Science.gov

Sample records for active pulse compression

  1. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  2. International magnetic pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12--14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card -- its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  3. International magnetic pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  4. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  5. Pulse compression in plasma: Generation of femtosecond pulses without CPA

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N. J. Fisch; A. Pukhov; J. Meyer-ter-Vehn

    2000-07-20

    Laser pulses can be efficiently compressed to femtosecond duration when a smaller-frequency short pulse collides with high frequency long pulse in rare plasma, absorbing most of its energy. The mechanism of short pulse amplification is nonlinear superradiance.

  6. Digital pulse compression with low range sidelobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larvor, J. P.

    A definition of pulse compression performance is introduced and the pulse compression filter synthesis is explained. The evaluation of the real performance of a pulse compression system is described, taking into account the contribution and imperfections of each analog device of the transmitting and receiving channels. A realization example is given.

  7. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; George, Edward V.; Miller, John L.; Krupke, William F.

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  8. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  9. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  10. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers.

    PubMed

    Alessi, David A; Rosso, Paul A; Nguyen, Hoang T; Aasen, Michael D; Britten, Jerald A; Haefner, Constantin

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. Combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in our group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.

  11. Pulse Compression Made Easy With VSIPL++

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engine VSI/Pro C/ASM Kernel Object Oriented Strategies - Deferred Evaluation Synthetic Aperature Radar Pulse CompressionCritical Benchmarks... Synthetic Aperature Radar Pulse Compression VSIPL++ (C++)API VSIPL C API VSI/Pro Internal C++ Engine VSI/Pro C / ASM Kernels • What are the benefits of a...state of the art radar systems. Pulse Compression: The VSIPL way The pseudocode: Create Vectors Create Forward FFT object Create Inverse FFT object

  12. Optimization of radar pulse compression processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Samuel M.; Kim, Woonkyung M.; Lee, Myung-Su

    1997-06-01

    We propose an optimal radar pulse compression technique and evaluate its performance in the presence of Doppler shift. The traditional pulse compression using Barker code increases the signal strength by transmitting a Barker coded long pulse. The received signal is then processed by an appropriate correlation processing. This Barker code radar pulse compression enhances the detection sensitivity while maintaining the range resolution of a single chip of the Barker coded long pulse. But unfortunately, the technique suffers from the addition of range sidelobes which sometimes will mask weak targets in the vicinity of larger targets. Our proposed optimal algorithm completely eliminates the sidelobes at the cost of additional processing.

  13. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  14. Pulsed spheromak reactor with adiabatic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    1999-03-29

    Extrapolating from the Pulsed Spheromak reactor and the LINUS concept, we consider ignition achieved by injecting a conducting liquid into the flux conserver to compress a low temperature spheromak created by gun injection and ohmic heating. The required energy to achieve ignition and high gain by compression is comparable to that required for ohmic ignition and the timescale is similar so that the mechanical power to ignite by compression is comparable to the electrical power to ignite ohmically. Potential advantages and problems are discussed. Like the High Beta scenario achieved by rapid fueling of an ohmically ignited plasma, compression must occur on timescales faster than Taylor relaxation.

  15. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  16. Pulse compression using binary phase codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    In most MST applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capacity. Short pulses are required for good range resolution, but the problem of range ambiguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a technique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without sacrificing range resolution. As the name implies, a pulse of power P and duration T is in a certain sense converted into one of power nP and duration T/n. In the frequency domain, compression involves manipulating the phases of the different frequency components of the pulse. One way to compress a pulse is via phase coding, especially binary phase coding, a technique which is particularly amenable to digital processing techniques. This method, which is used extensively in radar probing of the atmosphere and ionosphere is discussed. Barker codes, complementary and quasi-complementary code sets, and cyclic codes are addressed.

  17. International magnetic pulse compression workshop: (Proceedings)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  18. Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

  19. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  20. Pulse-compression ghost imaging lidar via coherent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chenjin; Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2016-11-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) lidar, as a novel remote sensing technique,has been receiving increasing interest in recent years. By combining pulse-compression technique and coherent detection with GI, we propose a new lidar system called pulse-compression GI lidar. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that pulse-compression GI lidar can obtain the target's spatial intensity distribution, range and moving velocity. Compared with conventional pulsed GI lidar system, pulse-compression GI lidar, without decreasing the range resolution, is easy to obtain high single pulse energy with the use of a long pulse, and the mechanism of coherent detection can eliminate the influence of the stray light, which can dramatically improve the detection sensitivity and detection range.

  1. Pulse-compression ghost imaging lidar via coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chenjin; Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2016-11-14

    Ghost imaging (GI) lidar, as a novel remote sensing technique, has been receiving increasing interest in recent years. By combining pulse-compression technique and coherent detection with GI, we propose a new lidar system called pulse-compression GI lidar. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that pulse-compression GI lidar can obtain the target's spatial intensity distribution, range and moving velocity. Compared with conventional pulsed GI lidar system, pulse-compression GI lidar, without decreasing the range resolution, is easy to obtain high single pulse energy with the use of a long pulse, and the mechanism of coherent detection can eliminate the influence of the stray light, which is helpful to improve the detection sensitivity and detection range.

  2. Fibonacci-like photonic structure for femtosecond pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Makarava, L N; Nazarov, M M; Ozheredov, I A; Shkurinov, A P; Smirnov, A G; Zhukovsky, S V

    2007-03-01

    The compression of femtosecond laser pulses by linear quasiperiodic and periodic photonic multilayer structures is studied both experimentally and theoretically. We compare the compression performance of a Fibonacci and a periodic structure with similar total thickness and the same number of layers, and find the performance to be higher in the Fibonacci case, as predicted by numerical simulation. This compression enhancement takes place due to the larger group velocity dispersion at a defect resonance of the transmission spectrum of the Fibonacci structure. We demonstrate that the Fibonacci structure with the thickness of only 2.8 microm can compress a phase-modulated laser pulse by up to 30%. The possibility for compression of laser pulses with different characteristics in a single multilayer is explored. The operation of the compressor in the reflection regime has been modeled, and we show numerically that the reflected laser pulse is subjected to real compression: not only does its duration decrease but also its amplitude rises.

  3. All-fiber pulse compression at 1.32 microm.

    PubMed

    Blow, K J; Doran, N J; Nelson, B P

    1985-08-01

    We have constructed a pulse compressor using two different optical fibers. By adjusting the waveguide dispersion it has been possible to produce fibers with positive and negative dispersion at 1.32 microm. We have demonstrated the compression of 130-psec pulses down to our photodiode limit of 70 psec. This is supported by our calculations, which give a theoretical pulse width of 50 psec. This is the first reported demonstration of both an all-fiber pulse compressor and optical pulse compression at 1.32 microm.

  4. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  5. Enhanced Pulse Compression in Nonlinear Fiber by a WDM Optical Pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.; Bergman, L.

    1997-01-01

    A new way to compress an optical pulse in a single-mode fiber is presented in this paper. By the use of the cross phase modulation (CPM) effect caused by the nonlinearity of the optical fiber, a shepherd pulse propagating on a different wavelength beam in a wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) single-mode fiber system can be used to enhance the pulse compression of a co-propagating primary pulse.

  6. Divided-pulse nonlinear amplification and simultaneous compression

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Qiang; Zhang, Qingshan; Sun, Tingting; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yuqing; Guo, Zhengru; Yang, Kangwen; Guo, Zhanhua; Zeng, Heping

    2015-03-09

    We report on a fiber laser system delivering 122 fs pulse duration and 600 mW average power at 1560 nm by the interplay between divided pulse amplification and nonlinear pulse compression. A small-core double-clad erbium-doped fiber with anomalous dispersion carries out the pulse amplification and simultaneously compresses the laser pulses such that a separate compressor is no longer necessary. A numeric simulation reveals the existence of an optimum fiber length for producing transform-limited pulses. Furthermore, frequency doubling to 780 nm with 240 mW average power and 98 fs pulse duration is achieved by using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal at room temperature.

  7. Nonlinear femtosecond pulse compression in cholesteric liquid crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yikun; Zhou, Jianying; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Khoo, Iam-Choon

    2016-09-01

    Liquid crystals materials have the advantage of having a large nonlinear coefficient, but the response time is slow, normally up to several minisecond. This makes it is hard to apply in ultra fast optical devices. Recently, fentosecond (fs) nonlinear effect in choleteric liquid crystals is reported, nonlinear coefficient in the scale of 10-12 cm2/W is achieved. Base on this effect, in this work, fentosecond pulse compression technique in a miniature choleteric liquid crystal is demonstrated1,2. Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC) is a kind of 1-dimensional phontonic structure with helical periodic. In a 10 μm thick CLC, femtosecond pulse with 100 fs is compressed to about 50 fs. CLC sample in planar texture with 500μm thick cell gap is further fabricated. In this sample, femtosecond pulse with 847 fs can be compressed to 286 fs. Due to the strong dispersion at the edge of photonic band gap, femtosecond pulse stretching and compensation can be achieve. In this experiment, laser pulse with duration 90 fs is stretched to above 2 picosecond in the first CLC sample and re-compressed to 120 fs in the second sample. Such technique might be applied in chirp pulse amplification. In conclusion, we report ultra fast nonlinear effect in cholesteric liquid crystals. Due to the strong dispersion and nonlinearity of CLC, femtosecond pulse manipulating devices can be achieved in the scale of micrometer.

  8. Radio-Frequency Pulse Compression for Linear Accelerators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantista, Christopher Dennis

    Recent efforts to develop plans for an electron -positron linear collider with center-of-mass energy approaching a TeV have highlighted the need for sources capable of delivering hundreds of megawatts of peak rf drive power at X-band frequencies. This need has driven work in the area of rf pulse compression, which enhances the peak power available from pulsed rf tubes by compressing their output pulses in time, accumulating the available energy into shorter pulses. The classic means of rf pulse compression for linear accelerators is SLED. This technique is described, and the problem it presents for multibunch acceleration explained. Other pulse compression schemes, capable of producing suitable output pulses are explored, both theoretically and experimentally, in particular Binary Pulse Compression and SLED-II. The merits of each are considered with regard to gain, efficiency, complexity, size and cost. The development of some novel system components, along with the theory behind their design, is also discussed. The need to minimize copper losses in long waveguide runs led to the use of the circular TE_{01} propagation mode in over-moded guide, requiring much attention to mechanisms of coupling power between modes. The construction and commissioning of complete, high-power pulse compression systems is reported on, as well as their use in the testing of X-band accelerating structures, which, along with the X-band klystrons used, were developed at SLAC in parallel with the pulse compression work. The focus of the dissertation is on SLED-II, the favored scheme in some current linear accelerator designs. In addition to our experimental results, practical implementation considerations and design improvements are presented. The work to date has led to detailed plans for SLED-II systems to be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator, now under construction at SLAC. The prototype of the upgraded system is near completion. Descriptions of various rf pulse-compression

  9. Wave-breaking-extended fiber supercontinuum generation for high compression ratio transform-limited pulse compression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Wave-breaking often occurs when a short intense optical pulse propagates in a long normally dispersive optical fiber. This effect has conventionally been avoided in fiber (super-)continuum-based pulse compression because the accumulated frequency chirp of the output pulse cannot be fully compensated by a standard prism (or grating) pair. Thus, the spectral extending capability of the wave-breaking has not been utilized to shorten the compressed pulse. We demonstrate that wave-breaking-free operation is not necessary if a 4f pulse shaper-based compressor is employed to remove both the linear and nonlinear chirp of the output pulse. By propagating a 180 fs (FWHM) input pulse in a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber beyond the wave-breaking limit, we compress the wave-breaking-extended supercontinuum output pulse to the bandwidth-limited duration of 6.4 fs (FWHM). The combination of high compression ratio (28×) and short pulse width represents a significant improvement over that attained in the wave-breaking-free regime. PMID:22739845

  10. Spectral compression of single-photon-level laser pulse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanhua; Xiang, Tong; Nie, Yiyou; Sang, Minghuang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the bandwidth of single photons laser pulse is compressed by a factor of 58 in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide chip. A positively chirped single photons laser pulse and a negatively chirped classical laser pulse are employed to produce a narrowband single photon pulse with new frequency through sum-frequency generation. In our experiment, the frequency and bandwidth of single photons at 1550 nm are simultaneously converted. Our results mark a critical step towards the realization of coherent photonic interface between quantum communication at 1550 nm and quantum memory in the near-visible window. PMID:28240245

  11. Spectral compression of single-photon-level laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanhua; Xiang, Tong; Nie, Yiyou; Sang, Minghuang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the bandwidth of single photons laser pulse is compressed by a factor of 58 in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide chip. A positively chirped single photons laser pulse and a negatively chirped classical laser pulse are employed to produce a narrowband single photon pulse with new frequency through sum-frequency generation. In our experiment, the frequency and bandwidth of single photons at 1550 nm are simultaneously converted. Our results mark a critical step towards the realization of coherent photonic interface between quantum communication at 1550 nm and quantum memory in the near-visible window.

  12. Projectile-power-compressed magnetic-field pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Barlett, R.H.; Takemori, H.T.; Chase, J.B.

    1983-03-17

    Design considerations and experimental results are presented of a compressed magnetic field pulsed energy source. A 100-mm-diameter, gun-fired projectile of approx. 2MJ kinetic energy was the input energy source. An initial magnetic field was trapped and compressed by the projectile. With a shorted load, a magajoule in a nanohenry was the design goal, i.e., 50 percent energy transformation from kinetic to magnetic. Five percent conversion was the highest recorded before gauge failure.

  13. Study of radar pulse compression for high resolution satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Nathanson, F. E.; Brooks, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pulse compression techniques are studied which are applicable to a satellite altimeter having a topographic resolution of + 10 cm. A systematic design procedure is used to determine the system parameters. The performance of an optimum, maximum likelihood processor is analysed, which provides the basis for modifying the standard split-gate tracker to achieve improved performance. Bandwidth considerations lead to the recommendation of a full deramp STRETCH pulse compression technique followed by an analog filter bank to separate range returns. The implementation of the recommended technique is examined.

  14. A design approach for systems based on magnetic pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Durga Praveen; Mitra, S; Senthil, K; Sharma, D K; Rajan, Rehim N; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-04-01

    A design approach giving the optimum number of stages in a magnetic pulse compression circuit and gain per stage is given. The limitation on the maximum gain per stage is discussed. The total system volume minimization is done by considering the energy storage capacitor volume and magnetic core volume at each stage. At the end of this paper, the design of a magnetic pulse compression based linear induction accelerator of 200 kV, 5 kA, and 100 ns with a repetition rate of 100 Hz is discussed with its experimental results.

  15. All-optical three-dimensional electron pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie Wong, Liang; Freelon, Byron; Rohwer, Timm; Gedik, Nuh; Johnson, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    We propose an all-optical, three-dimensional electron pulse compression scheme in which Hermite-Gaussian optical modes are used to fashion a three-dimensional optical trap in the electron pulse’s rest frame. We show that the correct choices of optical incidence angles are necessary for optimal compression. We obtain analytical expressions for the net impulse imparted by Hermite-Gaussian free-space modes of arbitrary order. Although we focus on electrons, our theory applies to any charged particle and any particle with non-zero polarizability in the Rayleigh regime. We verify our theory numerically using exact solutions to Maxwell’s equations for first-order Hermite-Gaussian beams, demonstrating single-electron pulse compression factors of \\gt {{10}2} in both longitudinal and transverse dimensions with experimentally realizable optical pulses. The proposed scheme is useful in ultrafast electron imaging for both single- and multi-electron pulse compression, and as a means of circumventing temporal distortions in magnetic lenses when focusing ultrashort electron pulses. Other applications include the creation of flat electron beams and ultrashort electron bunches for coherent terahertz emission.

  16. Pulse Compression using a Tapered Microstructure Optical Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Pulse compression using a tapered microstructure optical fiber Jonathan Hu, Brian S. Marks, and Curtis R. Menyuk University of Maryland Baltimore...R. Menyuk , ”Optimization of the Split-Step Fourier Method in Modeling Optical-Fiber Communications Systems,” J. Lightwave Technol. 21, 61–68 (2003

  17. Advanced application flight experiment breadboard pulse compression radar altimeter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, development and performance of the pulse compression radar altimeter is described. The high resolution breadboard system is designed to operate from an aircraft at 10 Kft above the ocean and to accurately measure altitude, sea wave height and sea reflectivity. The minicomputer controlled Ku band system provides six basic variables and an extensive digital recording capability for experimentation purposes. Signal bandwidths of 360 MHz are obtained using a reflective array compression line. Stretch processing is used to achieve 1000:1 pulse compression. The system range command LSB is 0.62 ns or 9.25 cm. A second order altitude tracker, aided by accelerometer inputs is implemented in the system software. During flight tests the system demonstrated an altitude resolution capability of 2.1 cm and sea wave height estimation accuracy of 10%. The altitude measurement performance exceeds that of the Skylab and GEOS-C predecessors by approximately an order of magnitude.

  18. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy; Asay, James Russell; Chantrenne, Sophie J.; Hickman, Randall John; Willis, Michael David; Shay, Andrew W.; Grine-Jones, Suzi A.; Hall, Clint Allen; Baer, Melvin R.

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  19. Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Radousky, Harry B.

    2017-01-01

    Here we review the scaling of pulse energy with duration for sub-ns laser-driven dynamic compression experiments, which suggests that extreme pressures (multiple Mbar) might be achieved in rapidly equilibrating materials with substantially lower energy than used in traditional experiments. For instance, conventional scaling of pressure with laser intensity indicates that pressures well into the multiple Mbar range should be accessible by compressing with a hundreds of picosecond duration drive pulse with some tens of mJ of energy - orders of magnitude less than required for conventional experiments. Via a related scaling argument, we also show that the throughput of time-resolved pulsed x-ray dynamic compression experiments (such as those performed at x-ray free electron lasers) varies as the inverse square of the time scale of the experiment. The strong variation of throughput with the scale of the experiment should be a significant consideration in the design of such experiments - to obtain high throughput, the time scale of compression should be no longer than required (via material equilibration) to achieve the desired final material state.

  20. Pulse compression techniques to improve modulated pulsed laser line scan systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Robert W.; Nash, Justin K.; Cochenour, Brandon M.; Mullen, Linda J.

    2015-05-01

    A modulated pulse laser imaging system has been developed which utilizes coded/chirped RF modulation to mitigate the adverse effects of optical scattering in degraded visual underwater environments. Current laser imaging techniques employ either short pulses or single frequency modulated pulses to obtain both intensity and range images. Systems using short pulses have high range resolution but are susceptible to scattering due to the wide bandwidth nature of the pulse. Range gating can be used to limit the effects of backscatter, but this can lead to blind spots in the range image. Modulated pulse systems can help suppress the contribution from scattered light in generated imagery without gating the receiver. However, the use of narrowband, single tone modulation results in limited range resolution where small targets are camouflaged within the background. This drives the need for systems which have high range resolution while still suppressing the effects of scattering caused by the environment. Coded/chirped modulated pulses enable the use of radar pulse compression techniques to substantially increase range resolution while also providing a way to discriminate the object of interest from the light scattered from the environment. Linearly frequency chirped waveforms and phase shift keyed barker codes were experimentally investigated to determine the effects that pulse compression would have on intensity/range data. The effect of modulation frequency on the data produced with both wideband and narrowband modulation was also investigated. The results from laboratory experiments will be presented and compared to model predictions.

  1. A new class of polyphase pulse compression codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hai; Lin, Maoyong

    The study presents the synthesis method of a new class of polyphase pulse compression codes - NLFM code, and investigates the properties of this code. The NLFM code, which is derived from sampling and quantization of a nonlinear FM waveform, features a low-range sidelobe and insensitivity to Doppler effect. Simulation results show that the major properties of the NLFM polyphase code are superior to the Frank code.

  2. Self-compression of a femtosecond pulse due to Raman coherence of molecular rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Kida, Yuichiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2004-09-01

    We have observed self-modulation and self-compression of a femtosecond laser pulse after passing the beam through a Raman-active medium of hydrogen. Femtosecond pulses produce Stokes emissions of ortho-hydrogen and para-hydrogen, depending on the input beam conditions. The shape of the output pulses drastically changed as a function of the intensity of the Stokes emissions and the total width of the spectrum. This is attributed to nonlinear modulation of the wave form induced by coherent rotational motions of hydrogen molecules in the time domain.

  3. Self-compression of intense short laser pulses in relativistic magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Olumi, M.; Maraghechi, B.

    2014-11-15

    The compression of a relativistic Gaussian laser pulse in a magnetized plasma is investigated. By considering relativistic nonlinearity and using non-linear Schrödinger equation with paraxial approximation, a second-order differential equation is obtained for the pulse width parameter (in time) to demonstrate the longitudinal pulse compression. The compression of laser pulse in a magnetized plasma can be observed by the numerical solution of the equation for the pulse width parameter. The effects of magnetic field and chirping are investigated. It is shown that in the presence of magnetic field and negative initial chirp, compression of pulse is significantly enhanced.

  4. Nd:YAP laser pulse compression by three-stage transient stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubeček, V.; Hamal, K.; Procházka, I.; Buzelis, R.; Girdauskas, V.; Dementiev, A.

    1991-08-01

    There is a continuous effort to generate stable, powerful picosecond laser pulses for application in spectroscopy, nonlinear optics and parametric light generation, as well. One of the possible methods is the compression of longer nanosecond laser pulses by stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattering. The advantages of such a technique, in comparison to the used mode locked picosecond lasers, are as follows: the absence of the active and/or passive mode lockers used to generate a train of picosecond pulses, and the absence of a fast electrooptical shutter used to select a single pulse from a train of pulses. The application of stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattering permits to generate picosecond pulses in the wavelength regions not covered by mode locked lasers. Of special interest is the wavelength region of 0·8 μm, which may be amplified by the attractive Titanium Sapphire lasers. In this paper we are summarizing our results in theoretical modelling and in real generation of picosecond pulses by means of cascaded stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering. The models of scattering processes have been investigated. The stable generation of 5, 7, 3 picosecond pulses have been optimized for the wavelengths of 0·8, 0·64 and 0·54 μm, respectively. In all these cases, the pulses exhibited the far field pattern close to Gaussian, with the pulse energy ranging from 0·2 to 1 mJ.

  5. Laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present theory and numerical analysis which demonstrate laser-pulse compression in a collisional plasma under the weak-relativistic ponderomotive nonlinearity. Plasma equilibrium density is modified due to the ohmic heating of electrons, the collisions, and the weak relativistic-ponderomotive force during the interaction of a laser pulse with plasmas. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the longitudinal self-compression mechanism is discussed. Three-dimensional analysis (spatiotemporal) of laser pulse propagation is also investigated by coupling the self-compression with the self-focusing. In the regime in which the laser becomes self-focused due to the weak relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity, we provide results for enhanced pulse compression. The results show that the matched interplay between self-focusing and self-compression can improve significantly the temporal profile of the compressed pulse. Enhanced pulse compression can be achieved by optimizing and selecting the parameters such as collision frequency, ion-temperature, and laser intensity.

  6. Observation of amplification of a 1ps pulse by SRS of a 1 ns pulse in a plasma with conditions relevant to pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Dewald, E; Wilks, S C; Meezan, N; Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N J; Malkin, V M

    2006-05-24

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam Which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression With large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS or non-resonantly. We describe experiments in which a plasma suitable for pulse compression is created , and amplification of an ultra short pulse beam is demonstrated.

  7. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  8. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; ...

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted onmore » the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.« less

  9. Further considerations of adaptive canceller and pulse compression interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Karl

    1995-01-01

    The number of independent samples per channel needed so that the average adaptive range sidelobe level is within 3 dB of the quiescent range sidelobe level are derived. This analysis is used to predict the canceller weight calculation of a contaminating desired signal. It is shown that if the code length L of the desired waveform is less than or equal to the processing batch width K of the canceller, it is necessary to place the pulse compression after the adaptive canceller. Moreover, if L greater than K, the issue is not so clear-cut, thus tradeoff study is necessary.

  10. Compressible octave spanning supercontinuum generation by two-pulse collisions.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Ayhan; Amiranashvili, Shalva; Brée, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2013-06-07

    We demonstrate a novel method for supercontinuum generation in an optical fiber based on two-color pumping with a delay and a group velocity matching. The scheme relies on the enhanced cross-phase-modulation at an intensity induced refractive index barrier between a dispersive wave and a soliton. The generation mechanism neither incorporates soliton fission nor a modulation instability and therefore exhibits extraordinary coherence properties, enabling the temporal compression of octave bandwidth into a short pulse. Moreover, the properties of the supercontinuum are adjustable over a wide range in the frequency domain by suitable choice of the dispersive wave.

  11. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-08-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  12. Compressive sensing reconstruction of feed-forward connectivity in pulse-coupled nonlinear networks.

    PubMed

    Barranca, Victor J; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    Utilizing the sparsity ubiquitous in real-world network connectivity, we develop a theoretical framework for efficiently reconstructing sparse feed-forward connections in a pulse-coupled nonlinear network through its output activities. Using only a small ensemble of random inputs, we solve this inverse problem through the compressive sensing theory based on a hidden linear structure intrinsic to the nonlinear network dynamics. The accuracy of the reconstruction is further verified by the fact that complex inputs can be well recovered using the reconstructed connectivity. We expect this Rapid Communication provides a new perspective for understanding the structure-function relationship as well as compressive sensing principle in nonlinear network dynamics.

  13. A pulse-compression-ring circuit for high-efficiency electric propulsion.

    PubMed

    Owens, Thomas L

    2008-03-01

    A highly efficient, highly reliable pulsed-power system has been developed for use in high power, repetitively pulsed inductive plasma thrusters. The pulsed inductive thruster ejects plasma propellant at a high velocity using a Lorentz force developed through inductive coupling to the plasma. Having greatly increased propellant-utilization efficiency compared to chemical rockets, this type of electric propulsion system may one day propel spacecraft on long-duration deep-space missions. High system reliability and electrical efficiency are extremely important for these extended missions. In the prototype pulsed-power system described here, exceptional reliability is achieved using a pulse-compression circuit driven by both active solid-state switching and passive magnetic switching. High efficiency is achieved using a novel ring architecture that recovers unused energy in a pulse-compression system with minimal circuit loss after each impulse. As an added benefit, voltage reversal is eliminated in the ring topology, resulting in long lifetimes for energy-storage capacitors. System tests were performed using an adjustable inductive load at a voltage level of 3.3 kV, a peak current of 20 kA, and a current switching rate of 15 kA/micros.

  14. Type-I cascaded quadratic soliton compression in lithium niobate: Compressing femtosecond pulses from high-power fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Morten; Wise, Frank W.

    2010-05-15

    The output pulses of a commercial high-power femtosecond fiber laser or amplifier are typically around 300-500 fs with wavelengths of approximately 1030 nm and tens of microjoules of pulse energy. Here, we present a numerical study of cascaded quadratic soliton compression of such pulses in LiNbO{sub 3} using second-harmonic generation in a type-I phase-matching configuration. We find that because of competing cubic material nonlinearities, compression can only occur in the nonstationary regime, where group-velocity-mismatch-induced Raman-like nonlocal effects prevent compression to less than 100 fs. However, the strong group-velocity dispersion implies that the pulses can achieve moderate compression to durations of less than 130 fs in available crystal lengths. Most of the pulse energy is conserved because the compression is moderate. The effects of diffraction and spatial walk-off are addressed, and in particular the latter could become an issue when compressing such long crystals (around 10 cm long). We finally show that the second harmonic contains a short pulse locked to the pump and a long multi-picosecond red-shifted detrimental component. The latter is caused by the nonlocal effects in the nonstationary regime, but because it is strongly red-shifted to a position that can be predicted, we show that it can be removed using a bandpass filter, leaving a visible component of less than 100 fs at {lambda}=515 nm with excellent pulse quality.

  15. A real-time receive method of wideband radar based on subband pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    The data rate with high capacity and speed of wideband signal makes its real-time processing limited by hardware and software. In this paper, wideband signal is made pulse compression based on subband pulse compression system. It is used uniform complex modulation to generate analysis filter bank and synthesis filter bank, then signals are processed in each subband. The processed results of simulated and measured datas indicate, that the parallel means of subband pulse compression raises the operation speed and improves real-time processing performance of the system, selecting proper subband number according to the data quantity when the result closed to that of directed pulse compression.

  16. Few-cycle pulse compression through cascade of bulk media and hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Li, D. X.; Chen, X. W.; Leng, Y. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2010-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a new few-cycle pulse compression technique through the cascade of bulk media and hollow-core fiber (HCF) and this compression system has been intensively studied. The pulses with the duration of ˜5 fs and the energy of 0.33 mJ near 800 nm have been generated by compressing the ˜40 fs input pulse from a commercial laser system. In principle, this technique allows compression of pulses with duration of picoseconds to a few cycles (sub-7 fs) and the output can be above 1 mJ.

  17. Progress Towards Plasma Pulse Compression of High Energy, Long Pulse Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Ping, Y; Rygg, R; Wilks, S; Meezan, N; Niemann, C; Landen, O; Fisch, N; Malkin, V; Valeo, E; Wurtele, J

    2008-06-19

    Compression of laser pulses to < {approx} 1-10 ps duration using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a plasma promises to provide unprecedented power and intensity for a variety of applications, by avoiding the limits to fluence and intensity that are needed to avoid damage to the solid state optics that are used in conventional approaches. In particular, the ability to compress pump beam pulses of {approx} ns duration will allow present facilities with 10's kJ to over a MJ of energy to produce ultra short pulses efficiently, advancing applications in; fusion by fast ignition, x-ray production of high energy density experiments, as well as laser driven particle accelerators. We will discuss a series of experiments to demonstrate the needed beam amplification rate, and focal spot quality in a < 3mm plasma with the properties needed for compression of these pulses (n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} 200 to 300 eV) when the plasma is extended. The experiments use He plasmas produced with a 300 J, 1 ns, beam at the Jupiter Laser facility to amplify a counter-propagating, ultra-short pulse (USP) seed by a factor of 10x to 37x and study the dependence of the amplification, the associated non-linear wave response, and the resulting beam quality and energy, on the intensity of both seed and pump beam. In particular, a regime in which amplification of USP beams is achieved while maintaining a low angular divergence of the beam consistent with good focal spot quality will be discussed.

  18. Efficient compression of the femtosecond pulses of an ytterbium laser in a gas-filled capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2011-07-31

    A 290-fs radiation pulse of an ytterbium laser system with a central wavelength of 1028 nm and an energy of 145 {mu}J was compressed to a 27-fs pulse with an energy of 75 {mu}J. The compression was realised on the basis of the effect of pulse spectrum broadening in a xenon-filled glass capillary for a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  19. Optimization of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for high-quality pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Wen; Lim, JinKang; Huang, Shu-Wei; Schimpf, Damian N; Kärtner, Franz X; Chang, Guoqing

    2012-12-17

    We both theoretically and experimentally investigate the optimization of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers (YDFAs) to achieve high-quality, high-power, compressed pulses. Ultrashort pulses amplified inside YDFAs are modeled by the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation coupled to the steady-state propagation-rate equations. We use this model to study the dependence of compressed-pulse quality on the YDFA parameters, such as the gain fiber's doping concentration and length, and input pulse pre-chirp, duration, and power. The modeling results confirmed by experiments show that an optimum negative pre-chirp for the input pulse exists to achieve the best compression.

  20. Compression of ultra-short pulses due to cascaded second order nonlinearities in photonic bandgap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Shereena; Shahid Khan, Mohd.; Hafiz, Aurangzeb Khurram

    2016-03-01

    The cascaded second order nonlinearities in a 1-D photonic bandgap structure (1-D PBG) in the spectral domain have been explored. A weak signal pulse operating at frequency of interest is seeded with a strong pulse operating at its second harmonic (SH) frequency. The interaction of both pulses in the periodic structure takes place with a particular phase mismatch condition. The intensity of SH pulse controls the propagation of signal pulse and the signal pulse exhibits pulse compression at particular input SH intensity. Considering the parameter for GaInP/InAlP PBG structure we have demonstrated pulse compression from 290 fs to 155 fs. The dependency of pulse compression on the structural parameters, group velocity mismatch, group velocity dispersion and input intensity of pump has also been explored.

  1. Tunable pulse width and multi-megawatt peak-power pulses from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryutarou; Maeda, Kazuo; Watanabe, Goro; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jun; Sumida, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We report on tunable pulse width and high peak power pulse generation from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system. The master seed source employs a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator (MZIM). This seed source has operational flexibility with respect to pulse width, 90 ps to 2 ns and repetition rate, 200 kHz to 2 MHz. The seed pulses are amplified by a monolithic three-stage amplifier system based on polarization maintain Yb-doped fibers. The maximum output power was 32 W at the shortest pulse condition, the pulse width of 90 ps and the repetition rate of 750 kHz. A spectral width after amplification was broadened to 0.73 nm at RMS width. Both of ASE and SRS are not observed in the spectrum. After amplification, we also demonstrated pulse compression with a small piece of chirped volume Bragg-grating (CVBG) which has the dispersion rate of 81 ps/nm. As a result of pulse compression, the shortest pulse width was reduced from 90 ps to 3.5 ps, which brought an increase of the peak power up to 3.2 MW. The compressed pulses are clean with little structure in their wings. We can expand the operation range of the monolithic fiber MOPA system in pulse width, 3.5 ps to 2 ns.

  2. Insentropic compression of solid using pulsed magnetic loading

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,CLINT A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; REISMAN,D.; TOOR,A.; CAUBLE,R.; HAYES,D.B.

    2000-04-18

    Shock loading techniques are often used to determine material response along a specific pressure loading curve referred to as the Hugoniot. However, many technological and scientific applications require accurate determination of dynamic material response that is off-Hugoniot, covering large regions of the equation-of-state surface. Unloading measurements from the shocked state provide off-Hugoniot information, but experimental techniques for measuring compressive off-Hugoniot response have been limited. A new pulsed magnetic loading technique is presented which provides previously unavailable information on isentropic loading of materials to pressures of several hundred kbar. This smoothly increasing pressure loading provides a good approximation to the high-pressure material isentrope centered at ambient conditions. The approach uses high current densities to create ramped magnetic loading to a few hundred kbar over time intervals of 100--200 ns. The method has successfully determined the isentropic mechanical response of copper to about 200 kbar and has been used to evaluate the kinetics of the alpha-epsilon phase transition occurring in iron at 130 kbar. With refinements in progress, the method shows promise for performing isentropic compression experiments to multi-Mbar pressures.

  3. Simultaneous compression and characterization of ultrashort laser pulses using chirped mirrors and glass wedges.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Miguel; Fordell, Thomas; Arnold, Cord; L'Huillier, Anne; Crespo, Helder

    2012-01-02

    We present a simple and robust technique to retrieve the phase of ultrashort laser pulses, based on a chirped mirror and glass wedges compressor. It uses the compression system itself as a diagnostic tool, thereby making unnecessary the use of complementary diagnostic tools. We used this technique to compress and characterize 7.1 fs laser pulses from an ultrafast laser oscillator.

  4. Compression of An Ultrashort Laser Pulse via Self-Phase Modulation in An Argon Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Masashi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    Compression and splitting of the optical laser pulse due to multiple filamentation in an argon gas-filled channel was observed. A 130-140-fs linearly polarized pulse was successfully compressed to less than 60-80 fs with the output energy of a few 10 mJ.

  5. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  6. Temporal and spectral compression of pulses in fibers with a running refractive index wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotovskii, I. O.; Lapin, V. A.; Sementsov, D. I.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    For pulses propagating in fibers with a running refractive index wave, the pulse power could be drastically increased due to decrease of the pulse duration. We report temporal and spectral compression of the pulses and conditions for formation of soliton-like chirped pulses in nonlinear fibers with a running refractive index wave. We demonstrate 100- fold compression of the wave packets propagating in media with a running refractive index wave (down to sub-picosecond durations) achieved on lengths shorter than 10 cm. In addition, the modulation instability of wave packets will be studied in such media.

  7. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  8. Observation of amplification of a 1ps pulse by SRS of a 1 ns pulse in a plasma with conditions relevant to pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Dewald, E; Wilks, S C; Meezan, N; Niemann, C; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N J; Malkin, V M

    2005-10-28

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression with large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS [1] or non-resonantly [2].

  9. Passive and active pulse stacking scheme for pulse shaping

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Schipper, John F.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing a sequence of radiation pulses with a pulse envelope of time variation which is controllable by an external electromagnetic signal applied to an active medium or by a sectored reflector, through which the radiation passes.

  10. Peristaltic pulse dynamic compression of the lower extremity enhances flexibility.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; Murray, Melonie B; Murray, Steven R; McNeal, Jeni R; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Kimitake; Stone, Michael H

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of peristaltic pulse dynamic compression (PPDC) on range-of-motion (ROM) changes in forward splits. Serious stretching usually involves discomfort and large time investments. Tissue structural changes and stretch tolerance have heretofore been considered the primary mechanisms of enhanced ROM. The PPDC treatment was computer controlled. Circumferential and segmented inflation pressures were induced by feet to hip leggings. Nine subjects, experienced in stretching and a forward split position, volunteered. The subjects were familiarized with the protocol and randomly assigned to an initial condition: experimental (PPDC), or control (CONT). The study involved a crossover design. Second conditions were tested within 1-5 days. All tests were 2 trials of right and left forward splits. Split flexibility was assessed by measuring the height of the anterior superior iliac spine of the rear leg from the floor. Pelvic posture was controlled by rear leg position. The PPDC treatment was 15 minutes of seated PPDC. The control condition was the same except that leggings were not inflated. Pressures of 5 cells in the leggings were set at factory defaults, 70 mm Hg sequentially. Difference score results indicated statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences by condition and the condition by leg interaction. The rapid acute changes in ROM (PPDC: right 25.3%, left 33.3%; CONT: right 12.2%, left 1.0%) support the premise that changes in ROM were dependent on mechanisms other than tissue structural changes and/or stretch tolerance. PPDC provides a means of rapidly enhancing acute ROM requiring less discomfort and time.

  11. High average power nonlinear compression to 4  GW, sub-50  fs pulses at 2  μm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M; Gaida, C; Stutzki, F; Hädrich, S; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2017-02-15

    The combination of high-repetition-rate ultrafast thulium-doped fiber laser systems and gas-based nonlinear pulse compression in waveguides offers promising opportunities for the development of high-performance few-cycle laser sources at 2 μm wavelength. In this Letter, we report on a nonlinear pulse compression stage delivering 252 μJ, sub-50 fs-pulses at 15.4 W of average power. This performance level was enabled by actively mitigating ultrashort pulse propagation effects induced by the presence of water vapor absorptions.

  12. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  13. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  14. Compressed 6 ps pulse in nonlinear amplification of a Q-switched microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Ruxin; Liu, Zuosheng; Niu, Fuzeng; Wang, Aimin; Taira, Takunori; Zhang, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    We present a passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 crystal microchip laser with a 6 ps pulse width, which is based on SPM-induced spectral broadening and pulse compression. The passive Q-switching is obtained by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The laser’s seed source centered at 1064 nm pulses with a duration of 80 ps, at a repetition rate of 600 kHz corresponding to an average output power of 10 mW. After amplification and compression, the pulses were compressed to 6 ps with a maximum pulse energy of 0.5 µJ.

  15. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  16. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  17. Using electric fields for pulse compression and group-velocity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Kinos, Adam; Thuresson, Axel; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we experimentally demonstrate a way of controlling the group velocity of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, the slow-light effect, and the linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. The group velocity can be changed continuously by a factor of 20 without significant pulse distortion or absorption of the pulse energy. With a similar technique, an optical pulse can also be compressed in time. Theoretical simulations were developed to simulate the group-velocity control and the pulse compression processes. The group velocity as well as the pulse reshaping are solely controlled by external voltages which makes it promising in quantum information and quantum communication processes. It is also proposed that the group velocity can be changed even more in an Er-doped crystal while at the same time having a transmission band matching the telecommunication wavelength.

