Science.gov

Sample records for active pulse compression

  1. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  2. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  3. International magnetic pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12--14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card -- its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  4. International magnetic pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  5. The development of the electrically controlled high power RF switch and its application to active RF pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiquan

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system---an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width---is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  6. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  7. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  8. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; George, Edward V.; Miller, John L.; Krupke, William F.

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  9. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  10. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  11. Pulse power applications of flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics are presented for two different types of explosive driven flux compression generators and a megavolt pulse transformer. Status reports are given for rail gun and plasma focus programs for which the generators serve as power sources.

  12. Pulsed spheromak reactor with adiabatic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    1999-03-29

    Extrapolating from the Pulsed Spheromak reactor and the LINUS concept, we consider ignition achieved by injecting a conducting liquid into the flux conserver to compress a low temperature spheromak created by gun injection and ohmic heating. The required energy to achieve ignition and high gain by compression is comparable to that required for ohmic ignition and the timescale is similar so that the mechanical power to ignite by compression is comparable to the electrical power to ignite ohmically. Potential advantages and problems are discussed. Like the High Beta scenario achieved by rapid fueling of an ohmically ignited plasma, compression must occur on timescales faster than Taylor relaxation.

  13. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  14. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Perry B.

    1995-07-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0-1.5 TeV, 5 TeV, and 25 TeV. In order to keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0-1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150-200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30-40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-II system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternatively, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0-1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  15. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here.

  16. Binary Pulse Compression Techniques for MST Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.; Sulzer, M. P.; Farley, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    In most mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capability. Short pulses are required for good range resolution but the problem of range biguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a echnique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without scarificing range resolution. Binary phase coding methods for pulse compression are discussed. Many aspects of codes and decoding and their applications to MST experiments are addressed; this includes Barker codes and longer individual codes, and then complementary codes and other code sets. Software decoding, hardware decoders, and coherent integrators are also discussed.

  17. Pulse compression using binary phase codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    In most MST applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capacity. Short pulses are required for good range resolution, but the problem of range ambiguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a technique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without sacrificing range resolution. As the name implies, a pulse of power P and duration T is in a certain sense converted into one of power nP and duration T/n. In the frequency domain, compression involves manipulating the phases of the different frequency components of the pulse. One way to compress a pulse is via phase coding, especially binary phase coding, a technique which is particularly amenable to digital processing techniques. This method, which is used extensively in radar probing of the atmosphere and ionosphere is discussed. Barker codes, complementary and quasi-complementary code sets, and cyclic codes are addressed.

  18. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    PubMed

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  19. International magnetic pulse compression workshop: (Proceedings)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  20. Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

  1. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  2. Incoherent pulse compression in laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodensky, Daniel; Kravitz, Daniel; Arbel, Nadav; Levanon, Nadav; Zadok, Avinoam

    2014-06-01

    Laser ranging measurements using incoherent pulse compression of complementary code pairs is reported. The two bipolar codes are converted to unipolar representations using a pulse position modulation algorithm, and used in succession in intensity modulation of a laser ranging source. Reflected echoes from a wall target are directly and incoherently detected. The cross-correlation between each of the two collected echoes and its respective, reference bipolar sequence, that is digitally stored at the receiver, is calculated. The two correlation functions are then added together. The off-peak aperiodic correlation functions of two codes sum up to zero, hence they are particularly suitable for low-sidelobe radar and laser ranging and detection systems. The scheme does not require the preservation of phase information in transmission or reception and provides superior sidelobe suppression compared with that of longer single codes. The code pairs are scalable to arbitrary lengths through simple procedures. Simulated and experimental ranging measurements in the presence of additive noise are discussed. The distance to the target could be recovered based on weak collected echoes, with an average optical power as low as 2 nW, without averaging over repeating measurements.

  3. Fibonacci-like photonic structure for femtosecond pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Makarava, L N; Nazarov, M M; Ozheredov, I A; Shkurinov, A P; Smirnov, A G; Zhukovsky, S V

    2007-03-01

    The compression of femtosecond laser pulses by linear quasiperiodic and periodic photonic multilayer structures is studied both experimentally and theoretically. We compare the compression performance of a Fibonacci and a periodic structure with similar total thickness and the same number of layers, and find the performance to be higher in the Fibonacci case, as predicted by numerical simulation. This compression enhancement takes place due to the larger group velocity dispersion at a defect resonance of the transmission spectrum of the Fibonacci structure. We demonstrate that the Fibonacci structure with the thickness of only 2.8 microm can compress a phase-modulated laser pulse by up to 30%. The possibility for compression of laser pulses with different characteristics in a single multilayer is explored. The operation of the compressor in the reflection regime has been modeled, and we show numerically that the reflected laser pulse is subjected to real compression: not only does its duration decrease but also its amplitude rises.

  4. Compressive spectrum sensing of radar pulses based on photonic techniques.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Liang, Yunhua; Chen, Minghua; Chen, Hongwei; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-02-23

    We present a photonic-assisted compressive sampling (CS) system which can acquire about 10(6) radar pulses per second spanning from 500 MHz to 5 GHz with a 520-MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC). A rectangular pulse, a linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulse and a pulse stream is respectively reconstructed faithfully through this system with a sliding window-based recovery algorithm, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed photonic-assisted CS system in spectral estimation for radar pulses.

  5. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, T. L.

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by x-band klystrons with RF pulse compression. The design of the linac RF system is based on x-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of RF pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by RF phase modulation, intrapulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  6. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  7. Divided-pulse nonlinear amplification and simultaneous compression

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Qiang; Zhang, Qingshan; Sun, Tingting; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yuqing; Guo, Zhengru; Yang, Kangwen; Guo, Zhanhua; Zeng, Heping

    2015-03-09

    We report on a fiber laser system delivering 122 fs pulse duration and 600 mW average power at 1560 nm by the interplay between divided pulse amplification and nonlinear pulse compression. A small-core double-clad erbium-doped fiber with anomalous dispersion carries out the pulse amplification and simultaneously compresses the laser pulses such that a separate compressor is no longer necessary. A numeric simulation reveals the existence of an optimum fiber length for producing transform-limited pulses. Furthermore, frequency doubling to 780 nm with 240 mW average power and 98 fs pulse duration is achieved by using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal at room temperature.

  8. Compression of picosecond pulses from diode lasers using a modified grating-pair compressor.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M; Wiesenfeld, J M; Radzihovsky, L R

    1990-02-01

    Optical pulses from gain-switched diode lasers were compressed using a grating-pair compressor containing an internal telescope. Original pulses of 20-30 psec were compressed to 5-7 psec, with the largest compression factor ~5. Diode-laser pulse compression is well modeled by transmission of Gaussian pulses with excess bandwidth through a dispersive system. PMID:19759750

  9. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Theodore L.

    1995-07-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test—the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)—which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  10. Radio-Frequency Pulse Compression for Linear Accelerators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantista, Christopher Dennis

    Recent efforts to develop plans for an electron -positron linear collider with center-of-mass energy approaching a TeV have highlighted the need for sources capable of delivering hundreds of megawatts of peak rf drive power at X-band frequencies. This need has driven work in the area of rf pulse compression, which enhances the peak power available from pulsed rf tubes by compressing their output pulses in time, accumulating the available energy into shorter pulses. The classic means of rf pulse compression for linear accelerators is SLED. This technique is described, and the problem it presents for multibunch acceleration explained. Other pulse compression schemes, capable of producing suitable output pulses are explored, both theoretically and experimentally, in particular Binary Pulse Compression and SLED-II. The merits of each are considered with regard to gain, efficiency, complexity, size and cost. The development of some novel system components, along with the theory behind their design, is also discussed. The need to minimize copper losses in long waveguide runs led to the use of the circular TE_{01} propagation mode in over-moded guide, requiring much attention to mechanisms of coupling power between modes. The construction and commissioning of complete, high-power pulse compression systems is reported on, as well as their use in the testing of X-band accelerating structures, which, along with the X-band klystrons used, were developed at SLAC in parallel with the pulse compression work. The focus of the dissertation is on SLED-II, the favored scheme in some current linear accelerator designs. In addition to our experimental results, practical implementation considerations and design improvements are presented. The work to date has led to detailed plans for SLED-II systems to be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator, now under construction at SLAC. The prototype of the upgraded system is near completion. Descriptions of various rf pulse-compression

  11. Wave-breaking-extended fiber supercontinuum generation for high compression ratio transform-limited pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2012-06-15

    Wave-breaking often occurs when a short intense optical pulse propagates in a long normally dispersive optical fiber. This effect has conventionally been avoided in fiber (super-)continuum-based pulse compression because the accumulated frequency chirp of the output pulse cannot be fully compensated by a standard prism (or grating) pair. Thus, the spectral extending capability of the wave-breaking has not been utilized to shorten the compressed pulse. We demonstrate that wave-breaking-free operation is not necessary if a 4f pulse shaper-based compressor is employed to remove both the linear and nonlinear chirp of the output pulse. By propagating a 180 fs (FWHM) input pulse in a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber beyond the wave-breaking limit, we compress the wave-breaking-extended supercontinuum output pulse to the bandwidth-limited duration of 6.4 fs (FWHM). The combination of high compression ratio (28×) and short pulse width represents a significant improvement over that attained in the wave-breaking-free regime.

  12. Efficient reflection grisms for pulse compression and dispersion compensation of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Emily A.; Gaudiosi, David M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Kane, Steve; Huff, Rachel; Durfee, Charles; Squier, Jeff

    2006-11-01

    Efficient reflection grisms for pulse-compression and material-dispersion compensation have been designed and demonstrated in a 40 fs, 300 μJ, 5 kHz downchirped pulse amplification system for the first time to our knowledge. A grism design for 800nm femtosecond laser pulse dispersion compensation applications is realized by using standard, commercial diffraction gratings.

  13. Optical pulse compression of ultrashort laser pulses in an argon-filled planar waveguide.

    PubMed

    Nurhuda, Muhammad; Suda, Akira; Bohman, Samuel; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2006-10-13

    We investigate the possibility of optical pulse compression of high energy ultrashort laser pulses in an argon-filled planar waveguide, based on two level coupled mode theory and the full 3D nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We derive general expressions for controlling the spatial beam profile and the extent of the spectral broadening. The analysis and simulations suggest that the proposed method should be appropriate for optical pulse compression of ultrashort laser pulses with energies as high as 600 mJ.

  14. Study of radar pulse compression for high resolution satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Nathanson, F. E.; Brooks, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pulse compression techniques are studied which are applicable to a satellite altimeter having a topographic resolution of + 10 cm. A systematic design procedure is used to determine the system parameters. The performance of an optimum, maximum likelihood processor is analysed, which provides the basis for modifying the standard split-gate tracker to achieve improved performance. Bandwidth considerations lead to the recommendation of a full deramp STRETCH pulse compression technique followed by an analog filter bank to separate range returns. The implementation of the recommended technique is examined.

  15. Compression of Electron Pulses for Femtosecond Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Our goal is to improve the temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments to 100 fs by compressing the electron pulses using a time-varying electric field. The compressed pulse can be used for a better understanding of the dynamics of molecules under study. A bunch of 3 million electrons is generated at a photocathode by femtosecond UV laser pulses and accelerated to 100 keV in a static electric field. Then, the longitudinal component of the electric field of a microwave cavity is employed to compress the bunch. The cavity's frequency and phase are accurately tuned in such a way that the electric field is parallel to the bunch motion at its arrival and antiparallel to it at its exit. Compression in the transverse directions is done by magnetic lenses. Simulations have been done to predict the bunch profile at different positions and times by General Particle Tracer code. A streak camera has been built to measure the duration of the pulses. It uses the electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor to rotate the bunch so that angular spreading of the bunch is proportional to its duration. The capacitor is discharged by a laser pulse incident on a photo switch.

  16. Advanced application flight experiment breadboard pulse compression radar altimeter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, development and performance of the pulse compression radar altimeter is described. The high resolution breadboard system is designed to operate from an aircraft at 10 Kft above the ocean and to accurately measure altitude, sea wave height and sea reflectivity. The minicomputer controlled Ku band system provides six basic variables and an extensive digital recording capability for experimentation purposes. Signal bandwidths of 360 MHz are obtained using a reflective array compression line. Stretch processing is used to achieve 1000:1 pulse compression. The system range command LSB is 0.62 ns or 9.25 cm. A second order altitude tracker, aided by accelerometer inputs is implemented in the system software. During flight tests the system demonstrated an altitude resolution capability of 2.1 cm and sea wave height estimation accuracy of 10%. The altitude measurement performance exceeds that of the Skylab and GEOS-C predecessors by approximately an order of magnitude.

  17. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy; Asay, James Russell; Chantrenne, Sophie J.; Hickman, Randall John; Willis, Michael David; Shay, Andrew W.; Grine-Jones, Suzi A.; Hall, Clint Allen; Baer, Melvin R.

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  18. Subpicosecond optical pulse compression via an integrated nonlinear chirper.

    PubMed

    Peccianti, Marco; Ferrera, Marcello; Razzari, Luca; Morandotti, Roberto; Little, Brent E; Chu, Sai T; Moss, David J

    2010-04-12

    Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) capable of ultra-fast, signal processing are recognized as being fundamental for future applications involving ultra-short optical pulse propagation, including the ability to meet the exponentially growing global fiber-optic telecommunications bandwidth demand. Integrated all-optical signal processors would carry substantial benefits in terms of performance, cost, footprint, and energy efficiency. Here, we demonstrate an optical pulse compressor based on an integrated nonlinear chirper, capable of operating on a sub-picosecond (> 1Tb/s) time scale. It is CMOS compatible and based on a 45cm long, high index doped silica glass waveguide we achieve pulse compression at relatively low input peak powers, due to the high nonlinearity and low linear and nonlinear losses of the device. The flexibility of this platform in terms of nonlinearity and dispersion allows the implementation of several compression schemes.

  19. Three-wave mixing mediated femtosecond pulse compression in β-barium borate.

    PubMed

    Grün, A; Austin, Dane R; Cousin, Seth L; Biegert, J

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear pulse compression mediated by three-wave mixing is demonstrated for ultrashort Ti:sapphire pulses in a type II phase-matched β-barium borate (BBO) crystal using noncollinear geometry. 170 μJ pulses at 800 nm with a pulse duration of 74 fs are compressed at their sum frequency to 32 fs with 55 μJ of pulse energy. Experiments and computer simulations demonstrate the potential of sum-frequency pulse compression to match the group velocities of the interacting waves to crystals that were initially not considered in the context of nonlinear pulse compression.

  20. Pulse compression techniques to improve modulated pulsed laser line scan systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Robert W.; Nash, Justin K.; Cochenour, Brandon M.; Mullen, Linda J.

    2015-05-01

    A modulated pulse laser imaging system has been developed which utilizes coded/chirped RF modulation to mitigate the adverse effects of optical scattering in degraded visual underwater environments. Current laser imaging techniques employ either short pulses or single frequency modulated pulses to obtain both intensity and range images. Systems using short pulses have high range resolution but are susceptible to scattering due to the wide bandwidth nature of the pulse. Range gating can be used to limit the effects of backscatter, but this can lead to blind spots in the range image. Modulated pulse systems can help suppress the contribution from scattered light in generated imagery without gating the receiver. However, the use of narrowband, single tone modulation results in limited range resolution where small targets are camouflaged within the background. This drives the need for systems which have high range resolution while still suppressing the effects of scattering caused by the environment. Coded/chirped modulated pulses enable the use of radar pulse compression techniques to substantially increase range resolution while also providing a way to discriminate the object of interest from the light scattered from the environment. Linearly frequency chirped waveforms and phase shift keyed barker codes were experimentally investigated to determine the effects that pulse compression would have on intensity/range data. The effect of modulation frequency on the data produced with both wideband and narrowband modulation was also investigated. The results from laboratory experiments will be presented and compared to model predictions.

  1. High quality sub-two cycle pulses from compression of supercontinuum generated in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Alexander M; Rothhardt, Jan; Hartung, Alexander; Bartelt, Hartmut; Rohwer, Erich G; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-07-18

    We demonstrate nonlinear pulse compression based on recently introduced highly coherent broadband supercontinuum (SC) generation in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber (ANDi PCF). The special temporal properties of the octave-spanning SC spectra generated with 15 fs, 1.7 nJ pulses from a Ti:Sapphire oscillator in a 1.7 mm fiber piece allow the compression to 5.0 fs high quality pulses by linear chirp compensation with a compact chirped mirror compressor. This is the shortest pulse duration achieved to date from the external recompression of SC pulses generated in PCF. Numerical simulations in excellent agreement with the experimental results are used to discuss the scalability of the concept to the single-cycle regime employing active phase shaping. We show that previously reported limits to few-cycle pulse generation from compression of SC spectra generated in conventional PCF possessing one or more zero dispersion wavelengths do not apply for ANDi PCF.

  2. Self-compression of ultrashort pulses in a quartz-fiber/amplifier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimov, B. S.; Isaev, S. K.; Luzgin, S. N.; Trukhov, D. V.

    1986-11-01

    A fiber-optic compressor-amplifier (FOCA) which conserves a smooth monopulse shape of the compressed pulse has been developed. Continuous compression in the FOCA scheme with cyclic amplification makes it possible to vary the output pulse duration in a wide range. Several FOCA variants are proposed including pulse compression in a cyclic scheme with a wideband color-center laser-amplifier and compression with stimulated Raman scattering.

  3. Optimization design of pulse compression multilayer dielectric gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuwei; Bai, Liang; Jia, Shenli

    2015-05-01

    The pulse compression multilayer dielectric grating (MDG) is one of the key elements of high-power laser systems. Mixed metal multilayer dielectric gratings(MMDG) with wider spectrum and higher diffraction efficiency are gradually becoming hot topic in chirped pulse compressor. In this paper, we studied the reflection and diffraction characteristics of pulse compression grating, i.e MMDG. First the thin-film structure, which would be applied to MMDG, was designed by combining characteristic matrix method and global optimization algorithm and the influence of the metal thickness and the number of layer film to reflectivity was also analyzed. Grating design software based on reflectivity vector theory (RCW)was developed to analyze the diffraction characteristic of MMDG. Combining generic algorithm and RCW, the optimization design of MMDG is studied. Comparing the diffraction efficiency of before and after optimization design, the highest diffraction efficiency is higher than 99% and bandwidth of MMDG is over 200nm, 50nm wider than that of MDG.

  4. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  5. Pulse Compression with Very Low Sidelobes in an Airborne Rain Mapping Rada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, A.; Durden, S.; Im, E.; Li, F.; Ricketts, W.; Wilsons, W.

    1993-01-01

    The pulse compression system for an airborne rain mapping rada is described. This system uses time domain weighting of the transmit pulse and is able to achive a pulse compression sidelobe level of -55 dB. This is significantly lower than any values previously reported in the open literature.

  6. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-08-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  7. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  8. Multi-moded passive rf pulse compression development at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantista, Christopher D.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-05-01

    The design of a pulse compressing power distribution system for the Next Linear Collider has evolved significantly in the past few years. This system allows the combined power of several klystrons to be directed, by means of drive phase manipulation, to different accelerator feeds at different times during each pulse. The desire to reduce the amount of required low-loss, circular-waveguide delay line has led to multi-moded schemes [1], in which different modes are propagated through the same waveguide to different destinations. We will present current plans for a system utilizing two modes, in which manipulations are done primarily in overmoded rectangular guide. We will describe several novel, passive waveguide components developed for this system. Because these must carry up to 600 MW pulsed rf power, features that invite breakdown, such as coupling slots, irises, and septa, are avoided, and h-plane symmetry is exploited to allow the use of overheight waveguide. This X-band pulse compressor is scalable to higher frequencies.

  9. Compressive sensing reconstruction of feed-forward connectivity in pulse-coupled nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranca, Victor J.; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    Utilizing the sparsity ubiquitous in real-world network connectivity, we develop a theoretical framework for efficiently reconstructing sparse feed-forward connections in a pulse-coupled nonlinear network through its output activities. Using only a small ensemble of random inputs, we solve this inverse problem through the compressive sensing theory based on a hidden linear structure intrinsic to the nonlinear network dynamics. The accuracy of the reconstruction is further verified by the fact that complex inputs can be well recovered using the reconstructed connectivity. We expect this Rapid Communication provides a new perspective for understanding the structure-function relationship as well as compressive sensing principle in nonlinear network dynamics.

  10. Compressive sensing reconstruction of feed-forward connectivity in pulse-coupled nonlinear networks.

    PubMed

    Barranca, Victor J; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    Utilizing the sparsity ubiquitous in real-world network connectivity, we develop a theoretical framework for efficiently reconstructing sparse feed-forward connections in a pulse-coupled nonlinear network through its output activities. Using only a small ensemble of random inputs, we solve this inverse problem through the compressive sensing theory based on a hidden linear structure intrinsic to the nonlinear network dynamics. The accuracy of the reconstruction is further verified by the fact that complex inputs can be well recovered using the reconstructed connectivity. We expect this Rapid Communication provides a new perspective for understanding the structure-function relationship as well as compressive sensing principle in nonlinear network dynamics.

  11. A pulse-compression-ring circuit for high-efficiency electric propulsion.

    PubMed

    Owens, Thomas L

    2008-03-01

    A highly efficient, highly reliable pulsed-power system has been developed for use in high power, repetitively pulsed inductive plasma thrusters. The pulsed inductive thruster ejects plasma propellant at a high velocity using a Lorentz force developed through inductive coupling to the plasma. Having greatly increased propellant-utilization efficiency compared to chemical rockets, this type of electric propulsion system may one day propel spacecraft on long-duration deep-space missions. High system reliability and electrical efficiency are extremely important for these extended missions. In the prototype pulsed-power system described here, exceptional reliability is achieved using a pulse-compression circuit driven by both active solid-state switching and passive magnetic switching. High efficiency is achieved using a novel ring architecture that recovers unused energy in a pulse-compression system with minimal circuit loss after each impulse. As an added benefit, voltage reversal is eliminated in the ring topology, resulting in long lifetimes for energy-storage capacitors. System tests were performed using an adjustable inductive load at a voltage level of 3.3 kV, a peak current of 20 kA, and a current switching rate of 15 kA/micros.

  12. Pulse compression grating fabrication by diffractive proximity photolithography.

    PubMed

    Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Fuchs, Frank; Harzendorf, Torsten; Zeitner, Uwe D

    2014-02-15

    We report about a newly devised throughput-scalable fabrication method for high-quality periodic submicron structures. The process is demonstrated for optical transmission gratings in fused silica with a period of 800 nm (1250  lines/mm) to be used in laser pulse compression. The technology is based on an innovative advancement of i-line proximity photolithography performed in a mask aligner. The aerial image is encoded in a rigorously optimized electron-beam-written three-level phase mask which is illuminated by an adapted multipole configuration of incidence angles. In comparison to conventional proximity lithography, the process enables a significantly higher resolution while maintaining a good depth of focus--in contrast to lithography based on direct Talbot-imaging. Details about the grating fabrication process and characterization of fabricated pulse compression grating wafers are presented. The gratings show a diffraction efficiency of 97% at a wavelength of 1030 nm and a wavefront error comparable to gratings fabricated by electron-beam lithography.

  13. Pulse self-compression to single-cycle pulse widths a few decades above the self-focusing threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    We identify a physical scenario whereby optical-field waveforms with peak powers several decades above the critical power of self-focusing can self-compress to subcycle pulse widths. With beam breakup, intense hot spots, and optical damage of the material avoided within the pulse compression length by keeping this length shorter than the modulation-instability buildup length, the beam is shown to preserve its continuity at the point of subcycle pulse generation.

  14. Compression, spectral broadening, and collimation in multiple, femtosecond pulse filamentation in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2012-09-01

    A sequence of femtosecond laser pulses propagating through atmosphere and delayed near the rotational recurrence period of N2 can resonantly drive molecular alignment. Through the polarization density, the molecular alignment provides an index of refraction contribution that acts as a lens copropagating with each laser pulse. Each pulse enhances this contribution to the index, modifying the propagation of subsequent pulses. Here we present propagation simulations of femtosecond pulse sequences in which we have implemented a self-consistent calculation of the rotational polarization density using linearized density matrix theory. We find that a femtosecond pulse sequence can enhance pulse compression or collimation in atmosphere. In particular, when the pulses are delayed by exactly the rotational recurrence period, each subsequent pulse is increasingly compressed due to a combination of spectral broadening and negative dispersion. Alternatively, when the intensity peak of each pulse is centered on the maximum index generated by the preceding pulses, each pulse is increasingly collimated.

  15. Efficient compression of the femtosecond pulses of an ytterbium laser in a gas-filled capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2011-07-31

    A 290-fs radiation pulse of an ytterbium laser system with a central wavelength of 1028 nm and an energy of 145 {mu}J was compressed to a 27-fs pulse with an energy of 75 {mu}J. The compression was realised on the basis of the effect of pulse spectrum broadening in a xenon-filled glass capillary for a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  16. Optimization of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for high-quality pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Wen; Lim, JinKang; Huang, Shu-Wei; Schimpf, Damian N; Kärtner, Franz X; Chang, Guoqing

    2012-12-17

    We both theoretically and experimentally investigate the optimization of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers (YDFAs) to achieve high-quality, high-power, compressed pulses. Ultrashort pulses amplified inside YDFAs are modeled by the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation coupled to the steady-state propagation-rate equations. We use this model to study the dependence of compressed-pulse quality on the YDFA parameters, such as the gain fiber's doping concentration and length, and input pulse pre-chirp, duration, and power. The modeling results confirmed by experiments show that an optimum negative pre-chirp for the input pulse exists to achieve the best compression.

  17. Temporal compression of pulses from a 100-KHz-repetiton-rate femtosecond ytterbium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    We report the temporal compression a femtosecond ytterbium laser pulse at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz using the effect of nonlinear self-phase modulation in a gas-filled capillary. A 260-fs laser pulse is compressed down to 17 fs with an energy efficiency of 40%. An average radiation power at the compressor output is 2 W. At a second compression stage, the time contrast is increased and the pulse duration is reduced in the process of the second harmonic generation in a KDP crystal. The obtained pulses have a duration of 11 fs at an efficiency of 35%.

  18. Insentropic compression of solid using pulsed magnetic loading

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,CLINT A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; REISMAN,D.; TOOR,A.; CAUBLE,R.; HAYES,D.B.

    2000-04-18

    Shock loading techniques are often used to determine material response along a specific pressure loading curve referred to as the Hugoniot. However, many technological and scientific applications require accurate determination of dynamic material response that is off-Hugoniot, covering large regions of the equation-of-state surface. Unloading measurements from the shocked state provide off-Hugoniot information, but experimental techniques for measuring compressive off-Hugoniot response have been limited. A new pulsed magnetic loading technique is presented which provides previously unavailable information on isentropic loading of materials to pressures of several hundred kbar. This smoothly increasing pressure loading provides a good approximation to the high-pressure material isentrope centered at ambient conditions. The approach uses high current densities to create ramped magnetic loading to a few hundred kbar over time intervals of 100--200 ns. The method has successfully determined the isentropic mechanical response of copper to about 200 kbar and has been used to evaluate the kinetics of the alpha-epsilon phase transition occurring in iron at 130 kbar. With refinements in progress, the method shows promise for performing isentropic compression experiments to multi-Mbar pressures.

  19. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  20. Compression of An Ultrashort Laser Pulse via Self-Phase Modulation in An Argon Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Masashi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    Compression and splitting of the optical laser pulse due to multiple filamentation in an argon gas-filled channel was observed. A 130-140-fs linearly polarized pulse was successfully compressed to less than 60-80 fs with the output energy of a few 10 mJ.

  1. Filamentary pulse self-compression: The impact of the cell windows

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Bethge, Jens; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Skupin, Stefan; Berge, Luc; Steinmeyer, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    Self-compression of multi-millijoule laser pulses during filamentary propagation is usually explained by the interplay of self-focusing and defocusing effects, causing a substantial concentration of energy on the axis of the propagating optical pulse. Recently, it has been argued that cell windows may play a decisive role in the self-compression mechanism. As such windows have to be used for media other than air their presence is often unavoidable, yet they present a sudden nonadiabatic change in dispersion and nonlinearity that should lead to a destruction of the temporal and spatial integrity of the light bullets generated in the self-compression mechanism. We now experimentally prove that there is, in fact, a self-healing mechanism that helps to overcome the potentially destructive consequences of the cell windows. We show in two carefully conducted experiments that the cell window position decisively influences activation or inhibition of the self-healing mechanism. A comparison with a windowless cell shows that the presence of this mechanism is an important prerequisite for the exploitation of self-compression effects in windowed cells filled with inert gases.

  2. Pulse compression by nonlinear pulse evolution with reduced optical wave breaking in erbium-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Tamura, K; Nakazawa, M

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear pulse evolution is studied for a fiber with normal dispersion (ND) and gain. Numerical simulations show that under certain conditions the pulse evolves into a parabolic shape, which has been shown to reduce optical wave breaking. Much as with the square pulse that forms in passive fibers with ND, the interplay of ND and self-phase modulation creates a highly linear chirp, which can be efficiently compressed. Application to an amplifying fiber/grating (prism) pair pulse compressor is considered, with an experimental demonstration of compression from 350 to 77 fs at a gain of 18 dB in an erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

  3. Temporal pulse compression and retardation by incoherent all-optical control

    SciTech Connect

    Tognetti, Marco V.; Sali, Emiliano; Cavalieri, Stefano; Buffa, Roberto

    2010-02-15

    We present a theoretical analysis of a new scheme for temporal retardation combined with temporal compression of weak laser pulses, optically controlled by the presence of one additional light pulse. A realistic realization of this scheme in hot Rb is discussed, showing that a large range of values of the optically controllable delay-bandwidth product can be obtained with a limited pulse distortion.

  4. Experimental verification and analysis of wavelength effect on pulse stretching and compressing in mid-IR chirped-pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Haizhe; Yuan, Peng; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lifu; Ma, Jingui; Li, Ying; Fan, Dianyuan

    2016-02-01

    As a consequence of the general experimental challenge to detect signals in mid-IR range, taking dispersive chirped near-IR laser pulses as the injected signal source seems to be an artistic route avoiding the daunting mid-IR stretcher and constantly was applied in moderate energy mid-IR optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifications (OPCPA) systems. In this paper we study the wavelength effect on pulse stretching and compressing in detail. Beginning with the theoretical analysis on each dispersion term of grating pairs, we evaluate the residual dispersions when pulse stretcher and compressor work at distinct wavelengths, which shows that this wavelength effect will result in poorly compressed pulses far from transform-limited. Via proof-of-principle experiments based on mid-IR OPCPAs and corresponding numerical simulations, we show that this artful configuration led to un-compressible pulses of ∼2 ps with a time-bandwidth product of ∼ 10 when the chirped-pulse duration is ∼400 ps. To overcome this effect, we demonstrate a simple design of pulse stretcher and compressor. The presented design consisted of a reflection grism-pair compressor can simultaneously cancel the quadric and cubic dispersions of conventional grating based stretcher, showing a potential ability of supporting high-contrast, sub-100-fs pulse-duration and 10,000× of pulse expansion.

  5. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  6. Dynamics of linear compression of chirped femtosecond optical pulses under fourth-order dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeng Mandeng, Lucien; Ibraid Fewo, Serge; Tchawoua, Clément; Crépin Kofané, Timoléon

    2014-05-01

    In a linear dispersive optical medium under fourth-order dispersion (FOD), we study the dynamics of the chirped pulse compression with the help of trial Gaussian and raised-cosine (RC) ansätze pulses. The analysis based on the variational approach leads to the occurrence of compression conditions, highlighting the cases where both the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) and the chirp could have the same sign or the case where both the FOD and the GVD have the same sign. Furthermore, we show that the compression process is dependent on the considered input profile. Particularly, a condition supposing that the GVD, the FOD and the chirp have the same sign leads to a compression only for the RC pulse in comparison to the previous results obtained for the Gaussian pulse. Numerical simulations, which confirm these features, are presented for the 380-fs input pulses undergoing ? value in the FOD.

  7. Optical pulse compression reflectometry based on single-sideband modulator driven by electrical frequency-modulated pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Weiwen; Yu, Lei; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate a linear frequency-modulated optical pulse with high extinction ratio based on an electrical frequency-modulated pulse and optical single-sideband modulator. This scheme is proved to improve the stability and accuracy of optical pulse compression reflectometry (OPCR). In the experiment, a high spatial resolution of 10 cm and a long measurement range of 10.8 km using a laser source with 2-km coherence length are demonstrated.

  8. Passive and active pulse stacking scheme for pulse shaping

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Schipper, John F.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing a sequence of radiation pulses with a pulse envelope of time variation which is controllable by an external electromagnetic signal applied to an active medium or by a sectored reflector, through which the radiation passes.

  9. Combined flux compression and plasma opening switch on the Saturn pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Felber, Franklin S; Waisman, Eduardo M; Mazarakis, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 micros. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  10. Combined Flux Compression and Plasma Opening Switch on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felber, Franklin S.; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Mazarakis, Michael G.

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 {mu}s. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  11. Peristaltic pulse dynamic compression of the lower extremity enhances flexibility.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; Murray, Melonie B; Murray, Steven R; McNeal, Jeni R; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Kimitake; Stone, Michael H

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of peristaltic pulse dynamic compression (PPDC) on range-of-motion (ROM) changes in forward splits. Serious stretching usually involves discomfort and large time investments. Tissue structural changes and stretch tolerance have heretofore been considered the primary mechanisms of enhanced ROM. The PPDC treatment was computer controlled. Circumferential and segmented inflation pressures were induced by feet to hip leggings. Nine subjects, experienced in stretching and a forward split position, volunteered. The subjects were familiarized with the protocol and randomly assigned to an initial condition: experimental (PPDC), or control (CONT). The study involved a crossover design. Second conditions were tested within 1-5 days. All tests were 2 trials of right and left forward splits. Split flexibility was assessed by measuring the height of the anterior superior iliac spine of the rear leg from the floor. Pelvic posture was controlled by rear leg position. The PPDC treatment was 15 minutes of seated PPDC. The control condition was the same except that leggings were not inflated. Pressures of 5 cells in the leggings were set at factory defaults, 70 mm Hg sequentially. Difference score results indicated statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences by condition and the condition by leg interaction. The rapid acute changes in ROM (PPDC: right 25.3%, left 33.3%; CONT: right 12.2%, left 1.0%) support the premise that changes in ROM were dependent on mechanisms other than tissue structural changes and/or stretch tolerance. PPDC provides a means of rapidly enhancing acute ROM requiring less discomfort and time.

  12. Design and Fabrication of Efficient Reflection Grisms for Pulse Compression and Dispersion Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Steve; Tortajada, Fred; Dinger, Herb; Touzet, Bruno; Huff, Rachel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles; Gibson, Emily; Jimenez, Ralph; Gaudiosi, David; Kapteyn, Henry

    Efficient reflection grisms for pulse compression and material-dispersion compensation have been designed and demonstrated in a CPA system. Designs for 800-nm and 1030-nm ultrafast applications are characterized using off-the-shelf diffraction gratings.

  13. Relativistic Single-Cycled Short-Wavelength Laser Pulse Compressed from a Chirped Pulse Induced by Laser-Foil Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L. L.; Shen, B. F.; Li, D. X.; Wang, D.; Leng, Y. X.; Zhang, X. M.; Wen, M.; Wang, W. P.; Xu, J. C.; Yu, Y. H.

    2010-07-09

    By particle-in-cell simulation and analysis, we propose a plasma approach to generate a relativistic chirped pulse based on a laser-foil interaction. When two counterpropagating circularly polarized pulses interact with an overdense foil, the driving pulse (with a larger laser field amplitude) will accelerate the whole foil to form a double-layer structure, and the scattered pulse (with a smaller laser field amplitude) is reflected by this flying layer. Because of the Doppler effect and the varying velocity of the layer, the reflected pulse is up-shifted for frequency and chirped; thus, it could be compressed to a nearly single-cycled relativistic laser pulse with a short wavelength. Simulations show that a nearly single-cycled subfemtosecond relativistic pulse can be generated with a wavelength of 0.2 {mu}m after dispersion compensation.

  14. Direct femtosecond pulse compression with miniature-sized Bragg cholesteric liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Song, Liyan; Fu, Shenhe; Liu, Yikun; Zhou, Jianying; Chigrinov, Vladimir G; Khoo, Iam Choon

    2013-12-01

    Direct compression of femtosecond optical pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser oscillator was realized with a cholesteric liquid crystal acting as a nonlinear 1D periodic Bragg grating. With a 6 μm thick sample, the pulse duration could be compressed from 100 to 48 fs. Coupled-mode equations for forward and backward waves were employed to simulate the dynamics therein, and good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. PMID:24281504

  15. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  16. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  17. High-efficiency laser-pulse compression by stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Damzen, M J; Hutchinson, M H

    1983-06-01

    Highly efficient compression of laser pulses down to 1 nsec in duration by stimulated Brillouin scattering has been demonstrated. Compression ratios of ~10 and energy-conversion efficiencies >70% have been produced. Several compressor systems have been investigated, including the use of tapered waveguides, long-focal-length geometries, and generator-amplifier systems. PMID:19718098

  18. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  19. Compression of chirp pulses from a femtosecond fiber based amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Rumi; Takiuchi, Ken-ichi; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jyun; Sumida, Shin

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a single mode fiber based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) with a single polarization and a fully monolithic design. We have built a passive mode-locked polarization maintaining Yb doped fiber as the master oscillator contains a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and a chirped fiber Bragg grating for the dispersion management. The net intracavity dispersion was managed to be slightly anomalous. The oscillator generates the 150 fs (sech2) pulses at the center wavelength of 1065 nm, and the repetition rate of 42 MHz. The oscillator output was amplified to 1.4 W from 80 mW in the single stage fiber amplifier which results in pulse shape distortion. The pulse shaping with a band pass filter and a compressor was applied to the amplified pulses. The shaping pulses have the pulse width of 90 fs and the pulse energy of 16 nJ.

  20. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  1. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Pearson, Chris; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Chan, Jose; Fant, Karen; Frisch, Josef; Atkinson, Dennis

    2005-04-01

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  2. Simultaneous compression of the passively mode-locked pulsewidth and pulse train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Xiang-Chun; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Zhao-Qing; Sun, Zhan-Ao; Yang, Fu-Min; Tan, De-Tong; Chen, Wan-Zhen; Lu, Wen-Hu; Xiao, Chi-Kun

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous compression of the passively mode-locked pulse width and pulse train have been achieved by using a plano-convex unstable resonator hybrided by a nonlinear Sagnac ring interferometer. The greater than 30 mJ single pulse energy of a lone oscillator and less than or equal to 10 ps pulsewidth have been obtained. Using this system, the LAGEOS and ETALON satellites' laser ranging have been performed successfully.

  3. Periodic compression of chirped femtosecond pulses in silicon waveguides under fourth-order dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeng Mandeng, Lucien; Ibraid Fewo, Serge; Tchawoua, Clément; Crépin Kofané, Timoléon

    2014-08-01

    We report the analysis of the compression mechanism for chirped femtosecond pulses in silicon-on-insulator waveguides under the effect of fourth-order dispersion (FOD) using the modified variational approach that involves Rayleigh's dissipation function (RDF). Our results show that the nonlinear compression in these waveguides is input pulse dependent. Moreover, this study leads to a nearly periodic-like dynamic induced by the interplay between self-phase modulation and FOD in a normal group-velocity dispersion. In addition, when large values of the initial chirp and absorption coefficients present in these waveguides are considered, the compression mechanism is completely destroyed, with the observation of at least one pulse amplification over a short distance of propagation prior to pulse broadening.

  4. Two-stage Raman compression of laser pulses with controllable phase fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, A. A.; Fraiman, G. M.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-05-15

    The phase front of an ultrashort laser pulse undergoing Raman amplification and compression in inhomogeneous plasma can be controlled such that it is unaffected by density gradients and thus remains focusable. This is achieved by performing the Raman backscattering in two stages. At the first stage, the standard nonlinear Raman compression of a seed wave takes place and produces a short ultraintense pulse, which yet may be poorly focusable. At the second stage, this amplified pulse is scattered again, now serving as a pump, off a second copy of the initial seed. This stage, which utilizes a denser and shorter plasma, is intended not for compression but rather for passing a significant fraction of the energy to the second seed quickly. Then, the output pulse that is produced is not just short and ultraintense, but also has the smooth phase front of the original seed.

