenolic transformation products (TPs). Due to their environmental relevance, the antiseptic ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), the plastics additive bisphenol A (BPA) and the psychoactive drug dextrorphan have been studied. Batch experiments confirmed that nitro- and nitroso-phenolic TPs can be formed under acidic conditions when nitrite is present. HNO2, N2O3 and NO and NO2 radicals are likely involved in the abiotic process. It was found that the process was promoted by the freezing of water samples, since this can lead to an unexpected pH drop. However, under conditions present at wastewater treatment plants (neutral pH, low nitrite concentrations), the formation of appreciable concentrations is rather unlikely through this process, since HNO2 concentrations are extremely low and NO and NO2 radicals will also react with other wastewater constituents. Thus, the transformation of phenolic substances such as OPP and BPA is mainly caused by biotic transformation. In addition to hydroxylation as a common reaction under aerobic conditions, the formation of sulfate conjugates was detected with the original compounds as well as with nitrophenolic TPs. Therefore, even when nitro-phenolic substances are formed it is likely that they are further transformed to sulfate conjugates. In raw wastewater and WWTP effluent nitrated BPA and NO2-dextrorphan were not detected. Only nitro-OPP was found in the influent of a WWTP with 2.3 ng/L, but it was not identified in the WWTP effluents. The concentrations of dextrorphan increased slightly during WWTP passage, possibly due to the cleavage of the glucuronide-conjugate, its human metabolite form, or demethylation of the prodrug dextromethorphan.

  20. Influence of soil reaction on diversity and antifungal activity of fluorescent pseudomonads in crop rhizospheres.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajni; Naosekpam, Ajit Singh; Kumar, Sanjay; Prasad, Ramdeen; Shanmugam, V

    2007-05-01

    The diversity and antifungal activity of fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from rhizospheres of tea, gladiolus, carnation and black gram grown in acidic soils with similar texture and climatic conditions were studied. Biochemical characterisation including antibiotic resistance assay, RAPD and PCR-RFLP studies revealed a largely homogenous population. At soil pH (5.2), the isolates exhibited growth with varying levels of siderophore production, irrespective of crop rhizospheres. Two isolates with maximum chitinase production showed antagonism. The bacterial populations in general lacked the ability to produce deleterious traits such as cellulase, pectinase and hydrogen cyanide. However, increased pH levels beyond 5.2 caused reduction in metabolite production with reduced antifungal activity. The homogeneity of the bacterial population irrespective of crop rhizospheres together with decreased secondary metabolite production at higher pH levels reinstated the importance of soil over host plant in influencing rhizosphere populations. The studies also yielded acid tolerant chitinase producing antagonistic fluorescent pseudomonads.

  1. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring of Daily Activity in Terms of Ground Reaction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T. (Inventor); Breit, Gregory A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to record and analyze habitual daily activity in terms of the history of gait-related musculoskeletal loading is disclosed. The device consists of a pressure-sensing insole placed into the shoe or embedded in a shoe sole, which detects contact of the foot with the ground. The sensor is coupled to a portable battery-powered digital data logger clipped to the shoe or worn around the ankle or waist. During the course of normal daily activity, the system maintains a record of time-of-occurrence of all non-spurious foot-down and lift-off events. Off line, these data are filtered and converted to a history of foot-ground contact times, from which measures of cumulative musculoskeletal loading, average walking- and running-specific gait speed, total time spent walking and running, total number of walking steps and running steps, and total gait-related energy expenditure are estimated from empirical regressions of various gait parameters to the contact time reciprocal. Data are available as cumulative values or as daily averages by menu selection. The data provided by this device are useful for assessment of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health and risk factors associated with habitual patterns of daily activity.

  2. Functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene nonspectator ligands upon internal alkyne activation reactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Francys E; Puerta, María del Carmen; Valerga, Pedro

    2013-06-03

    When studying the activation of 3-arylpropiolates by [TpRu(picolyl-(R)I)Cl]/NaBAr(F)4 (picolyl-(Me)I = 3-methyl-1-(2-picolyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (1); picolyl-(Me)BI = 3-methyl-1-(2-picolyl)benzoimidazol-2-ylidene (2)) a migratory insertion of the NHC into a ruthenium-carbon bond and an unprecedented C-N bond activation of the chelating picolyl-NHC ligand take place to give the new ruthenium metallacycles [TpRu(κ(3)-C,N,N'-═C(Ph)-C(CH2Py)(CO2Me)((Me)I)][BAr(F)4] 3a and 4a and [TpRu(κ(3)-C,N,N'-═C(4-CF3Ph)-C(CH2Py)(CO2Me)((Me)I)][BAr(F)4] 3b and 4b. X-ray crystal structures of 3a and 3b are reported, and a mechanistic pathway is proposed. In contrast, activation of internal alkynones by a mixture of [TpRu(picolyl-(Me)I)Cl] complex (1) and NaBAr(F)4 led to isolation and characterization of the corresponding disubstituted vinylidene complexes. Also, structures of [TpRu(picolyl-(Me)I)(═CC(COR)(Ph)][BAr(F)4] (R = Me (6a); Ph (6b)) are reported.