  18. Application of P4 Polyphase codes pulse compression method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Honggang; Zhou, Zhenggan

    2017-03-03

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing systems are usually restricted by low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The use of pulse compression techniques based on P4 Polyphase codes can improve the ultrasound SNR. This type of codes can generate higher Peak Side Lobe (PSL) ratio and lower noise of compressed signal. This paper proposes the use of P4 Polyphase sequences to code ultrasound with a NDT system based on air-coupled piezoelectric transducer. Furthermore, the principle of selecting parameters of P4 Polyphase sequence for obtaining optimal pulse compression effect is also studied. Successful results are presented in molded composite material. A hybrid signal processing method for improvement in SNR up to 12.11dB and in time domain resolution about 35% are achieved when compared with conventional pulse compression technique.

  19. Pulse compression with very low sidelobes in an airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, A.; Durden, S. L.; Denning, R.; Im, E.; Li, F. K.; Ricketts, W.; Wilson, W.

    1994-01-01

    Pulse compression allows a substantial reduction in the peak transmitted power of a radar and is attractive for spaceborne remote sensing applications. In the case of a downward looking rain measuring radar, however, the range sidelobes associated with surface return can mask return from rain and must be kept to a minimum. Here, we describe the pulse compression system for the NASA/JPL Airborne Rain Mapping Radar. This system uses time-domain weighting of the transmitted pulse and is able to achieve a range sidelobe level of -55 dB or better in flight tests. This is significantly lower than other values reported in the open literature.

  20. Two-stage Raman compression of laser pulses with controllable phase fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, A. A.; Fraiman, G. M.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-05-15

    The phase front of an ultrashort laser pulse undergoing Raman amplification and compression in inhomogeneous plasma can be controlled such that it is unaffected by density gradients and thus remains focusable. This is achieved by performing the Raman backscattering in two stages. At the first stage, the standard nonlinear Raman compression of a seed wave takes place and produces a short ultraintense pulse, which yet may be poorly focusable. At the second stage, this amplified pulse is scattered again, now serving as a pump, off a second copy of the initial seed. This stage, which utilizes a denser and shorter plasma, is intended not for compression but rather for passing a significant fraction of the energy to the second seed quickly. Then, the output pulse that is produced is not just short and ultraintense, but also has the smooth phase front of the original seed.

  1. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  2. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  3. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  4. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained.

  5. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Kroll, N.M.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE{sub 01} mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator).

  6. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  7. Pulse code modulation data compression for automated test equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Navickas, T.A.; Jones, S.G.

    1991-05-01

    Development of automated test equipment for an advanced telemetry system requires continuous monitoring of PCM data while exercising telemetry inputs. This requirements leads to a large amount of data that needs to be stored and later analyzed. For example, a data stream of 4 Mbits/s and a test time of thirty minutes would yield 900 Mbytes of raw data. With this raw data, information needs to be stored to correlate the raw data to the test stimulus. This leads to a total of 1.8 Gb of data to be stored and analyzed. There is no method to analyze this amount of data in a reasonable time. A data compression method is needed to reduce the amount of data collected to a reasonable amount. The solution to the problem was data reduction. Data reduction was accomplished by real time limit checking, time stamping, and smart software. Limit checking was accomplished by an eight state finite state machine and four compression algorithms. Time stamping was needed to correlate stimulus to the appropriate output for data reconstruction. The software was written in the C programming language with a DOS extender used to allow it to run in extended mode. A 94--98% compression in the amount of data gathered was accomplished using this method. 1 fig.

  8. Compression of pulses during their amplification in the field of a focused counterpropagating pump pulse of the same frequency and width in media with electrostriction nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, Aleksandr S; Demin, I; Murauskas, E; Slavinskis, S

    2011-02-28

    Efficient compression of focused {approx}0.9-ns pulses of a miniature Nd:YAG laser to less than 60 ps is experimentally obtained at their interaction with counterpropagating pulses of the same carrier frequency and width in CCl{sub 4}. In this case, electrostriction interaction (amplification) begins not from the level of spontaneous-scattering noise; therefore, the counterpropagating pulses can be compressed at pump pulse energies below the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) threshold energies. When counterpropagating seed pulses are used, the energy and temporal stability of compressed pulses are several times higher, and their time jitter is smaller than that for SBS compression from the level of spontaneous-scattering noise. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  9. Compression of femtosecond petawatt laser pulses in a plasma under the conditions of wake-wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, A. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2013-08-01

    We propose the concept of a plasma compressor capable of producing extremely short relativistic laser pulse, which is based on the studies of self-focusing of high-power laser pulses under the wake-wave excitation conditions. It is shown that, in the optimal regime, the compression of laser pulses up to a duration of one optical cycle is possible. We study the influence of hose instability on the process of pulse self-compression and have found that this instability is not important for a wide set of initial conditions. The matter is that the length of pulse distortion in both transverse and longitudinal directions is larger than the length of the pulse self-compression. Hose instability gives only negligible decrease of compression degree and weak deformation of pulse profile.

  10. High-Power X-Band Semiconductor RF Switch for Pulse Compression Systems of Future Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Tamura, Fumihiko

    2000-04-01

    We describe the potential of semiconductor X-band RF switch arrays as a means of developing high power RF pulse compression systems for future linear colliders. The switch systems described here have two designs. Both designs consist of two 3dB hybrids and active modules. In the first design the module is composed of a cascaded active phase shifter. In the second design the module uses arrays of SPST (Single Pole Single Throw) switches. Each cascaded element of the phase shifter and the SPST switch has similar design. The active element consists of symmetrical three-port tee-junctions and an active waveguide window in the symmetrical arm of the tee-junction. The design methodology of the elements and the architecture of the whole switch system are presented. We describe the scaling law that governs the relation between power handling capability and number of elements. The design of the active waveguide window is presented. The waveguide window is a silicon wafer with an array of four hundred PIN/NIP diodes covering the surface of the window. This waveguide window is located in an over-moded TE01 circular waveguide. The results of high power RF measurements of the active waveguide window are presented. The experiment is performed at power levels of tens of megawatts at X-band.

  11. A new design of low sidelobe pulse compression signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Zou, Chongzu

    By studying how the biphase coded signals reduce the range sidelobe, a new type of pulse amplitude modulation signal - the Nonlinear Programming Code - is presented in this paper. With regard to sidelobe level and energy utilization, it is better than the Huffman code with equal code length and real coefficients. Finally, quantative calculations of the Doppler mismatching effects are done and the improvement method is discussed.

  12. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzi, Matthew; Wang, Juwen; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate T E114 modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q0 of 9.4 ×104 and coupling factor (β ) of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor QL of 1.06 ×104 with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05 dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  13. Group-complementary code sets for implementing pulse compression with desirable range resolution properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, G.; Holliday, E. M.

    This paper describes the structure and properties of a waveform design technique intended to provide desirable range resolution properties in radar sensor systems. The waveform design, called group-complementary coding, consists of groups of binary sequences which can be used for bi-phase coding of a radar carrier pulsed waveform. When pulse compression processing is extended to include the composite of a number of pulses through coherent integration, then group-complementary coding provides the often desirable property of complete range sidelobe cancellation (for zero Doppler shift).

  14. Two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine with pulsed air supplier

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John M.

    2003-08-05

    A two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine includes a volume pulsed air supplier, such as a piston driven pump, for efficient scavenging. The usage of a homogenous charge tends to decrease emissions. The use of a volume pulsed air supplier in conjunction with conventional poppet type intake and exhaust valves results in a relatively efficient scavenging mode for the engine. The engine preferably includes features that permit valving event timing, air pulse event timing and injection event timing to be varied relative to engine crankshaft angle. The principle use of the invention lies in improving diesel engines.

  15. Generation of high intensity rf pulses in the ionosphere by means of in situ compression

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Perkins, F.W.; Valeo, E.J.

    1993-04-01

    We demonstrate, using a simple model, that high intensity pulses can be generated from a frequency-chirped modifier of much lower intensity by making use of the dispersive properties of the ionosphere. We show that a frequency-chirped pulse can be constructed so that its various components overtake each other at a prescribed height, resulting in large (up to one hundred times) transient intensity enhancements as compared to those achievable from a steady modifier operating at the same power. We examine briefly one possible application: the enhancement of plasma wave amplitudes which occurs as a result of the interaction of such a compressed pulse with pre-generated turbulence.

  16. Possibility of Ion Beam Pulse Compression by X-Ray Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Takashi

    1985-02-01

    A previously proposed scheme for ion beam pulse compression is reexamined from a different viewpoint. It is shown that the criticisms made by Unterseer and Meyer-ter-Vehn are not reasonable in a real target configuration. In addition, the spherically converging effect is shown to offer further advantages.

  17. Radio frequency pulse compression experiments at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Spalek, G.; Wilson, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed future positron-electron linear colliders would be capable of investigating fundamental processes of interest in the 0.5--5 TeV beam-energy range. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) gradient of about 20 MV/m this would imply prohibitive lengths of about 50--250 kilometers per linac. We can reduce the length by increasing the gradient but this implies high peak power, on the order of 400-- to 1000-MW at X-Band. One possible way to generate high peak power is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a short pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before DC to RF conversion, as is done using magnetic switching for induction linacs, or after DC to RF conversion, as is done for the SLC. Using RF pulse compression it is possible to boost the 50-- to 100-MW output that has already been obtained from high-power X-Band klystrons the levels required by the linear colliders. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered.

  18. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed.

  19. Generation of ultra-short hydrogen atom pulses by bunch-compression photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Sven; Schwarzer, Dirk; Reichardt, Christian; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-short light pulses enable many time-resolved studies in chemistry, especially when used in pump-probe experiments. However, most chemical events are not initiated by light, but rather by collisions. Time-resolved collisional experiments require ultra-short pulses of atoms and molecules—sadly, methods for producing such pulses are so far unknown. Here we introduce bunch-compression photolysis, an approach to forming ultra-short and highly intense pulses of neutral atoms. We demonstrate H-atom pulses of 1.2±0.3 ns duration, far shorter than any previously reported. Owing to its extraordinarily simple physical principles, we can accurately model the method—the model shows H-atom pulses as short as 110-ps are achievable. Importantly, due to the bunch-compression, large (mm3) photolysis volumes are possible, a key advantage for pulse intensity. This technique overcomes the most challenging barrier to a new class of experiments on time-resolved collisions involving atoms and molecules.

  20. A scheme of pulse compression lidar with enhanced modulated bandwidth for detection through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng-hua; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Chen-fei; Xu, Lu; Yang, Xu; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yue-hao; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a scheme of pulse compression lidar with enhanced electrical modulated bandwidth. An ultra-wideband linear frequency modulated signal with a bandwidth of 50 GHz is generated using femtosecond laser and superimposed linear chirp fiber Bragg gratings in the transmitter, which separates the echo of the target from the backward scattered noise with low modulated frequency. An optical pulse compression system based on a negative dispersion fiber Bragg grating is used to compress the ultra-wideband linear frequency modulated signal in the receiver. SNR and range resolution of the proposed scheme are numerically simulated to prove its feasibility. The simulation results indicate that an enhancement of SNR by 15.8 dB can be achieved using the scheme, and the range resolution of the scheme increases from 0.68 m to 0.0027 m. It is therefore concluded that the proposed scheme is suitable for detection through scattering media.

  1. Pulse compression and dispersion compensation for high- resolution Lamb wave inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, J.; Lin, J.; Zeng, L.

    2015-07-01

    The dispersion of ultrasonic guided waves causes the energy of a signal to spread out in space and time as it propagates, which decreases the performance for damage detection significantly. A lot of signal processing methods have been proposed to reduce the effect of dispersion for this reason. In this paper, with the aim of developing an efficient methodology for high resolution Lamb wave inspection, a pulse compression and dispersion compensation method is established. In this method, broadband excitation and pulse compression technique are introduced to reconstruct the transform function with a high SNR. Subsequently, a scheme is established to alleviate the dispersion effects by performing compensation on the original narrowband excitation signals, and thus the time duration of received wave packet can be compressed during the extracting process. Finally, Numerical simulation and experiment are carried on aluminum specimens to investigate the behavior of the proposed method.

  2. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10/sup 10/ 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10/sup 10/ neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output.

  3. Pulsed flashover of solid dielectric materials in compressed gas environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Somesh Vinayak E-mail: svtewari@barc.gov.in; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K. C.

    2015-06-24

    An experimental investigation of surface flashover characteristics of PMMA and POM is studied in compressed nitrogen gas environment with nitrogen as the background gas. The operating pressure range is from 1kg/cm{sup 2} to 4kg/cm{sup 2}. It is observed that the breakdown voltage of PMMA is higher than POM owing to a higher permittivity mismatch between POM- nitrogen interface as compared to the PMMA- nitrogen interface. The reduction in spacer efficiency with pressure for PMMA is 11% as compared to POM which shows a higher reduction of 18%. This paper further emphasizes on the role of energy level and density of charge carrier trapping centers for a reduced breakdown voltage in POM as compared to PMMA.

  4. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  5. Temporal compression of cw diode-laser output into short pulses with cesium-vapor group-velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Choi, K; Menders, J; Ross, D; Korevaar, E

    1993-11-15

    Using a technique similar to chirped pulse compression, we have compressed the 50-mW cw output of a diode laser into pulses of greater than 500-mW peak power and less than 400-ps duration. By applying a small current modulation to the diode, we induced a small wavelength modulation in the vicinity of the 6s(1/2)-to-6p(3/2) cesium resonance transition at 852 nm. Group-velocity dispersion on propagation through a cesium vapor cell then led to pulse compression. We developed a simple model to make predictions of output pulse shapes by using different modulation waveforms.

  6. Pulse compression of harmonic chirp signals using the fractional fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Arif, M; Cowell, D M J; Freear, S

    2010-06-01

    In ultrasound harmonic imaging with chirp-coded excitation, a harmonic matched filter (HMF) is typically used on the received signal to perform pulse compression of the second harmonic component (SHC) to recover signal axial resolution. Designing the HMF for the compression of the SHC is a problematic issue because it requires optimal window selection. In the compressed second harmonic signal, the sidelobe level may increase and the mainlobe width (MLW) widen under a mismatched condition, resulting in loss of axial resolution. We propose the use of the fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) as an alternative tool to perform compression of the chirp-coded SHC generated as a result of the nonlinear propagation of an ultrasound signal. Two methods are used to experimentally assess the performance benefits of the FrFT technique over the HMF techniques. The first method uses chirp excitation with central frequency of 2.25 MHz and bandwidth of 1 MHz. The second method uses chirp excitation with pulse inversion to increase the bandwidth to 2 MHz. In this study, experiments were performed in a water tank with a single-element transducer mounted coaxially with a hydrophone in a pitch-catch configuration. Results are presented that indicate that the FrFT can perform pulse compression of the second harmonic chirp component, with a 14% reduction in the MLW of the compressed signal when compared with the HMF. Also, the FrFT provides at least 23% reduction in the MLW of the compressed signal when compared with the harmonic mismatched filter (HMMF). The FrFT maintains comparable peak and integrated sidelobe levels when compared with the HMF and HMMF techniques.

  7. Analysis and design of nonlinear fiber Bragg gratings and their application for optical compression of reflected pulses.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Amir; Horowitz, Moshe

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel split-step solution for analyzing nonlinear fiber Bragg gratings. The solution is used for designing nonlinear fiber Bragg gratings with a low reflectivity. The structure of the grating is designed according to the profiles of the incident and reflected pulses. We demonstrate our method for nonlinear compression of a pulse reflected from a fiber Bragg grating. The method allows us to obtain compressed pulses with a very low wing intensity.

  8. Relativistic laser pulse focusing and self-compression in stratified plasma-vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karle, Ch.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2008-12-15

    Laser pulse compression in plasma-vacuum systems is investigated in the weakly relativistic regime. First, within one-dimensional hydrodynamic models, the basic features of propagation in plasmas, like width and amplitude changes, are demonstrated. The numerical findings can be interpreted, in part, a by simplified model based on the variation of action method. Since transverse effects like filamentation do play a significant role, the numerical evaluations are then generalized to two-dimensional situations. An approximate analytical criterion for the dominating transverse wave number during laser propagation in plasmas is presented. Finite plasma-vacuum systems show in addition to the filamentation instability the so-called plasma lens effect. The latter is first demonstrated for a single plasma layer. It is then discussed how (i) longitudinal and transversal self-compression in plasmas, (ii) focusing by a plasma layer, and (iii) cleaning of unstable modes compete with each other in layered plasma-vacuum systems. Depending on the available parameters, optimized plasma-vacuum systems are proposed for pulse compression. Such systems can be used as a substitute for hollow fibers which are in use to shorten a pulse. Pulse lengths of one or two cycles can be reached by optimized plasma-vacuum systems, while attaining ultrarelativistic intensities in the focal spot behind the system of layers.

  9. Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshnay, N. K.; Singh, A.; Benerji, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression suitable for material processing applications are presented here. The laser incorporates in-built compact gas circulation and gas cooling to ensure fresh gas mixture between the electrodes for repetitive operation. A magnetically coupled tangential blower is used for gas circulation inside the laser chamber for repetitive operation. The exciter consists of C-C energy transfer circuit and thyratron is used as a high-voltage main switch with single-stage magnetic pulse compression (MPC) between thyratron and the laser electrodes. Low inductance of the laser head and uniform and intense pre-ionization are the main features of the electric circuit used in the laser. A 250 ns rise time voltage pulse was compressed to 100 ns duration with a single-stage magnetic pulse compressor using Ni-Zn ferrite cores. The laser can generate about 150 mJ at ˜100 Hz rep-rate reliably from a discharge volume of 100 cm 3. 2D spatial laser beam profile generated is presented here. The profile shows that the laser beam is completely filled with flat-top which is suitable for material processing applications. The SEM image of the microhole generated on copper target is presented here.

  10. Thermal transport in shock wave–compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ~25 GPa and ~1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  11. Thermal transport in shock wave–compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-15

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ∼25 GPa and ∼1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  12. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  13. Inspection of high-attenuation and high-noise materials using ultrasonic pulse compression technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, P.

    1996-12-31

    Within a highly attenuating material, it is often difficult to identify relevant target signals due to the system`s white noise that is elevated by high gain settings on a conventional ultrasonic system. Ultrasonic pulse compression technique resolves such problem. The ultrasonic pulse compression technique permits an ultrasonic system to operate with long transmitted pulses for an increased detection range, but without sacrificing the depth resolution by signal correlation. The data contains 2048 points sampled at 40 nsec interval using 256 bits long and 100 nsec wide (single bit) Golay codes. Typical pulse compression systems transmit random or pseudorandom codes such as Barker code, maximal-length sequence, and linear FM chirp. And the configuration of such systems varies depending upon the type of code and its generation and processing methodology. However, such systems suffer from inherent limitation, called self noise or range sidelobes when finite integration time limits are used to approximate the signal correlation. To reduce the self noise to a tolerable level, Center for NDE, Iowa State University, has implemented a set of complementary binary codes, known as Golay codes, into a laboratory prototype pulse compression system. Golay code is a set of complementary series of the same length, each has its own auto-correlation having one main response, but the relative polarities are opposite except the main peak. So, if these two correlation results are added, the main response doubles and all others cancel. These characteristics of the Golay codes allow us to obtain a correlated signal of an enhanced SNR without the range sidelobe that is normally produced in other random or pseudorandom codes.

  14. Two techniques for temporal pulse compression in gas-filled hollow-core kagomé photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Travers, J C; Joly, N Y; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate temporal pulse compression in gas-filled kagomé hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using two different approaches: fiber-mirror compression based on self-phase modulation under normal dispersion, and soliton effect self-compression under anomalous dispersion with a decreasing pressure gradient. In the first, efficient compression to near-transform-limited pulses from 103 to 10.6 fs was achieved at output energies of 10.3 μJ. In the second, compression from 24 to 6.8 fs was achieved at output energies of 6.6 μJ, also with near-transform-limited pulse shapes. The results illustrate the potential of kagomé-PCF for postprocessing the output of fiber lasers. We also show that, using a negative pressure gradient, ultrashort pulses can be delivered directly into vacuum.

  15. Soliton compression to few-cycle pulses with a high quality factor by engineering cascaded quadratic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianglong; Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2012-11-19

    We propose an efficient approach to improve few-cycle soliton compression with cascaded quadratic nonlinearities by using an engineered multi-section structure of the nonlinear crystal. By exploiting engineering of the cascaded quadratic nonlinearities, in each section soliton compression with a low effective order is realized, and high-quality few-cycle pulses with large compression factors are feasible. Each subsequent section is designed so that the compressed pulse exiting the previous section experiences an overall effective self-defocusing cubic nonlinearity corresponding to a modest soliton order, which is kept larger than unity to ensure further compression. This is done by increasing the cascaded quadratic nonlinearity in the new section with an engineered reduced residual phase mismatch. The low soliton orders in each section ensure excellent pulse quality and high efficiency. Numerical results show that compressed pulses with less than three-cycle duration can be achieved even when the compression factor is very large, and in contrast to standard soliton compression, these compressed pulses have minimal pedestal and high quality factor.

  16. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  17. Ultrafast tilting of the dispersion of a photonic crystal and adiabatic spectral compression of light pulses.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Daryl M; Krauss, Thomas F; Kuipers, L; Kampfrath, Tobias

    2012-01-20

    We demonstrate, by theory and experiment, the ultrafast tilting of the dispersion curve of a photonic-crystal waveguide following the absorption of a femtosecond pump pulse. By shaping the pump-beam cross section with a nanometric shadow mask, different waveguide eigenmodes acquire different spatial overlap with the perturbing pump, leading to a local flattening of the dispersion by up to 11%. We find that such partial mode perturbation can be used to adiabatically compress the spectrum of a light pulse traveling through the waveguide.

  18. Spectral broadening and compression of high-intensity laser pulses in quasi-periodic systems with Kerr nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, Sergei N; Koposova, E V; Yashin, V E

    2012-11-30

    We report the results of theoretical studies and numerical simulations of optical high-power pulse compression systems based on the spectral broadening in a Kerr nonlinear medium with subsequent pulse compression in a dispersive delay line. It is shown that the effective spectral broadening requires suppressing a smallscale instability arising due to self-focusing, which is possible in quasi-periodic systems consisting of a nonlinear medium and optical relay telescopes transmitting images of the laser beam through the system. The numerical calculations have shown the possibility of broadening the spectrum, followed by 15-fold pulse compression until the instability is excited. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  19. Analysis of LAPAN-IPB image lossless compression using differential pulse code modulation and huffman coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, P. R.; Permala, R.

    2017-01-01

    LAPAN-A3/IPB satellite is the latest Indonesian experimental microsatellite with remote sensing and earth surveillance missions. The satellite has three optical payloads, which are multispectral push-broom imager, digital matrix camera and video camera. To increase data transmission efficiency, the multispectral imager data can be compressed using either lossy or lossless compression method. This paper aims to analyze Differential Pulse Code Modulation (DPCM) method and Huffman coding that are used in LAPAN-IPB satellite image lossless compression. Based on several simulation and analysis that have been done, current LAPAN-IPB lossless compression algorithm has moderate performance. There are several aspects that can be improved from current configuration, which are the type of DPCM code used, the type of Huffman entropy-coding scheme, and the use of sub-image compression method. The key result of this research shows that at least two neighboring pixels should be used for DPCM calculation to increase compression performance. Meanwhile, varying Huffman tables with sub-image approach could also increase the performance if on-board computer can support for more complicated algorithm. These results can be used as references in designing Payload Data Handling System (PDHS) for an upcoming LAPAN-A4 satellite.

  20. Design and fabrication of transmission gratings with high diffraction efficiency for pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoming; Chen, Xinrong; Li, Lin; Li, Xiaoyang; Zha, Hang; Yu, Jian; Hu, Zuyuan; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-11-01

    Fused silica transmission grating plays an important role in the ultra-short laser pulse compression system. Fused silica transmission grating have the advantages of high diffraction efficiency, high damage threshold, long life and no shelter. The design and fabrication of pulse compression grating are investigated theoretically and experimentally in this paper. Rigorous coupled wave theory is used for design transmission grating with trapezoidal structure. The trapezoidal structure has better diffraction efficiency than that of the rectangular structure. The deep-etched fused silica transmission grating (1250lp/mm) is fabricated by holographic recording and ion beam etching. The aperture of transmission grating is Φ65mm, and its thickness is 1mm.The absolute -1st diffraction efficiency is about to 98%(@808nm). Experimental results are coincident with the theoretical analysis.

  1. Pulse Compression Degradation Due to Open Loop Adaptive Cancellation. Part 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-23

    An exact expression for the perturbed range sidelobe level of a compressed pulse that has been preprocessed through an adaptive canceller is derived...good approximate expression is also obtained for evaluating the perturbed range sidelobe level. This report derives the number of independent samples per...channel (main and auxiliaries) necessary so that the average adaptive range sidelobe level is within 3 dB of the quiescent range sidelobe level

  2. Efficient hollow fiber compression scheme for generating multi-mJ, carrier-envelope phase stable, sub-5 fs pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Malvache, A.; Ricci, A.; Jullien, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.

    2011-01-01

    We show that a standard hollow-core fiber (HCF) compressor device can be used to efficiently compress multi-mJ energy laser pulses down to few-cycle duration, when seeded with linearly chirped, circularly polarized pulses. With this approach, we routinely generate carrier-envelope phase (CEP)-locked, 1.6 mJ, 4.8 fs pulses using only 3 mJ, 25 fs pulses as the seed.

  3. New Binary Complementary Codes Compressing a Pulse to a Width of Several Sub-pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-14

    Department of Computer and Information Engineering , Nippon Institute of Technology 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro, Saitama-ken, 345-8501 Japan 8. PERFORMING...codes pressed to several sub-pulses,” Trans. IEICE of Japan (in Japanese), . J85 -B, no.8, pp.1434-1444, Aug. 2002. akasugi and S.Fukao, “Sidelobe

  4. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-12-30

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  5. Picosecond pulses compression at 1053-nm center wavelength by using a gas-filled hollow-core fiber compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ding; Leng, Yu-Xin; Dai, Ye

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of picosecond pulses with 10-mJ of input energy at the 1053-nm center wavelength by using a one-meter-long gas-filled hollow-core fiber (HCF) compressor and considering the third-order dispersion (TOD) effect. It is found that when the input pulse is about 1 ps/10 mJ, it can be compressed down to less than 20 fs with a high transmission efficiency. The gas for optimal compression is krypton gas which is filled in a HCF with a 400-μm inner diameter. When the input pulse duration is increased to 5 ps, it can also be compressed down to less than 100 fs efficiently under proper conditions. The results show that the TOD effect has little impact on picosecond pulse compression and the HCF compressor can be applied on compressing picosecond pulses efficiently with a high compression ratio, which will benefit the research of high-field laser physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204328, 61221064, 61078037, 11127901, and 11134010), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), the Commission of Science and Technology of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 12dz1100700), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 13ZR1414800), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2011DFA11300).

  6. Proceedings of the International Magnetic Pulse Compression Workshop. Volume 2: Technical summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high average power handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  7. Nonlinear optical compression of high-power 10-μm CO2 laser pulses in gases and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, Jeremy; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chan

    2017-03-01

    We review a series of experiments on nonlinear optical compression of high-power, picosecond, 10-µm CO2 laser pulses. Presented schemes include self-phase modulation in a Xe-filled hollow glass waveguide, self-phase modulation in GaAs followed by compression, and multiple four-wave mixing compression of a laser beat-wave in GaAs. The novel nonlinear optics and technical challenges uncovered through these experiments are discussed.

  8. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  9. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  10. Adiabat shape Laser Pulses for ablation front instability control and high fuel compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    At the end of the NIC campaign a large body of experimental evidence showed that the point-design implosions driven by low-adiabat pulses had a high degree of mix. To reduce instability a high-adiabat (~3 × higher picket drive) design was fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experimental results from this campaign have shown considerable improvement in performance (10 × neutron yields) over the point design with little evidence of mix. However, the adiabat of the implosions may be too high to achieve ignition for the available laser energy. To overcome this difficulty, and to take advantage of the high-picket drives, we have developed hybrid laser pulses that combined the virtue of both designs. These pulses can be thought of achieving adiabat shaping, where the ablator is set in a higher adiabat for instability control, while the fuel is maintained at a lower adiabat favoring higher fuel compression. Using these pulses, recent experiments at the NIF have indeed shown reduced growth rates. In this talk we will present the design of high-yield low-growth DT ignition experiments using these adiabat-shaped pulses. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Pulse compression degradation due to open loop adaptive cancellation, part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Karl

    1991-08-01

    An exact expression for the perturbed range sidelobe level of a compressed pulse that has been preprocessed through an adaptive canceller is derived. This result is a generalization of past research (parts 1 and 2, NRL Reports 9107 and 9309) where the signal was assumed to be completely contained within the canceller's processing batch. In this report, we allow the signal to extend over an arbitrary number of canceller processing batches. A good approximate expression is also obtained for evaluating the perturbed range sidelobe level. This report derives the number of independent samples per channel (main and auxiliaries) necessary so that the average adaptive range sidelobe level is within 3 dB of the quiescent range sidelobe level. Furthermore, the same analysis is used to predict the canceller noise power level that is induced by the desired signal's presence in the canceller weight calculation. Placement of the pulse compressor before or after the canceller is also considered. It Is shown that if the desired waveform's code length L is less than or equal to the canceller's processing batch width K, it is desirable to place the pulse compression after the adaptive canceller. If L greater than K, then the issue is not so clear-cut, and a trade-off study is necessary.

  12. The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator's RF Pulse Compression And Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Adelphson, C.; Holmes, S.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Nantista, C.; Pearson, C.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    The overmoded rf transmission and pulsed power compression system for SLAC's Next Linear Collider (NLC) program requires a high degree of transmission efficiency and mode purity to be economically feasible. To this end, a number of new, high power components and systems have been developed at X-band, which transmit rf power in the low loss, circular TE01 mode with negligible mode conversion. In addition, a highly efficient SLED-II* pulse compressor has been developed and successfully tested at high power. The system produced a 200 MW, 250 ns wide pulse with a near-perfect flat-top. In this paper we describe the design and test results of the high power pulse compression system using SLED-II. The NLC rf systems use low loss highly over-moded circular waveguides operating in the TE01 mode. The efficiency of the systems is sensitive to the mode purity of the mode excited inside these guides. We used the so called flower petal mode transducer [2] to excite the TE01 mode. This type of mode transducer is efficient, compact and capable of handling high levels of power. To make more efficient systems, we modified this device by adding several mode selective chokes to act as mode purifiers. To manipulate the rf signals we used these modified mode converters to convert back and forth between over-moded circular waveguides and single-moded WR90 rectangular waveguides. Then, we used the relatively simple rectangular waveguide components to do the actual manipulation of rf signals. For example, two mode transducers and a mitered rectangular waveguide bend comprise a 90 degree bend. Also, a magic tee and four mode transducers would comprise a four-port-hybrid, etc. We will discuss the efficiency of an rf transport system based on the above methodology. We also used this methodology in building the SLEDII pulse compression system. At SLAC we built 4 of these pulse systems. In this paper we describe the SLEDII system and compare the performance of these 4 systems at SLAC. We

  13. Pulse compression technique for simultaneous HIFU surgery and ultrasonic imaging: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Chang, Jin Ho; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    In an ultrasound image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) surgery, reflected HIFU waves received by an imaging transducer should be suppressed for real-time simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of pulse compression scheme combined with notch filtering in order to minimize these HIFU interference signals. A chirp signal modulated by the Dolph-Chebyshev window with 3–9 MHz frequency sweep range is used for B-mode imaging and 4 MHz continuous wave is used for HIFU. The second order infinite impulse response notch filters are employed to suppress reflected HIFU waves whose center frequencies are 4 MHz and 8 MHz. The prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer that composed of three rectangular elements with a spherically con-focused aperture was fabricated. The center element has the ability to transmit and receive 6 MHz imaging signals and two outer elements are only used for transmitting 4 MHz continuous HIFU wave. When the chirp signal and 4 MHz HIFU wave are simultaneously transmitted to the target, the reflected chirp signals mixed with 4 MHz and 8 MHz HIFU waves are detected by the imaging transducer. After the application of notch filtering with pulse compression process, HIFU interference waves in this mixed signal are significantly reduced while maintaining original imaging signal. In the single scanline test using a strong reflector, the amplitude of the reflected HIFU wave is reduced to −45 dB. In vitro test, with a sliced porcine muscle shows that the speckle pattern of the restored B-mode image is close to that of the original image. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for the pulse compression scheme with notch filtering to achieve real-time ultrasound image-guided HIFU surgery. PMID:22356771

  14. Intense optical pulse compression with gas-filled hollow-core fibers and bulk materials in anomalous dispersion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding; Leng, Yuxin

    2013-10-01

    We numerically study the propagation dynamics and compression of ultrashort laser pulses in a hollow-core fiber (HCF) filled with noble gases at different carrier wavelengths from 1.8 μm to 3.9 μm. In the optimal parameter range, single-cycle or even sub-cycle pulses with clean spatial and temporal profiles can be obtained due to chirp compensation beyond 3rd order by bulk material. It is found that the intensity-dependent group velocity sets the upper limits on both the gas pressures and input pulse energies if a clean and well-compressed pulse is required only through compression with bulk materials. In order to use higher gas pressures and larger input energies, two ways are demonstrated to deal with the limitations imposed by the intensity-dependent group velocity.

  15. Sub 25 fs pulses from solid-core nonlinear compression stage at 250 W of average power.

    PubMed

    Jocher, Christoph; Eidam, Tino; Hädrich, Steffen; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    We report on a highpower femtosecond fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with an excellent beam quality (M(2)=1.2) operating at 250 MHz repetition rate. We demonstrate nonlinear compression in a solid-core photonic crystal fiber at unprecedented average power levels. By exploiting self-phase modulation with subsequent chirped-mirror compression we achieve pulse shortening by more than one order of magnitude to 23 fs pulses. The use of circular polarization allows higher than usual peak powers in the broadening fiber resulting in compressed 0.9 μJ pulse energy and a peak power of 34 MW at 250 W of average power (M(2)=1.3). This system is well suited for driving cavity-enhanced high-repetition rate high-harmonic generation.

  16. Application of magnetic pulse compression to the grid system of the ETA/ATA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Cook, E.G.; Reginato, L.L.; Schmidt, J.A.; Smith, M.W.

    1982-11-02

    During the past year, several magnetic pulse compression systems have been built and applied to the ETA accelerator. In view of their excellent performance, a non-linear magnetic system has been adopted for the ATA grid drive in place of the spark gap driven Blumlein. The magnetic system will give us a much higher reliability and greater flexibility by being independent of the high pressure gas blown system. A further advantage of this system will be the capability of achieving higher rep-rates in case of a future upgrade. System design and performance under burst mode will be described.

  17. Weakly relativistic and ponderomotive effects on self-focusing and self-compression of laser pulses in near critical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-10-15

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of high power laser pulses in near critical plasmas are studied taking in to account the effects of relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the effects of initial parameters such as laser intensity, plasma density, and plasma electron temperature on the self-compression mechanism are discussed. The results illustrate that the ponderomotive nonlinearity obstructs the relativistic self-compression above a certain intensity value. Moreover, the results indicate the existence of the turning point temperature in which the compression process has its strongest strength. Next, the three-dimensional analysis of laser pulse propagation is investigated by coupling the self-focusing equation with the self-compression one. It is shown that in contrast to the case in which the only relativistic nonlinearity is considered, in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity, the self-compression mechanism obstructs the self-focusing and leads to an increase of the laser spot size.

  18. Nonlinear compression of an ultrashort-pulse thulium-based fiber laser to sub-70  fs in Kagome photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M; Gaida, C; Hädrich, S; Stutzki, F; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2015-06-15

    Nonlinear pulse compression of ultrashort pulses is an established method for reducing the pulse duration and increasing the pulse peak power beyond the intrinsic limits of a given laser architecture. In this proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate nonlinear compression of the pulses emitted by a high-repetition-rate thulium-based fiber CPA system. The initial pulse duration of about 400 fs has been shortened to <70  fs with 19.7 μJ of pulse energy, which corresponds to about 200 MW of pulse peak power.

  19. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  20. Sub-Nyquist sampling and detection in Costas coded pulse compression radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanif, Adnan; Mansoor, Atif Bin; Imran, Ali Shariq

    2016-12-01

    Modern pulse compression radar involves digital signal processing of high bandwidth pulses modulated with different coding schemes. One of the limiting factors in the radar's design to achieve desired target range and resolution is the need of high rate analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion fulfilling the Nyquist sampling criteria. The high sampling rates necessitate huge storage capacity, more power consumption, and extra processing requirement. We introduce a new approach to sample wideband radar waveform modulated with Costas sequence at a sub-Nyquist rate based upon the concept of compressive sensing (CS). Sub-Nyquist measurements of Costas sequence waveform are performed in an analog-to-information (A/I) converter based upon random demodulation replacing traditional A/D converter. The novel work presents an 8-order Costas coded waveform with sub-Nyquist sampling and its reconstruction. The reconstructed waveform is compared with the conventionally sampled signal and depicts high-quality signal recovery from sub-Nyquist sampled signal. Furthermore, performance of CS-based detections after reconstruction are evaluated in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and compared with conventional Nyquist-rate matched filtering scheme.

  1. An all solid-state high-voltage ns trigger generator based on magnetic pulse compression and transmission line transformer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiajin; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiande; Chen, Xinbing

    2013-09-01

    Innovative design of an all solid-state high-voltage ns trigger generator, based on magnetic pulse compression and transmission line transformer, is presented. The repetitive trigger pulse generator was developed to trigger a 700 kV trigatron, which has been used to pulse a repetitive intense electron beam accelerator with Tesla transformer charged double pulse forming lines (PFLs). Experimental results show that the trigger pulse generator could produce 180 kV 65 ns duration pulses with a rise time of 20 ns. The repetitive trigger pulses have nice uniform in the voltage waveform. The control time jitter is less then 3 ns. Owing to its good stability and low time jitter, the high-voltage trigger generator is an excellent candidate to trigger the repetitive accelerator.

  2. Active pulse synchronization for OPCPA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueffing, Moritz; Metzger, Thomas; Deng, Yunpei; Schwarz, Alexander; Krausz, Ferenc; Kienberger, Reinhard

    2011-05-01

    The parametric amplification in nonlinear crystals requires both spacial and temporal stability of pump and seed pulses to attain stability of the amplified pulse. Especially the development of thin disk pump sources with pulse lengths down to 2 ps requires a temporal stability well beyond 100 fs . To reduce the timing shifts between pump and seed pulses in OPCPA systems we introduce a novel, active pulse synchronization system combining a high precision translation stage and a piezo-electric driven mirror. The timing jitter reduction of OPCPAs with kHz repetition rate demands a fast detection system allowing nearly shot to shot correction. Therefore the spectrum of a cross-correlation between the 1030 nm , 1 nm bandwidth pump and a broad bandwidth Ti:Sa seed pulse stretched to 10 ps in a BBO crystal is directly and in real time measured using a position sensitive detector. This method can easily be adopted to other OPA/OPCPA systems giving the chance to correct not only for slow drifts but also for fluctuations up to 300 Hz .

  3. Compression of fiber supercontinuum pulses to the Fourier-limit in a high-numerical-aperture focus

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    A multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS) adaptively and automatically compensates the combined phase distortion from a fiber supercontinuum source, a spatial light modulator pulse shaper, and a high-NA microscope objective, allowing Fourier-transform-limited compression of the supercontinuum pulses at the focus of the objective. A second-harmonic-generation-based method is employed to independently validate the transform-limited compression. The compressed pulses at the focus of the objective have a tunable duration of 10.8–38.9 fs (FWHM), a central wavelength of ~1020 nm, an average power of 18–70 mW, and a repetition rate of 76 MHz, permitting the application of this source to nonlinear optical microscopy and coherently controlled microspectroscopy. PMID:21686005

  4. High Sensitivity EMAT System using Chirp Pulse Compression and Its Application to Crater End Detection in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Y.; Awajiya, Y.

    2014-06-01

    A high sensitivity EMAT system using chirp pulse compression technique was developed. The system uses a high power gated amplifier having 2kVpp output to transmit chirp waves. Pulse compression of the received signals are performed digitally in a PC after amplification and analog-to-digital conversion. A 20dB improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved by chirp pulse compression and synchronous averaging. A new surface cooling technique was also developed to improve the signal amplitude of the bulk shear wave with hot steel, and its effectiveness was demonstrated. An actual plant test of crater end detection by the developed EMAT system was conducted at a continuous caster, and clear detection by non-contact EMATs was achieved.