  5. Nonlinear pulse compression of picosecond parabolic-like pulses synthesized with a long period fiber grating filter.

    PubMed

    Krcmarík, David; Slavík, Radan; Park, Yongwoo; Azaña, José

    2009-04-27

    tract: We demonstrate high quality pulse compression at high repetition rates by use of spectral broadening of short parabolic-like pulses in a normally-dispersive highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) followed by linear dispersion compensation with a conventional SMF-28 fiber. The key contribution of this work is on the use of a simple and efficient long-period fiber grating (LPFG) filter for synthesizing the desired parabolic-like pulses from sech(2)-like input optical pulses; this all-fiber low-loss filter enables reducing significantly the required input pulse power as compared with the use of previous all-fiber pulse re-shaping solutions (e.g. fiber Bragg gratings). A detailed numerical analysis has been performed in order to optimize the system's performance, including investigation of the optimal initial pulse shape to be launched into the HNLF fiber. We found that the pulse shape launched into the HNLF is critically important for suppressing the undesired wave breaking in the nonlinear spectral broadening process. The optimal shape is found to be independent on the parameters of normally dispersive HNLFs. In our experiments, 1.5-ps pulses emitted by a 10-GHz mode-locked laser are first reshaped into 3.2-ps parabolic-like pulses using our LPFG-based pulse reshaper. Flat spectrum broadening of the amplified initial parabolic-like pulses has been generated using propagation through a commercially-available HNLF. Pulses of 260 fs duration with satellite peak and pedestal suppression greater than 17 dB have been obtained after the linear dispersion compensation fiber. The generated pulses exhibit a 20-nm wide supercontinuum energy spectrum that has almost a square-like spectral profile with >85% of the pulse energy contained in its FWHM spectral bandwidth. PMID:19399083

  6. Nonlinear pulse compression of picosecond parabolic-like pulses synthesized with a long period fiber grating filter.

    PubMed

    Krcmarík, David; Slavík, Radan; Park, Yongwoo; Azaña, José

    2009-04-27

    tract: We demonstrate high quality pulse compression at high repetition rates by use of spectral broadening of short parabolic-like pulses in a normally-dispersive highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) followed by linear dispersion compensation with a conventional SMF-28 fiber. The key contribution of this work is on the use of a simple and efficient long-period fiber grating (LPFG) filter for synthesizing the desired parabolic-like pulses from sech(2)-like input optical pulses; this all-fiber low-loss filter enables reducing significantly the required input pulse power as compared with the use of previous all-fiber pulse re-shaping solutions (e.g. fiber Bragg gratings). A detailed numerical analysis has been performed in order to optimize the system's performance, including investigation of the optimal initial pulse shape to be launched into the HNLF fiber. We found that the pulse shape launched into the HNLF is critically important for suppressing the undesired wave breaking in the nonlinear spectral broadening process. The optimal shape is found to be independent on the parameters of normally dispersive HNLFs. In our experiments, 1.5-ps pulses emitted by a 10-GHz mode-locked laser are first reshaped into 3.2-ps parabolic-like pulses using our LPFG-based pulse reshaper. Flat spectrum broadening of the amplified initial parabolic-like pulses has been generated using propagation through a commercially-available HNLF. Pulses of 260 fs duration with satellite peak and pedestal suppression greater than 17 dB have been obtained after the linear dispersion compensation fiber. The generated pulses exhibit a 20-nm wide supercontinuum energy spectrum that has almost a square-like spectral profile with >85% of the pulse energy contained in its FWHM spectral bandwidth.

  7. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-04-28

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  8. Compression and collisions of chirped pulses in a dense two-level medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitsky, Denis V.

    2016-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we study propagation of linearly-chirped optical pulses in a homogeneously broadened two-level medium. We pay attention to the three main topics - validity of the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), pulse compression, and collisions of counter-propagating pulses. The cases of long and single-cycle pulses are considered and compared with each other. We show that the RWA does not give a correct description of chirped pulse interaction with the medium. The compression of the chirp-free single-cycle pulse is stronger than of the chirped one, while the opposite is true for long pulses. We demonstrate that the influence of chirp on the collisions of the long pulses allows us to control the state of the transmitted radiation: the transmission of the chirp-free pulse can be dramatically changed under collision with the chirped counter-propagating one, in sharp contrast to the case when both pulses are chirped. On the other hand, the collisions of the chirped single-cycle pulses can be used for precise control of medium excitation in a narrow spatial region.

  9. Optimizing ultrashort laser pulse compression by two photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, G.; Frisch, J.; Smith, S.; Glownia, J. M.; Fry, A.

    2016-02-01

    Demonstrated is an approach for relative optimization of ultrashort pulses using two-photon generated photocurrent in a GaAsP photodiode. Two-photon absorption is a nonlinear process, allowing for highly sensitive tuning of ultrashort laser systems.

  10. Multi-mJ pulse compression in hollow fibers using circular polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvache, A.; Chen, X.; Durfee, C. G.; Jullien, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.

    2011-07-01

    We develop a numerical model to explore the polarization-dependent compression of multi-mJ laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow fiber. We show how losses and instabilities due to cycling of pulse energy between fiber modes can be efficiently minimized using circularly polarized light and adjusting simple experimental parameters such as pulse energy, chirp and gas pressure. This should help scale the peak power of few-cycle pulses available for high-field experiments using standard hollow fiber compressors. We also discuss the limits of this approach.

  11. Chirped self-healing Airy pulses compression in silicon waveguides under fourth-order dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeng Mandeng, Lucien; Tchawoua, Clément

    2013-03-01

    We present the compression of Airy pulses in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides under the fourth-order dispersion (FOD) using the variational approach that involves Rayleigh's dissipation function (RDF). All the pulse characteristics are under the influence of the two-photon and the frequency-carrier absorptions. In a quasi-linear approximation, the pulse compression conditions induced by the interaction of the group-velocity dispersion (GVD), the chirp and the FOD are derived. In the nonlinear case, the self-phase modulation (SPM), the two-photon absorption (TPA) and the free-carrier absorption (FCA) reduce the length of compression in a propagation regime of normal GVD, positive chirp and a negative value of FOD. The TPA reduces the maximal power reached than the SPM while the FCA rather increases its value. These results are confirmed in the general case where they all interact with the linear dispersion terms of the SOI waveguide.

  12. Ultrafast pulse compression, stretching-and-recompression using cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yikun; Wu, You; Chen, Chun-Wei; Zhou, Jianying; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Khoo, Iam Choon

    2016-05-16

    We have experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of direct compression, or stretching and recompression of laser pulses in a very wide temporal time scale spanning 10's fs to ~1 ps time with sub-mm thick cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells. The mechanisms at work here are the strong dispersion at the photonic band-edges and nonlinear phase modulation associated with the non-resonant ultrafast molecular electronic optical nonlinearity. The observed pulse compression limit, spectral characteristics and intensity dependence of the compression are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and simulations based on a coupled-mode propagation model. Owing to the large degree of freedom to engineer the wavelength locations of CLC photonic bandgap and band-edges, these self-action all-optical processes can be realized with ultrafast lasers pulses in a very wide spectral region from the visible to near infrared, with potential applications in compact ultrafast photonic modulation devices/platforms. PMID:27409869

  13. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  14. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  15. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  16. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:23351273

  17. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  18. Characterization of the RHEPP 1 {mu}s magnetic pulse compression module

    SciTech Connect

    Harjes, C.; Adcock, J.; Martinez, L.; Van DeValde, D.; Wavrik, R.; Laderach, G.; Pena, G.

    1993-08-01

    The technology for pulsed power based high average power accelerators is being developed in the RHEPP (Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power) project. This technology base uses magnetic pulse compression to generate repetitive, high peak power pulses. The 1 {mu}s pulse compressor accepts 3400 V rms, 120 Hz input power from a 600-kW alternator and delivers unipolar {approximately}1 {mu}s rise time, 260 kV pulses to the RHEPP pulse forming line at a rate of 120 pps. The compressor consists of 5 stages of pulse compression with a 15 to 260 kV step up transformer between stages 2 and 3. Magnetic switches are used throughout the compressor because such switches seem to offer the potential of meeting the lifetime requirements of high average power systems. Thermal and electrical data has been acquired to characterize the compressor during several long duration runs (some over 1 million shots). A description of the compressor and its components along with data and a discussion of the compressors performance are presented.

  19. Grating configurations to compress extreme-ultraviolet ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca

    2015-09-10

    It is here discussed the design of ultrafast extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) grating compressors that can be used to condition the spectral phase of ultrashort chirped pulses to compensate for the phase chirp and get closer to the Fourier limit. We discuss the two configurations that can be used to realize the compressor, the classical diffraction mount, and the off-plane one. The concept is applied to the realization of a XUV compressor with applications to free-electron lasers.

  20. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzi, Matthew; Wang, Juwen; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate T E114 modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q0 of 9.4 ×104 and coupling factor (β ) of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor QL of 1.06 ×104 with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05 dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  1. Two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine with pulsed air supplier

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John M.

    2003-08-05

    A two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine includes a volume pulsed air supplier, such as a piston driven pump, for efficient scavenging. The usage of a homogenous charge tends to decrease emissions. The use of a volume pulsed air supplier in conjunction with conventional poppet type intake and exhaust valves results in a relatively efficient scavenging mode for the engine. The engine preferably includes features that permit valving event timing, air pulse event timing and injection event timing to be varied relative to engine crankshaft angle. The principle use of the invention lies in improving diesel engines.

  2. Shear wave pulse compression for dynamic elastography using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Assessing the biomechanical properties of soft tissue provides clinically valuable information to supplement conventional structural imaging. In the previous studies, we introduced a dynamic elastography technique based on phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) to characterize submillimetric structures such as skin layers or ocular tissues. Here, we propose to implement a pulse compression technique for shear wave elastography. We performed shear wave pulse compression in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using a mechanical actuator to generate broadband frequency-modulated vibrations (1 to 5 kHz), induced displacements were detected at an equivalent frame rate of 47 kHz using a PhS-OCT. The recorded signal was digitally compressed to a broadband pulse. Stiffness maps were then reconstructed from spatially localized estimates of the local shear wave speed. We demonstrate that a simple pulse compression scheme can increase shear wave detection signal-to-noise ratio (>12  dB gain) and reduce artifacts in reconstructing stiffness maps of heterogeneous media. PMID:24441876

  3. Doppler and Band-width Characteristics of Periodic Binary Code Compressed to Several Sub-pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Shinriki, Masanori; Susaki, Hironori

    The new periodic binary codes compressed to several sub-pulses are shown. The Doppler characteristics and band-width characteristics are studied by using of MATLAB / Simulink. The results are compared with the characteristics of the M-sequence. It is demonstrated the new periodic binary codes have better these characteristics than M-sequences.

  4. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed.

  5. Pulsed flashover of solid dielectric materials in compressed gas environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Somesh Vinayak E-mail: svtewari@barc.gov.in; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K. C.

    2015-06-24

    An experimental investigation of surface flashover characteristics of PMMA and POM is studied in compressed nitrogen gas environment with nitrogen as the background gas. The operating pressure range is from 1kg/cm{sup 2} to 4kg/cm{sup 2}. It is observed that the breakdown voltage of PMMA is higher than POM owing to a higher permittivity mismatch between POM- nitrogen interface as compared to the PMMA- nitrogen interface. The reduction in spacer efficiency with pressure for PMMA is 11% as compared to POM which shows a higher reduction of 18%. This paper further emphasizes on the role of energy level and density of charge carrier trapping centers for a reduced breakdown voltage in POM as compared to PMMA.

  6. Pulsed dipole radiation in a transformation-optics wedge waveguide designed by azimuthal space compression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heungjoon; Pack, Seung Pil; Yi, Yun; Kim, Hwi

    2013-09-23

    A transformation-optics wedge waveguide designed for the simultaneous collection and directional collimation of pulsed dipole radiation is described and tested with numerical simulation. Azimuthal compression of free space toward a narrow fan-shaped waveguide sector allows dipole pulse radiation in free space to be transformed into a directional non-dispersive pulse propagating within that sector. The collection and collimation ability of the proposed structure is compared with classical approaches using metallic wedge mirrors and parabolic mirrors, which inherently allow multiple internal reflections and thus generate significant pulse distortion and low light-collection efficiency. It is shown that the optical pulse generated by the dipole and propagated through the proposed transformation-optics waveguide maintains its original shape within the structure, and demonstrates enhanced optical power.

  7. Compression of X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulses to Attosecond Duration

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, James D.; Nathvani, Ricky; Oleśkiewicz, Piotr; Ceurvorst, Luke A.; Ratan, Naren; Kasim, Muhammad F.; Trines, Raoul M. G. M.; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    State of the art X-ray Free Electron Laser facilities currently provide the brightest X-ray pulses available, typically with mJ energy and several hundred femtosecond duration. Here we present one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, utilising the process of stimulated Raman amplification, showing that these pulses are compressed to a temporally coherent, sub-femtosecond pulse at 8% efficiency. Pulses of this type may pave the way for routine time resolution of electrons in nm size potentials. Furthermore, evidence is presented that significant Landau damping and wave-breaking may be beneficial in distorting the rear of the interaction and further reducing the final pulse duration. PMID:26568520

  8. Compression of X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulses to Attosecond Duration.

    PubMed

    Sadler, James D; Nathvani, Ricky; Oleśkiewicz, Piotr; Ceurvorst, Luke A; Ratan, Naren; Kasim, Muhammad F; Trines, Raoul M G M; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    State of the art X-ray Free Electron Laser facilities currently provide the brightest X-ray pulses available, typically with mJ energy and several hundred femtosecond duration. Here we present one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, utilising the process of stimulated Raman amplification, showing that these pulses are compressed to a temporally coherent, sub-femtosecond pulse at 8% efficiency. Pulses of this type may pave the way for routine time resolution of electrons in nm size potentials. Furthermore, evidence is presented that significant Landau damping and wave-breaking may be beneficial in distorting the rear of the interaction and further reducing the final pulse duration. PMID:26568520

  9. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-03-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers.

  10. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  11. Characterization and compression of dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daojing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Junyu; Zhao, Luming; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report numerical and experimental studies of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) in a fiber laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror. The DSR pulse presents temporally a flat-top profile and a clamped peak power. Its spectrum has a rectangle profile with characteristic steep edges. It shows a unique behavior as pulse energy increases: The rectangle part of the spectrum is unchanged while the newly emerging spectrum sits on the center part and forms a peak. Experimental observations match well with the numerical results. Moreover, the detailed evolution of the DSR pulse compression is both numerically and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. An experimentally obtained DSR pulse of 63 ps duration is compressed down to 760 fs, with low-intensity pedestals using a grating pair. Before being compressed to its narrowest width, the pulse firstly evolves into a cat-ear profile, and the corresponding autocorrelation trace shows a crown shape, which distinguishes itself from properties of other solitons formed in fiber lasers. PMID:27025189

  12. Temporal compression of cw diode-laser output into short pulses with cesium-vapor group-velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Choi, K; Menders, J; Ross, D; Korevaar, E

    1993-11-15

    Using a technique similar to chirped pulse compression, we have compressed the 50-mW cw output of a diode laser into pulses of greater than 500-mW peak power and less than 400-ps duration. By applying a small current modulation to the diode, we induced a small wavelength modulation in the vicinity of the 6s(1/2)-to-6p(3/2) cesium resonance transition at 852 nm. Group-velocity dispersion on propagation through a cesium vapor cell then led to pulse compression. We developed a simple model to make predictions of output pulse shapes by using different modulation waveforms. PMID:19829441

  13. Optical pulse compression using the combination of phase modulation and high-order dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guo; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua

    2010-09-01

    Optical pulse compression using high-order dispersion compensation is proposed and theoretically analyzed. Firstly, the required dispersion profile for the high-order dispersion compensation is derived, according to the linear chirp and the nonlinear chirp of a phase-modulated continuous-wave (CW) laser source. With the use of the high-order dispersion compensation, such as the combination compensation of the second order dispersion (SOD) and the fourth order dispersion (FOD), an efficient pulse compression having a less time-bandwidth product and a greater peak power is realized. A sampled fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with both the SOD and the FOD is then designed using the equivalent chirp and the reconstruction algorithm. Finally, in the numerical simulation an optical pulse with a time-bandwidth product of 0.79 is generated via high-order dispersion compensation that is performed by using the sampled FBG.

  14. Effect of intrapulse stimulated Raman scattering on soliton-effect pulse compression in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, G P

    1990-02-15

    The effect of intrapulse stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) on the quality of soliton-effect pulse compression is analyzed by solving the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation numerically. The results show that ISRS can improve the performance of soliton-effect pulse compressors both qualitatively and quantitatively. The compressed pulse is shorter with a higher peak power when ISRS is taken into account. Furthermore it is pedestal free as it separates from the background. The separation is due to the soliton self-frequency shift initiated by the process of ISRS. It can also be understood in terms of the soliton decay. The optimum fiber length is found to be longer than that expected in the absence of ISRS.

  15. Single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy in shock-compressed benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.; Schiferl, D.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Single-pulse backwards stimulated Raman and reflected broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (BSRC and RBBCARS) have been used to measure the vibrational frequency shifts of the 992 cm/sup -1/ ring-stretching mode of liquid benzene shock-compressed to pressures up to 1.2 GPa. The resulting shifts of approx. 7.5 cm/sup -1//GPa in the dynamic experiments are compared to spontaneous Raman-scattering measurements of heated samples compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. RBBCARS was used to simultaneously measure the ring-stretching mode vibrational frequencies of liquid benzene/liquid perdeuterobenzene mixtures shock-compressed to pressures up to 1.53 GPa. Additional experiments that demonstrate the difficulty of using polarization-sensitive coherent Raman techniques, such as Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (RIKES), in shock-compressed samples are described.

  16. Two-stage optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier using sub-nanosecond pump pulse generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Sho; Matsuyama, Takahiro; Sueda, Keiichi; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Tsubakimoto, Koji; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) based on two-beam pumping, using sub-nanosecond pulses generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering compression. Seed pulse energy, duration, and center wavelength were 5 nJ, 220 ps, and ˜1065 nm, respectively. The 532 nm pulse from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was compressed to ˜400 ps in heavy fluorocarbon FC-40 liquid. Stacking of two time-delayed pump pulses reduced the amplifier gain fluctuation. Using a walk-off-compensated two-stage OPCPA at a pump energy of 34 mJ, a total gain of 1.6 × 105 was obtained, yielding an output energy of 0.8 mJ. The amplified chirped pulse was compressed to 97 fs.

  17. Thermal transport in shock wave–compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-15

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ∼25 GPa and ∼1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  18. Thermal transport in shock wave-compressed solids using pulsed laser heating.

    PubMed

    La Lone, B M; Capelle, G; Stevens, G D; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ~25 GPa and ~1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  19. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  20. Optimization of the nonlinear regime of self-compression at femtosecond laser pulses in silica and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavchev, V.; Kovachev, L.; Ivanov, L. M.

    2015-03-01

    In the present work it is demonstrated two efficient methods of self-compression of femtosecond pulses based on suitable selection of optical elements, parameters of the medium and laser radiation. The basic idea is that the phase modulated pulses more efficiently can be compressed trough nonlinear mechanisms. The first method can be applied for mediums with significant dispersion like fused silica, where the sign of the dispersion of the group velocity is important. We show that the combination of focusing by optical lens and a balance between anomalous dispersion and nonlinearity lead to significant compression from 100fs to~20-30fs of optical pulse. The second method for self-compression is by using only one optical diffraction grating to obtain broadband pulses and the following self-compression in nonlinear regime. In the second case in addition is observed generation of X wave.

  1. Two techniques for temporal pulse compression in gas-filled hollow-core kagomé photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Travers, J C; Joly, N Y; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate temporal pulse compression in gas-filled kagomé hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using two different approaches: fiber-mirror compression based on self-phase modulation under normal dispersion, and soliton effect self-compression under anomalous dispersion with a decreasing pressure gradient. In the first, efficient compression to near-transform-limited pulses from 103 to 10.6 fs was achieved at output energies of 10.3 μJ. In the second, compression from 24 to 6.8 fs was achieved at output energies of 6.6 μJ, also with near-transform-limited pulse shapes. The results illustrate the potential of kagomé-PCF for postprocessing the output of fiber lasers. We also show that, using a negative pressure gradient, ultrashort pulses can be delivered directly into vacuum.

  2. Beam dynamics analysis in pulse compression using electron beam compact simulator for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Toru; Harada, Nob.

    2013-11-01

    In a final stage of an accelerator system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), pulse shaping and beam current increase by bunch compression are required for effective pellet implosion. A compact simulator with an electron beam was constructed to understand the beam dynamics. In this study, we investigate theoretically and numerically the beam dynamics for the extreme bunch compression in the final stage of HIF accelerator complex. The theoretical and numerical results implied that the compact experimental device simulates the beam dynamics around the stagnation point for initial low temperature condition.

  3. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  4. High-contrast linear optical pulse compression using a temporal hologram.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Fernández-Ruiz, Maria R; Lou, Shuqin; Azaña, José

    2015-03-01

    Temporal holograms can be realized by temporal amplitude-only modulation devices and used for generation and processing of complex (amplitude and phase) time-domain signals. Based on the temporal hologram concept, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a novel design for linear optical pulse compression using temporal modulation of continuous-wave light combined with dispersion. The newly introduced scheme overcomes the undesired background problem that is intrinsic to designs based on temporal zone plates, while also offering an energy efficiency of ~25%. This pulse compression scheme can ideally provide an arbitrarily high time-bandwidth product using a low peak-power modulation driving signal, though in practice it is limited by the achievable modulation bandwidth and dispersion amount.

  5. RF-photonic wideband measurements of energetic pulses on NIF enhanced by compressive sensing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jason; Valley, George C.; Hernandez, Vincent J.; Bennett, Corey V.; Pelz, Larry; Heebner, John; Di Nicola, J. M.; Rever, Matthew; Bowers, Mark

    2014-03-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), home of the world's largest laser, a critical pulse screening process is used to ensure safe operating conditions for amplifiers and target optics. To achieve this, high speed recording instrumentation up to 34 GHz measures pulse shape characteristics throughout a facility the size of three football fields—which can be a time consuming procedure. As NIF transitions to higher power handling and increased wavelength flexibility, this lengthy and extensive process will need to be performed far more frequently. We have developed an accelerated highthroughput pulse screener that can identify nonconforming pulses across 48 locations using a single, real-time 34-GHz oscilloscope. Energetic pulse shapes from anywhere in the facility are imprinted onto telecom wavelengths, multiplexed, and transported over fiber without distortion. The critical pulse-screening process at high-energy laser facilities can be reduced from several hours just seconds—allowing greater operational efficiency, agility to system modifications, higher power handling, and reduced costs. Typically, the sampling noise from the oscilloscope places a limit on the achievable signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement, particularly when highly shaped and/or short duration pulses are required by target physicists. We have developed a sophisticated signal processing algorithm for this application that is based on orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP). This algorithm, developed for recovering signals in a compressive sensing system, enables high fidelity single shot screening even for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements.

  6. Chirp-pulse-compression three-dimensional lidar imager with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Guy N; Ridley, Kevin D; Willetts, David V

    2005-01-10

    A coherent three-dimensional (angle-angle-range) lidar imager using a master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept and operating at a wavelength of 1.5 microm with chirp-pulse compression is described. A fiber-optic delay line in the local oscillator path enables a single continuous-wave semiconductor laser source with a modulated drive waveform to generate both the constant-frequency local oscillator and the frequency chirp. A portion of this chirp is gated out and amplified by a two-stage fiber amplifier. The digitized return signal was compressed by cross correlating it with a sample of the outgoing pulse. In this way a 350-ns, 10-microJ pulse with a 250-MHz frequency sweep is compressed to a width of approximately 8 ns. With a 25-mm output aperture, the lidar has been used to produce three-dimensional images of hard targets out to a range of approximately 2 km with near-diffraction-limited angular resolution and submeter range resolution. PMID:15678779

  7. Chirp-pulse-compression three-dimensional lidar imager with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Guy N; Ridley, Kevin D; Willetts, David V

    2005-01-10

    A coherent three-dimensional (angle-angle-range) lidar imager using a master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept and operating at a wavelength of 1.5 microm with chirp-pulse compression is described. A fiber-optic delay line in the local oscillator path enables a single continuous-wave semiconductor laser source with a modulated drive waveform to generate both the constant-frequency local oscillator and the frequency chirp. A portion of this chirp is gated out and amplified by a two-stage fiber amplifier. The digitized return signal was compressed by cross correlating it with a sample of the outgoing pulse. In this way a 350-ns, 10-microJ pulse with a 250-MHz frequency sweep is compressed to a width of approximately 8 ns. With a 25-mm output aperture, the lidar has been used to produce three-dimensional images of hard targets out to a range of approximately 2 km with near-diffraction-limited angular resolution and submeter range resolution.

  8. A note on ultra-short pulses compression in silicon optical waveguides under fourth-order dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeng Mandeng, L.; Fewo Ibraid, S.; Tchawoua, C.; Kofané, T. C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an overview of the pulse compression phenomenon obtained during the propagation of ultra-short pulses in common used optical waveguides. In the case of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides, using the modified and realistic variational approach (MVA) that involves the Rayleigh's dissipation function (RDF), we conduct the analysis of the compression mechanism on different input profiles. This study allows to show the effects of fourth-order dispersion (FOD), the nonlinear coefficients of absorption (nonlinear absorption) and the chirp, not only on symmetric and compact pulses but also on those with asymmetric profile as the Airy pulses. Indeed, considering the case of linear compression, the conditions of their occurrence are obtained. A relation between the FOD, the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) and the chirp is proposed in this way. In the nonlinear case, using the symmetric profiles as input pulses, we demonstrate a periodic compression induced by the interplay between the self-phase modulation (SPM) and the FOD. This appears as a new mode to generate the pulse compression phenomenon. Then, we show that when large values of the initial chirp and absorption coefficients as the two-photon absorption (TPA) present in these waveguides are considered, the compression mechanism is completely destroyed with at least the observation of one pulse amplification over a short distance of propagation before the pulse broadening. Finally, the study relating to the Airy pulses, leads rather to the reduction of the compression length induced by the SPM, the TPA and the free-carrier absorption (FCA) showing the pulse asymmetry influence.

  9. Compression and swelling of activated sludge cakes during dewatering.

    PubMed

    Sveegaard, Steffen Gralert; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2012-10-15

    A drainage/filtration apparatus was developed for automatically determining sedimentation velocity and dewatering rate. Pressure-step testing was used to study filter cake compressibility, resistance, and swelling. Activated sludge was analysed, and the data indicate that the sludge is highly compressible even at low pressures (10 kPa). Furthermore, compressed sludge cakes swell if the pressure is released. Hence, the average specific cake resistance decreases if the pressure is released, though the resistance is higher after the compression cycle than before. Sludge must be dewatered under low pressure, because higher pressure only compresses the cake and does not improve the dewatering rate.

  10. Passively mode-locked 1 GHz MOPA system generating sub-500-fs pulses after external compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulm, Thorsten; Harth, Florian; Klehr, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; L'huillier, Johannes

    2012-06-01

    We compared the performance of DQW and TQW edge-emitters in a passively mode-locked 1GHz MOPA system at 1075 nm wavelength. Passive mode-locking is induced by applying a reverse DC voltage to the absorber section. The average power is increased up to 0.9Wby a single-stripe pre-amplifier and a tapered amplifier. After compensation of the quadratic chirp in a grating compressor we achieved a pulse duration of 342 fs. We found that the oscillator gain current and the absorber bias voltage have significant impact on the pulse duration. Both parameters were used to optimize the MOPA system with respect to the shortest pulse length after compression.

  11. Picosecond pulses compression at 1053-nm center wavelength by using a gas-filled hollow-core fiber compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ding; Leng, Yu-Xin; Dai, Ye

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of picosecond pulses with 10-mJ of input energy at the 1053-nm center wavelength by using a one-meter-long gas-filled hollow-core fiber (HCF) compressor and considering the third-order dispersion (TOD) effect. It is found that when the input pulse is about 1 ps/10 mJ, it can be compressed down to less than 20 fs with a high transmission efficiency. The gas for optimal compression is krypton gas which is filled in a HCF with a 400-μm inner diameter. When the input pulse duration is increased to 5 ps, it can also be compressed down to less than 100 fs efficiently under proper conditions. The results show that the TOD effect has little impact on picosecond pulse compression and the HCF compressor can be applied on compressing picosecond pulses efficiently with a high compression ratio, which will benefit the research of high-field laser physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204328, 61221064, 61078037, 11127901, and 11134010), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), the Commission of Science and Technology of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 12dz1100700), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 13ZR1414800), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2011DFA11300).

  12. Proceedings of the International Magnetic Pulse Compression Workshop. Volume 2: Technical summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high average power handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  13. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  14. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  15. Effect of laser pulse energy on the laser ignition of compressed natural gas fueled engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Wintner, Ernst; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Laser pulses of few a nanoseconds' duration are focused by an appropriate converging lens system, leading to breakdown of the medium (combustible gases), resulting in the formation of intense plasma. Plasma thus induced can be used to initiate the combustion of combustible air-fuel mixtures in a spark ignition engine provided the energy of the plasma spark is high enough. Laser ignition has several advantages over the conventional spark ignition system, especially in case of lean air-fuel mixture. In this study, laser ignition of compressed natural gas was investigated in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC) as well as in a single-cylinder engine. Flame kernel visualizations for different pulse energy of natural gas-air mixtures were carried out in the CVCC. The images of the development of early flame kernel stages and its growth with time were recorded by shadowgraphy technique. The effect of laser pulse energy on the engine combustion, performance, and emissions was investigated using different air-fuel mixtures. Increased peak cylinder pressure, higher rate of heat release, faster combustion, and increased combustion stability were observed for higher laser pulse energies. The effect of laser pulse energy on the engine-out emissions was also investigated in this study.

  16. Adiabat shape Laser Pulses for ablation front instability control and high fuel compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    At the end of the NIC campaign a large body of experimental evidence showed that the point-design implosions driven by low-adiabat pulses had a high degree of mix. To reduce instability a high-adiabat (~3 × higher picket drive) design was fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experimental results from this campaign have shown considerable improvement in performance (10 × neutron yields) over the point design with little evidence of mix. However, the adiabat of the implosions may be too high to achieve ignition for the available laser energy. To overcome this difficulty, and to take advantage of the high-picket drives, we have developed hybrid laser pulses that combined the virtue of both designs. These pulses can be thought of achieving adiabat shaping, where the ablator is set in a higher adiabat for instability control, while the fuel is maintained at a lower adiabat favoring higher fuel compression. Using these pulses, recent experiments at the NIF have indeed shown reduced growth rates. In this talk we will present the design of high-yield low-growth DT ignition experiments using these adiabat-shaped pulses. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator's RF Pulse Compression And Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Adelphson, C.; Holmes, S.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Nantista, C.; Pearson, C.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    The overmoded rf transmission and pulsed power compression system for SLAC's Next Linear Collider (NLC) program requires a high degree of transmission efficiency and mode purity to be economically feasible. To this end, a number of new, high power components and systems have been developed at X-band, which transmit rf power in the low loss, circular TE01 mode with negligible mode conversion. In addition, a highly efficient SLED-II* pulse compressor has been developed and successfully tested at high power. The system produced a 200 MW, 250 ns wide pulse with a near-perfect flat-top. In this paper we describe the design and test results of the high power pulse compression system using SLED-II. The NLC rf systems use low loss highly over-moded circular waveguides operating in the TE01 mode. The efficiency of the systems is sensitive to the mode purity of the mode excited inside these guides. We used the so called flower petal mode transducer [2] to excite the TE01 mode. This type of mode transducer is efficient, compact and capable of handling high levels of power. To make more efficient systems, we modified this device by adding several mode selective chokes to act as mode purifiers. To manipulate the rf signals we used these modified mode converters to convert back and forth between over-moded circular waveguides and single-moded WR90 rectangular waveguides. Then, we used the relatively simple rectangular waveguide components to do the actual manipulation of rf signals. For example, two mode transducers and a mitered rectangular waveguide bend comprise a 90 degree bend. Also, a magic tee and four mode transducers would comprise a four-port-hybrid, etc. We will discuss the efficiency of an rf transport system based on the above methodology. We also used this methodology in building the SLEDII pulse compression system. At SLAC we built 4 of these pulse systems. In this paper we describe the SLEDII system and compare the performance of these 4 systems at SLAC. We

  18. Active compressive intraoceanic deformation: early stages of ophiolites emplacement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias; Montési, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    Oceanic lithosphere is strong and continental lithosphere is weak. As a result, there is relatively little deformation in the oceanic domain away from plate boundaries. However, the interior of oceanic lithosphere does deform when highly stressed. We review here places where intraoceanic compression is at work. In the more than 30 years since the first observations of active compressive intraplate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean through seismic profiling (Eittreim et al., 1972), compressive deformation has been identified in a variety of other oceanic tectonic settings: as a result of small differential motion between large plates (between North America and South America in the Central Atlantic; between Eurasia and Nubia offshore Gibraltar; between Macquarie and Australia plates in the Southern Ocean), within back-arcs (northwest Celebes Sea, Okushiri Ridge in the Japan Sea, on the eastern border of the Caroline plate), and ahead of subduction (Zenisu Ridge off Nankai Trough). Deformation appears to be more diffuse when larger plates are involved, and more localized for younger plates, perhaps in relation with the increasing rigidity of oceanic plates with age. The best example of diffuse deformation studied so far remains the Central Indian Ocean. Numerous marine data have been collected in this area, including shallow and deep seismic, heat flow measurements, multibeam bathymetry. The present-day deformation field has been modeled using GPS and earthquakes as far field and near field constraints respectively. Reactivation of the oceanic fabric (including for portions of the Indo-Australian plate which are now in subduction as evidenced by the September 2009 Padang earthquake), selective fault abandonment (Delescluse et al., 2008) and serpentinization (Delescluse and Chamot-Rooke, 2008) are some of the important processes that shape the present-day pattern of deformation. These rare intraplate deformation areas constitute excellent natural laboratories to

  19. Heating and compression of a laser produced plasma in a pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, J. R.; Donnelly, T.; Lunney, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    A pulsed 0.3 T magnetic field was used to heat and compress a low-temperature laser produced copper plasma. The magnetic field was generated using a planar 3-turn coil positioned 10 mm above the ablation spot. The plasma flowing through a central aperture in the coil was strongly focused. Inductive heating of the plasma caused a large enhancement of the overall visible light emission and the appearance of Cu II line emission. The plasma focusing is also evident in the constriction of the spatial distribution of deposited copper. The plasma heating and focusing can be explained in the framework of resistive magnetohydrodynamics.

  20. Application of pulse compression signal processing techniques to electromagnetic acoustic transducers for noncontact thickness measurements and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K.S.; Gan, T.H.; Billson, D.R.; Hutchins, D.A.

    2005-05-15

    A pair of noncontact Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) has been used for thickness measurements and imaging of metallic plates. This was performed using wide bandwidth EMATs and pulse-compression signal processing techniques, using chirp excitation. This gives a greatly improved signal-to-noise ratio for air-coupled experiments, increasing the speed of data acquisition. A numerical simulation of the technique has confirmed the performance. Experimental results indicate that it is possible to perform noncontact ultrasonic imaging and thickness gauging in a wide range of metal plates. An accuracy of up to 99% has been obtained for aluminum, brass, and copper samples. The resolution of the image obtained using the pulse compression approach was also improved compared to a transient pulse signal from conventional pulser(receiver). It is thus suggested that the combination of EMATs and pulse compression can lead to a wide range of online applications where fast time acquisition is required.

  1. Intense optical pulse compression with gas-filled hollow-core fibers and bulk materials in anomalous dispersion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding; Leng, Yuxin

    2013-10-01

    We numerically study the propagation dynamics and compression of ultrashort laser pulses in a hollow-core fiber (HCF) filled with noble gases at different carrier wavelengths from 1.8 μm to 3.9 μm. In the optimal parameter range, single-cycle or even sub-cycle pulses with clean spatial and temporal profiles can be obtained due to chirp compensation beyond 3rd order by bulk material. It is found that the intensity-dependent group velocity sets the upper limits on both the gas pressures and input pulse energies if a clean and well-compressed pulse is required only through compression with bulk materials. In order to use higher gas pressures and larger input energies, two ways are demonstrated to deal with the limitations imposed by the intensity-dependent group velocity.

  2. Weakly relativistic and ponderomotive effects on self-focusing and self-compression of laser pulses in near critical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-10-15

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of high power laser pulses in near critical plasmas are studied taking in to account the effects of relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities. First, within one-dimensional analysis, the effects of initial parameters such as laser intensity, plasma density, and plasma electron temperature on the self-compression mechanism are discussed. The results illustrate that the ponderomotive nonlinearity obstructs the relativistic self-compression above a certain intensity value. Moreover, the results indicate the existence of the turning point temperature in which the compression process has its strongest strength. Next, the three-dimensional analysis of laser pulse propagation is investigated by coupling the self-focusing equation with the self-compression one. It is shown that in contrast to the case in which the only relativistic nonlinearity is considered, in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity, the self-compression mechanism obstructs the self-focusing and leads to an increase of the laser spot size.

  3. Fiber optic pulse compression concept for processing wide bandwidth radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, E. O.; Efurd, R. B.

    1982-08-01

    The possibility of constructing a fiber optic correlator to permit radar operations at GHz rates with one nanosecond subpulses is discussed. The correlation concept, wherein transmitted pulses are divided into subpulses with the phase or polarization of each consecutive subpulse changing according to a binary code, allows pulse compression at correlation speeds of 1 GHz. The fiber optic correlator consists of a laser, fiber couplers, fiber delay lines, photodiodes, inverting amplifiers, noninverting amplifiers, and a power combiner. A simplified block diagram of the system circuitry is provided. A solid state injection laser is recommended because of the flat response to modulation rates of 1 GHz, continuous operation at room temperature, and emissions in both longitudinal and transverse modes. Finally, temperature effects potentially affecting the system are modeled.

  4. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  5. Design considerations for 100 MJ class flux compression pulse power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1993-10-01

    With the cost of high performance, capacitor-discharge, pulse power systems continuing around $1--2 per joule and with energy requirements for experiments such as fast compression of magnetized plasmas ranging to 100 MJ and beyond, the need for economical, super-energy pulse power systems is being recognized. Explosively powered flux compressors, capable of delivering 100 MJ to a plasma physics experiment, can be designed, fabricated, and fielded at costs of less than $0.01J per shot. While less economical than laboratory pulsed power systems, if system life exceeds a few hundred full-energy shots, explosive pulse power techniques allow initial experiments to be performed quickly and economically at energies that are prohibitively costly, and hence unavailable, using conventional techniques. A variety of configurations for flux compressors suitable for 100-MJ operation can be considered. Among these, the disk configuration, pioneered by researchers at the All Russian Institute of Experimental Physics has demonstrated both high current and high energy capabilities.

  6. Pulse compression and beam focusing with segmented diffraction gratings in a high-power chirped-pulse amplification glass laser system.

    PubMed

    Habara, Hideaki; Xu, Guang; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Kodama, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kenji; Sawai, Kiyonobu; Kondo, Kiminori; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Mima, Kunioki; Rushford, Michael C; Britten, Jerald A; Barty, Christopher P J

    2010-06-01

    Segmented (tiled) grating arrays are being intensively investigated for petawatt-scale pulse compression due to the expense and technical challenges of fabricating monolithic diffraction gratings with apertures of over 1m. However, the considerable freedom of motion among grating segments complicates compression and laser focusing. We constructed a real compressor system using a segmented grating for an 18cm aperture laser beam of the Gekko MII 100TW laser system at Osaka University. To produce clean pulse shapes and single focal spots tolerant of misalignment and groove density difference of grating tiles, we applied a new compressor scheme with image rotation in which each beam segment samples each grating segment but from opposite sides. In high-energy shots of up to 50J, we demonstrated nearly Fourier-transform-limited pulse compression (0.5ps) with an almost diffraction-limited spot size (20microm).

  7. Pulse compression and beam focusing with segmented diffraction gratings in a high-power chirped-pulse amplification glass laser system.

    PubMed

    Habara, Hideaki; Xu, Guang; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Kodama, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kenji; Sawai, Kiyonobu; Kondo, Kiminori; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Mima, Kunioki; Rushford, Michael C; Britten, Jerald A; Barty, Christopher P J

    2010-06-01

    Segmented (tiled) grating arrays are being intensively investigated for petawatt-scale pulse compression due to the expense and technical challenges of fabricating monolithic diffraction gratings with apertures of over 1m. However, the considerable freedom of motion among grating segments complicates compression and laser focusing. We constructed a real compressor system using a segmented grating for an 18cm aperture laser beam of the Gekko MII 100TW laser system at Osaka University. To produce clean pulse shapes and single focal spots tolerant of misalignment and groove density difference of grating tiles, we applied a new compressor scheme with image rotation in which each beam segment samples each grating segment but from opposite sides. In high-energy shots of up to 50J, we demonstrated nearly Fourier-transform-limited pulse compression (0.5ps) with an almost diffraction-limited spot size (20microm). PMID:20517415

  8. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  9. An all solid-state high-voltage ns trigger generator based on magnetic pulse compression and transmission line transformer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiajin; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiande; Chen, Xinbing

    2013-09-01

    Innovative design of an all solid-state high-voltage ns trigger generator, based on magnetic pulse compression and transmission line transformer, is presented. The repetitive trigger pulse generator was developed to trigger a 700 kV trigatron, which has been used to pulse a repetitive intense electron beam accelerator with Tesla transformer charged double pulse forming lines (PFLs). Experimental results show that the trigger pulse generator could produce 180 kV 65 ns duration pulses with a rise time of 20 ns. The repetitive trigger pulses have nice uniform in the voltage waveform. The control time jitter is less then 3 ns. Owing to its good stability and low time jitter, the high-voltage trigger generator is an excellent candidate to trigger the repetitive accelerator.