  5. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  6. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  7. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  8. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  9. Ion acceleration by petawatt class laser pulses and pellet compression in a fast ignition scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, C.; Londrillo, P.; Liseykina, T. V.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Turchetti, G.

    2009-07-01

    Ion drivers based on standard acceleration techniques have faced up to now several difficulties. We consider here a conceptual alternative to more standard schemes, such as HIDIF (Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion), which are still beyond the present state of the art of particle accelerators, even though the requirements on the total beam energy are lowered by fast ignition scenarios. The new generation of petawatt class lasers open new possibilities: acceleration of electrons or protons for the fast ignition and eventually light or heavy ions acceleration for compression. The pulses of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers allow ions acceleration with very high efficiency at reachable intensities ( I˜1021 W/cm2), if circularly polarized light is used since we enter in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) regime. We analyze the possibility of accelerating carbon ion bunches by interaction of a circularly polarized pulses with an ultra-thin target. The advantage would be compactness and modularity, due to identical accelerating units. The laser efficiency required to have an acceptable net gain in the inertial fusion process is still far from the presently achievable values both for CPA short pulses and for long pulses used for direct illumination. Conversely the energy conversion efficiency from the laser pulse to the ion bunch is high and grows with the intensity. As a consequence the energy loss is not the major concern. For a preliminary investigation of the ions bunch production we have used the PIC code ALaDyn developed to analyze the results of the INFN-CNR PLASMONX experiment at Frascati National Laboratories (Rome, Italy) where the 0.3 PW laser FLAME will accelerate electrons and protons. We present the results of some 1D simulations and parametric scan concerning the acceleration of carbon ions that we suppose to be fully ionized. Circularly polarized laser pulses of 50 J and 50-100 fs duration, illuminating a 100 μm2 area of a 20 nm thick carbon

  10. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.

    2010-06-01

    Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 - 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs) [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction) of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1). The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa), a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the particulate

  11. Optimization design and laser damage threshold analysis of pulse compression multilayer dielectric gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuwei; Bai, Liang; Chen, Nana

    2016-08-01

    As one of the key elements of high-power laser systems, the pulse compression multilayer dielectric grating is required for broader band, higher diffraction efficiency and higher damage threshold. In this paper, the multilayer dielectric film and the multilayer dielectric gratings(MDG) were designed by eigen matrix and optimized with the help of generic algorithm and rigorous coupled wave method. The reflectivity was close to 100% and the bandwith were over 250nm, twice compared to the unoptimized film structure. The simulation software of standing wave field distribution within MDG was developed and the electric field of the MDG was calculated. And the key parameters which affected the electric field distribution were also studied.

  12. Analysis of Doppler Effect on the Pulse Compression of Different Codes Emitted by an Ultrasonic LPS

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, José A.; Aguilera, Teodoro; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Lozano, Jesús; Morera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This work analyses the effect of the receiver movement on the detection by pulse compression of different families of codes characterizing the emissions of an Ultrasonic Local Positioning System. Three families of codes have been compared: Kasami, Complementary Sets of Sequences and Loosely Synchronous, considering in all cases three different lengths close to 64, 256 and 1,024 bits. This comparison is first carried out by using a system model in order to obtain a set of results that are then experimentally validated with the help of an electric slider that provides radial speeds up to 2 m/s. The performance of the codes under analysis has been characterized by means of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation bounds. The results derived from this study should be of interest to anyone performing matched filtering of ultrasonic signals with a moving emitter/receiver. PMID:22346670

  13. On the Theory of High-Power Ultrashort Pulse Propagation in Raman-Active Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belenov, E. M.; Isakov, V. A.; Kanavin, A. P.; Smetanin, I. V.

    1996-01-01

    The propagation of an intense femtosecond pulse in a Raman-active medium is analyzed. An analytic solution which describes in explicit form the evolution of the light pulse is derived. The field of an intense light wave undergoes a substantial transformation as the wave propagates through the medium. The nature of this transformation can change over time scales comparable to the period of the optical oscillations. As a result, the pulse of sufficiently high energy divides into stretched and compressed domains where the field decreases and increases respectively.

  14. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing,more » both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.« less

  15. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing, both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.

  16. Advances in Isentropic Compression Experiments (ICE) Using High Explosive Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; Oona, H.; Fowler, C. M.; King, J. C.; Herrera, D.; Torres, D.

    2004-07-01

    We are developing a prototype high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to obtain isentropic Equation of State (EOS) data with the Asay technique. Our prototype system comprises a flat-plate explosive driven magnetic flux compression generator (FCG), an explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switch, and a series of explosively-actuated closing switches. The FCG is capable of producing ˜10 MA into suitable loads, and, at a length of 216 mm, the EFF will sustain voltages in excess of 200 kV. The load has an inductance of ˜3 to 10 nH, allowing up to ˜7 MA to be delivered in times of ˜0.5 μs. This prototype will produce isentropic compression profiles in excess of 2 Mbar in a material such as tungsten. We will obtain isentropic EOS data for copper at pressures up to ˜1.5 Mbar with the prototype system, immediately after this conference; eventually we plan to reach several tens of Mbar with larger, more advanced systems.

  17. Sub-phonon-period compression of electron pulses for atomic diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Gliserin, A.; Walbran, M.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the rearrangement of atoms in a wide range of molecular and condensed-matter systems requires resolving picometre displacements on a 10-fs timescale, which is achievable using pump–probe diffraction, given short enough pulses. Here we demonstrate the compression of single-electron pulses with a de Broglie wavelength of 0.08 ångström to a full-width at half-maximum duration of 28 fs or equivalently 12-fs root-mean square, substantially shorter than most phonon periods and molecular normal modes. Atomic resolution diffraction from a complex organic molecule is obtained with good signal-to-noise ratio within a data acquisition period of minutes. The electron-laser timing is found to be stable within 5 fs (s.d.) over several hours, allowing pump–probe diffraction at repetitive excitation. These measurements show the feasibility of laser-pump/electron-probe scans that can resolve the fastest atomic motions relevant in reversible condensed-matter transformations and organic chemistry. PMID:26502750

  18. High-quality pulse compression in a novel architecture based on a single-mode fiber cascading a nonlinear optical loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-zhao; Song, Jian-xun; Zhang, Geng; Liu, Min-xia; Ling, Dong-xiong

    2016-07-01

    A novel all-fiber low-pedestal pulse compression scheme is proposed and investigated. The scheme is based on an anomalously dispersive single-mode fiber (SMF) cascading a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) with another anomalously dispersive SMF in the loop. Numerical results show that excellent pulse compression and pedestal reduction can be achieved by using the proposed scheme.

  19. Compression of 200 GHz DWDM channelized TDM pulsed carrier from optically modelocking WRC-FPLD fiber ring at 10 GHz.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chan; Peng, Guo-Hsuan; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2009-03-30

    The compression of 200GHz DWDM channelized optically mode-locking WRC-FPLD fiber ring pulse of at 10 GHz is performed for high-capacity TDM application. To prevent temporal and spectral cross-talk, the duty-cycle of the DWDM channelized WRC-FPLD FL pulse needs to be shortened without broadening its linewidth. With dual-cavity configuration induced DWDM channelization, a shortest single-channel WRC-FPLD FL pulsewidth of 19 ps is generated, which can be linearly compensated to 10 ps and fifth-order soliton compressed to 1.4 ps. Under a maximum pulsewidth compression ratio up to 14 and a +/-100 m tolerance on compressing fiber length, the single-channel pulsewidth remains <2 ps (duty-cycle <2%) with spectral linewidth only broadening from 0.29 nm to 0.8 nm. In comparison, a typical SOAFL without intra-cavity TBF in fiber ring broadens its spectral linewidth from 2.4 to 3.8 nm after compressing its mode-locked pulsewidth from 21 to 2.1 ps. The duty-cycle of the DWDM channelized WRC-FPLD FL pulsed carrier is approaching 1% to satisfy at least 256 optical TDM channels.

  20. Comparison of the filamentation and the hollow-core fibercharacteristics for pulse compression into the few-cycle regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmann, L.; Pfeifer, T.; Nagel, P.M.; Abel, M.J.; Neumark,D.M.; Leone, S.R.

    2006-10-23

    The gas-filled hollow-core fiber compression and the opticalfilamentation technique are compared experimentally in a parameter regimesuitable for intense few-cycle pulse generation. In particular, pointingstability, spectral properties, and spatial chirp are investigated. It isfound that in the case of filamentation, the critical parameter forpointing stability is gas pressure inside the generation cell whereas forthe hollow-core fiber it is alignment that plays this role. Thehollow-core fiber technique yields spectra that are better suited forchirped-mirror pulse compression whereas filamentation offers higherthroughput and prospects for easy-to-implement self-compression. Wepresent spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-fieldreconstruction (SPIDER) measurements that directly show the transition inthe spectral phase of the output continua into the self-compressionregime as the gas pressure is increased.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  2. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk.

    PubMed

    Shumakova, V; Malevich, P; Ališauskas, S; Voronin, A; Zheltikov, A M; Faccio, D; Kartashov, D; Baltuška, A; Pugžlys, A

    2016-09-13

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air.

  3. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumakova, V.; Malevich, P.; Ališauskas, S.; Voronin, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Faccio, D.; Kartashov, D.; Baltuška, A.; Pugžlys, A.

    2016-09-01

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air.

  4. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Shumakova, V.; Malevich, P.; Ališauskas, S.; Voronin, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Faccio, D.; Kartashov, D.; Baltuška, A.; Pugžlys, A.

    2016-01-01

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air. PMID:27620117

  5. Implementing and diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed power accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Bliss, David E.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Martin, Matthew R.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Slutz, Stephen A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Awe, Thomas James; Hess, M. H.; Lemke, Raymond W.; Dolan, D. H.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Jobe, Marc Ronald Lee; Fang, Lu; Hahn, Kelly D.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Maurer, A. J.; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Cuneo, Michael E.; Sinars, Daniel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Smith, Gary; Paguio, Reny; Intrator, Tom; Weber, Thomas; Greenly, John

    2015-11-01

    We report on the progress made to date for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator (0-20 MA in 100 ns). Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using the Z accelerator's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, B z ( 0 ) , supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by B z ( t ) = B z ( 0 ) x [ R ( 0 ) / R ( t )] 2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, B z ( t ) and dB z / dt values exceeding 10 4 T and 10 12 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report on our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes to measure the fringe fields associated with flux compression, (2) streaked visible Zeeman absorption spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We also mention two new techniques that make use of the neutron diagnostics suite on Z. These techniques were not developed under this LDRD, but they could influence how we prioritize our efforts to diagnose magnetic flux compression on Z in the future. The first technique is based on the yield ratio of secondary DT to primary DD reactions. The second technique makes use of the secondary DT neutron time-of-flight energy spectra. Both of these techniques have been used successfully to infer the degree of magnetization at stagnation in fully integrated Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z [P. F. Schmit et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 155004 (2014); P. F. Knapp et al. , Phys. Plasmas, 22 , 056312 (2015)]. Finally, we present some recent developments for designing

  6. Direct measurement of magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Bliss, D. E.; Martin, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Lamppa, D. C.; Dolan, D. H.; Lemke, R. W.; Rovang, D. C.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for directly measuring magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid aluminum liner (a cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-20-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz(t) =Bz (0)×[R(0)/R(t)]2, where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields directly. We report on our latest efforts to do so using a fiber-optic-based Faraday rotation diagnostic, where the magneto-active portion of the sensor is made from terbium-doped optical fiber. We have now used this diagnostic to measure a flux-compressed magnetic field to over 600 T prior to the imploding liner hitting the on-axis fiber housing. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. High-Average-Power Diffraction Pulse-Compression Gratings Enabling Next-Generation Ultrafast Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, D.

    2016-11-01

    Pulse compressors for ultrafast lasers have been identified as a technology gap in the push towards high peak power systems with high average powers for industrial and scientific applications. Gratings for ultrashort (sub-150fs) pulse compressors are metallic and can absorb a significant percentage of laser energy resulting in up to 40% loss as well as thermal issues which degrade on-target performance. We have developed a next generation gold grating technology which we have scaled to the petawatt-size. This resulted in improvements in efficiency, uniformity and processing as compared to previous substrate etched gratings for high average power. This new design has a deposited dielectric material for the grating ridge rather than etching directly into the glass substrate. It has been observed that average powers as low as 1W in a compressor can cause distortions in the on-target beam. We have developed and tested a method of actively cooling diffraction gratings which, in the case of gold gratings, can support a petawatt peak power laser with up to 600W average power. We demonstrated thermo-mechanical modeling of a grating in its use environment and benchmarked with experimental measurement. Multilayer dielectric (MLD) gratings are not yet used for these high peak power, ultrashort pulse durations due to their design challenges. We have designed and fabricated broad bandwidth, low dispersion MLD gratings suitable for delivering 30 fs pulses at high average power. This new grating design requires the use of a novel Out Of Plane (OOP) compressor, which we have modeled, designed, built and tested. This prototype compressor yielded a transmission of 90% for a pulse with 45 nm bandwidth, and free of spatial and angular chirp. In order to evaluate gratings and compressors built in this project we have commissioned a joule-class ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser system. Combining the grating cooling and MLD technologies developed here could enable petawatt laser systems to

  8. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  9. X-Band Active-Passive Rf Pulse Compressor with Plasma Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A.L.; Ivanov, O.A.; Gorbachev, A.M.; Lobaev, M.A.; Isaev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Lewandowski, J.R.; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Omega-P, New Haven /Yale U.

    2012-04-27

    As proposed by SLAC, the efficiency of a pulse compressor of the SLED-II type could be increased by changing both the phase of the microwave source and the coupling coefficient of the delay line. In the existing SLED-II system at frequency 11.4 GHz, the resonant delay line is coupled with the source via an iris with a constant reflection coefficient. Replacement of the iris with an active component makes it possible to create an active SLED-II system. In this paper, the use of plasma switches as the active elements is discussed. Plasma switches have been developed and tested at a high-power level for production of flattop compressed pulses. Active switching of SLED-II has demonstrated a marked increase in efficiency (by 20%) and power gain (by 37%) as compared with passive switching. The active compressor has produced 173 ns rf flattop output pulses with a power of about 112 MW.

  10. Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) with cold compression: Cold compressor, colder expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiho; Ko, Junseok; Cha, Jeongmin; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2016-03-01

    This research paper focuses on the performance prediction and its validation via experimental investigation of a Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) equipped with a cold linear compressor. When the working gas is compressed at cryogenic temperature, the acoustic power (PV power) can be directly transmitted through the regenerator to the pulsating tube without experiencing unnecessary precooling process. The required PV power generated by the linear compressor, furthermore, can be significantly diminished due to the relatively small specific volume of the working gas at low temperature. The PTR can reach lower temperature efficiently with higher heat lift at the corresponding temperature than other typical single-stage Stirling-type PTRs. Utilizing a cryogenic reservoir as a warm end and regulating the entire operating temperature range of the PTR will enable a PTR to operate efficiently under space environment. In this research, the experimental validation as a proof of concept was carried out to demonstrate the capability of PTR operating between 80 K and 40 K. The linear compressor was submerged in a liquid nitrogen bath and the lowest temperature was measured as 38.5 K. The test results were analyzed to identify loss mechanisms with the simple numerical computation (linear model) which considers the dynamic characteristics of the cold linear compressor with thermo-hydraulic governing equations for each of sub components of the PTR. All the mass flows and pressure waves were assumed to be sinusoidal.

  11. Pulse Power Compression by Cutting a Dense Z-Pinch with a Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1999-07-01

    A thin cut made through a z-pinch by an intense laser beam can become a magnetically insulated diode crossed by an intense ion beam. For larger cuts, the gap is crossed by an intense relativistic electron beam, stopped by magnetic bremsstrahlung resulting in a pointlike intense x-ray source. In either case, the impedance of the pinch discharge is increased, with the power delivered rising in the same pro-portion. A magnetically insulated cut is advantageous for three reasons: First, with the ion current com-parable to the Alfvèn ion current, the pinch instabilities are reduced. Second, with the energy deposit-ed into fast ions, a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution is established increasing<σ ν> value for nuclear fusion reactions taking place in the pinch discharge. Third, in a high density z-pinch plasma, the intense ion beam can launch a thermonuclear detonation wave propagating along the pinch discharge channel. For larger cuts the soft x-rays produced by magnetic bremsstrahlung can be used to drive a thermonuclear hohlraum target. Finally, the proposed pulse power compression scheme permits to use a cheap low power d.c. source charging a magnetic storage coil delivering the magnetically stored energy to the pinch discharge load by an exploding wire opening switch.

  12. Frequency modulation and compression of optical pulses in an optical fibre with a travelling refractive-index wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Lapin, V A; Sementsov, D I

    2016-01-31

    We have studied the conditions for spectral broadening, frequency modulation and compression (both temporal and spectral) of Gaussian pulses propagating in a fibre with a travelling refractive-index wave. Analytical expressions have been derived for the dependences of pulse duration, chirp and spectral width on the distance travelled through the fibre, parameters of the fibre and radiation launched into it. Based on the numerical analysis we have studied the behaviour of these characteristics by changing the coefficient of the refractive-index modulation and other parameters of the travelling refractive-index wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. Compression mechanism of subpicosecond pulses by malachite green dye in passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI CW dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Takemura, H.; Tanaka, S.

    1983-04-01

    The pulse width compression effect of a malachite green (MG) dye upon subpicosecond pulses has been experimentally investigated in a CW passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI dye laser. The pulse width reduces as MG concentration increases, and reaches 0.34 ps at 1.5 X 10/sup -6/ M. By adding the MG dye, good mode locking is achieved in a rather wide pumping-power range. A computer simulation of pulse growth has also been carried out by using simple rate equations, in which the fast-recovery component of loss due to the MG dye is taken into account. The simulated results can explain some experimental results qualitatively such as pulse width compression and pumping-power restriction. The pulse width compression results essentially from the fast recovery of cavity loss caused by the MG dye.

  14. Active RF Pulse Compression using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2008-01-30

    In this paper, we will present our recent results on the research of the ultra-fast high power RF switches based on silicon. We have developed a switch module at X-band which can use a silicon window as the switch. The switching is realized by generation of carriers in the bulk silicon. The carriers can be generated electrically or/and optically. The electrically controlled switches use PIN diodes to inject carrier. We have built the PIN diode switches at X-band, with <300ns switching time. The optically controlled switches use powerful lasers to excite carriers. By combining the laser excitation and electrical carrier generation, significant reduction in the required power of both the laser and the electrical driver is expected. High power test is under going.

  15. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  16. Superfast assembly and synthesis of gold nanostructures using nanosecond low-temperature compression via magnetic pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binsong; Bian, Kaifu; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Salerno, K. Michael; Grest, Gary S.; Ao, Tommy; Hickman, Randy; Wise, Jack; Wang, Zhongwu; Fan, Hongyou

    2017-03-01

    Gold nanostructured materials exhibit important size- and shape-dependent properties that enable a wide variety of applications in photocatalysis, nanoelectronics and phototherapy. Here we show the use of superfast dynamic compression to synthesize extended gold nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires and nanosheets, with nanosecond coalescence times. Using a pulsed power generator, we ramp compress spherical gold nanoparticle arrays to pressures of tens of GPa, demonstrating pressure-driven assembly beyond the quasi-static regime of the diamond anvil cell. Our dynamic magnetic ramp compression approach produces smooth, shockless (that is, isentropic) one-dimensional loading with low-temperature states suitable for nanostructure synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy clearly establishes that various gold architectures are formed through compressive mesoscale coalescences of spherical gold nanoparticles, which is further confirmed by in-situ synchrotron X-ray studies and large-scale simulation. This nanofabrication approach applies magnetically driven uniaxial ramp compression to mimic established embossing and imprinting processes, but at ultra-short (nanosecond) timescales.

  17. Superfast assembly and synthesis of gold nanostructures using nanosecond low-temperature compression via magnetic pulsed power

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binsong; Bian, Kaifu; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Salerno, K. Michael; Grest, Gary S.; Ao, Tommy; Hickman, Randy; Wise, Jack; Wang, Zhongwu; Fan, Hongyou

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanostructured materials exhibit important size- and shape-dependent properties that enable a wide variety of applications in photocatalysis, nanoelectronics and phototherapy. Here we show the use of superfast dynamic compression to synthesize extended gold nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires and nanosheets, with nanosecond coalescence times. Using a pulsed power generator, we ramp compress spherical gold nanoparticle arrays to pressures of tens of GPa, demonstrating pressure-driven assembly beyond the quasi-static regime of the diamond anvil cell. Our dynamic magnetic ramp compression approach produces smooth, shockless (that is, isentropic) one-dimensional loading with low-temperature states suitable for nanostructure synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy clearly establishes that various gold architectures are formed through compressive mesoscale coalescences of spherical gold nanoparticles, which is further confirmed by in-situ synchrotron X-ray studies and large-scale simulation. This nanofabrication approach applies magnetically driven uniaxial ramp compression to mimic established embossing and imprinting processes, but at ultra-short (nanosecond) timescales. PMID:28300067

  18. Nonlinear simultaneous reconstruction of inhomogeneous compressibility and mass density distributions in unidirectional pulse-echo ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Markus C.; Salehi, Leili; Schmitz, Georg

    2013-09-01

    In diagnostic ultrasound imaging, the image reconstruction quality is crucial for reliable diagnosis. Applying reconstruction algorithms based on the acoustic wave equation, the obtained image quality depends significantly on the physical material parameters accounted for in the equation. In this contribution, we extend a proposed iterative nonlinear one-parameter compressibility reconstruction algorithm by the additional reconstruction of the object’s inhomogeneous mass density distribution. The improved iterative algorithm is able to reconstruct inhomogeneous maps of the object’s compressibility and mass density simultaneously using only one conventional linear transducer array at a fixed location for wave transmission and detection. The derived approach is based on an acoustic wave equation including spatial compressibility and mass density variations, and utilizes the Kaczmarz method for iterative material parameter reconstruction. We validate our algorithm numerically for an unidirectional pulse-echo breast imaging application, and thus generate simulated measurements acquired from a numerical breast phantom with realistic compressibility and mass density values. Applying these measurements, we demonstrate with two reconstruction experiments the necessity to calculate the mass density in case of tissues with significant mass density inhomogeneities. When reconstructing spatial mass density variations, artefacts in the breast’s compressibility image are reduced resulting in improved spatial resolution. Furthermore, the compressibility relative error magnitude within a diagnostically significant region of interest (ROI) decreases from 3.04% to 2.62%. Moreover, a second image showing the breast’s inhomogeneous mass density distribution is given to provide additional diagnostic information. In the compressibility image, a spatial resolution moderately higher than the classical half-wavelength limit is observed.

  19. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  20. Defect dynamics and ordering in compressible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prashant; Srivastava, Pragya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Active nematics, such as suspensions of biopolymers activated by molecular motors or bacteria swimming in passive liquid crystals, exhibit complex self-sustained flow, excitability and defect generation. Activity renders the defect themselves self-propelled particles, capable of organizing in emergent ordered structures. We have developed a minimal model of compressible active nematics on a substrate. We eliminate the flow velocity in favor of the nematic order parameter via the balance of frictional dissipation and active driving to obtain a dynamical description entirely in terms of the nematic alignment order parameter. Activity renormalizes the bend and splay elastic constants rendering them anisotropic and driving them to zero or even negative, resulting in the appearance of modulated states and defective structures. Using linear stability analysis and numerics we organize the various regimes into a phase diagram and discuss the relation to experiments. This work was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184.

  1. Active stabilization of thin-wall structures under compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welham, Jared; Calius, Emilio P.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2003-08-01

    The active suppression of elastic buckling instability has the potential to significantly increase the effective strength of thin-wall structures. Despite all the interest in smart structures, the active suppression of buckling has received comparatively little attention. This paper addresses the effects of embedded actuation on the compression buckling strength of laminated composite plates through analysis and simulation. Numerical models are formulated that include the influence of essential features such as sensor uncertainty and noise, actuator saturation and control architecture on the buckling process. Silicon-based strain sensors and diffuse laser distance sensors are both considered for use in the detection of incipient buckling behavior due to their increased sensitivity. Actuation is provided by paired distributions of piezo-electric material incorporated into both sides of the laminate. Optimal controllers are designed to command the structure to deform in ways that interfere with the development of buckling mode shapes. Commercial software packages are used to solve the resulting non-linear equations, and some of the tradeoffs are enumerated. Overall, the results show that active buckling control can considerably enhance resistance to instability under compressive loads. These buckling load predictions demonstrate the viability of optimal control and piezo-electric actuation for implementing active buckling control. Due to the importance of early detection, the relative effectiveness of active buckling control is shown to be strongly dependent on the performance of the sensing scheme, as well as on the characteristics of the structure.

  2. Efficient spectral broadening in the 100-W average power regime using gas-filled kagome HC-PCF and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Saraceno, Clara J; Debord, Benoit; Ghosh, Debashri; Diebold, Andreas; Gèrôme, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-12-15

    We present nonlinear pulse compression of a high-power SESAM-modelocked thin-disk laser (TDL) using an Ar-filled hypocycloid-core kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The output of the modelocked Yb:YAG TDL with 127 W average power, a pulse repetition rate of 7 MHz, and a pulse duration of 740 fs was spectrally broadened 16-fold while propagating in a kagome HC-PCF containing 13 bar of static argon gas. Subsequent compression tests performed using 8.4% of the full available power resulted in a pulse duration as short as 88 fs using the spectrally broadened output from the fiber. Compressing the full transmitted power through the fiber (118 W) could lead to a compressed output of >100  W of average power and >100  MW of peak power with an average power compression efficiency of 88%. This simple laser system with only one ultrafast laser oscillator and a simple single-pass fiber pulse compressor, generating both high peak power >100  MW and sub-100-fs pulses at megahertz repetition rate, is very interesting for many applications such as high harmonic generation and attosecond science with improved signal-to-noise performance.

  3. Investigation of active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Kakimi, Yasuhiro; Matsubara, Yoichi

    An active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator, which is a GM type pulse tube refrigerator, is described in this paper. Two or more buffers are connected at the hot end of the pulse tube through on/off valves. The main purpose of this method is to increase the efficiency. A numerical method is introduced to analyse the working process. To understand the basic mechanism, an ideal cycle is also introduced. With a prototype single stage active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator, a cooling capacity of 166 W and a percent Carnot of 13% at 80 K have been obtained.

  4. Monopolar intracochlear pulse trains selectively activate the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Schoenecker, Matthew C; Bonham, Ben H; Stakhovskaya, Olga A; Snyder, Russell L; Leake, Patricia A

    2012-10-01

    Previous cochlear implant studies using isolated electrical stimulus pulses in animal models have reported that intracochlear monopolar stimulus configurations elicit broad extents of neuronal activation within the central auditory system-much broader than the activation patterns produced by bipolar electrode pairs or acoustic tones. However, psychophysical and speech reception studies that use sustained pulse trains do not show clear performance differences for monopolar versus bipolar configurations. To test whether monopolar intracochlear stimulation can produce selective activation of the inferior colliculus, we measured activation widths along the tonotopic axis of the inferior colliculus for acoustic tones and 1,000-pulse/s electrical pulse trains in guinea pigs and cats. Electrical pulse trains were presented using an array of 6-12 stimulating electrodes distributed longitudinally on a space-filling silicone carrier positioned in the scala tympani of the cochlea. We found that for monopolar, bipolar, and acoustic stimuli, activation widths were significantly narrower for sustained responses than for the transient response to the stimulus onset. Furthermore, monopolar and bipolar stimuli elicited similar activation widths when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Surprisingly, we found that in guinea pigs, monopolar and bipolar stimuli produced narrower sustained activation than 60 dB sound pressure level acoustic tones when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Therefore, we conclude that intracochlear electrical stimulation using monopolar pulse trains can produce activation patterns that are at least as selective as bipolar or acoustic stimulation.

  5. Laser Activated Streak Camera for Measurement of Electron Pulses with Femtosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Desimone, Alice; Wilkin, Kyle; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The duration of femtosecond electron pulses used in time-resolved diffraction and microscopy experiments is challenging to measure in-situ. To overcome this problem, we have fabricated a streak camera that uses the time-varying electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor is discharged using a laser-activated GaAs photoswitch, resulting in a damped oscillation of the electric field. The delay time between the laser pulse and electron pulse is set so that the front and back halves of the bunch encounter opposite electric fields of the capacitor and are deflected in opposite directions. Thus, the electron bunch appears streaked on the detector with a length proportional to its duration. The temporal resolution of the streak camera is proportional to the maximum value of the electric field and the frequency of the discharge oscillation. The capacitor is charged by high voltage short pulses to achieve a high electric field and prevent breakdown. We have achieved an oscillation frequency in the GHz range by reducing the circuit size and hence its inductance. The camera was used to measure 100 keV electron pulses with up to a million electrons that are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by an RF cavity. This work was supported mainly by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ultrashort Pulse Laser Matter Interaction program, under grant # FA9550-12-1-0149.

  6. Dynamic Chirp Control and Pulse Compression for Attosecond High-Order Harmonic Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yinghui; Zeng Zhinan; Zou Pu; Zhang Li; Li Xiaofang; Liu Peng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2009-07-24

    We propose a scheme to compensate dynamically the intrinsic chirp of the attosecond harmonic pulses. By adding a weak second harmonic laser field to the driving laser field, the chirp compensation can be varied from the negative to the positive continuously by simply adjusting the relative time delay between the two-color pulses. Using this technique, the compensation of the negative chirp in harmonic emission is demonstrated experimentally for the first time and the nearly transform-limited attosecond pulse trains are obtained.

  7. Dynamic Chirp Control and Pulse Compression for Attosecond High-Order Harmonic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yinghui; Zeng, Zhinan; Zou, Pu; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiaofang; Liu, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2009-07-01

    We propose a scheme to compensate dynamically the intrinsic chirp of the attosecond harmonic pulses. By adding a weak second harmonic laser field to the driving laser field, the chirp compensation can be varied from the negative to the positive continuously by simply adjusting the relative time delay between the two-color pulses. Using this technique, the compensation of the negative chirp in harmonic emission is demonstrated experimentally for the first time and the nearly transform-limited attosecond pulse trains are obtained.

  8. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  9. Application of wavelet filtering and Barker-coded pulse compression hybrid method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Baoquan; Jiang, Jingtao; Yu, Guang; Liu, Kui; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) technique has been viewed as a viable solution in defect detection of advanced composites used in aerospace and aviation industries. However, the giant mismatch of acoustic impedance in air-solid interface makes the transmission efficiency of ultrasound low, and leads to poor signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of received signal. The utilisation of signal-processing techniques in non-destructive testing is highly appreciated. This paper presents a wavelet filtering and phase-coded pulse compression hybrid method to improve the SNR and output power of received signal. The wavelet transform is utilised to filter insignificant components from noisy ultrasonic signal, and pulse compression process is used to improve the power of correlated signal based on cross-correction algorithm. For the purpose of reasonable parameter selection, different families of wavelets (Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet) and decomposition level in discrete wavelet transform are analysed, different Barker codes (5-13 bits) are also analysed to acquire higher main-to-side lobe ratio. The performance of the hybrid method was verified in a honeycomb composite sample. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is very efficient in improving the SNR and signal strength. The applicability of the proposed method seems to be a very promising tool to evaluate the integrity of high ultrasound attenuation composite materials using the ACUT.

  10. Microwave pulse compression from a storage cavity with laser-induced switching

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    A laser-induced switch and a multiple cavity configuration are disclosed for producing high power microwave pulses. The microwave pulses are well controlled in wavelength and timing, with a quick rise time and a variable shape and power of the pulse. In addition, a method of reducing pre-pulse leakage to a low level is disclosed. Microwave energy is directed coherently to one or more cavities that stores the energy in a single mode, represented as a standing wave pattern. In order to switch the stored microwave energy out of the main cavity and into the branch waveguide, a laser-actuated switch is provided for the cavity. The switch includes a laser, associated optics for delivering the beam into the main cavity, and a switching gas positioned at an antinode in the main cavity. When actuated, the switching gas ionizes, creating a plasma, which becomes reflective to the microwave energy, changing the resonance of the cavity, and as a result the stored microwave energy is abruptly switched out of the cavity. The laser may directly pre-ionize the switching gas, or it may pump an impurity in the switching gas to an energy level which switches when a pre-selected cavity field is attained. Timing of switching the cavities is controlled by varying the pathlength of the actuating laser beam. For example, the pathlengths may be adjusted to output a single pulse of high power, or a series of quick lower power pulses.

  11. Ferroelectric switch for a high-power Ka-band active pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  12. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  13. A feasibility study of rain radar for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. IV - A discussion of pulse compression and adaptive scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    1988-07-01

    The possible use of a pulse compression system on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to meet the requirement on the number of independent samples for the rain radar under the constraint on allowable power consumption. The applicability of a pulse compression system to the mission depends on the technological feasibility of reducing the range sidelobe levels of the strong surface echo down to at least -60 dB. It is found that applying the pulse compression technique to the mission is risky. The concept of adaptive scanning is examined, and its power saving efficiency is numerically evaluated for four kinds of rain searching schemes. It is shown that the power saving efficiency of adaptive scanning is considerably high for all the rain searching schemes evaluated.

  14. Isentropic compression of metals, at multi-megabar pressures, using high explosive pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; King, J. C.; Martinez, E. C.; Oona, H.; Sena, F. C.; Reisman, D. B.; Cauble, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Accurate, ultra-high pressure isentropic equation of state (EOS) data, are required for a variety of applications and materials. Asay reported a new method to obtain these data using pulsed magnetic loading on the Sandia Z-machine. Fast rising current pulses (risetimes from 100 to 30011s) at current densities exceeding many MNcm, create continuous magnetic loading up to a few Mbar. As part of a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories we are adapting our high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) methods to obtain isentropic EOS data with the Asay technique. This year we plan to obtain isentropic EOS data for copper and tantalum at pressures up to -2 Mbar; eventually we hope to reach several tens of Mbar. We will describe the design of the HEPP systems and show out attempts to obtain EOS data to date.

  15. Evaluation of Pulsed Power Architectures for Active Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    strongest responses of the fissile material, prompt and delayed neutrons and delayed gammas . Based on a notional detection scenario, the...EVALUATION OF PULSED POWER ARCHITECTURES FOR ACTIVE DETECTION* I.D. Smith, P.A. Corcoran, R. Altes, D. Morton, R. Stevens and B. Whitney L-3...Abstract: Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD, [1]; also see presentations at this conference by B.V. Weber, et al., D.P Murphy et al

  16. High-speed compressive range imaging based on active illumination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Yuan, Xin; Pang, Shuo

    2016-10-03

    We report a compressive imaging method based on active illumination, which reconstructs a 3D scene at a frame rate beyond the acquisition speed limit of the camera. We have built an imaging prototype that projects temporally varying illumination pattern and demonstrated a joint reconstruction algorithm that iteratively retrieves both the range and high-temporal-frequency information from the 2D low-frame rate measurement. The reflectance and depth-map videos have been reconstructed at 1000 frames per second (fps) from the measurement captured at 200 fps. The range resolution is in agreement with the resolution calculated from the triangulation methods based on the same system geometry. We expect such an imaging method could become a simple solution to a wide range of applications, including industrial metrology, 3D printing, and vehicle navigations.

  17. Compression of Ultrafast Laser Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    the theory, construction, and evaluation of 2 separate algorithms, a modified genetic algorithm and the multiphoton intrapulse interference phase...pulse compression was evaluated, and it was found that the MIIPS algorithm was superior to the genetic algorithm for pulse compression. 15...SUBJECT TERMS ultrafast lasers, pulse compression, genetic algorithm, MIIPS algorithm, pulse shaping, pulse shaper construction 16. SECURITY

  18. Sub-100 ps laser-driven dynamic compression of solid deuterium with a ∼40 μJ laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Michael R. Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Bastea, Sorin; Zaug, Joseph M.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2014-07-14

    We dynamically compress solid deuterium over <100 ps from initial pressures of 22 GPa to 55 GPa, to final pressures as high as 71 GPa, with <40 μJ of pulse energy. At 25 GPa initial pressure, we measure compression wave speeds consistent with quasi-isentropic compression and a 24% increase in density. The laser drive energy per unit density change is 10{sup 9} times smaller than it is for recent longer (∼30 ns) time scale compression experiments. This suggests that, for a given final density, dynamic compression of hydrogen might be achieved using orders of magnitude lower laser energy than currently used.

  19. An excellent reduction in sidelobe level for P4 code by using of a new pulse compression scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alighale, S.; Zakeri, B.

    2014-10-01

    P4 polyphase code is well known in pulse compression technique. For P4 code with length 1000, peak sidelobe level (PSL) and integrated sidelobe level (ISL) are -36dB and -16dB, respectively. In order to increase the performance, there are different reduction techniques to reduce the sidelobes of P4 code. This paper presents a novel sidelobe reduction technique that reduces the PSL and ISL to -127dB and -104dB, respectively. Also, other sidelobe reduction techniques such as Woo filter are investigated and compared with the novel proposed technique. Simulations and results show that the proposed technique produces a better peak side lobe ratio (PSL) and integrated side lobe ratio (ISL) than other techniques.

  20. Spiral Flux Compression Generator (FCG) Based Self-Contained Pulsed High Voltage Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    electric There is an oltage source our view, th development diameter spira decreases in F output deterior energy source design with diameter 50 m...agnetic field. substantially or size, which e dimension implementa he electric str ally the spiral CG with a co D SELF- netic Resear e Enterpris...s d r h d d n B. FCG S Three m primary e high- volta The prim batteries DC volta across th pulsed ca surge in t connected explosive source

  1. Multi-meter fiber-delivery and pulse self-compression of milli-Joule femtosecond laser and fiber-aided laser-micromachining.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Vincetti, L; Husakou, A; Fourcade-Dutin, C; Hoenninger, C; Mottay, E; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2014-05-05

    We report on damage-free fiber-guidance of milli-Joule energy-level and 600-femtosecond laser pulses into hypocycloid core-contour Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. Up to 10 meter-long fibers were used to successfully deliver Yb-laser pulses in robustly single-mode fashion. Different pulse propagation regimes were demonstrated by simply changing the fiber dispersion and gas. Self-compression to ~50 fs, and intensity-level nearing petawatt/cm(2) were achieved. Finally, free focusing-optics laser-micromachining was also demonstrated on different materials.

  2. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Laser system based on a commercial microwave oscillator with time compression of a microwave pump pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteev, M. S.; Vaulin, V. A.; Slinko, V. N.; Chumerin, P. Yu; Yushkov, Yu G.

    1992-06-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using a commercial microsecond microwave oscillator, supplemented by a device for time compression of microwave pulses, in pumping of industrial lasers with a high efficiency of conversion of the pump source energy into laser radiation. The results are reported of preliminary experiments on the commissioning of an excimer XeCl laser.

  3. Multi-kilowatt, all-fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system yielding 40x pulse compression using air-core fiber and conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    de Matos, C; Taylor, J

    2004-02-09

    We present a totally fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system using air-core photonic bandgap fiber and a conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier. ~40-ps input pulses, generated in a Mach-Zehnder modulator, were stretched and spectrally broadened in a dispersion-shifted fiber before being amplified and subsequently compressed in 10 m of anomalously-dispersive photonic bandgap fiber to yield ~960 fs pulses. The system gives multi-kilowatt peak powers while the amplifier nonlinearity threshold is as low as ~150 W. Higher peak powers could be obtained by the use of an amplifier with higher nonlinearity threshold.

  4. Air-guided photonic-crystal-fiber pulse-compression delivery of multimegawatt femtosecond laser output for nonlinear-optical imaging and neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitrii A.; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Ömer Ilday, F.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-03-01

    Large-core hollow photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are shown to enable a fiber-format air-guided delivery of ultrashort infrared laser pulses for neurosurgery and nonlinear-optical imaging. With an appropriate dispersion precompensation, an anomalously dispersive 15-μm-core hollow PCF compresses 510-fs, 1070-nm light pulses to a pulse width of about 110 fs, providing a peak power in excess of 5 MW. The compressed PCF output is employed to induce a local photodisruption of corpus callosum tissues in mouse brain and is used to generate the third harmonic in brain tissues, which is captured by the PCF and delivered to a detector through the PCF cladding.

  5. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity.

  6. Nonlinear compression of picosecond chirped pulse from thin-disk amplifier system through a gas-filled hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ding; Xu, Yi; Liu, Yan-Qi; Guo, Xiao-Yang; Li, Wen-Kai; Wu, Fen-Xiang; Liu, Zheng-Zheng; Leng, Yu-Xin

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of a 20-mJ, 1030-nm picosecond chirped pulse from the thin-disk amplifier in a krypton gas-filled hollow-core fiber. The chirp from the thin-disk amplifier system has little influence on the initial pulse, however, it shows an effect on the nonlinear compression in hollow-core fiber. We use a large diameter hollow waveguide to restrict undesirable nonlinear effects such as ionization; on the other hand, we employ suitable gas pressure and fiber length to promise enough spectral broadening; with 600-μm, 6-bar (1 bar = 105 Pa), 1.8-m hollow fiber, we obtain 31.5-fs pulse. Moreover, we calculate and discuss the optimal fiber lengths and gas pressures with different initial durations induced by different grating compression angles for reaching a given bandwidth. These results are meaningful for a compression scheme from picoseconds to femtoseconds. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), the Funds from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 1112790, 10734080, 61221064, 60908008, and 61078037).

  7. Effects of uncertainties on pulse attenuation in dimer granular chains with and without pre-compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. A.; Pichler, L.; Starosvetsky, Y.; McFarland, D. M.; Vakakis, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the effects of inherent variability of the geometric properties of dimer granular chains on their capacity to passively attenuate propagating pulses are investigated. Numerical studies are performed for both the nominal model and the system with uncertainty. The deterministic system is governed by a single parameter (the ratio of the radii of "heavy" and "light" beads of the dimer) and is fully rescalable with energy. The effects of uncertainty, i.e., of the spatial variability of the radii of the light (odd) beads of the granular chain, on the transmitted force at its boundary are investigated. Reliability analysis through Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analysis of the dimer with uncertain properties are carried out, and a deeper insight for improved bead configurations is provided. It is shown that the optimal level of force attenuation achieved with a deterministically predicted optimal parameter can be further increased when certain spatial variations in the parameter, based on specific wave number content, are introduced.

  8. Thickness-dependent optical properties in compressively strained BiFeO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3} films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Zhihua; Jiang, Kai; Wu, Jiada; Sun, Jian; Hu, Zhigao; Chu, Junhao

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • BFO with various thicknesses was grown on LAO substrates by pulsed laser deposition. • The structure and compressive strains were clarified via Raman scattering. • The charge transfer excitation was blue shifted with increasing compressive strain. • The compressive strain affects the distortion of Fe{sup 3+} local environment and O 2p states. - Abstract: Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) films with various thicknesses were epitaxially grown on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering spectra reveal that the films were highly (11{sup ¯}1) oriented with the single phase. With increasing the thickness, the compressive strain decreases and the strain ratios between the film and bulk crystal are evaluated to be 1.75, 1.57, and 1. Moreover, the compressive strain induces band gap shrinkage from 2.7 to 2.65 eV, while the charge transfer transition energy increases from 3.5 to 4.1 eV. It could be due to the shift of O 2p states and the variation of local Fe{sup 3+} crystal field.

  9. Simultaneous pulse amplification and compression in all-fiber-integrated pre-chirped large-mode-area Er-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Lin, Ying-Tsung; Lee, Chao-Kuei

    2007-03-19

    A large-mode-area Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (LMA-EDFA) based all-fiber-integrated amplified compressor with ultrashort length of 5.37 m and ultralow pumping power (260 mW) is proposed. The LMAEDFA suppresses nonlinear soliton-self-frequency-shift effect happened during femtosecond pulse amplification, in which the fiber laser pulse is reshaped to a low-pedestal hyperbolic-second shape with nearly 100% energy confinement. The pre-chirped amplification from 0.96 to 104 mW and the simultaneous compression of a passively mode-locked fiber laser pulse from 300 to 56 fs is demonstrated. The input pulse energy of 24 pJ is amplified up to 2.6 nJ with shortened pulsewidth of 56 fs and peak power as high as 46 kW.

  10. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  11. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO_2 laser beat-wave in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, J. J.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Joshi, C.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the generation of a train of ~ 2 ps, 10 um laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO2 laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  12. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO₂ laser beat-wave in GaAs.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, J J; Tochitsky, S Ya; Joshi, C

    2015-12-15

    We report on the generation of a train of ∼2  ps, 10 μm laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl crystals. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO₂ laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves, we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  13. Dynamic Stabilization of Simple Fractures With Active Plates Delivers Stronger Healing Than Conventional Compression Plating

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Stanley; Bliven, Emily K.; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kindt, Philipp; Augat, Peter; Henschel, Julia; Fitzpatrick, Daniel C.; Madey, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Active plates dynamize a fracture by elastic suspension of screw holes within the plate. We hypothesized that dynamic stabilization with active plates delivers stronger healing relative to standard compression plating. Methods: Twelve sheep were randomized to receive either a standard compression plate (CP) or an active plate (ACTIVE) for stabilization of an anatomically reduced tibial osteotomy. In the CP group, absolute stabilization was pursued by interfragmentary compression with 6 cortical screws. In the ACTIVE group, dynamic stabilization after bony apposition was achieved with 6 elastically suspended locking screws. Fracture healing was analyzed weekly on radiographs. After sacrifice 9 weeks postsurgery, the torsional strength of healed tibiae and contralateral tibiae was measured. Finally, computed tomography was used to assess fracture patterns and healing modes. Results: Healing in both groups included periosteal callus formation. ACTIVE specimens had almost 6 times more callus area by week 9 (P < 0.001) than CP specimens. ACTIVE specimens recovered on average 64% of their native strength by week 9, and were over twice as strong as CP specimens, which recovered 24% of their native strength (P = 0.008). Microcomputed tomography demonstrated that compression plating induced a combination of primary bone healing and gap healing. Active plating consistently stimulated biological bone healing by periosteal callus formation. Conclusions: Compared with compression plating, dynamic stabilization of simple fractures with active plates delivers significantly stronger healing. PMID:27861456

  14. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  15. Impact of information compression on intellectual activities in the brain.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, J T

    1996-09-01

    Imaging and modeling represent an action of information compression, which is inevitable for a complex system in order to process and communicate data. Humans are such complex systems. Sensational and body reaction information is processed by the brain, the overall information rate being 10(11)-10(12) bit/s. Consciousness is the result of massive information compression, the attentional data rate being 10-14 bit/s. The primary purpose of the conscious state is to control the interaction with the environment. In humans, this ability facilitates the projection of the future horizon far away from the next instant. Thinking and reasoning can be thought of as a process of retrospective control. Retrospective in the sense that the sub-conscious has already decided what is to come next. In the long run, however, conscious thought influences the cortical context potentiation, thus providing steering to the associative process. The paper emphasizes that all cognitive operations are restricted to the bioelectrical signal processing of the brain. Accordingly, mental models and scientific theories will always be constrained by this fact. The last subject of this paper deals with the interaction between the brain, the glands and the rest of the body. It is interpreted that qualia are the result of a complex feedback interaction between those parts, a self-supported process close to a singularity point.

  16. Generation of unipolar optical pulses in a Raman-active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Tolmachev, Yu A.; Babushkin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Response of a Raman-active media (RAM) to the excitation by a series of ultrashort (few-cycle) optical pulses propagating at a superluminal velocity is studied theoretically. It is shown that under certain conditions rectangular unipolar pulses (video-pulses) can be generated as the RAM response. The duration, shape and amplitude of these video-pulses can be widely tuned by modifying the pump pulse parameters.

  17. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  18. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  19. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  20. Pulse-Driven Magnetoimpedance Sensor Detection of Cardiac Magnetic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology. PMID:22022453

  1. Passive feedback control of actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarov, Ivan C.; Saltiel, Solomon M.

    1992-11-01

    A passive feedback control in an actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to shorten the pulse duration or obtain millisecond trains of ultra-short light pulses. The intracavity second harmonic generation in a crystal situated at proper distance from the output mirror served as a positive or negative feedback. When negative feedback was used, the length of the train was limited by the length of the flash lamp pumping pulse.

  2. Trunk Muscle Activation and Estimating Spinal Compressive Force in Rope and Harness Vertical Dance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Dai, Boyi; Zhu, Qin; Humphrey, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Rope and harness vertical dance takes place off the floor with the dancer suspended from his or her center of mass in a harness attached to a rope from a point overhead. Vertical dance represents a novel environment for training and performing in which expected stresses on the dancer's body are different from those that take place during dance on the floor. Two male and eleven female dancers with training in vertical dance performed six typical vertical dance movements with electromyography (EMG) electrodes placed bilaterally on rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi. EMG data were expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A simplified musculoskeletal model based on muscle activation for these four muscle groups was used to estimate the compressive force on the spine. The greatest muscle activation for erector spinae and latissimus dorsi and the greatest trunk compressive forces were seen in vertical axis positions where the dancer was moving the trunk into a hyper-extended position. The greatest muscle activation for rectus abdominus and external oblique and the second highest compressive force were seen in a supine position with the arms and legs extended away from the center of mass (COM). The least muscle activation occurred in positions where the limbs were hanging below the torso. These movements also showed relatively low muscle activation compression forces. Post-test survey results revealed that dancers felt comfortable in these positions; however, observation of some positions indicated insufficient muscular control. Computing the relative contribution of muscles, expressed as muscle activation and estimated spinal compression, provided a measure of how much the muscle groups were working to support the spine and the rest of the dancer's body in the different movements tested. Additionally, identifying typical muscle recruitment patterns in each movement will help identify key exercises

  3. Picosecond pulse measurements using the active laser medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardin, James P.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the pulse lengths of synchronously pumped dye lasers which does not require the use of an external nonlinear medium, such as a doubling crystal or two-photon fluorescence cell, to autocorrelate the pulses is discussed. The technique involves feeding the laser pulses back into the dye jet, thus correlating the output pulses with the intracavity pulses to obtain pulse length signatures in the resulting time-averaged laser power. Experimental measurements were performed using a rhodamine 6G dye laser pumped by a mode-locked frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results agree well with numerical computations, and the method proves effective in determining lengths of picosecond laser pulses.

  4. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  5. Active lamp pulse driver circuit. [optical pumping of laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, K. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flashlamp drive circuit is described which uses an unsaturated transistor as a current mode switch to periodically subject a partially ionized gaseous laser excitation flashlamp to a stable, rectangular pulse of current from an incomplete discharge of an energy storage capacitor. A monostable multivibrator sets the pulse interval, initiating the pulse in response to a flash command by providing a reference voltage to a non-inverting terminal of a base drive amplifier; a tap on an emitter resistor provides a feedback signal sensitive to the current amplitude to an inverting terminal of amplifier, thereby controlling the pulse amplitude. The circuit drives the flashlamp to provide a squarewave current flashlamp discharge.

  6. Tunable time-reversal cavity for high-pressure ultrasonic pulses generation: A tradeoff between transmission and time compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents a time reversal cavity that has both a high reverberation time and a good transmission factor. A multiple scattering medium has been embedded inside a fluid-filled reverberating cavity. This allows creating smart ultrasonic sources able to generate very high pressure pulses at the focus outside the cavity with large steering capabilities. Experiments demonstrate a 25 dB gain in pressure at the focus. This concept will enable us to convert conventional ultrasonic imaging probes driven by low power electronics into high power probes for therapeutic applications requiring high pressure focused pulses, such as histotripsy or lithotripsy.

  7. Exploring Pulses through Math, Science, and Nutrition Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Diane K.; Mandal, Bidisha; Wallace, Michael L.; Riddle, Lee Anne; Kerr, Susan; Atterberry, Kelly Ann; Miles, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 includes pulses as a required component of the school lunch menu standard. Pulses are nutritionally important staple food crops, and include dry beans, dry peas, garbanzo beans, and lentils. This current study examined the short-term effectiveness of a Science, Technology, Engineering,…

  8. Two-spring model for active compression textiles with integrated NiTi coil actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, B.; Newman, D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a two-spring model to predict the performance of hybrid compression textiles combining passive elastic fabrics and integrated NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) coil actuators. An analytic model that treats passive fabric-SMA coil systems as conjoined linear springs is presented to predict garment passive and active counter-pressure as a function of 11 design variables. For a fixed SMA coil design (encompassing five design variables), the model predicts that passive fabric material modulus, initial length, width and thickness determine both passive counter-pressure magnitude and activation stroke length, and that passive and active pressures are highly dependent on the relative unstretched lengths of the conjoined SMA-fabric system compared to the total limb circumference. Several passive fabrics were tested to determine their moduli and to generally assess the fabric linearity model assumption: two fabrics (spandex and neoprene) were found to behave linearly up to 200% strain, while two other fabrics (flat polyester elastic and a tri-laminate Lycra) were found to be nonlinear in the same strain envelope. Five hypothetical compression tourniquet designs are presented using experimentally determined fabric characteristics and previously studied SMA actuators developed at MIT. The performance of each tourniquet design is discussed with a specific focus on mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suit design requirements, with designs presented that achieve the full MCP design specification (\\gt 29.6 kPa) while minimizing (\\lt 5 mm) garment thickness. The modeling framework developed in this effort enables compression garment designers to tailor counter-pressure and activation stroke properties of active compression garments based on a variety of design parameters to meet a wide range of performance specifications.

  9. [The antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria after nanosecond pulsed periodic X-ray exposure].

    PubMed

    Kniazeva, I R; Ivanov, V V; Bol'shakov, M A; Zharkova, L P; Kereia, A V; Kutenkov, O P; Rostov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The effect of repetitive pulsed X-ray (4 ns pulse duration, 300 kV accelerating voltage; 2.5 kA electron beam current) on the antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria has been investigated. The mitochondrial suspension was exposed to single 4000 pulse X-ray radiation with repetition rates ranging between 10 and 22 pps (pulsed dose was 0.3-1.8 x 10(-6) Gy/pulse, the total absorbed dose following a single exposure was 7.2 x 10(-3) Gy). It was shown that a short-time exposure to X-ray radiation changes the antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria. The greatest effect was observed in the changes of the activity of the metal-containing enzymes: superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The effect depends on the pulse repetition frequency and radiation dose.

  10. Design and performance of the 10-kV, 5-MA pulsed-power system for the FRX-C compression experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Barnes, G.A.; Gribble, R.J.; Hinckley, J.E.; Kreider, T.W.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The design and performance of the pulsed-power system for the FRX-C compact toroid compression heating experiment are reviewed. Two inductively-isolated, 10-kV capacitor banks (total energy = 1.5 MJ) are discharged through a common, low-inductance load. The 5-MA currents are switched and crowbarred with parallel arrays of size-D ignitrons. Power supplies are constructed in simple 25 and 50 kJ modules, each capable of supplying 100 kA at 10 kV. Non-negligible source inductance and the addition of high-power resistors maintain module isolation and protect the system during fault modes. 21 refs., 31 figs.

  11. Spatial homogeneity criteria for active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chebotarev, Gennady D; Prutsakov, Oleg O; Latush, Evgeny L

    2005-07-31

    The formation of the transverse distribution of the metal vapour concentration in repetitively pulsed lasers is analysed. The criterion for the homogeneity of this distribution is found. The optimal conditions for excitation of the active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers are determined under which a high degree of both longitudinal and transverse homogeneity is achieved. (active media)

  12. Analysis of the stability of an active mode-locking pulsed laser for ultra-short pulses generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracamontes Rodríguez, Y. E.; Beltrán Pérez, G.; Kuzin, Eugin; Castillo Mixcóatl, J.; Muñoz Aguirre, S.

    2013-11-01

    Pulsed lasers have become very important owing to the great amount of applications, from communications to diverse medicine areas. Many works have reported the development of these kinds of sources which uses quite complex cavity configurations and that present instabilities in the output signal. In this work the analysis of a pulsed laser that uses a ring cavity with a length of 16.5 m is presented. A phase modulator (LiNbO3) controlled by an RF generator operated at a frequency of 12.5108 MHz was used to perform the mode lock. The modulator input has a birrefringent fiber then the light polarization affects the mode lock. Therefore it was necessary to perform an analysis and characterization in the input and output signals of the modulator in order to obtain more stable output pulses without requiring a continuous adjustment. The laser implemented with 2 modes of operation, active mode-lock and passive mode-lock. The obtained pulses whit temporal width of 7 ns FWHM for the frequency fundamental 12.5108 MHz and 781 -261-120-116 ps for the harmonic 5-10-16-20 .The results for the passive mode-lock the obtained pulses whit temporal width 2 ps and average power 200 W.

  13. High speed and high resolution interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating sensor based on microwave photonic filtering and chirped microwave pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ou; Zhang, Jiejun; Yao, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    High speed and high resolution interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on microwave photonic filtering and chirped microwave pulse compression is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed sensor, a broadband linearly chirped microwave waveform (LCMW) is applied to a single-passband microwave photonic filter (MPF) which is implemented based on phase modulation and phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion using a phase modulator (PM) and a phase-shifted FBG (PS-FBG). Since the center frequency of the MPF is a function of the central wavelength of the PS-FBG, when the PS-FBG experiences a strain or temperature change, the wavelength is shifted, which leads to the change in the center frequency of the MPF. At the output of the MPF, a filtered chirped waveform with the center frequency corresponding to the applied strain or temperature is obtained. By compressing the filtered LCMW in a digital signal processor, the resolution is improved. The proposed interrogation technique is experimentally demonstrated. The experimental results show that interrogation sensitivity and resolution as high as 1.25 ns/με and 0.8 με are achieved.

  14. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    D'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  15. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  16. Transform-limited pulses generated by an actively Q-switched distributed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Pérez-Millán, P; Andrés, M V; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Barmenkov, Yu O

    2008-11-15

    A single-mode, transform-limited, actively Q-switched distributed-feedback fiber laser is presented, based on a new in-line acoustic pulse generator. Our technique permits a continuous adjustment of the repetition rate that modulates the Q factor of the cavity. Optical pulses of 800 mW peak power, 32 ns temporal width, and up to 20 kHz repetition rates were obtained. The measured linewidth demonstrates that these pulses are transform limited: 6 MHz for a train of pulses of 10 kHz repetition rate, 80 ns temporal width, and 60 mW peak power. Efficient excitation of spontaneous Brillouin scattering is demonstrated.

  17. The back compressive forces during maximal push-pull activities in the sagittal plane.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S

    1994-12-01

    Ten normal young male and ten normal young female subjects (each group with a mean age of 21.1 years) performed isometric and isokinetic (50 cm per second) push and pull activity at 35 cm, 100 cm and 150 cm heights. The subjects were placed on a specially designed subject-stabilizing-platform to stabilize their lower extremities. Horizontal push-pull forces were exerted through a friction-reduced rod and sleeve assembly attached to the modified Static Dynamic Strength Tester. The strength measured by a SM 500 load cell was fed to an IBM XT through an A to D converter. The postural records were made on a videotape. The posture and strength were synchronized through an external light signal. The strength for pull activities was higher than the corresponding push activities (p < 0.01). The isometric strengths were significantly higher than the isokinetic strengths (p < 0.01). Though the push strengths were significantly lower than the pull strength, the low-back compressive forces for the push activities were 129% to 627% of the corresponding pull conditions. It is concluded that the push activities are more hazardous due to the higher magnitude of compressive load and their faster contribution to the threshold level of cumulative load leading to the precipitation of injuries.

  18. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  19. Gigahertz planar photoconducting antenna activated by picosecond optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. W.; Thaxter, J. B.; Bliss, D. F.

    1995-07-01

    We have generated 1-20-GHz microwave pulses by illuminating an Fe-compensated InP wafer with 50-ps optical pulses at normal incidence. The process of the generation of microwave radiation was monitored and analyzed directly through a 40-GHz sampling oscilloscope with precision. The saturation properties, the waveform evolution, and the optical coupling efficiency of the gigahertz photoconducting antenna are discussed. The flexibility, compactness, and high-resolution features offered by this technique merit new applications for radar communication as well as for other microwave detecting devices.

  20. Gigahertz planar photoconducting antenna activated by picosecond optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, D W; Thaxter, J B; Bliss, D F

    1995-07-15

    We have generated 1-20-GHz microwave pulses by illuminating an Fe-compensated InP wafer with 50-ps optical pulses at normal incidence. The process of the generation of microwave radiation was monitored and analyzed directly through a 40-GHz sampling oscilloscope with precision. The saturation properties, the waveform evolution, and the optical coupling efficiency of the gigahertz photoconducting antenna are discussed. The flexibility, compactness, and high-resolution features offered by this technique merit new applications for radar communication as well as for other microwave detecting devices.

  1. Novel mid-infrared lasers with compressively strained InAsSb active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A.

    1997-02-01

    Mid-infrared lasers grown by MOCVD with AlAsSb claddings and strained InAsSb active regions are reported. A 3.8--3.9 {micro}m injection laser with a pseudomorphic InAsSb multiple quantum well active region lased at 210 K under pulsed operation. A semi-metal layer acts as an internal electron source for the injection laser. An optically pumped laser with an InAsSb/InAsP strained-layer superlattice active region was demonstrated at 3.7 {micro}m, 240 K.

  2. Towards the development of active compression bandages using dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourazadi, S.; Ahmadi, S.; Menon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Disorders associated with the lower extremity venous system are common and significantly affect the quality of life of a large number of individuals. These disorders include orthostatic hypotension, oedema, deep vein thrombosis and a number of other conditions related to insufficient venous blood return. The common recommended treatment for these disorders is the use of hosiery compression stockings. In this research, an active compression bandage (ACB) based on the technology of dielectric elastomeric actuators (DEA) was designed, prototyped and tested. A customized calf prototype (CP) was developed to measure the pressure applied by the ACB. Experimental results performed with the CP showed that the pressure applied by the ACB could be electrically controlled to be either below or above the pressure exerted by commercially available compression stockings. An analytical model was used to provide the design criteria. A finite element model (FEM) was also developed to simulate the electromechanical behaviour of the DEA. Comparison of the experimental results with the FEM and analytical models showed that the modelling could accurately predict the behaviour of the ACB. The FEM was subsequently used to study how to improve the ACB performance by varying geometrical parameters such as the ACB thickness.

  3. Consequences of Laughter Upon Trunk Compression and Cortical Activation: Linear and Polynomial Relations

    PubMed Central

    Svebak, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Results from two studies of biological consequences of laughter are reported. A proposed inhibitory brain mechanism was tested in Study 1. It aims to protect against trunk compression that can cause health hazards during vigorous laughter. Compression may be maximal during moderate durations and, for protective reasons, moderate in enduring vigorous laughs. Twenty-five university students volunteered to see a candid camera film. Laughter responses (LR) and the superimposed ha-responses were operationally assessed by mercury-filled strain gauges strapped around the trunk. On average, the thorax compression amplitudes exceeded those of the abdomen, and greater amplitudes were seen in the males than in the females after correction for resting trunk circumference. Regression analyses supported polynomial relations because medium LR durations were associated with particularly high thorax amplitudes. In Study 2, power changes were computed in the beta and alpha EEG frequency bands of the parietal cortex from before to after exposure to the comedy “Dinner for one” in 56 university students. Highly significant linear relations were calculated between the number of laughs and post-exposure cortical activation (increase of beta, decrease of alpha) due to high activation after frequent laughter. The results from Study 1 supported the hypothesis of a protective brain mechanism that is activated during long LRs to reduce the risk of harm to vital organs in the trunk cavity. The results in Study 2 supported a linear cortical activation and, thus, provided evidence for a biological correlate to the subjective experience of mental refreshment after laughter. PMID:27547260

  4. Local effect of compression stockings on skin microcirculatory activity through the measurement of skin effective thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Etienne; Gehin, Claudine; Lun, Bertrand; McAdams, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study to demonstrate the instantaneous local effect of compression stocking (Class 2) on skin microcirculatory activity. The measurement needs to be carefully performed as the sensor is placed under the garment. To assess the local effect of compression stockings, we use the ambulatory device Hematron located on the calf under the garment. Skin microcirculatory activity is assessed through the skin's effective thermal conductivity measurement. A specific housing for the sensor has been designed to avoid excessive pressure induced by the sensor when squeezed by stockings. The experiment, conducted on ten healthy subjects, comprised two stages: without and with compression stockings. Skin effective thermal conductivity was recorded at three successive positions (supine, sitting and standing). Significant improvement in skin microcirculatory activity was recorded by the Hematron device for the three positions. We have also demonstrated that Hematron sensor can be used under compression stockings.

  5. Compression dewatering of municipal activated sludge: effects of salt and pH.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Mickael; Vaxelaire, Jean; Olivier, Jérémy; Dieudé-Fauvel, Emilie; Baudez, Jean-Christophe

    2012-09-15

    Even after mechanical dewatering, activated sludge contains a large amount of water. Due to its composition and biological nature this material is usually highly compressible and known to be difficult to dewater. In the present work, two treatments (salt addition and pH modification) are proposed to highlight some aspects which could explain the poor dewaterability of activated sludge. Dewatering tests are carried out in a pressure-driven device in order to well examine both, filtration and compression stages. Physico-chemical parameters, such as surface charge, hydrophobicity, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content and filtrate turbidity are measured on the tested sludge, for a better analysis of dewatering results. The dewatering ability of the sludge is widely linked to the cohesion of the flocculated matrix and the presence of fine particles. Both treatments alter the flocculated matrix and release fine particles. The release of fine particles tends to clog both, the filter cake and the filter medium. Consequently, the filtration rate decreases due to higher resistances to the flow. On another hand, the polymeric matrix breakdown enables to release some water trapped within the floc to the bulk liquid phase and thus facilitates its removal, which tends to decrease the moisture content of the filter-cake. It also impacts the compression dewatering step. The more destroyed structures lead to less elastic cakes and thus a slower primary consolidation stage. At the opposite, the mobility of the broken aggregates within the filter-cake does not seem to be improved by size reduction (the kinetics of the secondary consolidation stage are not significantly modified).

  6. Spontaneous pulsing states in an active particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Sarah; Appert-Rolland, Cécile; Evans, Martin R.

    2016-09-01

    We study a two-lane two-species exclusion process inspired by Lin et al (2011 J. Stat. Mech. P09027) that exhibits a non-equilibrium pulsing phase. Particles move on two parallel one-dimensional tracks, with one open and one reflecting boundary. The particle type defines the hopping direction. When only particles hopping towards the open end are allowed to change lane, the system exhibits a phase transition from a low density phase to a pulsing phase depending on the ratio between particle injection and type-changing rate. This phase transition can be observed in the stochastic model as well as in a mean-field description. In the low density phase, the density profile can be predicted analytically. The pulsing phase is characterised by a fast filling of the system and—once filled—by a slowly backwards moving front separating a decreasing dense region and an expanding low density region. The hopping of the front on the discrete lattice is found to create density oscillations, both, in time and space. By means of a stability analysis we can predict the structure of the dense region during the emptying process, characterised by exponentially damped perturbations, both at the open end and near the moving front.

  7. Determination of antioxidant activity of spices and their active principles by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alberto; Ruiz Montoya, Mercedes; Arteaga, Jesús F; Rodríguez Mellado, Jose M

    2014-01-22

    The anodic oxidation of mercury in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to determine the antioxidant (AO) character of radical scavengers. Hydroperoxide radical is formed at the potentials of the oxidation peak on mercury electrodes, such radical reacting with the antioxidants in different extension. The parameter C10 (antioxidant concentration at which the peak area decreases by 10%) is used to measure the scavenging activity of the individual antioxidants. To establish the scavenging activity of antioxidant mixtures as a whole, the parameter, μ10 as the reverse of V10, V10 being the volume necessary to decrease the peak area in DPV by 10%, was selected. Higher μ10 values correspond to higher scavenging activity. The studies have been extended to aqueous extracts of some species. The results may be useful in explaining the effect of spices in vitro and in vivo studies.

  8. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  9. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  10. Fibre amplifier based on an ytterbium-doped active tapered fibre for the generation of megawatt peak power ultrashort optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Koptev, M Yu; Anashkina, E A; Lipatov, D S; Andrianov, A V; Muravyev, S V; Kim, A V; Bobkov, K K; Likhachev, M E; Levchenko, A E; Aleshkina, S S; Semjonov, S L; Denisov, A N; Bubnov, M M; Laptev, A Yu; Gur'yanov, A N

    2015-05-31

    We report a new ytterbium-doped active tapered fibre used in the output amplifier stage of a fibre laser system for the generation of megawatt peak power ultrashort pulses in the microjoule energy range. The tapered fibre is single-mode at its input end (core and cladding diameters of 10 and 80 μm) and multimode at its output end (diameters of 45 and 430 μm), but ultrashort pulses are amplified in a quasi-single-mode regime. Using a hybrid Er/Yb fibre system comprising an erbium master oscillator and amplifier at a wavelength near 1.5 μm, a nonlinear wavelength converter to the 1 μm range and a three-stage ytterbium-doped fibre amplifier, we obtained pulses of 1 μJ energy and 7 ps duration, which were then compressed by a grating-pair dispersion compressor with 60% efficiency to a 130 fs duration, approaching the transform-limited pulse duration. The present experimental data agree well with numerical simulation results for pulse amplification in the threestage amplifier. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. Electromagnetic activity before initial breakdown pulses of lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathna, N.; Karunarathne, S.

    2014-11-01

    Lightning flash initiation is studied using electric field change (E-change) measurements made in Florida. An initial E-change (IEC) was found immediately before the first initial breakdown (IB) pulse in both cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) flashes if the E-change sensor was within 80% of the reversal distance of the IEC. For 18 CG flashes, the IECs had an average point dipole moment of 23 C m and an average duration of 0.18 ms; these parameters for 18 IC flashes were -170 C m and 1.53 ms. The IECs of CG flashes began with a change in the slope of the E-change (with respect to time) from zero slope to a positive slope, consistent with downward motion of negative charge and/or upward motion of positive charge. For IECs of IC flashes, the beginning slope change was from zero to negative slope, consistent with upward motion of negative charge and/or downward motion of positive charge. During an IEC, the E-change monotonically increased for CG flashes and monotonically decreased for IC flashes. In 14 of 36 cases, the IEC beginning was coincident with a discrete, impulsive source of VHF radiation; another 13 cases had at least one VHF source during the IEC or the first IB pulse. Before the IECs, there were no preliminary variations detected in the 36 flashes. It is hypothesized that lightning initiation begins with an ionizing event that causes the IEC and that the IEC enhances the ambient electric field to produce the first IB pulse.

  12. Electrical conductivity of activated carbon-metal oxide nanocomposites under compression: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Macías-García, A; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2014-12-07

    From a granular commercial activated carbon (AC) and six metal oxide (Al2O3, Fe2O3, SnO2, TiO2, WO3 and ZnO) precursors, two series of AC-metal oxide nanocomposites were prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 °C, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 or 850 °C in an inert atmosphere. Here, the electrical conductivity of the resulting products was studied under moderate compression. The influence of the applied pressure, sample volume, mechanical work, and density of the hybrid materials was thoroughly investigated. The DC electrical conductivity of the compressed samples was measured at room temperature by the four-probe method. Compaction assays suggest that the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are largely determined by the carbon matrix. Both the decrease in volume and the increase in density were relatively small and only significant at pressures lower than 100 kPa for AC and most nanocomposites. In contrast, the bulk electrical conductivity of the hybrid materials was strongly influenced by the intrinsic conductivity, mean crystallite size, content and chemical nature of the supported phases, which ultimately depend on the metal oxide precursor and heat treatment temperature. The supported nanoparticles may be considered to act as electrical switches either hindering or favouring the effective electron transport between the AC cores of neighbouring composite particles in contact under compression. Conductivity values as a rule were lower for the nanocomposites than for the raw AC, all of them falling in the range of semiconductor materials. With the increase in heat treatment temperature, the trend is toward the improvement of conductivity due to the increase in the crystallite size and, in some cases, to the formation of metals in the elemental state and even metal carbides. The patterns of variation of the electrical conductivity with pressure and mechanical work were slightly similar, thus suggesting the predominance of the pressure

  13. Pulsed Light Stimulation Increases Boundary Preference and Periodicity of Episodic Motor Activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuang; Xiao, Chengfeng; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the therapeutic benefits of long-term sensory stimulation for improving cognitive abilities and motor performance of stroke patients. The rationale is that such stimulation would activate mechanisms of neural plasticity to promote enhanced coordination and associated circuit functions. Experimental approaches to characterize such mechanisms are needed. Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most attractive model organisms to investigate neural mechanisms responsible for stimulation-induced behaviors with its powerful accessibility to genetic analysis. In this study, the effect of chronic sensory stimulation (pulsed light stimulation) on motor activity in w1118 flies was investigated. Flies were exposed to a chronic pulsed light stimulation protocol prior to testing their performance in a standard locomotion assay. Flies responded to pulsed light stimulation with increased boundary preference and travel distance in a circular arena. In addition, pulsed light stimulation increased the power of extracellular electrical activity, leading to the enhancement of periodic electrical activity which was associated with a centrally-generated motor pattern (struggling behavior). In contrast, such periodic events were largely missing in w1118 flies without pulsed light treatment. These data suggest that the sensory stimulation induced a response in motor activity associated with the modifications of electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Finally, without pulsed light treatment, the wild-type genetic background was associated with the occurrence of the periodic activity in wild-type Canton S (CS) flies, and w+ modulated the consistency of periodicity. We conclude that pulsed light stimulation modifies behavioral and electrophysiological activities in w1118 flies. These data provide a foundation for future research on the genetic mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying such behavioral modification. PMID:27684063

  14. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2015-01-06

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s⁻¹ and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s⁻¹ on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle-tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission.

  15. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Luke A.; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s−1 and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s−1 on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle–tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission. PMID:25551151

  16. Shuttle extravehicular activity signal processor pulse amplitude modulation decommutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, D. E.; Conrad, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    To provide data with long-term stability and accuracy, the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) decommutator was synchronized to the PAM-return to zero wavetrain, and each channel was sampled with a common sample and hold circuit and digitized sequentially. The digital value of each channel was then scaled by the digital value of the calibration channels. The corrected digital value of each channel was stored for one complete frame and then transferred to the multiplexer-demultiplexer at a high rate in one block of serial digital data. A test model was built to demonstrate this design approach taken for the PAM decom and performance data was provided. The accuracies obtained with various signal to noise ratios are shown.

  17. Hip adductor activations during run-to-cut manoeuvres in compression shorts: implications for return to sport after groin injury.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Ajit M W; Jamison, Steven T; McNally, Michael P; Pan, Xueliang; Schmitt, Laura C

    2014-01-01

    Athletes at high risk of groin strains in sports such as hockey and soccer often choose to wear shorts with directional compression to aid in prevention of or recovery from hip adductor strains. Large, eccentric contractions are known to result in or exacerbate strain injuries, but it is unknown if these shorts have a beneficial effect on hip adductor muscle activity. In this study, surface electromyography (EMG) of the adductor longus and ground reaction force (GRF) data were obtained simultaneously on 29 healthy individuals without previous history of serious injury while performing unanticipated 45° run-to-cut manoeuvres in a laboratory setting wearing shorts with non-directional compression (control, HeatGear, Under Armour, USA) or shorts with directional compression (directional, CoreShort PRO, Under Armour, USA), in random order. Average adductor activity in the stance leg was significantly lower in the directional condition than in the control condition during all parts of stance phase (all P < 0.042). From this preliminary analysis, wearing directional compression shorts appears to be associated with reduced stance limb hip adductor activity. Athletes seeking to reduce demand on the hip adductors as they approach full return to activities may benefit from the use of directional compression shorts.

  18. Hip adductor activations during run-to-cut maneuvers in compression shorts: Implications for return to sport after groin injury

    PubMed Central

    CHAUDHARI, AJIT M. W.; JAMISON, STEVEN T.; MCNALLY, MICHAEL P.; PAN, XUELIANG; SCHMITT, LAURA C.

    2014-01-01

    Athletes at high risk of groin strains in sports such as hockey and soccer often choose to wear shorts with directional compression to aid in prevention or recovery from hip adductor strains. Large eccentric contractions are known to result in or exacerbate strain injuries, but it is unknown if these shorts have a beneficial effect on hip adductor muscle activity. In this study, surface electromyography of the adductor longus and ground reaction force (GRF) data were obtained simultaneously on 29 healthy individuals without previous history of serious injury while performing unanticipated 45° run-to-cut maneuvers in a laboratory setting wearing shorts with non-directional compression (control, HeatGear, Under Armour, USA) or shorts with directional compression (directional, CoreShort PRO, Under Armour, USA), in random order. Average adductor activity in the stance leg was significantly lower in the directional condition than in the control condition during all parts of stance phase (all p<0.042). From this preliminary analysis, wearing directional compression shorts appears to be associated with reduced stance limb hip adductor activity. Athletes seeking to reduce demand on the hip adductors as they approach full return to activities may benefit from the use of directional compression shorts. PMID:24669858

  19. Storage and retrieval of light pulses in a fast-light medium via active Raman gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Datang; Bai, Zhengyang; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme to realize the storage and retrieval of light pulses in a fast-light medium via a mechanism of active Raman gain (ARG). The system under consideration is a four-level atomic gas interacting with three (pump, signal, and control) laser fields. We show that a stable propagation of signal light pulses with superluminal velocity (i.e., fast-light pulses) is possible in such a system through the ARG contributed by the pump field and the quantum interference effect induced by the control field. We further show that a robust storage and retrieval of light pulses in such a fast-light medium can be implemented by switching on and off the pump and the control fields simultaneously. The results reported here may have potential applications for light information processing and transmission using fast-light media.

  20. Dynamic Compression Effects on Immature Nucleus Pulposus: a Study Using a Novel Intelligent and Mechanically Active Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Gan, Yibo; Wang, Haoming; Zhang, Chengmin; Wang, Liyuan; Xu, Yuan; Song, Lei; Li, Songtao; Li, Sukai; Ou, Yangbin; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous cell culture and animal in vivo studies indicate the obvious effects of mechanical compression on disc cell biology. However, the effects of dynamic compression magnitude, frequency and duration on the immature nucleus pulposus (NP) from an organ-cultured disc are not well understood. Objective: To investigate the effects of a relatively wide range of compressive magnitudes, frequencies and durations on cell apoptosis and matrix composition within the immature NP using an intelligent and mechanically active bioreactor. Methods: Discs from the immature porcine were cultured in a mechanically active bioreactor for 7 days. The discs in various compressive magnitude groups (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.3 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz for 2 hours), frequency groups (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 Hz at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa for 2 hours) and duration groups (1, 2, 4 and 8 hours at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa and frequency of 1.0 Hz) experienced dynamic compression once per day. Discs cultured without compression were used as controls. Immature NP samples were analyzed using the TUNEL assay, histological staining, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content measurement, real-time PCR and collagen II immunohistochemical staining. Results: In the 1.3 MPa, 5.0 Hz and 8 hour groups, the immature NP showed a significantly increase in apoptotic cells, a catabolic gene expression profile with down-regulated matrix molecules and up-regulated matrix degradation enzymes, and decreased GAG content and collagen II deposition. In the other compressive magnitude, frequency and duration groups, the immature NP showed a healthier status regarding NP cell apoptosis, gene expression profile and matrix production. Conclusion: Cell apoptosis and matrix composition within the immature NP were compressive magnitude-, frequency- and duration-dependent. The relatively high compressive magnitude or frequency and long compressive duration are not helpful for maintaining the healthy status of an

  1. Adaptive Pulse Compression Repair Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    algorithm such that an MMSE filter could be estimated for each individual range cell to suppress range sidelobes. Range sidelobe suppression can also be...noticeable effect yet the increased sensitivity of PCR results in a general increase in range sidelobe levels. Also, the sidelobe shoulders are again...to its significantly increased sensitivity the PCR algorithm (a single stage) has some degradation that manifests in the form of increased range

  2. Activation of ganglion cells in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas with monophasic and biphasic current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F. III

    2009-06-01

    We and other research groups are designing an electronic retinal prosthesis to provide vision for patients who are blind due to photoreceptor degeneration. In this study, we examined the effect of stimulus waveform on the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) when the retinal neural network is stimulated. Isolated retinas of wild-type and rd1 mice were stimulated with cathodal and anodal monophasic current pulses of 1 ms duration and symmetric biphasic current pulses (1 ms per phase) delivered through an electrode that was located subretinally. For both wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas, cathodal current pulses were least effective in activating most RGCs. The median threshold current for a cathodal current pulse was 2.0-4.4 fold higher than the median threshold current for either an anodal or a biphasic current pulse. In wild-type mouse retinas, the median threshold current for activating RGCs with anodal current pulses was 23% lower than that with biphasic current pulses. In rd1 mouse retinas, the median threshold currents for anodal and biphasic current pulses were about the same. However, the variance in thresholds of rd1 RGCs for biphasic pulse stimulation was much smaller than for anodal pulse stimulation. Thus, a symmetric biphasic current pulse may be the best stimulus for activating the greatest number of RGCs in retinas devoid of photoreceptors.