  10. Extreme self-compression of laser pulses in the self-focusing mode resistant to transverse instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, A. A.; Kim, A. V.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We show that a self-focusing mode for intense laser pulses comprising less than about ten optical cycles is resistant to the transverse modulational instability. For such pulses, a method of pulse self-compression based on adiabatic decrease of the duration of a solitonlike wave packet and transverse cumulating of energy during the self-focusing in Kerr-like media with anomalous dispersion is proposed. This method can be used for generation of high-quality, high-energy, few-cycle pulses down to a single-cycle duration.

  11. Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on temperature, pulse, and respiration is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  12. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  13. All solid-state spectral broadening: an average and peak power scalable method for compression of ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Marcus; Arisholm, Gunnar; Brons, Jonathan; Pervak, Vladimir; Pronin, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    Spectral broadening in bulk material is a simple, robust and low-cost method to extend the bandwidth of a laser source. Consequently, it enables ultrashort pulse compression. Experiments with a 38 MHz repetition rate, 50 W average power Kerr-lens mode-locked thin-disk oscillator were performed. The initially 1.2 μJ, 250 fs pulses are compressed to 43 fs by means of self-phase modulation in a single 15 mm thick quartz crystal and subsequent chirped-mirror compression. The losses due to spatial nonlinear effects are only about 40 %. A second broadening stage reduced the Fourier transform limit to 15 fs. It is shown that the intensity noise of the oscillator is preserved independent of the broadening factor. Simulations manifest the peak power scalability of the concept and show that it is applicable to a wide range of input pulse durations and energies.

  14. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  15. Fiber grating compression of giant-chirped nanosecond pulses from an ultra-long nanotube mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Woodward, R I; Kelleher, E J R; Runcorn, T H; Loranger, S; Popa, D; Wittwer, V J; Ferrari, A C; Popov, S V; Kashyap, R; Taylor, J R

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that the giant chirp of coherent, nanosecond pulses generated in an 846 m long, all-normal dispersion, nanotube mode-locked fiber laser can be compensated using a chirped fiber Bragg grating compressor. Linear compression to 11 ps is reported, corresponding to an extreme compression factor of ∼100. Experimental results are supported by numerical modeling, which is also used to probe the limits of this technique. Our results unequivocally conclude that ultra-long cavity fiber lasers can support stable dissipative soliton attractors and highlight the design simplicity for pulse-energy scaling through cavity elongation.

  16. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.

    2010-06-01

    Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 - 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs) [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction) of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1). The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa), a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the particulate

  17. Propagation of a strong x-ray pulse: Pulse compression, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, lasing without inversion, and four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-15

    We study the compression of strong x-ray pulses from x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon. The simulations are based on the three-level model with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p{sub 3/2}-4s resonance. The pulse propagation is accompanied by the self-seeded stimulated resonant Raman scattering (SRRS). The SRRS starts from two channels of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), 4s-2p{sub 3/2} and 3s-2p{sub 3/2}, which form the extensive ringing pattern and widen the power spectrum. The produced seed field triggers the Stokes ASE channel 3s-2p{sub 3/2}. The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where the ASE is followed by the lasing without inversion (LWI), which amplifies the Stokes component. Both ASE and LWI reshape the input pulse: The compressed front part of the pulse (up to 100 as) is followed by the long tail of the ringing and beating between the pump and Stokes frequencies. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. These four spectral bands have fine structures caused by the dynamical Stark effect. A slowdown of the XFEL pulse up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum is found because of a large nonlinear refractive index.

  18. Analysis of Doppler Effect on the Pulse Compression of Different Codes Emitted by an Ultrasonic LPS

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, José A.; Aguilera, Teodoro; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Lozano, Jesús; Morera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This work analyses the effect of the receiver movement on the detection by pulse compression of different families of codes characterizing the emissions of an Ultrasonic Local Positioning System. Three families of codes have been compared: Kasami, Complementary Sets of Sequences and Loosely Synchronous, considering in all cases three different lengths close to 64, 256 and 1,024 bits. This comparison is first carried out by using a system model in order to obtain a set of results that are then experimentally validated with the help of an electric slider that provides radial speeds up to 2 m/s. The performance of the codes under analysis has been characterized by means of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation bounds. The results derived from this study should be of interest to anyone performing matched filtering of ultrasonic signals with a moving emitter/receiver. PMID:22346670

  19. Analysis of Doppler effect on the pulse compression of different codes emitted by an ultrasonic LPS.

    PubMed

    Paredes, José A; Aguilera, Teodoro; Alvarez, Fernando J; Lozano, Jesús; Morera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This work analyses the effect of the receiver movement on the detection by pulse compression of different families of codes characterizing the emissions of an ultrasonic local positioning system. Three families of codes have been compared: Kasami, Complementary Sets of Sequences and Loosely Synchronous, considering in all cases three different lengths close to 64, 256 and 1,024 bits. This comparison is first carried out by using a system model in order to obtain a set of results that are then experimentally validated with the help of an electric slider that provides radial speeds up to 2 m/s. The performance of the codes under analysis has been characterized by means of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation bounds. The results derived from this study should be of interest to anyone performing matched filtering of ultrasonic signals with a moving emitter/receiver.

  20. High spatial resolution, low-noise Brillouin dynamic gratings reflectometry based on digital pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A; Langer, T; Tur, M

    2016-08-01

    Digital pulse compression was used to enhance the performance of optical time-domain reflectometry, employing Brillouin dynamic gratings (BDGs) in polarization-maintaining fibers. The fundamental and unique issues in BDG field-reflection are addressed, and rules for proper selection of the coding and detection techniques are formulated. While coding in BDG applications generally requires coherent processing of the reflection, conditions are established for use of direct detection. A 256-bit Golay complementary unipolar probe code is used to demonstrate an eightfold signal-to-noise ratio enhancement in the measurement of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS), with a spatial resolution of 2 cm and a full-BGS acquisition rate of 133⅓ kHz, resulting in an equivalent reduction in the estimation error of small Brillouin frequency shifts. PMID:27472639

  1. Temporal pulse compression in a xenon-filled Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber at high average power.

    PubMed

    Heckl, O H; Saraceno, C J; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Wang, Y Y; Cheng, Y; Benabid, F; Keller, U

    2011-09-26

    In this study we demonstrate the suitability of Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers (HC-PCF) for multiwatt average power pulse compression. We spectrally broadened picosecond pulses from a SESAM mode-locked thin disk laser in a xenon gas filled Kagome-type HC-PCF and compressed these pulses to below 250 fs with a hypocycloid-core fiber and 470 fs with a single cell core defect fiber. The compressed average output power of 7.2 W and 10.2 W at a pulse repetition rate of approximately 10 MHz corresponds to pulse energies of 0.7 µJ and 1 µJ and to peak powers of 1.6 MW and 1.7 MW, respectively. Further optimization of the fiber parameters should enable pulse compression to below 50 fs duration at substantially higher pulse energies.

  2. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell W.; Pruett, Brian O. M.

    2016-02-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulent eddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing, both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulent eddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of -5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a -1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.

  3. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing, both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.

  4. Turbulent eddies in a compressible jet in crossflow measured using pulse-burst particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing,more » both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.« less

  5. Sub-phonon-period compression of electron pulses for atomic diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Gliserin, A.; Walbran, M.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the rearrangement of atoms in a wide range of molecular and condensed-matter systems requires resolving picometre displacements on a 10-fs timescale, which is achievable using pump–probe diffraction, given short enough pulses. Here we demonstrate the compression of single-electron pulses with a de Broglie wavelength of 0.08 ångström to a full-width at half-maximum duration of 28 fs or equivalently 12-fs root-mean square, substantially shorter than most phonon periods and molecular normal modes. Atomic resolution diffraction from a complex organic molecule is obtained with good signal-to-noise ratio within a data acquisition period of minutes. The electron-laser timing is found to be stable within 5 fs (s.d.) over several hours, allowing pump–probe diffraction at repetitive excitation. These measurements show the feasibility of laser-pump/electron-probe scans that can resolve the fastest atomic motions relevant in reversible condensed-matter transformations and organic chemistry. PMID:26502750

  6. Compression of ultra-short light pulses using the graded refractive index one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiri, R.; Bananej, A.; Safari, E.

    2016-09-01

    The one-dimensional photonic crystals (1D PCs) containing a graded refractive index layer have been theoretically utilized to compress the positively chirped ultra-short pulses of light. Two types of simple and graded index multi-layer structures consisting alternating layers of TiO2 and SiO2 with the same total thicknesses and periodicity have been investigated and compared. For the graded structure, three different refractive index distributions including linear, exponential and parabolic profiles have been considered. The results revealed that replacing one of the homogeneous layers of the unit cells in simple photonic crystal with a graded material having parabolic refractive index profile efficiently improves compression behavior of the structure. The compress factors of as much as 47% and 78% depending on the pulse's initial chirp rate obtained with parabolic profile of such the structures.

  7. Comparison of the filamentation and the hollow-core fibercharacteristics for pulse compression into the few-cycle regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmann, L.; Pfeifer, T.; Nagel, P.M.; Abel, M.J.; Neumark,D.M.; Leone, S.R.

    2006-10-23

    The gas-filled hollow-core fiber compression and the opticalfilamentation technique are compared experimentally in a parameter regimesuitable for intense few-cycle pulse generation. In particular, pointingstability, spectral properties, and spatial chirp are investigated. It isfound that in the case of filamentation, the critical parameter forpointing stability is gas pressure inside the generation cell whereas forthe hollow-core fiber it is alignment that plays this role. Thehollow-core fiber technique yields spectra that are better suited forchirped-mirror pulse compression whereas filamentation offers higherthroughput and prospects for easy-to-implement self-compression. Wepresent spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-fieldreconstruction (SPIDER) measurements that directly show the transition inthe spectral phase of the output continua into the self-compressionregime as the gas pressure is increased.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  9. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumakova, V.; Malevich, P.; Ališauskas, S.; Voronin, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Faccio, D.; Kartashov, D.; Baltuška, A.; Pugžlys, A.

    2016-09-01

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air.

  10. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk.

    PubMed

    Shumakova, V; Malevich, P; Ališauskas, S; Voronin, A; Zheltikov, A M; Faccio, D; Kartashov, D; Baltuška, A; Pugžlys, A

    2016-01-01

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air. PMID:27620117

  11. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Shumakova, V.; Malevich, P.; Ališauskas, S.; Voronin, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Faccio, D.; Kartashov, D.; Baltuška, A.; Pugžlys, A.

    2016-01-01

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air. PMID:27620117

  12. Multi-millijoule few-cycle mid-infrared pulses through nonlinear self-compression in bulk.

    PubMed

    Shumakova, V; Malevich, P; Ališauskas, S; Voronin, A; Zheltikov, A M; Faccio, D; Kartashov, D; Baltuška, A; Pugžlys, A

    2016-09-13

    The physics of strong-field applications requires driver laser pulses that are both energetic and extremely short. Whereas optical amplifiers, laser and parametric, boost the energy, their gain bandwidth restricts the attainable pulse duration, requiring additional nonlinear spectral broadening to enable few or even single cycle compression and a corresponding peak power increase. Here we demonstrate, in the mid-infrared wavelength range that is important for scaling the ponderomotive energy in strong-field interactions, a simple energy-efficient and scalable soliton-like pulse compression in a mm-long yttrium aluminium garnet crystal with no additional dispersion management. Sub-three-cycle pulses with >0.44 TW peak power are compressed and extracted before the onset of modulation instability and multiple filamentation as a result of a favourable interplay between strong anomalous dispersion and optical nonlinearity around the wavelength of 3.9 μm. As a manifestation of the increased peak power, we show the evidence of mid-infrared pulse filamentation in atmospheric air.

  13. Implementing and diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed power accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Bliss, David E.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Martin, Matthew R.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Slutz, Stephen A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Awe, Thomas James; Hess, M. H.; Lemke, Raymond W.; Dolan, D. H.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Jobe, Marc Ronald Lee; Fang, Lu; Hahn, Kelly D.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Maurer, A. J.; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Cuneo, Michael E.; Sinars, Daniel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Smith, Gary; Paguio, Reny; Intrator, Tom; Weber, Thomas; Greenly, John

    2015-11-01

    We report on the progress made to date for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator (0-20 MA in 100 ns). Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using the Z accelerator's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, B z ( 0 ) , supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by B z ( t ) = B z ( 0 ) x [ R ( 0 ) / R ( t )] 2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, B z ( t ) and dB z / dt values exceeding 10 4 T and 10 12 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report on our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes to measure the fringe fields associated with flux compression, (2) streaked visible Zeeman absorption spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We also mention two new techniques that make use of the neutron diagnostics suite on Z. These techniques were not developed under this LDRD, but they could influence how we prioritize our efforts to diagnose magnetic flux compression on Z in the future. The first technique is based on the yield ratio of secondary DT to primary DD reactions. The second technique makes use of the secondary DT neutron time-of-flight energy spectra. Both of these techniques have been used successfully to infer the degree of magnetization at stagnation in fully integrated Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z [P. F. Schmit et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 155004 (2014); P. F. Knapp et al. , Phys. Plasmas, 22 , 056312 (2015)]. Finally, we present some recent developments for designing

  14. Errors associated with the use of adaptive differential pulse code modulation in the compression of isometric and dynamic myo-electric signals.

    PubMed

    Chan, A D; Lovely, D F; Hudgins, B

    1998-03-01

    Muscle activity produces an electrical signal termed the myo-electric signal (MES). The MES is a useful clinical tool, used in diagnostics and rehabilitation. This signal is typically stored in 2 bytes as 12-bit data, sampled at 3 kHz, resulting in a 6 kbyte s-1 storage requirement. Processing MES data requires large bit manipulations and heavy memory storage requirements. Adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) is a popular and successful compression technique for speech. Its application to MES would reduce 12-bit data to a 4-bit representation, providing a 3:1 compression. As, in most practical applications, memory is organised in bytes, the realisable compression is 4:1, as pairs of data can be stored in a single byte. The performance of the ADPCM compression technique, using a real-time system at 1 kHz, 2 kHz and 4 kHz sampling rates, is evaluated. The data used include MES from both isometric and dynamic contractions. The percent residual difference (PRD) between an unprocessed and processed MES is used as a performance measure. Errors in computed parameters, such as median frequency and variance, which are used in clinical diagnostics, and waveform features employed in prosthetic control are also used to evaluate the system. The results of the study demonstrate that the ADPCM compression technique is an excellent solution for relieving the data storage requirements of MES both in isometric and dynamic situations. PMID:9684462

  15. X-Band Active-Passive Rf Pulse Compressor with Plasma Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A.L.; Ivanov, O.A.; Gorbachev, A.M.; Lobaev, M.A.; Isaev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Lewandowski, J.R.; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Omega-P, New Haven /Yale U.

    2012-04-27

    As proposed by SLAC, the efficiency of a pulse compressor of the SLED-II type could be increased by changing both the phase of the microwave source and the coupling coefficient of the delay line. In the existing SLED-II system at frequency 11.4 GHz, the resonant delay line is coupled with the source via an iris with a constant reflection coefficient. Replacement of the iris with an active component makes it possible to create an active SLED-II system. In this paper, the use of plasma switches as the active elements is discussed. Plasma switches have been developed and tested at a high-power level for production of flattop compressed pulses. Active switching of SLED-II has demonstrated a marked increase in efficiency (by 20%) and power gain (by 37%) as compared with passive switching. The active compressor has produced 173 ns rf flattop output pulses with a power of about 112 MW.

  16. Skin blood flow with elastic compressive extravehicular activity space suit.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Gotoh, Taro M; Morita, Hironobu; Hargens, Alan R

    2003-10-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), current space suits are pressurized with 100% oxygen at approximately 222 mmHg. A tight elastic garment, or mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit that generates pressure by compression, may have several advantages over current space suit technology. In this study, we investigated local microcirculatory effects produced with negative ambient pressure with an MCP sleeve. The MCP glove and sleeve generated pressures similar to the current space suit. MCP remained constant during negative pressure due to unchanged elasticity of the material. Decreased skin capillary blood flow and temperature during MCP compression was counteracted by greater negative pressure or a smaller pressure differential.

  17. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  18. Optimized FIR filters for digital pulse compression of biphase codes with low sidelobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanal, M.; Kuloor, R.; Sagayaraj, M. J.

    In miniaturized radars where power, real estate, speed and low cost are tight constraints and Doppler tolerance is not a major concern biphase codes are popular and FIR filter is used for digital pulse compression (DPC) implementation to achieve required range resolution. Disadvantage of low peak to sidelobe ratio (PSR) of biphase codes can be overcome by linear programming for either single stage mismatched filter or two stage approach i.e. matched filter followed by sidelobe suppression filter (SSF) filter. Linear programming (LP) calls for longer filter lengths to obtain desirable PSR. Longer the filter length greater will be the number of multipliers, hence more will be the requirement of logic resources used in the FPGAs and many time becomes design challenge for system on chip (SoC) requirement. This requirement of multipliers can be brought down by clustering the tap weights of the filter by kmeans clustering algorithm at the cost of few dB deterioration in PSR. The cluster centroid as tap weight reduces logic used in FPGA for FIR filters to a great extent by reducing number of weight multipliers. Since k-means clustering is an iterative algorithm, centroid for weights cluster is different in different iterations and causes different clusters. This causes difference in clustering of weights and sometimes even it may happen that lesser number of multiplier and lesser length of filter provide better PSR.

  19. Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) with cold compression: Cold compressor, colder expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiho; Ko, Junseok; Cha, Jeongmin; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2016-03-01

    This research paper focuses on the performance prediction and its validation via experimental investigation of a Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) equipped with a cold linear compressor. When the working gas is compressed at cryogenic temperature, the acoustic power (PV power) can be directly transmitted through the regenerator to the pulsating tube without experiencing unnecessary precooling process. The required PV power generated by the linear compressor, furthermore, can be significantly diminished due to the relatively small specific volume of the working gas at low temperature. The PTR can reach lower temperature efficiently with higher heat lift at the corresponding temperature than other typical single-stage Stirling-type PTRs. Utilizing a cryogenic reservoir as a warm end and regulating the entire operating temperature range of the PTR will enable a PTR to operate efficiently under space environment. In this research, the experimental validation as a proof of concept was carried out to demonstrate the capability of PTR operating between 80 K and 40 K. The linear compressor was submerged in a liquid nitrogen bath and the lowest temperature was measured as 38.5 K. The test results were analyzed to identify loss mechanisms with the simple numerical computation (linear model) which considers the dynamic characteristics of the cold linear compressor with thermo-hydraulic governing equations for each of sub components of the PTR. All the mass flows and pressure waves were assumed to be sinusoidal.

  20. Compression mechanism of subpicosecond pulses by malachite green dye in passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI CW dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Takemura, H.; Tanaka, S.

    1983-04-01

    The pulse width compression effect of a malachite green (MG) dye upon subpicosecond pulses has been experimentally investigated in a CW passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI dye laser. The pulse width reduces as MG concentration increases, and reaches 0.34 ps at 1.5 X 10/sup -6/ M. By adding the MG dye, good mode locking is achieved in a rather wide pumping-power range. A computer simulation of pulse growth has also been carried out by using simple rate equations, in which the fast-recovery component of loss due to the MG dye is taken into account. The simulated results can explain some experimental results qualitatively such as pulse width compression and pumping-power restriction. The pulse width compression results essentially from the fast recovery of cavity loss caused by the MG dye.

  1. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  2. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high power fast laser beam transportation and pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M.; Dutin, C. F.; Bradley, T. D.; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on recent design and fabrication of Kagome type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for the purpose of high power fast laser beam transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all Kagome fibers) of 40dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single modedness, low dispersion and relatively low banding loss makes it an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74μJ, 850fs and 40kHz repetition rate ultra-short pulse at 1550nm has been faithfully delivered with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105μJ laser pulse from 850fs to 300fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  3. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  4. Defect dynamics and ordering in compressible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prashant; Srivastava, Pragya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Active nematics, such as suspensions of biopolymers activated by molecular motors or bacteria swimming in passive liquid crystals, exhibit complex self-sustained flow, excitability and defect generation. Activity renders the defect themselves self-propelled particles, capable of organizing in emergent ordered structures. We have developed a minimal model of compressible active nematics on a substrate. We eliminate the flow velocity in favor of the nematic order parameter via the balance of frictional dissipation and active driving to obtain a dynamical description entirely in terms of the nematic alignment order parameter. Activity renormalizes the bend and splay elastic constants rendering them anisotropic and driving them to zero or even negative, resulting in the appearance of modulated states and defective structures. Using linear stability analysis and numerics we organize the various regimes into a phase diagram and discuss the relation to experiments. This work was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184.

  5. Nonlinear propagation analysis of few-optical-cycle pulses for subfemtosecond compression and carrier envelope phase effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Yo; Nagasawa, Minoru; Ohtani, Morimasa; Yamashita, Mikio

    2005-12-15

    A numerical approach called Fourier direct method (FDM) is applied to nonlinear propagation of optical pulses with the central wavelength 800 nm, the width 2.67-12.00 fs, and the peak power 25-6870 kW in a fused-silica fiber. Bidirectional propagation, delayed Raman response, nonlinear dispersion (self-steepening, core dispersion), as well as correct linear dispersion are incorporated into 'bidirectional propagation equations' which are derived directly from Maxwell's equations. These equations are solved for forward and backward waves, instead of the electric-field envelope as in the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE). They are integrated as multidimensional simultaneous evolution equations evolved in space. We investigate, both theoretically and numerically, the validity and the limitation of assumptions and approximations used for deriving the NLSE. Also, the accuracy and the efficiency of the FDM are compared quantitatively with those of the finite-difference time-domain numerical approach. The time-domain size 500 fs and the number of grid points in time 2048 are chosen to investigate numerically intensity spectra, spectral phases, and temporal electric-field profiles up to the propagation distance 1.0 mm. On the intensity spectrum of a few-optical-cycle pulses, the self-steepening, core dispersion, and the delayed Raman response appear as dominant, middle, and slight effects, respectively. The delayed Raman response and the core dispersion reduce the effective nonlinearity. Correct linear dispersion is important since it affects the intensity spectrum sensitively. For the compression of femtosecond optical pulses by the complete phase compensation, the shortness and the pulse quality of compressed pulses are remarkably improved by the intense initial peak power rather than by the short initial pulse width or by the propagation distance longer than 0.1 mm. They will be compressed as short as 0.3 fs below the damage threshold of fused-silica fiber 6 MW. It

  6. Grating-less, fiber-based oscillator that generates 25 nJ pulses at 80 MHz, compressible to 150 fs.

    PubMed

    An, J; Kim, D; Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Barty, C P J

    2007-07-15

    We report a passively mode-locked fiber-based oscillator that has no internal dispersion-compensating gratings. This design, which we believe to be the first of its kind, produces 25 nJ pulses at 80 MHz with the pulses compressible to 150 fs. The pulses appear to be self-similar and initial data imply that their energy is further scalable.

  7. Efficient spectral broadening in the 100-W average power regime using gas-filled kagome HC-PCF and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Saraceno, Clara J; Debord, Benoit; Ghosh, Debashri; Diebold, Andreas; Gèrôme, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-12-15

    We present nonlinear pulse compression of a high-power SESAM-modelocked thin-disk laser (TDL) using an Ar-filled hypocycloid-core kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The output of the modelocked Yb:YAG TDL with 127 W average power, a pulse repetition rate of 7 MHz, and a pulse duration of 740 fs was spectrally broadened 16-fold while propagating in a kagome HC-PCF containing 13 bar of static argon gas. Subsequent compression tests performed using 8.4% of the full available power resulted in a pulse duration as short as 88 fs using the spectrally broadened output from the fiber. Compressing the full transmitted power through the fiber (118 W) could lead to a compressed output of >100  W of average power and >100  MW of peak power with an average power compression efficiency of 88%. This simple laser system with only one ultrafast laser oscillator and a simple single-pass fiber pulse compressor, generating both high peak power >100  MW and sub-100-fs pulses at megahertz repetition rate, is very interesting for many applications such as high harmonic generation and attosecond science with improved signal-to-noise performance.

  8. Direct density measurement of shock-compressed iron using hard x rays generated by a short laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Wei, H G; Barbrel, B; Audebert, P; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Boehly, T; Endo, T; Gregory, C D; Kimura, T; Kodama, R; Ozaki, N; Park, H-S; Koenig, M

    2009-11-01

    We present the application of short-pulse laser-driven hard x rays (>40 keV) for the direct density measurement of iron compressed by a laser-driven shock. By using an on-shot calibration of the spectral absorption, we are able to obtain line densities with 5%-10% precision, although the x-ray source is not monochromatic. We also discuss possibilities for increasing the precision, which would be an improvement for equation of state measurements. PMID:20365083

  9. Laser Activated Streak Camera for Measurement of Electron Pulses with Femtosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Desimone, Alice; Wilkin, Kyle; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The duration of femtosecond electron pulses used in time-resolved diffraction and microscopy experiments is challenging to measure in-situ. To overcome this problem, we have fabricated a streak camera that uses the time-varying electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor is discharged using a laser-activated GaAs photoswitch, resulting in a damped oscillation of the electric field. The delay time between the laser pulse and electron pulse is set so that the front and back halves of the bunch encounter opposite electric fields of the capacitor and are deflected in opposite directions. Thus, the electron bunch appears streaked on the detector with a length proportional to its duration. The temporal resolution of the streak camera is proportional to the maximum value of the electric field and the frequency of the discharge oscillation. The capacitor is charged by high voltage short pulses to achieve a high electric field and prevent breakdown. We have achieved an oscillation frequency in the GHz range by reducing the circuit size and hence its inductance. The camera was used to measure 100 keV electron pulses with up to a million electrons that are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by an RF cavity. This work was supported mainly by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ultrashort Pulse Laser Matter Interaction program, under grant # FA9550-12-1-0149.

  10. Study of dopant activation in biaxially compressively strained SiGe layers using excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, G. V.; Wirths, S.; Stefanov, S.; Holländer, B.; Schubert, J.; Conde, J. C.; Stoica, T.; Breuer, U.; Chiussi, S.; Goryll, M.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.

    2013-05-01

    Excimer Laser Annealing (ELA) with a wavelength of 248 nm is used to study doping of biaxialy compressively strained Si1-xGex/Si heterostructures. The challenge is to achieve a high activation of As in SiGe, while conserving the elastic strain and suppressing dopant diffusion. Doping of 20 nm Si0.64Ge0.36 layers by ion implantation of 1 × 1015 As+/cm2 and subsequent laser annealing using single 20 ns pulse with an energy density of 0.6 J/cm2 leads to an As activation of about 20% and a sheet resistance of 650 Ω/sq. At this laser energy density, the entire SiGe layer melts and the subsequent fast recrystallization on a nanosecond time scale allows high As incorporation into the lattice. Moreover, using these annealing parameters, the SiGe layer exhibits epitaxial regrowth with negligible strain relaxation. ELA at energy densities greater than 0.6 J/cm2 resembles Pulsed Lased Induced Epitaxy, leading to an intermixing of the SiGe layer with the Si substrate, thus to thicker single-crystalline strained SiGe layers with sheet resistance down to 62 Ω/sq. Effects of energy densities on composition, crystal quality, activation of As and co-doping with B are discussed and related to the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated zone, as simulated by Finite Element Methods.

  11. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  12. Self-compression in a solid fiber to 24 MW peak power with few-cycle pulses at 2 μm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Gaida, C; Gebhardt, M; Stutzki, F; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2015-11-15

    We report on the experimental realization of a compact, fiber-based, ultrashort-pulse laser system in the 2 μm wavelength region delivering 24 fs pulse duration with 24 MW pulse peak power and 24.6 W average power. This performance level has been enabled by the favorable quadratic wavelength-dependence of the self-focusing limit, which has been experimentally verified to be at approximately 24 MW for circular polarization in a solid-core fused-silica fiber operated at a wavelength around 2 μm. The anomalous dispersion in this wavelength region allows for a simultaneous nonlinear spectral broadening and temporal pulse compression. This makes an additional compression stage redundant and facilitates a very simple and power-scalable approach. Simulations that include both the nonlinear pulse evolution and the transverse optical Kerr effect support the experimental results.

  13. Application of wavelet filtering and Barker-coded pulse compression hybrid method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Baoquan; Jiang, Jingtao; Yu, Guang; Liu, Kui; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) technique has been viewed as a viable solution in defect detection of advanced composites used in aerospace and aviation industries. However, the giant mismatch of acoustic impedance in air-solid interface makes the transmission efficiency of ultrasound low, and leads to poor signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of received signal. The utilisation of signal-processing techniques in non-destructive testing is highly appreciated. This paper presents a wavelet filtering and phase-coded pulse compression hybrid method to improve the SNR and output power of received signal. The wavelet transform is utilised to filter insignificant components from noisy ultrasonic signal, and pulse compression process is used to improve the power of correlated signal based on cross-correction algorithm. For the purpose of reasonable parameter selection, different families of wavelets (Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet) and decomposition level in discrete wavelet transform are analysed, different Barker codes (5-13 bits) are also analysed to acquire higher main-to-side lobe ratio. The performance of the hybrid method was verified in a honeycomb composite sample. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is very efficient in improving the SNR and signal strength. The applicability of the proposed method seems to be a very promising tool to evaluate the integrity of high ultrasound attenuation composite materials using the ACUT.

  14. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  15. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  16. Microwave pulse compression from a storage cavity with laser-induced switching

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    A laser-induced switch and a multiple cavity configuration are disclosed for producing high power microwave pulses. The microwave pulses are well controlled in wavelength and timing, with a quick rise time and a variable shape and power of the pulse. In addition, a method of reducing pre-pulse leakage to a low level is disclosed. Microwave energy is directed coherently to one or more cavities that stores the energy in a single mode, represented as a standing wave pattern. In order to switch the stored microwave energy out of the main cavity and into the branch waveguide, a laser-actuated switch is provided for the cavity. The switch includes a laser, associated optics for delivering the beam into the main cavity, and a switching gas positioned at an antinode in the main cavity. When actuated, the switching gas ionizes, creating a plasma, which becomes reflective to the microwave energy, changing the resonance of the cavity, and as a result the stored microwave energy is abruptly switched out of the cavity. The laser may directly pre-ionize the switching gas, or it may pump an impurity in the switching gas to an energy level which switches when a pre-selected cavity field is attained. Timing of switching the cavities is controlled by varying the pathlength of the actuating laser beam. For example, the pathlengths may be adjusted to output a single pulse of high power, or a series of quick lower power pulses.

  17. Process and application of shock compression by nanosecond pulses of frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Kimura, Motohiko; Mukai, Naruhiko; Yoda, Masaki; Obata, Minoru; Ogisu, Tatsuki

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed a new process of laser-induced shock compression to introduce a residual compressive stress on material surface, which is effective for prevention of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and enhancement of fatigue strength of metal materials. The process developed is unique and beneficial. It requires no pre-conditioning for the surface, whereas the conventional process requires that the so-called sacrificial layer is made to protect the surface from damage. The new process can be freely applied to water- immersed components, since it uses water-penetrable green light of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The process developed has the potential to open up new high-power laser applications in manufacturing and maintenance technologies. The laser-induced shock compression process (LSP) can be used to improve a residual stress field from tensile to compressive. In order to understand the physics and optimize the process, the propagation of a shock wave generated by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the material were analyzed by time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program using laser-induced plasma pressure as an external load. The analysis shows that a permanent strain and a residual compressive stress remain after the passage of the shock wave with amplitude exceeding the yield strength of the material. A practical system materializing the LSP was designed, manufactured, and tested to confirm the applicability to core components of light water reactors (LWRs). The system accesses the target component and remotely irradiates laser pulses to the heat affected zone (HAZ) along weld lines. Various functional tests were conducted using a full-scale mockup facility, in which remote maintenance work in a reactor vessel could be simulated. The results showed that the system remotely accessed the target weld lines and successfully introduced a residual compressive stress. After sufficient training

  18. Sub-100 ps laser-driven dynamic compression of solid deuterium with a ∼40 μJ laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Michael R. Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Bastea, Sorin; Zaug, Joseph M.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2014-07-14

    We dynamically compress solid deuterium over <100 ps from initial pressures of 22 GPa to 55 GPa, to final pressures as high as 71 GPa, with <40 μJ of pulse energy. At 25 GPa initial pressure, we measure compression wave speeds consistent with quasi-isentropic compression and a 24% increase in density. The laser drive energy per unit density change is 10{sup 9} times smaller than it is for recent longer (∼30 ns) time scale compression experiments. This suggests that, for a given final density, dynamic compression of hydrogen might be achieved using orders of magnitude lower laser energy than currently used.

  19. Fast dynamic 3D MR spectroscopic imaging with compressed sensing and multiband excitation pulses for hyperpolarized 13C studies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Peder E Z; Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B; Nelson, Sarah J; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2011-03-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging can detect not only the uptake of the pre-polarized molecule but also its metabolic products in vivo, thus providing a powerful new method to study cellular metabolism. Imaging the dynamic perfusion and conversion of these metabolites provides additional tissue information but requires methods for efficient hyperpolarization usage and rapid acquisitions. In this work, we have developed a time-resolved 3D MR spectroscopic imaging method for acquiring hyperpolarized 13C data by combining compressed sensing methods for acceleration and multiband excitation pulses to efficiently use the magnetization. This method achieved a 2 sec temporal resolution with full volumetric coverage of a mouse, and metabolites were observed for up to 60 sec following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate. The compressed sensing acquisition used random phase encode gradient blips to create a novel random undersampling pattern tailored to dynamic MR spectroscopic imaging with sampling incoherency in four (time, frequency, and two spatial) dimensions. The reconstruction was also tailored to dynamic MR spectroscopic imaging by applying a temporal wavelet sparsifying transform to exploit the inherent temporal sparsity. Customized multiband excitation pulses were designed with a lower flip angle for the [1-(13)C]-pyruvate substrate given its higher concentration than its metabolic products ([1-(13)C]-lactate and [1-(13)C]-alanine), thus using less hyperpolarization per excitation. This approach has enabled the monitoring of perfusion and uptake of the pyruvate, and the conversion dynamics to lactate and alanine throughout a volume with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20939089

  20. Fast Dynamic 3D MRSI with Compressed Sensing and Multiband Excitation Pulses for Hyperpolarized 13C Studies

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MRSI can detect not only the uptake of the pre-polarized molecule but also its metabolic products in vivo, thus providing a powerful new method to study cellular metabolism. Imaging the dynamic perfusion and conversion of these metabolites provides additional tissue information but requires methods for efficient hyperpolarization usage and rapid acquisitions. In this work, we have developed a time-resolved 3D MRSI method for acquiring hyperpolarized 13C data by combining compressed sensing methods for acceleration and multiband excitation pulses to efficiently use the magnetization. This method achieved a 2 sec temporal resolution with full volumetric coverage of a mouse, and metabolites were observed for up to 60 sec following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. The compressed sensing acquisition used random phase encode gradient blips to create a novel random undersampling pattern tailored to dynamic MRSI with sampling incoherency in four (time, frequency and two spatial) dimensions. The reconstruction was also tailored to dynamic MRSI by applying a temporal wavelet sparsifying transform in order to exploit the inherent temporal sparsity. Customized multiband excitation pulses were designed with a lower flip angle for the [1-13C]-pyruvate substrate given its higher concentration than its metabolic products ([1-13C]-lactate and [1-13C]-alanine), thus using less hyperpolarization per excitation. This approach has enabled the monitoring of perfusion and uptake of the pyruvate, and the conversion dynamics to lactate and alanine throughout a volume with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20939089

  1. Multi-meter fiber-delivery and pulse self-compression of milli-Joule femtosecond laser and fiber-aided laser-micromachining.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Vincetti, L; Husakou, A; Fourcade-Dutin, C; Hoenninger, C; Mottay, E; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2014-05-01

    We report on damage-free fiber-guidance of milli-Joule energy-level and 600-femtosecond laser pulses into hypocycloid core-contour Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. Up to 10 meter-long fibers were used to successfully deliver Yb-laser pulses in robustly single-mode fashion. Different pulse propagation regimes were demonstrated by simply changing the fiber dispersion and gas. Self-compression to ~50 fs, and intensity-level nearing petawatt/cm(2) were achieved. Finally, free focusing-optics laser-micromachining was also demonstrated on different materials.

  2. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Laser system based on a commercial microwave oscillator with time compression of a microwave pump pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteev, M. S.; Vaulin, V. A.; Slinko, V. N.; Chumerin, P. Yu; Yushkov, Yu G.

    1992-06-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using a commercial microsecond microwave oscillator, supplemented by a device for time compression of microwave pulses, in pumping of industrial lasers with a high efficiency of conversion of the pump source energy into laser radiation. The results are reported of preliminary experiments on the commissioning of an excimer XeCl laser.

  3. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity.

  4. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity. PMID:26454712

  5. Air-guided photonic-crystal-fiber pulse-compression delivery of multimegawatt femtosecond laser output for nonlinear-optical imaging and neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitrii A.; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Ömer Ilday, F.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-03-01

    Large-core hollow photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are shown to enable a fiber-format air-guided delivery of ultrashort infrared laser pulses for neurosurgery and nonlinear-optical imaging. With an appropriate dispersion precompensation, an anomalously dispersive 15-μm-core hollow PCF compresses 510-fs, 1070-nm light pulses to a pulse width of about 110 fs, providing a peak power in excess of 5 MW. The compressed PCF output is employed to induce a local photodisruption of corpus callosum tissues in mouse brain and is used to generate the third harmonic in brain tissues, which is captured by the PCF and delivered to a detector through the PCF cladding.

  6. Envelope evolution of a laser pulse in an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Siders, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The authors show that the envelope velocity, v{sub env}, of a short laser pulse can, via propagation in an active medium, be made less than, equal to, or even greater than c, the vacuum phase velocity of light. Simulation results, based on moving frame propagation equations coupling the laser pulse, active medium and plasma, are presented, as well as equations that determines the design value of super- and sub-luminous v{sub env}. In this simulation the laser pulse evolves in time in a moving frame as opposed to their earlier work where the profile was fixed. The elimination of phase slippage and pump depletion effects in the laser wakefield accelerator is discussed as a particular application. Finally they discuss media properties necessary for an experimental realization of this technique.

  7. Nociceptor activation and damage by pulsed E-fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nene, Deepti; Jiang, Nan; Rau, Kristofer K.; Richardson, Martin; Cooper, Brian Y.

    2006-05-01

    We assessed the capacity of ultrashort E-fields to activate rat cutaneous nociceptors. Experiments were conducted in vitro on nociceptive neurons representing hairy skin and glabrous skin. Electrical and optical recording methods were used to assess action potentials and membrane damage thresholds. Strength duration (SD) curves were formed for E-field pulses from 500 μsec to 350 ns. There were no differences in the SD time contant (taue (59 μsec) or ultrashort thresholds (129 V/cm at 350 ns) for hairy or glabrous skin nociceptors, for nociceptors with distinct geometry or for nociceptors expressing different combinations of voltage sensitive Na + channels (TTX s and TTX r Na v) or hyperpolarization activated channels (HCN; I H). Subthreshold activation was possible with high frequency pulsing at ultrashort durations (350 ns; 4,000 Hz). Relative to single pulse thresholds, activation threshold could be reduced over 50% by high frequency burst trains (4,000 Hz; 1-40 msec). Nociceptors were not damaged by E-field activation. Irreversible membrane disruption occurred at significantly higher field strength and varied by cell radius (3,266-4,240 V/cm, 350 ns, 40 Hz, 5 sec). Pulse frequency had no influence on acute membrane failure (10, 20, 40, 4,000 Hz; 5 sec).

  8. Dynamic parabolic pulse generation using temporal shaping of wavelength to time mapped pulses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dat; Piracha, Mohammad Umar; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Delfyett, Peter J

    2011-06-20

    Self-phase modulation in fiber amplifiers can significantly degrade the quality of compressed pulses in chirped pulse amplification systems. Parabolic pulses with linear frequency chirp are suitable for suppressing nonlinearities, and to achieve high peak power pulses after compression. In this paper, we present an active time domain technique to generate parabolic pulses for chirped pulse amplification applications. Pulses from a mode-locked laser are temporally stretched and launched into an amplitude modulator, where the drive voltage is designed using the spectral shape of the input pulse and the transfer function of the modulator, resulting in the generation of parabolic pulses. Experimental results of pulse shaping with a pulse train from a mode-locked laser are presented, with a residual error of less than 5%. Moreover, an extinction ratio of 27 dB is achieved, which is ideal for chirped pulse amplification applications.