  3. Compressive strength and the effect of duration after photo-activation among dual-cure bulk fill composite core materials

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess compressive strength and effect of duration after photoactivation on the compressive strength of different dual cure bulk fill composites. Methods: Seventy-two disc shaped (4x10mm) specimens were prepared from three dual cure bulk fill materials, ZirconCore (ZC) (n=24), MulticCore Flow (MC) (n=24) and Luxacore Dual (LC) (n=24). Half of the specimens in each material were tested for failure loads after one hour [MC1 (n=12), LC1 (n=12) & ZC1 (n=12)] and the other half in 7 days [MC7 (n=12), LC7 (n=12), ZC7 (n=12)] from photo-polymerization using the universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 cm/minutes. Compressive strength was calculated using the formula UCS=4f/πd2. Compressive strengths among different groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s multiple comparisons test. Results: Maximum and minimum compressive strengths were observed in ZC7 (344.14±19.22) and LC1 (202.80±15.52) groups. Specimens in LC1 [202.80 (15.52)] showed significantly lower compressive strength as compared to MC1 [287.06 (15.03)] (p<0.01) and ZC1 [276.82 (11.51)] (p<0.01). ZC7 [344.14 (19.22)] specimens showed significantly higher (p<0.01) compressive strengths compared to LC7 [324.56 (19.47)] and MC7 [315.26 (12.36)]. Compressive strengths among all three materials were significantly higher (p<0.01) at 7 days as compared to one hour. Conclusions: Bulk fill material with Zr nano-hybrid filler (ZC) showed high compressive strength compared to MC and LC. Increasing the post photo-activation duration (from one hour to 7 days) significantly improves the compressive strengths of dual cure bulk fill material. PMID:27882021

  4. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running?

    PubMed

    Lovell, Dale I; Mason, Dale G; Delphinus, Elias M; McLellan, Christopher P

    2011-12-01

    Lovell, DI, Mason, DG, Delphinus, EM, and McLellan, CP. Do compression garments enhance the active recovery process after high-intensity running? J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3264-3268, 2011-This study examined the effect of wearing waist-to-ankle compression garments (CGs) on active recovery after moderate- and high-intensity submaximal treadmill running. Twenty-five male semiprofessional rugby league players performed two 30-minute treadmill runs comprising of six 5-minute stages at 6 km·h, 10 km·h, approximately 85% VO(2)max, 6 km·h as a recovery stage followed by approximately 85% VO(2)max and 6 km·h wearing either CGs or regular running shorts in a randomized counterbalanced order with each person acting as his own control. All stages were followed by 30 seconds of rest during which a blood sample was collected to determine blood pH and blood lactate concentration [La]. Expired gases and heart rate (HR) were measured during the submaximal treadmill tests to determine metabolic variables with the average of the last 2 minutes used for data analysis. The HR and [La] were lower (p ≤ 0.05) after the first and second 6 km·h recovery bouts when wearing CGs compared with when wearing running shorts. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was higher and [La] lower (p ≤ 0.05) after the 10 km·h stage, and only RER was higher after both 85% VO(2)max stages when wearing CGs compared with when wearing running shorts. There was no difference in blood pH at any exercise stage when wearing the CGs and running shorts. The results of this study indicate that the wearing of CGs may augment the active recovery process in reducing [La] and HR after high-intensity exercise but not effect blood pH. The ability to reduce [La] and HR has important consequences for many sports that are intermittent in nature and consist of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with periods of low-intensity exercise or recovery.

  5. Compressed gas manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  6. Generation of Single-Cycle Light Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B C; Jovanovic, I; Armstrong, J P; Pyke, B; Crane, J K; Shuttlesworth, R

    2004-02-13

    Most optical pulses, even at the 10-femtosecond timescale, consist of several oscillations of the electric field. By producing and amplifying an ultra-broadband continuum, single cycle (e 3 fs) or shorter optical pulses may be generated. This requires a very challenging pulse-compression with sub-femtosecond accuracy. Production of these single-cycle pulses will lead to new generations of experiments in the areas of coherent control of chemical excitations and reactions, 0.1-fs high-order harmonic (XUV) generation for probing of materials and fast processes, and selective 3-D micron-scale material removal and modification. We activated the first stage of a planned three-stage optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that would ultimately produce sub-3 fs pulses. Active control with a learning algorithm was implemented to optimize the continuum generated in an argon-filled capillary and to control and optimize the final compressed pulse temporal shape. A collaboration was initiated to coherently control the population of different states upon dissociation of Rb{sub 2}. Except for one final optic, a pulse compressor and diagnostics were constructed to produce and characterize pulses in the 5-fs range from the first OPA stage.

  7. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  8. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  9. Image data compression investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  10. Electric Pulse Discharge Activated Carbon Supercapacitors for Transportation Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi; Agrawal, Jyoti

    2012-03-01

    ScienceTomorrow is developing a high-speed, low-cost process for synthesizing high-porosity electrodes for electrochemical double-layer capacitors. Four types of coal (lignite, subbituminous, bituminous, and anthracite) were used as precursor materials for spark discharge activation with multiscale porous structure. The final porosity and pore distribution depended, among other factors, on precursor type. The high gas content in low-grade carbon resulted in mechanical disintegration, whereas high capacitance was attained in higher-grade coal. The properties, including capacitance, mechanical robustness, and internal conductivity, were excellent when the cost is taken into consideration.

  11. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  12. Restoration of the ascending reticular activating system compressed by hematoma in a stroke patient

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Seo, Jeong Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We report on restoration of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), compressed by an intracerebral hematoma and perihematomal edema following a stroke. The restoration of the ARAS was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: In a 60-year-old male, a brain MRI taken at 2 weeks after the surgery showed a hematoma and perihematomal edema in the left posterolateral pons and cerebellum, which were markedly resolved on a brain MRI after 5 weeks. Diagnoses: Intraventricular hemorrhage. Interventions: Navigation-guided stereotactic drainage of a hematoma in the left cerebellum, comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including hypersomnia medication (modafinil), physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Outcomes: His hypersomnia improved significantly with rehabilitation, with no daytime hypersomnia beginning 3 weeks after the surgery. On 2-week DTT, neither the neural tract of the left lower dorsal or ventral ARAS were reconstructed, but these neural tracts were wellreconstructed on 5-week DTT. Lessons: In conclusion, restoration of nonreconstructed neural tracts of the lower ARAS with the resolution of the hematoma and perihematomal edema was demonstrated in a stroke patient, using DTT. PMID:28207526

  13. Active measurements of defect processes in shock compressed metals and other solids

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Solid samples have been routinely recovered for examination after having been subjected to high pressure shock loading. Such investigations have revealed many unique and interesting defect features and are essential if a detailed understanding of shock deformation processes is to be achieved. Nevertheless, examination of samples hours or days after they are compressed for only a few microseconds in a loading whose rise time may be subnanosecond fails to address the relationship between the residual defect structure and that existing during the loading. Electrical probes, and to a lesser extent optical probes, have provided reasonably direct measurements of defect states and some limited information on the evolution of these states. For example, measurements of the electrical resistance of metals provide an indication of vacancy concentrations. Similarly, measurements of shock-induced electrical polarization in insulating solids have provided evidence that large numbers of point defects are generated and displaced by the stress and velocity gradients within the shock fronts. Optical measurements of shock-induced bleaching of color centers in NaCl have provided some evidence for kinetics of the formation of higher-order point defects. This paper reviews the status of active measurements which have provided information about shock-induced changes in the defect state of solids.

  14. Chaotic parametric soliton-like pulses in ferromagnetic-film active ring resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, S. V. Golova, T. M.; Morozova, M. A.; Romanenko, D. V.; Seleznev, E. P.; Sysoev, I. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-10-15

    The generation of quasi-periodic sequences of parametric soliton-like pulses in an active ring resonator with a ferromagnetic film via the three-wave parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave is studied theoretically and experimentally. These dissipative structures form in time due to the competition between the cubic nonlinearity caused by parametric coupling between spin waves and the time dispersion caused by the resonant cavity that is present in a self-oscillatory system. The development of dynamic chaos due to the parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave results in irregular behavior of a phase. However, this behavior does not break a quasi-periodic pulse sequence when the gain changes over a wide range. The generated soliton-like pulses have a chaotic nature, which is supported by the maximum Lyapunov exponent estimated from experimental time series.

  15. Compression of CEP-stable multi-mJ laser pulses down to 4 fs in long hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhle, Frederik; Kretschmar, Martin; Jullien, Aurélie; Kovacs, Mate; Miranda, Miguel; Romero, Rosa; Crespo, Helder; Morgner, Uwe; Simon, Peter; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Nagy, Tamas

    2014-09-01

    Carrier-envelope phase stable 4 fs near-IR pulses with 3 mJ energy were generated by spectral broadening of circularly polarized 8 mJ pulses in a differentially pumped 2 m long composite stretched flexible hollow fiber. The pulses were characterized using both second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) and SHG d-scan methods.

  16. Data Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstein, Abraham; Storer, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduces this issue, which contains papers from the 1991 Data Compression Conference, and defines data compression. The two primary functions of data compression are described, i.e., storage and communications; types of data using compression technology are discussed; compression methods are explained; and current areas of research are…

  17. Effects of the pelvic compression belt on gluteus medius, quadratus lumborum, and lumbar multifidus activities during side-lying hip abduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Suhn-Yeop; Oh, Duck-Won

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effect of the pelvic compression belt on the electromyographic (EMG) activities of gluteus medius (GM), quadratus lumborum (QL), and lumbar multifidus (LM) during side-lying hip abduction. Thirty-one volunteers (15 men and 16 women) with no history of pathology volunteered for this study. Subjects were instructed to perform hip abduction in side-lying position with and without applying the pelvic compression belt. The pelvic compression belt was adjusted just below the anterior superior iliac spines with the stabilizing pressure using elastic compression bands. Surface EMG data were collected from the GM, QL, and LM of the dominant limb. Significantly decreased EMG activity in the QL (without the pelvic compression belt, 60.19±23.66% maximal voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]; with the pelvic compression belt, 51.44±23.00% MVIC) and significantly increased EMG activity in the GM (without the pelvic compression belt, 26.71±12.88% MVIC; with the pelvic compression belt, 35.02±18.28% MVIC) and in the LM (without the pelvic compression belt, 30.28±14.60% MVIC; with the pelvic compression belt, 37.47±18.94% MVIC) were found when the pelvic compression belt was applied (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences of the EMG activity between male and female subjects. The findings suggest that the pelvic compression belt may be helpful to prevent unwanted substitution movement during side-lying hip abduction, through increasing the GM and LM and decreasing the QL.

  18. Stimulated Raman self-scattering of femtosecond pulses. II. The self-compression of Schroedinger solitons in a spectrally inhomogeneous dispersion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Serkin, Vladimir N; Belyaeva, T L; Corro, G H; Granados, M Agueero

    2003-05-31

    It is shown that stimulated Raman self-scattering (SRSS) can be efficiently used for the compression of femtosecond optical solitons in optical fibres with the spectrally inhomogeneous frequency dependence of the group-velocity dispersion. The SRS dynamics is studied in detail near the point of the second-order zero dispersion. The saturation of compression of femtosecond solitons in spectrally inhomogeneous fibres in the zero-dispersion region is predicted. (solitons)

  19. A bismuth activation counter for high sensitivity pulsed 14 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, E. J. T.; Thacher, P. D.; Hassig, G. J.; Decker, R. D.; Romero, J. A.; Barrett, K. P.

    2011-08-01

    We have built a fast neutron bismuth activation counter that measures activation counts from pulsed 14-MeV neutron generators for incident neutron fluences between 30 and 300 neutrons/cm2 at 15.2 cm (6 in.). The activation counter consists of a large bismuth germanate (BGO) detector surrounded by a bismuth metal shield in front of and concentric with the cylindrical detector housing. The 14 MeV neutrons activate the 2.6-millisecond (ms) isomer in the shield and the detector by the reaction 209Bi (n,2nγ) 208mBi. The use of millisecond isomers and activation counting times minimizes the background from other activated materials and the environment. In addition to activation, the bismuth metal shields against other outside radiation sources. We have tested the bismuth activation counter, simultaneously, with two data acquisition systems (DASs) and both give similar results. The two-dimensional (2D) DAS and three dimensional (3D) DAS both consist of pulse height analysis (PHA) systems that can be used to discriminate against gamma radiations below 300 keV photon energy, so that the detector can be used strictly as a counter. If the counting time is restricted to less than 25 ms after the neutron pulse, there are less than 10 counts of background for single pulse operation in all our operational environments tested so far. High-fluence neutron generator operations are restricted by large dead times and pulse height saturation. When we operate our 3D DAS PHA system in list mode acquisition (LIST), real-time corrections to dead time or live time can be made on the scale of 1 ms time windows or dwell times. The live time correction is consistent with nonparalyzable models for dead time of 1.0±0.2 μs for our 3D DAS and 1.5±0.3 μs for our 2D DAS dominated by our fixed time width analog to digital converters (ADCs). With the same solid angle, we have shown that the bismuth activation counter has a factor of 4 increase in sensitivity over our lead activation counter

  20. EBSD analysis of (10–12) twinning activity in Mg–3Al–1Zn alloy during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingshu; Deng, Liping; Guo, Ning; Xu, Zeren; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    The (10–12) twinning activity of Mg–3Al–1Zn magnesium alloy during uniaxial compression at room temperature has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results indicated that the twinning activity was closely related with two angles: one was the angle between the c-axis and the compression direction and the other was the angle between the a-axis and the titling direction in the basal plane for a given relation between the c-axis and the compression direction. These two parameters can be used to explain which twinning variant will operate under the given strain path. For the grains containing a single (10–12) twinning variant, the (10–12) twinning variant occurred in a wide range of Schmid factor values (0 < Schmid factor < 0.5) and the Schmid factor rank of 1 or 2 was the most commonly observed. By contrast, for the grains containing two (10–12) twinning variants, the (10–12) twinning activity exhibited a stronger orientation dependence and the combinations of Schmid factor ranks 1–3 and 1–2 were the most commonly observed. - Highlights: • Twinning activity of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by EBSD. • (10–12) twinning shows a strong orientation dependence. • Two angles can be used to explain which twin variant will operate.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of biopolymer-antibiotic thin films fabricated by advanced pulsed laser methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Miroiu, F. M.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Gittard, S. D.; Miller, P. R.; Narayan, R. J.; Enculescu, M.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2013-08-01

    We report on thin film deposition by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of two polymer-drug composite thin film systems. A pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used to deposit composite thin films of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) containing several gentamicin concentrations. FTIR spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical structures similar to those of drop cast materials. Scanning electron microscopy data indicated that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of PDLLA-gentamicin composite thin films against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using drop testing. The influence of drug concentration on microbial viability was also assessed. Our studies indicate that polymer-drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE may be used to impart antimicrobial activity to implants, medical devices, and other contact surfaces.

  2. Determining the sizes of micropores in activated charcoals by the pulsed NMR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogelashvili, G. Sh.; Khozina, E. V.; Vartapetyan, R. Sh.; Ladychuk, D. V.; Grunin, Yu. B.

    2011-07-01

    The pulsed NMR method was used to measure the nuclear spin-spin relaxation of protons of water adsorbed in micropores of activated charcoal (AC) samples with different porous structures. A correlation was found between the spin-spin relaxation time of water protons in AC with completely filled micropores and the volume density of water primary adsorption centers in the AC samples. An equation for approximating obtained dependences is proposed that allows us to determine the volume of micropores in AC.

  3. Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-07

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6770--14-9554 Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using...of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission R.J. Commisso, J.W. Schumer, R.J. Allen, D.D. Hinshelwood, S.L...induce photofission in fissile material . We are investigating the applicability of this mechanism, using photons from bremsstrahlung, for long-range

  4. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) With Improved Selectivity Achieved By Ion Pulse Compression Using In-Source Time-of-flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V. I.; Malinovsky, A. L.; Mishin, D. V.

    2009-03-17

    This paper describes for the first time the improved selectivity of the RILIS made possible by the time-of-flight (TOF) ion bunch compression. Brief description of the compression principles and some preliminary experimental results are presented. In the off-line experiments short ion peaks of natural Li, Na, K, Tm and Yb are observed as ions leave the RILIS-TOF structure. For Tm the ion peaks of 5 {mu}s half-height duration are detected and 1 {mu}s peaks for Sn are predicted. In view of the repetition rate of the ISOLDE-RILIS lasers it is hoped that the selectivity of Sn isotopes production may be improved as much as 100 employing the RILIS with the TOF ion bunch compression and a gating technique.

  5. Modeling depth filtration of activated sludge effluent using a compressible medium filter.

    PubMed

    Caliskaner, Onder; Tchobanoglous, George

    2005-01-01

    A new filter, using a compressible-filter medium, has been evaluated for the filtration of secondary effluent. The ability to adjust the properties of the filter medium by altering the degree of the medium compression is a significant departure from conventional depth-filtration technology. Unlike conventional filters, it is possible to optimize the performance of the compressible-medium filter (CMF) by adjusting the medium properties (i.e., collector size, porosity, and depth) to respond to the variations in influent quality. Because existing filter models cannot be used to predict the performance of the CMF, a new predictive model has been developed to describe the filtration performance of the CMF and the effect of medium-compression ratio. The model accounts for the fact that the properties of the filter medium change with time and depth. The model, developed for heterodisperse suspensions and variable influent total suspended solids concentrations, can be used to predict all possible phases of filtration (i.e., ripening, constant removal, and breakthrough). A hyperbolic-type, second-order, nonlinear, partial-differential equation was derived to model the CMF. The equation was solved using the finite-difference numerical method. The accuracy of the numerical method was tested by a sensitivity analysis and a convergence test. The model is first-order accurate with respect to medium depth and time. Field data were obtained for the filtration of settled secondary effluent using a CMF with a capacity of 1200 m3/d. Model predictions were compared with observed performance from filter runs conducted at medium-compression ratios between 15 and 40% and filtration rates from 410 to 820 L/m2 min. The difference between the observed and the predicted values was found to be within 0 to 15%.

  6. Insecticidal Activity and Chemical Composition of the Morinda lucida Essential Oil against Pulse Beetle Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Owolabi, Moses S.; Ogundajo, Akintayo L.; Ogunwande, Isiaka A.; Yusuff, Olaniyi K.; Flores-Fernandez, Karen Isabel; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of essential oil extracted from Morinda lucida was tested on pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is a pest that causes serious damage to several pulses. The insecticidal activity was compared with two pesticides, Phostoxin and Primo-ban-20. 120 mixed sex adult C. maculatus were introduced, along with 30 g of cowpeas. Four concentrations (0.40, 0.20, 0.10, and 0.05 μg/mL) of the M. lucida essential oil, Phostoxin, and Primo-ban-20 were tested. Essential oil chemical composition was analyzed by GC-MS. M. lucida essential oil showed a high toxicological effect, producing 100% mortality after 72 hours at a dose of 0.20 μg/mL. M. lucida essential oil had a potent insecticidal activity (LC90 = 0.629 μg/mL) compared to both pesticides, Phostoxin (LC90 = 0.652 μg/mL) and Primo-ban-20 (LC90 = 0.726 μg/mL), at 24 h. The main compounds of the essential oil were the oxygenated monoterpenoids, 1,8-cineole (43.4%), and α-terpinyl acetate (14.5%), and the monoterpene hydrocarbons, mostly sabinene (8.2%) and β-pinene (4.0%). Results clearly indicate that M. lucida essential oil can be used as an effective alternative for pulse beetle C. maculatus control, and it could be tested against other pulse beetles affecting Asia and Africa and throughout the world, thereby reducing use of synthetic pesticides. PMID:25143991

  7. Insecticidal activity and chemical composition of the Morinda lucida essential oil against pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Moses S; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Ogundajo, Akintayo L; Ogunwande, Isiaka A; Flamini, Guido; Yusuff, Olaniyi K; Allen, Kirk; Flores-Fernandez, Karen Isabel; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of essential oil extracted from Morinda lucida was tested on pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is a pest that causes serious damage to several pulses. The insecticidal activity was compared with two pesticides, Phostoxin and Primo-ban-20. 120 mixed sex adult C. maculatus were introduced, along with 30 g of cowpeas. Four concentrations (0.40, 0.20, 0.10, and 0.05 μg/mL) of the M. lucida essential oil, Phostoxin, and Primo-ban-20 were tested. Essential oil chemical composition was analyzed by GC-MS. M. lucida essential oil showed a high toxicological effect, producing 100% mortality after 72 hours at a dose of 0.20 μg/mL. M. lucida essential oil had a potent insecticidal activity (LC90 = 0.629 μg/mL) compared to both pesticides, Phostoxin (LC90 = 0.652 μg/mL) and Primo-ban-20 (LC90 = 0.726 μg/mL), at 24 h. The main compounds of the essential oil were the oxygenated monoterpenoids, 1,8-cineole (43.4%), and α-terpinyl acetate (14.5%), and the monoterpene hydrocarbons, mostly sabinene (8.2%) and β-pinene (4.0%). Results clearly indicate that M. lucida essential oil can be used as an effective alternative for pulse beetle C. maculatus control, and it could be tested against other pulse beetles affecting Asia and Africa and throughout the world, thereby reducing use of synthetic pesticides.

  8. The evaluation of upper body muscle activity during the performance of external chest compressions in simulated hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krygiel, Rebecca G.; Waye, Abigail B.; Baptista, Rafael Reimann; Heidner, Gustavo Sandri; Rehnberg, Lucas; Russomano, Thais

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND: This original study evaluated the electromyograph (EMG) activity of four upper body muscles: triceps brachii, erector spinae, upper rectus abdominis, and pectoralis major, while external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed in simulated Martian hypogravity using a Body Suspension Device, counterweight system, and standard full body cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) mannequin. METHOD: 20 young, healthy male subjects were recruited. One hundred compressions divided into four sets, with roughly six seconds between each set to indicate 'ventilation', were performed within approximately a 1.5 minute protocol. Chest compression rate, depth and number were measured along with the subject's heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). RESULTS: All mean values were used in two-tailed t-tests using SPSS to compare +1 Gz values (control) versus simulated hypogravity values. The AHA (2005) compression standards were maintained in hypogravity. RPE and HR increased by 32% (p < 0.001) and 44% (p = 0.002), respectively, when ECCs were performed during Mars simulation, in comparison to +1 Gz. In hypogravity, the triceps brachii showed significantly less activity (p < 0.001) when compared with the other three muscles studied. The comparison of all the other muscles showed no difference at +1 Gz or in hypogravity. CONCLUSIONS: This study was among the first of its kind, however several limitations were faced which hopefully will not exist in future studies. Evaluation of a great number of muscles will allow space crews to focus on specific strengthening exercises within their current training regimes in case of a serious cardiac event in hypogravity.

  9. Development of Miniature and High-repetition-rate Magnetic Pulse Compression Circuit for Production of Streamer-like Discharge Plasmas in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Takahisa; Kouno, Kanako; Akiyama, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sakugawa, Takashi

    Pulsed power technology enables production of non-thermal plasmas with a large volume in gases by generating a high electric field at the tip of streamer discharge plasmas. Recently, all solid-state pulsed power generators which are operated with a high repetition rate, long lifetime and high reliability, have been developed aiming for industrial applications. Here, a new high-repetition-rate pulsed power generator for discharge plasmas in water is developed. The generator consists of semiconductor switches and saturable inductors. The semiconductor switches are thyristors in parallel and series circuits. An output peak voltage over 20kV is generated with a voltage rise time of 100ns, and streamer-like discharge plasmas in water are produced repetitively.

  10. Correlated patterns of tracheal compression and convective gas exchange in a carabid beetle.

    PubMed

    Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F; Waters, James S; Fezzaa, Kamel; Westneat, Mark W

    2008-11-01

    Rhythmic tracheal compression is a prominent feature of internal dynamics in multiple orders of insects. During compression parts of the tracheal system collapse, effecting a large change in volume, but the ultimate physiological significance of this phenomenon in gas exchange has not been determined. Possible functions of this mechanism include to convectively transport air within or out of the body, to increase the local pressure within the tracheae, or some combination thereof. To determine whether tracheal compressions are associated with excurrent gas exchange in the ground beetle Pterostichus stygicus, we used flow-through respirometry and synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging to simultaneously record CO(2) emission and observe morphological changes in the major tracheae. Each observed tracheal compression (which occurred at a mean frequency and duration of 15.6+/-4.2 min(-1) and 2.5+/-0.8 s, respectively) was associated with a local peak in CO(2) emission, with the start of each compression occurring simultaneously with the start of the rise in CO(2) emission. No such pulses were observed during inter-compression periods. Most pulses occurred on top of an existing level of CO(2) release, indicating that at least one spiracle was open when compression began. This evidence demonstrates that tracheal compressions convectively pushed air out of the body with each stroke. The volume of CO(2) emitted per pulse was 14+/-4 nl, representing approximately 20% of the average CO(2) emission volume during x-ray irradiation, and 13% prior to it. CO(2) pulses with similar volume, duration and frequency were observed both prior to and after x-ray beam exposure, indicating that rhythmic tracheal compression was not a response to x-ray irradiation per se. This study suggests that intra-tracheal and trans-spiracular convection of air driven by active tracheal compression may be a major component of ventilation for many insects.

  11. Active immunotherapy for cancer patients using tumor lysate pulsed dendritic cell vaccine: a safety study.

    PubMed

    Ovali, E; Dikmen, T; Sonmez, M; Yilmaz, M; Unal, A; Dalbasti, T; Kuzeyli, K; Erturk, M; Omay, S B

    2007-06-01

    Cancer vaccine therapy represents a promising therapeutical option. Consistently, with these new treatment strategies, the use of dendritic cell vaccines is becoming increasingly widespread and currently in the forefront for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in patients with advanced cancers. For this purpose, eighteen patients with relapsed or refractory cancer were vaccinated with peripheral monocyte-derived DCs generated with GM-CSF and IL-4, and pulsed consequently with 100 microg/ml of tumor lysate before maturation in culture in the presence of IL-1beta, PGE2 and TNF alpha for two days. The first two vaccinations were given intradermally every two weeks while further injections were given monthly. Tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell injections were well-tolerated in all patients with no more than grade 1 injection-related toxicity. Local inflammatory response was mainly erythematous which subsided in 48 hrs time. No end organ toxicity or autoimmune toxicity was identified. Clinical responses observed in our study were satisfactory for a phase I clinical study. We observed 4 (22%) objective clinical responses. These responses are significantly correlated with delayed type hypersensitivity testing (DTH) (p < 0.01). The results showed that this active immunotherapy is feasible, safe, and may be capable of eliciting immune responses against cancer.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dependence of pressure in a compressed condensed matter on parameters of high-power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, A. I.; Lebo, I. G.; Batani, D.

    2008-08-01

    Based on analysis of two-dimensional numerical calculations and experiments performed on the PALS setup, the similarity relations are obtained for determining pressure in a condensed matter irradiated by a short laser pulse of intensity 5×1013-5×1014 W cm-2.

  13. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  14. Pulsed infrared light alters neural activity in rat somatosensory cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Friedman, Robert M.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahavaden-Jansen, Anita; Roe, Anna W.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed infrared light has shown promise as an alternative to electrical stimulation in applications where contact free or high spatial precision stimulation are desired. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is well characterized in the peripheral nervous system; however, to date, research has been limited in the central nervous system. In this study, pulsed infrared light (λ=1.875 μm, pulse width=250 μs, radiant exposure=0.01–0.55 J/cm2, fiber size=400 μm, repetition rate=50–200 Hz) was used to stimulate the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats, and its efficacy was assessed using intrinsic optical imaging and electrophysiology techniques. INS was found to evoke an intrinsic response of similar magnitude to that evoked by tactile stimulation (0.3–0.4% change in intrinsic signal magnitude). A maximum deflection in the intrinsic signal was measured to range from 0.05% to 0.4% in response to INS, and the activated region of cortex measured approximately 2 mm in diameter. The intrinsic signal magnitude increased with faster laser repetition rates and increasing radiant exposures. Single unit recordings indicated a statistically significant decrease in neuronal firing that was observed at the onset of INS stimulation (0.5 s stimulus) and continued up to 1 s after stimulation onset. The pattern of neuronal firing differed from that observed during tactile stimulation, potentially due to a different spatial integration field of the pulsed infrared light compared to tactile stimulation. The results demonstrate that INS can be used safely and effectively to manipulate neuronal firing. PMID:21513806

  15. Pulse Wave Amplitude Drops during Sleep are Reliable Surrogate Markers of Changes in Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Delessert, Alexandre; Espa, Fabrice; Rossetti, Andrea; Lavigne, Gilles; Tafti, Mehdi; Heinzer, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Background: During sleep, sudden drops in pulse wave amplitude (PWA) measured by pulse oximetry are commonly associated with simultaneous arousals and are thought to result from autonomic vasoconstriction. In the present study, we determine whether PWA drops were associated with changes in cortical activity as determined by EEG spectral analysis. Methods: A 20% decrease in PWA was chosen as a minimum for a drop. A total of 1085 PWA drops from 10 consecutive sleep recordings were analyzed. EEG spectral analysis was performed over 5 consecutive epochs of 5 seconds: 2 before, 1 during, and 2 after the PWA drop. EEG spectral analysis was performed over delta, theta, alpha, sigma, and beta frequency bands. Within each frequency band, power density was compared across the five 5-sec epochs. Presence or absence of visually scored EEG arousals were adjudicated by an investigator blinded to the PWA signal and considered associated with PWA drop if concomitant. Results: A significant increase in EEG power density in all EEG frequency bands was found during PWA drops (P < 0.001) compared to before and after drop. Even in the absence of visually scored arousals, PWA drops were associated with a significant increase in EEG power density (P < 0.001) in most frequency bands. Conclusions: Drops in PWA are associated with a significant increase in EEG power density, suggesting that these events can be used as a surrogate for changes in cortical activity during sleep. This approach may prove of value in scoring respiratory events on limited-channel (type III) portable monitors. Citation: Delessert A; Espa F; Rossetti A; Lavigne G; Tafti M; Heinzer R. Pulse wave amplitude drops during sleep are reliable surrogate markers of changes in cortical activity. SLEEP 2010;33(12):1687-1692. PMID:21120131

  16. Active Control of Unsteady Gasdynamics for Shock Compression and Turbulence Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    the combustor . With correct timing the system will ignite, providing a high pressure, supersonic flame at the combustor exit. Other methods for pulsed...air systems have been explored, but the electromagnetic solenoid was chosen for its cost and ease of implementation [9, 10]. 3 The combustor used in... combustor . Additionally, the computational model of the experimental system is described. Section 3 discusses the design and creation of the two optical

  17. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  18. Steady-state analysis of activated sludge processes with a settler model including sludge compression.

    PubMed

    Diehl, S; Zambrano, J; Carlsson, B

    2016-01-01

    A reduced model of a completely stirred-tank bioreactor coupled to a settling tank with recycle is analyzed in its steady states. In the reactor, the concentrations of one dominant particulate biomass and one soluble substrate component are modelled. While the biomass decay rate is assumed to be constant, growth kinetics can depend on both substrate and biomass concentrations, and optionally model substrate inhibition. Compressive and hindered settling phenomena are included using the Bürger-Diehl settler model, which consists of a partial differential equation. Steady-state solutions of this partial differential equation are obtained from an ordinary differential equation, making steady-state analysis of the entire plant difficult. A key result showing that the ordinary differential equation can be replaced with an approximate algebraic equation simplifies model analysis. This algebraic equation takes the location of the sludge-blanket during normal operation into account, allowing for the limiting flux capacity caused by compressive settling to easily be included in the steady-state mass balance equations for the entire plant system. This novel approach grants the possibility of more realistic solutions than other previously published reduced models, comprised of yet simpler settler assumptions. The steady-state concentrations, solids residence time, and the wastage flow ratio are functions of the recycle ratio. Solutions are shown for various growth kinetics; with different values of biomass decay rate, influent volumetric flow, and substrate concentration.

  19. The Effect of Compression Stockings on Physiological and Psychological Responses after 5-km Performance in Recreationally Active Females.

    PubMed

    Treseler, Christine; Bixby, Walter R; Nepocatych, Svetlana

    2016-07-01

    Treseler, C, Bixby, WR, and Nepocatych, S. The effect of compression stockings on physiological and psychological responses after 5-Km performance in recreationally active females. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1985-1991, 2016-The purpose of the study was to examine the physiological and perceptual responses to wearing below-the-knee compression stockings (CS) after a 5-km running performance in recreationally active women. Nineteen women were recruited to participate in the study (20 ± 1 year, 61.4 ± 5.3 kg, 22.6 ± 3.9% body fat). Each participant completed two 5-km performance time trials with CS or regular socks in a counterbalanced order separated by 1 week. For each session, 5-km time, heart rate (HR), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), pain pressure threshold, muscle soreness (MS), and rate of perceived recovery were measured. There was no significant difference in average 5-km times between CS and regular socks (p = 0.74) and HR response (p = 0.42). However, significantly higher RPE and lower gain scores (%) for lower extremity MS but not for calf were observed with CS when compared with regular socks (p = 0.05, p = 0.01, and p = 0.3, respectively). Based on the results of this study, there were no significant improvements in average 5-km running time, heart rate, or perceived calf MS. However, participants perceived less MS in lower extremities and working harder with CS compared with regular socks. Compression stockings may not cause significant physiological improvements; however, there might be psychological benefits positively affecting postexercise recovery.

  20. Excitation and relaxation of metastable atomic states in an active medium of a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A; Lyabin, N A; Chursin, A D

    2016-02-28

    The influence of a pre-pulse population of copper atom metastable states and their sub-population at a current pulse edge on the copper vapour laser pulse energy is studied under optimal temperature conditions. Experiments have been performed with active elements of a commercial laser having an internal diameter of a discharge channel of 14 and 20 mm. It is found that at a pulse repetition frequency of 12 – 14 kHz, corresponding to a maximal output power, the reduction of the energy due to a residual population of metastable states is by an order of magnitude less than due to their sub-population at a current pulse edge. The modelling based on the experimental results obtained has shown that in the case of an active element with an internal diameter of 14 mm, a decrease in the pulse leading edge from ∼25 ns to 0.6 ns does not reduce the laser pulse energy up to the repetition frequency of ∼50 kHz at an average output power of 70 W m{sup -1} and efficiency of ∼11%. (lasers)

  1. Actively cooled plasma electrode for long pulse operations in a cesium-seeded negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Trainham, Rusty; Jacquot, Claude

    2005-01-01

    An actively cooled plasma electrode has been developed for long pulse operation in a cesium-seeded negative ion source. To keep the electrode temperature at about 300°C, which is the optimum range of temperature to enhance cesium effects, the electrode cooling structure has been designed using three-dimensional numerical simulation assuming that the heat flux from the source plasma was 15W/cm2. Water cooling tubes were brazed to the plasma electrode substrate with spacers made of stainless steel, which acts as a thermal resistance. The fabricated plasma electrode has been tested in a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source called Kamaboko source. The temperature of the electrode reached 280°C for the arc power of 41kW, which is the operating condition required for producing D- beams with current densities exceeding 20mA/cm2. It was demonstrated that the actively cooled plasma electrode is applicable to long pulse operations, meeting the temperature requirement for optimizing the surface-production process of negative ions in the cesium-seeded ion source.

  2. Clicks, whistles and pulses: Passive and active signal use in dolphin communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzing, Denise L.

    2014-12-01

    The search for signals out of noise is a problem not only with radio signals from the sky but in the study of animal communication. Dolphins use multiple modalities to communicate including body postures, touch, vision, and most elaborately sound. Like SETI radio signal searches, dolphin sound analysis includes the detection, recognition, analysis, and interpretation of signals. Dolphins use both passive listening and active production to communicate. Dolphins use three main types of acoustic signals: frequency modulated whistles (narrowband with harmonics), echolocation (broadband clicks) and burst pulsed sounds (packets of closely spaced broadband clicks). Dolphin sound analysis has focused on frequency-modulated whistles, yet the most commonly used signals are burst-pulsed sounds which, due to their graded and overlapping nature and bimodal inter-click interval (ICI) rates are hard to categorize. We will look at: 1) the mechanism of sound production and categories of sound types, 2) sound analysis techniques and information content, and 3) examples of lessons learned in the study of dolphin acoustics. The goal of this paper is to provide perspective on how animal communication studies might provide insight to both passive and active SETI in the larger context of searching for life signatures.

  3. Gravity drainage of activated sludge: new experimental method and considerations of settling velocity, specific cake resistance and cake compressibility.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Dominik; Christensen, Morten; Keiding, Kristian; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2011-02-01

    A laboratory scale setup was used for characterization of gravitational drainage of waste activated sludge. The aim of the study was to assess how time of drainage and cake dry matter depended on volumetric load, SS content and sludge floc properties. It was demonstrated that activated sludge forms compressible cakes, even at the low pressures found in gravitational drainage. The values of specific cake resistance were two to three orders of magnitude lower than those obtained in pressure filtration. Despite the compressible nature of sludge, key macroscopic parameters such as time of drainage and cake solid content showed simple functional dependency of the volumetric load and SS of a given sludge. This suggests that the proposed method may be applied for design purposes without the use of extensive numerical modeling. The possibilities for application of this new technique are, among others, the estimation of sludge drainability prior to mechanical dewatering on a belt filter, or the application of surplus sludge on reed beds, as well as adjustments of sludge loading, concentration or sludge pre-treatment in order to optimize the drainage process.

  4. The 2001 April Burst Activation of SGR 1900-14: Pulse Properties and Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Finger, M. H.; Feroci, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Swank, J. H.; Hurley, K.; Heise, J.; Smith D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on observations of SGR 1900+14 made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAXduring the 2001 April burst activation of the source. Using these data, we measure the spin-down torque on the star and confirm earlier findings that the torque and burst activity are not directly correlated. We compare the X-ray pulse profile to the gamma-ray profile during the April 18 intermediate flare and show that (1) their shapes are similar and (1) the gamma-ray profile aligns closely in phase with the X-ray pulsations. The good phase alignment of the gamma-ray and X-ray profiles suggests that there was no rapid spin-down following this flare of the magnitude inferred for the August 27 giant flare. We discuss how these observations further constrain magnetic field reconfiguration models for the large flares of SGRs.

  5. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  6. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  7. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  8. Intense THz pulses cause H2AX phosphorylation and activate DNA damage response in human skin tissue

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Golubov, Andrey; Fogen, Dawson; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Recent emergence and growing use of terahertz (THz) radiation for medical imaging and public security screening raise questions on reasonable levels of exposure and health consequences of this form of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, picosecond-duration THz pulses have shown promise for novel diagnostic imaging techniques. However, the effects of THz pulses on human cells and tissues thus far remain largely unknown. We report on the investigation of the biological effects of pulsed THz radiation on artificial human skin tissues. We observe that exposure to intense THz pulses for ten minutes leads to a significant induction of H2AX phosphorylation, indicating that THz pulse irradiation may cause DNA damage in exposed skin tissue. At the same time, we find a THz-pulse-induced increase in the levels of several proteins responsible for cell-cycle regulation and tumor suppression, suggesting that DNA damage repair mechanisms are quickly activated. Furthermore, we find that the cellular response to pulsed THz radiation is significantly different from that induced by exposure to UVA (400 nm). PMID:23577291

  9. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  10. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  11. Flow measurement by pulsed-neutron activation techniques at the PKL facility at Erlangen (Germany). [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kehler, P.

    1982-03-01

    Flow velocities in the downcomer at the PKL facility (in Erlangen, Germany) were measured by the Pulsed-Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. This was the first time that a fully automated PNA system, incorporating a dedicated computer for on-line data reduction, was used for flow measurements. A prototype of a portable, pulsed, high-output neutron source, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was also successfully demonstrated during this test. The PNA system was the primary flow-measuring device used at the PKL, covering the whole range of velocities of interest. In this test series, the PKL simulated small-break accidents similar to the one that occurred at TMI. The flow velocities in the downcomer were, therefore, very low, ranging between 0.03 and 0.35 m/sec. Two additional flow-measuring methods were used over a smaller range of velocities. Wherever comparison was possible, the PNA-derived velocity values agreed well with the measurements performed by the two more conventional methods.

  12. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  13. Effects of Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Treatment on Enhancing Activity and Conformation of α-Amylase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei-ling; Fang, Ting; Du, Mu-ying; Zhang, Fu-sheng

    2016-04-01

    To explore an efficient, safe, and speedy application of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology for enzymatic modification, effects of PEF treatment on the enzymatic activity, property and kinetic parameters of α-amylase were investigated. Conformational transitions were also studied with the aid of circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectra. The maximum enzymatic activity of α-amylase was obtained under 15 kV/cm electric field intensity and 100 mL/min flow velocity PEF treatment, in which the enzymatic activity increased by 22.13 ± 1.14% compared with control. The activation effect could last for 18 h at 4 °C. PEF treatment could widen the range of optimum temperature for α-amylase, however, it barely exerted any effect on the optimum pH. On the other hand, α-amylase treated by PEF showed an increase of Vmax, t1/2 and ΔG, whereas a decrease of Km and k were observed. Furthermore, it can be observed from fluorescence and CD spectra that PEF treatment had increased the number of amino acid residues, especially that of tryptophan, on α-amylase surface with enhanced α-helices by 34.76% and decreased random coil by 12.04% on α-amylase when compared with that of untreated. These changes in structure had positive effect on enhancing α-amylase activity and property.

  14. Up-Regulation of Pain Behavior and Glial Activity in the Spinal Cord after Compression and Application of Nucleus Pulposus onto the Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Norimoto, Masaki; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Miyako; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Inoue, Gen; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Nakamura, Junichi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Experimental animal study. Purpose To evaluate pain-related behavior and changes in glial activity in the spinal dorsal horn after combined sciatic nerve compression and nucleus pulposus (NP) application in rats. Overview of Literature Mechanical compression and inflammation caused by prostaglandins and cytokines at disc herniation sites induce pain. Structural changes and pain-associated cytokines in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal dorsal horn contribute to prolonged pain. Glial cells in the spinal dorsal horn may also function in pain transmission. Methods The sciatic nerve was compressed with NP for 2 seconds using forceps in the NP+nerve compression group; the sham-operated group received neither compression nor NP; and the control group received no operation. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured for 3 weeks using von Frey filaments. Glial activity in the spinal dorsal horn was examined 7 days and 14 days postsurgery using anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein and anti-Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 antibodies to detect astrocytes and microglia, respectively. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was detected throughout the 14-day observation in the NP+nerve compression group, but not in control or sham-operated groups (p<0.05). Both astrocytes and microglia were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of the NP+nerve compression group compared to control and sham groups on days 7 and 14 (p<0.05). Conclusions Nerve compression with NP application produces pain-related behavior, and up-regulates astrocytes and microglia in the spinal dorsal horn, suggesting that these glia may be related to pain transmission. PMID:25346806

  15. Nerve compression activates selective nociceptive pathways and upregulates peripheral sodium channel expression in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Laura Rummler; Palispis, Winnie Anne; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are common musculoskeletal conditions that affect patients with debilitating loss of sensory function and pain. Although early detection and treatment are important, our understanding of pain-related molecular mechanisms remains largely unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using an animal model for CNC injury. To confirm that CNC injury induces pain, we assessed expression of c-fos, a gene that is rapidly expressed in spinal sensory afferents in response to painful peripheral stimuli, and TNF-alpha and IL-6, two proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial to development of inflammatory-mediated pain. Results show c-fos upregulation 1-2 weeks postinjury in the absence of TNF-alpha or IL-6 expression, indicating increased neural sensitivity without an inflammatory response. This is consistent with previous studies that showed no morphologic evidence of inflammation in the CNC model. Surprisingly, we also found de novo expression of Na(V)1.8, a sodium channel linked to the development of neuropathic pain, in endoneurial Schwann cells following injury. Until now, Na(V)1.8 expression was thought to be restricted to sensory neurons. CNC injury appears to be a unique model of noninflammatory neuropathic pain. Further investigation of the underlying molecular basis could yield promising targets for early diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Compressive Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Se Hoon

    Compressive holography estimates images from incomplete data by using sparsity priors. Compressive holography combines digital holography and compressive sensing. Digital holography consists of computational image estimation from data captured by an electronic focal plane array. Compressive sensing enables accurate data reconstruction by prior knowledge on desired signal. Computational and optical co-design optimally supports compressive holography in the joint computational and optical domain. This dissertation explores two examples of compressive holography: estimation of 3D tomographic images from 2D data and estimation of images from under sampled apertures. Compressive holography achieves single shot holographic tomography using decompressive inference. In general, 3D image reconstruction suffers from underdetermined measurements with a 2D detector. Specifically, single shot holographic tomography shows the uniqueness problem in the axial direction because the inversion is ill-posed. Compressive sensing alleviates the ill-posed problem by enforcing some sparsity constraints. Holographic tomography is applied for video-rate microscopic imaging and diffuse object imaging. In diffuse object imaging, sparsity priors are not valid in coherent image basis due to speckle. So incoherent image estimation is designed to hold the sparsity in incoherent image basis by support of multiple speckle realizations. High pixel count holography achieves high resolution and wide field-of-view imaging. Coherent aperture synthesis can be one method to increase the aperture size of a detector. Scanning-based synthetic aperture confronts a multivariable global optimization problem due to time-space measurement errors. A hierarchical estimation strategy divides the global problem into multiple local problems with support of computational and optical co-design. Compressive sparse aperture holography can be another method. Compressive sparse sampling collects most of significant field

  17. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery.

  18. generation of picosecond pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported of investigations aimed at generating nanosecond radiation pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media having broad gain lines. Passive mode locking is accomplished for the first time in a BeLa:Nd/sup 3/ laser at a wavelength 1.354 microm, and in a YAG:Nd/sup 3/ laser on a 1.32-microm transition. The free lasing and mode-locking regimes were investigated in an alexandrite (BeA1/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3/) laser in the 0.72-0.78-microm range and in a synchronously pumped laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers in LiF in the 1.12-1.24-microm region. The features of nonlinear perception of IR radiation by the eye, using a developed picosecond laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers, are investigated for the first time.

  19. Neutron activation system for spectral measurements of pulsed ion diode neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Kruse, L.W.

    1980-02-01

    A neutron energy spectrometer has been developed to study intense ion beam-target interactions in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. The main component is a neutron threshold activation system employing two multiplexed high efficiency Ge(Li) detectors, an annihilation gamma coincidence system, and a pneumatic sample transport. Additional constraints on the neutron spectrum are provided by total neutron yield and time-of-flight measurements. A practical lower limit on the total neutron yield into 4..pi.. required for a spectral measurement with this system is approx. 10/sup 10/ n where the neutron yield is predominantly below 4 MeV and approx. 10/sup 8/ n when a significant fraction of the yield is above 4 MeV. Applications of this system to pulsed ion diode neutron production experiments on Hermes II are described.

  20. Single-Active-Electron Approximation for Describing Molecules in Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Alejandro; Awasthi, Manohar; Vanne, Yulian; Castro, Alberto; Decleva, Piero

    2008-05-01

    A numerical approach that allows for the solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (TDSE) describing molecules exposed to intense short laser pulses was developed. The molecular response to the strong field is described within the single-active electron approximation (SAE). The method is applied to molecular hydrogen and the validity of the SAE is investigated by comparing the ionization and electronic excitation yields to full two-electron solutions of the TDSE. The present results are also used to investigate the validity of approximate SAE methods like the molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov and the strong-field approximation. Finally, results for larger molecules like O2, N2, and C2H2 (acetylene) are presented.

  1. The prediction of filter belt press dewatering efficiency for activated sludge by experimentation on filtration compression cells.

    PubMed

    Olivier, J; Vaxelaire, J

    2004-12-01

    The filter belt press is commonly used to dewater activated sludge. However, little research has been done on this process and the prediction of its efficiency. Experimentation has been carried out in a filtration compression cell (FCC) and in a pilot scale filter belt press. It offers a way of determining filter belt press efficiency thanks to simple laboratory research. The pressure distribution around the pressing roller was measured inside the pilot scale filter belt press. It showed progressive increase (up to a certain maximum value: plateau), which was followed by a rapid decrease. The impact of the progressive increase of applied pressure onto the dry solid sludge content was observed in FCC. Similar dry solid contents were obtained from both the above laboratory devices when the application of the pressure is comparable (in time and increasing rate).

  2. Strain rate sensitivity and activation volume of Cu/Ni metallic multilayer thin films measured via micropillar compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. S.; Misra, A.; Uchic, M. D.; Anderson, P. M.

    2012-07-01

    Micropillar compression testing with repeated jumps in strain rate is used to circumvent inherent difficulties associated with nanoindentation and tensile testing of free-standing films. Application to sputtered 21 nm/21 nm Cu/Ni multilayer thin films with a cube-on-cube texture reveals an average strain rate sensitivity (m = 0.014) and activation volume (V = 17 b3), comparable to nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals. Yet, m increases by ˜50% and V decreases by 70% with increasing strain, opposite to trends reported for nanotwinned Cu. The large, strain-dependent shifts in m and V are dependent on the underlying misfit dislocation structure of Cu/Ni interfaces.

  3. [Analysis of pulsed bioelectric activity of rabbit cerebral cortex in response to low-intensity microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, S N; Monseeva, N V

    1998-01-01

    In experiments on 22 rabbits the influence of a pulse microwave irradiation on extracellular activity of separate nervous cells of sensorimotori and occipital areas of a cortex brain is shown. The reaction could consist in activation or in braking frequency of the discharges, that was connected to frequency impulsation in an initial background. The researched mode of a microwave irradiation (1.5 GHz, duration of a pulsed-0.4 microsecond, frequency of their recurrence 1000 Hz, DFEpulsed-300 microW/sm2) had a corrigizing action.

  4. A comparative study of the bactericidal activity and daily disinfection housekeeping surfaces by a new portable pulsed UV radiation device.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Kazuo; Asai, Satomi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Miyachi, Hayato

    2012-06-01

    Daily cleaning and disinfecting of non-critical surfaces in the patient-care areas are known to reduce the occurrence of health care-associated infections. However, the conventional means for decontamination of housekeeping surfaces of sites of frequent hand contact such as manual disinfection using ethanol wipes are laborious and time-consuming in daily practice. This study evaluated a newly developed portable pulsed ultraviolet (UV) radiation device for its bactericidal activity in comparison with continuous UV-C, and investigated its effect on the labor burden when implemented in a hospital ward. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin-resistant A. baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Bacillus cereus were irradiated with pulsed UV or continuous UV-C. Pulsed UV and continuous UV-C required 5 and 30 s of irradiation, respectively, to attain bactericidal activity with more than 2Log growth inhibition of all the species. The use of pulsed UV in daily disinfection of housekeeping surfaces reduced the working hours by half in comparison to manual disinfection using ethanol wipes. The new portable pulsed UV radiation device was proven to have a bactericidal activity against critical nosocomial bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria after short irradiation, and was thus found to be practical as a method for disinfecting housekeeping surfaces and decreasing the labor burden.

  5. Femtosecond compressed-nitrogen Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    We have estimated the minimum laser pulse duration at which stimulated Raman scattering in gases is possible. Femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser pulses have been converted to the first Stokes in compressed nitrogen using double-pulse pumping of a gas-filled capillary tube by orthogonally polarised chirped pulses. We have obtained 980-nm Stokes pulses of 51 fs duration. The energy conversion efficiency was 12% at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz and average laser output power of 2 W.

  6. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  7. Active pulse shaping for end-pumped Nd:YVO4 amplifier with high gain.

    PubMed

    Nie, Mingming; Liu, Qiang; Ji, Encai; Cao, Xuezhe; Fu, Xing; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-15

    We demonstrated the active shaping for a solid-state Nd:YVO4 amplifier with a high average gain of 39.2 dB. The average output power was 8.3 W with respect to the input power of 1 mW. A range of common and useful pulse shapes was generated at the final output. In addition, a very flat square pulse was produced with a root-mean-square less than 3% in amplitude. A numerical method was proposed to realize active shaping without an experimental test for the Nd:YVO4 amplifier, showing great potential for the design of lasers with both high peak power (>100  kW) and a desired pulse shape.

  8. Influence of lasing parameters on the cleaning efficacy of laser-activated irrigation with pulsed erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Havelaerts, Sophie; De Moor, Roeland J

    2016-05-01

    Laser-activated irrigation (LAI) using erbium lasers is an irrigant agitation technique with great potential for improved cleaning of the root canal system, as shown in many in vitro studies. However, lasing parameters for LAI vary considerably and their influence remains unclear. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the influence of pulse energy, pulse frequency, pulse length, irradiation time and fibre tip shape, position and diameter on the cleaning efficacy of LAI. Transparent resin blocks containing standardized root canals (apical diameter of 0.4 mm, 6% taper, 15 mm long, with a coronal reservoir) were used as the test model. A standardized groove in the apical part of each canal wall was packed with stained dentin debris. The canals were filled with irrigant, which was activated by an erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2940 nm, AT Fidelis, Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia). In each experiment, one laser parameter was varied, while the others remained constant. In this way, the influence of pulse energy (10-40 mJ), pulse length (50-1000 μs), frequency (5-30 Hz), irradiation time (5-40 s) and fibre tip shape (flat or conical), position (pulp chamber, canal entrance, next to groove) and diameter (300-600 μm) was determined by treating 20 canals per parameter. The amount of debris remaining in the groove after each LAI procedure was scored and compared among the different treatments. The parameters significantly (P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis) affecting debris removal from the groove were fibre tip position, pulse length, pulse energy, irradiation time and frequency. Fibre tip shape and diameter had no significant influence on the cleaning efficacy.

  9. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  10. Resuscitation of the rare biosphere contributes to pulses of ecosystem activity

    PubMed Central

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Jones, Stuart E.; Fierer, Noah; Lennon, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy is a life history trait that may have important implications for linking microbial communities to the functioning of natural and managed ecosystems. Rapid changes in environmental cues may resuscitate dormant bacteria and create pulses of ecosystem activity. In this study, we used heavy-water (H182O) stable isotope probing (SIP) to identify fast-growing bacteria that were associated with pulses of trace gasses (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from different ecosystems [agricultural site, grassland, deciduous forest, and coniferous forest (CF)] following a soil-rewetting event. Irrespective of ecosystem type, a large fraction (69–74%) of the bacteria that responded to rewetting were below detection limits in the dry soils. Based on the recovery of sequences, in just a few days, hundreds of rare taxa increased in abundance and in some cases became dominant members of the rewetted communities, especially bacteria belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae, and Oxalobacteraceae. Resuscitation led to dynamic shifts in the rank abundance of taxa that caused previously rare bacteria to comprise nearly 60% of the sequences that were recovered in rewetted communities. This rapid turnover of the bacterial community corresponded with a 5–20-fold increase in the net production of CO2 and up to a 150% reduction in the net production of CH4 from rewetted soils. Results from our study demonstrate that the rare biosphere may account for a large and dynamic fraction of a community that is important for the maintenance of bacterial biodiversity. Moreover, our findings suggest that the resuscitation of rare taxa from seed banks contribute to ecosystem functioning. PMID:25688238

  11. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  12. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  13. Propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in active one-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Ostatochnikov, V A

    2015-02-28

    The propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in onedimensional photonic crystals with gain is considered. A correct expression is derived for the delay time of the pulse maximum. This expression takes into account the input pulse characteristics: duration, frequency modulation and spectrum position in the photonic band gap. The analytical results are basically in agreement with the results of numerical simulation. The influence of gain in the photonic-crystal structure is considered. It is shown that the parameters of a transmitted pulse can be controlled by changing the inputpulse frequency modulation. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  15. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application.

  16. The 2001 April Burst Activation of SGR 1900+14: Pulse Properties and Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Finger, M. H.; Feroci, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Swank, J. H.; Hurley, K.; Heise, J.; Smith, D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on observations of SGR 1900+14 made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAX during the April 2001 burst activation of the source. Using these data, we measure the spindown torque on the star and confirm earlier findings that the torque and burst activity are not directly correlated. We compare the X-ray pulse profile to the gamma-ray profile during the April 18 intermediate flare and show that (i) their shapes are similar and (ii) the gamma-ray profile aligns closely in phase with the X-ray pulsations. The good phase alignment of the gamma-ray and X-ray profiles suggests that there was no rapid spindown following this flare, in contrast to the August 27 giant flare. The absence of rapid spindown in the hours following the April 18 flare suggests that there was no significant outflow of material as was believed to be present following the August 27 flare. Finally, we discuss how these observations further constrain magnetic field reconfiguration models for the large flares of SGRs.

  17. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Compressive nonlinearity in the hair bundle's active response to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Hudspeth, A J

    2001-12-04

    The auditory system's ability to interpret sounds over a wide range of amplitudes rests on the nonlinear responsiveness of the ear. Whether measured by basilar-membrane vibration, nerve-fiber activity, or perceived loudness, the ear is most sensitive to small signals and grows progressively less responsive as stimulation becomes stronger. Seeking a correlate of this behavior at the level of mechanoelectrical transduction, we examined the responses of hair bundles to direct mechanical stimulation. As reported by the motion of an attached glass fiber, an active hair bundle from the bullfrog's sacculus oscillates spontaneously. Sinusoidal movement of the fiber's base by as little as +/-1 nm, corresponding to the application at the bundle's top of a force of +/-0.3 pN, causes detectable phase-locking of the bundle's oscillations to the stimulus. Although entrainment increases as the stimulus grows, the amplitude of the hair-bundle movement does not rise until phase-locking is nearly complete. A bundle is most sensitive to stimulation at its frequency of spontaneous oscillation. Far from that frequency, the sensitivity of an active hair bundle resembles that of a passive bundle. Over most of its range, an active hair bundle's response grows as the one-third power of the stimulus amplitude; the bundle's sensitivity declines accordingly in proportion to the negative two-thirds power of the excitation. This scaling behavior, also found in the response of the mammalian basilar membrane to sound, signals the operation of an amplificatory process at the brink of an oscillatory instability, a Hopf bifurcation.

  19. Tunable WDM sampling pulse streams using a spatial phase modulator in a biased pulse shaper.

    PubMed

    Sinefeld, David; Shayovitz, Dror; Golani, Ori; Marom, Dan M

    2014-02-01

    We generate transform-limited WDM optical sampling pulse bursts by filtering ultrashort pulses from a mode-locked laser. A phase spatial light modulator (SLM) is used in a biased pulse shaper to circumvent the need to modulate with 2π phase wraps, which are known to limit the phase response. The arrangement compresses and retimes user-selectable bandwidths from the optical short pulse source with precise control of pulse bandwidth, pulse stream rates, and duty cycle.

  20. Mapping Horizontal Spread of Activity in Monkey Motor Cortex Using Single Pulse Microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Riehle, Alexa; Brochier, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical studies have demonstrated that distant cortical points are interconnected through long range axon collaterals of pyramidal cells. However, the functional properties of these intrinsic synaptic connections, especially their relationship with the cortical representations of body movements, have not been systematically investigated. To address this issue, we used multielectrode arrays chronically implanted in the motor cortex of two rhesus monkeys to analyze the effects of single-pulse intracortical microstimulation (sICMS) applied at one electrode on the neuronal activities recorded at all other electrodes. The temporal and spatial distribution of the evoked responses of single and multiunit activities was quantified to determine the properties of horizontal propagation. The typical responses were characterized by a brief excitatory peak followed by inhibition of longer duration. Significant excitatory responses to sICMS could be evoked up to 4 mm away from the stimulation site, but the strength of the response decreased exponentially and its latency increased linearly with the distance. We then quantified the direction and strength of the propagation in relation to the somatotopic organization of the motor cortex. We observed that following sICMS the propagation of neural activity is mainly directed rostro-caudally near the central sulcus but follows medio-lateral direction at the most anterior electrodes. The fact that these interactions are not entirely symmetrical may characterize a critical functional property of the motor cortex for the control of upper limb movements. Overall, these results support the assumption that the motor cortex is not functionally homogeneous but forms a complex network of interacting subregions. PMID:28018182

  1. Proposal for Wireless Power Distribution System with Capacitive Coupling Using One-Pulse Switching Active Capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funato, Hirohito; Chiku, Yuki; Harakawa, Ken-Ichi

    Wireless electric power distribution is an attractive means of supplying power to mobile equipment such as mobile phones and electric vehicles. Magnetic field coupling is the most popular method for wireless power distribution. However, this method has certain disadvantages such as power decrease in the case of inexact placement of couplings. Wireless power distribution with capacitive coupling has been proposed to overcome the disadvantages of wireless power distribution with magnetic field coupling. It is, however, difficult to transfer high power owing to the small capacitance of capacitive coupling. The authors propose a new power converter suitable for wireless power distribution with capacitive coupling using a novel one-pulse switching active capacitor (OPSAC) to enhance power transfer. The proposed system improves the power transfer efficiency without LC resonance and is hence robust to parameter change. In this paper, a wireless power distribution system with improved OPSAC (I-OPSAC) is proposed. In the I-OPSAC, the dc voltage source for the inverter is replaced by a capacitor because the OPSAC behaves like a reactive element. The I-OPSAC shows stable operation without any feedback loop including dc capacitor voltage control. In this paper, a control scheme and the detailed operational characteristics are reported, in addition to the simulations and experimental results.

  2. Activation of endogenous opioid gene expression in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts by pulsed radiofrequency energy fields

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John; Fray, Linley M; Kubat, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulsed radiofrequency energy (PRFE) fields are being used increasingly for the treatment of pain arising from dermal trauma. However, despite their increased use, little is known about the biological and molecular mechanism(s) responsible for PRFE-mediated analgesia. In general, current therapeutics used for analgesia target either endogenous factors involved in inflammation, or act on endogenous opioid pathways. Methods and Results Using cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), we investigated the effect of PRFE treatment on factors, which are involved in modulating peripheral analgesia in vivo. We found that PRFE treatment did not inhibit cyclooxygenase enzyme activity, but instead had a positive effect on levels of endogenous opioid precursor mRNA (proenkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, prodynorphin) and corresponding opioid peptide. In HEK cells, increases in opioid mRNA were dependent, at least in part, on endothelin-1. In HDF cells, additional pathways also appear to be involved. PRFE treatment was also followed by changes in endogenous expression of several cytokines, including increased levels of interleukin-10 mRNA and decreased levels of interleukin-1β mRNA in both cell types. Conclusion These findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying PRFE-mediated analgesia reported in the clinical setting. PMID:23055776

  3. Characteristics and Antitumor Activity of Morchella esculenta Polysaccharide Extracted by Pulsed Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Sun, Yonghai; Mao, Qian; Guo, Xiaolei; Li, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Na

    2016-06-22

    Polysaccharides from Morchella esculenta have been proven to be functional and helpful for humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical structure and anti-proliferating and antitumor activities of a Morchella esculenta polysaccharide (MEP) extracted by pulsed electric field (PEF) in submerged fermentation. The endo-polysaccharide was separated and purified by column chromatography and Gel permeation chromatography, and analyzed by gas chromatography. The MEP with an average molecular weight of 81,835 Da consisted of xylose, glucose, mannose, rhamnose and galactose at the ratio of 5.4:5.0:6.5:7.8:72.3. Structure of MEP was further analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and ¹H and (13)C liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Apoptosis tests proved that MEP could inhibit the proliferation and growth of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner within 48 h. This study provides more information on chemical structure of anti-proliferating polysaccharides isolated from Morchella esculenta.

  4. Pulsed electromagnetic fields on postmenopausal osteoporosis in Southwest China: a randomized, active-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Fang; Yang, Lin; He, Hong-Chen; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Chao; He, Cheng-Qi

    2013-05-01

    A randomized, active-controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) in southwest China. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to receive alendronate or one course of PEMFs treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean percentage change in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDL), and secondary endpoints were the mean percentage changes in left proximal femur bone mineral density (BMDF), serum 25OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D) concentrations, total lower-extremity manual muscle test (LE MMT) score, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score. The BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score and BBS score were recorded at baseline, 5, 12, and 24 weeks. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured at baseline and 5 weeks. Using a mixed linear model, there was no significant treatment difference between the two groups in the BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score, and BBS score (P ≥ 0.05). For 25(OH)D concentrations, the effects were also comparable between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05) with the Mann-Whitney's U-test. These results suggested that a course of PEMFs treatment with specific parameters was as effective as alendronate in treating PMO within 24 weeks.

  5. Characteristics and Antitumor Activity of Morchella esculenta Polysaccharide Extracted by Pulsed Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Sun, Yonghai; Mao, Qian; Guo, Xiaolei; Li, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Na

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides from Morchella esculenta have been proven to be functional and helpful for humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical structure and anti-proliferating and antitumor activities of a Morchella esculenta polysaccharide (MEP) extracted by pulsed electric field (PEF) in submerged fermentation. The endo-polysaccharide was separated and purified by column chromatography and Gel permeation chromatography, and analyzed by gas chromatography. The MEP with an average molecular weight of 81,835 Da consisted of xylose, glucose, mannose, rhamnose and galactose at the ratio of 5.4:5.0:6.5:7.8:72.3. Structure of MEP was further analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and 1H and 13C liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Apoptosis tests proved that MEP could inhibit the proliferation and growth of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner within 48 h. This study provides more information on chemical structure of anti-proliferating polysaccharides isolated from Morchella esculenta. PMID:27338370

  6. High-power diode-seeded thulium-doped fiber MOPA incorporating active pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongxing; Tan, Fangzhou; Cao, Yi; Wang, Peng; Wang, Pu

    2016-10-01

    A turnkey fiber laser source generating high beam quality pulses with 240 W average power and arbitrary pulse shapes is presented in theory and experiment. It is based on semiconductor laser diode modulated by arbitrary waveform generator as a seed and polarization maintaining (PM) master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system to boost the pulse energy. Detailed experimental and theoretical studies are in a very good agreement. The polarization extinction ratio (PER) of system measured at maximum output power is beyond 17 dB with the excellent beam quality factor M 2 of 1.25.

  7. Physical activity and resting pulse rate in older adults: findings from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Pahor, Marco; Buford, Thomas W.; Dodson, John A.; Forman, Daniel E.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated resting pulse rate (RPR) is a well-recognized risk factor for adverse outcomes. Epidemiological evidence supports the beneficial effects of regular exercise for lowering RPR, but studies are mainly confined to persons younger than 65 years. We set out to evaluate the utility of a physical activity (PA) intervention for slowing RPR among older adults. Methods A total of 424 seniors (ages 70-89 years) were randomized to a moderate intensity PA intervention or an education-based “successful aging” (SA) health program. RPR was assessed at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Longitudinal differences in RPR were evaluated between treatment groups using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, reporting unstandardized beta coefficients (β) with robust standard errors (SE). Results Increased frequency and duration of aerobic training was observed for the PA group at 6 and 12 months as compared with the SA group (P <0.001). In both groups, RPR remained unchanged over the course of the 12-month study period (P =0.67). No significant improvement was observed (β [SE] = 0.58 [0.88], P =0.51) for RPR when treatment groups were compared using the GEE method. Comparable results were found after omitting participants with a pacemaker, cardiac arrhythmia, or who were receiving beta-blockers. Conclusions Twelve months of moderate intensity aerobic training did not improve RPR among older adults. Additional studies are needed to determine whether physical activity of longer duration and/or greater intensity can slow RPR in older persons. PMID:25262271

  8. Investigation of plasma parameters in an active screen cage-pulsed dc plasma used for plasma nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, M.; Khattak, Z. I.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Shabir, S.; Khan, A. W.; Zakaullah, M.

    2014-11-01

    Active screen cage-pulsed dc plasmas are widely used in the material processing applications such as plasma nitriding, carburizing and nitrocarburizing. Specifically for plasma nitriding applications, a H2-N2 mixture is used. In this article, a study of the electron number density (ne), atomic nitrogen density ([N]), electron temperature ? and the excitation temperature ? is reported in the presence of an active screen cage-pulsed dc plasma. The ne and ? are determined here by a triple Langmuir probe, while [N] and ? are estimated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The two temperatures and their ratio ? are compared for different input parameters (such as applied power, gas pressure and H2 percentage). This study is useful in active screen cage plasma nitriding applications where only few plasma diagnostic measurements have been reported.

  9. Why are Jupiter-family comets active and asteroids in cometary-like orbits inactive?. How hydrostatic compression leads to inactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Surveys in the visible and near-infrared spectral range have revealed the presence of low-albedo asteroids in cometary-like orbits (ACOs). In contrast to Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), ACOs are inactive, but possess similar orbital parameters. Aims: In this work, we discuss why ACOs are inactive, whereas JFCs show gas-driven dust activity, although both belong to the same class of primitive solar system bodies. Methods: We hypothesize that ACOs and JFCs have formed under the same physical conditions, namely by the gravitational collapse of ensembles of ice and dust aggregates. We use the memory effect of dust-aggregate layers under gravitational compression to discuss under which conditions the gas-driven dust activity of these bodies is possible. Results: Owing to their smaller sizes, JFCs can sustain gas-driven dust activity much longer than the bigger ACOs, whose sub-surface regions possess an increased tensile strength, due to gravitational compression of the material. The increased tensile strength leads to the passivation against dust activity after a relatively short time of activity. Conclusions: The gravitational-collapse model of the formation of planetesimals, together with the gravitational compression of the sub-surface material simultaneously, explains the inactivity of ACOs and the gas-driven dust activity of JFCs. Their initially larger sizes means that ACOs possess a higher tensile strength of their sub-surface material, which leads to a faster termination of gas-driven dust activity. Most objects with radii larger than 2 km have already lost their activity due to former gravitational compression of their current surface material.

  10. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses to selectively block the activation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles during vagal nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, M.; Yoshida, K.; Toft, E.; Struijk, J. J.

    2007-09-01

    The stimulation of the vagus nerve has been used as an anti-epileptic treatment for over a decade, and its use for depression and chronic heart failure is currently under investigation. Co-activation of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles may limit the clinical use of vagal stimulation, especially in the case of prolonged activation. To prevent this, the use of a selective stimulation paradigm has been tested in seven acute pig experiments. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses successfully blocked the population of the largest and fastest vagal myelinated fibers being responsible for the co-activation. The first response in the vagus compound action potential was reduced by 75 ± 22% (mean ± SD) and the co-activated muscle action potential by 67 ± 25%. The vagal bradycardic effects remained unchanged during the selective block, confirming the leading role of thin nerve fibers for the vagal control of the heart. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses may be an alternative to rectangular pulses in clinical vagal stimulation when the co-activation of laryngeal muscles must be avoided.

  11. Association of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) Gene Polymorphisms with Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures (OVCFs) in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Oh; Han, Soo Hong; Lee, Yeon Ho; Ahn, Tae Keun; Lim, Jae Joon; Chung, Young Sun; Shin, Dong Eun; Lee, Woo Sik; Han, In Bo; Kim, Nam Keun

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are strongly associated with mortality and morbidity, both in developing and developed countries. Menopause accelerates bone loss due to estrogen deficiency and age-related linear bone loss. We investigated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms in postmenopausal women with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). In this case-control study, 355 postmenopausal women were genotyped for the presence of PAI-1 gene polymorphisms −844A > G, −675 4G > 5G, 43G > A, 9785A > G, and 11053T > G. Genetic polymorphisms of PAI-1 were analyzed by the polymerization chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism assay, and their association with disease status and folate and homocysteine levels was determined in 158 OVCF patients and 197 control subjects. The PAI-1 −675 5G5G (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 3.302; p = 0.017) and 43GA + AA (AOR, 2.087; p = 0.042) genotype frequencies showed significant association with the increased prevalence of OVCFs in postmenopausal women. In addition, we performed gene–environment interaction studies and demonstrated an association between PAI-1 gene polymorphisms and OVCF prevalence. Our novel finding is the identification of several PAI-1 genetic variants that increase susceptibility to OVCF. Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in PAI-1 may contribute to OVCF, and that they can be developed as biomarkers for evaluating OVCF risk. PMID:27941685

  12. Subpicosecond thin-disk laser oscillator with pulse energies of up to 25.9 microjoules by use of an active multipass geometry.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Joerg; Bauer, Dominik; Zhang, Jing; Killi, Alexander; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Kumkar, Malte; Weiler, Sascha; Guina, Mircea; Sutter, Dirk H; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2008-12-08

    The pulse shaping dynamics of a diode-pumped laser oscillator with active multipass cell was studied experimentally and numerically. We demonstrate the generation of high energy subpicosecond pulses with a pulse energy of up to 25.9 microJ at a pulse duration of 928 fs directly from a thin-disk laser oscillator. These results are achieved by employing a selfimaging active multipass geometry operated in ambient atmosphere. Stable single pulse operation has been obtained with an average output power in excess of 76 W and at a repetition rate of 2.93 MHz. Self starting passive mode locking was accomplished using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations, showing good agreement including the appearance of Kelly sidebands. Furthermore, a modified soliton-area theorem for approximating the pulse duration is presented.

  13. Pulse activity of populations of cortical neurons under microwave exposures of different intensity.

    PubMed

    Chizhenkova, R A

    2004-06-01

    In rabbit pulse flows of populations of cortical neurons were investigated prior to, during, and after 1-min microwave irradiation (wavelength 37.5 cm, power density 0.2-40 mW/cm2). It was found that the microwave irradiation produced shifts in mean values of interspike intervals and in the number of spike bursts. Peculiarities of rearrangements of pulse flows of cortical neurons were conditioned by an intensity of exposures.

  14. Advanced concepts for electromagnetic launcher power supplies incorporating magnetic flux compression

    SciTech Connect

    Driga, M.D. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Fair, H.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil launchers offer the potential for extremely high efficiency, flexible, noncontracting, hypervelocity electromagnetic accelerators. Unfortunately, their implementation and development has been severely limited by the lack of compact power supplies capable of providing the required high energy and high powers. Integrating novel magnetic flux compression features into multistage rotating machines provides the flexible means for generating tailored, high-energy, high-power electromagnetic pulses required to efficiently drive these promising coil launchers. This paper presents advanced concepts of high energy power supplies for coil launchers. These concepts are designed to produce high inductive compression ratios and large current and magnetic field multiplication ratios in the range of megamperes of current and gigawatts of active power. As a consequence of the flexibility of multiwinding rotating generators, such designs provide an extensive range of output pulse shaping in single or multiple pulses, enabling optimum operation of the coil launcher.

  15. The action of microsecond-pulsed plasma-activated media on the inactivation of human lung cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Jeon, Su Nam; Park, Bong Sang; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we have generated reactive species (RS) through microsecond-pulsed plasma (MPP) in the cell culture media using a Marx generator with point-point electrodes of approximately 0.06 J discharge energy/pulse. RS generated in culture media through MPP have a selective action between growth of the H460 lung cancer cells and L132 normal lung cells. We observed that MPP-activated media (MPP-AM) induced apoptosis on H460 lung cancer cells through an oxidative DNA damage cascade. Additionally, we studied the apoptosis-related mRNA expression, DNA oxidation and polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleaved analysis from treated cancer cells. The result proves that radicals generated through MPP play a pivotal role in the activation of media that induces the selective killing effect.

  16. Compression stockings

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee bend. Compression Stockings Can Be Hard to Put on If it's hard for you to put on the stockings, try these tips: Apply lotion ... your legs, but let it dry before you put on the stockings. Use a little baby powder ...

  17. Characterization of the shock pulse-induced cavitation bubble activities recorded by an optical fiber hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gwansuk; Cho, Sung Chan; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2014-03-01

    A shock pressure pulse used in an extracorporeal shock wave treatment has a large negative pressure (<-5 MPa) which can produce cavitation. Cavitation cannot be measured easily, but may have known therapeutic effects. This study considers the signal recorded for several hundred microseconds using an optical hydrophone submerged in water at the focus of shock pressure field. The signal is characterized by shock pulse followed by a long tail after several microseconds; this signal is regarded as a cavitation-related signal (CRS). An experimental investigation of the CRS was conducted in the shock pressure field produced in water using an optical hydrophone (FOPH2000, RP Acoustics, Germany). The CRS was found to contain characteristic information about the shock pulse-induced cavitation. The first and second collapse times (t1 and t2) were identified in the CRS. The collapse time delay (tc = t2 - t1) increased with the driving shock pressures. The signal amplitude integrated for time from t1 to t2 was highly correlated with tc (adjusted R(2) = 0.990). This finding suggests that a single optical hydrophone can be used to measure shock pulse and to characterize shock pulse-induced cavitation.

  18. Nanosecond pulse electric field (nanopulse): a novel non-ligand agonist for platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jue; Blackmore, Peter F; Hargrave, Barbara Y; Xiao, Shu; Beebe, Stephen J; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2008-03-15

    Nanosecond pulse stimulation of a variety of cells produces a wide range of physiological responses (e.g., apoptosis, stimulation of calcium (Ca2+) fluxes, changes in membrane potential). In this study, we investigated the effect of nanosecond pulses, which generate intense electric fields (nsPEFs), on human platelet aggregation, intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) and platelet-derived growth factor release. When platelet rich plasma was pulsed with one 300ns pulse with an electric field of 30kV/cm, platelets aggregated and a platelet gel was produced. Platelet aggregation was observed with pulses as low as 7kV/cm with maximum effects seen with approximately 30kV/cm. The increases in intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx were dose dependent on the electrical energy density and were maximally stimulated with approximately 30kV/cm. The increases in [Ca2+]i induced by nsPEF were similar to those seen with thapsigargin but not thrombin. We postulate that nsPEF caused Ca2+ to leak out of intracellular Ca2+ stores by a process involving the formation of nanopores in organelle membranes and also caused Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane nanopores. We conclude that nsPEFs dose-dependently cause platelets to rapidly aggregate, like other platelet agonists, and this is most likely initiated by the nsPEFs increasing [Ca2+]i, however by a different mechanism.

  19. Effect of Paired-Pulse Electrical Stimulation on the Activity of Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kei; Onishi, Hideaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the transient effect of short-duration paired-pulse electrical stimulation (ppES) on corticospinal excitability and the after-effect of long-duration ppES on excitability, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), and afferent facilitation (AF). Methods: A total of 28 healthy subjects participated in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles before and immediately after short-duration ppES (5 s) at various inter-pulse intervals (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 30 ms). In Experiment 2, MEPs, SAI, and AF were measured before, immediately, and 20 and 40 min after long-duration ppES (20 min, inter-pulse interval of 5 and 15 ms) and peripheral electrical stimulation (20 min, 10 and 20 Hz). Results: Short-duration ppES with inter-pulse intervals of 5 and 20 ms significantly increased MEP measured in APB but not in ADM. Long-duration ppES with an inter-pulse interval of 5 ms significantly decreased SAI but not MEPs in APB. In contrast, long-duration ppES did not affect ADM. Conclusion: The afferent inputs induced by ppES-5 ms were effective for transiently increasing MEP and sustaining SAI reduction. PMID:26733847

  20. [Effect of low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation on activity of alkaline phosphatase in blood serum].

    PubMed

    Pashovkina, M S; Akoev, I G

    2001-01-01

    The change in alkaline phosphotase activity in vitro with frequencies modulation at low intensity of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation was experimentally shown (EMR, 2375 MHz, intensity: 0.8, 8.0; 40.0 microW/cm2; range modulation: 30-310 Hz; time of interaction: 1-3 min). Revealed effects could be regarded as an evidence of informative character of interaction of modulated EMR.