  9. Pulse release of doxazosin from hydroxyethylcellulose compression coated tablet: mechanistic and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nikhil; Guha, Arijit; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2015-01-01

    Chronotherapeutically programmed hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) based compression coated doxazosin tablets were prepared and the influence of disintegrants croscarmellose sodium, L-hydroxypropylcellulose (L-HPC), gellan gum on drug release and in vivo performance were investigated. Infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetric studies did not indicate any excipient incompatibility in the tablets. The disintegrants induced a continuous water influx resulting in a rapid expansion of the membrane. The subsequent formation of fractures into the coats leads to a fast drug release after an initial lag time. Release rates indicated that croscarmellose sodium and L-HPC were directly proportional to their concentration in the formulations. In vitro optimized croscarmellose sodium-HEC matrix showed significantly faster (p < 0.05) drug release (t90% = 46 min) after an initial lag of 243 min. Disintegrant-HEC blended matrices were found significantly superior (p < 0.05) in terms of in vitro release and bioavailability in comparison to plain HEC matrices. Drug release kinetics followed modified power law and Weibull model (r > 0.99). The mechanism involved in release was anomalous transport and super case II transport with matrix swelling. The pulsatile tablets showed no changes either in physicochemical appearance, drug content or in dissolution pattern during its accelerated stability studies.

  10. Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for beam delivery and pulse compression of high-power ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraceno, C. J.; Emaury, F.; Diebold, A.; Schriber, C.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Südmeyer, T.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2015-02-01

    Tremendous progress has been achieved in the last years in the field of ultrafast high-power sources. Among the different laser technologies driving this progress, thin-disk lasers (TDLs) have gained significant ground, both from amplifiers and modelocked oscillators. Modelocked TDLs are particularly attractive, as they allow for unprecedented high energy and average powers directly from an oscillator. The exponential progress in the performance of these sources drives growing needs for efficient means of beam delivery and pulse compression at high average power (< 100 W) and high peak power (> 10 MW). This remains a challenging regime for standard fiber solutions: microstructured large-mode-area silica photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are good candidates, but peak powers are limited to ≈4-6 MW by self-focusing. Hollow-core (HC) capillaries are adapted for higher peak powers, but exhibit high losses and are not suitable for compact beam delivery. In parallel to the progress achieved in the performance of ultrafast laser systems, recent progress in novel hollow-core PCF designs are currently emerging as an excellent solution for these challenges. In particular, Inhibited-coupling Kagome-type HC-PCFs are particularly promising: their intrinsic guiding properties allow for extremely high damage thresholds, low losses over wide transmission windows and ultra-low dispersion. In our most recent results, we achieve pulse compression in the hundred-watt average power regime using Kagome-type HC-PCFs. We launch 127-W, 18-μJ, 740-fs pulses from our modelocked TDL into an Ar-filled fiber (13 bar), reaching 93% transmission. The resulting spectral broadening allows us to compress the pulses to 88 fs at 112 W of average power, reaching 105 MW of peak power, at 88% compression efficiency. These results demonstrate the outstanding suitability of Kagome HC-PCFs for compression and beam delivery of state-of-the-art kilowatt-class ultrafast systems.

  11. Magnetic field effects on ultrafast lattice compression dynamics of Si(111) crystal when excited by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Koji; Odaka, Hideho; Ono, Kimitoshi; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements of Si (111) single crystal are performed when excited by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (780 nm, 260 fs, negatively-chirped, 1 kHz) under a magnetic field (0.47 T). Laser fluence on the sample surface is 40 mJ/cm^2, which is enough lower than the ablation threshold at 200 mJ/cm^2. Probing X-ray pulses of iron characteristic X-ray lines at 0.193604 and 0.193998 nm are generated by focusing femtosecond laser pulses onto audio-cassette tapes in air. Linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulse irradiation onto Si(111) crystal surface induces transient lattice compression in the picosecond time range, which is confirmed by transient angle shift of X-ray diffraction to higher angles. Little difference of compression dynamics is observed when the laser polarization is changed from p to s-pol. without a magnetic field. On the other hand, under a magnetic field, the lattice compression dynamics changes when the laser is p-polarized which is vertical to the magnetic field vector. These results may be assigned to photo-carrier formation and energy-band distortion.

  12. Long pulse and steady state operation activities at KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young-Soon; KSTAR Team; KAERI Collaboration; JAEA Collaboration; PPPL Collaboration; SNU Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The mission of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is to develop a steady state capable advanced tokamak (AT) operation. The original AT operation mode at KSTAR is a reversed shear scenario with the plasma current of 2 MA, the toroidal magnetic field of 3.5 T, βN of 5, safety factor q95 of 3.7. Recently, the stationary long pulse H-mode discharge is sustained for maximum pulse duration of 20 s using heating of 2.5-MW NBI and 0.7-MW, X3 170 GHz ECH with low density level ~ 0.3 × 1020/m3. The main activities of long pulse and steady state operation in KSTAR are the density feedback control, optimization of plasma shape and vertical control, real-time β control, and steady state capable heating upgrade. For the longer pulse H-mode discharge at the increased plasma current upcoming KSTAR campaign, there have been improvements in plasma control system and upgraded heating systems. Meanwhile, steady state operation scenario in KSTAR next 4-year is being investigated using time-dependent integrated transport simulation code with possible heating upgrade-schemes. The promising steady state scenario near future is a reversed shear using a new 4 MW off-axis neutral beam injector for broad pressure profile peaked at off-axis, and using ECH for local current profile control aiming at βN > 3 with Ip ~ 1 MA. This paper present activities and plan for steady state operation in KSTAR as well as the long pulse H-mode discharge results in the recent KSTAR campaign.

  13. Self-focusing and self-compression of a laser pulse in the presence of an external tapered magnetized density-ramp plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saedjalil, N.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of external tapered axial magnetic field and plasma density-ramp on the spatiotemporal evolution of the laser pulse in inhomogeneous plasma have been studied. The external magnetic field can modify the refractive index of plasma and consequently intensifies the nonlinear effects. By considering the relativistic nonlinearity effect, self-focusing and self-compression of the laser beam propagating through the magnetized plasma have been investigated, numerically. Numerical results indicate that self-focusing and self-compression are better enhanced in a tapered magnetic field than in a uniform one. Besides, in plasma density-ramp profile, self-focusing and self-compression of the laser beam improve in comparison with no ramp structure. In addition, with increasing both the slope of the density ramp and slope constant parameter of the tapered magnetic field, the laser focusing increases, properly, in short distances of the laser propagation through the plasma.

  14. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  15. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  16. Clinical evaluation of the AutoPulse automated chest compression device for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the northern district of Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanzhuo; Peng, Hu; Chen, Yanqing; Zhuang, Yugang; Zhou, Shuqin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whether the AutoPulse automated chest compression device is worthy of clinical use for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains controversial. A prospective controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effect of AutoPulse versus manual chest compression for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of OHCA patients in the northern district of Shanghai, China. Material and methods A total of 133 patients with OHCA who were treated at the Emergency Medical Center of the Tenth People's Hospital Affiliated with Tongji University between March 2011 and March 2012 were included. The patients were randomly assigned to the Manual CPR (n = 64) and AutoPulse CPR groups (n = 69) in accordance with the approach of chest compression received. The primary outcome measure was return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the secondary outcome measures included 24-h survival rate, hospital discharge rate, and neurological prognosis at hospital discharge. Results The ROSC rate of patients with OHCA was significantly higher in the AutoPulse CPR group than in the Manual CPR group (44.9% vs. 23.4%; p = 0.009). The 24-h survival rate of OHCA patients was significantly higher in the AutoPulse CPR group than in the Manual CPR group (39.1% vs. 21.9%; p = 0.03). The hospital discharge rate of the patients with OHCA was significantly higher in the AutoPulse CPR group than in the Manual CPR group (18.8% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.03). The proportion of patients with OHCA and a cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2 points at hospital discharge was higher in the AutoPulse CPR group than in the Manual CPR group, but the difference was not statistically significant (16.2% vs. 13.4%, p = 1.00). Conclusions Use of the AutoPulse increases CPR success and survival rates in patients with OHCA, but its ability to improve cerebral performance requires further evaluation. PMID:27279849

  17. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO₂ laser beat-wave in GaAs.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, J J; Tochitsky, S Ya; Joshi, C

    2015-12-15

    We report on the generation of a train of ∼2  ps, 10 μm laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl crystals. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO₂ laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves, we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  18. RF pulse compression development

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Coherent propagation effects and pulse self-compression under the conditions of two-photon resonant difference-frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarkin, A.; Korn, G.

    1997-12-01

    We predict the possibility of using two-photon coherent propagation effects for generating pulses at the difference frequency with duration significantly shorter and intensity higher than those of the input pump and injection pulse.

  20. Generation of unipolar optical pulses in a Raman-active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Tolmachev, Yu A.; Babushkin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Response of a Raman-active media (RAM) to the excitation by a series of ultrashort (few-cycle) optical pulses propagating at a superluminal velocity is studied theoretically. It is shown that under certain conditions rectangular unipolar pulses (video-pulses) can be generated as the RAM response. The duration, shape and amplitude of these video-pulses can be widely tuned by modifying the pump pulse parameters.

  1. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  2. Littrow angle based autocollimation method for precision online monitoring three-dimensional angular drifts of chirped-pulse compression-gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Wang, Tao; Xu, Guang; Li, Dawei; Chen, Lei; Dai, Yaping

    2013-06-01

    A simple optical method for online precisely monitoring three-dimensional (3D) angular drifts of chirped-pulse compression-gratings in chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) lasers is proposed. Monitoring objects include all dimensional angular drifts of a grating, especially the grating groove in-plane-rotation. Monitoring contents contain direction and amount. And monitoring results are obtained by detecting the direction and the amount of 2D relative offsets of three focal spots formed by a ternary monitoring beam line. The theoretical model of the proposed method is set up using a matrix ray-tracing method, and a simplified monitoring equation is concluded based on numerical simulations. And the validity of this method is verified by a simple demonstration experiment. Besides, monitoring error and reliability discussion of the method are presented, as well.

  3. Trunk Muscle Activation and Estimating Spinal Compressive Force in Rope and Harness Vertical Dance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Dai, Boyi; Zhu, Qin; Humphrey, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Rope and harness vertical dance takes place off the floor with the dancer suspended from his or her center of mass in a harness attached to a rope from a point overhead. Vertical dance represents a novel environment for training and performing in which expected stresses on the dancer's body are different from those that take place during dance on the floor. Two male and eleven female dancers with training in vertical dance performed six typical vertical dance movements with electromyography (EMG) electrodes placed bilaterally on rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi. EMG data were expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A simplified musculoskeletal model based on muscle activation for these four muscle groups was used to estimate the compressive force on the spine. The greatest muscle activation for erector spinae and latissimus dorsi and the greatest trunk compressive forces were seen in vertical axis positions where the dancer was moving the trunk into a hyper-extended position. The greatest muscle activation for rectus abdominus and external oblique and the second highest compressive force were seen in a supine position with the arms and legs extended away from the center of mass (COM). The least muscle activation occurred in positions where the limbs were hanging below the torso. These movements also showed relatively low muscle activation compression forces. Post-test survey results revealed that dancers felt comfortable in these positions; however, observation of some positions indicated insufficient muscular control. Computing the relative contribution of muscles, expressed as muscle activation and estimated spinal compression, provided a measure of how much the muscle groups were working to support the spine and the rest of the dancer's body in the different movements tested. Additionally, identifying typical muscle recruitment patterns in each movement will help identify key exercises

  4. Control of cavitation activity by different shockwave pulsing regimes.

    PubMed

    Huber, P; Debus, J; Jöchle, K; Simiantonakis, I; Jenne, J; Rastert, R; Spoo, J; Lorenz, W J; Wannenmacher, M

    1999-06-01

    The aim of the study was to control the number of inertial cavitation bubbles in the focal area of an electromagnetic lithotripter in water independently of peak intensity, averaged intensity or pressure waveform. To achieve this, the shockwave pulses were applied in double pulse sequences, which were administered at a fixed pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.33 Hz. The two pulses of a double pulse were separated by a variable short pulse separation time (PST) ranging from 200 micros to 1500 ms. The number and size of the cavitation bubbles were monitored by scattered laser light and stroboscopic photographs. We found that the number of inertial cavitation bubbles as a measure of cavitation dose was substantially influenced by variation of the PST, while the pressure pulse waveform, averaged acoustic intensity and bubble size were kept constant. The second pulse of each double pulse generated more cavitation bubbles than the first. At 14 kV capacitor voltage, the total number of cavitation bubbles generated by the double pulses increased with shorter PST down to approximately 400 micros, the cavitation lifespan. The results can be explained by cavitation nuclei generated by the violently imploding inertial cavitation bubbles. This method of pulse administration and cavitation monitoring could be useful to establish a cavitation dose-effect relationship independently of other acoustic parameters.

  5. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  6. Active lamp pulse driver circuit. [optical pumping of laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, K. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flashlamp drive circuit is described which uses an unsaturated transistor as a current mode switch to periodically subject a partially ionized gaseous laser excitation flashlamp to a stable, rectangular pulse of current from an incomplete discharge of an energy storage capacitor. A monostable multivibrator sets the pulse interval, initiating the pulse in response to a flash command by providing a reference voltage to a non-inverting terminal of a base drive amplifier; a tap on an emitter resistor provides a feedback signal sensitive to the current amplitude to an inverting terminal of amplifier, thereby controlling the pulse amplitude. The circuit drives the flashlamp to provide a squarewave current flashlamp discharge.

  7. Compressive strength of dental composites photo-activated with different light tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, M. R.; Caldas, S. G. F. R.; Calabrez-Filho, S.; Campos, E. A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of microhybrid (Filtek™ Z250) and nanofilled (Filtek™ Supreme XT) composite resins photo-activated with two different light guide tips, fiber optic and polymer, coupled with one LED. The power density was 653 mW cm-2 when using the fiber optic light tip and 596 mW cm-2 with the polymer. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 2 °C for seven days, the samples were subjected to mechanical testing of compressive strength in an EMIC universal mechanical testing machine with a load cell of 5 kN and speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with a confidence interval of 95% and Tamhane’s test. The results showed that the mean values of compressive strength were not influenced by the different light tips (p > 0.05). However, a statistical difference was observed (p < 0.001) between the microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip and the nanofilled composite resin. Based on these results, it can be concluded that microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip showed better results than nanofilled, regardless of the tip used, and the type of the light tip did not influence the compressive strength of either composite. Thus, the presented results suggest that both the fiber optic and polymer light guide tips provide adequate compressive strength to be used to make restorations. However, the fiber optic light tip associated with microhybrid composite resin may be an interesting option for restorations mainly in posterior teeth.

  8. Accelerated Cardiac T2 Mapping using Breath-hold Multi-Echo Fast Spin-Echo Pulse Sequence with Compressed sensing and Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Jung, Hong; Jensen, Jens H.; Ye, Jong C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Kim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac T2 mapping is a promising method for quantitative assessment of myocardial edema and iron overload. We have developed a new multi-echo fast spin echo (ME-FSE) pulse sequence for breath-hold T2 mapping with acceptable spatial resolution. We propose to further accelerate this new ME-FSE pulse sequence using k-t FOCal Underdetermined System Solver (FOCUSS) adapted with a framework that utilizes both compressed sensing and parallel imaging (.e.g, GRAPPA) to achieve higher spatial resolution. We imaged twelve control subjects in mid-ventricular short-axis planes and compared the accuracy of T2 measurements obtained using ME-FSE with GRAPPA and ME-FSE with k-t FOCUSS. For image reconstruction, we used a bootstrapping two-step approach, where in the first step fast Fourier transform was used as the sparsifying transform and in the final step principal component analysis was used as the sparsifying transform. Compared with T2 measurements obtained using GRAPPA, T2 measurements obtained using k-t FOCUSS were in excellent agreement (mean difference = 0.04 ms; upper/lower 95% limits of agreement were 2.26/−2.19 ms). The proposed accelerated ME-FSE pulse sequence with k-t FOCUSS is a promising investigational method for rapid T2 measurement of the heart with relatively high spatial resolution (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm). PMID:21360737

  9. Exploring Pulses through Math, Science, and Nutrition Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Diane K.; Mandal, Bidisha; Wallace, Michael L.; Riddle, Lee Anne; Kerr, Susan; Atterberry, Kelly Ann; Miles, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 includes pulses as a required component of the school lunch menu standard. Pulses are nutritionally important staple food crops, and include dry beans, dry peas, garbanzo beans, and lentils. This current study examined the short-term effectiveness of a Science, Technology, Engineering,…

  10. Tunable time-reversal cavity for high-pressure ultrasonic pulses generation: A tradeoff between transmission and time compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents a time reversal cavity that has both a high reverberation time and a good transmission factor. A multiple scattering medium has been embedded inside a fluid-filled reverberating cavity. This allows creating smart ultrasonic sources able to generate very high pressure pulses at the focus outside the cavity with large steering capabilities. Experiments demonstrate a 25 dB gain in pressure at the focus. This concept will enable us to convert conventional ultrasonic imaging probes driven by low power electronics into high power probes for therapeutic applications requiring high pressure focused pulses, such as histotripsy or lithotripsy.

  11. Two-spring model for active compression textiles with integrated NiTi coil actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, B.; Newman, D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a two-spring model to predict the performance of hybrid compression textiles combining passive elastic fabrics and integrated NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) coil actuators. An analytic model that treats passive fabric-SMA coil systems as conjoined linear springs is presented to predict garment passive and active counter-pressure as a function of 11 design variables. For a fixed SMA coil design (encompassing five design variables), the model predicts that passive fabric material modulus, initial length, width and thickness determine both passive counter-pressure magnitude and activation stroke length, and that passive and active pressures are highly dependent on the relative unstretched lengths of the conjoined SMA-fabric system compared to the total limb circumference. Several passive fabrics were tested to determine their moduli and to generally assess the fabric linearity model assumption: two fabrics (spandex and neoprene) were found to behave linearly up to 200% strain, while two other fabrics (flat polyester elastic and a tri-laminate Lycra) were found to be nonlinear in the same strain envelope. Five hypothetical compression tourniquet designs are presented using experimentally determined fabric characteristics and previously studied SMA actuators developed at MIT. The performance of each tourniquet design is discussed with a specific focus on mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suit design requirements, with designs presented that achieve the full MCP design specification (\\gt 29.6 kPa) while minimizing (\\lt 5 mm) garment thickness. The modeling framework developed in this effort enables compression garment designers to tailor counter-pressure and activation stroke properties of active compression garments based on a variety of design parameters to meet a wide range of performance specifications.

  12. Consequences of Laughter Upon Trunk Compression and Cortical Activation: Linear and Polynomial Relations.

    PubMed

    Svebak, Sven

    2016-08-01

    Results from two studies of biological consequences of laughter are reported. A proposed inhibitory brain mechanism was tested in Study 1. It aims to protect against trunk compression that can cause health hazards during vigorous laughter. Compression may be maximal during moderate durations and, for protective reasons, moderate in enduring vigorous laughs. Twenty-five university students volunteered to see a candid camera film. Laughter responses (LR) and the superimposed ha-responses were operationally assessed by mercury-filled strain gauges strapped around the trunk. On average, the thorax compression amplitudes exceeded those of the abdomen, and greater amplitudes were seen in the males than in the females after correction for resting trunk circumference. Regression analyses supported polynomial relations because medium LR durations were associated with particularly high thorax amplitudes. In Study 2, power changes were computed in the beta and alpha EEG frequency bands of the parietal cortex from before to after exposure to the comedy "Dinner for one" in 56 university students. Highly significant linear relations were calculated between the number of laughs and post-exposure cortical activation (increase of beta, decrease of alpha) due to high activation after frequent laughter. The results from Study 1 supported the hypothesis of a protective brain mechanism that is activated during long LRs to reduce the risk of harm to vital organs in the trunk cavity. The results in Study 2 supported a linear cortical activation and, thus, provided evidence for a biological correlate to the subjective experience of mental refreshment after laughter.

  13. Consequences of Laughter Upon Trunk Compression and Cortical Activation: Linear and Polynomial Relations.

    PubMed

    Svebak, Sven

    2016-08-01

    Results from two studies of biological consequences of laughter are reported. A proposed inhibitory brain mechanism was tested in Study 1. It aims to protect against trunk compression that can cause health hazards during vigorous laughter. Compression may be maximal during moderate durations and, for protective reasons, moderate in enduring vigorous laughs. Twenty-five university students volunteered to see a candid camera film. Laughter responses (LR) and the superimposed ha-responses were operationally assessed by mercury-filled strain gauges strapped around the trunk. On average, the thorax compression amplitudes exceeded those of the abdomen, and greater amplitudes were seen in the males than in the females after correction for resting trunk circumference. Regression analyses supported polynomial relations because medium LR durations were associated with particularly high thorax amplitudes. In Study 2, power changes were computed in the beta and alpha EEG frequency bands of the parietal cortex from before to after exposure to the comedy "Dinner for one" in 56 university students. Highly significant linear relations were calculated between the number of laughs and post-exposure cortical activation (increase of beta, decrease of alpha) due to high activation after frequent laughter. The results from Study 1 supported the hypothesis of a protective brain mechanism that is activated during long LRs to reduce the risk of harm to vital organs in the trunk cavity. The results in Study 2 supported a linear cortical activation and, thus, provided evidence for a biological correlate to the subjective experience of mental refreshment after laughter. PMID:27547260

  14. Design and performance of the 10-kV, 5-MA pulsed-power system for the FRX-C compression experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Barnes, G.A.; Gribble, R.J.; Hinckley, J.E.; Kreider, T.W.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The design and performance of the pulsed-power system for the FRX-C compact toroid compression heating experiment are reviewed. Two inductively-isolated, 10-kV capacitor banks (total energy = 1.5 MJ) are discharged through a common, low-inductance load. The 5-MA currents are switched and crowbarred with parallel arrays of size-D ignitrons. Power supplies are constructed in simple 25 and 50 kJ modules, each capable of supplying 100 kA at 10 kV. Non-negligible source inductance and the addition of high-power resistors maintain module isolation and protect the system during fault modes. 21 refs., 31 figs.

  15. Compression and acceleration of electron bunches to high energies in the interference field of intense laser pulses with tilted amplitude fronts: concept and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Trofimov, V A; Shiryaev, O B

    2013-03-31

    A new concept of accelerating electrons by laser radiation is proposed, namely, direct acceleration by a laser field under the conditions of interference of several relativistic-intensity laser pulses with amplitude fronts tilted by the angle 45 Degree-Sign with respect to the phase fronts. Due to such interference the traps moving with the speed of light arise that capture the electrons, produced in the process of ionisation of low-density gas by the same laser radiation. The modelling on the basis of solving the relativistic Newton equation with the appropriate Lorenz force shows that these traps, moving in space, successively collect electrons from the target, compress the resulting electron ensemble in all directions up to the dimensions smaller than the wavelength of the laser radiation and accelerate it up to the energies of the order of a few GeV per electron. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  16. Active bilayer films of thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone obtained by compression molding.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Toro, Rodrigo; Morey, Iris; Talens, Pau; Chiralt, Amparo

    2015-08-20

    Bilayer films consisting of one layer of PCL with either one of thermoplastic starch (S) or one of thermoplastic starch with 5% PCL (S95) were obtained by compression molding. Before compression, aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid or potassium sorbate were sprayed onto the S or S95 layers in order to plasticize them and favor layer adhesion. S95 films formed bilayers with PCL with very good adhesion and good mechanical performance, especially when potassium sorbate was added at the interface. All bilayers enhanced their barrier properties to water vapour (up to 96% compared to net starch films) and oxygen (up to 99% compared to PCL pure). Bilayers consisting of PCL and starch containing 5% PCL, with potassium sorbate at the interface, showed the best mechanical and barrier properties and interfacial adhesion while having active properties, associated with the antimicrobial action of potassium sorbate. PMID:25965485

  17. Active bilayer films of thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone obtained by compression molding.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Toro, Rodrigo; Morey, Iris; Talens, Pau; Chiralt, Amparo

    2015-08-20

    Bilayer films consisting of one layer of PCL with either one of thermoplastic starch (S) or one of thermoplastic starch with 5% PCL (S95) were obtained by compression molding. Before compression, aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid or potassium sorbate were sprayed onto the S or S95 layers in order to plasticize them and favor layer adhesion. S95 films formed bilayers with PCL with very good adhesion and good mechanical performance, especially when potassium sorbate was added at the interface. All bilayers enhanced their barrier properties to water vapour (up to 96% compared to net starch films) and oxygen (up to 99% compared to PCL pure). Bilayers consisting of PCL and starch containing 5% PCL, with potassium sorbate at the interface, showed the best mechanical and barrier properties and interfacial adhesion while having active properties, associated with the antimicrobial action of potassium sorbate.

  18. Effects of tetramethylpyrazine on microglia activation in spinal cord compression injury of mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Won; Moon, Ja-Young; Seong, Ju-Won; Song, Sang-Hoon; Cheong, Young-Jin; Kang, Chulhun; Sohn, Nak-Won

    2013-01-01

    Secondary mechanisms, including inflammation and microglia activation, serve as targets for the development and application of pharmacological strategies in the management of spinal cord injury (SCI). Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), an active ingredient of Ligusticum wallichii (chuanxiong), has shown anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects against SCI. However, it remains uncertain whether the inflammation-suppressive effects of TMP play a modulatory role over microglia activation in SCI. The present study investigated the effects of TMP on microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal cord compression injury in mice. For a real-time PCR measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, SCI was induced in mice by the clip compression method (30 g force, 1 min) and TMP (15 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered once, 30 minutes before the SCI induction. For immunohistochemistry, TMP (30 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment was given three times during the first 48 hours after the SCI. 30 mg/kg of TMP treatment reduced the up-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2 mRNA in the spinal tissue at four hours after the SCI induction. TMP also significantly attenuated microglia activation and neutrophil infiltration at 48 hours after the SCI induction. In addition, iNOS expression in the spinal tissue was attenuated with TMP treatment. These results suggest that TMP plays a modulatory role in microglia activation and may protect the spinal cord from or potentially delay secondary spinal cord injury. PMID:24228606

  19. Ultrasonic position and velocity measurement for a moving object by M-sequence pulse compression using Doppler velocity estimation by spectrum-pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Yohei; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Pulse compression using a maximum-length sequence (M-sequence) can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflected echo in the pulse-echo method. In the case of a moving object, however, the echo is modulated owing to the Doppler effect. The Doppler-shifted M-sequence-modulated signal cannot be correlated with the reference signal that corresponds to the transmitted M-sequence-modulated signal. Therefore, Doppler velocity estimation by spectrum-pattern analysis of a cyclic M-sequence-modulated signal and cross correlations with Doppler-shifted reference signals that correspond to the estimated Doppler velocities has been proposed. In this paper, measurements of the position and velocity of a moving object by the proposed method are described. First, Doppler velocities of the object are estimated using a microphone array. Secondly, the received signal from each microphone is correlated with each Doppler-shifted reference signal. Then, the position of the object is determined from the B-mode image formed from all cross-correlation functions. After that, the velocity of the object is calculated from velocity components estimated from the Doppler velocities and the position. Finally, the estimated Doppler velocities, determined positions, and calculated velocities are evaluated.

  20. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  1. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    D'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  2. Transform-limited pulses generated by an actively Q-switched distributed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Pérez-Millán, P; Andrés, M V; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Barmenkov, Yu O

    2008-11-15

    A single-mode, transform-limited, actively Q-switched distributed-feedback fiber laser is presented, based on a new in-line acoustic pulse generator. Our technique permits a continuous adjustment of the repetition rate that modulates the Q factor of the cavity. Optical pulses of 800 mW peak power, 32 ns temporal width, and up to 20 kHz repetition rates were obtained. The measured linewidth demonstrates that these pulses are transform limited: 6 MHz for a train of pulses of 10 kHz repetition rate, 80 ns temporal width, and 60 mW peak power. Efficient excitation of spontaneous Brillouin scattering is demonstrated.

  3. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  4. Towards the development of active compression bandages using dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourazadi, S.; Ahmadi, S.; Menon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Disorders associated with the lower extremity venous system are common and significantly affect the quality of life of a large number of individuals. These disorders include orthostatic hypotension, oedema, deep vein thrombosis and a number of other conditions related to insufficient venous blood return. The common recommended treatment for these disorders is the use of hosiery compression stockings. In this research, an active compression bandage (ACB) based on the technology of dielectric elastomeric actuators (DEA) was designed, prototyped and tested. A customized calf prototype (CP) was developed to measure the pressure applied by the ACB. Experimental results performed with the CP showed that the pressure applied by the ACB could be electrically controlled to be either below or above the pressure exerted by commercially available compression stockings. An analytical model was used to provide the design criteria. A finite element model (FEM) was also developed to simulate the electromechanical behaviour of the DEA. Comparison of the experimental results with the FEM and analytical models showed that the modelling could accurately predict the behaviour of the ACB. The FEM was subsequently used to study how to improve the ACB performance by varying geometrical parameters such as the ACB thickness.

  5. Consequences of Laughter Upon Trunk Compression and Cortical Activation: Linear and Polynomial Relations

    PubMed Central

    Svebak, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Results from two studies of biological consequences of laughter are reported. A proposed inhibitory brain mechanism was tested in Study 1. It aims to protect against trunk compression that can cause health hazards during vigorous laughter. Compression may be maximal during moderate durations and, for protective reasons, moderate in enduring vigorous laughs. Twenty-five university students volunteered to see a candid camera film. Laughter responses (LR) and the superimposed ha-responses were operationally assessed by mercury-filled strain gauges strapped around the trunk. On average, the thorax compression amplitudes exceeded those of the abdomen, and greater amplitudes were seen in the males than in the females after correction for resting trunk circumference. Regression analyses supported polynomial relations because medium LR durations were associated with particularly high thorax amplitudes. In Study 2, power changes were computed in the beta and alpha EEG frequency bands of the parietal cortex from before to after exposure to the comedy “Dinner for one” in 56 university students. Highly significant linear relations were calculated between the number of laughs and post-exposure cortical activation (increase of beta, decrease of alpha) due to high activation after frequent laughter. The results from Study 1 supported the hypothesis of a protective brain mechanism that is activated during long LRs to reduce the risk of harm to vital organs in the trunk cavity. The results in Study 2 supported a linear cortical activation and, thus, provided evidence for a biological correlate to the subjective experience of mental refreshment after laughter. PMID:27547260

  6. ɣ And pulse radiolytic study of the antioxidant activity of vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jore, D.; Ferradini, C.; Patterson, L. K.

    The radical mechanisms involved in the antioxidant activity of vitamin E are examined by pulse and steady state ɣ radiolysis. A kinetic scheme is proposed for ɣtocopherol oxidation by H 3C-CH(OH)OO . radicals.

  7. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick GlauertGoldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  8. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  9. Determination of antioxidant activity of spices and their active principles by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alberto; Ruiz Montoya, Mercedes; Arteaga, Jesús F; Rodríguez Mellado, Jose M

    2014-01-22

    The anodic oxidation of mercury in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to determine the antioxidant (AO) character of radical scavengers. Hydroperoxide radical is formed at the potentials of the oxidation peak on mercury electrodes, such radical reacting with the antioxidants in different extension. The parameter C10 (antioxidant concentration at which the peak area decreases by 10%) is used to measure the scavenging activity of the individual antioxidants. To establish the scavenging activity of antioxidant mixtures as a whole, the parameter, μ10 as the reverse of V10, V10 being the volume necessary to decrease the peak area in DPV by 10%, was selected. Higher μ10 values correspond to higher scavenging activity. The studies have been extended to aqueous extracts of some species. The results may be useful in explaining the effect of spices in vitro and in vivo studies.

  10. Deformation twinning activated α --> ω transformation in titanium under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Hongxiang; Lookman, Turab

    Materials dynamics, especially the behavior of solids under extreme compression, is a topic of broad scientific and technological interest. However, less is known of the role of grain boundary structures on the shock response of hexagonal-close-packed metals. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study deformation mechanisms in shock compressed Ti bicrystals containing three types of grain boundary (GB) microstructures, i.e., coherent twin boundaries (CTBs), symmetric incoherent twin boundaries (ITB) and {1-210}asymmetric tilt grain boundaries. Our results show that both dislocation activity and the α -> ω phase transformation in Ti are sensitive to the GB characteristics. In particular, we find that the elastic shock wave can readily trigger the α -> ω transformation at CTBs but not at the other two GBs, and the activation of the α -> ω transformation at CTBs leads to considerable wave attenuation (i.e., the elastic precursor decay). Combined with first principle calculations, we find that CTBs can facilitate the overcoming of the energy barrier for the α -> ω transformation. Our findings have potential implications for interface engineering and materials design under extreme conditions.

  11. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  12. Tickling the retina: integration of subthreshold electrical pulses can activate retinal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, S.; Jalligampala, A.; Zrenner, E.; Rathbun, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The field of retinal prosthetics has made major progress over the last decade, restoring visual percepts to people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. The stimulation pulses used by present implants are suprathreshold, meaning individual pulses are designed to activate the retina. In this paper we explore subthreshold pulse sequences as an alternate stimulation paradigm. Subthreshold pulses have the potential to address important open problems such as fading of visual percepts when patients are stimulated at moderate pulse repetition rates and the difficulty in preferentially stimulating different retinal pathways. Approach. As a first step in addressing these issues we used Gaussian white noise electrical stimulation combined with spike-triggered averaging to interrogate whether a subthreshold sequence of pulses can be used to activate the mouse retina. Main results. We demonstrate that the retinal network can integrate multiple subthreshold electrical stimuli under an experimental paradigm immediately relevant to retinal prostheses. Furthermore, these characteristic stimulus sequences varied in their shape and integration window length across the population of retinal ganglion cells. Significance. Because the subthreshold sequences activate the retina at stimulation rates that would typically induce strong fading (25 Hz), such retinal ‘tickling’ has the potential to minimize the fading problem. Furthermore, the diversity found across the cell population in characteristic pulse sequences suggests that these sequences could be used to selectively address the different retinal pathways (e.g. ON versus OFF). Both of these outcomes may significantly improve visual perception in retinal implant patients.

  13. Electrical conductivity of activated carbon-metal oxide nanocomposites under compression: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Macías-García, A; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2014-12-01

    From a granular commercial activated carbon (AC) and six metal oxide (Al2O3, Fe2O3, SnO2, TiO2, WO3 and ZnO) precursors, two series of AC-metal oxide nanocomposites were prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 °C, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 or 850 °C in an inert atmosphere. Here, the electrical conductivity of the resulting products was studied under moderate compression. The influence of the applied pressure, sample volume, mechanical work, and density of the hybrid materials was thoroughly investigated. The DC electrical conductivity of the compressed samples was measured at room temperature by the four-probe method. Compaction assays suggest that the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are largely determined by the carbon matrix. Both the decrease in volume and the increase in density were relatively small and only significant at pressures lower than 100 kPa for AC and most nanocomposites. In contrast, the bulk electrical conductivity of the hybrid materials was strongly influenced by the intrinsic conductivity, mean crystallite size, content and chemical nature of the supported phases, which ultimately depend on the metal oxide precursor and heat treatment temperature. The supported nanoparticles may be considered to act as electrical switches either hindering or favouring the effective electron transport between the AC cores of neighbouring composite particles in contact under compression. Conductivity values as a rule were lower for the nanocomposites than for the raw AC, all of them falling in the range of semiconductor materials. With the increase in heat treatment temperature, the trend is toward the improvement of conductivity due to the increase in the crystallite size and, in some cases, to the formation of metals in the elemental state and even metal carbides. The patterns of variation of the electrical conductivity with pressure and mechanical work were slightly similar, thus suggesting the predominance of the pressure

  14. Fibre amplifier based on an ytterbium-doped active tapered fibre for the generation of megawatt peak power ultrashort optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, M. Yu; Anashkina, E. A.; Bobkov, K. K.; Likhachev, M. E.; Levchenko, A. E.; Aleshkina, S. S.; Semjonov, S. L.; Denisov, A. N.; Bubnov, M. M.; Lipatov, D. S.; Laptev, A. Yu; Gur'yanov, A. N.; Andrianov, A. V.; Muravyev, S. V.; Kim, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    We report a new ytterbium-doped active tapered fibre used in the output amplifier stage of a fibre laser system for the generation of megawatt peak power ultrashort pulses in the microjoule energy range. The tapered fibre is single-mode at its input end (core and cladding diameters of 10 and 80 μm) and multimode at its output end (diameters of 45 and 430 μm), but ultrashort pulses are amplified in a quasi-single-mode regime. Using a hybrid Er/Yb fibre system comprising an erbium master oscillator and amplifier at a wavelength near 1.5 μm, a nonlinear wavelength converter to the 1 μm range and a three-stage ytterbium-doped fibre amplifier, we obtained pulses of 1 μJ energy and 7 ps duration, which were then compressed by a grating-pair dispersion compressor with 60% efficiency to a 130 fs duration, approaching the transform-limited pulse duration. The present experimental data agree well with numerical simulation results for pulse amplification in the threestage amplifier.

  15. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy induced fall in natural killer cell activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Beyer, J M; Rasmussen, A; Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B N; Helin, P

    1984-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity was studied in 8 patients with classic or definite rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by investigating the killing of K 562 cells by peripheral blood lymphocytes before, during, and after intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT). MPPT produced a considerable fall in NK activity and after 3 months NK activity was less than half that before MPPT. PMID:6516854

  16. Impaired long-term habituation is dissociated from increased locomotor activity after sensorimotor cortex compression.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Tiago; Cebers, Gvido; Salehi, Mehdi; Wägner, Anna; Liljequist, Sture

    2006-02-15

    Behavioural habituation to a novel environment is a simple form of learning in rodents. We studied the habituation and locomotor activity (LMA) of Wistar rats subjected to unilateral, transient (30min) extradural compression (EC) of the right sensorimotor cortex. One group of rats was tested every 24h during the first 5 days (D1-D5) post-EC. Two other groups were tested for the first time in the LMA boxes on D3 and D6 post-EC and their performance was compared with the group tested on D1 (activity in a novel environment). Total and center locomotion, vertical activity and time spent in the center of the LMA box were reduced on D1 post-EC and normalized by D2. The EC-induced motor paresis was undetectable on the rotarod by D2 and on the beam-walking by D3. Total locomotion, vertical activity and time spent in the center of EC-rats significantly increased from D1 to D3. EC caused neurodegeneration in the cortex, caudate putamen and thalamus as detected by Fluoro-Jade staining. The size of the cortical damage decreased from D2 to D5 in the medial and caudal regions of the compressed hemisphere, in accordance with recovery of motor function. LMA provided additional information in the follow-up of recovery from brain injury and habituation to the environment. Thus, long-term, inter-session habituation was impaired from D1 to D3 but dissociated from increased LMA intra-session on D3, when the motor deficits provoked by EC were already undetectable in the rotarod and beam-walking tests. PMID:16337698

  17. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s⁻¹ and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s⁻¹ on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle-tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission.

  18. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Luke A.; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s−1 and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s−1 on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle–tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission. PMID:25551151

  19. Pulsed Light Stimulation Increases Boundary Preference and Periodicity of Episodic Motor Activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuang; Xiao, Chengfeng; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the therapeutic benefits of long-term sensory stimulation for improving cognitive abilities and motor performance of stroke patients. The rationale is that such stimulation would activate mechanisms of neural plasticity to promote enhanced coordination and associated circuit functions. Experimental approaches to characterize such mechanisms are needed. Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most attractive model organisms to investigate neural mechanisms responsible for stimulation-induced behaviors with its powerful accessibility to genetic analysis. In this study, the effect of chronic sensory stimulation (pulsed light stimulation) on motor activity in w1118 flies was investigated. Flies were exposed to a chronic pulsed light stimulation protocol prior to testing their performance in a standard locomotion assay. Flies responded to pulsed light stimulation with increased boundary preference and travel distance in a circular arena. In addition, pulsed light stimulation increased the power of extracellular electrical activity, leading to the enhancement of periodic electrical activity which was associated with a centrally-generated motor pattern (struggling behavior). In contrast, such periodic events were largely missing in w1118 flies without pulsed light treatment. These data suggest that the sensory stimulation induced a response in motor activity associated with the modifications of electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Finally, without pulsed light treatment, the wild-type genetic background was associated with the occurrence of the periodic activity in wild-type Canton S (CS) flies, and w+ modulated the consistency of periodicity. We conclude that pulsed light stimulation modifies behavioral and electrophysiological activities in w1118 flies. These data provide a foundation for future research on the genetic mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying such behavioral modification. PMID:27684063

  20. Compressed and Distributed Sensing of Neuronal Activity for Real Time Spike Train Decoding

    PubMed Central

    Aghagolzadeh, Mehdi; Oweiss, Karim

    2009-01-01

    Multivariate point processes are increasingly being used to model neuronal response properties in the cortex. Estimating the conditional intensity functions underlying these processes is important to characterize and decode the firing patterns of cortical neurons. This paper proposes a new approach for estimating these intensity functions directly from a compressed representation of the neurons’ extracellular recordings. The approach is based on exploiting a sparse representation of the extracellular spike waveforms, previously demonstrated to yield near-optimal denoising and compression properties. We show that by restricting this sparse representation to a subset of projections that simultaneously preserve features of the spike waveforms in addition to the temporal characteristics of the underlying intensity functions, we can reasonably approximate the instantaneous firing rates of the recorded neurons with variable tuning characteristics across a multitude of time scales. Such feature is highly desirable to detect subtle temporal differences in neuronal firing characteristics from single-trial data. An added advantage of this approach is that it eliminates multiple steps from the typical processing path of neural signals that are customarily performed for instantaneous neural decoding. We demonstrate the decoding performance of the approach using a stochastic cosine tuning model of motor cortical activity during a natural, nongoal-directed 2-D arm movement. PMID:19193517

  1. Tuning active Brownian motion with shot-noise energy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ebeling, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to explore the possibility of modeling the biological energy support mediated by absorption of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as an energetic shot noise. We develop a general model with discrete input of energy pulses and study shot-noise-driven ratchets. We consider these ratchets as prototypes of Brownian motors driven by energy-rich ATP molecules. Our model is a stochastic machine able to acquire energy from the environment and convert it into kinetic energy of motion. We present characteristic features and demonstrate the possibility of tuning these motors by adapting the mean frequency of the discrete energy inputs, which are described as a special shot noise. In particular, the effect of stochastically driven directionality and uphill flux in systems acquiring energy from the shot noise is analyzed. As a possible application we consider the motion of kinesin on a microtubule under a constant load force.

  2. Hip adductor activations during run-to-cut maneuvers in compression shorts: Implications for return to sport after groin injury

    PubMed Central

    CHAUDHARI, AJIT M. W.; JAMISON, STEVEN T.; MCNALLY, MICHAEL P.; PAN, XUELIANG; SCHMITT, LAURA C.

    2014-01-01

    Athletes at high risk of groin strains in sports such as hockey and soccer often choose to wear shorts with directional compression to aid in prevention or recovery from hip adductor strains. Large eccentric contractions are known to result in or exacerbate strain injuries, but it is unknown if these shorts have a beneficial effect on hip adductor muscle activity. In this study, surface electromyography of the adductor longus and ground reaction force (GRF) data were obtained simultaneously on 29 healthy individuals without previous history of serious injury while performing unanticipated 45° run-to-cut maneuvers in a laboratory setting wearing shorts with non-directional compression (control, HeatGear, Under Armour, USA) or shorts with directional compression (directional, CoreShort PRO, Under Armour, USA), in random order. Average adductor activity in the stance leg was significantly lower in the directional condition than in the control condition during all parts of stance phase (all p<0.042). From this preliminary analysis, wearing directional compression shorts appears to be associated with reduced stance limb hip adductor activity. Athletes seeking to reduce demand on the hip adductors as they approach full return to activities may benefit from the use of directional compression shorts. PMID:24669858

  3. Hip adductor activations during run-to-cut manoeuvres in compression shorts: implications for return to sport after groin injury.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Ajit M W; Jamison, Steven T; McNally, Michael P; Pan, Xueliang; Schmitt, Laura C

    2014-01-01

    Athletes at high risk of groin strains in sports such as hockey and soccer often choose to wear shorts with directional compression to aid in prevention of or recovery from hip adductor strains. Large, eccentric contractions are known to result in or exacerbate strain injuries, but it is unknown if these shorts have a beneficial effect on hip adductor muscle activity. In this study, surface electromyography (EMG) of the adductor longus and ground reaction force (GRF) data were obtained simultaneously on 29 healthy individuals without previous history of serious injury while performing unanticipated 45° run-to-cut manoeuvres in a laboratory setting wearing shorts with non-directional compression (control, HeatGear, Under Armour, USA) or shorts with directional compression (directional, CoreShort PRO, Under Armour, USA), in random order. Average adductor activity in the stance leg was significantly lower in the directional condition than in the control condition during all parts of stance phase (all P < 0.042). From this preliminary analysis, wearing directional compression shorts appears to be associated with reduced stance limb hip adductor activity. Athletes seeking to reduce demand on the hip adductors as they approach full return to activities may benefit from the use of directional compression shorts. PMID:24669858

  4. The effects of high-voltage pulse electric discharges on ion adsorption on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, M. M.; Sveshnikova, D. A.; Larin, S. V.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Shabanova, Z. E.; Yusupova, A. A.; Ramazanov, A. Sh.

    2008-07-01

    The effects of high-voltage pulse electric discharges (HPED) on sorption of boron and sulfate ions on activated carbons of different kinds (KM-2, BAU, DAK) were investigated. The effect of HPED activation on the sorption characteristics of the systems was found to be similar to the temperature effect.

  5. Transform-limited pulses generated by an actively Q-switched distributed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Pérez-Millán, P; Andrés, M V; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Barmenkov, Yu O

    2008-11-15

    A single-mode, transform-limited, actively Q-switched distributed-feedback fiber laser is presented, based on a new in-line acoustic pulse generator. Our technique permits a continuous adjustment of the repetition rate that modulates the Q factor of the cavity. Optical pulses of 800 mW peak power, 32 ns temporal width, and up to 20 kHz repetition rates were obtained. The measured linewidth demonstrates that these pulses are transform limited: 6 MHz for a train of pulses of 10 kHz repetition rate, 80 ns temporal width, and 60 mW peak power. Efficient excitation of spontaneous Brillouin scattering is demonstrated. PMID:19015677

  6. Dynamic Compression Effects on Immature Nucleus Pulposus: a Study Using a Novel Intelligent and Mechanically Active Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Gan, Yibo; Wang, Haoming; Zhang, Chengmin; Wang, Liyuan; Xu, Yuan; Song, Lei; Li, Songtao; Li, Sukai; Ou, Yangbin; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous cell culture and animal in vivo studies indicate the obvious effects of mechanical compression on disc cell biology. However, the effects of dynamic compression magnitude, frequency and duration on the immature nucleus pulposus (NP) from an organ-cultured disc are not well understood. Objective: To investigate the effects of a relatively wide range of compressive magnitudes, frequencies and durations on cell apoptosis and matrix composition within the immature NP using an intelligent and mechanically active bioreactor. Methods: Discs from the immature porcine were cultured in a mechanically active bioreactor for 7 days. The discs in various compressive magnitude groups (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.3 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz for 2 hours), frequency groups (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 Hz at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa for 2 hours) and duration groups (1, 2, 4 and 8 hours at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa and frequency of 1.0 Hz) experienced dynamic compression once per day. Discs cultured without compression were used as controls. Immature NP samples were analyzed using the TUNEL assay, histological staining, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content measurement, real-time PCR and collagen II immunohistochemical staining. Results: In the 1.3 MPa, 5.0 Hz and 8 hour groups, the immature NP showed a significantly increase in apoptotic cells, a catabolic gene expression profile with down-regulated matrix molecules and up-regulated matrix degradation enzymes, and decreased GAG content and collagen II deposition. In the other compressive magnitude, frequency and duration groups, the immature NP showed a healthier status regarding NP cell apoptosis, gene expression profile and matrix production. Conclusion: Cell apoptosis and matrix composition within the immature NP were compressive magnitude-, frequency- and duration-dependent. The relatively high compressive magnitude or frequency and long compressive duration are not helpful for maintaining the healthy status of an

  7. In-vitro suppression of metabolic activity in malignant human glioblastomas due to pulsed - low frequency electric potential exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Abby; Waynant, Ronald W.; Tata, Darrell B.

    2010-02-01

    The role of pulsed - low repetition frequency electric potential was investigated in suppressing the metabolic activities of aggressive human brain cancer cells. Twenty four hours post exposure the glioblastomas were found to be significantly inhibited in their metabolic activity. The findings herein reveal a near complete inhibition of glioblastoma's metabolic activity through selective applications of low frequency pulsed electric potentials.

  8. A novel application of pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for improving glutathione (GSH) antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Wang, Ke; Wang, Ying; Lin, Songyi; Zhao, Ping; Jones, Gregory

    2014-10-15

    Glutathione (GSH) was treated by pulsed electric field (PEF) processing to investigate its effect on antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of GSH was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical inhibition. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three independent variables, which were concentration, electric field intensity and pulse frequency was used to establish the regression equation of second-order response surface. Optimal conditions were as follows: GSH concentration 8.86mg/mL, electric field intensity 9.74kV/cm and pulse frequency 2549.08Hz. The DPPH radical inhibition increased from 81.83% to 97.40%. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) were used to analyse the change of structure and functional groups of GSH.

  9. Compressed gas manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  10. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  11. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  12. Generation of Single-Cycle Light Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B C; Jovanovic, I; Armstrong, J P; Pyke, B; Crane, J K; Shuttlesworth, R

    2004-02-13

    Most optical pulses, even at the 10-femtosecond timescale, consist of several oscillations of the electric field. By producing and amplifying an ultra-broadband continuum, single cycle (e 3 fs) or shorter optical pulses may be generated. This requires a very challenging pulse-compression with sub-femtosecond accuracy. Production of these single-cycle pulses will lead to new generations of experiments in the areas of coherent control of chemical excitations and reactions, 0.1-fs high-order harmonic (XUV) generation for probing of materials and fast processes, and selective 3-D micron-scale material removal and modification. We activated the first stage of a planned three-stage optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that would ultimately produce sub-3 fs pulses. Active control with a learning algorithm was implemented to optimize the continuum generated in an argon-filled capillary and to control and optimize the final compressed pulse temporal shape. A collaboration was initiated to coherently control the population of different states upon dissociation of Rb{sub 2}. Except for one final optic, a pulse compressor and diagnostics were constructed to produce and characterize pulses in the 5-fs range from the first OPA stage.

  13. Effects of wearing compression garments on thermoregulation during simulated team sport activity in temperate environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence A; Dawson, Brian; Maloney, Shane K

    2009-03-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests compression garments (CGs) are being worn underneath normal playing attire during team sports. Wearing CGs as a baselayer could possibly increase heat storage, and so this field study investigated the effects of wearing CGs, comprising knee-length shorts and short-sleeved top underneath normal match-day attire (COMP), versus normal match-day attire alone (NORM) on thermoregulation during simulated team sport activity. Ten match-fit field hockey players twice performed 4x15min exercise bouts consisting of repeated cycles of intermittent, varied-intensity 20m shuttle running (Loughborough intermittent shuttle test), once in COMP and once in NORM. Testing was conducted in an indoor gymnasium (ambient conditions: approximately 17 degrees C, approximately 60% relative humidity). Participants acted as their own controls. Heart rate (HR), 15m sprint time, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), blood lactate concentration, sweat rate and body core temperature (T(core)) were similar between trials (p>0.05). Mean skin temperature (T(skin)) was significantly higher in COMP than NORM (p<0.05). Overall, CGs worn as a baselayer during simulated team sport exercise in temperate ambient conditions had no thermoregulatory benefits nor any detrimental effects on T(core), physiological performance or dehydration. However, the higher T(skin) may affect individual preference for wearing CGs as an undergarment during team sports.

  14. Active measurements of defect processes in shock compressed metals and other solids

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Solid samples have been routinely recovered for examination after having been subjected to high pressure shock loading. Such investigations have revealed many unique and interesting defect features and are essential if a detailed understanding of shock deformation processes is to be achieved. Nevertheless, examination of samples hours or days after they are compressed for only a few microseconds in a loading whose rise time may be subnanosecond fails to address the relationship between the residual defect structure and that existing during the loading. Electrical probes, and to a lesser extent optical probes, have provided reasonably direct measurements of defect states and some limited information on the evolution of these states. For example, measurements of the electrical resistance of metals provide an indication of vacancy concentrations. Similarly, measurements of shock-induced electrical polarization in insulating solids have provided evidence that large numbers of point defects are generated and displaced by the stress and velocity gradients within the shock fronts. Optical measurements of shock-induced bleaching of color centers in NaCl have provided some evidence for kinetics of the formation of higher-order point defects. This paper reviews the status of active measurements which have provided information about shock-induced changes in the defect state of solids.

  15. Chaotic parametric soliton-like pulses in ferromagnetic-film active ring resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, S. V. Golova, T. M.; Morozova, M. A.; Romanenko, D. V.; Seleznev, E. P.; Sysoev, I. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-10-15

    The generation of quasi-periodic sequences of parametric soliton-like pulses in an active ring resonator with a ferromagnetic film via the three-wave parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave is studied theoretically and experimentally. These dissipative structures form in time due to the competition between the cubic nonlinearity caused by parametric coupling between spin waves and the time dispersion caused by the resonant cavity that is present in a self-oscillatory system. The development of dynamic chaos due to the parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave results in irregular behavior of a phase. However, this behavior does not break a quasi-periodic pulse sequence when the gain changes over a wide range. The generated soliton-like pulses have a chaotic nature, which is supported by the maximum Lyapunov exponent estimated from experimental time series.

  16. Hotspot activity and plume pulses recorded by geometry of spreading axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Meir; Agnon, Amotz

    2001-06-01

    Anomalous plan view geometry (planform) of spreading axes is shown to be a faithful indicator of hotspot influence, possibly capable of detecting pulses of hotspot discharge. A planform anomaly (PA) occurs when the orientation of second-order ridge segments is prominently oblique to the spreading direction. PA is found in the vicinity of hotspots at shallow ridges (<1.5 km), suggesting hotspot influence. In places the PA and shallow bathymetry are accompanied by geochemical anomalies, corroborating hotspot influence. This linkage is best expressed in the western Gulf of Aden, where the extent of the PA from the Afar hotspot coincides with the extent of La/Sm and Sr isotopic anomalies. Using fracture mechanics we predict PA to reflect overpressurized melt that dominates the stresses in the crust, consistent with hotspot regime. Accordingly, the temporal variations of the planform previously inferred from magnetic anomalies around the Kolbeinsey Ridge (KR), north of Iceland, record episodes of interaction with the hotspot and major pulses of the plume. This suggestion is corroborated by temporal correlation of episodes showing PA north of Iceland with plume pulses previously inferred by the V-shaped ridges around the Reykjanes Ridge (RR), south of Iceland. In contrast to the RR, the temporal correlation suggests simultaneous incidence of the plume pulses at Iceland and KR, hundreds of kilometers to the north. A deep northward branch of the Iceland plume active during pulse-periods may explain these observations.

  17. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power.

  18. Compressing μJ-level pulses from 250  fs to sub-10  fs at 38-MHz repetition rate using two gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber stages.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Seidel, M; Pronin, O; Frosz, M H; Abdolvand, A; Pervak, V; Apolonski, A; Krausz, F; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-04-01

    Compression of 250-fs, 1-μJ pulses from a KLM Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator down to 9.1 fs is demonstrated. A kagomé-PCF with a 36-μm core-diameter is used with a pressure gradient from 0 to 40 bar of krypton. Compression to 22 fs is achieved by 1200  fs2 group-delay-dispersion provided by chirped mirrors. By coupling the output into a second kagomé-PCF with a pressure gradient from 0 to 25 bar of argon, octave spanning spectral broadening via the soliton-effect is observed at 18-W average output power. Self-compression to 9.1 fs is measured, with compressibility to 5 fs predicted. Also observed is strong emission in the visible via dispersive wave generation, amounting to 4% of the total output power. PMID:25831302

  19. Compression of CEP-stable multi-mJ laser pulses down to 4 fs in long hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhle, Frederik; Kretschmar, Martin; Jullien, Aurélie; Kovacs, Mate; Miranda, Miguel; Romero, Rosa; Crespo, Helder; Morgner, Uwe; Simon, Peter; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Nagy, Tamas

    2014-09-01

    Carrier-envelope phase stable 4 fs near-IR pulses with 3 mJ energy were generated by spectral broadening of circularly polarized 8 mJ pulses in a differentially pumped 2 m long composite stretched flexible hollow fiber. The pulses were characterized using both second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) and SHG d-scan methods.

  20. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  1. Circadian and dark-pulse activation of orexin/hypocretin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Oliver J; Williams, Rhîannan H; Canal, Maria M; Samuels, Rayna E; Upton, Neil; Piggins, Hugh D

    2008-01-01

    Temporal control of brain and behavioral states emerges as a consequence of the interaction between circadian and homeostatic neural circuits. This interaction permits the daily rhythm of sleep and wake, regulated in parallel by circadian cues originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and arousal-promoting signals arising from the orexin-containing neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus (TH). Intriguingly, the SCN circadian clock can be reset by arousal-promoting stimuli while activation of orexin/hypocretin neurons is believed to be under circadian control, suggesting the existence of a reciprocal relationship. Unfortunately, since orexin neurons are themselves activated by locomotor promoting cues, it is unclear how these two systems interact to regulate behavioral rhythms. Here mice were placed in conditions of constant light, which suppressed locomotor activity, but also revealed a highly pronounced circadian pattern in orexin neuronal activation. Significantly, activation of orexin neurons in the medial and lateral TH occurred prior to the onset of sustained wheel-running activity. Moreover, exposure to a 6 h dark pulse during the subjective day, a stimulus that promotes arousal and phase advances behavioral rhythms, activated neurons in the medial and lateral TH including those containing orexin. Concurrently, this stimulus suppressed SCN activity while activating cells in the median raphe. In contrast, dark pulse exposure during the subjective night did not reset SCN-controlled behavioral rhythms and caused a transient suppression of neuronal activation in the TH. Collectively these results demonstrate, for the first time, pronounced circadian control of orexin neuron activation and implicate recruitment of orexin cells in dark pulse resetting of the SCN circadian clock. PMID:19055781

  2. EBSD analysis of (10–12) twinning activity in Mg–3Al–1Zn alloy during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingshu; Deng, Liping; Guo, Ning; Xu, Zeren; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    The (10–12) twinning activity of Mg–3Al–1Zn magnesium alloy during uniaxial compression at room temperature has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results indicated that the twinning activity was closely related with two angles: one was the angle between the c-axis and the compression direction and the other was the angle between the a-axis and the titling direction in the basal plane for a given relation between the c-axis and the compression direction. These two parameters can be used to explain which twinning variant will operate under the given strain path. For the grains containing a single (10–12) twinning variant, the (10–12) twinning variant occurred in a wide range of Schmid factor values (0 < Schmid factor < 0.5) and the Schmid factor rank of 1 or 2 was the most commonly observed. By contrast, for the grains containing two (10–12) twinning variants, the (10–12) twinning activity exhibited a stronger orientation dependence and the combinations of Schmid factor ranks 1–3 and 1–2 were the most commonly observed. - Highlights: • Twinning activity of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by EBSD. • (10–12) twinning shows a strong orientation dependence. • Two angles can be used to explain which twin variant will operate.

  3. Regeneration of Acid Orange 7 Exhausted Granular Activated Carbon Using Pulsed Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Guo, He; Liu, Yongjie; Yi, Chengwu

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrodes geometry was set up to investigate the regeneration of acid orange 7 (AO7) exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC). Regeneration of GAC was studied under different conditions of peak pulse discharge voltage and water pH, as well as the modification effect of GAC by the pulse discharge process, to figure out the regeneration efficiency and the change of the GAC structure by the PDP treatment. The obtained results showed that there was an appropriate peak pulse voltage and an optimal initial pH value of the solution for GAC regeneration. Analyses of scanning electron microscope (SEM), Boehm titration, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Horvath-Kawazoe (HK), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) showed that there were more mesopore and macropore in the regenerated GAC and the structure turned smoother with the increase of discharge voltage; the amount of acidic functional groups on the GAC surface increased while the amount of basic functional groups decreased after the regeneration process. From the result of the XRD analysis, there were no new substances produced on the GAC after PDP treatment. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21207052), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 20110491353) and Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds, China (No. 1102116C)

  4. Absolute frequency synthesis of pulsed coherent light waves through phase-modulation active optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Horiguchi, T; Koyamada, Y

    1996-11-15

    A novel method for the broadband absolute frequency synthesis of pulsed coherent lightwaves is demonstrated. It is based on pulse recirculation around an active optical feedback ring containing a delay-line fiber, an external phase modulator, an acousto-optic frequency shifter (AOFS), and a high-finesse Fabry-Perot étalon. The modulation frequency F(M) and the frequency shift F(AO) that are due to AOFS are designed so that their sum or difference equals the free-spectral range of the étalon and F(AO) is set at larger than the half-width at full maximum of its resonant peaks. If one of the peak frequencies is tuned to the frequency of the initial pulse, the frequency of the recirculating pulse jumps to the next peak for each round trip. In the experiment the absolute frequency is synthesized over a frequency span of 700 GHz around the initial stabilized frequency of the master laser.

  5. Effects of Cr2O3 Activating Flux on the Plasma Plume in Pulsed Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Luo; Yunfei, Du; Xiaojian, Xie; Rui, Wan; Liang, Zhu; Jingtao, Han

    2016-08-01

    The effects of Cr2O3 activating flux on pulsed YAG laser welding of stainless steel and, particularly, on the behavior of the plasma plume in the welding process were investigated. According to the acoustic emission (AE) signals detected in the welding process, the possible mechanism for the improvement in penetration depth was discussed. The results indicated that the AE signals detected in the welding process reflected the behavior of the plasma plume as pulsed laser energy affecting the molten pool. The root-mean-square (RMS) waveform, AE count, and power spectrum of AE signals were three effective means to characterize the behavior of the plasma plume, which indicated the characteristics of energy released by the plasma plume. The activating flux affected by the laser beam helped to increase the duration and intensity of energy released by the plasma plume, which improved the recoil force and thermal effect transferred from the plasma plume to the molten pool. These results were the main mechanism for Cr2O3 activating flux addition improving the penetration depth in pulsed YAG laser welding.

  6. Effects of Cr2O3 Activating Flux on the Plasma Plume in Pulsed Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Luo; Yunfei, Du; Xiaojian, Xie; Rui, Wan; Liang, Zhu; Jingtao, Han

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cr2O3 activating flux on pulsed YAG laser welding of stainless steel and, particularly, on the behavior of the plasma plume in the welding process were investigated. According to the acoustic emission (AE) signals detected in the welding process, the possible mechanism for the improvement in penetration depth was discussed. The results indicated that the AE signals detected in the welding process reflected the behavior of the plasma plume as pulsed laser energy affecting the molten pool. The root-mean-square (RMS) waveform, AE count, and power spectrum of AE signals were three effective means to characterize the behavior of the plasma plume, which indicated the characteristics of energy released by the plasma plume. The activating flux affected by the laser beam helped to increase the duration and intensity of energy released by the plasma plume, which improved the recoil force and thermal effect transferred from the plasma plume to the molten pool. These results were the main mechanism for Cr2O3 activating flux addition improving the penetration depth in pulsed YAG laser welding.

  7. ECG data compression by modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Madhukar, B.; Murthy, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for data compression of single lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) data. The method is based on Parametric modeling of the Discrete Cosine Transformed ECG signal. Improved high frequency reconstruction is achieved by separately modeling the low and the high frequency regions of the transformed signal. Differential Pulse Code Modulation is applied on the model parameters to obtain a further increase in the compression. Compression ratios up to 1:40 were achieved without significant distortion. PMID:1482940

  8. Insecticidal Activity and Chemical Composition of the Morinda lucida Essential Oil against Pulse Beetle Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Owolabi, Moses S.; Ogundajo, Akintayo L.; Ogunwande, Isiaka A.; Yusuff, Olaniyi K.; Flores-Fernandez, Karen Isabel; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of essential oil extracted from Morinda lucida was tested on pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is a pest that causes serious damage to several pulses. The insecticidal activity was compared with two pesticides, Phostoxin and Primo-ban-20. 120 mixed sex adult C. maculatus were introduced, along with 30 g of cowpeas. Four concentrations (0.40, 0.20, 0.10, and 0.05 μg/mL) of the M. lucida essential oil, Phostoxin, and Primo-ban-20 were tested. Essential oil chemical composition was analyzed by GC-MS. M. lucida essential oil showed a high toxicological effect, producing 100% mortality after 72 hours at a dose of 0.20 μg/mL. M. lucida essential oil had a potent insecticidal activity (LC90 = 0.629 μg/mL) compared to both pesticides, Phostoxin (LC90 = 0.652 μg/mL) and Primo-ban-20 (LC90 = 0.726 μg/mL), at 24 h. The main compounds of the essential oil were the oxygenated monoterpenoids, 1,8-cineole (43.4%), and α-terpinyl acetate (14.5%), and the monoterpene hydrocarbons, mostly sabinene (8.2%) and β-pinene (4.0%). Results clearly indicate that M. lucida essential oil can be used as an effective alternative for pulse beetle C. maculatus control, and it could be tested against other pulse beetles affecting Asia and Africa and throughout the world, thereby reducing use of synthetic pesticides. PMID:25143991

  9. Insecticidal activity and chemical composition of the Morinda lucida essential oil against pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Moses S; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Ogundajo, Akintayo L; Ogunwande, Isiaka A; Flamini, Guido; Yusuff, Olaniyi K; Allen, Kirk; Flores-Fernandez, Karen Isabel; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Insecticidal activity of essential oil extracted from Morinda lucida was tested on pulse beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is a pest that causes serious damage to several pulses. The insecticidal activity was compared with two pesticides, Phostoxin and Primo-ban-20. 120 mixed sex adult C. maculatus were introduced, along with 30 g of cowpeas. Four concentrations (0.40, 0.20, 0.10, and 0.05 μg/mL) of the M. lucida essential oil, Phostoxin, and Primo-ban-20 were tested. Essential oil chemical composition was analyzed by GC-MS. M. lucida essential oil showed a high toxicological effect, producing 100% mortality after 72 hours at a dose of 0.20 μg/mL. M. lucida essential oil had a potent insecticidal activity (LC90 = 0.629 μg/mL) compared to both pesticides, Phostoxin (LC90 = 0.652 μg/mL) and Primo-ban-20 (LC90 = 0.726 μg/mL), at 24 h. The main compounds of the essential oil were the oxygenated monoterpenoids, 1,8-cineole (43.4%), and α-terpinyl acetate (14.5%), and the monoterpene hydrocarbons, mostly sabinene (8.2%) and β-pinene (4.0%). Results clearly indicate that M. lucida essential oil can be used as an effective alternative for pulse beetle C. maculatus control, and it could be tested against other pulse beetles affecting Asia and Africa and throughout the world, thereby reducing use of synthetic pesticides.

  10. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) With Improved Selectivity Achieved By Ion Pulse Compression Using In-Source Time-of-flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V. I.; Malinovsky, A. L.; Mishin, D. V.

    2009-03-17

    This paper describes for the first time the improved selectivity of the RILIS made possible by the time-of-flight (TOF) ion bunch compression. Brief description of the compression principles and some preliminary experimental results are presented. In the off-line experiments short ion peaks of natural Li, Na, K, Tm and Yb are observed as ions leave the RILIS-TOF structure. For Tm the ion peaks of 5 {mu}s half-height duration are detected and 1 {mu}s peaks for Sn are predicted. In view of the repetition rate of the ISOLDE-RILIS lasers it is hoped that the selectivity of Sn isotopes production may be improved as much as 100 employing the RILIS with the TOF ion bunch compression and a gating technique.

  11. The evaluation of upper body muscle activity during the performance of external chest compressions in simulated hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krygiel, Rebecca G.; Waye, Abigail B.; Baptista, Rafael Reimann; Heidner, Gustavo Sandri; Rehnberg, Lucas; Russomano, Thais

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND: This original study evaluated the electromyograph (EMG) activity of four upper body muscles: triceps brachii, erector spinae, upper rectus abdominis, and pectoralis major, while external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed in simulated Martian hypogravity using a Body Suspension Device, counterweight system, and standard full body cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) mannequin. METHOD: 20 young, healthy male subjects were recruited. One hundred compressions divided into four sets, with roughly six seconds between each set to indicate 'ventilation', were performed within approximately a 1.5 minute protocol. Chest compression rate, depth and number were measured along with the subject's heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). RESULTS: All mean values were used in two-tailed t-tests using SPSS to compare +1 Gz values (control) versus simulated hypogravity values. The AHA (2005) compression standards were maintained in hypogravity. RPE and HR increased by 32% (p < 0.001) and 44% (p = 0.002), respectively, when ECCs were performed during Mars simulation, in comparison to +1 Gz. In hypogravity, the triceps brachii showed significantly less activity (p < 0.001) when compared with the other three muscles studied. The comparison of all the other muscles showed no difference at +1 Gz or in hypogravity. CONCLUSIONS: This study was among the first of its kind, however several limitations were faced which hopefully will not exist in future studies. Evaluation of a great number of muscles will allow space crews to focus on specific strengthening exercises within their current training regimes in case of a serious cardiac event in hypogravity.

  12. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  13. Calcium Influx and DREAM Protein Are Required For GnRH Gene Expression Pulse Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Gilles M.; Boockfor, Fredric R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence using GT1-7 cells indicates that GnRH pulsatility depends on exocytotic-release and gene transcription events. To determine whether calcium or DREAM may play a role in linking these processes, we used an L-type Ca2+-blocker (nimodipine) and found that not only GnRH gene expression (GnRH-GE) pulse activity was abolished but also that binding of proteins to OCT1BS-a (essential site for GnRH-GE pulses) was reduced. We further found that only EF-hand forms of DREAM were expressed in GT1-7 and that DREAM was part of the complex binding to OCT1BS-a. Finally, microinjection of DREAM antibody into cells abolished GnRH-GE pulses demonstrating its importance in pulsatility. These results reveal that calcium and DREAM may bridge cytoplasmic and nuclear events enabling temporal coordination of intermittent activity. Expression of DREAM in various cell types coupled with the universal role of calcium raise the possibility that these factors may play similar role in other secretory cells. PMID:17241740

  14. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  15. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  16. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  17. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  18. Cascade amplification of self-similar frequency-modulated pulses in normal group velocity dispersion active fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, Igor' O; Okhotnikov, Oleg G; Sementsov, Dmitrii I; Sysolyatin, A A; Fotiadi, A A

    2012-09-30

    This paper examines the possibility of efficient amplification of self-similar frequency-modulated wave packets in longitudinally inhomogeneous active fibres. We analyse the dynamics of parabolic pulses with a constant frequency modulation rate and derive algorithms for optimising the group velocity dispersion profile in order to ensure self-similar propagation of such pulses. We demonstrate that the use of a cascade scheme can ensure efficient amplification of individual subpicosecond pulses of this type. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  19. Electromagnetic pulse activated brain microglia via the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long-Long; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Wei-Dong; Li, Hai-Juan; Kang-Chu-Li; Miao, Xia; An, Guang-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Ding, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that electromagnetic pulses (EMP) induced an increase in blood brain barrier permeability and the leakage of albumin from blood into brain tissue. Albumin is known to activate microglia cells. Thus, we hypothesised that microglia activation could occur in the brain after EMP exposure. To test this hypothesis, the morphology and secretory function of microglia cells, including the expression of OX-42 (a marker of microglia activation), and levels of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-1β, and NO were determined in the rat cerebral cortex after EMP exposure. In addition, to examine the signalling pathway of EMP-induced microglia activation, protein and phosphorylated protein levels of p38, JNK and ERK were determined. It was found that the expression of OX-42increased significantly at 1, 6 and 12h (p<0.05) and recovered to the sham group level at 24h after EMP exposure. Levels of NO, TNF-α and IL-10 also changed significantly in vivo and in vitro after EMP exposure. The protein level of p38 and phosphorylated p38 increased significantly after EMP exposure (p<0.05) and recovered to sham levels at 12 and 24h, respectively. Protein and phosphorylated protein levels of ERK and JNK did not change. SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) partly prevented the change in NO, IL-10, IL-1β, TNF-α levels induced by EMP exposure. Taken together, these results suggested that EMP exposure (200kV/m, 200 pulses) could activate microglia in rat brain and affect its secretory function both in vivo and in vitro, and the p38 pathway is involved in this process. PMID:26688329

  20. Electromagnetic pulse activated brain microglia via the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long-Long; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Wei-Dong; Li, Hai-Juan; Kang-Chu-Li; Miao, Xia; An, Guang-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Ding, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that electromagnetic pulses (EMP) induced an increase in blood brain barrier permeability and the leakage of albumin from blood into brain tissue. Albumin is known to activate microglia cells. Thus, we hypothesised that microglia activation could occur in the brain after EMP exposure. To test this hypothesis, the morphology and secretory function of microglia cells, including the expression of OX-42 (a marker of microglia activation), and levels of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-1β, and NO were determined in the rat cerebral cortex after EMP exposure. In addition, to examine the signalling pathway of EMP-induced microglia activation, protein and phosphorylated protein levels of p38, JNK and ERK were determined. It was found that the expression of OX-42increased significantly at 1, 6 and 12h (p<0.05) and recovered to the sham group level at 24h after EMP exposure. Levels of NO, TNF-α and IL-10 also changed significantly in vivo and in vitro after EMP exposure. The protein level of p38 and phosphorylated p38 increased significantly after EMP exposure (p<0.05) and recovered to sham levels at 12 and 24h, respectively. Protein and phosphorylated protein levels of ERK and JNK did not change. SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) partly prevented the change in NO, IL-10, IL-1β, TNF-α levels induced by EMP exposure. Taken together, these results suggested that EMP exposure (200kV/m, 200 pulses) could activate microglia in rat brain and affect its secretory function both in vivo and in vitro, and the p38 pathway is involved in this process.

  1. Clicks, whistles and pulses: Passive and active signal use in dolphin communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzing, Denise L.

    2014-12-01

    The search for signals out of noise is a problem not only with radio signals from the sky but in the study of animal communication. Dolphins use multiple modalities to communicate including body postures, touch, vision, and most elaborately sound. Like SETI radio signal searches, dolphin sound analysis includes the detection, recognition, analysis, and interpretation of signals. Dolphins use both passive listening and active production to communicate. Dolphins use three main types of acoustic signals: frequency modulated whistles (narrowband with harmonics), echolocation (broadband clicks) and burst pulsed sounds (packets of closely spaced broadband clicks). Dolphin sound analysis has focused on frequency-modulated whistles, yet the most commonly used signals are burst-pulsed sounds which, due to their graded and overlapping nature and bimodal inter-click interval (ICI) rates are hard to categorize. We will look at: 1) the mechanism of sound production and categories of sound types, 2) sound analysis techniques and information content, and 3) examples of lessons learned in the study of dolphin acoustics. The goal of this paper is to provide perspective on how animal communication studies might provide insight to both passive and active SETI in the larger context of searching for life signatures.

  2. Gravity drainage of activated sludge: new experimental method and considerations of settling velocity, specific cake resistance and cake compressibility.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Dominik; Christensen, Morten; Keiding, Kristian; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2011-02-01

    A laboratory scale setup was used for characterization of gravitational drainage of waste activated sludge. The aim of the study was to assess how time of drainage and cake dry matter depended on volumetric load, SS content and sludge floc properties. It was demonstrated that activated sludge forms compressible cakes, even at the low pressures found in gravitational drainage. The values of specific cake resistance were two to three orders of magnitude lower than those obtained in pressure filtration. Despite the compressible nature of sludge, key macroscopic parameters such as time of drainage and cake solid content showed simple functional dependency of the volumetric load and SS of a given sludge. This suggests that the proposed method may be applied for design purposes without the use of extensive numerical modeling. The possibilities for application of this new technique are, among others, the estimation of sludge drainability prior to mechanical dewatering on a belt filter, or the application of surplus sludge on reed beds, as well as adjustments of sludge loading, concentration or sludge pre-treatment in order to optimize the drainage process.

  3. Interplay between stochasticity and negative feedback leads to pulsed dynamics and distinct gene activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Samuel; Bianchi, Marco E.; Agresti, Alessandra; Molina, Nacho

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression is an inherently stochastic process that depends on the structure of the biochemical regulatory network in which the gene is embedded. Here we study the dynamical consequences of the interplay between stochastic gene switching and the widespread negative feedback regulatory loop in a simple model of a biochemical regulatory network. Using a simplified hybrid simulation approach, in which only the gene activation is modeled stochastically, we find that stochasticity in gene switching by itself can induce pulses in the system, providing also analytical insights into their origin. Furthermore, we find that this simple network is able to reproduce both exponential and peaked distributions of gene active and inactive times similar to those that have been observed experimentally. This simplified hybrid simulation approach also allows us to link these patterns to the dynamics of the system for each gene state.

  4. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in active rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, I A; Baylis, E M; Shipley, M E

    1982-07-31

    To confirm the findings of uncontrolled trials that methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) is a safe treatment for active rheumatoid disease, a double-blind trial was conducted in which 20 patients with active rheumatoid disease were randomly allocated to receive an infusion of either 1 g methylprednisolone or placebo. Methylprednisolone produced significant improvement in all clinical variables measured, a benefit which was sustained for at least 6 weeks. The placebo produced only transient improvement in some of the clinical variables measured. when the 10 placebo groups patients were later given an infusion of 1 g methylprednisolone, they too showed significant clinical benefit. The methylprednisolone also gave rise to improvements in some haematological and biochemical variables. PMID:6124671

  5. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.

  6. A possible relation between pulses of platform activation and plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Georg Robert

    1987-11-01

    The idea of the cyclic evolution of platforms may have an explanation related to plate kinematics as a function of two main parameters: the spreading rate and rotation pole switches. These kinematic parameters as defined by other authors studying the South Atlantic appear to bear a coherent relationship with pulses of platform activation in South America and Africa. In Gondwana's history, after its break-up at least four major peaks of volcano-tectonic activity on the continents seem to be related to important changes in position of the rotation poles and the spreading rates of the South American and African plates. Mantle convection patterns such as those suggested by McKenzie on the Pacific floor can be seen as feasible mechanisms for explaining the origin and shape of large syneclises and archings.

  7. Pulse Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands On!, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity using computer software to investigate the role of the heart and blood, how the blood system responds to exercise, and how pulse rate is a good measure of physical condition. (ASK)

  8. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  9. CQ-4: a 4 MA, 500ns Compact Pulsed Power Generator Dedicated to Magnetically Driven Quasi-isentropic Compression Experiments (ICE) and Hypervelocity Flyer Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Kuai, Bin; Mo, Jianjun; Wu, Gang

    2011-06-01

    Compact pulsed power generators have been widely used to produce high magnetic pressure to study dynamic behaviors of materials and do some hypervelocity impact experiments. After the compact pulsed power generator CQ-1.5 developed by us, a larger current and shorter rise time compact pulsed power generator CQ-4 has been designed and being constructed. The generator CQ-4 is composed of 20 energy-storage modules in parallel, of which is constituted by a 1.6 μF, 100 kV capacitor and a coaxial field-distortion spark gas switch with inductance of 25 nH. The energy is transmitted by the aluminum strip transmission lines insulated by 16 layers of Mylar films, of which is 0.1 mm in thickness. Before the short-circuit load, 72 peaking capacitors in parallel with the energy-storage capacitors are used to shape the discharging current waveforms in load. Each peaking capacitor is with rated capacitance of 0.1 μF and rated voltage of 120 kV. When the capacitor is charged to 70-80 kV, the peak current can reach 4-5MA, and the rise time is 400-500 ns (0-100%). The expected magnetic pressure can be up to 100GPa on the metallic loads and a hypervelocity of 12-15 km/s can be reached for the aluminum flyer plates with size of 10 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm in thickness.

  10. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  11. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  12. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  13. Modeling of coherent beam combining from multimillijoule chirped pulse tapered fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Kim, A. V.; Anashkina, E. A.; Meyerov, I. B.; Lebedev, S. A.; Sergeev, A. M.; Koenig, K.; Mourou, G.

    2015-10-01

    The amplification of high energy chirped pulses in Large Mode Area tapered fiber amplifiers and their coherent combining have been investigated numerically. We have developed a three-dimensional model of strongly chirped nanosecond pulse amplification and compression back to femtosecond duration fully taking into account transverse and longitudinal variations of refractive index profile and distribution of active ions in the fiber, wavelength dependence of emission and absorption cross sections, gain saturation and Kerr nonlinearity. Modeling of Yb-doped fiber amplifier shows that up to 3 mJ of output energy can be extracted in 1 ns pulse with single-mode beam quality. Finally, we have investigated numerically the capabilities of compression and coherent combining of up to 36 perturbed amplifying channels in which high-order modes were excited and have obtained more than 70% combining efficiency and 380 fs compressed pulse duration.

  14. Nerve compression activates selective nociceptive pathways and upregulates peripheral sodium channel expression in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Laura Rummler; Palispis, Winnie Anne; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are common musculoskeletal conditions that affect patients with debilitating loss of sensory function and pain. Although early detection and treatment are important, our understanding of pain-related molecular mechanisms remains largely unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using an animal model for CNC injury. To confirm that CNC injury induces pain, we assessed expression of c-fos, a gene that is rapidly expressed in spinal sensory afferents in response to painful peripheral stimuli, and TNF-alpha and IL-6, two proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial to development of inflammatory-mediated pain. Results show c-fos upregulation 1-2 weeks postinjury in the absence of TNF-alpha or IL-6 expression, indicating increased neural sensitivity without an inflammatory response. This is consistent with previous studies that showed no morphologic evidence of inflammation in the CNC model. Surprisingly, we also found de novo expression of Na(V)1.8, a sodium channel linked to the development of neuropathic pain, in endoneurial Schwann cells following injury. Until now, Na(V)1.8 expression was thought to be restricted to sensory neurons. CNC injury appears to be a unique model of noninflammatory neuropathic pain. Further investigation of the underlying molecular basis could yield promising targets for early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Influence of pulsed mechanical activation of hematite-graphite-aluminum powder mixtures on the reduction of iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, L. E.; Vatolin, N. A.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Petrova, S. A.; Popova, E. A.; Zakharov, R. G.

    2011-11-01

    To decrease the temperature of direct iron reduction by carbon and aluminum, short-term pulsed mechanical activation (PMA) of an Fe2O3 + Cgr + Al powder mixture is perfumed during sound-frequency shock loading by a flat activating plunger. The PMA efficiency for powders in comparable with mechanical activation in high-energy ball mills in a decrease in the activation time and retaining the chemical purity of a powder composition.

  16. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  17. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  18. generation of picosecond pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported of investigations aimed at generating nanosecond radiation pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media having broad gain lines. Passive mode locking is accomplished for the first time in a BeLa:Nd/sup 3/ laser at a wavelength 1.354 microm, and in a YAG:Nd/sup 3/ laser on a 1.32-microm transition. The free lasing and mode-locking regimes were investigated in an alexandrite (BeA1/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3/) laser in the 0.72-0.78-microm range and in a synchronously pumped laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers in LiF in the 1.12-1.24-microm region. The features of nonlinear perception of IR radiation by the eye, using a developed picosecond laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers, are investigated for the first time.

  19. A theoretical model of linearly filtered reverberation for pulsed active sonar in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Murray, John J

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a statistical model useful for characterizing pulsed active sonar reverberation in shallow water. The model is based on the fundamental assumption that reverberation consists of echoes from point scatterers having random positions, strengths, and Doppler dilations. Receive array beam patterns, simple propagation losses, and planar bistatic geometry are included. The probability distribution of uniformly dense scatterers as a function of echo delay and bearing is explicitly related to the change in the area from which scatterer echoes contribute to the reverberation, and is presented in closed form. The cross Q-function of the transmitted waveform and the linear filter applied to the received signal arises naturally from the development. This function, along with environmental spreading, determines the shape of the reverberation along the Doppler axis. The assumptions and simplifications under which the reverberation decouples into independent spatial (delay and bearing) and Doppler terms are presented.

  20. 3D pulsed laser-triggered high-speed microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Yu-Chun; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-11-12

    We report a 3D microfluidic pulsed laser-triggered fluorescence-activated cell sorter capable of sorting at a throughput of 23 000 cells per s with 90% purity in high-purity mode and at a throughput of 45 000 cells per s with 45% purity in enrichment mode in one stage and in a single channel. This performance is realized by exciting laser-induced cavitation bubbles in a 3D PDMS microfluidic channel to generate high-speed liquid jets that deflect detected fluorescent cells and particles focused by 3D sheath flows. The ultrafast switching mechanism (20 μs complete on-off cycle), small liquid jet perturbation volume, and three-dimensional sheath flow focusing for accurate timing control of fast (1.5 m s(-1)) passing cells and particles are three critical factors enabling high-purity sorting at high-throughput in this sorter. PMID:23844418

  1. Activation of autophagy in response to nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Jody C; Tarango, Melissa; Roth, Caleb C; Ibey, Bennett L

    2015-03-01

    Previous work demonstrated significant changes in cellular membranes following exposure of cells to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), including nanoporation and increases in intracellular calcium concentration. While it is known that nsPEF exposure can cause cell death, how cells repair and survive nsPEF-induced cellular damage is not well understood. In this paper, we investigated whether autophagy is stimulated following nsPEF exposure to repair damaged membranes, proteins, and/or organelles in a pro-survival response. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated to repair nsPEF-induced plasma membrane damage and overwhelming this compensatory mechanism results in cell death. Activation of autophagy and subsequent cell death pathways were assessed measuring toxicity, gene and protein expression of autophagy markers, and by monitoring autophagosome formation and maturation using fluorescent microscopy. Results show that autophagy is activated at subtoxic nsPEF doses, as a compensatory mechanism to repair membrane damage. However, prolonged exposure results in increased cell death and a concomitant decrease in autophagic markers. These results suggest that cells take an active role in membrane repair, through autophagy, following exposure to nsPEF. PMID:25660455

  2. Observation of power gain in an inductive pulsed power system with an optically activated semiconductor closing and opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Chun C.; Funk, Eric E.; Chauchard, Eve A.; Rhee, M. J.; Lee, Chi H.; Yan, Li

    1991-03-01

    Peak power gain greater than 15 was obtained with a current charged transmission line and an optically activated semiconductor opening switch. The optical pulse used for activating the switch is generated by a Nd:glass laser emitting at 1. 054 pm. It has a slow rise-time (''--''2OO uS) and a fast fall-time (s1O uS). In the experiment a 2 kV output voltage pulse was achieved with a 5 mm cube GaAs p-i-n diode sitch at 500 V charging voltage.

  3. A comparative study of the bactericidal activity and daily disinfection housekeeping surfaces by a new portable pulsed UV radiation device.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Kazuo; Asai, Satomi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Miyachi, Hayato

    2012-06-01

    Daily cleaning and disinfecting of non-critical surfaces in the patient-care areas are known to reduce the occurrence of health care-associated infections. However, the conventional means for decontamination of housekeeping surfaces of sites of frequent hand contact such as manual disinfection using ethanol wipes are laborious and time-consuming in daily practice. This study evaluated a newly developed portable pulsed ultraviolet (UV) radiation device for its bactericidal activity in comparison with continuous UV-C, and investigated its effect on the labor burden when implemented in a hospital ward. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin-resistant A. baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Bacillus cereus were irradiated with pulsed UV or continuous UV-C. Pulsed UV and continuous UV-C required 5 and 30 s of irradiation, respectively, to attain bactericidal activity with more than 2Log growth inhibition of all the species. The use of pulsed UV in daily disinfection of housekeeping surfaces reduced the working hours by half in comparison to manual disinfection using ethanol wipes. The new portable pulsed UV radiation device was proven to have a bactericidal activity against critical nosocomial bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria after short irradiation, and was thus found to be practical as a method for disinfecting housekeeping surfaces and decreasing the labor burden.

  4. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  5. Resuscitation of the rare biosphere contributes to pulses of ecosystem activity.

    PubMed

    Aanderud, Zachary T; Jones, Stuart E; Fierer, Noah; Lennon, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy is a life history trait that may have important implications for linking microbial communities to the functioning of natural and managed ecosystems. Rapid changes in environmental cues may resuscitate dormant bacteria and create pulses of ecosystem activity. In this study, we used heavy-water (H(18) 2O) stable isotope probing (SIP) to identify fast-growing bacteria that were associated with pulses of trace gasses (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from different ecosystems [agricultural site, grassland, deciduous forest, and coniferous forest (CF)] following a soil-rewetting event. Irrespective of ecosystem type, a large fraction (69-74%) of the bacteria that responded to rewetting were below detection limits in the dry soils. Based on the recovery of sequences, in just a few days, hundreds of rare taxa increased in abundance and in some cases became dominant members of the rewetted communities, especially bacteria belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae, and Oxalobacteraceae. Resuscitation led to dynamic shifts in the rank abundance of taxa that caused previously rare bacteria to comprise nearly 60% of the sequences that were recovered in rewetted communities. This rapid turnover of the bacterial community corresponded with a 5-20-fold increase in the net production of CO2 and up to a 150% reduction in the net production of CH4 from rewetted soils. Results from our study demonstrate that the rare biosphere may account for a large and dynamic fraction of a community that is important for the maintenance of bacterial biodiversity. Moreover, our findings suggest that the resuscitation of rare taxa from seed banks contribute to ecosystem functioning.

  6. Resuscitation of the rare biosphere contributes to pulses of ecosystem activity

    PubMed Central

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Jones, Stuart E.; Fierer, Noah; Lennon, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy is a life history trait that may have important implications for linking microbial communities to the functioning of natural and managed ecosystems. Rapid changes in environmental cues may resuscitate dormant bacteria and create pulses of ecosystem activity. In this study, we used heavy-water (H182O) stable isotope probing (SIP) to identify fast-growing bacteria that were associated with pulses of trace gasses (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from different ecosystems [agricultural site, grassland, deciduous forest, and coniferous forest (CF)] following a soil-rewetting event. Irrespective of ecosystem type, a large fraction (69–74%) of the bacteria that responded to rewetting were below detection limits in the dry soils. Based on the recovery of sequences, in just a few days, hundreds of rare taxa increased in abundance and in some cases became dominant members of the rewetted communities, especially bacteria belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae, and Oxalobacteraceae. Resuscitation led to dynamic shifts in the rank abundance of taxa that caused previously rare bacteria to comprise nearly 60% of the sequences that were recovered in rewetted communities. This rapid turnover of the bacterial community corresponded with a 5–20-fold increase in the net production of CO2 and up to a 150% reduction in the net production of CH4 from rewetted soils. Results from our study demonstrate that the rare biosphere may account for a large and dynamic fraction of a community that is important for the maintenance of bacterial biodiversity. Moreover, our findings suggest that the resuscitation of rare taxa from seed banks contribute to ecosystem functioning. PMID:25688238

  7. A Kinematically Beamed, Low Energy Pulsed Neutron Source for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W; Hamm, R

    2004-10-07

    We are developing a new active interrogation system based on a kinematically focused low energy neutron beam. The key idea is that one of the defining characteristics of SNM (Special Nuclear Materials) is the ability for low energy or thermal neutrons to induce fission. Thus by using low energy neutrons for the interrogation source we can accomplish three goals, (1) Energy discrimination allows us to measure the prompt fast fission neutrons produced while the interrogation beam is on; (2) Neutrons with an energy of approximately 60 to 100 keV do not fission 238U and Thorium, but penetrate bulk material nearly as far as high energy neutrons do and (3) below about 100keV neutrons lose their energy by kinematical collisions rather than via the nuclear (n,2n) or (n,n') processes thus further simplifying the prompt neutron induced background. 60 keV neutrons create a low radiation dose and readily thermal capture in normal materials, thus providing a clean spectroscopic signature of the intervening materials. The kinematically beamed source also eliminates the need for heavy backward and sideway neutron shielding. We have designed and built a very compact pulsed neutron source, based on an RFQ proton accelerator and a lithium target. We are developing fast neutron detectors that are nearly insensitive to the ever-present thermal neutron and neutron capture induced gamma ray background. The detection of only a few high energy fission neutrons in time correlation with the linac pulse will be a clear indication of the presence of SNM.

  8. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  9. Influence of lasing parameters on the cleaning efficacy of laser-activated irrigation with pulsed erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Havelaerts, Sophie; De Moor, Roeland J

    2016-05-01

    Laser-activated irrigation (LAI) using erbium lasers is an irrigant agitation technique with great potential for improved cleaning of the root canal system, as shown in many in vitro studies. However, lasing parameters for LAI vary considerably and their influence remains unclear. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the influence of pulse energy, pulse frequency, pulse length, irradiation time and fibre tip shape, position and diameter on the cleaning efficacy of LAI. Transparent resin blocks containing standardized root canals (apical diameter of 0.4 mm, 6% taper, 15 mm long, with a coronal reservoir) were used as the test model. A standardized groove in the apical part of each canal wall was packed with stained dentin debris. The canals were filled with irrigant, which was activated by an erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2940 nm, AT Fidelis, Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia). In each experiment, one laser parameter was varied, while the others remained constant. In this way, the influence of pulse energy (10-40 mJ), pulse length (50-1000 μs), frequency (5-30 Hz), irradiation time (5-40 s) and fibre tip shape (flat or conical), position (pulp chamber, canal entrance, next to groove) and diameter (300-600 μm) was determined by treating 20 canals per parameter. The amount of debris remaining in the groove after each LAI procedure was scored and compared among the different treatments. The parameters significantly (P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis) affecting debris removal from the groove were fibre tip position, pulse length, pulse energy, irradiation time and frequency. Fibre tip shape and diameter had no significant influence on the cleaning efficacy.

  10. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power. PMID:26507308

  11. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  12. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application. PMID:26705066

  13. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application.

  14. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  15. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. PKC activators enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and paired-pulse facilitation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Liu, Q-Y; Alkon, D L

    2014-05-30

    Bryostatin-1, a potent agonist of protein kinase C (PKC), has recently been found to enhance spatial learning and long-term memory in rats, mice, rabbits and the nudibranch Hermissenda, and to exert profound neuroprotective effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD) in transgenic mice. However, details of the mechanistic effects of bryostatin on learning and memory remain unclear. To address this issue, whole-cell recording, a dual-recording approach and extracellular recording techniques were performed on young (2-4months) Brown-Norway rats. We found that bath-applied bryostatin-1 significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). The firing rate of GABAergic interneurons significantly was also increased as recorded with a loosely-attached extracellular recording configuration. Simultaneous recordings from communicating cell pairs of interneuron and pyramidal neuron revealed unique activity-dependent properties of GABAergic synapses. Furthermore, the bryostatin-induced increase of the frequency and amplitude of IPSCs was blocked by methionine enkephalin which selectively suppressed the excitability of interneurons. Pretreatment with RO-32-0432, a relatively specific PKCα antagonist, blocked the effect of bryostatin on sIPSCs. Finally, bryostatin increased paired-pulse ratio of GABAergic synapses that lasted for at least 20min while pretreatment with RO-32-0432 significantly reduced the ratio. In addition, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a selective PKCε activator, also increased the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that bryostatin enhances GABAergic neurotransmission in pyramidal neurons by activating the PKCα & ε-dependent pathway and by a presynaptic mechanism with excitation of GABAergic interneurons. These effects of bryostatin on GABAergic transmissions and modifiability may contribute to the improvement of learning and memory

  17. RACC Code System for Computing Radioactivity-Related Parameters for Fusion Reactor Systems Modified for Pulsed/Intermittent Activation Analysis.

    1996-04-30

    Version 00 CCC-388/RACC was specifically developed to compute the radioactivity and radioactivity-related parameters (e.g., afterheat, biological hazard potential, etc.) due to neutron activation within Inertial Fusion Energy and Magnetic Fusion Energy reactor systems. It can also be utilized to compute the radioactivity in fission, accelerator or any other neutron generating and neutron source system. This new version designated RACC-PULSE is based on CCC-388 and has the capability to model irradiation histories of varying flux levelsmore » having varying pulse widths (on times) and dwell periods (off times) and varying maintenance periods. This provides the user with the flexibility of modeling most any complexity of irradiation history beginning with simple steady state operating systems to complex multi-flux level pulse/intermittent operating systems.« less

  18. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-02

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes.

  19. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates tooth movement via activation of the BMP-2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Ziping; Bai, Xiufeng; Li, Gang; Zhang, Caidi; He, Sanhu; Li, Weihong; Lajud, Shayanne A; Duan, Yinzhong; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) induced alveolar bone remodeling and the role of BMP-2 expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model. Orthodontic appliances were placed between the homonymy upper first molars and the upper central incisors in rats under general anesthesia, followed by daily 20-min LIPUS or sham LIPUS treatment beginning at day 0. Tooth movement distances and molecular changes were evaluated at each observation point. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to detect HGF (Hepatocyte growth factor)/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathways and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) expression by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry. At day 3, LIPUS had no effect on the rat orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2-induced alveolar bone remodeling. However, beginning at day 5 and for the following time points, LIPUS significantly increased orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression compared with the control group. The qRT-PCR and Western blot data in vitro and in vivo to study BMP-2 expression were consistent with the immunohistochemistry observations. The present study demonstrates that LIPUS promotes alveolar bone remodeling by stimulating the HGF/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model, and LIPUS increased BMP-2 expression via Runx2 regulation.

  20. Characteristics and Antitumor Activity of Morchella esculenta Polysaccharide Extracted by Pulsed Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Sun, Yonghai; Mao, Qian; Guo, Xiaolei; Li, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Na

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides from Morchella esculenta have been proven to be functional and helpful for humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical structure and anti-proliferating and antitumor activities of a Morchella esculenta polysaccharide (MEP) extracted by pulsed electric field (PEF) in submerged fermentation. The endo-polysaccharide was separated and purified by column chromatography and Gel permeation chromatography, and analyzed by gas chromatography. The MEP with an average molecular weight of 81,835 Da consisted of xylose, glucose, mannose, rhamnose and galactose at the ratio of 5.4:5.0:6.5:7.8:72.3. Structure of MEP was further analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and 1H and 13C liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Apoptosis tests proved that MEP could inhibit the proliferation and growth of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner within 48 h. This study provides more information on chemical structure of anti-proliferating polysaccharides isolated from Morchella esculenta. PMID:27338370

  1. Pulsed electromagnetic fields on postmenopausal osteoporosis in Southwest China: a randomized, active-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Fang; Yang, Lin; He, Hong-Chen; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Chao; He, Cheng-Qi

    2013-05-01

    A randomized, active-controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) in southwest China. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to receive alendronate or one course of PEMFs treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean percentage change in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDL), and secondary endpoints were the mean percentage changes in left proximal femur bone mineral density (BMDF), serum 25OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D) concentrations, total lower-extremity manual muscle test (LE MMT) score, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score. The BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score and BBS score were recorded at baseline, 5, 12, and 24 weeks. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured at baseline and 5 weeks. Using a mixed linear model, there was no significant treatment difference between the two groups in the BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score, and BBS score (P ≥ 0.05). For 25(OH)D concentrations, the effects were also comparable between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05) with the Mann-Whitney's U-test. These results suggested that a course of PEMFs treatment with specific parameters was as effective as alendronate in treating PMO within 24 weeks.

  2. Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy of 33S-Labeled Molybdenum Cofactor in Catalytically Active Bioengineered Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eric L.; Belaidi, Abdel Ali; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Davis, Amanda C.; Krämer, Tobias; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Neese, Frank; Schwarz, Günter; Enemark, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum enzymes contain at least one pyranopterin dithiolate (molybdopterin, MPT) moiety that coordinates Mo through two dithiolate (dithiolene) sulfur atoms. For sulfite oxidase (SO), hyperfine interactions (hfi) and nuclear quadrupole interactions (nqi) of magnetic nuclei (I ≠ 0) near the Mo(V) (d1) center have been measured using high-resolution pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods and interpreted with the help of the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. These have provided important insights about the active site structure and the reaction mechanism of the enzyme. However, it has not been possible to use EPR to probe the dithiolene sulfurs directly since naturally abundant 32S has no nuclear spin (I = 0). Here we describe direct incorporation of 33S (I = 3/2), the only stable magnetic sulfur isotope, into MPT using controlled in vitro synthesis with purified proteins. The electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra from 33S-labeled MPT in this catalytically active SO variant are dominated by the ‘inter-doublet’ transition arising from the strong nuclear quadrupole interaction, as also occurs for the 33S-labeled exchangeable equatorial sulfite ligand [Klein, E. L., et al., Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 1408 – 1418]. The estimated experimental hfi and nqi parameters for 33S (aiso = 3 MHz and e2Qq/h = 25 MHz) are in good agreement with those predicted by DFT. In addition, the DFT calculations show that the two 33S atoms are indistinguishable by EPR and reveal a strong intermixing between their out-of-plane pz orbitals and the dxy orbital of Mo(V). PMID:24387640

  3. Short wavelengths active bichromatic pulsed pyrometer for solids and liquids designed for measurements in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navello, L.; Lebedinsky, J.; Offret, J. P.; Serio, B.; Davin, T.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Optical passive methods for temperature measurements such as thermography or optical pyrometry are very interesting because they allow a non-intrusive measurement when the emissivity is known. The knowledge of this coefficient is critical for determining the actual temperature of a surface from the thermal radiation emitted in a wavelength band. The bichromatic pulsed pyrometer allows to overcome the knowledge of this parameter provided that precautions are taken in the choice of the values of wavelengths. When the object to be measured is placed in harsh environments, such passive optical methods are greatly disturbed by the presence of an optically absorbing medium. They are also distorted when the measured objects are located in very hot environments emitting intense disturbing radiation. In this study, we present an active bichromatic radiometric method for measuring the temperature of a surface in harsh environments. The method is based on a localized excitation by a modulated laser source in the infrared range. Detecting the temperature modulation, which is correlated with the excitation, is performed using a lock-in amplifier able to extract the signal embedded in a noise up to a million times superior. Working at short wavelengths (visible range and near infrared range) offers a large dynamic range and minimizes the error due to variations in emissivity with the wavelength. This system collects the radiation emitted by the object at a distance from a few meters up to dozens of meters depending on the configuration of the optical system. Both the principle and the design of the active bichromatic optical surface thermometer are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the method, results obtained on a molten ceramic stream are presented.

  4. Why are Jupiter-family comets active and asteroids in cometary-like orbits inactive?. How hydrostatic compression leads to inactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Surveys in the visible and near-infrared spectral range have revealed the presence of low-albedo asteroids in cometary-like orbits (ACOs). In contrast to Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), ACOs are inactive, but possess similar orbital parameters. Aims: In this work, we discuss why ACOs are inactive, whereas JFCs show gas-driven dust activity, although both belong to the same class of primitive solar system bodies. Methods: We hypothesize that ACOs and JFCs have formed under the same physical conditions, namely by the gravitational collapse of ensembles of ice and dust aggregates. We use the memory effect of dust-aggregate layers under gravitational compression to discuss under which conditions the gas-driven dust activity of these bodies is possible. Results: Owing to their smaller sizes, JFCs can sustain gas-driven dust activity much longer than the bigger ACOs, whose sub-surface regions possess an increased tensile strength, due to gravitational compression of the material. The increased tensile strength leads to the passivation against dust activity after a relatively short time of activity. Conclusions: The gravitational-collapse model of the formation of planetesimals, together with the gravitational compression of the sub-surface material simultaneously, explains the inactivity of ACOs and the gas-driven dust activity of JFCs. Their initially larger sizes means that ACOs possess a higher tensile strength of their sub-surface material, which leads to a faster termination of gas-driven dust activity. Most objects with radii larger than 2 km have already lost their activity due to former gravitational compression of their current surface material.

  5. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses to selectively block the activation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles during vagal nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, M.; Yoshida, K.; Toft, E.; Struijk, J. J.

    2007-09-01

    The stimulation of the vagus nerve has been used as an anti-epileptic treatment for over a decade, and its use for depression and chronic heart failure is currently under investigation. Co-activation of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles may limit the clinical use of vagal stimulation, especially in the case of prolonged activation. To prevent this, the use of a selective stimulation paradigm has been tested in seven acute pig experiments. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses successfully blocked the population of the largest and fastest vagal myelinated fibers being responsible for the co-activation. The first response in the vagus compound action potential was reduced by 75 ± 22% (mean ± SD) and the co-activated muscle action potential by 67 ± 25%. The vagal bradycardic effects remained unchanged during the selective block, confirming the leading role of thin nerve fibers for the vagal control of the heart. Quasi-trapezoidal pulses may be an alternative to rectangular pulses in clinical vagal stimulation when the co-activation of laryngeal muscles must be avoided.

  6. Recurrent winter warming pulses enhance nitrogen cycling and soil biotic activity in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerings, J.; Jentsch, A.; Hammerl, V.; Lenz, K.; Henry, H. A. L.; Malyshev, A. V.; Kreyling, J.

    2014-06-01

    Winter air temperatures are projected to increase in the temperate zone, whereas snow cover is projected to decrease, leading to more extreme soil temperature variability, and potentially to changes in nutrient cycling. Therefore, we applied six winter warming pulses by infra-red heating lamps and surface heating wires in a field experiment over one winter in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms. The experiment was replicated at two sites, a colder mountainous upland site with high snow accumulation and a warmer and dryer lowland site. Winter warming pulses enhanced soil biotic activity for both sites during winter, as indicated by 35% higher nitrogen (N) availability in the soil solution, 40% higher belowground decomposition and a 25% increase in the activity of the enzyme cellobiohydrolase. The mobilization of N differed between sites, and the incorporation of 15N into leaves was reduced by 31% in response to winter warming pulses, but only at the cold site, with significant reductions occurring for three of four tested plant species at this site. Furthermore, there was a trend of increased N leaching in response to the recurrent winter warming pulses. Overall, projected winter climate change in the temperate zone, with less snow and more variable soil temperatures, appears important for shifts in ecosystem functioning (i.e. nutrient cycling). While the effects of warming pulses on plant N mobilization did not differ among sites, reduced plant 15N incorporation at the colder temperate site suggests that frost damage may reduce plant performance in a warmer world, with important implications for nitrogen cycling and nitrogen losses from ecosystems.

  7. Enzymatic Activity Measurement at High Temperature by Pulse Heating of Micro Reactor with On-Chip Micro Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, Hideyuki; Noji, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    The activity of an enzyme, captured in a micro chamber array, at elevated temperature has been successfully measured thanks to the rapid temperature control enabled by an on-chip micro heater. The enzyme, β-Galactosidase, survived short exposure (4 seconds) to high temperature at which it was severely damaged by longer exposure. Its activity at the higher temperature (around 60°C) was shown to be 4.2 times greater than that at 23°C. Furthermore, the degree of accelerated activity is expected to be controlled by changing the frequency of the heat pulses.

  8. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  9. The action of microsecond-pulsed plasma-activated media on the inactivation of human lung cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Jeon, Su Nam; Park, Bong Sang; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we have generated reactive species (RS) through microsecond-pulsed plasma (MPP) in the cell culture media using a Marx generator with point-point electrodes of approximately 0.06 J discharge energy/pulse. RS generated in culture media through MPP have a selective action between growth of the H460 lung cancer cells and L132 normal lung cells. We observed that MPP-activated media (MPP-AM) induced apoptosis on H460 lung cancer cells through an oxidative DNA damage cascade. Additionally, we studied the apoptosis-related mRNA expression, DNA oxidation and polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleaved analysis from treated cancer cells. The result proves that radicals generated through MPP play a pivotal role in the activation of media that induces the selective killing effect.

  10. Wearable sensor glove based on conducting fabric using electrodermal activity and pulse-wave sensors for e-health application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbum; Lee, Byungwoo; Lee, Myoungho

    2010-03-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of health in medicine, both at home and the hospital, calls for improved sensors that might be included in a common carrier such as a wearable sensor device to measure various biosignals and provide healthcare services that use e-health technology. Designed to be user-friendly, smart clothes and gloves respond well to the end users for health monitoring. This study describes a wearable sensor glove that is equipped with an electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor, pulse-wave sensor, conducting fabric, and an embedded system. The EDA sensor utilizes the relationship between drowsiness and the EDA signal. The EDA sensors were made using a conducting fabric instead of silver chloride electrodes, as a more practical and practically wearable device. The pulse-wave sensor measurement system, which is widely applied in oriental medicinal practices, is also a strong element in e-health monitoring systems. The EDA and pulse-wave signal acquisition module was constructed by connecting the sensor to the glove via a conductive fabric. The signal acquisition module is then connected to a personal computer that displays the results of the EDA and pulse-wave signal processing analysis and gives accurate feedback to the user. This system is designed for a number of applications for the e-health services, including drowsiness detection and oriental medicine.

  11. Effect of Paired-Pulse Electrical Stimulation on the Activity of Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kei; Onishi, Hideaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the transient effect of short-duration paired-pulse electrical stimulation (ppES) on corticospinal excitability and the after-effect of long-duration ppES on excitability, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), and afferent facilitation (AF). Methods: A total of 28 healthy subjects participated in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles before and immediately after short-duration ppES (5 s) at various inter-pulse intervals (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 30 ms). In Experiment 2, MEPs, SAI, and AF were measured before, immediately, and 20 and 40 min after long-duration ppES (20 min, inter-pulse interval of 5 and 15 ms) and peripheral electrical stimulation (20 min, 10 and 20 Hz). Results: Short-duration ppES with inter-pulse intervals of 5 and 20 ms significantly increased MEP measured in APB but not in ADM. Long-duration ppES with an inter-pulse interval of 5 ms significantly decreased SAI but not MEPs in APB. In contrast, long-duration ppES did not affect ADM. Conclusion: The afferent inputs induced by ppES-5 ms were effective for transiently increasing MEP and sustaining SAI reduction. PMID:26733847

  12. An overview of DREV's activities on pulsed CO2 laser transmitters: Frequency stability and lifetime aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruickshank, James; Pace, Paul; Mathieu, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    After introducing the desired features in a transmitter for laser radar applications, the output characteristics of several configurations of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers are reviewed. Based on work carried out at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV), output pulses are examined from short cavity lasers, CW-TEA hybrid lasers, and amplifiers for low power pulses. It is concluded that the technique of injecting a low-power laser beam into a TEA laser resonator with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors should be investigated because it appears well adapted to producing high energy, single mode, low chirp pulses. Finally, a brief report on tests carried out on catalysts composed of stannic oxide and noble metals demonstrates the potential of these catalysts, operating at close to room temperature, to provide complete closed-cycle laser operation.

  13. Pulsed Radio Emission from PSR J1119-6127 re-activated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Kerr, M.; Esposito, P.; Rea, N.; Zelati, F. Coti; Israel, G. L.; Johnston, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prompted by the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission from the known pulsar PSR J1119-6127 (Burgay et al., Atel #9286; Majid et al. Atel #9321), we have undertaken a program at the Parkes radio telescope to investigate any further evolution of the radio emission from the neutron star.

  14. Applying the Active Heating Pulse DFOT Method to Drip Irrigation. Characterization of a wetting bulb in drip emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez-Buelga, J.; Rodriguez-Sinobas, L.; María Gil-Rodríguez, M.; Sayde, C.; Selker, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature Measurement (DFOT) method for estimating temperature variation along a cable of fiber optic has been largely reported in multiple environmental applications. Recently , its usage has been combined with an active heating pulses technique- measurement of the temperature increase when a certain amount of tension is applied to the stainless jacket surrounding the fiber optic cable-in order to estimate soil water content in field and laboratory conditions with great accuracy . Thus, a methodology potentially capable of monitoring spatial variability and accurately estimates soil water content is created. This study presents a direct application of the Active Heated DFOT method for measuring soil water distribution and wetting bulb of a single drip emitter. In order to do so, three concentric helixes of fiber optics were placed in a hexagonal column of Plexiglas of 0.5 m base radius and 0.6 m height. After being filled up with air-dried loamy soil of controlled bulk density, a pressure compensating drip emitter of 2 L/h discharge was placed on top of the soil column. For an irrigation time of 5 hours and 40 min, 21 heating pulses of 2 minutes and 20W/m, were applied. In addition, soil samples after each heat pulse were also collected. Results showed the potential of this method for monitoring soil water behavior during irrigation and also its capability to estimate soil water content with accuracy.

  15. Efficient intracellular delivery of molecules with high cell viability using nanosecond-pulsed laser-activated carbon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aritra; Kelly, Sean C; Dwivedi, Nishant; Thadhani, Naresh; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-03-25

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5-9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability.

  16. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  17. Characterization of the dynamic activities of a population of microbubbles driven by pulsed ultrasound exposures in sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Z.; Chen, D.; Deng, C.X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound driven microbubble activities have been exploited to transiently disrupt the cell membrane (sonoporation) for non-viral intracellular drug delivery and gene transfection both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the dynamic behaviors of a population of microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound exposures and their impact on adherent cells in terms of intracellular delivery and cell viability. By systematically analyzing the bubble activities at time scales relevant to pulsed ultrasound exposures, we identified two quantification parameters that categorized the diverse bubble activities subjected to various ultrasound conditions into three characteristic behaviors, i.e., stable cavitation/aggregation (Type I), growth/coalescence and translation (Type II), and localized inertial cavitation/collapse (Type III). Correlation of the bubble activities with sonoporation outcome suggested that Type III behavior resulted in intracellular delivery, while Type II behavior caused death of a large number of cells. These results provide useful insights for rational selection of ultrasound parameters to optimize outcomes of sonoporation and other applications that exploit the use of ultrasound-driven bubble activities. PMID:24486236

  18. Mechanism of dark decomposition of iodine donor in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, A I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2002-06-30

    A scheme is proposed that describes the dark decomposition of iodide - the donor of iodine - and the relaxation of singlet oxygen in the chlorine-containing active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL). For typical compositions of the active media of pulsed COILs utilising CH{sub 3}I molecules as iodine donors, a branching chain reaction of the CH{sub 3}I decomposition accompanied by the efficient dissipation of singlet oxygen is shown to develop even at the stage of filling the active volume. In the active media with CF{sub 3}I as the donor, a similar chain reaction is retarded due to the decay of CF{sub 3} radicals upon recombination with oxygen. The validity of this mechanism is confirmed by a rather good agreement between the results of calculations and the available experimental data. The chain decomposition of alkyliodides accompanied by an avalanche production of iodine atoms represents a new way of efficient chemical production of iodine for a COIL. (active media)

  19. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  20. Pulse width modulated push-pull driven parallel resonant converter with active free-wheel

    DOEpatents

    Reass, William A.; Schrank, Louis

    2004-06-22

    An apparatus and method for high frequency alternating power generation to control kilowatts of supplied power in microseconds. The present invention includes a means for energy storage, push-pull switching means, control electronics, transformer means, resonant circuitry and means for excess energy recovery, all in electrical communication. A push-pull circuit works synchronously with a force commutated free-wheel transistor to provide current pulses to a transformer. A change in the conduction angle of the push-pull circuit changes the amount of energy coupled into the transformer's secondary oscillating circuit, thereby altering the induced secondary resonating voltage. At the end of each pulse, the force commutated free-wheel transistor causes residual excess energy in the primary circuit to be transmitted back to the storage capacitor for later use.

  1. Effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) on structures and antioxidant activity of soybean source peptides-SHCMN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Songyi; Liang, Rong; Li, Xingfang; Xing, Jie; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-12-15

    Recently, high-intensity pulsed electric field (PEF) has successfully used in improvement of antioxidant activity. Ser-His-Cys-Met-Asn (SHCMN) obtained from soybean protein was chosen to investigate the phenomenon of antioxidant activity improvement. Effects of PEF treatment on antioxidant activity of SHCMN were evaluated by DPPH radical inhibition. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mid-infrared (MIR), circular dichroism (CD) were used to analyze structures of SHCMN. Two-factor-at-a-time results show that DPPH radical inhibition of SHCMN is significantly (P<0.05) increased to 94.35±0.03% at conditions of electric field intensity of 5kV/cm, pulse frequency of 2400Hz, and retention time of 2h. In addition, MIR and NMR spectra show that the basic structure of peptides SHCMN is stable by PEF treatment. But the secondary structures (α-helix, β-turn, and random coil) can be affected and zeta potential of PEF-treated SHCNM was reduced to 0.59±0.03mV. The antioxidant activity improvement of SHCMN might result from the changes of secondary structures and zeta potential. PMID:27451222

  2. Effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) on structures and antioxidant activity of soybean source peptides-SHCMN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Songyi; Liang, Rong; Li, Xingfang; Xing, Jie; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-12-15

    Recently, high-intensity pulsed electric field (PEF) has successfully used in improvement of antioxidant activity. Ser-His-Cys-Met-Asn (SHCMN) obtained from soybean protein was chosen to investigate the phenomenon of antioxidant activity improvement. Effects of PEF treatment on antioxidant activity of SHCMN were evaluated by DPPH radical inhibition. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mid-infrared (MIR), circular dichroism (CD) were used to analyze structures of SHCMN. Two-factor-at-a-time results show that DPPH radical inhibition of SHCMN is significantly (P<0.05) increased to 94.35±0.03% at conditions of electric field intensity of 5kV/cm, pulse frequency of 2400Hz, and retention time of 2h. In addition, MIR and NMR spectra show that the basic structure of peptides SHCMN is stable by PEF treatment. But the secondary structures (α-helix, β-turn, and random coil) can be affected and zeta potential of PEF-treated SHCNM was reduced to 0.59±0.03mV. The antioxidant activity improvement of SHCMN might result from the changes of secondary structures and zeta potential.

  3. Power, pulse width, and repetition rate agile low-cost multi-spectral semi-active laser simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, Jason K.; Young, Preston; Golden, Eric; Barton, Robert; Snyder, Donald

    2010-04-01

    The emergence of spectrally multimode smart missiles requires hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) facilities to simulate multiple spectral signatures simultaneously. While traditional diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) sources provide a great basic testing source for smart missiles, they typically are bulky and provide substantially more power peak power than what is required for laboratory simulation, have fixed pulse widths, and require some external means to attenuate the output power. HWIL facilities require systems capable of high speed variability of the angular divergence and optical intensity over several orders of magnitude, which is not typically provided by basic DPSS systems. In order to meet the needs of HWIL facilities, we present a low-cost semi-active laser (SAL) simulator source using laser diode sources that emits laser light at the critical wavelengths of 1064 nm and 1550 nm, along with light in the visible for alignment, from a single fiber aperture. Fiber delivery of the multi-spectral output can provide several advantages depending on the testing setup. The SAL simulator source presented is capable of providing attenuation of greater than 70 dB with a response time of a few milliseconds and provides a means to change the angular divergence over an entire dynamic range of 0.02- 6º in less than 400 ms. Further, the SAL simulator is pulse width and pulse repetition rate agile making it capable of producing both current and any future coding format necessary.

  4. Compressive sensing of sparse tensors.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Shmuel; Li, Qun; Schonfeld, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has triggered an enormous research activity since its first appearance. CS exploits the signal's sparsity or compressibility in a particular domain and integrates data compression and acquisition, thus allowing exact reconstruction through relatively few nonadaptive linear measurements. While conventional CS theory relies on data representation in the form of vectors, many data types in various applications, such as color imaging, video sequences, and multisensor networks, are intrinsically represented by higher order tensors. Application of CS to higher order data representation is typically performed by conversion of the data to very long vectors that must be measured using very large sampling matrices, thus imposing a huge computational and memory burden. In this paper, we propose generalized tensor compressive sensing (GTCS)-a unified framework for CS of higher order tensors, which preserves the intrinsic structure of tensor data with reduced computational complexity at reconstruction. GTCS offers an efficient means for representation of multidimensional data by providing simultaneous acquisition and compression from all tensor modes. In addition, we propound two reconstruction procedures, a serial method and a parallelizable method. We then compare the performance of the proposed method with Kronecker compressive sensing (KCS) and multiway compressive sensing (MWCS). We demonstrate experimentally that GTCS outperforms KCS and MWCS in terms of both reconstruction accuracy (within a range of compression ratios) and processing speed. The major disadvantage of our methods (and of MWCS as well) is that the compression ratios may be worse than that offered by KCS.

  5. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  6. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2010-03-04

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5–9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50–70 MW and durations of 40–70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1–11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50–63%.

  7. Production of Picosecond, Kilojoule, and Petawatt Laser Pulses via Raman Amplification of Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2011-09-02

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by "activating" the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a restricted

  9. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by "activating" the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a restricted

  10. Desynchronization of epileptiform activity by extracellular current pulses in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, D M; Warman, E N

    1994-01-01

    1. A single cathodic current pulse applied in the somatic CA1 region of the hippocampus was found to induce a large decrease in the amplitude of the population spike. 2. Intracellular recordings showed intense cellular firing suggesting the amplitude decrease could not be attributed to a decrease in neuronal firing. 3. Simultaneous intracellular and extracellular potentials were recorded to analyse the synchronization of neuronal firing in the CA1 region. Action potentials were synchronized with the first population spike but this synchronization decreased with subsequent spikes. Histograms of the phase of the action potentials displayed a normal distribution. 4. Histograms of the phases of the action potentials following the application of the 'singular stimulus' (one producing a singular response) revealed a uniform distribution of the phases suggesting that the neuronal population was desynchronized. 5. This desynchronization effect of the singular stimulus was verified by double intracellular recordings. The simultaneous firing of two neurons could be desynchronized by the application of the singular stimulus. 6. These findings indicate that it is possible to desynchronize a neuronal pool with the application of a single current pulse. In addition, the results show that it is possible for a neuronal population to fire a large number of action potentials with no resulting evoked potentials in the extracellular space. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7869266

  11. Compression of surface myoelectric signals using MP3 encoding.

    PubMed

    Chan, Adrian D C

    2011-01-01

    The potential of MP3 compression of surface myoelectric signals is explored in this paper. MP3 compression is a perceptual-based encoder scheme, used traditionally to compress audio signals. The ubiquity of MP3 compression (e.g., portable consumer electronics and internet applications) makes it an attractive option for remote monitoring and telemedicine applications. The effects of muscle site and contraction type are examined at different MP3 encoding bitrates. Results demonstrate that MP3 compression is sensitive to the myoelectric signal bandwidth, with larger signal distortion associated with myoelectric signals that have higher bandwidths. Compared to other myoelectric signal compression techniques reported previously (embedded zero-tree wavelet compression and adaptive differential pulse code modulation), MP3 compression demonstrates superior performance (i.e., lower percent residual differences for the same compression ratios). PMID:22255464

  12. Effect of coil orientation on strength–duration time constant and I-wave activation with controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Goetz, Stefan M.; Hannah, Ricci; Ciocca, Matteo; Chieffo, Raffaella; Chen, Jui-Cheng A.; Peterchev, Angel V.; Rothwell, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the strength–duration (S–D) time constants of motor cortex structures activated by current pulses oriented posterior–anterior (PA) or anterior–posterior (AP) across the central sulcus. Methods Motor threshold and input–output curve, along with motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies, of first dorsal interosseus were determined at pulse widths of 30, 60, and 120 μs using a controllable pulse parameter (cTMS) device, with the coil oriented PA or AP. These were used to estimate the S–D time constant and we compared with data for responses evoked by cTMS of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Results The S–D time constant with PA was shorter than for AP stimulation (230.9 ± 97.2 vs. 294.2 ± 90.9 μs; p < 0.001). These values were similar to those calculated after stimulation of ulnar nerve (197 ± 47 μs). MEP latencies to AP, but not PA stimulation were affected by pulse width, showing longer latencies following short duration stimuli. Conclusion PA and AP stimuli appear to activate the axons of neurons with different time constants. Short duration AP pulses are more selective than longer pulses in recruiting longer latency corticospinal output. Significance More selective stimulation of neural elements may be achieved by manipulating pulse width and orientation. PMID:26077634

  13. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution

    PubMed Central

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by “activating” the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a

  14. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1984-02-21

    A method is disclosed for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the stock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  15. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David S.; Schmidt, Stephen C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the shock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  16. Using an active temporal compensating system to achieve the super-Gaussian pulses in high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulei; Liu, Rui; Yuan, Hang; Li, Sensen; Liu, Zhaohong; Zhu, Xuehua; He, Weiming; Lv, Zhiwei

    2015-08-01

    In high-power solid-state laser, initiative pulse shaping can help improve the output laser's performance. The evaluation for output laser pulse is also incomplete. In this paper, we propose a method of initiative pulse shaping by using arbitrary waveform generator (AWG), and establish a relatively complete evaluation system for the output pulses shape simultaneously. It achieves the super-Gaussian pulse output with high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio). As a consequence, a square laser pulse with pulse adjustable width ~5ns, rising time 197ps is obtained. The power imbalance of the output square pulse is 3.72%. The similarity between the eight-order super-Gaussian pulse and the one we get from experiment reached 99%.

  17. Dynalets: a new method for modelling and compressing biological signals. Applications to physiological and molecular signals.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, Jacques; Hansen, Olivier; Hamie, Ali; Franco, Céline; Sutton, Brian; Cohen, Elie-Paul

    2014-11-01

    The biological information coming from electrophysiologic sensors like ECG, pulse sensor or from molecular signal devices like NMR spectrometry has to be visualized and manipulated in a compressed way for an efficient medical use by clinicians, if stored in scientific data bases or in personalized patient records repositories. Here, we define a new transform called Dynalet based on Liénard ordinary differential equations susceptible to model the mechanism at the source of the studied signal, and we propose to apply this new technique first to the modelling and compression of real biological periodic signals like ECG and pulse rhythm. We consider that the cardiovascular activity results from the summation of cellular oscillators located in the cardiac sinus node and we show that, as a result, the van der Pol oscillator (a particular Liénard system) fits well the ECG signal and the pulse signal. The reconstruction of the original signal (pulse or ECG) using Dynalet transform is then compared with that of Fourier, counting the number of parameters to be set for obtaining an expected signal-to-noise ratio. Then, we apply the Dynalet transform to the modelling and compression of molecular spectra obtained by protein NMR spectroscopy. The reconstruction of the original signal (peak) using Dynalet transform is again compared with that of Fourier. After reconstructing visually the peak, we propose to periodize the signal and give it to hear, the whole process being called the protein "stethoscope". PMID:25444705

  18. Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyun; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2007-05-10

    The short laser pulse generated from an active cw-injected ring cavity with Yb3+:YAG crystal, which is treated as the homogeneously broadened amplifier, is studied theoretically. Based on the derived results, the impacts of the amplifier length, the seeding laser intensity and frequency, the pump intensity, the efficiency of the acousto-optic modulator (AOM), and the frequency shift generated by the AOM on the performance of the laser pulse are analyzed. PMID:17446920

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  20. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  2. The Effect of Ethylene and Propylene Pulses on Respiration, Ripening Advancement, Ethylene-Forming Enzyme, and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid Synthase Activity in Avocado Fruit.

    PubMed

    Starrett, D A; Laties, G G

    1991-03-01

    When early-season avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) were treated with ethylene or propylene for 24 hours immediately on picking, the time to the onset of the respiratory climacteric, i.e. the lag period, remained unchanged compared with that in untreated fruit. When fruit were pulsed 24 hours after picking, on the other hand, the lag period was shortened. In both cases, however, a 24 hour ethylene or propylene pulse induced a transient increase in respiration, called the pulse-peak, unaccompanied by ethylene production (IL Eaks [1980] Am Soc Hortic Sci 105: 744-747). The pulse also caused a sharp rise in ethylene-forming enzyme activity in both cases, without any increase in the low level of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase activity. Thus, the shortening of the lag period by an ethylene pulse is not due to an effect of ethylene on either of the two key enzymes in ethylene biosynthesis. A comparison of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis polypeptide profiles of in vitro translation products of poly(A(+)) mRNA from control and ethylene-pulsed fruit showed both up- and down-regulation in response to ethylene pulsing of a number of genes expressed during the ripening syndrome. It is proposed that the pulse-peak or its underlying events reflect an intrinsic element in the ripening process that in late-season or continuously ethylene-treated fruit may be subsumed in the overall climacteric response. A computerized system that allows continuous readout of multiple samples has established that the continued presentation of exogeneous ethylene or propylene to preclimacteric fruit elicits a dual respiration response comprising the merged pulse-peak and climacteric peak in series. The sequential removal of cores from a single fruit has proven an unsatisfactory sampling procedure inasmuch as coring induces wound ethylene, evokes a positive respiration response, and advances ripening.

  3. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  4. Temporal Behavior of the Pump Pulses, Residual Pump Pulses, and THz Pulses for D2O Gas Pumped by a TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhai, Yusheng; Su, Yuling; Zhou, Fanghua; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-08-01

    Temporal behavior of the pump pulses, residual pump pulses, and THz pulses for optically pumped D2O gas molecules was investigated by using a tunable TEA CO2 laser as the pumping source. The pulse profiles of pump laser pulses, residual pump pulses, and the THz output pulses were measured, simultaneously, at several different gas pressures. For THz pulse, the pulse delay between the THz pulse and the pump pulse was observed and the delay time was observed to increase from 40 to 70 ns with an increase in gas pressure from 500 to 1700 Pa. Both THz pulse broadening and compression were observed, and the pulse broadening effect transformed to the compression effect with increasing the gas pressure. For the residual pump pulse, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main pulse decreased with increasing gas pressure, and the main pulse disappeared at high gas pressures. The secondary pulses were observed at high gas pressure, and the time intervals of about 518 and 435 ns were observed between the THz output pulse and the secondary residual pump pulse at the pressure of 1400 Pa and 1700 Pa, from which the vibrational relaxation time constants of about 5.45 and 5.55 μs Torr were obtained.

  5. Generation of active entities by the pulsed arc electrohydraulic discharge system and application to removal of atrazine.

    PubMed

    Karpel Vel Leitner, N; Syoen, G; Romat, H; Urashima, K; Chang, J-S

    2005-11-01

    Reactions induced by the pulsed arc electrohydraulic discharge (PAED) system in aqueous solutions were studied. PAED was generated by a spark gap type power supply (0.5 kJ/pulse) with rod-to-rod type electrodes in water. The measurements of physical parameters showed that the discharge is characterized by a sudden drop of the voltage while a peak of current occurs. The pressure waveform is composed of a positive pressure wave (shock wave) followed by negative pressure waves (expansion waves with a multiple wall reflection wave). The optical emission arc spectrum covers the UV-B, UV-A and visible zone with a maximum intensity in the range 380-425 nm. Peaks were representative of OH() radicals and atomic hydrogen emission lines. The identification of typical by-products from the removal of selected compounds in aqueous solution showed that PAED is the origin of photolysis, oxidation and reduction reactions. The impact of scavengers for OH() radicals or solvated electrons on the removal of atrazine and the concentration of the by-product deethylatrazine allowed the study of the combined and separate effects of the active entities. The energy efficiency of the PAED system can be improved by varying the gap of the electrodes in water.

  6. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  7. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  8. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-12-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  9. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-01-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  10. Micro pulse lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Spinhirne, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering has been demonstrated. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped [mu]J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view (FOV) and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited by optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that systems built on the micro pulse lidar concept are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  11. Chirped pulse amplification of 300 fs pulses in an Alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Bado, P.; Mourou, G. ); Harter, D.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the amplification of femtosecond dye laser pulses up to the 3.5 mJ level in an alexandrite regenerative amplifier. An expansion/compression system using diffraction gratings allows chirped pulse amplification techniques to be used to produce peak powers upwards of 1 GW. Limitations in the chirped pulse amplification of ultrashort pulses due to intracavity dispersive elements are discussed.

  12. Cooperative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Michael; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the concept of cooperative (COOP) pulses which are designed to compensate each other's imperfections. In multi-scan experiments, COOP pulses can cancel undesired signal contributions, complementing and generalizing phase cycles. COOP pulses can be efficiently optimized using an extended version of the optimal-control-based gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm. The advantage of the COOP approach is experimentally demonstrated for broadband and band-selective pulses.

  13. Time-Domain Quaternary-Weighted Pulse Width Modulation Driving Method for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun-Sang; Kuk, Seung-Hee; Han, Min-Koo

    2008-03-01

    We proposed a new digital driving method and its pixel structure for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays employing time-domain quaternary-weighted pulse width modulation. In the new digital driving method, the luminance of AMOLED displays is accurately determined by averaging photon flux to the desired level over a frame period. The proposed pixel was verified by spice simulation and the output linearity between the grayscale and the OLED current was successfully achieved. In the proposed digital driving pixel, the timing margin was increased and the effect on luminance of AMOLED displays by the troublesome variation of the thin-film transistors (TFTs) was suppressed without additional compensation schemes.

  14. Enhanced antibacterial activity of copper/copper oxide nanowires prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Pandey, J. K.; Soumya, K. K.; Dwivedi, P.; Sundaram, S.; Prasad, Sanjay; Gopal, R.

    2016-07-01

    Copper/copper oxide nanowires (NWs) are well known for its antibacterial activity against various pathogens. In the present study, we have shown the enhanced antibacterial activity of the NWs against gram-negative bacterial strains ( Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and gram-positive bacterial strains ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus). The increase in the activity is because of the shape and size of the colloidal NWs which were prepared at room temperature in a one-step process by pulsed laser ablation of copper metal target. The purity, shape and size of the colloidal NWs were well characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NWs were of diameters in the range of 15-30 nm and lengths ranging from 200 to 600 nm. The dose-dependent antibacterial activity of these NWs was found to be more effective against gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria. As gram-negative bacteria have thinner layer of cell wall made up of peptidoglycan possibly which makes them more susceptible to Cu/Cu2O NWs, Cu/Cu2O NWs can be a potent candidate to be used as bactericidal or as growth inhibitor.

  15. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  16. A codimension-2 bifurcation controlling endogenous bursting activity and pulse-triggered responses of a neuron model.

    PubMed

    Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of individual neurons are crucial for producing functional activity in neuronal networks. An open question is how temporal characteristics can be controlled in bursting activity and in transient neuronal responses to synaptic input. Bifurcation theory provides a framework to discover generic mechanisms addressing this question. We present a family of mechanisms organized around a global codimension-2 bifurcation. The cornerstone bifurcation is located at the intersection of the border between bursting and spiking and the border between bursting and silence. These borders correspond to the blue sky catastrophe bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle (SNIC) curves, respectively. The cornerstone bifurcation satisfies the conditions for both the blue sky catastrophe and SNIC. The burst duration and interburst interval increase as the inverse of the square root of the difference between the corresponding bifurcation parameter and its bifurcation value. For a given set of burst duration and interburst interval, one can find the parameter values supporting these temporal characteristics. The cornerstone bifurcation also determines the responses of silent and spiking neurons. In a silent neuron with parameters close to the SNIC, a pulse of current triggers a single burst. In a spiking neuron with parameters close to the blue sky catastrophe, a pulse of current temporarily silences the neuron. These responses are stereotypical: the durations of the transient intervals-the duration of the burst and the duration of latency to spiking-are governed by the inverse-square-root laws. The mechanisms described here could be used to coordinate neuromuscular control in central pattern generators. As proof of principle, we construct small networks that control metachronal-wave motor pattern exhibited in locomotion. This pattern is determined by the phase relations of bursting neurons in a simple central pattern generator modeled by a chain of

  17. Vestibular and pulse-related modulation of skin sympathetic nerve activity during sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation in human subjects.

    PubMed

    James, Cheree; Stathis, Alexandra; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2010-04-01

    We have previously shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS), a means of a selectively modulating vestibular afferent input without affecting other inputs, can cause partial entrainment of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Given that motion sickness causes sweating and pallor, we tested the hypothesis that sGVS also entrains skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), but that the optimal frequencies are closer to those associated with slow postural changes (0.2 Hz). SSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve in 11 awake-seated subjects. Bipolar binaural sinusoidal GVS (+/-2 mA, 200 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at frequencies of 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1.1, 1.4, 1.7 and 2.0 Hz. All subjects reported strong postural illusions of 'rocking in a boat' or 'swaying in a hammock'. Sinusoidal GVS caused a marked entrainment of SSNA at all frequencies. Measured as the modulation index, vestibular modulation ranged from 81.5 +/- 4.0% at 0.2 Hz to 76.6 +/- 3.6% at 1.7 Hz; it was significantly weaker at 2.0 Hz (63.2 +/- 5.4%). Interestingly, pulse-related modulation of SSNA, which is normally weak, increased significantly during sGVS but was stronger at 0.8 Hz (86.2 +/- 2.0%) than at 0.2 Hz (69.3 +/- 8.3%), the opposite of the pattern seen with vestibular modulation of MSNA. We conclude that vestibular inputs can entrain the firing of cutaneous sympathetic neurones and increase their normally weak pulse-related rhythmicity.

  18. Mental Aptitude and Comprehension of Time-Compressed and Compressed-Expanded Listening Selections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    The comprehensibility of materials compressed and then expanded by means of an electromechanical process was tested with 280 Army inductees divided into groups of high and low mental aptitude. Three short listening selections relating to military activities were subjected to compression and compression-expansion to produce seven versions. Data…

  19. A high-speed distortionless predictive image-compression scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.; Smyth, P.; Wang, H.

    1990-01-01

    A high-speed distortionless predictive image-compression scheme that is based on differential pulse code modulation output modeling combined with efficient source-code design is introduced. Experimental results show that this scheme achieves compression that is very close to the difference entropy of the source.

  20. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  1. Programmable dispersion compensation and pulse shaping in a 26-fs chirped-pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Efimov, A; Reitze, D H

    1998-10-15

    We have constructed a 26-fs chirped-pulse amplifier that incorporates a programmable liquid-crystal spatial light modulator in the pulse stretcher. The modulator serves a dual purpose. First, we apply frequency-dependent phase shifts to compensate for cubic, quartic, and nonlinear phase dispersion in the amplifier, which results in a reduction in pulse duration from 32 to 26 fs, in agreement with the transform limit of the amplified pulse spectrum. Second, we are able to produce high-fidelity compressed amplified shaped pulses by applying phase masks directly within the stretcher. Shaped pulse energies of greater than 1 mJ are routinely obtained.

  2. Programmable dispersion compensation and pulse shaping in a 26-fs chirped-pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Efimov, A; Reitze, D H

    1998-10-15

    We have constructed a 26-fs chirped-pulse amplifier that incorporates a programmable liquid-crystal spatial light modulator in the pulse stretcher. The modulator serves a dual purpose. First, we apply frequency-dependent phase shifts to compensate for cubic, quartic, and nonlinear phase dispersion in the amplifier, which results in a reduction in pulse duration from 32 to 26 fs, in agreement with the transform limit of the amplified pulse spectrum. Second, we are able to produce high-fidelity compressed amplified shaped pulses by applying phase masks directly within the stretcher. Shaped pulse energies of greater than 1 mJ are routinely obtained. PMID:18091861

  3. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  4. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  5. PULSE SORTER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-07-29

    An apparatus is described for counting and recording the number of electrical pulses occurring in each of a timed sequence of groups of pulses. The particular feature of the invention resides in a novel timing circuit of the univibrator type which provides very accurately timed pulses for opening each of a series of coincidence channels in sequence. The univibrator is shown incorporated in a pulse analyzing system wherein a series of pulse counting channels are periodically opened in order, one at a time, for a predetermtned open time interval, so that only one channel will be open at the time of occurrence of any of the electrical pulses to be sorted.

  6. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  7. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(С3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2]  >  10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron–ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t  =  1–30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  8. Electro-optic time lensing with an intense single-cycle terahertz pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuzhen; Carr, G. L.; Murphy, James B.; Wang Xijie; Yang Xi; Tsang, Thomas Y.

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate that an intense single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulse can act as a time lens to phase modulate and compress a copropagating ultrashort laser pulse. By using the THz-induced phase modulation as a time lens and a glass plate as a group velocity dispersive element, we have compressed an unchirped {approx} 165 fs laser pulse to {approx} 45 fs.

  9. Electro-optic time lensing with an intense single-cycle terahertz pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Carr, G.L.; Murphy, J.B.; Tsang, T. Y.; Wang, X.; Yang, X.

    2010-05-18

    We demonstrate that an intense single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulse can act as a time lens to phase modulate and compress a copropagating ultrashort laser pulse. By using the THz-induced phase modulation as a time lens and a glass plate as a group velocity dispersive element, we have compressed an unchirped {approx}165 fs laser pulse to {approx}45 fs.

  10. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  11. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  12. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  13. A comparative study of three techniques for diameter selective fiber activation in the vagal nerve: anodal block, depolarizing prepulses and slowly rising pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Tosato, Marco; Struijk, Johannes J.

    2008-09-01

    The paper shows selective smaller fiber activation in the left and right vagal nerve in in vivo experiments in pigs using three different techniques: anodal block, depolarizing prepulses and slowly rising pulses. All stimulation techniques were performed with the same experimental setup. The techniques have been compared in relation to maximum achievable suppression of nerve activity, maximum required current, maximum achievable stimulation frequency and the required charge per phase. Suppression of the largest fiber activity (expressed as a percentage of the maximum response) was 0-40% for anodal block, 10-25% for depolarizing prepulses and 40-50% for slowly rising pulses (duration up to 5 ms). Incomplete suppression of activation was mainly attributed to the large size of the vagal nerve (3.0-3.5 mA) which resulted in a large difference of the excitation thresholds of nerve fibers at different distances from the electrode, as well as a relatively short duration of slowly rising pulses. The technique of anodal block required the highest currents. The techniques of slowly rising pulses and anodal block required comparable charge per phase that was larger than for the technique of depolarizing prepulses. Depolarizing prepulses were an optimal choice regarding maximum required current and charge per phase but were very sensitive to small changes of the current amplitude. The other two techniques were more robust regarding small changes of stimulation parameters. The maximum stimulation frequency, using typical values of stimulation parameters, was 105 Hz for depolarizing prepulses, 30 Hz for anodal block and 28 Hz for slowly rising pulses. Only a technique of depolarizing prepulses had a charge per phase within the safe limits. For the other two techniques it would be necessary to optimize the shape of a stimulation pulse in order to reduce the charge per phase.

  14. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  15. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES. PMID:27110556

  16. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get an ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ...

  17. Current density compression of intense ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Adam Bennett

    Current density compression of intense ion beams in space and time is required for heavy ion fusion, in order to achieve the necessary intensities to implode an inertial confinement fusion target. Longitudinal compression to high current in a short pulse is achieved by imposing a velocity tilt upon the space-charge-dominated charge bunch, and a variety of means exist for simultaneous transverse focusing to a coincident focal plane. Compression to the desired levels requires sufficient neutralization of the beam by a pre-formed plasma during final transport. The physics of current density compression is studied in scaled experiments relevant for the operating regime of a heavy ion driver, and related theory and advanced particle-in-cell simulations provide valuable insight into the physical and technological limitations involved. A fast Faraday cup measures longitudinal compression ratios greater than 50 with pulse durations less than 5 ns, in excellent agreement with reduced models and sophisticated simulations, which account for many experimental parameters and effects. The detailed physics of achieving current density compression in the laboratory is reviewed. Quantitative examples explore the dependency of longitudinal compression on effects such as the finite-size acceleration gap, voltage waveform accuracy, variation in initial beam temperature, pulse length, intended fractional velocity tilt, and energy uncertainty, as well as aberration within focusing elements and plasma neutralization processes. In addition, plasma evolution in experimental sources responsible for the degree of beam neutralization is studied numerically, since compression stagnation occurs under inadequate neutralization conditions, which may excite nonlinear collective excitations due to beam-plasma interactions. The design of simultaneous focusing experiments using both existing and upgraded hardware is provided, and parametric variations important for compression physics are

  18. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value. PMID:27295438

  19. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  20. Evaluation of critical process parameters for inter-tablet coating uniformity of active-coated GITS using Terahertz Pulsed Imaging.

    PubMed

    Brock, Daniela; Zeitler, J Axel; Funke, Adrian; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of critical process parameters (CPP) for inter-tablet coating uniformity in an active pan coating process using nondestructive Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI). Coating uniformity was assessed by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) of coating thickness measured by TPI, and the CV of API content measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A design of experiments (DoE) was performed at pilot scale with drum load, drum speed, spray rate, run duration and spray pressure as factors. Good agreement in the CV of both analytical techniques was shown. The DoE models both revealed the same CPP: a low drum load, high drum speed, low spray rate and high run duration were beneficial for coating uniformity. The spray pressure was only significant in one of the DoE models. It was further shown that the negative impact of a high drum load on the CV cannot only be compensated by high drum speed, but also be compensated by a low spray rate and long run duration. It was demonstrated that TPI is a feasible tool for the measurement of inter-tablet coating uniformity and for the evaluation of CPP in an active pan coating process. PMID:25034044

  1. Magneto-impedance sensor for quasi-noncontact monitoring of breathing, pulse rate and activity status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corodeanu, S.; Chiriac, H.; Radulescu, L.; Lupu, N.

    2014-05-01

    Results on the development and testing of a novel magnetic sensor based on the detection of the magneto-impedance variation due to changes in the permeability of an amorphous wire are reported. The proposed application is the quasi-noncontact monitoring of the breathing frequency and heart rate for diagnosing sleep disorders. Patient discomfort is significantly decreased by transversally placing the sensitive element onto the surface of a flexible mattress in order to detect its deformation associated with cardiorespiratory activity and body movements. The developed sensor has a great application potential in monitoring the vital signs during sleep, with special advantages for children sleep monitoring.

  2. In vitro activation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes by hTERT-pulsed dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Fedor; Ocadlíková, Darina; Kovárová, Lucie; Buresová, Ivana; Hájek, Roman; Michálek, Jaroslav

    2009-12-01

    Multiple myeloma has been considered a weakly immunogenic malignancy that can cause profound defects in the immune system. An important issue for the immunotherapy of myeloma is the identification of appropriate tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Recently, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) was detected on a majority of human malignancies. In the studies reported here, we studied antigen-specific and HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic activity against an ARH77 myeloma cell line in vitro. An HLA-A2-specific hTERT-derived nonapeptide ((540)ILAKFLHWL(548)) was used as a TAA. Myeloma-specific cytotoxic activity of hTERT-reactive cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) was established by repeated stimulation of the CTLs via dendritic cells loaded with hTERT-derived nonapeptide. These studies were able to demonstrate that hTERT-reactive T-lymphocytes can be identified and expanded using relatively simple in vitro techniques consisting of antigen-specific stimulation, immunomagnetic sorting, and then induction of rapid expansion. PMID:19908943

  3. 3-Dimensional Scene Perception during Active Electrolocation in a Weakly Electric Pulse Fish

    PubMed Central

    von der Emde, Gerhard; Behr, Katharina; Bouton, Béatrice; Engelmann, Jacob; Fetz, Steffen; Folde, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Weakly electric fish use active electrolocation for object detection and orientation in their environment even in complete darkness. The African mormyrid Gnathonemus petersii can detect object parameters, such as material, size, shape, and distance. Here, we tested whether individuals of this species can learn to identify 3-dimensional objects independently of the training conditions and independently of the object's position in space (rotation-invariance; size-constancy). Individual G. petersii were trained in a two-alternative forced-choice procedure to electrically discriminate between a 3-dimensional object (S+) and several alternative objects (S−). Fish were then tested whether they could identify the S+ among novel objects and whether single components of S+ were sufficient for recognition. Size-constancy was investigated by presenting the S+ together with a larger version at different distances. Rotation-invariance was tested by rotating S+ and/or S− in 3D. Our results show that electrolocating G. petersii could (1) recognize an object independently of the S− used during training. When only single components of a complex S+ were offered, recognition of S+ was more or less affected depending on which part was used. (2) Object-size was detected independently of object distance, i.e. fish showed size-constancy. (3) The majority of the fishes tested recognized their S+ even if it was rotated in space, i.e. these fishes showed rotation-invariance. (4) Object recognition was restricted to the near field around the fish and failed when objects were moved more than about 4 cm away from the animals. Our results indicate that even in complete darkness our G. petersii were capable of complex 3-dimensional scene perception using active electrolocation. PMID:20577635

  4. Short delays and low pulse amplitudes produce widespread activation in the target-distance processing area of auditory cortex of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Macías, Silvio; Hechavarría, Julio C

    2016-08-01

    While approaching an object, echolocating bats decrease the amplitude of their vocalizations. This behavior is known as "echo-level compensation." Here, the activation pattern of the cortical FM-FM (frequency modulated) area of the mustached bat is assessed by using acoustic stimuli that correspond to sonar signals and their echoes emitted during echo-level compensation behavior. Activation maps were calculated from the delay response areas of 86 cortical neurons, and these maps were used to explore the topography of cortical activation during echolocation and its relation to the bats' cortical "chronotopy." Chronotopy predicts short echo-delays to be represented by rostral auditory cortex neurons while caudal neurons represent long echo-delays. The results show that a chronotopic activation of the cortex is evident only at loud pulse amplitudes [80-90 dB sound pressure level (SPL)]. In response to fainter pulse levels (60-70 dB SPL), as those produced as the animals zoom-in on targets, chronotopic activation of the cortex becomes less clear because units throughout the FM-FM area start firing, especially in response to short echo-delays. The fact that cortical activity is more widespread in response to combinations of short echo-delays and faint pulse amplitudes could represent an adaptation that enhances cortical activity in the late stages of echo-level compensation. PMID:27586724

  5. Short delays and low pulse amplitudes produce widespread activation in the target-distance processing area of auditory cortex of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Macías, Silvio; Hechavarría, Julio C

    2016-08-01

    While approaching an object, echolocating bats decrease the amplitude of their vocalizations. This behavior is known as "echo-level compensation." Here, the activation pattern of the cortical FM-FM (frequency modulated) area of the mustached bat is assessed by using acoustic stimuli that correspond to sonar signals and their echoes emitted during echo-level compensation behavior. Activation maps were calculated from the delay response areas of 86 cortical neurons, and these maps were used to explore the topography of cortical activation during echolocation and its relation to the bats' cortical "chronotopy." Chronotopy predicts short echo-delays to be represented by rostral auditory cortex neurons while caudal neurons represent long echo-delays. The results show that a chronotopic activation of the cortex is evident only at loud pulse amplitudes [80-90 dB sound pressure level (SPL)]. In response to fainter pulse levels (60-70 dB SPL), as those produced as the animals zoom-in on targets, chronotopic activation of the cortex becomes less clear because units throughout the FM-FM area start firing, especially in response to short echo-delays. The fact that cortical activity is more widespread in response to combinations of short echo-delays and faint pulse amplitudes could represent an adaptation that enhances cortical activity in the late stages of echo-level compensation.

  6. Temporal Self-Restoration of Compressed Optical Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, L.; Skupin, S.; Steinmeyer, G.

    2008-11-21

    We numerically investigate the propagation of a self-compressed optical filament through a gas-glass-gas interface. Few-cycle light pulses survive a sudden and short order-of-magnitude increase of nonlinearity and dispersion, even when all conservative estimates predict temporal spreading or spatial breakup. Spatiotemporal distortions are shown to self-heal upon further propagation when the pulse refocuses in the second gas. This self-healing mechanism has important implications for pulse compression techniques handled by filamentation and explains the robustness of such sources.

  7. Drift Compression and Final Focus for Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Non-periodic, Time-dependent Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin; Ronald C. Davidson; John J. Barnard; Edward P. Lee

    2005-02-14

    In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a non-periodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the sam e focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory.

  8. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  9. Photoelectron circular dichroism in the multiphoton ionization by short laser pulses. I. Propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in chiral pseudo-potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Hochstuhl, David

    2015-06-28

    A theoretical method to study the angle-resolved multiphoton ionization of polyatomic molecules is developed. It is based on the time-dependent formulation of the Single Center (TDSC) method and consists in the propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in the effective molecular potentials in the presence of intense laser pulses. For this purpose, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron, moving in a molecular field and interacting with an arbitrary laser pulse, is solved in spherical coordinates by an efficient numerical approach. As a test, the method is applied to the one- and two-photon ionizations of a model methane-like chiral system by circularly polarized short intense high-frequency laser pulses. Thereby, we analyze the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the momentum distribution. The considered model application illustrates the capability of the TDSC method to study multiphoton PECD in fixed-in-space and randomly oriented chiral molecules.

  10. Compact electron acceleration and bunch compression in THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Fallahi, Arya; Kärtner, Franz X

    2013-04-22

    We numerically investigate the acceleration and bunch compression capabilities of 20 mJ, 0.6 THz-centered coherent terahertz pulses in optimized metallic dielectric-loaded cylindrical waveguides. In particular, we theoretically demonstrate the acceleration of 1.6 pC and 16 pC electron bunches from 1 MeV to 10 MeV over an interaction distance of 20mm, the compression of a 1.6 pC 1 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 2 fs (50 times compression) over an interaction distance of about 18mm, and the compression of a 1.6 pC 10 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 1.61 fs (62 times) over an interaction distance of 42 cm. The obtained results show the promise of coherent THz pulses in realizing compact electron acceleration and bunch compression schemes. PMID:23609686

  11. Drift Compression and Final Focus Options for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin; Ronald C. Davidson; John J. Barnard; Edward P. Lee

    2005-02-14

    A drift compression and final focus lattice for heavy ion beams should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. We show that this requirement implies that the drift compression design needs to satisfy a self-similar symmetry condition. For un-neutralized beams, the Lie symmetry group analysis is applied to the warm-fluid model to systematically derive the self-similar drift compression solutions. For neutralized beams, the 1-D Vlasov equation is solved explicitly, and families of self-similar drift compression solutions are constructed. To compensate for the deviation from the self-similar symmetry condition due to the transverse emittance, four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of the drift compression such that the entire beam pulse can be focused onto the same focal spot.

  12. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Koenig, M.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benedetti, C.; Brambrink, E.; Chawla, S.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Heathcote, R.; Higginson, D. P.; Hulin, S.; Jafer, R.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lancaster, K.; Mac Kinnon, A. J.; McPhee, A. G.; Nazarov, W.; Nicolai, P.; Pasley, J.; Ravasio, A.; Richetta, M.; Santos, J. J.; Sgattoni, A.; Spindloe, C.; Vauzour, B.; Volpe, L.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams (~4 × 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53 µm) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm-3). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm-3 and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 × 1018 W cm-2. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  13. Pulse Length Control in an X-Ray FEL by Using Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, S.; Pellegrini, Claudio; Emma, P.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2008-03-18

    For the users of the high-brightness radiation sources of free-electron lasers it is desirable to reduce the FEL pulse length to 10 fs and below for time-resolved pump and probe experiments. Although it can be achieved by conventional compression methods for the electron beam or the chirped FEL pulse, the technical realization is demanding. In this presentation we study the impact of longitudinal wakefields in the undulator and how their properties can be used to reduced the amplifying part of the bunch to the desired length. Methods of actively controlling the wakefields are presented.

  14. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2 dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  15. Biological activities of Zingiber officinale (Zingiberaceae) and Piper cubeba (Piperaceae) essential oils against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Mukesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Zingiber officinale (Zingiberaceae) and Piper cubeba (Piperaceae) was essential oils were investigated for repellent, insecticidal, antiovipositional, egg hatching, persistence of its insecticidal activities against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Essential oil vapours repelled bruchid adults significantly as oviposition was found reduced in choice oviposition assay. Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils caused both fumigant and contact toxicity in C. chinensis adults. In fumigation toxicity assay, median lethal concentrations (LC50) were 0.34 and 0.27 microL cm(-3) for Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils, respectively, while in contact toxicity assay, LC50 were 0.90 and 0.66 microL cm(-2) for Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils, respectively. These two essential oils reduced oviposition in C. chinensis adults when treated with sublethal concentrations by fumigation and contact method. Oviposition inhibition was more pronounced when adults come in contact than in vapours. Both essential oils significantly reduced egg hatching rate when fumigated. Persistence in insecticidal efficiency of both essential oils decreased with time. P. cubeba showed less persistence than Z. officinale essential oil because no mortality was observed in C. chinensis adults after 36 h of treatment with P. cubeba and after 48 h of treatment of Z. officinale essential oil. Fumigation with these essential oils has no effect on the germination of the cowpea seeds. Findings of the study suggest that Z. officinale and P. cubeba essential oils can be useful as promising agent in insect pest management programme.

  16. Low frequency and low intensity pulsed electromagnetic field exerts its antiinflammatory effect through restoration of plasma membrane calcium ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Ramasamy; Ganesan, Kalaivani; Narayana Raju, K V S; Gangadharan, Akkalayi Chandrapuram; Manohar, Bhakthavatchalam Murali; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2007-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting 1% of the population worldwide. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has a number of well-documented physiological effects on cells and tissues including antiinflammatory effect. This study aims to explore the antiinflammatory effect of PEMF and its possible mechanism of action in amelioration of adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA). Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of heat killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis at a concentration of 500 microg in 0.1 ml of paraffin oil into the right hind paw of rats. The arthritic animals showed a biphasic response regarding changes in the paw edema volume. During the chronic phase of the disease, arthritic animals showed an elevated level of lipid peroxides and depletion of antioxidant enzymes with significant radiological and histological changes. Besides, plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) activity was inhibited while intracellular Ca(2+) level as well as prostaglandin E(2) levels was noticed to be elevated in blood lymphocytes of arthritic rats. Exposure of arthritic rats to PEMF at 5 Hzx4 microT x 90 min, produced significant antiexudative effect resulting in the restoration of the altered parameters. The antiinflammatory effect could be partially mediated through the stabilizing action of PEMF on membranes as reflected by the restoration of PMCA and intracellular Ca(2+) levels in blood lymphocytes subsequently inhibiting PGE(2) biosynthesis. The results of this study indicated that PEMF could be developed as a potential therapy for RA in human beings.

  17. Pulsed Current Activated Synthesis and Consolidation of Nanostructured Ti-TiC Composite and Its Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ki; Park, Na-Ra; Kim, Byung-Su; Yoon, Jin-Kook; Hong, Kyung-Tae; Shon, In-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Ti and CNT powders were milled by high energy ball milling. The milled powders were then simultaneously synthesized and consolidated using pulsed current activated sintering (PCAS) within one minute under the applied pressure of 80 MPa. The advantage of this process is not only rapid densification to near theoretical density but also to prevent grain growth in nano-structured materials The milling did not induce any reaction between the constituent powders. Meanwhile, PCAS of the Ti-CNT mixture produced a Ti-TiC composite according to the reaction (Ti + 0.06CNT --> 0.94Ti+0.06TiC, Ti+0.12CNT --> 0.88Ti+0.12TiC). Highly dense nanocrystalline Ti-TiC compos- ites with a relative density of up to 99.5% were obtained within one minute. The hardness and fracture toughness of the dense Ti-6mole% TiC and Ti-12 mole% TiC produced by PCAS were also investigated. PMID:27433696

  18. Advanced concepts for electromagnetic launcher power supplies incorporating magnetic flux compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driga, M. D.; Fair, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts of high-energy power supplies for coil launchers are designed to produce high inductive compression ratios and large current and magnetic field multiplication ratios in the range of megaamperes of current and gigawatts of active power. As a consequence of the flexibility of multiwinding rotating generators, such designs provide an extensive range of output pulse shaping in single or multiple pulses, enabling optimum operation of the coil launcher. The interaction of different stationary and rotating electrical windings in strong magnetic fields with feedback generated amplification and nonuniform compensation of the armature reaction is the key to providing a large and flexible spectrum of tailored output pulses, eliminating the need for switching and other large external electromagnetic pulse-forming components. Dynamic interactions between the internal impedance of these generators and the induced electromotive forces in various windings, as well as the role of the external passive circuit components introduced in the launcher circuit (such as capacitors and inductors), are discussed and numerically evaluated. Finally, an adaptive finite-element method numerical code is given which takes into account the relative motion and is designed to evaluate machines incorporating flux compression.

  19. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  20. High gain broadband amplification of ultraviolet pulses in optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Paweł; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Radzewicz, Czesław

    2010-04-12

    We report on a high gain amplification of broadband ultraviolet femtosecond pulses in an optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier. Broadband ultraviolet seed pulses were obtained by an achromatic frequency doubling of the output from a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator. Stretched seed pulses were amplified in a multipass parametric amplifier with a single BBO crystal pumped by a ns frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. A noncollinear configuration was used for a broadband amplification. The total (after compression) amplification of 2.510(5) was achieved, with compressed pulse energy of 30 microJ and pulse duration of 24 fs. We found that the measured gain was limited by thermal effects induced by the absorption of the pump laser by color centers created in the BBO crystal.

  1. Magnetic Flux Compression in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux compression (MFC) as a method for producing ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields had been originated in the 1950s by Sakharov et al. at Arzamas in the USSR (now VNIIEF, Russia) and by Fowler et al. at Los Alamos in the US. The highest magnetic field produced by explosively driven MFC generator, 28 MG, was reported by Boyko et al. of VNIIEF. The idea of using MFC to increase the magnetic field in a magnetically confined plasma to 3-10 MG, relaxing the strict requirements on the plasma density and Lawson time, gave rise to the research area known as MTF in the US and MAGO in Russia. To make a difference in ICF, a magnetic field of ˜100 MG should be generated via MFC by a plasma liner as a part of the capsule compression scenario on a laser or pulsed power facility. This approach was first suggested in mid-1980s by Liberman and Velikovich in the USSR and Felber in the US. It has not been obvious from the start that it could work at all, given that so many mechanisms exist for anomalously fast penetration of magnetic field through plasma. And yet, many experiments stimulated by this proposal since 1986, mostly using pulsed-power drivers, demonstrated reasonably good flux compression up to ˜42 MG, although diagnostics of magnetic fields of such magnitude in HED plasmas is still problematic. The new interest of MFC in plasmas emerged with the advancement of new drivers, diagnostic methods and simulation tools. Experiments on MFC in a deuterium plasma filling a cylindrical plastic liner imploded by OMEGA laser beam led by Knauer, Betti et al. at LLE produced peak fields of 36 MG. The novel MagLIF approach to low-cost, high-efficiency ICF pursued by Herrmann, Slutz, Vesey et al. at Sandia involves pulsed-power-driven MFC to a peak field of ˜130 MG in a DT plasma. A review of the progress, current status and future prospects of MFC in plasmas is presented.

  2. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  3. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  4. 90 mJ parametric chirped pulse amplification of 10 fs pulses.

    PubMed

    Tavella, Franz; Marcinkevicius, Andrius; Krausz, Ferenc

    2006-12-25

    We demonstrate the amplification of broadband pulses from a Ti:Sapphire oscillator by non-collinear optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification technique in a type-I BBO crystal to energies of 90 mJ. Partial compression of the amplified pulses is demonstrated down to a 10 fs duration. These parameters come in combination with good spatial quality and focusability of the amplified beam.

  5. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  6. Recoil Experiments Using a Compressed Air Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Ping-Pong vacuum cannons, potato guns, and compressed air cannons are popular and dramatic demonstrations for lecture and lab. Students enjoy them for the spectacle, but they can also be used effectively to teach physics. Recently we have used a student-built compressed air cannon as a laboratory activity to investigate impulse, conservation of…

  7. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2016-04-01

    We studied by numerical simulations the effects of compressibility on passive scalar transport in stationary compressible turbulence. The turbulent Mach number varied from zero to unity. The difference in driven forcing was the magnitude ratio of compressive to solenoidal modes. In the inertial range, the scalar spectrum followed the k-5 /3 scaling and suffered negligible influence from the compressibility. The growth of the Mach number showed (1) a first reduction and second enhancement in the transfer of scalar flux; (2) an increase in the skewness and flatness of the scalar derivative and a decrease in the mixed skewness and flatness of the velocity-scalar derivatives; (3) a first stronger and second weaker intermittency of scalar relative to that of velocity; and (4) an increase in the intermittency parameter which measures the intermittency of scalar in the dissipative range. Furthermore, the growth of the compressive mode of forcing indicated (1) a decrease in the intermittency parameter and (2) less efficiency in enhancing scalar mixing. The visualization of scalar dissipation showed that, in the solenoidal-forced flow, the field was filled with the small-scale, highly convoluted structures, while in the compressive-forced flow, the field was exhibited as the regions dominated by the large-scale motions of rarefaction and compression.

  8. Thermal detection thresholds of Aδ- and C-fibre afferents activated by brief CO2 laser pulses applied onto the human hairy skin.

    PubMed

    Churyukanov, Maxim; Plaghki, Léon; Legrain, Valéry; Mouraux, André

    2012-01-01

    Brief high-power laser pulses applied onto the hairy skin of the distal end of a limb generate a double sensation related to the activation of Aδ- and C-fibres, referred to as first and second pain. However, neurophysiological and behavioural responses related to the activation of C-fibres can be studied reliably only if the concomitant activation of Aδ-fibres is avoided. Here, using a novel CO(2) laser stimulator able to deliver constant-temperature heat pulses through a feedback regulation of laser power by an online measurement of skin temperature at target site, combined with an adaptive staircase algorithm using reaction-time to distinguish between responses triggered by Aδ- and C-fibre input, we show that it is possible to estimate robustly and independently the thermal detection thresholds of Aδ-fibres (46.9±1.7°C) and C-fibres (39.8±1.7°C). Furthermore, we show that both thresholds are dependent on the skin temperature preceding and/or surrounding the test stimulus, indicating that the Aδ- and C-fibre afferents triggering the behavioural responses to brief laser pulses behave, at least partially, as detectors of a change in skin temperature rather than as pure level detectors. Most importantly, our results show that the difference in threshold between Aδ- and C-fibre afferents activated by brief laser pulses can be exploited to activate C-fibres selectively and reliably, provided that the rise in skin temperature generated by the laser stimulator is well-controlled. Our approach could constitute a tool to explore, in humans, the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in processing C- and Aδ-fibre input, respectively.

  9. Long-lasting changes in brain activation induced by a single REAC technology pulse in Wi-Fi bands. Randomized double-blind fMRI qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Salvatore; Mura, Marco; Castagna, Alessandro; Fontani, Vania

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this randomized double-blind study was to evaluate in healthy adult subjects, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), long lasting changes in brain activation patterns following administration of a single, 250 milliseconds pulse emitted with radio-electric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology in the Wi-Fi bands. The REAC impulse was not administered during the scan, but after this, according to a protocol that has previously been demonstrated to be effective in improving motor control and postural balance, in healthy subjects and patients. The study was conducted on 33 healthy volunteers, performed with a 1.5 T unit while operating a motor block task involving cyclical and alternating flexion and extension of one leg. Subsequently subjects were randomly divided into a treatment and a sham treatment control group. Repeated fMRI examinations were performed following the administration of the REAC pulse or sham treatment. The Treated group showed cerebellar and ponto-mesencephalic activation components that disappeared in the second scan, while these activation components persisted in the Sham group. This study shows that a very weak signal, such as 250 milliseconds Wi-Fi pulse, administered with REAC technology, could lead to lasting effects on brain activity modification. PMID:25011544

  10. Long-lasting changes in brain activation induced by a single REAC technology pulse in Wi-Fi bands. Randomized double-blind fMRI qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Salvatore; Mura, Marco; Castagna, Alessandro; Fontani, Vania

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this randomized double-blind study was to evaluate in healthy adult subjects, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), long lasting changes in brain activation patterns following administration of a single, 250 milliseconds pulse emitted with radio-electric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology in the Wi-Fi bands. The REAC impulse was not administered during the scan, but after this, according to a protocol that has previously been demonstrated to be effective in improving motor control and postural balance, in healthy subjects and patients. The study was conducted on 33 healthy volunteers, performed with a 1.5 T unit while operating a motor block task involving cyclical and alternating flexion and extension of one leg. Subsequently subjects were randomly divided into a treatment and a sham treatment control group. Repeated fMRI examinations were performed following the administration of the REAC pulse or sham treatment. The Treated group showed cerebellar and ponto-mesencephalic activation components that disappeared in the second scan, while these activation components persisted in the Sham group. This study shows that a very weak signal, such as 250 milliseconds Wi-Fi pulse, administered with REAC technology, could lead to lasting effects on brain activity modification. PMID:25011544

  11. Long-lasting changes in brain activation induced by a single REAC technology pulse in Wi-Fi bands. Randomized double-blind fMRI qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Salvatore; Mura, Marco; Castagna, Alessandro; Fontani, Vania

    2014-07-11

    The aim of this randomized double-blind study was to evaluate in healthy adult subjects, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), long lasting changes in brain activation patterns following administration of a single, 250 milliseconds pulse emitted with radio-electric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology in the Wi-Fi bands. The REAC impulse was not administered during the scan, but after this, according to a protocol that has previously been demonstrated to be effective in improving motor control and postural balance, in healthy subjects and patients. The study was conducted on 33 healthy volunteers, performed with a 1.5 T unit while operating a motor block task involving cyclical and alternating flexion and extension of one leg. Subsequently subjects were randomly divided into a treatment and a sham treatment control group. Repeated fMRI examinations were performed following the administration of the REAC pulse or sham treatment. The Treated group showed cerebellar and ponto-mesencephalic activation components that disappeared in the second scan, while these activation components persisted in the Sham group. This study shows that a very weak signal, such as 250 milliseconds Wi-Fi pulse, administered with REAC technology, could lead to lasting effects on brain activity modification.

  12. Dynamic pulse difference circuit

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Gerald L.

    1978-01-01

    A digital electronic circuit of especial use for subtracting background activity pulses in gamma spectrometry comprises an up-down counter connected to count up with signal-channel pulses and to count down with background-channel pulses. A detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal when the up-down counter has completed one scaling sequence cycle of counts in the up direction. In an alternate embodiment, a detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal upon overflow of the counter.

  13. Pulsed light decontamination of endive salad and mung bean sprouts and impact on color and respiration activity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B; Wunderlich, J; Muranyi, P

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was the determination of the efficiency of pulsed light (PL) treatments for the decontamination of endive salad and mung bean sprouts, as well as the assessment of quality changes in relation to discoloration and alteration of respiration activity. Produce samples were artificially inoculated with two bacterial test strains Escherichia coli (DSM 498) and Listeria innocua (DSM 20649) and exposed to PL at different energy doses. The inactivation efficiency with regard to the naturally occurring microbiota was also investigated. Besides microbiological investigations, color changes were determined as well as the produce respiration during chilled storage. The results indicated that inactivation of more than 2 log was possible with one flash in the case of fresh-cut salad, while the reduction on mung bean sprouts was limited to approximately 1.6 log with one flash, irrespective if the natural flora or inoculated E. coli or L. innocua were considered. The UV part of the PL proved to be exclusively responsible for the inactivation of microorganisms. Significant lower levels of microbial counts of treated compared with untreated samples were maintained for up to 6 days. In the case of endive salad, a dose-dependent progressive discoloration and increase in respiration was diminished by applying optical bandpass filters, which only slightly affected the inactivation efficiency. In contrast, PL treatments showed a positive effect on color and general appearance of mung bean sprouts, while the respiration was almost unaffected. However, care must be taken with regard to efficiency-limiting matrix effects and impact on food quality. These aspects have to be assessed for each treated product. The integration of PL in industrial food processing plants could be an alternative way to improve the microbial quality of fresh produce, and therefore have a positive impact on public health by reducing the risk of contaminations with pathogenic bacteria.

  14. The role of molecular motors in the mechanics of active gels and the effects of inertia, hydrodynamic interaction and compressibility in passive microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Andres Cordoba

    The mechanical properties of soft biological materials are essential to their physiological function and cannot easily be duplicated by synthetic materials. The study of the mechanical properties of biological materials has lead to the development of new rheological characterization techniques. In the technique called passive microbead rheology, the positional autocorrelation function of a micron-sized bead embedded in a viscoelastic fluid is used to infer the dynamic modulus of the fluid. Single particle microrheology is limited to fluids were the microstructure is much smaller than the size of the probe bead. To overcome this limitation in two-bead microrheology the cross-correlated thermal motion of pairs of tracer particles is used to determine the dynamic modulus. Here we present a time-domain data analysis methodology and generalized Brownian dynamics simulations to examine the effects of inertia, hydrodynamic interaction, compressibility and non-conservative forces in passive microrheology. A type of biological material that has proven specially challenging to characterize are active gels. They are formed by semiflexible polymer filaments driven by motor proteins that convert chemical energy from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to mechanical work and motion. Active gels perform essential functions in living tissue. Here we introduce a single-chain mean-field model to describe the mechanical properties of active gels. We model the semiflexible filaments as bead-spring chains and the molecular motors are accounted for by using a mean-field approach. The level of description of the model includes the end-to-end length and attachment state of the filaments, and the motor-generated forces, as stochastic state variables which evolve according to a proposed differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. The model allows accounting for physics that are not available in models that have been postulated on coarser levels of description. Moreover it allows

  15. Kinetics of the refractive index change in the core of active fibers, doped with Yb3+ and Er3+ ions, under pulsed optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainov, V. V.; Ryabushkin, O. A.

    2012-03-01

    The kinetics of refractive index change (RIC) in the core of Yb3+/Er3+ fibers at a radiation wave-length lying beyond the range of resonant absorption of active ions under pulsed pumping of fiber laser has been analyzed. The measurement of RIC kinetics with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer makes it possible to separate the contributions of the electronic and thermal RIC mechanisms and determine quantitatively the temperature profile inhomogeneity in the fiber. The measured values are compared with the numerical estimates derived from the spectral properties of the active medium in order to check the modern models of RIC in active fibers.

  16. Compressive sensing for nuclear security.

    SciTech Connect

    Gestner, Brian Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Special nuclear material (SNM) detection has applications in nuclear material control, treaty verification, and national security. The neutron and gamma-ray radiation signature of SNMs can be indirectly observed in scintillator materials, which fluoresce when exposed to this radiation. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to the scintillator material is often used to convert this weak fluorescence to an electrical output signal. The fluorescence produced by a neutron interaction event differs from that of a gamma-ray interaction event, leading to a slightly different pulse in the PMT output signal. The ability to distinguish between these pulse types, i.e., pulse shape discrimination (PSD), has enabled applications such as neutron spectroscopy, neutron scatter cameras, and dual-mode neutron/gamma-ray imagers. In this research, we explore the use of compressive sensing to guide the development of novel mixed-signal hardware for PMT output signal acquisition. Effectively, we explore smart digitizers that extract sufficient information for PSD while requiring a considerably lower sample rate than conventional digitizers. Given that we determine the feasibility of realizing these designs in custom low-power analog integrated circuits, this research enables the incorporation of SNM detection into wireless sensor networks.

  17. High-Dynamic-Range Temporal Measurements of Short Pulses Amplified by OPCPA

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoud, V.; Zuegel, J.D.; Forget, N.; LeBlanc, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the first experimental measurement of high-dynamic-range pulse contrast of compressed optical parametric chirped-pulse-amplification (OPCPA) pulses on the picosecond scale. A key to achieving better contrast with OPCPA is the simpler experimental setup that promotes more-efficient coupling of seed pulse energy into the amplification system.

  18. Sub-15fs ultraviolet pulses generated by achromatic phase-matching sum-frequency mixing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baozhen; Jiang, Yongliang; Sueda, Keiich; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2009-09-28

    A broadband ultraviolet pulse with a spectral width of 44 nm was generated by achromatic sum-frequency mixing of an 805-nm pulse and ultrabroadband visible pulse. Angular dispersion was introduced to achieve broadband phase matching by a prism pair. The UV pulse was compressed to 13.2 fs with another prism pair, with energy of 600 nJ. PMID:19907556

  19. Picosecond pulse generation at two wavelengths by simultaneous active mode locking in an Er-doped fiber laser with wide-bandwidth (>1 nm) nonchirped fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Kiyan, Roman V.; Salik, Ertan; Starodubov, Dmitry S.; Feinberg, Jack; Pottiez, Olivier; Megret, Patrice; Blondel, Michel

    1999-11-01

    Generation of picosecond pulses at two distinct wavelengths is interesting for wavelength-division-multiplexing, fiber communication and sensing. For this purpose, we achieved harmonic active mode locking simultaneously at two wavelengths separated by about 15 m in an Erbium-doped fiber laser. Dual- wavelength lasing was obtained with two wide-bandwidth (greater than 1 nm) nonchirped high-reflectivity fiber Bragg gratings inserted in the laser cavity. The fiber Bragg gratings were written with 275-nm light from an Ar laser in hydrogen-loaded fibers. Optical path lengths and losses were carefully adjusted at each wavelength to obtain perfect mode locking at both wavelengths. Total cavity dispersion was set in the anomalous dispersion regime and optimized at each wavelength independently to generate solitons. Pulses at 3-GHz repetition rate were obtained at two wavelengths simultaneously with pulse widths of 16 ps and 13 ps, at 1547 nm and 1562 nm respectively. Time-bandwidth products of 0.37 and 0.34 respectively confirmed that the pulses were nearly transform-limited at each wavelength.

  20. Parametric and working fluid analysis of a combined organic Rankine-vapor compression refrigeration system activated by low-grade thermal energy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, B

    2016-09-01

    The potential use of many common hydrofluorocarbons and hydrocarbons as well as new hydrofluoroolefins, i.e. R1234yf and R1234ze(E) working fluids for a combined organic Rankine cycle and vapor compression refrigeration (ORC-VCR) system activated by low-grade thermal energy is evaluated. The basic ORC operates between 80 and 40 °C typical for low-grade thermal energy power plants while the basic VCR cycle operates between 5 and 40 °C. The system performance is characterized by the overall system coefficient of performance (COPS) and the total mass flow rate of the working fluid for each kW cooling capacity ([Formula: see text]). The effects of different working parameters such as the evaporator, condenser, and boiler temperatures on the system performance are examined. The results illustrate that the maximum COPS values are attained using the highest boiling candidates with overhanging T-s diagram, i.e. R245fa and R600, while R600 has the lowest [Formula: see text] under the considered operating conditions. Among the proposed candidates, R600 is the best candidate for the ORC-VCR system from the perspectives of environmental issues and system performance. Nevertheless, its flammability should attract enough attention. The maximum COPS using R600 is found to reach up to 0.718 at a condenser temperature of 30 °C and the basic values for the remaining parameters. PMID:27489732

  1. Parametric and working fluid analysis of a combined organic Rankine-vapor compression refrigeration system activated by low-grade thermal energy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, B

    2016-09-01

    The potential use of many common hydrofluorocarbons and hydrocarbons as well as new hydrofluoroolefins, i.e. R1234yf and R1234ze(E) working fluids for a combined organic Rankine cycle and vapor compression refrigeration (ORC-VCR) system activated by low-grade thermal energy is evaluated. The basic ORC operates between 80 and 40 °C typical for low-grade thermal energy power plants while the basic VCR cycle operates between 5 and 40 °C. The system performance is characterized by the overall system coefficient of performance (COPS) and the total mass flow rate of the working fluid for each kW cooling capacity ([Formula: see text]). The effects of different working parameters such as the evaporator, condenser, and boiler temperatures on the system performance are examined. The results illustrate that the maximum COPS values are attained using the highest boiling candidates with overhanging T-s diagram, i.e. R245fa and R600, while R600 has the lowest [Formula: see text] under the considered operating conditions. Among the proposed candidates, R600 is the best candidate for the ORC-VCR system from the perspectives of environmental issues and system performance. Nevertheless, its flammability should attract enough attention. The maximum COPS using R600 is found to reach up to 0.718 at a condenser temperature of 30 °C and the basic values for the remaining parameters.

  2. Cystic acne improved by photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid and sequential combination of intense pulsed light and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid (Levulan Kerastick, Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and activation by intense pulsed light in an initial treatment and blue light in 3 subsequent treatments has resulted in significant improvement in severity of acne, reduction in the number of lesions, improvement in skin texture, and smoothing of scar edges in an Asian patient with severe (class 4) facial cystic acne and scarring. PMID:16302560

  3. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  4. Photocatalytic activity of bipolar pulsed magnetron sputter deposited TiO2/TiWOx thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ko-Wei; Hu, Chung-Hsuan; Hua, Li-Yu; Lee, Chin-Tan; Zhao, Yu-Xiang; Chang, Julian; Yang, Shu-Yi; Han, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Titanium oxide films were formed by sputtering and then TiWOx films were deposited by bipolar pulsed magnetron sputtering with pure titanium and tungsten metal targets. The sputtering of titanium oxide with tungsten enhanced the orientation of the TiO2 (1 0 1) plane of the specimen assemblies. The main varying parameter was the tungsten pulse power. Titanium oxide sputtered with tungsten using a pulsing power of 50 W exhibited a superior hydrophilic property, and a contact angle of 13.1°. This fabrication conditions maximized the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue solution. The mechanism by which the titanium oxide was sputtered with tungsten involves the photogeneration of holes and electron traps, inhibiting the hole-electron recombination, enhancing hydrophilicity and reducing the contact angle.

  5. Square pulse linear transformer driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A. A.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.; Volkov, S. N.; Kondratiev, S. S.; Alexeenko, V. M.; Bayol, F.; Demol, G.; Stygar, W. A.

    2012-04-01

    The linear transformer driver (LTD) technological approach can result in relatively compact devices that can deliver fast, high current, and high-voltage pulses straight out of the LTD cavity without any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The usual LTD architecture [A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. A. Sinebryukhov, B. M. Kovalchuk, V. A. Vizir, S. N Volkov, F. Bayol, A. N. Bastrikov, V. G. Durakov, S. V. Frolov, V. M. Alexeenko, D. H. McDaniel, W. E. Fowler, K. LeCheen, C. Olson, W. A. Stygar, K. W. Struve, J. Porter, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; M. G. Mazarakis, W. E. Fowler, A. A. Kim, V. A. Sinebryukhov, S. T. Rogowski, R. A. Sharpe, D. H. McDaniel, C. L. Olson, J. L. Porter, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, and J. R. Woodworth, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] provides sine shaped output pulses that may not be well suited for some applications like z-pinch drivers, flash radiography, high power microwaves, etc. A more suitable power pulse would have a flat or trapezoidal (rising or falling) top. In this paper, we present the design and first test results of an LTD cavity that generates such a type of output pulse by including within its circular array a number of third harmonic bricks in addition to the main bricks. A voltage adder made out of a square pulse cavity linear array will produce the same shape output pulses provided that the timing of each cavity is synchronized with the propagation of the electromagnetic pulse.

  6. Components for monolithic fiber chirped pulse amplification laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, Michael Craig

    The first portion of this work develops techniques for generating femtosecond-pulses from conventional fabry-perot laser diodes using nonlinear-spectral-broadening techniques in Yb-doped positive dispersion fiber ampliers. The approach employed an injection-locked fabry-perot laser diode followed by two stages of nonlinear-spectral-broadening to generate sub-200fs pulses. This thesis demonstrated that a 60ps gain-switched fabry-perot laser-diode can be injection-locked to generate a single-longitudinal-mode pulse and compressed by nonlinear spectral broadening to 4ps. Two problems have been identified that must be resolved before moving forward with this approach. First, gain-switched pulses from a standard diode-laser have a number of characteristics not well suited for producing clean self-phase-modulation-broadened pulses, such as an asymmetric temporal shape, which has a long pulse tail. Second, though parabolic pulse formation occurs for any arbitrary temporal input pulse profile, deviation from the optimum parabolic input results in extensively spectrally modulated self-phase-modulation-broadened pulses. In conclusion, the approach of generating self-phase-modulation-broadened pulses from pulsed laser diodes has to be modified from the initial approach explored in this thesis. The first Yb-doped chirally-coupled-core ber based systems are demonstrated and characterized in the second portion of this work. Robust single-mode performance independent of excitation or any other external mode management techniques have been demonstrated in Yb-doped chirally-coupled-core fibers. Gain and power efficiency characteristics are not compromised in any way in this novel fiber structure up to the 87W maximum power achieved. Both the small signal gain at 1064nm of 30.3dB, and the wavelength dependence of the small signal gain were comparable to currently deployed large-mode-area-fiber technology. The efficiencies of the laser and amplifier were measured to be 75% and 54

  7. Parallel image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A parallel compression algorithm for the 16,384 processor MPP machine was developed. The serial version of the algorithm can be viewed as a combination of on-line dynamic lossless test compression techniques (which employ simple learning strategies) and vector quantization. These concepts are described. How these concepts are combined to form a new strategy for performing dynamic on-line lossy compression is discussed. Finally, the implementation of this algorithm in a massively parallel fashion on the MPP is discussed.

  8. Accumulation of selenium and changes in the activity of inulinase and catalase in the cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus on pulsed electric field treatment.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Urszula; Jamroz, Jerzy

    2010-07-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) of 1Hz, 1.5 kV, and 1 ms increased the activities of catalase and inulinase over the whole range of applied Se concentrations compared with the non-treated cultures. A significant effect of selenium concentration (in the range of 5-14 microg/ml) on both intra- and extracellular enzyme activities was noted. At a Se concentration of 10 microg/ml, the activities of intra- and extracellular inulinases and extracellular catalase in the PEF-treated cultures reached the maximum of 71 U/g d.m., 46 U/g d.m., and approx. 8 U/ml, respectively. The maximum activity of intracellular catalase of approx. 6 U/ ml (with and without PEF) was recorded at 5 microg Se/ml. Further increasing of selenium concentration caused a decrease in the activity of the enzymes.

  9. Generation of short and intense attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sabih Ud Din

    intense SAP from an APT driven by blue laser pulses. We also demonstrated compression of long blue pulses into >240 microJ broad-bandwidth pulses using neon filled hollow core fiber, which is the highest reported pulse energy of short blue pulses. However, compression of phase using chirp mirrors is still a technical challenge.

  10. Sequential neural text compression.

    PubMed

    Schmidhuber, J; Heil, S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that neural networks may be promising tools for data compression without loss of information. We combine predictive neural nets and statistical coding techniques to compress text files. We apply our methods to certain short newspaper articles and obtain compression ratios exceeding those of the widely used Lempel-Ziv algorithms (which build the basis of the UNIX functions "compress" and "gzip"). The main disadvantage of our methods is that they are about three orders of magnitude slower than standard methods.

  11. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  12. Method and apparatus for pulse stacking

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    An active pulse stacking system including an etalon and an electro-optical modulator apparatus combined with a pulse-forming network capable of forming and summing a sequence of time-delayed optical waveforms arising from, for example, a single laser pulse. The Pockels cell pulse stacker may attain an efficiency of about 2.6% while providing a controllable faster-than-exponential time rise in transmitted pulse intensity.

  13. 16.6 J chirped femtosecond laser pulses from a diode-pumped Yb:CaF2 amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Alexander; Hornung, Marco; Keppler, Sebastian; Schorcht, Frank; Hellwing, Marco; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Körner, Jörg; Sävert, Alexander; Siebold, Mathias; Schnepp, Matthias; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2014-03-15

    We report the amplification of laser pulses at a center wavelength of 1034 nm to an energy of 16.6 J from a fully diode-pumped amplifier using Yb:CaF2 as the active medium. Pumped by a total optical power of 300 kW from high-power laser diodes, a gain factor of g=6.1 was achieved in a nine-pass amplifier configuration agreeing with numerical simulations. A measured spectral bandwidth of 10 nm full width at half-maximum promises a bandwidth-limited compression of the pulses down to a duration of 150 fs. These are, to our knowledge, the most energetic laser pulses achieved from a diode-pumped chirped-pulse amplifier so far.

  14. Crackling noise during failure of alumina under compression: the effect of porosity.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Villa, Pedro O; Baró, Jordi; Planes, Antoni; Salje, Ekhard K H; Sellappan, Pathikumar; Kriven, Waltraud M; Vives, Eduard

    2013-07-24

    We study acoustic emission avalanches during the process of failure of porous alumina samples (Al2O3) under compression. Specimens with different porosities ranging from 30% to 59% have been synthesized from a mixture of fine-grained alumina and graphite. The compressive strength as well as the characteristics of the acoustic activity have been determined. The statistical analysis of the recorded acoustic emission pulses reveals, for all porosities, a broad distribution of energies with a fat tail, compatible with the existence of an underlying critical point. In the region of 35%-55% porosity, the energy distributions of the acoustic emission signals are compatible with a power-law behaviour over two decades in energy with an exponent ϵ = 1.8 ± 0.1. PMID:23817836

  15. 3M Coban 2 Layer Compression Therapy: Intelligent Compression Dynamics to Suit Different Patient Needs

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Tucker, Joseph; Schnobrich, Ellen; Parks, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Chronic venous insufficiency can lead to recalcitrant leg ulcers. Compression has been shown to be effective in healing these ulcers, but most products are difficult to apply and uncomfortable for patients, leading to inconsistent/ineffective clinical application and poor compliance. In addition, compression presents risks for patients with an ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) <0.8 because of the possibility of further compromising the arterial circulation. The ABPI is the ratio of systolic leg blood pressure (taken at ankle) to systolic arm blood pressure (taken above elbow, at brachial artery). This is measured to assess a patient's lower extremity arterial perfusion before initiating compression therapy.1 Solution Using materials science, two-layer compression systems with controlled compression and a low profile were developed. These materials allow for a more consistent bandage application with better control of the applied compression, and their low profile is compatible with most footwear, increasing patient acceptance and compliance with therapy. The original 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Compression System is suited for patients with an ABPI ≥0.8; 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Lite Compression System can be used on patients with ABPI ≥0.5. New Technology Both compression systems are composed of two layers that combine to create an inelastic sleeve conforming to the limb contour to provide a consistent proper pressure profile to reduce edema. In addition, they slip significantly less than other compression products and improve patient daily living activities and physical symptoms. Indications for Use Both compression systems are indicated for patients with venous leg ulcers, lymphedema, and other conditions where compression therapy is appropriate. Caution As with any compression system, caution must be used when mixed venous and arterial disease is present to not induce any damage. These products are not indicated when the ABPI is <0.5. PMID:24527315

  16. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  17. Ultrafast compression: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In the nearly 20 years since the first sub-ps time resolution compression wave measurements, ultrafast compression experiments have progressed from simple demonstrations to robust discoveries of extreme phenomena spanning material plasticity, solid-solid phase transitions, and shock induced chemistry. At strain rates above 109 s-1, many usual assumptions about material response no longer apply - virtually every system investigated on sub-ns time scales exhibits phenomena which are unfamiliar to conventional intuition about compression waves. This diverse of range of phenomena reflects the fundamental complexity of dynamic material behavior, but it has also been a significant impediment to a full understanding of material compression. Nonetheless, ultrafast experiments afford a number of practical advantages, primarily related to scale. Using an inexpensive table-top laser, it is possible to obtain information on materials at extreme conditions with a low laser pulse energy and a high data rate. In this talk, I will briefly review the history of ultrafast compression, significant results, and future opportunities. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. [Medical image compression: a review].

    PubMed

    Noreña, Tatiana; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Modern medicine is an increasingly complex activity , based on the evidence ; it consists of information from multiple sources : medical record text , sound recordings , images and videos generated by a large number of devices . Medical imaging is one of the most important sources of information since they offer comprehensive support of medical procedures for diagnosis and follow-up . However , the amount of information generated by image capturing gadgets quickly exceeds storage availability in radiology services , generating additional costs in devices with greater storage capacity . Besides , the current trend of developing applications in cloud computing has limitations, even though virtual storage is available from anywhere, connections are made through internet . In these scenarios the optimal use of information necessarily requires powerful compression algorithms adapted to medical activity needs . In this paper we present a review of compression techniques used for image storage , and a critical analysis of them from the point of view of their use in clinical settings. PMID:23715317

  19. [Medical image compression: a review].

    PubMed

    Noreña, Tatiana; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Modern medicine is an increasingly complex activity , based on the evidence ; it consists of information from multiple sources : medical record text , sound recordings , images and videos generated by a large number of devices . Medical imaging is one of the most important sources of information since they offer comprehensive support of medical procedures for diagnosis and follow-up . However , the amount of information generated by image capturing gadgets quickly exceeds storage availability in radiology services , generating additional costs in devices with greater storage capacity . Besides , the current trend of developing applications in cloud computing has limitations, even though virtual storage is available from anywhere, connections are made through internet . In these scenarios the optimal use of information necessarily requires powerful compression algorithms adapted to medical activity needs . In this paper we present a review of compression techniques used for image storage , and a critical analysis of them from the point of view of their use in clinical settings.

  20. Development of an active detector for the characterization of the late-time radiation environment from a reactor pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Luker, S.M.; Griffin, P.J.; Kolb, N.R.; Naranjo, G.N.; Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: This paper discusses the use of a commercially available {sup 235}U fission chamber, with a matching compensating ion chamber, originally sold as a single-ended detector with the signal conducted over the shield of a coaxial cable. The authors designed an aluminum housing that isolates the two detectors and converts the signals to full differential mode as a noise-reduction technique. The signals are processed using the switched resistor technique to extend the signal range to longer times from the peak of the pulse [Luker, S. M., Griffin, P. J., King, D. B., and Suo-Anttila, A. J., 'Improved Diagnostics for Analysis of a Reactor Pulse Radiation Environment,' 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry, Akersloot, Netherlands, May 25, 2008, pp. 4-6.]. The newly configured fission chamber assembly has been used at the annular core research reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to provide a high-fidelity characterization of the neutron time profile from a pulsed operation. (authors)

  1. In situ derivation of sulfur activated TiO{sub 2} nano porous layers through pulse-micro arc oxidation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, M.R.; Golestani-Fard, F.; Moshfegh, A.Z.; Molaei, Roya

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} S-TiO{sub 2} layers were grown by MAO technique under pulse current for the first time. {yields} Effect of growth parameters on chemical composition, topography, and morphology of the layers was studied. {yields} A correlation between photocatalytic performance and growth conditions was proposed. -- Abstract: Micro arc oxidation technique, as a facile and efficient process, was employed to grow sulfur doped titania porous layers. This research sheds light on the photocatalytic performance of the micro arc oxidized S-TiO{sub 2} nano-porous layers fabricated under pulse current. Morphological and topographical studies, performed by SEM and AFM techniques, revealed that increasing the frequency and/or decreasing the duty cycle resulted in formation of finer pores and smoother surfaces. XRD and XPS results showed that the layers consisted of anatase and rutile phases whose fraction was observed to change depending on the synthesis conditions. The highest anatase relative content was obtained at the frequency of 500 Hz and the duty cycle of 5%. Furthermore, photocatalytic activity of the layers was examined by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under both ultraviolet and visible photo irradiations. Maximum photodegradation reaction rate constants over the pulse-grown S-TiO{sub 2} layers were respectively measured as 0.0202 and 0.0110 min{sup -1} for ultraviolet and visible irradiations.

  2. Compressing TV-image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.; Rice, R. F.; Schlutsmeyer, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    Compressing technique calculates activity estimator for each segment of image line. Estimator is used in conjunction with allowable bits per line, N, to determine number of bits necessary to code each segment and which segments can tolerate truncation. Preprocessed line data are then passed to adaptive variable-length coder, which selects optimum transmission code. Method increases capacity of broadcast and cable television transmissions and helps reduce size of storage medium for video and digital audio recordings.

  3. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Gaussian laser pulse in a multi ions plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Milani, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Spatiotemporal evolutions of Gaussian laser pulse propagating through a plasma with multiple charged ions are studied, taking into account the ponderomotive nonlinearity. Coupled differential equations for beam width and pulse length parameters are established and numerically solved using paraxial ray approximation. In one-dimensional geometry, effects of laser and plasma parameters such as laser intensity, plasma density, and temperature on the longitudinal pulse compression and the laser intensity distribution are analyzed for plasmas with singly and doubly charged ions. The results demonstrate that self-compression occurs in a laser intensity range with a turning point intensity in which the self-compression process has its strongest extent. The results also show that the multiply ionized ions have different effect on the pulse compression above and below turning point intensity. Finally, three-dimensional geometry is used to analyze the simultaneous evolution of both self-focusing and self-compression of Gaussian laser pulse in such plasmas.

  5. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam.

    PubMed

    Roy, P K; Yu, S S; Henestroza, E; Anders, A; Bieniosek, F M; Coleman, J; Eylon, S; Greenway, W G; Leitner, M; Logan, B G; Waldron, W L; Welch, D R; Thoma, C; Sefkow, A B; Gilson, E P; Efthimion, P C; Davidson, R C

    2005-12-01

    Longitudinal compression of a velocity-tailored, intense neutralized beam at 300 keV, 25 mA has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. This measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  6. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W. G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2005-09-08

    Longitudinal compression of a velocity-tailored, intense neutralized K{sup +} beam at 300 keV, 25 mA has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. This measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  7. Magnetically guided fast electrons in cylindrically compressed matter.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J; Koenig, M; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Beg, F N; Benedetti, C; Brambrink, E; Chawla, S; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; Galimberti, M; Gizzi, L A; Gremillet, L; Heathcote, R; Higginson, D P; Hulin, S; Jafer, R; Koester, P; Labate, L; Lancaster, K L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Nazarov, W; Nicolai, P; Pasley, J; Ramis, R; Richetta, M; Santos, J J; Sgattoni, A; Spindloe, C; Vauzour, B; Vinci, T; Volpe, L

    2011-08-01

    Fast electrons produced by a 10 ps, 160 J laser pulse through laser-compressed plastic cylinders are studied experimentally and numerically in the context of fast ignition. K(α)-emission images reveal a collimated or scattered electron beam depending on the initial density and the compression timing. A numerical transport model shows that implosion-driven electrical resistivity gradients induce strong magnetic fields able to guide the electrons. The good agreement with measured beam sizes provides the first experimental evidence for fast-electron magnetic collimation in laser-compressed matter. PMID:21902333

  8. Fractal image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  9. Amplification of 1 ps Pulse Length Beam by Stimulated Raman Scattering of a 1 ns Beam in a Low Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kirkwood, R K; Niemann, C; Meezan, N; Wilks, S C; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Hur, M S; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N; Malkin, V M

    2005-06-12

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression with large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS [1] or non-resonantly [2]. We describe experiments in which a plasma suitable for pulse compression is created, and amplification of an ultra short pulse beam is demonstrated.

  10. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Adler, Gail K.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: (I) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, (II) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, (III) the sampling interval, and (IV) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing, and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-minute intervals over 24 hours from 10 healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 hours, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions. PMID:25935025

  11. Shock-wave studies of anomalous compressibility of glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodets, A. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Savinykh, A. S.; Kim, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The physico-mechanical properties of amorphous glassy carbon are investigated under shock compression up to 10 GPa. Experiments are carried out on the continuous recording of the mass velocity of compression pulses propagating in glassy carbon samples with initial densities of 1.502(5) g/cm3 and 1.55(2) g/cm3. It is shown that, in both cases, a compression wave in glassy carbon contains a leading precursor with amplitude of 0.135(5) GPa. It is established that, in the range of pressures up to 2 GPa, a shock discontinuity in glassy carbon is transformed into a broadened compression wave, and shock waves are formed in the release wave, which generally means the anomalous compressibility of the material in both the compression and release waves. It is shown that, at pressure higher than 3 GPa, anomalous behavior turns into normal behavior, accompanied by the formation of a shock compression wave. In the investigated area of pressure, possible structural changes in glassy carbon under shock compression have a reversible character. A physico-mechanical model of glassy carbon is proposed that involves the equation of state and a constitutive relation for Poisson's ratio and allows the numerical simulation of physico-mechanical and thermophysical properties of glassy carbon of different densities in the region of its anomalous compressibility.

  12. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  13. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2016-06-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-μm laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  14. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  15. ZnO nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation and their composite with cotton fabric: Preparation and study of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichnyi, Valery; Shabalina, Anastasiia; Lapin, Ivan; Goncharova, Daria; Nemoykina, Anna

    2016-05-01

    A simple deposition method was used to prepare a ZnO/cotton fabric composite from water and ethanol dispersions of ZnO nanoparticles obtained by the pulsed laser ablation method. The structure and composition of the nanoparticles from dispersions and as-prepared composites were studied using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and spectroscopy. The nanoparticles and composite obtained exhibited antibacterial activity to three different pathogenic microorganisms-Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. An attempt to understand a mechanism of bactericidal effect of ZnO nanoparticles was made. It was shown that zinc ions and hydrogen peroxide were not responsible for antibacterial activity of the particles and the composite, and surface properties of nanoparticles played an important role in antibacterial activity of zinc oxide. The proposed composite is a promising material for use as an antibacterial bandage.

  16. All-optical control and metrology of electron pulses.

    PubMed

    Kealhofer, C; Schneider, W; Ehberger, D; Ryabov, A; Krausz, F; Baum, P

    2016-04-22

    Short electron pulses are central to time-resolved atomic-scale diffraction and electron microscopy, streak cameras, and free-electron lasers. We demonstrate phase-space control and characterization of 5-picometer electron pulses using few-cycle terahertz radiation, extending concepts of microwave electron pulse compression and streaking to terahertz frequencies. Optical-field control of electron pulses provides synchronism to laser pulses and offers a temporal resolution that is ultimately limited by the rise-time of the optical fields applied. We used few-cycle waveforms carried at 0.3 terahertz to compress electron pulses by a factor of 12 with a timing stability of <4 femtoseconds (root mean square) and measure them by means of field-induced beam deflection (streaking). Scaling the concept toward multiterahertz control fields holds promise for approaching the electronic time scale in time-resolved electron diffraction and microscopy. PMID:27102476

  17. SPIDER: A decade of measuring ultrashort pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. E.; Monmayrant, A.; Gorza, S.-P.; Wasylczyk, P.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2008-04-01

    It was ten years ago in Rochester, New York that the first SPIDER was built. This simple acronym belies the subtleties of its inner workings; Spectral Phase Interferometry for Direct Electric-field Reconstruction (the ``f'' in field conveniently missed the cut) is a device that measures ultrashort pulses, utilizing spectral shearing interferometry and directly recovering the spectral phase. The very first SPIDER apparatus occupied nearly half an optical table, used a scanning monochromator, and had no computerized inversion routine. In the intervening decade, SPIDER has grown up. It has found a strong foothold in ultrafast laboratories throughout the world. Multiple groups have found useful new applications with this vital measurement tool, while others have contributed to the improvement of SPIDER itself, reaching to ever shorter pulses, new wavelength regimes, and making devices more sensitive, robust, smaller and faster. It also adapts to a field of research that changes rapidly. It was first designed to track and quantify the remaining spectral phase in a pulse to perfect its compression. In ten years, with the advent of pulse shapers, the real benefits of field diagnostics are becoming apparent. We have shifted away from the race towards the shortest IR pulse to a wide use of complex shaped pulses in almost every spectral range from far IR to XUV. But the quest of the shortest pulse is not over and new compression techniques utilize really broad spectra that are highly structured. All these applications provide new challenges for characterization techniques.

  18. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  19. Gonadal steroid replacement reverses gonadectomy-induced changes in the corticosterone pulse profile and stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Seale, J V; Wood, S A; Atkinson, H C; Harbuz, M S; Lightman, S L

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the effects of gonadal hormone replacement on the pulsatile parameters underlying basal circadian corticosterone secretion in castrated male and ovariectomized female rats using an automated sampling system. Blood was collected from freely moving, unanaesthetized rats every 10 min over a 24-h period and sampling was continued during a noise stress and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Castrated male rats had markedly higher corticosterone levels than intact controls. This was reflected by increased number and frequency of pulses in addition to an increase in the pulse height and amplitude under both basal circadian and stress conditions. Hormone replacement with either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone returned these corticosterone levels and circadian profile to those found in intact males, confirming an androgen-mediated effect. Ovariectomized females had significantly lower basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels with lower frequency and amplitude of corticosterone pulses than intact females. 17beta-oestradiol replacement returned basal levels, pulsatile measurements and stress-induced corticosterone levels to those found in intact females. Three hours post-LPS administration, castrated males demonstrated significantly higher values of parvocellular paraventricular nucleus (PVN) arginine vasopressin and corticotrophin-releasing factor and anterior pituitary pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA while ovariectomized females showed significantly lower levels of all three transcripts compared to intact controls. PVN glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels 3 h post-LPS administration were significantly decreased in castrated males and significantly increased in ovariectomized female rats. Replacement of gonadal steroids resulted in a return to the levels found in intact controls after LPS. Gonadal steroid replacement is sufficient to reverse changes in the pulsatile characteristics of corticosterone release after gonadectomy. In addition

  20. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.