  1. Laser Driven, Extreme Compression Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Jon

    2014-03-01

    Extreme-compression science is blessed by a number of new techniques and facilities that are shattering previous experimental limitations: static pressures above 600 GPa, equation of state (EOS) experiments on pulsed-power machines, picosecond-resolved x-ray diffraction on free-electron lasers, and many new experiments on high-energy lasers. Our goals, using high-energy lasers, have been to push the limits of high pressure accessible to measurement and to bridge the gap between static- and dynamic-compression experiments by exploring off-Hugoniot states. I will review laser techniques for both shock- and ramp-compression experiments, and discuss a variety of diagnostics. I will present recent results including: impedance-matching Hugoniot experiments, absolute-Hugoniot implosive-shock radiography, coupled radiometry and velocimetry, ramp-compression EOS, and in-situ x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy into the TPa regime. As the National Ignition Facility (NIF) transitions to a laser user facility for basic and applied science, we are transferring many of these techniques. The unprecedented quality and variety of diagnostics available, coupled with exquisite pulse-shaping predictability and control make the NIF a premier facility for extreme-compression experiments.

  2. Laser Driven, Extreme Compression Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Extreme-compression science is blessed by a number of new techniques and facilities that are shattering previous experimental limitations: static pressures above 600 GPa, equation of state (EOS) experiments on pulsed-power machines, picosecond-resolved x-ray diffraction on free-electron lasers, and many new experiments on high-energy lasers. Our goals, using high-energy lasers, have been to push the limits of high pressure accessible to measurement and to bridge the gap between static- and dynamic-compression experiments by exploring off-Hugoniot states. I will review laser techniques for both shock- and ramp-compression experiments, and discuss a variety of diagnostics. I will present recent results including: impedance-matching Hugoniot experiments, absolute-Hugoniot implosive-shock radiography, coupled radiometry and velocimetry, ramp-compression EOS, and in-situ x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy into the TPa regime. As the National Ignition Facility (NIF) transitions to a laser user facility for basic and applied science, we are transferring many of these techniques. The unprecedented quality and variety of diagnostics available, coupled with exquisite pulse-shaping predictability and control make the NIF a premier facility for extreme-compression experiments.

  3. North-south compression, active uplift, and abyssal mantle exhumation of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoki, A.; Sichel, S. E.; Campos, T. F.; Motoki, K. F.; Szatmari, P.; Poseidon-Colmeia

    2013-05-01

    This article presents near N-S compression, active uplift tectonism, and the consequent abyssal mantle exhumation of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The mantle peridotite ridge is about 80 km long, 25 km wide, 3800 m high, and of near E-W direction. The ridge flanks are extremely steep with sub-vertical scarps of about 2000 m of relative height. The Flandrian wave-cut and the 14C datings for the carbonaceous algae of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock indicate active uplift of 1.5 mm/year. The tectonic factures shows conjugated system of N-S compression tending slightly to NW-ES. Close to the peridotite ridge, the earthquakes with near N-S compression focal mechanism take place. The southern half of the peridotite ridge is constituted by undeformed peridotite. The existence of corrugation morphology indicates that the mantle rocks are originated from old megamullion. On the other hand, the northern half is composed of strongly deformed mylonitic peridotite suggesting that the ultramafic rocks are possibly originated from sub-crustal abyssal mantle of old transform fault. The mylonite structure is intensely perturbed indicating the tectonic events which disturbed the original parallel structure. The Saint Paul transform fault zone is characterized by E-W trend right lateral movement and the near N-S compression is unlikely. Therefore, an unusual local geotectonic process is expected. This tectonism was originated from the plate boundary jump at about 8 Ma, caused by the emergence of a new ridge segment, and the new transform fault is oblique to the relative plate movement. This angular discrepancy causes the compression perpendicular to the oblique transform fault, of near N-S direction, which squeeze out the sub-crustal abyssal mantle up to sea level. Therefore, the peridotite Ridge is considered to be a pressure ridge of the strike-slip movement of the Saint Paul transform fault.

  4. An overview of DREV's activities on pulsed CO2 laser transmitters: Frequency stability and lifetime aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruickshank, James; Pace, Paul; Mathieu, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    After introducing the desired features in a transmitter for laser radar applications, the output characteristics of several configurations of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers are reviewed. Based on work carried out at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV), output pulses are examined from short cavity lasers, CW-TEA hybrid lasers, and amplifiers for low power pulses. It is concluded that the technique of injecting a low-power laser beam into a TEA laser resonator with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors should be investigated because it appears well adapted to producing high energy, single mode, low chirp pulses. Finally, a brief report on tests carried out on catalysts composed of stannic oxide and noble metals demonstrates the potential of these catalysts, operating at close to room temperature, to provide complete closed-cycle laser operation.

  5. Controlled pulse delivery of electrical stimulation differentially reduces epileptiform activity in Mg2+-free-treated hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Albensi, Benedict C; Toupin, Justin D; Oikawa, Kensuke; Oliver, Derek R

    2008-08-21

    Electrical stimulation for applications in epilepsy has been attempted in multiple brain regions [corrected] using high- or low-frequency stimulation protocols. Data suggest that specific frequencies may have more benefit at controlling seizure activity. To this end, investigators have tested low-frequency stimulation (LFS) protocols (0.1 to 25 Hz) in both animal models and in human epileptic patients and reported reduced epileptiform synchronization, afterdischarge thresholds, and seizure activity in general. Collectively, these studies imply that LFS may have benefit in reducing epileptiform activity, however, the effectiveness of various electrical parameters still needs to be determined in specific targets. This study aimed to systematically control the total number of stimulation pulses when using primarily LFS protocols (0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 25 Hz) delivered for the suppression of seizure-like activity in the hippocampal brain slice using a Mg2+-free model of epilepsy. Fifty Hz was also tested as a reference higher frequency protocol. Regulating the total number of pulses also controlled the amount of electrical work delivered. Of the LFS protocols tested, 0.5 Hz, and 1 Hz were optimal and significantly (p<0.05) reduced several measures of epileptiform activity. However, the higher frequency protocol, 50 Hz was similarly effective at significantly (p < 0.05) suppressing several aspects of epileptiform activity (but not for reduction of population-spike amplitude). The data show that these protocols, which had a controlled number of pulses differentially reduced epileptiform activity in our model where increasing the frequency of stimulation did not result in increased attenuation.

  6. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts obtained from erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis) fruit using compressed propane and supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ciro E F; Scapinello, Jaqueline; Bohn, Aline; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Magro, Jacir Dall; Palliga, Marshall; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Tres, Marcus V

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, Ilex paraguariensis leaves are consumed in tea form or as typical drinks like mate and terere, while the fruits are discarded processing and has no commercial value. The aim of this work to evaluate phytochemical properties, total phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Ilex paraguariensis fruits obtained from supercritical CO2 and compressed propane extraction. The extraction with compressed propane yielded 2.72 wt%, whereas with supercritical CO2 1.51 wt% was obtained. The compound extracted in larger amount by the two extraction solvents was caffeine, 163.28 and 54.17 mg/g by supercritical CO2 and pressurized propane, respectively. The antioxidant activity was more pronounced for the supercritical CO2 extract, with no difference found in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus for the two extracts and better results observed for Escherichia coli when using supercritical CO2.

  7. Pulse Power Applications of Flux Compression Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    systems at similar peak currents. These results would also compare quite well with those of Freiwald and Downingl7. We have also observed a decrease in...of Recent LANSL-LLL Experiments," Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report, UCRL 84957 (1980). D. Freiwald and J. Downing, "A Survey of a 210

  8. Phase Resetting Light Pulses Induce Per1 and Persistent Spike Activity in a Subpopulation of Biological Clock Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlman, Sandra J.; Silver, Rae; Le Sauter, Joseph; Bult-Ito, Abel; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous circadian clock of the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be reset by light to synchronize the biological clock of the brain with the external environment. This process involves induction of immediate-early genes such as the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) and results in a stable shift in the timing of behavioral and physiological rhythms on subsequent days. The mechanisms by which gene activation permanently alters the phase of clock neuron activity are unknown. To study the relationship between acute gene activation and persistent changes in the neurophysiology of SCN neurons, we recorded from SCN neurons marked with a dynamic green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter of Per1 gene activity. Phase-resetting light pulses resulted in Per1 induction in a distinct subset of SCN neurons that also exhibited a persistent increase in action potential frequency 3–5 hr after a light pulse. By simultaneously quantifying Per1 gene activation and spike frequency in individual neurons, we found that the degree of Per1 induction was highly correlated with neuronal spike frequency on a cell-by-cell basis. Increased neuronal activity was mediated by membrane potential depolarization as a result of a reduction in outward potassium current. Double-label immunocytochemistry revealed that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing cells, but not arginine vasopressin (AVP)-expressing cells, exhibited significant Per1 induction by light pulses. Rhythmic GFP expression occurred in both VIP and AVP neurons. Our results indicate that the steps that link acute molecular events to permanent changes in clock phase involve persistent suppression of potassium current, downstream of Per1 gene induction, in a specific subset of Per1-expressing neurons enriched for VIP. PMID:12598633

  9. Conversion of chirp in fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Dombi, Péter; Rácz, Péter; Veisz, Laszlo; Baum, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Focusing positively chirped femtosecond pulses into nonlinear fibers provides significant spectral broadening and compression at higher pulse energies than achievable conventionally because self-focusing and damage are avoided. Here, we investigate the transfer of input to output chirp in such an arrangement. Our measurements show that the group delay dispersion of the output pulse, originating from the nonlinearities, is considerably reduced as compared to the initial value, by about a factor of 10. The mechanism of chirp reduction is understood by an interplay of self-phase modulation with initial chirp within the fiber. A simple model calculation based on this picture yields satisfactory agreement with the observations and predicts significant chirp reduction for input pulses up to the μJ regime. In practice, the reduction of chirp observed here allows for compressing the spectrally broadened intense pulses by ultrabroadband dispersive multilayer mirrors of quite moderate dispersion.

  10. Treatment of Breast Tumors using Pulsed HIFU for Delivery and Activation of Sonosensitizers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-14

    treated and control tumors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS high intensity focused ultrasound , sonodynamic, cavitation , free radicals, chemotherapy, targeted...vivo in combination with cavitation driven by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Applying HIFU in pulsed mode (to avoid overheating) has...synergistic effect, with the combination of compound and ultrasound cavitation killing over 95% of cells, while neither the drug nor the ultrasound alone

  11. Ti : sapphire laser synchronised with femtosecond Yb pump laser via nonlinear pulse coupling in Ti : sapphire active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Konyashchenko, D. A.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Kuritsyn, I. I.; Lutsenko, A. P.; Mavritskiy, A. O.

    2017-02-01

    A laser system utilising the method of synchronous pumping of a Ti : sapphire laser by a high-power femtosecond Yb3+-doped laser is described. The pulse repetition rate of the Ti : sapphire laser is successfully locked to the repetition rate of the Yb laser for more than 6 hours without the use of any additional electronics. The measured timing jitter is shown to be less than 1 fs. A simple qualitative model addressing the synchronisation mechanism utilising the cross-phase modulation of oscillation and pump pulses within a Ti : sapphire active medium is proposed. Output parameters of the Ti : sapphire laser as functions of its cavity length are discussed in terms of this model.

  12. Efficient intracellular delivery of molecules with high cell viability using nanosecond-pulsed laser-activated carbon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aritra; Kelly, Sean C; Dwivedi, Nishant; Thadhani, Naresh; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-03-25

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5-9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability.

  13. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  14. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by a combination of nisin, pulsed electric fields, and water activity reduction by sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Terebiznik, M; Jagus, R; Cerrutti, P; de Huergo, M S; Pilosof, A M R

    2002-08-01

    The effect of nisin combined with pulsed electric fields (PEF) and water activity reduction by sodium chloride (NaCl) on the inactivation of E. coli in simulated milk ultrafiltrate media was studied with a Doehlert design and a response surface method. The reduction of water activity from 0.99 to 0.95 by the addition of NaCl (without any other hurdle) did not affect E. coli viability of approximately 10(8) CFU/ml. A reduction in PEF effectiveness occurred when the NaCl concentration was increased because of an increase in conductance, which reduced the pulse decay time. In cells submitted to PEF nisin activity was decreased, probably as a consequence of the nonspecific binding of nisin to cellular debris or the emergence of new binding sites in or from cells. However, the lethal effect due to nisin was reestablished and further improved when water activity was reduced to 0.95. A synergistic effect was evidenced when low-intensity PEF were applied. Decreasing water activity to 0.95 and applying PEF at 5 kV/cm (a nonlethal intensity when no other hurdle is used) with the further addition of nisin (1,200 IU/ml) resulted in a 5-log cycle reduction of the bacterial population.

  15. Data compression techniques and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelli, G.; Cappellini, V.; Lotti, F.

    1980-02-01

    The paper reviews several data compression methods for signal and image digital processing and transmission, including both established and more recent techniques. Attention is also given to methods of prediction-interpolation, differential pulse code modulation, delta modulation and transformations. The processing of two dimensional data is also considered, and the results of the application of these techniques to space telemetry and biomedical digital signal processing and telemetry systems are presented.

  16. Pulse width modulated push-pull driven parallel resonant converter with active free-wheel

    DOEpatents

    Reass, William A.; Schrank, Louis

    2004-06-22

    An apparatus and method for high frequency alternating power generation to control kilowatts of supplied power in microseconds. The present invention includes a means for energy storage, push-pull switching means, control electronics, transformer means, resonant circuitry and means for excess energy recovery, all in electrical communication. A push-pull circuit works synchronously with a force commutated free-wheel transistor to provide current pulses to a transformer. A change in the conduction angle of the push-pull circuit changes the amount of energy coupled into the transformer's secondary oscillating circuit, thereby altering the induced secondary resonating voltage. At the end of each pulse, the force commutated free-wheel transistor causes residual excess energy in the primary circuit to be transmitted back to the storage capacitor for later use.

  17. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  18. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2010-03-04

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5–9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50–70 MW and durations of 40–70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1–11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50–63%.

  19. Production of Picosecond, Kilojoule, and Petawatt Laser Pulses via Raman Amplification of Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2011-09-02

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  20. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  1. Compressed convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Franz; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of compressed convolution, a technique to convolve a given data set with a large number of non-orthogonal kernels. In typical applications our technique drastically reduces the effective number of computations. The new method is applicable to convolutions with symmetric and asymmetric kernels and can be easily controlled for an optimal trade-off between speed and accuracy. It is based on linear compression of the collection of kernels into a small number of coefficients in an optimal eigenbasis. The final result can then be decompressed in constant time for each desired convolved output. The method is fully general and suitable for a wide variety of problems. We give explicit examples in the context of simulation challenges for upcoming multi-kilo-detector cosmic microwave background (CMB) missions. For a CMB experiment with detectors with similar beam properties, we demonstrate that the algorithm can decrease the costs of beam convolution by two to three orders of magnitude with negligible loss of accuracy. Likewise, it has the potential to allow the reduction of disk space required to store signal simulations by a similar amount. Applications in other areas of astrophysics and beyond are optimal searches for a large number of templates in noisy data, e.g. from a parametrized family of gravitational wave templates; or calculating convolutions with highly overcomplete wavelet dictionaries, e.g. in methods designed to uncover sparse signal representations.

  2. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David S.; Schmidt, Stephen C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the shock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  3. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1984-02-21

    A method is disclosed for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the stock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  4. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  5. Dynalets: a new method for modelling and compressing biological signals. Applications to physiological and molecular signals.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, Jacques; Hansen, Olivier; Hamie, Ali; Franco, Céline; Sutton, Brian; Cohen, Elie-Paul

    2014-11-01

    The biological information coming from electrophysiologic sensors like ECG, pulse sensor or from molecular signal devices like NMR spectrometry has to be visualized and manipulated in a compressed way for an efficient medical use by clinicians, if stored in scientific data bases or in personalized patient records repositories. Here, we define a new transform called Dynalet based on Liénard ordinary differential equations susceptible to model the mechanism at the source of the studied signal, and we propose to apply this new technique first to the modelling and compression of real biological periodic signals like ECG and pulse rhythm. We consider that the cardiovascular activity results from the summation of cellular oscillators located in the cardiac sinus node and we show that, as a result, the van der Pol oscillator (a particular Liénard system) fits well the ECG signal and the pulse signal. The reconstruction of the original signal (pulse or ECG) using Dynalet transform is then compared with that of Fourier, counting the number of parameters to be set for obtaining an expected signal-to-noise ratio. Then, we apply the Dynalet transform to the modelling and compression of molecular spectra obtained by protein NMR spectroscopy. The reconstruction of the original signal (peak) using Dynalet transform is again compared with that of Fourier. After reconstructing visually the peak, we propose to periodize the signal and give it to hear, the whole process being called the protein "stethoscope".

  6. Effect of coil orientation on strength–duration time constant and I-wave activation with controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Goetz, Stefan M.; Hannah, Ricci; Ciocca, Matteo; Chieffo, Raffaella; Chen, Jui-Cheng A.; Peterchev, Angel V.; Rothwell, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the strength–duration (S–D) time constants of motor cortex structures activated by current pulses oriented posterior–anterior (PA) or anterior–posterior (AP) across the central sulcus. Methods Motor threshold and input–output curve, along with motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies, of first dorsal interosseus were determined at pulse widths of 30, 60, and 120 μs using a controllable pulse parameter (cTMS) device, with the coil oriented PA or AP. These were used to estimate the S–D time constant and we compared with data for responses evoked by cTMS of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Results The S–D time constant with PA was shorter than for AP stimulation (230.9 ± 97.2 vs. 294.2 ± 90.9 μs; p < 0.001). These values were similar to those calculated after stimulation of ulnar nerve (197 ± 47 μs). MEP latencies to AP, but not PA stimulation were affected by pulse width, showing longer latencies following short duration stimuli. Conclusion PA and AP stimuli appear to activate the axons of neurons with different time constants. Short duration AP pulses are more selective than longer pulses in recruiting longer latency corticospinal output. Significance More selective stimulation of neural elements may be achieved by manipulating pulse width and orientation. PMID:26077634

  7. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution

    PubMed Central

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by “activating” the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a

  8. Using an active temporal compensating system to achieve the super-Gaussian pulses in high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulei; Liu, Rui; Yuan, Hang; Li, Sensen; Liu, Zhaohong; Zhu, Xuehua; He, Weiming; Lv, Zhiwei

    2015-08-01

    In high-power solid-state laser, initiative pulse shaping can help improve the output laser's performance. The evaluation for output laser pulse is also incomplete. In this paper, we propose a method of initiative pulse shaping by using arbitrary waveform generator (AWG), and establish a relatively complete evaluation system for the output pulses shape simultaneously. It achieves the super-Gaussian pulse output with high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio). As a consequence, a square laser pulse with pulse adjustable width ~5ns, rising time 197ps is obtained. The power imbalance of the output square pulse is 3.72%. The similarity between the eight-order super-Gaussian pulse and the one we get from experiment reached 99%.

  9. Temporal Behavior of the Pump Pulses, Residual Pump Pulses, and THz Pulses for D2O Gas Pumped by a TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhai, Yusheng; Su, Yuling; Zhou, Fanghua; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-08-01

    Temporal behavior of the pump pulses, residual pump pulses, and THz pulses for optically pumped D2O gas molecules was investigated by using a tunable TEA CO2 laser as the pumping source. The pulse profiles of pump laser pulses, residual pump pulses, and the THz output pulses were measured, simultaneously, at several different gas pressures. For THz pulse, the pulse delay between the THz pulse and the pump pulse was observed and the delay time was observed to increase from 40 to 70 ns with an increase in gas pressure from 500 to 1700 Pa. Both THz pulse broadening and compression were observed, and the pulse broadening effect transformed to the compression effect with increasing the gas pressure. For the residual pump pulse, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main pulse decreased with increasing gas pressure, and the main pulse disappeared at high gas pressures. The secondary pulses were observed at high gas pressure, and the time intervals of about 518 and 435 ns were observed between the THz output pulse and the secondary residual pump pulse at the pressure of 1400 Pa and 1700 Pa, from which the vibrational relaxation time constants of about 5.45 and 5.55 μs Torr were obtained.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  12. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  13. Assessment of Maillard reaction evolution, prebiotic carbohydrates, antioxidant activity and α-amylase inhibition in pulse flours.

    PubMed

    Moussou, Nadia; Corzo-Martínez, Marta; Sanz, María Luz; Zaidi, Farid; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the quality of bean, chickpea, fava beans, lentil and pea flours from Algeria has been evaluated. Maillard reaction (MR) indicators, modifications in the carbohydrate and protein fractions, antioxidant activity and α-amylase inhibitor of raw, toasted and stored samples were evaluated. Fava beans, beans and peas showed higher content of raffinose family oligosaccharides while chickpeas and lentils showed higher polyol content. Toasting and storage caused slightly change in pulse quality; MR showed slight losses of lysine but increased antioxidant activity. Moreover, inhibition of α-amylase was slightly augmented during processing; this could increase the undigested carbohydrates that reach the colon, modulating the glycemic response. These results point out the suitability of these flours for preparing high-quality foodstuffs intended for a wide spectrum of the population, including hyperglycemic and gluten intolerant individuals.

  14. Osteogenic activity of human fracture haematoma-derived progenitor cells is stimulated by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Miwa, M; Sakai, Y; Niikura, T; Kurosaka, M; Komori, T

    2009-02-01

    The haematoma occurring at the site of a fracture is known to play an important role in bone healing. We have recently shown the presence of progenitor cells in human fracture haematoma and demonstrated that they have the capacity for multilineage mesenchymal differentiation. There have been many studies which have shown that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulates the differentiation of a variety of cells, but none has investigated the effects of LIPUS on cells derived from human fracture tissue including human fracture haematoma-derived progenitor cells (HCs). In this in vitro study, we investigated the effects of LIPUS on the osteogenic activity of HCs. Alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin secretion, the expression of osteoblast-related genes and the mineralisation of HCs were shown to be significantly higher when LIPUS had been applied but without a change in the proliferation of the HCs. These findings provide evidence in favour of the use of LIPUS in the treatment of fractures.

  15. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-01-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  16. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  17. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  18. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  19. Waveform design and Doppler sensitivity analysis for nonlinear FM chirp pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. A.; Fairhead, A. C.

    1986-04-01

    The use of pulse compression to obtain simultaneous long-range detection and good range resolution is described. The types of modulation that can be used to obtain pulse compression are outlined with particular emphasis on their performance under Doppler shift. It is shown that nonlinear frequency-modulated (FM) signals are capable of providing low range-sidelobes while being compressed using a matched filter. A design method for nonlinear FM signals based on window functions is outlined. Simulation results for pulse compression of nonlinear FM signals based on four different window functions with Doppler shift are presented. The results are used to define the effects of Doppler shift on the pulse compression. An analysis is presented, and interpreted pictorially, that explains the effects of Doppler shift on the pulse compression. The analysis is also extended to explain the better Doppler performance of hybrid FM pulse compression systems.

  20. Chirped pulse amplification of 300 fs pulses in an Alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Bado, P.; Mourou, G. ); Harter, D.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the amplification of femtosecond dye laser pulses up to the 3.5 mJ level in an alexandrite regenerative amplifier. An expansion/compression system using diffraction gratings allows chirped pulse amplification techniques to be used to produce peak powers upwards of 1 GW. Limitations in the chirped pulse amplification of ultrashort pulses due to intracavity dispersive elements are discussed.

  1. Arcelins from an Indian wild pulse, Lablab purpureus, and insecticidal activity in storage pests.

    PubMed

    Janarthanan, Sundaram; Suresh, Palaniappan; Radke, Gary; Morgan, Thomas D; Oppert, Brenda

    2008-03-12

    A partially purified protein fraction was isolated from seed flour of the Indian wild bean, Lablab purpureus, by ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatographies. Partially purified L. purpureus proteins had hemagglutination and glycoslyation properties similar to those of lectins or lectin-like proteins from other pulses. Data obtained from two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF, and MALDI-TOF/TOF and N-terminal protein sequencing of the isolated polypeptides from L. purpureus demonstrated that the extract contained proteins similar to isoforms of arcelins 3 and 4 and pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PvPR1) of Phaseolus vulgaris. L. purpureus proteins were resistant to degradation by the commercial enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin and were moderately resistant to pepsin, but were readily hydrolyzed to smaller peptides by papain. Insect feeding bioassays of the extract with the storage pests Rhyzopertha dominica and Oryzaephilus surinamensis, internal and external feeders of grain, respectively, demonstrated that L. purpureus proteins at 2% in the diet resulted in retarded development. However, a 5% dose of the L. purpureus fraction resulted in complete mortality of all larvae in both species. This study has demonstrated that proteins in the partially purified L. purpureus extract have the potential to control storage pests in cereals transformed with L. purpureus defense-related genes, but the need for more studies regarding efficacy and safety is discussed.

  2. NONLINEAR OPTICAL PHENOMENA: Dispersive regime of spectral compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutuzyan, A. A.; Mansuryan, T. G.; Esayan, G. L.; Akopyan, R. S.; Muradyan, Kh

    2008-04-01

    The role of the group velocity dispersion in the spectral compression of subpicosecond laser pulses is analysed based on numerical and experimental studies. It is shown that the group velocity dispersion in an optical fibre can substantially change the physical pattern of the spectral compression process.

  3. Mental Aptitude and Comprehension of Time-Compressed and Compressed-Expanded Listening Selections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    The comprehensibility of materials compressed and then expanded by means of an electromechanical process was tested with 280 Army inductees divided into groups of high and low mental aptitude. Three short listening selections relating to military activities were subjected to compression and compression-expansion to produce seven versions. Data…

  4. Determination of fourteen polyphenols in pulses by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and correlation study with antioxidant activity and colour.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Federica; Caprioli, Giovanni; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Vittori, Sauro; Sagratini, Gianni

    2017-04-15

    Pulses, which include lentils, beans, chickpeas, peas, and soybeans, provide an important source of proteins, dietary fibers, minerals and vitamins, as well as such important bioactive molecules as polyphenols. The presence of polyphenols is often related to the colour of the pulse and to its antioxidant activity. The aim of this work was to set up a new HPLC-DAD method for simultaneously analysing 14 polyphenolic compounds, including two anthocyanins, in different varieties of pulses and to correlate the polyphenol content with the seed coat colour and the antioxidant activity. The total content of the analysed polyphenols ranged from 3mg/kg for dehulled red lentils to 1630.5mg/kg for ruviotto beans. Samples with dark testa (or seed coat), namely black lentils and diavoli beans, had higher antioxidant activity than those with pale testa, and a positive correlation was found between total phenolic content (TPC) and IC50 for dark coloured varieties.

  5. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  6. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  7. Cascaded photonic crystal fibers for three-stage soliton compression.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Cheng, Zihao

    2016-11-01

    Cascaded higher-order soliton compression in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is demonstrated, where both the hyperbolic secant and Gaussian input pulses are considered. Detailed fiber designs for three-stage higher-order soliton compression where soliton order is three or non-integer are presented. A highest compression factor of 221.32 has been achieved with only 49.48% pedestal energy.

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of 50 Hz pulsed dc nitrogen-hydrogen plasma in the presence of active screen cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, A.; Abrar, M.; Khan, A. W.; Jan, F.; Khan, B. S.; Shah, H. U.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2016-05-01

    The N2-H2 plasma gas mixture, generated in a 50 Hz pulsed dc discharge system with active screen cage, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), as a function of gas pressure, the fractions of hydrogen and current density. The N2 dissociation degree and N atomic density was measured with actinometery where argon gas is used as actinometer. It was shown that the increase in hydrogen fraction enhances the dissociation of N2, until the maximum of 40%. The excitation temperature is determined from Ar-I emission line intensities by using the simple Boltzmann plot method. The dissociation fraction and excitation temperature is found to increase with hydrogen mixing in nitrogen plasma.

  9. Emphasis on trap activity in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs through temperature dependent pulsed I-V characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboton, Alain; Defrance, Nicolas; Altuntas, Philippe; Lecourt, François; Douvry, Yannick; Hoel, Virginie; Soltani, Ali; De Jaeger, Jean-Claude

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on the temperature dependent threshold voltage analysis of AlGaN/GaN High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) in order to investigate the trap effects occurring in these devices. Measurements are performed in pulse configuration to emphasize the gate-lag and drain-lag effects involving current collapses. A quantitative extraction of the interface traps density is performed through the observation of the pinch-off voltage shifts in cold bias conditions. Additionally, a thermally activated energy level of 0.25 eV is evaluated whatever the bias condition. It is also shown that the trap density increases drastically when the drain is biased, limiting the performance of AlGaN/GaN devices through drain-lag effect.

  10. Enhanced antibacterial activity of copper/copper oxide nanowires prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Pandey, J. K.; Soumya, K. K.; Dwivedi, P.; Sundaram, S.; Prasad, Sanjay; Gopal, R.

    2016-07-01

    Copper/copper oxide nanowires (NWs) are well known for its antibacterial activity against various pathogens. In the present study, we have shown the enhanced antibacterial activity of the NWs against gram-negative bacterial strains ( Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and gram-positive bacterial strains ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus). The increase in the activity is because of the shape and size of the colloidal NWs which were prepared at room temperature in a one-step process by pulsed laser ablation of copper metal target. The purity, shape and size of the colloidal NWs were well characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NWs were of diameters in the range of 15-30 nm and lengths ranging from 200 to 600 nm. The dose-dependent antibacterial activity of these NWs was found to be more effective against gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria. As gram-negative bacteria have thinner layer of cell wall made up of peptidoglycan possibly which makes them more susceptible to Cu/Cu2O NWs, Cu/Cu2O NWs can be a potent candidate to be used as bactericidal or as growth inhibitor.

  11. A Codimension-2 Bifurcation Controlling Endogenous Bursting Activity and Pulse-Triggered Responses of a Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, William H.; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of individual neurons are crucial for producing functional activity in neuronal networks. An open question is how temporal characteristics can be controlled in bursting activity and in transient neuronal responses to synaptic input. Bifurcation theory provides a framework to discover generic mechanisms addressing this question. We present a family of mechanisms organized around a global codimension-2 bifurcation. The cornerstone bifurcation is located at the intersection of the border between bursting and spiking and the border between bursting and silence. These borders correspond to the blue sky catastrophe bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle (SNIC) curves, respectively. The cornerstone bifurcation satisfies the conditions for both the blue sky catastrophe and SNIC. The burst duration and interburst interval increase as the inverse of the square root of the difference between the corresponding bifurcation parameter and its bifurcation value. For a given set of burst duration and interburst interval, one can find the parameter values supporting these temporal characteristics. The cornerstone bifurcation also determines the responses of silent and spiking neurons. In a silent neuron with parameters close to the SNIC, a pulse of current triggers a single burst. In a spiking neuron with parameters close to the blue sky catastrophe, a pulse of current temporarily silences the neuron. These responses are stereotypical: the durations of the transient intervals–the duration of the burst and the duration of latency to spiking–are governed by the inverse-square-root laws. The mechanisms described here could be used to coordinate neuromuscular control in central pattern generators. As proof of principle, we construct small networks that control metachronal-wave motor pattern exhibited in locomotion. This pattern is determined by the phase relations of bursting neurons in a simple central pattern generator modeled by a chain of

  12. Sleep modulates cortical connectivity and excitability in humans: Direct evidence from neural activity induced by single-pulse electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Usami, Kiyohide; Matsumoto, Riki; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Hitomi, Takefumi; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Kunieda, Takeharu; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Sleep-induced changes in human brain connectivity/excitability and their physiologic basis remain unclear, especially in the frontal lobe. We investigated sleep-induced connectivity and excitability changes in 11 patients who underwent chronic implantation of subdural electrodes for epilepsy surgery. Single-pulse electrical stimuli were directly injected to a part of the cortices, and cortico-cortical evoked potentials (CCEPs) and CCEP-related high-gamma activities (HGA: 100-200 Hz) were recorded from adjacent and remote cortices as proxies of effective connectivity and induced neuronal activity, respectively. HGA power during the initial CCEP component (N1) correlated with the N1 size itself across all states investigated. The degree of cortical connectivity and excitability changed during sleep depending on sleep stage, approximately showing dichotomy of awake vs. non-rapid eye movement (REM) [NREM] sleep. On the other hand, REM sleep partly had properties of both awake and NREM sleep, placing itself in the intermediate state between them. Compared with the awake state, single-pulse stimulation especially during NREM sleep induced increased connectivity (N1 size) and neuronal excitability (HGA increase at N1), which was immediately followed by intense inhibition (HGA decrease). The HGA decrease was temporally followed by the N2 peak (the second CCEP component), and then by HGA re-increase during sleep across all lobes. This HGA rebound or re-increase of neuronal synchrony was largest in the frontal lobe compared with the other lobes. These properties of sleep-induced changes of the cortex may be related to unconsciousness during sleep and frequent nocturnal seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  13. Expanding range of pulsed range sensors with active projection from spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Xiaodong; Su, Wei; Cohn, Robert W.; Hassebrook, Laurence G.; Lau, Daniel L.

    2006-05-01

    LIDAR-based systems measure the time-of-flight of a laser source onto the scene and back to the sensor, building a wide field of view 3D raster image, but as a scanning process, there are problems associated with motion inside the scene over the duration of the scan. By illuminating the entire scene simultaneously using a broad laser pulse, a 2D camera equipped with a high speed shutter can measure the time-of-flight over the entire field of view (FOV), thereby, recording an instantaneous snap-shot of the entire scene. However, spreading the laser reduces the range. So what is required is a programmable system that can track multiple regions of interest by varying the field of regard to (1) a single direction, (2) the entire FOV, or (3) intermediate views of interest as required by the evolving scene environment. In this project, the investigators intend to add this variable illumination capability to existing instantaneous ranging hardware by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) beam steering system that adaptively varies the (single or multi) beam intensity profiles and pointing directions. For autonomous satellite rendezvous, docking, and inspection, the system can perform long-range sensing with a narrow FOV while being able to expand the FOV as the target object approaches the sensor. To this end in a previous paper, we analyzed the performance of a commercially available TOF sensor (3DVSystems' Zmini) in terms of the depth sensitivity versus target range and albedo. In this paper, we will analyze the laser system specifications versus range of field-of-view when beam steering is performed by means of a Boulder Nonlinear Systems' phase-only liquid crystal SLM. Experimental results show that the adjustable laser beam FOV extensively compensate the reflected image grayscale from objects at long range, and prove the feasibility of expanding range with the projection from the SLM.

  14. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  16. A Compressed Terahertz Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Pan, Rui; Xiong, Wei; He, Ting; Shen, Jing-Ling

    2012-10-01

    A compressed terahertz imaging method using a terahertz time domain spectroscopy system (THz-TDSS) is suggested and demonstrated. In the method, a parallel THz wave with the beam diameter 4cm from a usual THz-TDSS is used and a square shaped 2D echelon is placed in front of an imaged object. We confirm both in simulation and in experiment that only one terahertz time domain spectrum is needed to image the object. The image information is obtained from the compressed THz signal by deconvolution signal processing, and therefore the whole imaging time is greatly reduced in comparison with some other pulsed THz imaging methods. The present method will hopefully be used in real-time imaging.

  17. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  18. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  19. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  20. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  1. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? ...

  2. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  3. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES. PMID:27110556

  4. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES.

  5. Changes in alpha band activity associated with application of the compression of fourth ventricular (CV-4) osteopathic procedure: a qEEG pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miana, Luiz; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Almeida, Laís; Ribeiro, Pedro; Machado, Dionis; King, Hollis; Silva, Julio Guilherme

    2013-07-01

    The compression of the fourth ventricle (CV-4) is one of the more well known procedures in the cranial manipulation curriculum and practice. Cranial manipulation has received criticism because of the subtle, difficult to learn techniques, controversy over whether or not cranial bone structures move, and what if any clinical effects have been shown. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of CV-4 in 10 healthy subjects through quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG), specifically in alpha band. Participants were randomly distributed in control, sham-CV4 and CV4 conditions using a cross-over design. qEEG activity was recorded for each of the 10 subjects in each of the 3 conditions. There was a significant increase in the alpha absolute power between pre and post in the CV-4 condition. There appears to be potential for understanding the effect of the CV-4 if these finding are replicated in further clinical trials.

  6. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  7. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  8. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Stimulation Promotes Anti-cell Proliferative Activity in Doxorubicin-treated Mouse Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    MURAMATSU, YOSHITAKA; MATSUI, TAKUYA; DEIE, MASATAKA; SATO, KEIJI

    2017-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) and doxorubicin therapy in a mouse osteosarcoma cell line (LM8 cells) in vitro. Materials and Methods: The effects of PEMF (5 mT, 200 Hz) of different durations and doxorubicin on the proliferative activity of LM8 cells were measured by the MTT assay. Apoptotic-related factors such as cell-cycle phase, mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase 3/7 activity were investigated using 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and apoptosis kits. Identification of intracellular signaling molecules induced by the combination was comprehensively explored using a stress and apoptosis-related protein array kit. Results: PEMF enhanced the inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by doxorubicin but did not affect the cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential, or doxorubicin-induced G2/M arrest. The combination of PEMF and doxorubicin altered a few signaling molecules. PEMF tended to reduce the doxorubicin-induced decrease of phosphorylated BAD, while reducing the increased expression of total IĸB and phosphorylated-CHK1 induced by doxorubicin. Conclusion: Our results indicate that combination of PEMF and doxorubicin could be a novel chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:28064222

  9. Reduction of Timing Jitter with Active Control in a kHz Regenerative Amplifier of Femtosecond Pulse Ti:Al2O3 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taisuke; Takasago, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Katsuyuki; Zhang, Zhigang; Torizuka, Kenji; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2001-03-01

    We measured the timing error of femtosecond pulses amplified by a Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier operated at a 1 kHz repetition rate using a modified cross-correlation technique. This technique can detect sub-femtosecond timing variation. By actively controlling the amplifier cavity length, we reduced the rms timing jitter of the regenerative amplifier into the sub-femtosecond range.

  10. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). The MD/UT ratio was significantly higher during condition 3 than during conditions 1 and 2, and higher during condition 2 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that augmented trunk stabilization with the ECS may be advantageous with regard to reducing the compensatory muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength.

  11. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  12. Magneto-impedance sensor for quasi-noncontact monitoring of breathing, pulse rate and activity status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corodeanu, S.; Chiriac, H.; Radulescu, L.; Lupu, N.

    2014-05-01

    Results on the development and testing of a novel magnetic sensor based on the detection of the magneto-impedance variation due to changes in the permeability of an amorphous wire are reported. The proposed application is the quasi-noncontact monitoring of the breathing frequency and heart rate for diagnosing sleep disorders. Patient discomfort is significantly decreased by transversally placing the sensitive element onto the surface of a flexible mattress in order to detect its deformation associated with cardiorespiratory activity and body movements. The developed sensor has a great application potential in monitoring the vital signs during sleep, with special advantages for children sleep monitoring.

  13. Z-Pinch Driven Isentropic Compression for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Holland, K.G.; Slutz, S.A.; Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A.

    1999-02-01

    The achievement of high gain with inertial fusion requires the compression of hydrogen isotopes to high density and temperatures. High densities can be achieved most efficiently by isentropic compression. This requires relatively slow pressure pulses on the order of 10-20 nanoseconds; however, the pressure profile must have the appropriate time. We present 1-D numerical simulations that indicate such a pressure profile can be generated by using pulsed power driven z pinches. Although high compression is calculated, the initial temperature is too low for ignition. Ignition could be achieved by heating a small portion of this compressed fuel with a short (-10 ps) high power laser pulse as previously described. Our 1-D calculations indicate that the existing Z-accelerator could provide the driving current (-20 MA) necessary to compress fuel to roughly 1500 times solid density. At this density the required laser energy is approximately 10 kJ. Multidimensional effects such as the Rayleigh-Taylor were not addressed in this brief numerical study. These effects will undoubtedly lower fuel compression for a given chive current. Therefore it is necessary to perform z-pinch driven compression experiments. Finally, we present preliminary experimental data from the Z-accelerator indicating that current can be efficiently delivered to appropriately small loads (- 5 mm radius) and that VISAR can be used measure high pressure during isentropic compression.

  14. Drift compression and final focus options for heavy ionfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-18

    A drift compression and final focus lattice for heavy ion beams should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. The authors show that this requirement implies that the drift compression design needs to satisfy a self-similar symmetry condition. For un-neutralized beams, the Lie symmetry group analysis is applied to the warm-fluid model to systematically derive the self-similar drift compression solutions. For neutralized beams, the 1D Vlasov equation is solved explicitly and families of self-similar drift compression solutions are constructed. To compensate for the deviation from the self-similar symmetry condition due to the transverse emittance, four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of the drift compression such that the entire beam pulse can be focused onto the same focal spot.

  15. Photoelectron circular dichroism in the multiphoton ionization by short laser pulses. I. Propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in chiral pseudo-potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Hochstuhl, David

    2015-06-28

    A theoretical method to study the angle-resolved multiphoton ionization of polyatomic molecules is developed. It is based on the time-dependent formulation of the Single Center (TDSC) method and consists in the propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in the effective molecular potentials in the presence of intense laser pulses. For this purpose, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron, moving in a molecular field and interacting with an arbitrary laser pulse, is solved in spherical coordinates by an efficient numerical approach. As a test, the method is applied to the one- and two-photon ionizations of a model methane-like chiral system by circularly polarized short intense high-frequency laser pulses. Thereby, we analyze the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the momentum distribution. The considered model application illustrates the capability of the TDSC method to study multiphoton PECD in fixed-in-space and randomly oriented chiral molecules.

  16. Photoelectron circular dichroism in the multiphoton ionization by short laser pulses. I. Propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in chiral pseudo-potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Hochstuhl, David; Demekhin, Philipp V.

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical method to study the angle-resolved multiphoton ionization of polyatomic molecules is developed. It is based on the time-dependent formulation of the Single Center (TDSC) method and consists in the propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in the effective molecular potentials in the presence of intense laser pulses. For this purpose, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron, moving in a molecular field and interacting with an arbitrary laser pulse, is solved in spherical coordinates by an efficient numerical approach. As a test, the method is applied to the one- and two-photon ionizations of a model methane-like chiral system by circularly polarized short intense high-frequency laser pulses. Thereby, we analyze the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the momentum distribution. The considered model application illustrates the capability of the TDSC method to study multiphoton PECD in fixed-in-space and randomly oriented chiral molecules.

  17. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  18. Gravel-pack field examples of a new pulsed-neutron-activation logging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Caroll, J.F.; Smith, B.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Gravel packs traditionally have been evaluated with gamma/gamma density and neutron logging tools. These logging tools, particularly the density tools, do an acceptable job in most logging environments but have some limitations that affect their measurement resolution in attempts to define gravel-pack quality. The presence of high-density completion fluids significantly reduces the dynamic range of the conventional measurements. Low-contrast logging resolution is also encountered with the new matched-density gravel-pack systems that use matrix materials with densities near those of the completion fluids. This paper presents an alternative measurement of gravel-pack quality that is unaffected by the type of completion fluid present. The authors also present six field examples that demonstrate this new technique. Each example presents a different logging condition, e.g., heavy borehole fluid in a conventional gravel pack, gravel pack with sintered bauxite, two completions with Isopac gravel of different screen sizes, and multiple gravel-pack logs recorded before and after wireline repair work. Several of these examples show that neutron activation can be a useful method of gravel-pack analysis in some logging environments.

  19. The effects of chronic subcutaneous administration of an investigational kisspeptin analog, TAK-683, on gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator activity in goats.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Kohei; Matsui, Hisanori; Kusaka, Masami; Tanaka, Tomomi; Ohkura, Satoshi; Okamura, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The continuous activation of the kisspeptin receptor by its agonists causes the abrogation of kisspeptin signaling, leading to decreased pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. Employing this phenomenon as a tool for probing kisspeptin action, this study aimed to clarify the role of kisspeptin in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generation in goats. We examined the effects of chronic administration of TAK-683, an investigational kisspeptin analog, on LH secretion, GnRH immunostaining, pituitary responses to exogenous GnRH, and GnRH pulse generator activity, reflected by a characteristic increase in multiple-unit activity (MUA volley). An osmotic pump containing TAK-683 was subcutaneously implanted on day 0. TAK-683 treatment dose-dependently suppressed pulsatile LH secretion on day 1. Higher doses of chronic TAK-683 profoundly suppressed pulsatile LH secretion but had little effect on GnRH immunostaining patterns and pituitary responses to GnRH on day 5. In ovariectomized goats, MUA volleys occurred at approximately every 30 min on day -1. On day 5 of chronic TAK-683 administration, pulsatile LH secretion was markedly suppressed, whereas MUA volleys were similar to those observed on day -1. Male pheromones and senktide (neurokinin B receptor agonist) induced an MUA volley but had no effect on LH secretion during chronic TAK-683 administration. The results indicate that the chronic administration of a kisspeptin analog profoundly suppresses pulsatile LH secretion without affecting GnRH content, pituitary function or GnRH pulse generator activity, and they suggest an indispensable role for kisspeptin signaling in the cascade driving GnRH/LH pulses by the GnRH pulse generator.

  20. Biological activities of Zingiber officinale (Zingiberaceae) and Piper cubeba (Piperaceae) essential oils against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Mukesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Zingiber officinale (Zingiberaceae) and Piper cubeba (Piperaceae) was essential oils were investigated for repellent, insecticidal, antiovipositional, egg hatching, persistence of its insecticidal activities against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Essential oil vapours repelled bruchid adults significantly as oviposition was found reduced in choice oviposition assay. Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils caused both fumigant and contact toxicity in C. chinensis adults. In fumigation toxicity assay, median lethal concentrations (LC50) were 0.34 and 0.27 microL cm(-3) for Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils, respectively, while in contact toxicity assay, LC50 were 0.90 and 0.66 microL cm(-2) for Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils, respectively. These two essential oils reduced oviposition in C. chinensis adults when treated with sublethal concentrations by fumigation and contact method. Oviposition inhibition was more pronounced when adults come in contact than in vapours. Both essential oils significantly reduced egg hatching rate when fumigated. Persistence in insecticidal efficiency of both essential oils decreased with time. P. cubeba showed less persistence than Z. officinale essential oil because no mortality was observed in C. chinensis adults after 36 h of treatment with P. cubeba and after 48 h of treatment of Z. officinale essential oil. Fumigation with these essential oils has no effect on the germination of the cowpea seeds. Findings of the study suggest that Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils can be useful as promising agent in insect pest management programme.

  1. Pulsed Current Activated Synthesis and Consolidation of Nanostructured Ti-TiC Composite and Its Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ki; Park, Na-Ra; Kim, Byung-Su; Yoon, Jin-Kook; Hong, Kyung-Tae; Shon, In-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Ti and CNT powders were milled by high energy ball milling. The milled powders were then simultaneously synthesized and consolidated using pulsed current activated sintering (PCAS) within one minute under the applied pressure of 80 MPa. The advantage of this process is not only rapid densification to near theoretical density but also to prevent grain growth in nano-structured materials The milling did not induce any reaction between the constituent powders. Meanwhile, PCAS of the Ti-CNT mixture produced a Ti-TiC composite according to the reaction (Ti + 0.06CNT --> 0.94Ti+0.06TiC, Ti+0.12CNT --> 0.88Ti+0.12TiC). Highly dense nanocrystalline Ti-TiC compos- ites with a relative density of up to 99.5% were obtained within one minute. The hardness and fracture toughness of the dense Ti-6mole% TiC and Ti-12 mole% TiC produced by PCAS were also investigated.

  2. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2 dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  3. Magnetic Flux Compression in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux compression (MFC) as a method for producing ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields had been originated in the 1950s by Sakharov et al. at Arzamas in the USSR (now VNIIEF, Russia) and by Fowler et al. at Los Alamos in the US. The highest magnetic field produced by explosively driven MFC generator, 28 MG, was reported by Boyko et al. of VNIIEF. The idea of using MFC to increase the magnetic field in a magnetically confined plasma to 3-10 MG, relaxing the strict requirements on the plasma density and Lawson time, gave rise to the research area known as MTF in the US and MAGO in Russia. To make a difference in ICF, a magnetic field of ˜100 MG should be generated via MFC by a plasma liner as a part of the capsule compression scenario on a laser or pulsed power facility. This approach was first suggested in mid-1980s by Liberman and Velikovich in the USSR and Felber in the US. It has not been obvious from the start that it could work at all, given that so many mechanisms exist for anomalously fast penetration of magnetic field through plasma. And yet, many experiments stimulated by this proposal since 1986, mostly using pulsed-power drivers, demonstrated reasonably good flux compression up to ˜42 MG, although diagnostics of magnetic fields of such magnitude in HED plasmas is still problematic. The new interest of MFC in plasmas emerged with the advancement of new drivers, diagnostic methods and simulation tools. Experiments on MFC in a deuterium plasma filling a cylindrical plastic liner imploded by OMEGA laser beam led by Knauer, Betti et al. at LLE produced peak fields of 36 MG. The novel MagLIF approach to low-cost, high-efficiency ICF pursued by Herrmann, Slutz, Vesey et al. at Sandia involves pulsed-power-driven MFC to a peak field of ˜130 MG in a DT plasma. A review of the progress, current status and future prospects of MFC in plasmas is presented.

  4. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  5. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  6. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  7. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  8. Recoil Experiments Using a Compressed Air Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Ping-Pong vacuum cannons, potato guns, and compressed air cannons are popular and dramatic demonstrations for lecture and lab. Students enjoy them for the spectacle, but they can also be used effectively to teach physics. Recently we have used a student-built compressed air cannon as a laboratory activity to investigate impulse, conservation of…

  9. Short-pulse generation at 10 μm in an active cw-injected ring laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Gilbert L.

    2003-09-01

    Continuous coherent light conversion in a train of short pulses with good efficiency is possible with a multipass interferometer in which the frequency is shifted at every pass with an acousto-optic frequency shifter. This technique allows one to generate a spectrum made of equidistant components, interferences of which build intense light pulses. Unfortunately, both the width and efficiency of the pulses are limited by the losses undergone by the waves traveling through the interferometer cavity. Improvement of the pulse duration, the peak intensity, and the contrast can be expected in such an experiment when an amplifier is set up inside the cavity. I report on theoretical computations related to this apparatus and apply this theoretical model to a high-pressure CO2 amplifier.

  10. Dynamic pulse difference circuit

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Gerald L.

    1978-01-01

    A digital electronic circuit of especial use for subtracting background activity pulses in gamma spectrometry comprises an up-down counter connected to count up with signal-channel pulses and to count down with background-channel pulses. A detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal when the up-down counter has completed one scaling sequence cycle of counts in the up direction. In an alternate embodiment, a detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal upon overflow of the counter.

  11. Millimeter-wave compressive holography.

    PubMed

    Cull, Christy Fernandez; Wikner, David A; Mait, Joseph N; Mattheiss, Michael; Brady, David J

    2010-07-01

    We describe an active millimeter-wave holographic imaging system that uses compressive measurements for three-dimensional (3D) tomographic object estimation. Our system records a two-dimensional (2D) digitized Gabor hologram by translating a single pixel incoherent receiver. Two approaches for compressive measurement are undertaken: nonlinear inversion of a 2D Gabor hologram for 3D object estimation and nonlinear inversion of a randomly subsampled Gabor hologram for 3D object estimation. The object estimation algorithm minimizes a convex quadratic problem using total variation (TV) regularization for 3D object estimation. We compare object reconstructions using linear backpropagation and TV minimization, and we present simulated and experimental reconstructions from both compressive measurement strategies. In contrast with backpropagation, which estimates the 3D electromagnetic field, TV minimization estimates the 3D object that produces the field. Despite undersampling, range resolution is consistent with the extent of the 3D object band volume.

  12. Sub-15fs ultraviolet pulses generated by achromatic phase-matching sum-frequency mixing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baozhen; Jiang, Yongliang; Sueda, Keiich; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2009-09-28

    A broadband ultraviolet pulse with a spectral width of 44 nm was generated by achromatic sum-frequency mixing of an 805-nm pulse and ultrabroadband visible pulse. Angular dispersion was introduced to achieve broadband phase matching by a prism pair. The UV pulse was compressed to 13.2 fs with another prism pair, with energy of 600 nJ.

  13. Compressive sensing for nuclear security.

    SciTech Connect

    Gestner, Brian Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Special nuclear material (SNM) detection has applications in nuclear material control, treaty verification, and national security. The neutron and gamma-ray radiation signature of SNMs can be indirectly observed in scintillator materials, which fluoresce when exposed to this radiation. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to the scintillator material is often used to convert this weak fluorescence to an electrical output signal. The fluorescence produced by a neutron interaction event differs from that of a gamma-ray interaction event, leading to a slightly different pulse in the PMT output signal. The ability to distinguish between these pulse types, i.e., pulse shape discrimination (PSD), has enabled applications such as neutron spectroscopy, neutron scatter cameras, and dual-mode neutron/gamma-ray imagers. In this research, we explore the use of compressive sensing to guide the development of novel mixed-signal hardware for PMT output signal acquisition. Effectively, we explore smart digitizers that extract sufficient information for PSD while requiring a considerably lower sample rate than conventional digitizers. Given that we determine the feasibility of realizing these designs in custom low-power analog integrated circuits, this research enables the incorporation of SNM detection into wireless sensor networks.

  14. Pulse oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Jubran, Amal

    1999-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is one of the most commonly employed monitoringmodalities in the critical care setting. This review describes the latesttechnological advances in the field of pulse oximetry. Accuracy of pulseoximeters and their limitations are critically examined. Finally, the existingdata regarding the clinical applications and cost-effectiveness of pulseoximeters are discussed. PMID:11094477

  15. Issues in multiview autostereoscopic image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Druti; Dodgson, Neil A.

    2001-06-01

    Multi-view auto-stereoscopic images and image sequences require large amounts of space for storage and large bandwidth for transmission. High bandwidth can be tolerated for certain applications where the image source and display are close together but, for long distance or broadcast, compression of information is essential. We report on the results of our two- year investigation into multi-view image compression. We present results based on four techniques: differential pulse code modulation (DPCM), disparity estimation, three- dimensional discrete cosine transform (3D-DCT), and principal component analysis (PCA). Our work on DPCM investigated the best predictors to use for predicting a given pixel. Our results show that, for a given pixel, it is generally the nearby pixels within a view that provide better prediction than the corresponding pixel values in adjacent views. This led to investigations into disparity estimation. We use both correlation and least-square error measures to estimate disparity. Both perform equally well. Combining this with DPCM led to a novel method of encoding, which improved the compression ratios by a significant factor. The 3D-DCT has been shown to be a useful compression tool, with compression schemes based on ideas from the two-dimensional JPEG standard proving effective. An alternative to 3D-DCT is PCA. This has proved to be less effective than the other compression methods investigated.

  16. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  17. Results from Isentropic Compression Experiments (ICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; Oona, H.; Rigg, P. A.; Dennis-Koller, D.; King, J.; Torres, D.; Herrera, D.; Sena, F.; Abeyta, F.; Tabaka, L.

    2006-07-28

    We have developed high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) methods to obtain accurate isentropic EOS data with the isentropic compression experiment (ICE). In the HEPP-ICE experiment, fast rising current pulses (with risetimes from 400 to 600 ns) at current densities of many MA/cm, create continuous magnetic compression of materials to Mbar pressures. The response of materials to this isentropic loading, as determined with VISAR measurements of free surfaces, provides the required isentropic EOS. Experiments on copper will be presented here. The data are analyzed using conventional Lagrangian and Backward techniques. In the present arrangement four samples can be studied at one time, but accurate EOS data can only be obtained from opposing sample pairs, because it is only these pairs that share the same magnetic fields.

  18. The catalytic role of tungsten electrode material in the plasmachemical activity of a pulsed corona discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, Petr; Clupek, Martin; Babicky, Vaclav; Sisrova, Irena; Janda, Vaclav

    2011-06-01

    The effects of tungsten material used as a high-voltage needle electrode on the production of hydrogen peroxide and the degradation of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) caused by a pulsed corona discharge in water were investigated. A reactor of needle-plate electrode geometry was used. The erosion of the tungsten electrodes by the discharge was evaluated. The yields of H2O2 production and the decomposition of DMSO by the discharge, which were obtained using the tungsten electrodes, were compared with those determined for titanium electrodes. The electrode erosion increased significantly with an increase in the solution conductivity. A large fraction (50-70%) of the eroded tungsten electrode material was released into the solution in dissolved form as tungstate WO_4^{2-} ions. A correlation between the amount of eroded tungsten material released into the solution and the chemical effects induced by the discharge was determined. Lower yields of H2O2 and a higher degradation of DMSO by the discharge were obtained using the tungsten electrodes than were determined using titanium electrodes. Tungstate ions were shown to play a dominant role in the decomposition of H2O2, which was produced by the discharge using a tungsten electrode. The higher degradation of DMSO that was determined for tungsten was attributed to the tungstate-catalyzed oxidation of DMSO by H2O2, in addition to the oxidation of DMSO by OH radicals. Such a mechanism was supported by the detection of degradation by-products of DMSO (methanesulfonate, sulfate and dimethyl sulfone). The catalytic role of tungstate ions in the plasmachemical activity of the discharge generated using a tungsten electrode was also demonstrated on a pH-dependent decomposition of H2O2 and DMSO.

  19. Pulsed light decontamination of endive salad and mung bean sprouts and impact on color and respiration activity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B; Wunderlich, J; Muranyi, P

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was the determination of the efficiency of pulsed light (PL) treatments for the decontamination of endive salad and mung bean sprouts, as well as the assessment of quality changes in relation to discoloration and alteration of respiration activity. Produce samples were artificially inoculated with two bacterial test strains Escherichia coli (DSM 498) and Listeria innocua (DSM 20649) and exposed to PL at different energy doses. The inactivation efficiency with regard to the naturally occurring microbiota was also investigated. Besides microbiological investigations, color changes were determined as well as the produce respiration during chilled storage. The results indicated that inactivation of more than 2 log was possible with one flash in the case of fresh-cut salad, while the reduction on mung bean sprouts was limited to approximately 1.6 log with one flash, irrespective if the natural flora or inoculated E. coli or L. innocua were considered. The UV part of the PL proved to be exclusively responsible for the inactivation of microorganisms. Significant lower levels of microbial counts of treated compared with untreated samples were maintained for up to 6 days. In the case of endive salad, a dose-dependent progressive discoloration and increase in respiration was diminished by applying optical bandpass filters, which only slightly affected the inactivation efficiency. In contrast, PL treatments showed a positive effect on color and general appearance of mung bean sprouts, while the respiration was almost unaffected. However, care must be taken with regard to efficiency-limiting matrix effects and impact on food quality. These aspects have to be assessed for each treated product. The integration of PL in industrial food processing plants could be an alternative way to improve the microbial quality of fresh produce, and therefore have a positive impact on public health by reducing the risk of contaminations with pathogenic bacteria.

  20. Cystic acne improved by photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid and sequential combination of intense pulsed light and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid (Levulan Kerastick, Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and activation by intense pulsed light in an initial treatment and blue light in 3 subsequent treatments has resulted in significant improvement in severity of acne, reduction in the number of lesions, improvement in skin texture, and smoothing of scar edges in an Asian patient with severe (class 4) facial cystic acne and scarring.

  1. Parametric and working fluid analysis of a combined organic Rankine-vapor compression refrigeration system activated by low-grade thermal energy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, B

    2016-09-01

    The potential use of many common hydrofluorocarbons and hydrocarbons as well as new hydrofluoroolefins, i.e. R1234yf and R1234ze(E) working fluids for a combined organic Rankine cycle and vapor compression refrigeration (ORC-VCR) system activated by low-grade thermal energy is evaluated. The basic ORC operates between 80 and 40 °C typical for low-grade thermal energy power plants while the basic VCR cycle operates between 5 and 40 °C. The system performance is characterized by the overall system coefficient of performance (COPS) and the total mass flow rate of the working fluid for each kW cooling capacity ([Formula: see text]). The effects of different working parameters such as the evaporator, condenser, and boiler temperatures on the system performance are examined. The results illustrate that the maximum COPS values are attained using the highest boiling candidates with overhanging T-s diagram, i.e. R245fa and R600, while R600 has the lowest [Formula: see text] under the considered operating conditions. Among the proposed candidates, R600 is the best candidate for the ORC-VCR system from the perspectives of environmental issues and system performance. Nevertheless, its flammability should attract enough attention. The maximum COPS using R600 is found to reach up to 0.718 at a condenser temperature of 30 °C and the basic values for the remaining parameters.

  2. Photocatalytic activity of bipolar pulsed magnetron sputter deposited TiO2/TiWOx thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ko-Wei; Hu, Chung-Hsuan; Hua, Li-Yu; Lee, Chin-Tan; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Chang, Julian; Yang, Shu-Yi; Han, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Titanium oxide films were formed by sputtering and then TiWOx films were deposited by bipolar pulsed magnetron sputtering with pure titanium and tungsten metal targets. The sputtering of titanium oxide with tungsten enhanced the orientation of the TiO2 (1 0 1) plane of the specimen assemblies. The main varying parameter was the tungsten pulse power. Titanium oxide sputtered with tungsten using a pulsing power of 50 W exhibited a superior hydrophilic property, and a contact angle of 13.1°. This fabrication conditions maximized the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue solution. The mechanism by which the titanium oxide was sputtered with tungsten involves the photogeneration of holes and electron traps, inhibiting the hole-electron recombination, enhancing hydrophilicity and reducing the contact angle.

  3. [Low-frequency pulsed magnetotherapy combined with electrostimulation of biologically active points in the combined treatment of traumatic mandibular osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Korotkikh, N G; Oreshkin, A V

    1999-01-01

    The results of treatment are analyzed in 51 patients (35 with exacerbation of chronic traumatic mandibular osteomyelitis and 16 with chronic traumatic mandibular osteomyelitis). Low-intensity pulsed magnetic therapy of the focus in combination with electric stimulation of segmentary bioactive points, synchronized by the patient's pulse, are proposed to be added to the therapeutic complex. Such a modality improved the regional hemodynamics, promoted liquidation of the postoperative edema on days 1-2 after intervention, and sooner than after traditional therapy repaired the energy of the patient's organism.

  4. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Demchuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H2 - F2(NF3 or SF66) and He(Ne) - H2 - F2(NF3 or SF6) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% - 6%.

  5. Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.

    1993-06-01

    Time-resolved shock-wave measurements and post-shock recovery have long been used for inferring the underlaying micromechanics controlling high-rate deformation of solids; this requires considerable subjective interpretation. In spite of this, progress has been made in experimentation and theoretical interpretation of the shock-compression/release cycle and some of the results are reviewed here for weak shocks. This cycle involves the elements of the elastic precursor, plastic loading wave, pulse duration, release wave, and post-mortem examination. Those topics are examined, with emphasis on the second and fourth elements. Cu and Ta results show how shock data can be used to determine the transition from deformation mechanism of thermal activation to that of dislocation drag. Release-wave studies indicate that the leading observable release disturbance in fcc metals may not be propagating with the ideal longitudinal elastic-wave speed. 5 figs, 18 refs.

  6. Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved shock-wave measurements and post-shock recovery have long been used for inferring the underlaying micromechanics controlling high-rate deformation of solids; this requires considerable subjective interpretation. In spite of this, progress has been made in experimentation and theoretical interpretation of the shock-compression/release cycle and some of the results are reviewed here for weak shocks. This cycle involves the elements of the elastic precursor, plastic loading wave, pulse duration, release wave, and post-mortem examination. Those topics are examined, with emphasis on the second and fourth elements. Cu and Ta results show how shock data can be used to determine the transition from deformation mechanism of thermal activation to that of dislocation drag. Release-wave studies indicate that the leading observable release disturbance in fcc metals may not be propagating with the ideal longitudinal elastic-wave speed. 5 figs, 18 refs.

  7. Effects of intravenous administration of neurokinin receptor subtype-selective agonists on gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator activity and luteinizing hormone secretion in goats

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMURA, Takashi; WAKABAYASHI, Yoshihiro; OHKURA, Satoshi; NAVARRO, Victor M.; OKAMURA, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neurokinin B (NKB), a member of the neurokinin (tachykinin) peptide family, plays a pivotal role in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generation. Three types of neurokinin receptors (NKRs), NK1R, NK2R and NK3R, are found in the brain. Although NKB preferentially binds to NK3R, other NKRs are possibly also involved in NKB action. The present study examined the effects of intravenous administration of the NKR subtype-selective agonists GR73632 (NK1R), GR64349 (NK2R), and senktide (NK3R) on GnRH pulse generator activity and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. Multiple-unit activity (MUA) was monitored in ovariectomized goats (n = 5) implanted with recording electrodes. Characteristic increases in MUA (MUA volleys) were considered GnRH pulse generator activity. Although three NKR agonists dose-dependently induced an MUA volley and an accompanying increase in LH secretion, the efficacy in inducing the volley markedly differed. As little as 10 nmol of senktide induced an MUA volley in all goats, whereas a dose of 1000 nmol was only effective for the NK1R and NK2R agonists in two and four goats, respectively. When the treatment failed to evoke an MUA volley, no apparent change was observed in the MUA or LH secretion. Similar effects of the NK2R and NK3R agonists were observed in the presence of estradiol. The results demonstrated that NK3R plays a predominant role in GnRH pulse generation and suggested that the contributions of NK1R and NK2R to this mechanism may be few, if any, in goats. PMID:25345909

  8. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackowrth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1988-03-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electro-magnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exists simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers.

  9. Pulse Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteryoung, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the nature of pulse voltammetry, indicating that its widespread use arises from good sensitivity and detection limits and from ease of application and low cost. Provides analytical and mechanistic applications of the procedure. (JN)

  10. Development of Inductive Storage Pulsed Power Generators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-06

    in the capacitor bank is transferred to a vacuum storage inductor in 20 A. Wire fuses provide the first stage of pulse compression. Further pulse ...Introduction contained within a pressurized gas enclosure, a vacuum flashover closing switch that can be Inductive energy storage in combination command or self...contains the vacuum accomplished by a sequence of opening switches flashover switch (VFS), the vacuum opening svitcn electrically in parallel with each

  11. Generation of short and intense attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sabih Ud Din

    intense SAP from an APT driven by blue laser pulses. We also demonstrated compression of long blue pulses into >240 microJ broad-bandwidth pulses using neon filled hollow core fiber, which is the highest reported pulse energy of short blue pulses. However, compression of phase using chirp mirrors is still a technical challenge.

  12. Parallel image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A parallel compression algorithm for the 16,384 processor MPP machine was developed. The serial version of the algorithm can be viewed as a combination of on-line dynamic lossless test compression techniques (which employ simple learning strategies) and vector quantization. These concepts are described. How these concepts are combined to form a new strategy for performing dynamic on-line lossy compression is discussed. Finally, the implementation of this algorithm in a massively parallel fashion on the MPP is discussed.

  13. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  14. Pulsed Corona Discharge Generated By Marx Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sretenovic, G. B.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kovacevic, V. V.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric J.

    2010-07-01

    The pulsed plasma has a significant role in new environmental protection technologies. As a part of a pulsed corona system for pollution control applications, Marx type repetitive pulse generator was constructed and tested in arrangement with wire-plate corona reactor. We performed electrical measurements, and obtained voltage and current signals, and also power and energy delivered per pulse. Ozone formation by streamer plasma in air was chosen to monitor chemical activity of the pulsed corona discharge.

  15. Preconditioning with peristaltic external pneumatic compression does not acutely improve repeated Wingate performance nor does it alter blood lactate concentrations during passive recovery compared with sham.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeffrey S; Friedenreich, Zachary D; Borges, Alexandra R; Roberts, Michael D

    2015-11-01

    Application of dynamic external pneumatic compression (EPC) during recovery from athletic activities has demonstrated favorable effects on flexibility, soreness, swelling, and blood lactate (BLa) concentrations. However, the effects of "preconditioning" with a peristaltic pulse EPC device on subsequent performance and BLa concentrations have not been characterized. Herein, we demonstrate that pretreatment for 30 min with EPC has no effect on subsequent supramaximal exercise performance or BLa concentrations during passive recovery.

  16. HYDRODYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE FORGING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDRODYNAMICS), (*FORGING, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, LUBRICANTS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), DIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , STRAIN...MECHANICS), BERYLLIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , CASTING ALLOYS , PRESSURE, FAILURE(MECHANICS).

  17. Formation of the active medium in high-power repetitively pulsed gas lasers pumped by an electron-beam-controlled discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaev, V. D.; Lysenko, S. L.

    2015-07-01

    A high-power repetitively pulsed e-beam-controlled discharge CO2 laser is simulated numerically; the simulation results are compared with experimental data. Optimal sizes and design of electrodes and configuration of the external magnetic field are found, which allow one to introduce no less than 90% electric pump energy into a specified volume of the active medium, including the active volume of a laser with an aperture of 110 × 110 cm. The results obtained can also be used to design other types of highpower gas lasers.

  18. Formation of the active medium in high-power repetitively pulsed gas lasers pumped by an electron-beam-controlled discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaev, V D; Lysenko, S L

    2015-07-31

    A high-power repetitively pulsed e-beam-controlled discharge CO{sub 2} laser is simulated numerically; the simulation results are compared with experimental data. Optimal sizes and design of electrodes and configuration of the external magnetic field are found, which allow one to introduce no less than 90% electric pump energy into a specified volume of the active medium, including the active volume of a laser with an aperture of 110 × 110 cm. The results obtained can also be used to design other types of highpower gas lasers. (lasers)

  19. Generation and compression of dissipative soliton using fiber arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Somayeh; Niknafs, Akram; Rooholamininejad, Hossein; Bahrampour, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Compression of dissipative soliton (DS) and dissipative soliton resonance (DSR) have attracted considerable attention for generation of short pulse lasers. Generation of DS/DSR is investigated numerically in circular fiber array with optical central fiber. Parameter management can generate the DS and DSR in circular fiber array with central optical fiber and in normal or anomalous dispersion. The nonlinear circular fiber arrays can be used as an optical pulse compressor. In this paper, compression of DS and DSR versus the nonlinearity and dispersion parameters in circular fiber array with central fiber, are taken into investigation.

  20. Synchronization of 1064 and 1319 nm Pulses Emitted from Actively Mode-Locked Nd:YAG Lasers and Its Application to 589 nm Sum-Frequency Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Norihito; Akagawa, Kazuyuki; Hayano, Yutaka; Saito, Yoshihiko; Takami, Hideki; Iye, Masanori; Wada, Satoshi

    2005-11-01

    Sum-frequency generation was carried out by mixing 1064 and 1319 nm pulses emitted from actively mode-locked neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers for efficient 589 nm light generation. A radio frequency of approximately 75 MHz was split into two and fed to acousto-optic mode lockers of two lasers for mode-locked operation. The synchronization of the pulses was achieved by controlling the phase difference between the radio frequencies. The maximum output power at 589 nm reached 260 mW, which corresponded to an energy conversion efficiency of more than 13%. The output power was 3.8-fold that in continuous-wave operation.

  1. Controlling the influence of SPM in fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification systems by using an actively shaped parabolic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-12-10

    We report on the experimental demonstration of the control of the influence of nonlinearity in fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) using active spectral amplitude shaping. By applying a liquid crystal spatial light modulator, the influence of the spectral profile on the recompressed pulse quality is experimentally revealed. The parabolic spectrum is experimentally determined to be very suitable for CPA-systems in which nonlinearity is present. The corresponding nonlinear phase contribution can be efficiently compensated by a conventional grating compressor. In a proof-of-principle experiment using an Yb-doped fiber- CPA-system, control at a B-integral as high as 16 rad is demonstrated. The method allows significant performance improvement of fiber-based chirpedpulse amplification.

  2. A mild pulsed electric field condition that improves acid tolerance, growth, and protease activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-K and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus LB-12.

    PubMed

    Najim, N; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2013-06-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) processing involves the application of pulses of voltage for less than 1 s to fluid products placed between 2 electrodes. The effect of mild PEF on beneficial characteristics of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of mild PEF conditions on acid tolerance, growth, and protease activity of Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus LB-12. A pilot plant PEF system (OSU-4M; The Ohio State University, Columbus) was used. The PEF treatments were positive square unipolar pulse width of 3 µs, pulse period of 0.5s, electric field strength of 1 kV/cm, delay time of 20 µs, flow rate of 60 mL/min, and 40.5°C PEF treatment temperature. Both Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lb. bulgaricus LB-12 subjected to mild PEF conditions were acid tolerant until the end of the 120 min of incubation, unlike the Lb. bulgaricus control, which was not acid tolerant after 30 min. The mild PEF-treated Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lb. bulgaricus LB-12 reached the logarithmic phase of growth an hour earlier than the control. Mild PEF conditions studied significantly improved acid tolerance, exponential growth, and protease activity of both Lb. acidophilus LA-K and Lb. bulgaricus LB-12 compared with the control. The mild PEF conditions studied can be recommended for pretreating cultures to enhance these desirable attributes.

  3. Accumulation of selenium and changes in the activity of inulinase and catalase in the cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus on pulsed electric field treatment.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Urszula; Jamroz, Jerzy

    2010-07-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) of 1Hz, 1.5 kV, and 1 ms increased the activities of catalase and inulinase over the whole range of applied Se concentrations compared with the non-treated cultures. A significant effect of selenium concentration (in the range of 5-14 microg/ml) on both intra- and extracellular enzyme activities was noted. At a Se concentration of 10 microg/ml, the activities of intra- and extracellular inulinases and extracellular catalase in the PEF-treated cultures reached the maximum of 71 U/g d.m., 46 U/g d.m., and approx. 8 U/ml, respectively. The maximum activity of intracellular catalase of approx. 6 U/ ml (with and without PEF) was recorded at 5 microg Se/ml. Further increasing of selenium concentration caused a decrease in the activity of the enzymes.

  4. Amplification of 1 ps Pulse Length Beam by Stimulated Raman Scattering of a 1 ns Beam in a Low Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kirkwood, R K; Niemann, C; Meezan, N; Wilks, S C; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Hur, M S; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N; Malkin, V M

    2005-06-12

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression with large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS [1] or non-resonantly [2]. We describe experiments in which a plasma suitable for pulse compression is created, and amplification of an ultra short pulse beam is demonstrated.

  5. Episodic Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intraplate compression in Central Patagonia during Gondwana breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, César; Gianni, Guido; Echaurren, Andrés; Kingler, Federico Lince; Folguera, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    From Lower Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, several intraplate compression events affected discrete sectors of Central Patagonia, under a general context of crustal extension associated with Gondwana breakup. This was demonstrated by means of 2D and 3D seismic and borehole data, which show partial inversion of Lower and Middle Jurassic extensional structures of the Chubut and Cañadón Asfalto basins, during the earliest stages of breakup. A comparison with surrounding areas in Patagonia, where similar Jurassic intraplate compression was described, allowed the discrimination of three discrete pulses of subtle compression (C1: ∼188-185 Ma; C2: ∼170-163; C3: ∼157-136? Ma). Interestingly, episodic intraplate compressional events are closely followed by high flux magmatic events linked to the westward expansion of the Karoo-Ferrar thermal anomaly, which impacted on the lithosphere of southwest Gondwana in Lower Jurassic. In addition, we determined the approximate direction of the main compressive strain (σ1) compatible with other Jurassic intraplate belts of South America. These observations led us to propose a linkage between a thermo mechanically weakened continental crust due to LIPs activity, changes in plate motions and ridge-push forces generated by the opening of the Weddell Sea, in order to explain intraplate shortening, interrupted while Karoo LIPs magmatic invigoration took place.

  6. Compressing TV-image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.; Rice, R. F.; Schlutsmeyer, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    Compressing technique calculates activity estimator for each segment of image line. Estimator is used in conjunction with allowable bits per line, N, to determine number of bits necessary to code each segment and which segments can tolerate truncation. Preprocessed line data are then passed to adaptive variable-length coder, which selects optimum transmission code. Method increases capacity of broadcast and cable television transmissions and helps reduce size of storage medium for video and digital audio recordings.

  7. 26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock locks two spans together at highest point. There are three compression locks. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Fractal image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  9. Mechanical Compression of Articular Cartilage Induces Chondrocyte Proliferation and Inhibits Proteoglycan Synthesis by Activation of the Erk Pathway: Implications for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, James A.; Eisner, Eric A.; DuRaine, Grayson; You, Zongbing; Reddi, A. Hari

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage is recalcitrant to endogenous repair and regeneration and thus a focus of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies. A pre-requisite for articular cartilage tissue engineering is an understanding of the signal transduction pathways involved in mechanical compression during trauma or disease. We sought to explore the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) pathway in chondrocyte proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis following acute mechanical compression. Bovine articular cartilage explants were cultured with and without the ERK 1/2 pathway inhibitor PD98059. Cartilage explants were statically loaded to 40% strain at a strain rate of 1−sec for 5 seconds. Control explants were cultured under similar conditions but were not loaded. There were four experimental groups: 1) no load without inhibitor 2) no load with the inhibitor PD98059, 3) loaded without the inhibitor, and 4) loaded with the inhibitor PD98059. Explants were cultured for varying durations, from 5 minutes to 5 days. Explants were then analyzed by biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Mechanical compression induced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, and this was attenuated with the ERK 1/2 pathway inhibitor PD98059 in a dose-dependent manner. Chondrocyte proliferation was increased by mechanical compression. This effect was blocked by the inhibitor of the ERK 1/2 pathway. Mechanical compression also led to a decrease in proteoglycan synthesis that was reversed with inhibitor PD98059. In conclusion, the ERK 1/2 pathway is involved in the proliferative and biosynthetic response of chondrocytes following acute static mechanical compression. PMID:19177463

  10. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Adler, Gail K.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: (I) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, (II) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, (III) the sampling interval, and (IV) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing, and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-minute intervals over 24 hours from 10 healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 hours, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions. PMID:25935025

  11. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Rose T; Dahleh, Munther A; Adler, Gail K; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Brown, Emery N

    2015-10-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: 1) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, 2) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, 3) the sampling interval, and 4) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-min intervals over 24 h from ten healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 h, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions.

  12. Computational and experimental progress on laser-activated gas avalanche switches for broadband, high-power electromagnetic pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhall, D.J.; Yee, J.H. ); Villa, F. )

    1990-09-01

    The gas avalanche switch, a high-voltage, picosecond-speed switch, has been proposed. The basic switch consists of pulse-charged electrodes, immersed in a high-pressure (7--800 atm) gas. An avalanche discharge is induced in the gas between the electrodes by ionization from a picosecond-scale laser pulse. The avalanching electrons move toward the anode, causing the applied voltage to collapse in picoseconds. This voltage collapse, if rapid enough, generates electromagnetic waves. A two-dimensional (2D), finite difference computer code solves Maxwell's equations for transverse magnetic modes for rectilinear electrodes between parallel plate conductors, along with electron conservation equations for continuity, momentum, and energy. Collision frequencies for ionization and momentum and energy transfer to neutral molecules are assumed to scale linearly with neutral pressure. Electrode charging and laser-driven electron deposition are assumed to be instantaneous. Code calculations are done for a pulse generator geometry, consisting of an 0.7 mm wide by 0.8 mm high, beveled, rectangular center electrode between grounded parallel plates at 2 mm spacing in air. 17 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Experimental investigation of an explosive-driven pulse power system

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, T.J.; Hanson, D.L.; Cnare, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The results obtained in the test of a pulse-power system composed of an explosively driven compressed magnetic-field current generator driving an explosive opening switch and a 20 nH inductive load are presented. It is shown that microsecond risetime, multimegampere current pulses can be produced by this technique.

  14. Micro pulse lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering has been demonstrated. The transmitter of the micropulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited by optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that systems built on the micropulse lidar concept are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  15. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Branderhorst, W. Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den; Neeleman, C.

    2016-01-15

    compression, even small changes in the image receptor height can lead to a severe imbalance of the applied forces. This may make the procedure more painful than necessary and, in case the image receptor is set too low, may lead to image quality issues and increased radiation dose due to undercompression. In practice, these effects can be reduced by monitoring the force imbalance and actively adjusting the position of the image receptor throughout the compression.

  16. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view.

  17. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  18. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  19. Filamentation in Air with Ultrashort Mid-Infrared Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-09

    Filamentation in air with ultrashort mid-infrared pulses Bonggu Shim,1,2 Samuel E. Schrauth,1 and Alexander L. Gaeta1,3 1School of Applied and...filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in air in the mid-infrared regime under conditions in which the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) is anomalous. When a...and propagates several times its diffraction length. Compared with temporal self-compression in gases due to plasma formation and pulse splitting in the

  20. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackworth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electromagnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exist simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers.