Science.gov

Sample records for active receptor conformation

  1. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  2. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A; Lynch, Joseph W

    2007-12-01

    Models describing the structural changes mediating Cys loop receptor activation generally give little attention to the possibility that different agonists may promote activation via distinct M2 pore-lining domain structural rearrangements. We investigated this question by comparing the effects of different ligands on the conformation of the external portion of the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor M2 domain. Conformational flexibility was assessed by tethering a rhodamine fluorophore to cysteines introduced at the 19' or 22' positions and monitoring fluorescence and current changes during channel activation. During glycine activation, fluorescence of the label attached to R19'C increased by approximately 20%, and the emission peak shifted to lower wavelengths, consistent with a more hydrophobic fluorophore environment. In contrast, ivermectin activated the receptors without producing a fluorescence change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus, results from two separate labeled residues support the conclusion that the glycine receptor M2 domain responds with distinct conformational changes to activation by different agonists. PMID:17911099

  3. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%), the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%), the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86%) and 8/9 (89%) for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71%) and 7/9 (78%) for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by photochemical isomerization

  4. Exploring the active conformation of cyclohexane carboxylate positive allosteric modulators of the type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Xavier; Harrak, Youssef; Trapero, Ana; González-Bulnes, Patricia; Malhaire, Fanny; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Goudet, Cyril; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu

    2014-12-01

    The active conformation of a family of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4 ) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) with the cyclohexane 1,2-dicarboxylic scaffold present in cis-2-(3,5-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)cyclohexanecarboxylic acid (VU0155041) was investigated by testing structurally similar six-membered ring compounds that have a locked conformation. The norbornane and cyclohexane molecules designed as mGlu4 conformational probes and the enantiomers of the trans diastereomer were computationally characterized and tested in mGlu4 pharmacological assays. The results support a VU0155041 active conformation, with the chair cyclohexane having the aromatic amide substituent in an axial position and the carboxylate in an equatorial position. Moreover, the receptor displays enantiomeric discrimination of the chiral PAMs. The constructed pharmacophore characterized a highly constrained mGlu4 allosteric binding site, thus providing a step forward in structure-based drug design for mGlu4 PAMs.

  5. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  6. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  7. Potent and selective activation of abscisic acid receptors in vivo by mutational stabilization of their agonist-bound conformation

    PubMed Central

    Mosquna, Assaf; Peterson, Francis C.; Park, Sang-Youl; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrabactin resistance (PYR) 1 and its relatives belong to a family of soluble abscisic acid (ABA) receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) when in their agonist-stabilized conformation. Given their switch-like properties, we envisioned that mutations that stabilize their agonist-bound conformation could be used to activate signaling in vivo. To identify such mutations, we subjected PYR1 to site-saturation mutagenesis at 39 highly conserved residues that participate in ABA or PP2C contacts. All 741 possible single amino acid substitutions at these sites were tested to identify variants that increase basal PYR1-PP2C interactions, which uncovered activating mutations in 10 residues that preferentially cluster in PYR1's gate loop and C-terminal helix. The mutations cause measurable but incomplete receptor activation in vitro; however, specific triple and quadruple mutant combinations were constructed that promote an agonist-bound conformation, as measured by heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, and lead to full receptor activation. Moreover, these mutations retain functionality when introduced into divergent family members, and can therefore be used to dissect individual receptor function in vivo, which has been problematic because of redundancy and family size. Expression of activated PYL2 in Arabidopsis seeds activates ABA signaling by a number of measures: modulation of ABA-regulated gene expression, induction of hyperdormancy, and suppression of ABA deficiency phenotypes in the aba2-1 mutant. Our results set the stage for systematic gain-of-function studies of PYR1 and related ABA receptors and reveal that, despite the large number of receptors, activation of a single receptor is sufficient to activate signaling in planta. PMID:22139369

  8. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyl estrogen receptor binding affinity: An assessment of conformer flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, S.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Mekenyan, O.G.

    1996-11-01

    A diverse group of xenobiotics has a high binding affinity to the estrogen receptor (ER), suggesting that it can accommodate large variability in ligand structure. Relationships between xenobiotic surface, binding affinity, and estrogenic response have been suggested to be dependent on the conformational structures of the ligands. To explore the influence of conformational flexibility on ER binding affinity, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study was undertaken with estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, and a set of polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyls (PCHBs) of environmental concern. Although the low-energy minima of the PCHB congeners suggested that interconversions among conformers were likely, the electronic parameters associated with the conformer geometries for a specific PCHB congener could vary significantly. The results of the QSAR analysis suggested that among the PCHBs studied, the most polarizable conformers (lower absolute volume polarizability values) were most closely associated with ER binding affinity. Across the set of polarizable conformers, which did not include the low-energy gas-phase conformers, the electron donating properties of the hydroxy moiety and the aromatic component of the estradiol A ring analogue in the PCHBs were found to be correlated with higher ER binding affinity.

  9. Conformational Dynamics of Kir3.1/Kir3.2 Channel Activation Via δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Nagi, Karim; Audet, Nicolas; Sleno, Rory; Amraei, Mohammad; Hogue, Mireille; Balboni, Gianfranco; Schiller, Peter W.; Bouvier, Michel; Hébert, Terence E.; Pineyro, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed how conformational information encoded by ligand binding to δ-opioid receptors (DORs) is transmitted to Kir3.1/Kir3.2 channels. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were transfected with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) donor/acceptor pairs that allowed us to evaluate independently reciprocal interactions among signaling partners. These and coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that DORs, Gβγ, and Kir3 subunits constitutively interacted with one another. GαoA associated with DORs and Gβγ, but despite being part of the complex, no evidence of its direct association with the channel was obtained. DOR activation by different ligands left DOR-Kir3 interactions unmodified but modulated BRET between DOR-GαoA, DOR-Gβγ, GαoA-Gβγ, and Gβγ-Kir3 interfaces. Ligand-induced BRET changes assessing Gβγ-Kir3.1 subunit interaction 1) followed similar kinetics to those monitoring the GαoA-Gβγ interface, 2) displayed the same order of efficacy as those observed at the DOR-Gβγ interface, 3) were sensitive to pertussis toxin, and 4) were predictive of whether a ligand could evoke channel currents. Conformational changes at the Gβγ/Kir3 interface were lost when Kir3.1 subunits were replaced by a mutant lacking essential sites for Gβγ-mediated activation. Thus, conformational information encoded by agonist binding to the receptor is relayed to the channel via structural rearrangements that involve repositioning of Gβγ with respect to DORs, GαoA, and channel subunits. Further, the fact that BRET changes at the Gβγ-Kir3 interface are predictive of a ligand’s ability to induce channel currents points to these conformational biosensors as screening tools for identifying GPCR ligands that induce Kir3 channel activation. PMID:23175530

  10. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor by carbaryl: Computational evidence of the ability of carbaryl to assume a planar conformation.

    PubMed

    Casado, Susana; Alonso, Mercedes; Herradón, Bernardo; Tarazona, José V; Navas, José

    2006-12-01

    It has been accepted that aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands are compounds with two or more aromatic rings in a coplanar conformation. Although general agreement exists that carbaryl is able to activate the AhR, it has been proposed that such activation could occur through alternative pathways without ligand binding. This idea was supported by studies showing a planar conformation of carbaryl as unlikely. The objective of the present work was to clarify the process of AhR activation by carbaryl. In rat H4IIE cells permanently transfected with a luciferase gene under the indirect control of AhR, incubation with carbaryl led to an increase of luminescence. Ligand binding to the AhR was studied by means of a cell-free in vitro system in which the activation of AhR can occur only by ligand binding. In this system, exposure to carbaryl also led to activation of AhR. These results were similar to those obtained with the AhR model ligand beta-naphthoflavone, although this compound exhibited higher potency than carbaryl in both assays. By means of computational modeling (molecular mechanics and quantum chemical calculations), the structural characteristics and electrostatic properties of carbaryl were described in detail, and it was observed that the substituent at C-1 and the naphthyl ring were not coplanar. Assuming that carbaryl would interact with the AhR through a hydrogen bond, this interaction was studied computationally using hydrogen fluoride as a model H-bond donor. Under this situation, the stabilization energy of the carbaryl molecule would permit it to adopt a planar conformation. These results are in accordance with the mechanism traditionally accepted for AhR activation: Binding of ligands in a planar conformation.

  11. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  12. Difference and Influence of Inactive and Active States of Cannabinoid Receptor Subtype CB2: From Conformation to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Feng, Zhiwei; Ma, Shifan; Zhang, Yu; Tong, Qin; Alqarni, Mohammed Hamed; Gou, Xiaojun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-06-27

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain, osteoporosis, immune system, cancer, and drug abuse. The lack of an experimental three-dimensional CB2 structure has hindered not only the development of studies of conformational differences between the inactive and active CB2 but also the rational discovery of novel functional compounds targeting CB2. In this work, we constructed models of both inactive and active CB2 by homology modeling. Then we conducted two comparative 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the two systems-the active CB2 bound with both the agonist and G protein and the inactive CB2 bound with inverse agonist-to analyze the conformational difference of CB2 proteins and the key residues involved in molecular recognition. Our results showed that the inactive CB2 and the inverse agonist remained stable during the MD simulation. However, during the MD simulations, we observed dynamical details about the breakdown of the "ionic lock" between R131(3.50) and D240(6.30) as well as the outward/inward movements of transmembrane domains of the active CB2 that bind with G proteins and agonist (TM5, TM6, and TM7). All of these results are congruent with the experimental data and recent reports. Moreover, our results indicate that W258(6.48) in TM6 and residues in TM4 (V164(4.56)-L169(4.61)) contribute greatly to the binding of the agonist on the basis of the binding energy decomposition, while residues S180-F183 in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) may be of importance in recognition of the inverse agonist. Furthermore, pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening were carried out for the inactive and active CB2 models in parallel. Among all 10 hits, two compounds exhibited novel scaffolds and can be used as novel chemical probes for future studies of CB2. Importantly, our studies show that the hits obtained from the inactive CB2 model mainly act as inverse agonist(s) or neutral

  13. Difference and Influence of Inactive and Active States of Cannabinoid Receptor Subtype CB2: From Conformation to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Feng, Zhiwei; Ma, Shifan; Zhang, Yu; Tong, Qin; Alqarni, Mohammed Hamed; Gou, Xiaojun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-06-27

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain, osteoporosis, immune system, cancer, and drug abuse. The lack of an experimental three-dimensional CB2 structure has hindered not only the development of studies of conformational differences between the inactive and active CB2 but also the rational discovery of novel functional compounds targeting CB2. In this work, we constructed models of both inactive and active CB2 by homology modeling. Then we conducted two comparative 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the two systems-the active CB2 bound with both the agonist and G protein and the inactive CB2 bound with inverse agonist-to analyze the conformational difference of CB2 proteins and the key residues involved in molecular recognition. Our results showed that the inactive CB2 and the inverse agonist remained stable during the MD simulation. However, during the MD simulations, we observed dynamical details about the breakdown of the "ionic lock" between R131(3.50) and D240(6.30) as well as the outward/inward movements of transmembrane domains of the active CB2 that bind with G proteins and agonist (TM5, TM6, and TM7). All of these results are congruent with the experimental data and recent reports. Moreover, our results indicate that W258(6.48) in TM6 and residues in TM4 (V164(4.56)-L169(4.61)) contribute greatly to the binding of the agonist on the basis of the binding energy decomposition, while residues S180-F183 in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) may be of importance in recognition of the inverse agonist. Furthermore, pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening were carried out for the inactive and active CB2 models in parallel. Among all 10 hits, two compounds exhibited novel scaffolds and can be used as novel chemical probes for future studies of CB2. Importantly, our studies show that the hits obtained from the inactive CB2 model mainly act as inverse agonist(s) or neutral

  14. Conformational NMR Study of Bistriazolyl Anion Receptors.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Damjan; Merckx, Tamara; Dehaen, Wim; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Conformational features of pyridine- and pyrimidine-based bistriazolyl anion receptors dissolved in acetonitrile-d3 were assessed by multidimensional, heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. NOESY correlation signals suggested preorganization of both host molecules in solution in the absence of anions. In addition, only a single set of signals was observed in the 1H NMR spectra, which suggested a symmetrical conformation of anion receptors or their conformational exchange that is fast on the NMR time-scale. Furthermore, the predominant conformations of the pyridine- and pyrimidine-based anion receptors are preserved upon addition of chloride, bromide, and acetate anions. Chemical shift changes observed upon addition of anions showed that the NH (thio)urea and triazole protons are involved in anion-receptor interactions through hydrogen bonding. PMID:27640375

  15. Asymmetric Synthesis of Conformationally Constrained Fingolimod Analogues—Discovery of an Orally Active Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Type-1 Agonist and Receptor Type-3 Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ran; Snyder, Ashley H.; Kharel, Yugesh; Schaffter, Lisa; Sun, Qin; Kennedy, Perry C.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Compound 1 (FTY720, Fingolimod) represents a new generation of immunosuppressant that modulates lymphocyte trafficking by interacting with the S1P1 receptor. Compound 1 also provides a template molecule for studying the molecular biology of S1P receptors and related enzymes (kinases and phosphatases). In this study, two conformationally constrained analogues of 1 (3a and 3c) were asymmetrically synthesized in high optical purity. In vitro assessment documented that both analogues are Sphk2 substrates, their phosphorylated species are potent S1P1 receptor agonists, and 3a-P is a potent S1P3 antagonist. After oral administration in mice, both compounds evoked lymphopenia, but their duration of action differed markedly. PMID:17994678

  16. Systematic Exploitation of Multiple Receptor Conformations for Virtual Ligand Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bottegoni, Giovanni; Rocchia, Walter; Rueda, Manuel; Abagyan, Ruben; Cavalli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The role of virtual ligand screening in modern drug discovery is to mine large chemical collections and to prioritize for experimental testing a comparatively small and diverse set of compounds with expected activity against a target. Several studies have pointed out that the performance of virtual ligand screening can be improved by taking into account receptor flexibility. Here, we systematically assess how multiple crystallographic receptor conformations, a powerful way of discretely representing protein plasticity, can be exploited in screening protocols to separate binders from non-binders. Our analyses encompass 36 targets of pharmaceutical relevance and are based on actual molecules with reported activity against those targets. The results suggest that an ensemble receptor-based protocol displays a stronger discriminating power between active and inactive molecules as compared to its standard single rigid receptor counterpart. Moreover, such a protocol can be engineered not only to enrich a higher number of active compounds, but also to enhance their chemical diversity. Finally, some clear indications can be gathered on how to select a subset of receptor conformations that is most likely to provide the best performance in a real life scenario. PMID:21625529

  17. Identification of a novel conformationally constrained glucagon receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther C Y; Tu, Meihua; Stevens, Benjamin D; Bian, Jianwei; Aspnes, Gary; Perreault, Christian; Sammons, Matthew F; Wright, Stephen W; Litchfield, John; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Sharma, Raman; Didiuk, Mary T; Ebner, David C; Filipski, Kevin J; Brown, Janice; Atkinson, Karen; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Identification of orally active, small molecule antagonists of the glucagon receptor represents a novel treatment paradigm for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present work discloses novel glucagon receptor antagonists, identified via conformational constraint of current existing literature antagonists. Optimization of lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE or LipE) culminated in enantiomers (+)-trans-26 and (-)-trans-27 which exhibit good physicochemical and in vitro drug metabolism profiles. In vivo, significant pharmacokinetic differences were noted with the two enantiomers, which were primarily driven through differences in clearance rates. Enantioselective oxidation by cytochrome P450 was ruled out as a causative factor for pharmacokinetic differences.

  18. Conformational Fluctuations in G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael F.

    2014-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise almost 50% of pharmaceutical drug targets, where rhodopsin is an important prototype and occurs naturally in a lipid membrane. Rhodopsin photoactivation entails 11-cis to all-trans isomerization of the retinal cofactor, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Two important questions are: (1) Is rhodopsin is a simple two-state switch? Or (2) does isomerization of retinal unlock an activated conformational ensemble? For an ensemble-based activation mechanism (EAM) a role for conformational fluctuations is clearly indicated. Solid-state NMR data together with theoretical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations detect increased local mobility of retinal after light activation. Resultant changes in local dynamics of the cofactor initiate large-scale fluctuations of transmembrane helices that expose recognition sites for the signal-transducing G-protein. Time-resolved FTIR studies and electronic spectroscopy further show the conformational ensemble is strongly biased by the membrane lipid composition, as well as pH and osmotic pressure. A new flexible surface model (FSM) describes how the curvature stress field of the membrane governs the energetics of active rhodopsin, due to the spontaneous monolayer curvature of the lipids. Furthermore, influences of osmotic pressure dictate that a large number of bulk water molecules are implicated in rhodopsin activation. Around 60 bulk water molecules activate rhodopsin, which is much larger than the number of structural waters seen in X-ray crystallography, or inferred from studies of bulk hydrostatic pressure. Conformational selection and promoting vibrational motions of rhodopsin lead to activation of the G-protein (transducin). Our biophysical data give a paradigm shift in understanding GPCR activation. The new view is: dynamics and conformational fluctuations involve an ensemble of substates that activate the cognate G-protein in the amplified visual

  19. Estrogen receptor alpha somatic mutations Y537S and D538G confer breast cancer endocrine resistance by stabilizing the activating function-2 binding conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa A; Novick, Scott J; Toy, Weiyi; Green, Bradley; Panchamukhi, Srinivas; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Griffin, Patrick R; Shen, Yang; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene (ESR1), especially Y537S and D538G, have been linked to acquired resistance to endocrine therapies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that these mutants confer ERα constitutive activity and antiestrogen resistance and suggest that ligand-binding domain dysfunction leads to endocrine therapy resistance. Here, we integrate biophysical and structural biology data to reveal how these mutations lead to a constitutively active and antiestrogen-resistant ERα. We show that these mutant ERs recruit coactivator in the absence of hormone while their affinities for estrogen agonist (estradiol) and antagonist (4-hydroxytamoxifen) are reduced. Further, they confer antiestrogen resistance by altering the conformational dynamics of the loop connecting Helix 11 and Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which leads to a stabilized agonist state and an altered antagonist state that resists inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12792.001 PMID:26836308

  20. Conformational transitions linked to active site ligation in human thrombin: effect on the interaction with fibrinogen and the cleavable platelet receptor.

    PubMed

    De Cristofaro, R; De Candia, E; Picozzi, M; Landolfi, R

    1995-01-27

    An experimental strategy based on solution viscosity perturbation allowed us to study the energetics of amide-substrates, p-aminobenzamidine (p-ABZ) and proflavin binding to the catalytic site of two proteolyzed forms of alpha-thrombin, i.e. zeta- and gamma T-thrombin. These thrombin derivatives are cleaved at the Leu144-Gly150 loop and at the fibrinogen recognition exosite (FRS), respectively. A phenomenological analysis of thermodynamic data showed that the amide substrates and p-ABZ interactions with zeta-thrombin were respectively, associated with a chemical compensation (i.e. the linear relationship between entropy and enthalpy of binding) and a hydrophobic phenomenon (i.e. a change in the standard heat capacity). The latter was slightly lower than that previously observed for a alpha-thrombin (0.78 +/- 0.25 versus 1.01 +/- 0.17 kcal/mol K). Both phenomenon were absent in gamma T-thrombin. The interaction of a alpha-, zeta- and gamma T-thrombin with macromolecular substrates that "bridge-bind" to both the catalytic site (CS) and fibrinogen recognition exosite (FRS), such as fibrinogen and the cleavable platelet receptor (CPR), was also evaluated. These interactions were studied by following fibrinopeptide A (FpA) release and by measuring intraplatelet Ca2+ changes induced by thrombin-CPR interaction. It was found that the free energy of activation (RT ln Kcat/Km) for both fibrinogen and CPR hydrolysis followed the same hierarchy, i.e. alpha > zeta > gamma. Moreover, the values of delta Cp for alpha-, zeta- and gamma T-thrombin interaction with p-ABZ were found to be linearly correlated to the free energy of activation for both fibrinogen and CPR cleavage. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that: (1) the Leu144-Gly150 loop and the FRS are both involved in the conformational transition linked to the binding of p-aminobenzamidine to the thrombin active site; (2) the extent of thrombin's capacity to undergo conformational transitions in alpha-, zeta- and gamma

  1. Proteolytic degradation of the RGD-binding and non-RGD-binding conformers of human platelet integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa: clues for identification of regions involved in the receptor's activation.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J J; Mann, K; Schäfer, W; Fernandez-Lafuente, R; Guisán, J M

    1994-01-01

    The human integrin glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa plays a central role in haemostasis as an inducible receptor for fibrinogen and other RGD-containing adhesive proteins at the platelet plasma membrane. Expression of the fibrinogen receptor on platelet activation involves conformational changes in the quaternary structure of GPIIb/IIIa. Little is known, however, about the nature of this conformational transition. Given that isolated GPIIb/IIIa contains a mixture of RGD-binding and non-RGD-binding heterodimers, we used limited proteolysis as a tool for investigating the structural differences between the two conformers. Comparison of their fragmentation patterns shows that, whereas in the non-RGD-binding form of GPIIb/IIIa the N-terminal half of the heavy chain of GPIIb (GPIIbH) and the central region of GPIIIa are cleaved by endoproteinase Arg-C, these domains associate tightly with one another in the RGD-binding GPIIb/IIIa and are thus protected from proteolysis. In addition, the C-terminal half of GPIIb becomes more susceptible to degradation in the non-RGD-binding GPIIb/IIIa conformer. Our interpretation, in the context of available structural and functional data, is that a major relative reorientation of the GPIIbH and GPIIIa extracellular domains takes place along the subunit interface during the conformational transition of the platelet integrin. Images Figure 1 PMID:8129707

  2. Spacer conformation in biologically active molecules. Part 2. Structure and conformation of 4-[2-(diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine and its diphenylmethoxy analog—potential 5-HT 1A receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak-Wojciechowska, J.; Fruziński, A.; Czylkowski, R.; Paluchowska, M. H.; Mokrosz, M. J.

    2003-09-01

    As a part of studies on biologically active molecule structures with aliphatic linking chain, the structures of 4-[2-diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride ( 1) and 4-[2-diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine fumarate ( 2) have been reported. In both compounds, four atomic non-all-carbons linking chains (N)C-C-X-C are present. The conformation of that linking spacer depends on the nature of the X-atom. The preferred conformation for chain with XNH has been found to be fully extended while for that with XO—the bend one. It was confirmed by conformational calculations (strain energy distribution and random search) and crystallographic data, including statistics from CCDC.

  3. Functional Modulation of a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Conformational Landscape in a Lipid Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, Marina; Damian, Marjorie; Lescop, Ewen; Point, Elodie; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Levy, Daniel; Marie, Jacky; Guittet, Eric; Banères, Jean-Louis; Catoire, Laurent J

    2016-09-01

    Mapping the conformational landscape of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and in particular how this landscape is modulated by the membrane environment, is required to gain a clear picture of how signaling proceeds. To this end, we have developed an original strategy based on solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance combined with an efficient isotope labeling scheme. This strategy was applied to a typical GPCR, the leukotriene B4 receptor BLT2, reconstituted in a lipid bilayer. Because of this, we are able to provide direct evidence that BLT2 explores a complex landscape that includes four different conformational states for the unliganded receptor. The relative distribution of the different states is modulated by ligands and the sterol content of the membrane, in parallel with the changes in the ability of the receptor to activate its cognate G protein. This demonstrates a conformational coupling between the agonist and the membrane environment that is likely to be fundamental for GPCR signaling.

  4. Conformational analysis for some nonclassical antagonists of histamine H3 receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borota, Ana; Mracec, Maria; Rad, Ramona; Ostopovici, Liliana; Mracec, Mircea

    A conformational search in vacuum for a series of 1,3-substituted pyrrolidine derivatives has been performed using the AMBER, AM1, PM3, and MNDO methods. Conformational analysis of the pyrrolidine ligands suggests that these compounds could have many conformers that populate the low-energy minima on the potential energy surface (PES). The conformational space occupied by the ligands is large and, in vacuum, the rotation barriers of different flexible bonds have energies between 0.5 and thousands of kcal/mol. By optimization, most conformers have energy barriers of 0-5 kcal/mol; thus, they could interconvert easily to obtain better interactions in the receptor active site. Optimized conformers having energy barriers of >5 kcal/mol display bad geometries with very large bond lengths and deformed rings. Shapes and heights of rotation barriers obtained through COSMO-AM1 single-point calculations in water are similar to those obtained from single-point calculations in vacuum. However, in water the energy barriers are lower, allowing most conformers to convert in other low-energy conformers. The best conformers in vacuum and in water are different: the gas phase best conformer has a helical shape, while the best conformer in water has an extended shape.

  5. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:26227798

  6. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  7. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  8. Estimation of ligand efficacies of metabotropic glutamate receptors from conformational forces obtained from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Xue, Fengtian; Faden, Alan I; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2013-06-24

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are G-protein coupled receptors with a large bilobate extracellular ligand binding region (LBR) that resembles a Venus fly trap. Closing of this LBR in the presence of a ligand is associated with the activation of the receptor. From conformational sampling of the LBR-ligand complexes using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we characterized the conformational minima related to the hinge like motion associated with the LBR closing/opening in the presence of known agonists and antagonists. By applying a harmonic restraint on the LBR, we also determined the conformational forces generated by the different ligands. The change in the location of the minima and the conformational forces were used to quantify the efficacies of the ligands. This analysis shows that efficacies can be estimated from the forces of a single conformation of the receptor, indicating the potential of MD simulations as an efficient and useful technique to quantify efficacies, thereby facilitating the rational design of mGluR agonists and antagonists.

  9. Architecture and conformational switch mechanism of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction is initiated by the release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm of myocytes through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). RyRs are homotetrameric channels with a molecular mass of more than 2.2 megadaltons that are regulated by several factors, including ions, small molecules and proteins. Numerous mutations in RyRs have been associated with human diseases. The molecular mechanism underlying the complex regulation of RyRs is poorly understood. Using electron cryomicroscopy, here we determine the architecture of rabbit RyR1 at a resolution of 6.1 Å. We show that the cytoplasmic moiety of RyR1 contains two large α-solenoid domains and several smaller domains, with folds suggestive of participation in protein-protein interactions. The transmembrane domain represents a chimaera of voltage-gated sodium and pH-activated ion channels. We identify the calcium-binding EF-hand domain and show that it functions as a conformational switch allosterically gating the channel. PMID:25470059

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF IN VITRO AUTOPHOSPHORYLATION SITES AND THE EFFECTS OF PHOSPHORYLATION ON THE ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 (ACR4) RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE INTRACELLULAR DOMAIN: INSIGHTS INTO CONFORMATION, OLIGOMERIZATION AND ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthew R.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Townsend, R. Reid; Rao, A. Gururaj

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) is a receptor-like kinase (RLK) that consists of an extracellular domain and an intracellular domain (ICD) with serine/threonine kinase activity. While genetic and cell biology experiments have demonstrated that ACR4 is important in cell fate specification and overall development of the plant, little is known about the biochemical properties of the kinase domain and the mechanisms that underlie the overall function of the receptor. To complement in planta studies on the function of ACR4, we have expressed the ICD in Escherichia coli as a soluble C-terminal fusion to the N-utilization substance A (NusA) protein, purified the recombinant protein and characterized the enzymatic and conformational properties. The protein autophosphorylates via an intramolecular mechanism, prefers Mn2+ over Mg2+ as the divalent cation and displays typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to ATP with an apparent Km of 6.67 ± 2.07 μM and Vmax of 1.83 ± 0.18 nmol/min/mg. Autophosphorylation is accompanied by a conformational change as demonstrated by circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and limited proteolysis with trypsin. Analysis by nano-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS) revealed 16 confirmed sites of phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues. Sedimentation velocity and gel-filtration experiments indicate that the ICD has a propensity to oligomerize and that this property is lost upon autophosphorylation. PMID:21294549

  11. The conformation of enkephalin bound to its receptor: an “elusive goal” becoming reality

    PubMed Central

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Temussi, Piero A.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of solid state structures of opioid receptors has prompted us to reconsider a crucial question concerning bioactive peptides: can their conformation be studied without any knowledge of the structure of their receptors? The possibility of giving a meaningful answer to this query rests ultimately on the ease of dealing with the flexibility of bioactive peptides, and amongst them one of the most flexible bioactive peptides, enkephalin. All solution studies of enkephalin hint at an inextricable mixture of quasi isoenergetic conformers. In this study we refer to the only NMR work that yielded inter-residue NOEs, performed at very low temperature. In the present work, we have used the simplest possible docking methods to check the consistency of the main conformers of enkephalin with the steric requirements of the active site of the receptor, as provided by the crystal structure of its complex with naltrindole, a rigid antagonist. We show that the conformers found in the equilibrium mixture at low temperature are indeed compatible with a good fit to the receptor active site. The possible uncertainties linked to the different behavior of agonists and antagonists do not diminish the relevance of the finding. PMID:25988155

  12. Open conformers of HLA-F are high-affinity ligands of the activating NK-cell receptor KIR3DS1.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Hölzemer, Angelique; Martrus, Gloria; Chung, Amy W; Pacheco, Yovana; Simoneau, Camille R; Rucevic, Marijana; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro A; Pertel, Thomas; Kim, Tae-Eun; Dugan, Haley; Alter, Galit; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Jost, Stephanie; Carrington, Mary; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The activating natural killer (NK)-cell receptor KIR3DS1 has been linked to the outcome of various human diseases, including delayed progression of disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet a ligand that would account for its biological effects has remained unknown. We screened 100 HLA class I proteins and found that KIR3DS1 bound to HLA-F, a result we confirmed biochemically and functionally. Primary human KIR3DS1(+) NK cells degranulated and produced antiviral cytokines after encountering HLA-F and inhibited HIV-1 replication in vitro. Activation of CD4(+) T cells triggered the transcription and surface expression of HLA-F mRNA and HLA-F protein, respectively, and induced binding of KIR3DS1. HIV-1 infection further increased the transcription of HLA-F mRNA but decreased the binding of KIR3DS1, indicative of a mechanism for evading recognition by KIR3DS1(+) NK cells. Thus, we have established HLA-F as a ligand of KIR3DS1 and have demonstrated cell-context-dependent expression of HLA-F that might explain the widespread influence of KIR3DS1 in human disease.

  13. Open conformers of HLA-F are high-affinity ligands of the activating NK-cell receptor KIR3DS1.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Hölzemer, Angelique; Martrus, Gloria; Chung, Amy W; Pacheco, Yovana; Simoneau, Camille R; Rucevic, Marijana; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro A; Pertel, Thomas; Kim, Tae-Eun; Dugan, Haley; Alter, Galit; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Jost, Stephanie; Carrington, Mary; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The activating natural killer (NK)-cell receptor KIR3DS1 has been linked to the outcome of various human diseases, including delayed progression of disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet a ligand that would account for its biological effects has remained unknown. We screened 100 HLA class I proteins and found that KIR3DS1 bound to HLA-F, a result we confirmed biochemically and functionally. Primary human KIR3DS1(+) NK cells degranulated and produced antiviral cytokines after encountering HLA-F and inhibited HIV-1 replication in vitro. Activation of CD4(+) T cells triggered the transcription and surface expression of HLA-F mRNA and HLA-F protein, respectively, and induced binding of KIR3DS1. HIV-1 infection further increased the transcription of HLA-F mRNA but decreased the binding of KIR3DS1, indicative of a mechanism for evading recognition by KIR3DS1(+) NK cells. Thus, we have established HLA-F as a ligand of KIR3DS1 and have demonstrated cell-context-dependent expression of HLA-F that might explain the widespread influence of KIR3DS1 in human disease. PMID:27455421

  14. Conformational Changes in the GM-CSF Receptor Suggest a Molecular Mechanism for Affinity Conversion and Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Dhagat, Urmi; Taing, Houng; Gorman, Michael A; King-Scott, Jack; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    The GM-CSF, IL-3, and IL-5 receptors constitute the βc family, playing important roles in inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Typical of heterodimeric type I cytokine receptors, signaling requires recruitment of the shared subunit to the initial cytokine:α subunit binary complex through an affinity conversion mechanism. This critical process is poorly understood due to the paucity of crystal structures of both binary and ternary receptor complexes for the same cytokine. We have now solved the structure of the binary GM-CSF:GMRα complex at 2.8-Å resolution and compared it with the structure of the ternary complex, revealing distinct conformational changes. Guided by these differences we performed mutational and functional studies that, importantly, show GMRα interactions playing a major role in receptor signaling while βc interactions control high-affinity binding. These results support the notion that conformational changes underlie the mechanism of GM-CSF receptor activation and also suggest how related type I cytokine receptors signal. PMID:27396825

  15. Small molecule modulation of nuclear receptor conformational dynamics: implications for function and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kojetin, Douglas J; Burris, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are targets for a wide range of ligands, both natural and synthetic, that regulate their activity and provide a means to pharmacologically modulate the receptor. Recent emphasis in the nuclear receptor field has focused on selective nuclear receptor modulators, which can display graded transcriptional responses and tissue selective pharmacological responses that deviate from the prototypical agonist or antagonist. Understanding the molecular mechanism of action of these selective modulators will provide significant insight toward the development of the next generation of modulators. Although most nuclear receptor structural studies have primarily focused on obtaining ligand-receptor cocrystal structures, recent studies implicate an important role for protein dynamics in the mechanism of action of nuclear receptor ligands. Here we review nuclear receptor studies reporting how ligands modulate the conformational dynamics of the nuclear receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD). A particular emphasis is placed on protein NMR and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) techniques and how they provide complementary information that, when combined with crystallography, provide detailed insight into the function of nuclear receptors.

  16. Conformational Dynamics of Single G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Fürstenberg, Alexandre; Yao, Xiao Jie; Kobilka, Brian K.; Moerner, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of seven-helix transmembrane proteins which regulate cellular signaling by sensing light, ligands, and binding proteins. The GPCR activation process, however, is not a simple on-off switch; current models suggest a complex conformational landscape in which the active, signaling state includes multiple conformations with similar downstream activity. The present study probes the conformational dynamics of single β2-Adrenergic Receptors (β2ARs) in the solution phase by Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trapping. The ABEL trap uses fast electrokinetic feedback in a microfluidic configuration to allow direct observation of a single fluorescently-labeled β2AR for hundreds of milliseconds to seconds. By choosing a reporter dye and labeling site sensitive to ligand binding, we observe a diversity of discrete fluorescence intensity and lifetime levels in single β2ARs, indicating a varying radiative lifetime and a range of discrete conformational states with dwell times of hundreds of milliseconds. We find that binding of agonist increases the dwell times of these states, and furthermore, we observe millisecond fluctuations within states. The intensity autocorrelations of these faster fluctuations are well-described by stretched exponential functions with stretching exponent β ~ 0.5, suggesting protein dynamics over a range of timescales. PMID:21928818

  17. Conformationally restricted 3'-modified ABA analogs for controlling ABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Jun; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Masanori; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2015-04-14

    The physiological functions of abscisic acid (ABA) are regulated by a signal transduction pathway involving cytosolic ABA receptors, which include 14 PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYL) proteins in Arabidopsis. The development of a PYL antagonist could be a valuable tool to improve our understanding of the roles of ABA. We previously developed 3'-hexylsulfanyl-ABA (AS6), whose S-hexyl chain blocks protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) binding by steric hindrance. This finding not only validated our structure-based approach to the design of a PYL antagonist, but also provided a basis for the development of a more potent or subclass/subtype selective PYL antagonist. In the present study, we synthesized a conformationally restricted analog of AS6, namely propenyl-ABA with an O-butyl chain (PAO4), to improve the affinity for PYL proteins by reducing the entropic penalty for binding to the receptors. In seed germination assays, (+)-PAO4 was a slightly stronger antagonist than AS6 in Arabidopsis and a significantly stronger antagonist in lettuce. Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters associated with the formation of the Arabidopsis PYL-(+)-PAO4 complex revealed that (+)-PAO4 binds more strongly to PYL5 than AS6 owing to an entropic advantage. In PP2C assays, this enhancement effect was observed only for the monomeric PYL subclass containing PYL5, suggesting that (+)-PAO4 is more effective than AS6 in physiological events involving monomeric PYL proteins as ABA receptors. PMID:25758810

  18. Conformational Changes in the Capsid of a Calicivirus upon Interaction with Its Functional Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ossiboff, Robert J.; Zhou, Yi; Lightfoot, Patrick J.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Parker, John S.L.

    2010-07-19

    Nonenveloped viral capsids are metastable structures that undergo conformational changes during virus entry that lead to interactions of the capsid or capsid fragments with the cell membrane. For members of the Caliciviridae, neither the nature of these structural changes in the capsid nor the factor(s) responsible for inducing these changes is known. Feline functional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A) mediates the attachment and infectious viral entry of feline calicivirus (FCV). Here, we show that the infectivity of some FCV isolates is neutralized following incubation with the soluble receptor at 37 C. We used this property to select mutants resistant to preincubation with the soluble receptor. We isolated and sequenced 24 soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants and characterized the growth properties and receptor-binding activities of eight mutants. The location of the mutations within the capsid structure of FCV was mapped using a new 3.6-{angstrom} structure of native FCV. The srr mutations mapped to the surface of the P2 domain were buried at the protruding domain dimer interface or were present in inaccessible regions of the capsid protein. Coupled with data showing that both the parental FCV and the srr mutants underwent increases in hydrophobicity upon incubation with the soluble receptor at 37 C, these findings indicate that FCV likely undergoes conformational change upon interaction with its receptor. Changes in FCV capsid conformation following its interaction with fJAM-A may be important for subsequent interactions of the capsid with cellular membranes, membrane penetration, and genome delivery.

  19. Measurement of Conformational Changes Accompanying Desensitization in an Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong,N.; Jasti, J.; Beich-Frandsen, M.; Gouaux, E.

    2006-01-01

    The canonical conformational states occupied by most ligand-gated ion channels, and many cell-surface receptors, are the resting, activated, and desensitized states. While the resting and activated states of multiple receptors are well characterized, elaboration of the structural properties of the desensitized state, a state that is by definition inactive, has proven difficult. Here we use electrical, chemical, and crystallographic experiments on the AMPA-sensitive GluR2 receptor, defining the conformational rearrangements of the agonist binding cores that occur upon desensitization of this ligand-gated ion channel. These studies demonstrate that desensitization involves the rupture of an extensive interface between domain 1 of 2-fold related glutamate-binding core subunits, compensating for the ca. 21{sup o} of domain closure induced by glutamate binding. The rupture of the domain 1 interface allows the ion channel to close and thereby provides a simple explanation to the long-standing question of how agonist binding is decoupled from ion channel gating upon receptor desensitization.

  20. Conformational Constraint of the Glycerol Moiety of Lysophosphatidylserine Affords Compounds with Receptor Subtype Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sejin; Inoue, Asuka; Nakamura, Sho; Kishi, Takayuki; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Sayama, Misa; Ikubo, Masaya; Otani, Yuko; Kano, Kuniyuki; Makide, Kumiko; Aoki, Junken; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2016-04-28

    Lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) is an endogenous lipid mediator that specifically activates membrane proteins of the P2Y and its related families of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), GPR34 (LPS1), P2Y10 (LPS2), and GPR174 (LPS3). Here, in order to increase potency and receptor selectivity, we designed and synthesized LysoPS analogues containing the conformational constraints of the glycerol moiety. These reduced structural flexibility by fixation of the glycerol framework of LysoPS using a 2-hydroxymethyl-3-hydroxytetrahydropyran skeleton, and related structures identified compounds which exhibited high potency and selectivity for activation of GPR34 or P2Y10. Morphing of the structural shape of the 2-hydroxymethyl-3-hydroxytetrahydropyran skeleton into a planar benzene ring enhanced the P2Y10 activation potentcy rather than the GPR34 activation. PMID:27077565

  1. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C) crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the

  2. Conformational signaling required for synaptic plasticity by the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Aow, Jonathan; Dore, Kim; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-11-24

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) is known to transmit important information by conducting calcium ions. However, some recent studies suggest that activation of NMDARs can trigger synaptic plasticity in the absence of ion flow. Does ligand binding transmit information to signaling molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity? Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins expressed in neurons, conformational signaling is identified within the NMDAR complex that is essential for downstream actions. Ligand binding transiently reduces FRET between the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd) and the associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), requiring NMDARcd movement, and persistently reduces FRET between the NMDARcd and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a process requiring PP1 activity. These studies directly monitor agonist-driven conformational signaling at the NMDAR complex required for synaptic plasticity.

  3. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  4. Ligand Binding to the Androgen Receptor Induces Conformational Changes That Regulate Phosphatase Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Song; Xin, Hong-Wu; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Brautigan, David L.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a mechanism for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) targeting to the androgen receptor (AR) and provide insight into the more general issue of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AR. Simian virus 40 (SV40) small t antigen (ST) binding to N-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit induces structural changes transduced to C-terminal HEAT repeats. This enables the C-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit, including HEAT repeat 13, to discriminate between androgen- and androgen antagonist-induced AR conformations. The PP2A-AR interaction was used to show that an AR mutant in prostate cancer cells (T877A) is activated by multiple ligands without acquiring the same conformation as that induced by androgen. The correlation between androgen binding to AR and increased phosphorylation of the activation function 1 (AF-1) region implies that changes in AR conformation or chaperone composition are causal to kinase access to phosphorylation sites. However, AF-1 phosphorylation sites are kinase accessible prior to androgen binding. This suggests that androgens can enhance the phosphorylation state of AR either by negatively regulating the ability of the ligand-binding domain to bind phosphatases or by inducing an AR conformation that is resistant to phosphatase action. SV40 ST subverts this mechanism by promoting the direct transfer of PP2A onto androgen-bound AR, resulting in multisite dephosphorylation. PMID:17325038

  5. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  6. Conformational analysis of g protein-coupled receptor signaling by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Su Youn; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change and protein-protein interactions are two major mechanisms of membrane protein signal transduction, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon agonist binding, GPCRs change conformation, resulting in interaction with downstream signaling molecules such as G proteins. To understand the precise signaling mechanism, studies have investigated the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or electron paramagnetic resonance. In addition to these techniques, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently been used in GPCR studies. HDX-MS measures the rate at which peptide amide hydrogens exchange with deuterium in the solvent. Exposed or flexible regions have higher exchange rates and excluded or ordered regions have lower exchange rates. Therefore, HDX-MS is a useful tool for studying protein-protein interfaces and conformational changes after protein activation or protein-protein interactions. Although HDX-MS does not give high-resolution structures, it analyzes protein conformations that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography or NMR. Furthermore, conformational information from HDX-MS can help in the crystallization of X-ray crystallography by suggesting highly flexible regions. Interactions between GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules are not easily analyzed by X-ray crystallography or NMR because of the large size of the GPCR-signaling molecule complexes, hydrophobicity, and flexibility of GPCRs. HDX-MS could be useful for analyzing the conformational mechanism of GPCR signaling. In this chapter, we discuss details of HDX-MS for analyzing GPCRs using the β2AR-G protein complex as a model system.

  7. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  8. Ligand-dependent perturbation of the conformational ensemble for the GPCR beta2 adrenergic receptor revealed by HDX

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Chien, Ellen Y. T.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Chalmers, Michael J.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanism of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation and their modulation by functionally distinct ligands remains elusive. Using the technique of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry we examined the ligand-induced changes in conformational states and stability within the beta-2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). Differential HDX reveals ligand-specific alterations in the energy landscape of the receptor’s conformational ensemble. The inverse agonists timolol and carazolol were found to be most stabilizing even compared to the antagonist alprenolol, notably in intracellular regions where G-proteins are proposed to bind, while the agonist isoproterenol induced the largest degree of conformational mobility. The partial agonist clenbuterol displayed found in both the inverse agonists and the agonist. This study confirms the regional plasticity of the receptor, supports current models for GPCR signaling, and characterizes unique conformations spanning the entire receptor sequence stabilized solely by functionally selective ligands all of which differ from the apo state of the receptor. PMID:21889352

  9. Assessment of dopamine D1 receptor affinity and efficacy of three tetracyclic conformationally-restricted analogs of SKF38393

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alia H.; McCorvy, John D.; Watts, Val J.; Nichols, David E.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effect of conformational mobility on receptor activity, the β-phenyl substituent of dopamine D1 agonist ligands of the phenylbenzazepine class, (±)-6,6a,7,8,9,13b-hexahydro-5Hbenzo[d]naphtho[2,1-b]azepine-11,12-diol (8), and its oxygen and sulfur bioisosteres 9 and 10, respectively, were synthesized as conformationally-restricted analogues of SKF38393, a dopamine D1-selective partial agonist. Compounds trans-8b, 9, and 10 showed binding affinity comparable to that of SKF38393, but functionally, they displayed only very weak agonist activity. These results suggest that the conformationally-restricted structure of the analogues cannot adopt a binding orientation that is necessary for agonist activity. PMID:21862338

  10. Conformation-Activity Relationships of Polyketide Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik M.; Wilson, Matthew R.; Taylor, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Polyketides represent an important class of secondary metabolites that interact with biological targets connected to a variety of disease-associated pathways. Remarkably, nature’s assembly lines, polyketide synthases, manufacture these privileged structures through a combinatorial mixture of just a few structural units. This review highlights the role of these structural elements in shaping a polyketide’s conformational preferences, the use of computer-based molecular modeling and solution NMR studies in the identification of low-energy conformers, and the importance of conformational analogues in probing the bound conformation. In particular, this review covers several examples wherein conformational analysis complements classic structure-activity relationships in the design of biologically active natural product analogues. PMID:25974024

  11. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  12. Salt Effects on the Conformational Stability of the Visual G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Membrane protein stability is a key parameter with important physiological and practical implications. Inorganic salts affect protein stability, but the mechanisms of their interactions with membrane proteins are not completely understood. We have undertaken the study of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, the α-helical membrane protein rhodopsin from vertebrate retina, and explored the effects of inorganic salts on the thermal decay properties of both its inactive and photoactivated states. Under high salt concentrations, rhodopsin significantly increased its activation enthalpy change for thermal bleaching, whereas acid denaturation affected the formation of a denatured loose-bundle state for both the active and inactive conformations. This behavior seems to correlate with changes in protonated Schiff-base hydrolysis. However, chromophore regeneration with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and MetarhodopsinII decay kinetics were slower only in the presence of sodium chloride, suggesting that in this case, the underlying phenomenon may be linked to the activation of rhodopsin and the retinal release processes. Furthermore, the melting temperature, determined by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry measurements, was increased in the presence of high salt concentrations. The observed effects on rhodopsin could indicate that salts favor electrostatic interactions in the retinal binding pocket and indirectly favor hydrophobic interactions at the membrane protein receptor core. These effects can be exploited in applications where the stability of membrane proteins in solution is highly desirable. PMID:22261069

  13. Conformational and Thermodynamic Landscape of GPCR Activation from Theory and Computation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sijia S; Goddard, William A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-06-21

    We present a hybrid computational methodology to predict multiple energetically accessible conformations for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that might play a role in binding to ligands and different signaling partners. To our knowledge, this method, termed ActiveGEnSeMBLE, enables the first quantitative energy profile for GPCR activation that is consistent with the qualitative profile deduced from experiments. ActiveGEnSeMBLE starts with a systematic coarse grid sampling of helix tilts/rotations (∼13 trillion transmembrane-domain conformations) and selects the conformational landscape based on energy. This profile identifies multiple potential active-state energy wells, with the TM3-TM6 intracellular distance as an approximate activation coordinate. These energy wells are then sampled locally using a finer grid to find locally minimized conformation in each energy well. We validate this strategy using the inactive and active experimental structures of β2 adrenergic receptor (hβ2AR) and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Structures of membrane-embedded hβ2AR along its activation coordinate are subjected to molecular-dynamics simulations for relaxation and interaction energy analysis to generate a quantitative energy landscape for hβ2AR activation. This landscape reveals several metastable states along this coordinate, indicating that for hβ2AR, the agonist alone is not enough to stabilize the active state and that the G protein is necessary, consistent with experimental observations. The method's application to somatostatin receptor SSTR5 (no experimental structure available) shows that to predict an active conformation it is better to start from an inactive structure template based on a close homolog than to start from an active template based on a distant homolog. The energy landscape for hSSTR5 activation is consistent with hβ2AR in the role of the G protein. These results demonstrate the utility of the ActiveGEnSeMBLE method for predicting

  14. Conformational and Thermodynamic Landscape of GPCR Activation from Theory and Computation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sijia S; Goddard, William A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-06-21

    We present a hybrid computational methodology to predict multiple energetically accessible conformations for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that might play a role in binding to ligands and different signaling partners. To our knowledge, this method, termed ActiveGEnSeMBLE, enables the first quantitative energy profile for GPCR activation that is consistent with the qualitative profile deduced from experiments. ActiveGEnSeMBLE starts with a systematic coarse grid sampling of helix tilts/rotations (∼13 trillion transmembrane-domain conformations) and selects the conformational landscape based on energy. This profile identifies multiple potential active-state energy wells, with the TM3-TM6 intracellular distance as an approximate activation coordinate. These energy wells are then sampled locally using a finer grid to find locally minimized conformation in each energy well. We validate this strategy using the inactive and active experimental structures of β2 adrenergic receptor (hβ2AR) and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Structures of membrane-embedded hβ2AR along its activation coordinate are subjected to molecular-dynamics simulations for relaxation and interaction energy analysis to generate a quantitative energy landscape for hβ2AR activation. This landscape reveals several metastable states along this coordinate, indicating that for hβ2AR, the agonist alone is not enough to stabilize the active state and that the G protein is necessary, consistent with experimental observations. The method's application to somatostatin receptor SSTR5 (no experimental structure available) shows that to predict an active conformation it is better to start from an inactive structure template based on a close homolog than to start from an active template based on a distant homolog. The energy landscape for hSSTR5 activation is consistent with hβ2AR in the role of the G protein. These results demonstrate the utility of the ActiveGEnSeMBLE method for predicting

  15. Search for Active-State Conformation of Drug Target GPCR Using Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori; Aida, Misako

    G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large superfamily of proteins and are a target for nearly 50% of drugs in clinical use today. GPCRs have a unique structural motif, seven transmembrane helices, and it is known that agonists and antagonists dock with a GPCR in its ``active'' and ``inactive'' condition, respectively. Knowing conformations of both states is eagerly anticipated for elucidation of drug action mechanism. Since GPCRs are difficult to crystallize, the 3D structures of these receptors have not yet been determined by X-ray crystallography, except the inactive-state conformation of two proteins. The conformation of them enabled the inactive form of other GPCRs to be modeled by computer-aided homology modeling. However, to date, the active form of GPCRs has not been solved. This paper describes a novel method to predict the 3D structure of an active-state GPCR aiming at molecular docking-based virtual screening using real-coded genetic algorithm (real-coded GA), receptor-ligand docking simulations, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The basic idea of the method is that the MD is first used to calculate an average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the pico- or nano- second time scale, and then real-coded GA involving receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix as a movement on wider time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the established evolutionary search for the active state of the leukotriene receptor provided the appropriate 3D structure of the receptor to dock with its agonists.

  16. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  17. GABA{sub A} receptor open-state conformation determines non-competitive antagonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ligong; Xue Ling; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Casida, John E.

    2011-02-01

    The {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA{sub A}R) is one of the most important targets for insecticide action. The human recombinant {beta}3 homomer is the best available model for this binding site and 4-n-[{sup 3}H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([{sup 3}H]EBOB) is the preferred non-competitive antagonist (NCA) radioligand. The uniquely high sensitivity of the {beta}3 homomer relative to the much-less-active but structurally very-similar {beta}1 homomer provides an ideal comparison to elucidate structural and functional features important for NCA binding. The {beta}1 and {beta}3 subunits were compared using chimeragenesis and mutagenesis and various combinations with the {alpha}1 subunit and modulators. Chimera {beta}3/{beta}1 with the {beta}3 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}1 subunit transmembrane helices retained the high [{sup 3}H]EBOB binding level of the {beta}3 homomer while chimera {beta}1/{beta}3 with the {beta}1 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}3 subunit transmembrane helices had low binding activity similar to the {beta}1 homomer. GABA at 3 {mu}M stimulated heteromers {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}1{beta}3 binding levels more than 2-fold by increasing the open probability of the channel. Addition of the {alpha}1 subunit rescued the inactive {beta}1/{beta}3 chimera close to wildtype {alpha}1{beta}1 activity. EBOB binding was significantly altered by mutations {beta}1S15'N and {beta}3N15'S compared with wildtype {beta}1 and {beta}3, respectively. However, the binding activity of {alpha}1{beta}1S15'N was insensitive to GABA and {alpha}1{beta}3N15'S was stimulated much less than wildtype {alpha}1{beta}3 by GABA. The inhibitory effect of etomidate on NCA binding was reduced more than 5-fold by the mutation {beta}3N15'S. Therefore, the NCA binding site is tightly regulated by the open-state conformation that largely determines GABA{sub A} receptor sensitivity. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights

  18. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  19. Conformation-activity relationship of sweet molecules. Comparison of aspartame and naphthimidazolesulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Castiglione-Morelli, M A; Lelj, F; Naider, F; Tallon, M; Tancredi, T; Temussi, P A

    1990-02-01

    The shape of the active site of the receptor for sweet molecules was previously defined on the basis of a combination of both rigid (saccharins) and flexible (aspartame) molds. In this paper, the sweetness receptor is refined with use of the shapes of 3-anilino-2-styryl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (sweet) and of 3-anilino-2-phenyl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (tasteless), two large and almost completely rigid tastants. The minimum-energy conformations of the flexible portions of these tastants have been determined by using a detailed conformational analysis based on ab initio calculations. The refined receptor site is still consistent with all previously examined sweet molecules. In order to unequivocally assign the prochiral beta-CH2 protons of the Phe moiety of aspartame, (2S,3S)-[2H]-alpha-L-Asp-L-PheOMe was synthesized and examined by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the minimum-energy conformation for aspartame in water, DMSO-d6, and CDCl3 (as a crown ether complex) is different from that originally proposed (FIIDII instead of FIDII, according to a notation referred to the side chains). Although this conformation is not directly consistent with the shape of the sweet receptor, the interconversion of FIIDII to FIDII was found to require only 1 kcal/mol. Furthermore, a 120-ps molecular dynamics simulation in vacuo confirms the high flexibility of aspartame and the accessibility of the FIDII conformer whose topology is fully consistent with our model. PMID:2299622

  20. Conformation-activity relationship of sweet molecules. Comparison of aspartame and naphthimidazolesulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Castiglione-Morelli, M A; Lelj, F; Naider, F; Tallon, M; Tancredi, T; Temussi, P A

    1990-02-01

    The shape of the active site of the receptor for sweet molecules was previously defined on the basis of a combination of both rigid (saccharins) and flexible (aspartame) molds. In this paper, the sweetness receptor is refined with use of the shapes of 3-anilino-2-styryl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (sweet) and of 3-anilino-2-phenyl-3H-naphtho[1,2-d]imidazolesulfonate (tasteless), two large and almost completely rigid tastants. The minimum-energy conformations of the flexible portions of these tastants have been determined by using a detailed conformational analysis based on ab initio calculations. The refined receptor site is still consistent with all previously examined sweet molecules. In order to unequivocally assign the prochiral beta-CH2 protons of the Phe moiety of aspartame, (2S,3S)-[2H]-alpha-L-Asp-L-PheOMe was synthesized and examined by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the minimum-energy conformation for aspartame in water, DMSO-d6, and CDCl3 (as a crown ether complex) is different from that originally proposed (FIIDII instead of FIDII, according to a notation referred to the side chains). Although this conformation is not directly consistent with the shape of the sweet receptor, the interconversion of FIIDII to FIDII was found to require only 1 kcal/mol. Furthermore, a 120-ps molecular dynamics simulation in vacuo confirms the high flexibility of aspartame and the accessibility of the FIDII conformer whose topology is fully consistent with our model.

  1. Conformational Selection and Submillisecond Dynamics of the Ligand-binding Domain of the N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Dolino, Drew M.; Rezaei Adariani, Soheila; Shaikh, Sana A.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Sanabria, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are heteromeric non-selective cation channels that require the binding of glycine and glutamate for gating. Based on crystal structures, the mechanism of partial agonism at the glycine-binding site is thought to be mediated by a shift in the conformational equilibrium between an open clamshell and a closed clamshell-like structure of the bilobed ligand-binding domain (LBD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and multiparameter fluorescence detection, which allows us to study the conformational states and dynamics in the submillisecond time scale, we show that there are at least three conformational states explored by the LBD: the low FRET, medium FRET, and high FRET states. The distance of the medium and low FRET states corresponds to what has been observed in crystallography structures. We show that the high FRET state, which would represent a more closed clamshell conformation than that observed in the crystal structure, is most likely the state initiating activation, as evidenced by the fact that the fraction of the protein in this state correlates well with the extent of activation. Furthermore, full agonist bound LBDs show faster dynamic motions between the medium and high FRET states, whereas they show slower dynamics when bound to weaker agonists or to antagonists. PMID:27226581

  2. Biased Signaling of Protease-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Metcalf, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain, and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an emerging therapeutic target for major diseases. Most information about PAR activation and function derives from studies of a few proteases, for example thrombin in the case of PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4, and trypsin in the case of PAR2 and PAR4. These proteases cleave PARs at established sites with the extracellular N-terminal domains, and expose tethered ligands that stabilize conformations of the cleaved receptors that activate the canonical pathways of G protein- and/or β-arrestin-dependent signaling. However, a growing number of proteases have been identified that cleave PARs at divergent sites to activate distinct patterns of receptor signaling and trafficking. The capacity of these proteases to trigger distinct signaling pathways is referred to as biased signaling, and can lead to unique patho-physiological outcomes. Given that a different repertoire of proteases are activated in various patho-physiological conditions that may activate PARs by different mechanisms, signaling bias may account for the divergent actions of proteases and PARs. Moreover, therapies that target disease-relevant biased signaling pathways may be more effective and selective approaches for the treatment of protease- and PAR-driven diseases. Thus, rather than mediating the actions of a few proteases, PARs may integrate the biological actions of a wide spectrum of proteases in different patho-physiological conditions. PMID:24860547

  3. Design and synthesis of conformationally constrained 3-(N-alkylamino)propylphosphonic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Hale, Jeffrey J; Lynch, Christopher L; Budhu, Richard; Gentry, Amy; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2004-10-01

    A series of conformationally constrained 3-(N-alkylamino)propylphosphonic acids were systematically synthesized and their activities as S1P receptor agonists were evaluated. Several pyrrolidine and cyclohexane analogs had S1P receptor profiles comparable to the acyclic lead compound, 3-(N-tetradecylamino)propylphosphonic acid (3), lowered circulating lymphocytes in mice after iv administration and were thus identified as being suitable for further investigations.

  4. An allosteric role for receptor activity-modifying proteins in defining GPCR pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    J Gingell, Joseph; Simms, John; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Pioszak, Augen A; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are allosteric proteins that control transmission of external signals to regulate cellular response. Although agonist binding promotes canonical G protein signalling transmitted through conformational changes, G protein-coupled receptors also interact with other proteins. These include other G protein-coupled receptors, other receptors and channels, regulatory proteins and receptor-modifying proteins, notably receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMPs have at least 11 G protein-coupled receptor partners, including many class B G protein-coupled receptors. Prototypic is the calcitonin receptor, with altered ligand specificity when co-expressed with RAMPs. To gain molecular insight into the consequences of this protein–protein interaction, we combined molecular modelling with mutagenesis of the calcitonin receptor extracellular domain, assessed in ligand binding and functional assays. Although some calcitonin receptor residues are universally important for peptide interactions (calcitonin, amylin and calcitonin gene-related peptide) in calcitonin receptor alone or with receptor activity-modifying protein, others have RAMP-dependent effects, whereby mutations decreased amylin/calcitonin gene-related peptide potency substantially only when RAMP was present. Remarkably, the key residues were completely conserved between calcitonin receptor and AMY receptors, and between subtypes of AMY receptor that have different ligand preferences. Mutations at the interface between calcitonin receptor and RAMP affected ligand pharmacology in a RAMP-dependent manner, suggesting that RAMP may allosterically influence the calcitonin receptor conformation. Supporting this, molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the calcitonin receptor extracellular N-terminal domain is more flexible in the presence of receptor activity-modifying protein 1. Thus, RAMPs may act in an allosteric manner to generate a spectrum of unique calcitonin receptor

  5. An activation switch in the rhodopsin family of G protein-coupled receptors: the thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Urizar, Eneko; Claeysen, Sylvie; Deupí, Xavier; Govaerts, Cedric; Costagliola, Sabine; Vassart, Gilbert; Pardo, Leonardo

    2005-04-29

    We aimed at understanding molecular events involved in the activation of a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, the thyrotropin receptor. We have focused on the transmembrane region and in particular on a network of polar interactions between highly conserved residues. Using molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis techniques we have identified residue Asn-7.49, of the NPxxY motif of TM 7, as a molecular switch in the mechanism of thyrotropin receptor (TSHr) activation. Asn-7.49 appears to adopt two different conformations in the inactive and active states. These two states are characterized by specific interactions between this Asn and polar residues in the transmembrane domain. The inactive gauche+ conformation is maintained by interactions with residues Thr-6.43 and Asp-6.44. Mutation of these residues into Ala increases the constitutive activity of the receptor by factors of approximately 14 and approximately 10 relative to wild type TSHr, respectively. Upon receptor activation Asn-7.49 adopts the trans conformation to interact with Asp-2.50 and a putatively charged residue that remains to be identified. In addition, the conserved Leu-2.46 of the (N/S)LxxxD motif also plays a significant role in restraining the receptor in the inactive state because the L2.46A mutation increases constitutive activity by a factor of approximately 13 relative to wild type TSHr. As residues Leu-2.46, Asp-2.50, and Asn-7.49 are strongly conserved, this molecular mechanism of TSHr activation can be extended to other members of the rhodopsin-like family of G protein-coupled receptors.

  6. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  7. Models for the activation pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, S.R.; Niyogi, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor's intrinsic protein-tyrosine kinase activity, which occurs upon formation of the receptor-ligand complex, is the critical regulatory event affecting the subsequent EGF-dependent cellular responses leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. The molecular mechanism by which EGF-dependent activation of receptor kinase activity takes place is not clearly understood. In this study, the growth factor-dependent activation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase was examined in vitro using detergent-solubilized, partially purified GEF receptors from A5431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Evaluation of the cooperativity observed in the EGF-dependent activation of soluble receptor tyrosine kinase would suggest a mechanism requiring the binding of the EGF peptide to both ligand binding sites on a receptor dimer to induce full receptor kinase activity. Equations describing potential cooperative kinase activation pathways have been examined. The theoretical system which best simulates the allosteric regulation observed in the experimental kinase activation data is that describing multiple essential activation. In addition, studies using mutant analogs of the EGF peptide ligand appear to confirm the requirement for an essential conformational change in the receptor-ligand complex to activate the receptor kinase activity. Several mutant growth factor analogues are able to occupy the ligand binding sites on the receptor without inducing the fully active receptor conformation.

  8. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  9. Conformational Rearrangement Within the Soluble Domains of the CD4 Receptor is Ligand-Specific

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish,F.; Juncadella, I.; Garg, R.; Boone, C.; Anguita, J.; Krueger, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ligand binding induces shape changes within the four modular ectodomains (D1-D4) of the CD4 receptor, an important receptor in immune signaling. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) on both a two-domain and a four-domain construct of the soluble CD4 (sCD4) is consistent with known crystal structures demonstrating a bilobal and a semi-extended tetralobal Z conformation in solution, respectively. Detection of conformational changes within sCD4 as a result of ligand binding was followed by SAXS on sCD4 bound to two different glycoprotein ligands: the tick saliva immunosuppressor Salp15 and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120. Ab initio modeling of these data showed that both Salp15 and gp120 bind to the D1 domain of sCD4 and yet induce drastically different structural rearrangements. Upon binding, Salp15 primarily distorts the characteristic lobal architecture of the sCD4 without significantly altering the semi-extended shape of the sCD4 receptor. In sharp contrast, the interaction of gp120 with sCD4 induces a shape change within sCD4 that can be described as a Z-to-U bi-fold closure of the four domains across its flexible D2-D3 linker. Placement of known crystal structures within the boundaries of the SAXS-derived models suggests that the ligand-induced shape changes could be a result of conformational changes within this D2-D3 linker. Functionally, the observed shape changes in CD4 receptor causes dissociation of lymphocyte kinase from the cytoplasmic domain of Salp15-bound CD4 and facilitates an interaction between the exposed V3 loops of CD4-bound gp120 molecule to the extracellular loops of its co-receptor, a step essential for HIV-1 viral entry.

  10. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  11. The high affinity ligand binding conformation of the nuclear 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor is functionally linked to the transactivation domain 2 (AF-2).

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, S; Kahlen, J P; Carlberg, C

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD), VDR, is a transcription factor that mediates all genomic actions of the hormone. The activation of VDR by ligand induces a conformational change within its ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the lack of a crystal structure analysis, biochemical methods have to be applied in order to investigate the details of this receptor-ligand interaction. The limited protease digestion assay can be used as a tool for the determination of a functional dissociation constant (K(df)) of VDR with any potential ligand. This method provided with the natural hormone VD two protease-resistant fragments of the VDR LBD and with the 20-epi conformation of VD, known as MC1288, even an additional fragment of intermediate size. These fragments were interpreted as different receptor conformations and their decreasing size was found to be associated with decreasing ligand binding affinity. A critical amino acid for VDR's high ligand binding conformation has been identified by C-terminal receptor truncations and point mutations as phenylalanine 422. This amino acid appears to directly contact the ligand and belongs to the ligand-inducible activation function-2 (AF-2) domain. Moreover, functional assays supported the observation that high affinity ligand binding is directly linked to transactivation function. PMID:8948643

  12. How IGF-1 activates its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kavran, Jennifer M; McCabe, Jacqueline M; Byrne, Patrick O; Connacher, Mary Katherine; Wang, Zhihong; Ramek, Alexander; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Hristova, Kalina; Cole, Philip A; Leahy, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) is involved in growth and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. A ligand-dependent conformational change is thought to regulate IGF1R activity, but the nature of this change is unclear. We point out an underappreciated dimer in the crystal structure of the related Insulin Receptor (IR) with Insulin bound that allows direct comparison with unliganded IR and suggests a mechanism by which ligand regulates IR/IGF1R activity. We test this mechanism in a series of biochemical and biophysical assays and find the IGF1R ectodomain maintains an autoinhibited state in which the TMs are held apart. Ligand binding releases this constraint, allowing TM association and unleashing an intrinsic propensity of the intracellular regions to autophosphorylate. Enzymatic studies of full-length and kinase-containing fragments show phosphorylated IGF1R is fully active independent of ligand and the extracellular-TM regions. The key step triggered by ligand binding is thus autophosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03772.001 PMID:25255214

  13. Multiple conformations of 5-HT2A and 5-HT 2C receptors in rat brain: an autoradiographic study with [125I](±)DOI.

    PubMed

    López-Giménez, Juan F; Vilaró, M Teresa; Palacios, José M; Mengod, Guadalupe

    2013-10-01

    Earlier autoradiographic studies with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist [(125)I](±)DOI in human brain showed unexpected biphasic competition curves for various 5-HT2A antagonists. We have performed similar studies in rat brain regions with selective 5-HT2A (M100907) and 5-HT2C (SB242084) antagonists together with ketanserin and mesulergine. The effect of GTP analogues on antagonist competition was also studied. Increasing concentrations of Gpp(NH)p or GTPγS resulted in a maximal inhibition of [(125)I](±)DOI-specific binding of approximately 50 %. M100907 competed biphasically in all regions. In the presence of 100 μM Gpp(NH)p, M100907 still displaced biphasically the remaining [(125)I](±)DOI binding. Ketanserin showed biphasic curves in some regions and monophasic curves in others. In the latter, Gpp(NH)p evidenced an additional high-affinity site. SB242084 competed biphasically in brainstem nuclei and monophasically in the other regions. In most areas, SB242084 affinities were not notably altered by Gpp(NH)p. Mesulergine competed monophasically in all regions without alteration by Gpp(NH)p. These results conform with the extended ternary complex model of receptor action: receptor exists as an equilibrium of multiple conformations, i.e. ground (R), partly activated (R*) and activated G-protein-coupled (R*G) conformation/s. Thus, [(125)I](±)DOI would label multiple conformations of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in rat brain, and M100907 and ketanserin would recognise these conformations with different affinities.

  14. The conformation of acetylcholine at its target site in the membrane-embedded nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, P. T. F.; Verhoeven, A.; Miller, K. W.; Meier, B. H.; Watts, A.

    2007-01-01

    The conformation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine bound to the fully functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor embedded in its native membrane environment has been characterized by using frequency-selective recoupling solid-state NMR. Six dipolar couplings among five resolved 13C-labeled atoms of acetylcholine were measured. Bound acetylcholine adopts a bent conformation characterized with a quaternary ammonium-to-carbonyl distance of 5.1 Å. In this conformation, and with its orientation constrained to that previously determined by us, the acetylcholine could be docked satisfactorily in the agonist pocket of the agonist-bound, but not the agonist-free, crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnali. The quaternary ammonium group of the acetylcholine was determined to be within 3.9 Å of five aromatic residues and its acetyl group close to residues C187/188 of the principle and residue L112 of the complementary subunit. The observed >CO chemical shift is consistent with H bonding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor residues γY116 and δT119 that are homologous to L112 in the soluble acetylcholine-binding protein. PMID:17989232

  15. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  16. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  17. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-06-19

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor.

  18. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  19. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  20. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  1. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  2. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  3. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  4. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors. PMID:25046176

  5. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors.

  6. Involvement of RTE1 in conformational changes promoting ETR1 ethylene receptor signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Josephine S; Rivarola, Maximo; Chang, Caren

    2008-11-01

    Ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Arabidopsis perceives ethylene through five homologous receptors that negatively regulate ethylene responses. RTE1, a novel gene conserved in plants, animals and some protists, was recently identified as a positive regulator of the ETR1 ethylene receptor. Here, we genetically analyze the dependence of ETR1 on RTE1 in order to obtain further insight into RTE1 function. The function of RTE1 was found to be independent and distinct from that of RAN1, which encodes a copper transporter required for ethylene receptor function. We tested the ability of an rte1 loss-of-function mutation to suppress 11 etr1 ethylene-binding domain mis-sense mutations, all of which result in dominant ethylene insensitivity due to constitutive signaling. This suppression test uncovered two classes of etr1 mutations -RTE1-dependent and RTE1-independent. The nature of these mutations suggests that the ethylene-binding domain is a possible target of RTE1 action. Based on these findings, we propose that RTE1 promotes ETR1 signaling through a conformational effect on the ethylene-binding domain.

  7. Copper, differently from zinc, affects the conformation, oligomerization state and activity of bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Naletova, Irina; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Milardi, Danilo; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Grasso, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The sole role of bradykinin (BK) as an inflammatory mediator is controversial, as recent data also support an anti-inflammatory role for BK in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The involvement of two different receptors (B1R and B2R) could be a key to understand this issue. However, although copper and zinc dyshomeostasis has been demonstrated to be largely involved in the development of AD, a detailed study of the interaction of BK with these two metal ions has never been addressed. In this work, we have applied mass spectrometry, circular dichroism as well as computational methods in order to assess if copper and zinc have the ability to modulate the conformation and oligomerization of BK. In addition, we have correlated the chemical data with the effect of metals on the activity of BK analyzed in cell cultures by biochemical procedures. The biochemical analyses on monocyte/macrophage cell culture (THP-1 Cell Line human) in line with the effect of metals on the conformation of BK showed that the presence of copper can affect the signaling cascade mediated by the BK receptors. The results obtained show a further role of metal ions, particularly copper, in the development and outcome of neuroinflammatory diseases. The possible implications in AD are discussed. PMID:27328010

  8. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  9. Cyclic AMP Analog Blocks Kinase Activation by Stabilizing Inactive Conformation: Conformational Selection Highlights a New Concept in Allosteric Inhibitor Design*

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W.; Taylor, Susan S.; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound “B” and C-subunit-bound “H”-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through “induced fit” alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially “select” inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all “binding” constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation. PMID:21081668

  10. Conformational Ensembles Explored Dynamically from Disordered Peptides Targeting Chemokine Receptor CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Marian; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Tesauro, Diego; Accardo, Antonella; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Guillon, Jean; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Anna Maria; Ronga, Luisa; Rossi, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the design and the synthesis of two short linear peptides both containing a few amino acids with disorder propensity and an allylic ester group at the C-terminal end. Their structural properties were firstly analyzed by means of experimental techniques in solution such as CD and NMR methods that highlighted peptide flexibility. These results were further confirmed by MD simulations that demonstrated the ability of the peptides to assume conformational ensembles. They revealed a network of transient and dynamic H-bonds and interactions with water molecules. Binding assays with a well-known drug-target, i.e., the CXCR4 receptor, were also carried out in an attempt to verify their biological function and the possibility to use the assays to develop new specific targets for CXCR4. Moreover, our data indicate that these peptides represent useful tools for molecular recognition processes in which a flexible conformation is required in order to obtain an interaction with a specific target. PMID:26030674

  11. Defining the conformation of the estrogen receptor complex that controls estrogen-induced apoptosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Obiorah, Ifeyinwa; Sengupta, Surojeet; Curpan, Ramona; Jordan, V Craig

    2014-05-01

    Development of acquired antihormone resistance exposes a vulnerability in breast cancer: estrogen-induced apoptosis. Triphenylethylenes (TPEs), which are structurally similar to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT), were used for mechanistic studies of estrogen-induced apoptosis. These TPEs all stimulate growth in MCF-7 cells, but unlike the planar estrogens they block estrogen-induced apoptosis in the long-term estrogen-deprived MCF7:5C cells. To define the conformation of the TPE:estrogen receptor (ER) complex, we employed a previously validated assay using the induction of transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNA in situ in MDA-MB 231 cells stably transfected with wild-type ER (MC2) or D351G ER mutant (JM6). The assays discriminate ligand fit in the ER based on the extremes of published crystallography of planar estrogens or TPE antiestrogens. We classified the conformation of planar estrogens or angular TPE complexes as "estrogen-like" or "antiestrogen-like" complexes, respectively. The TPE:ER complexes did not readily recruit the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC3) or ER to the PS2 promoter in MCF-7 and MCF7:5C cells, and molecular modeling showed that they prefer to bind to the ER in an antagonistic fashion, i.e., helix 12 not sealing the ligand binding domain (LBD) effectively, and therefore reduce critical SRC3 binding. The fully activated ER complex with helix 12 sealing the LBD is suggested to be the appropriate trigger to initiate rapid estrogen-induced apoptosis.

  12. Deleting the Redundant TSH Receptor C-Peptide Region Permits Generation of the Conformationally Intact Extracellular Domain by Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M.; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) extracellular domain (ECD) comprises a N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and an hinge region (HR), the latter contributing to ligand binding and critical for receptor activation. The crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain component has been solved, but previous attempts to generate conformationally intact complete ECD or the isolated HR component for structural analysis have failed. The TSHR HR contains a C-peptide segment that is removed during spontaneous TSHR intramolecular cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits. We hypothesized that deletion of the redundant C-peptide would overcome the obstacle to generating conformationally intact TSHR ECD protein. Indeed, lacking the C-peptide region, the TSHR ECD (termed ECD-D1) and the isolated HR (termed HR-D1) were secreted into medium of insect cells infected with baculoviruses coding for these modified proteins. The identities of TSHR ECD-D1 and HR-D1 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting using TSHR-specific monoclonal antibodies. The TSHR-ECD-D1 in conditioned medium was folded correctly, as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit radiolabeled TSH binding to the TSH holoreceptor. The TSHR ECD-D1 purification was accomplished in a single step using a TSHR monoclonal antibody affinity column, whereas the HR-D1 required a multistep protocol with a low yield. In conclusion, we report a novel approach to generate the TSHR ECD, as well as the isolated HR in insect cells, the former in sufficient amounts for structural studies. However, such studies will require previous complexing of the ECD with a ligand such as TSH or a thyroid-stimulating antibody. PMID:25860033

  13. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  14. The WSXWS motif in cytokine receptors is a molecular switch involved in receptor activation: insight from structures of the prolactin receptor.

    PubMed

    Dagil, Robert; Knudsen, Maiken J; Olsen, Johan G; O'Shea, Charlotte; Franzmann, Magnus; Goffin, Vincent; Teilum, Kaare; Breinholt, Jens; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2012-02-01

    The prolactin receptor (PRLR) is activated by binding of prolactin in a 2:1 complex, but the activation mechanism is poorly understood. PRLR has a conserved WSXWS motif generic to cytokine class I receptors. We have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the membrane proximal domain of the human PRLR and find that the tryptophans of the motif adopt a T-stack conformation in the unbound state. By contrast, in the hormone bound state, a Trp/Arg-ladder is formed. The conformational change is hormone-dependent and influences the receptor-receptor dimerization site 3. In the constitutively active, breast cancer-related receptor mutant PRLR(I146L), we observed a stabilization of the dimeric state and a change in the dynamics of the motif. Here we demonstrate a structural link between the WSXWS motif, hormone binding, and receptor dimerization and propose it as a general mechanism for class 1 receptor activation.

  15. Conformational Changes in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor: Role of the Transmembrane Domain Investigated by Coarse-Grained MetaDynamics Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a dimeric membrane protein that regulates key aspects of cellular function. Activation of the EGFR is linked to changes in the conformation of the transmembrane (TM) domain, brought about by changes in interactions of the TM helices of the membrane lipid bilayer. Using an advanced computational approach that combines Coarse-Grained molecular dynamics and well-tempered MetaDynamics (CG-MetaD), we characterize the large-scale motions of the TM helices, simulating multiple association and dissociation events between the helices in membrane, thus leading to a free energy landscape of the dimerization process. The lowest energy state of the TM domain is a right-handed dimer structure in which the TM helices interact through the N-terminal small-X3-small sequence motif. In addition to this state, which is thought to correspond to the active form of the receptor, we have identified further low-energy states that allow us to integrate with a high level of detail a range of previous experimental observations. These conformations may lead to the active state via two possible activation pathways, which involve pivoting and rotational motions of the helices, respectively. Molecular dynamics also reveals correlation between the conformational changes of the TM domains and of the intracellular juxtamembrane domains, paving the way for a comprehensive understanding of EGFR signaling at the cell membrane. PMID:27459426

  16. Potent activity of a PK/PBAN analog with an (E)-alkene, trans-Pro mimic identifies the Pro orientation and core conformation during interaction with HevPBANR-C receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) family plays a multifunctional role in an array of important physiological processes in insects, including regulation of sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. A cyclic PK/PBAN analog (cyclo[NTSFTPRL]) retains significant activity...

  17. Conformational intermediates and fusion activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Korte, T; Ludwig, K; Booy, F P; Blumenthal, R; Herrmann, A

    1999-06-01

    Three strains of influenza virus (H1, H2, and H3) exhibited similar characteristics in the ability of their hemagglutinin (HA) to induce membrane fusion, but the HAs differed in their susceptibility to inactivation. The extent of inactivation depended on the pH of preincubation and was lowest for A/Japan (H2 subtype), in agreement with previous studies (A. Puri, F. Booy, R. W. Doms, J. M. White, and R. Blumenthal, J. Virol. 64:3824-3832, 1990). While significant inactivation of X31 (H3 subtype) was observed at 37 degrees C at pH values corresponding to the maximum of fusion (about pH 5.0), no inactivation was seen at preincubation pH values 0.2 to 0.4 pH units higher. Surprisingly, low-pH preincubation under those conditions enhanced the fusion rates and extents of A/Japan as well as those of X31. For A/PR 8/34 (H1 subtype), neither a shift of the pH (to >5.0) nor a decrease of the temperature to 20 degrees C was sufficient to prevent inactivation. We provide evidence that the activated HA is a conformational intermediate distinct from the native structure and from the final structure associated with the conformational change of HA, which is implicated by the high-resolution structure of the soluble trimeric fragment TBHA2 (P. A. Bullough, F. M. Hughson, J. J. Skehel, and D. C. Wiley, Nature 371:37-43, 1994). PMID:10233915

  18. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  19. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  20. Retinal conformation governs pKa of protonated Schiff base in rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengshuang; Brown, Michael F; Feller, Scott E

    2013-06-26

    We have explored the relationship between conformational energetics and the protonation state of the Schiff base in retinal, the covalently bound ligand responsible for activating the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin, using quantum chemical calculations. Guided by experimental structural determinations and large-scale molecular simulations on this system, we examined rotation about each bond in the retinal polyene chain, for both the protonated and deprotonated states that represent the dark and photoactivated states, respectively. Particular attention was paid to the torsional degrees of freedom that determine the shape of the molecule, and hence its interactions with the protein binding pocket. While most torsional degrees of freedom in retinal are characterized by large energetic barriers that minimize structural fluctuations under physiological temperatures, the C6-C7 dihedral defining the relative orientation of the β-ionone ring to the polyene chain has both modest barrier heights and a torsional energy surface that changes dramatically with protonation of the Schiff base. This surprising coupling between conformational degrees of freedom and protonation state is further quantified by calculations of the pKa as a function of the C6-C7 dihedral angle. Notably, pKa shifts of greater than two units arise from torsional fluctuations observed in molecular dynamics simulations of the full ligand-protein-membrane system. It follows that fluctuations in the protonation state of the Schiff base occur prior to forming the activated MII state. These new results shed light on important mechanistic aspects of retinal conformational changes that are involved in the activation of rhodopsin in the visual process.

  1. Assembly of the ligand-binding conformation of Mr 46,000 mannose 6- phosphate-specific receptor takes place before reaching the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The early steps in the biosynthesis of Mr 46,000 mannose 6-phosphate- specific receptor (MPR 46) have been studied by in vivo labeling of transfected BHK cells. The acquisition of phosphomannan-binding activity was compared with changes in protein structure and posttranslational modifications of MPR 46. Intramolecular disulfide bonds were formed before MPR 46 acquired a ligand-binding conformation. A conformational change that resulted in increased trypsin resistance, formation of highly immunogenic epitopes and assembly to noncovalently linked homodimers was observed almost simultaneously with the acquisition of ligand-binding activity. MPR 46 was shown to acquire ligand-binding activity before N-linked oligosaccharides were processed to complex-type forms. Maturation of the ligand-binding conformation was observed under conditions where transport to the Golgi was blocked by lowering the temperature to 16 degrees C, or by addition of brefeldin A or dinitrophenol to the medium at 37 degrees C. This suggests that receptor maturation and assembly take place before reaching the Golgi complex. The affinity towards phosphomannan- containing ligands was shown to be similar for the high-mannose and complex-glycosylated forms of MPR 46. PMID:2157722

  2. Detection of Receptor-Induced Glycoprotein Conformational Changes on Enveloped Virions by Using Confocal Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaonan; Liu, Qian; Benavides-Montano, Javier A.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Aston, D. Eric; Rasco, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Conformational changes in the glycoproteins of enveloped viruses are critical for membrane fusion, which enables viral entry into cells and the pathological cell-cell fusion (syncytia) associated with some viral infections. However, technological capabilities for identifying viral glycoproteins and their conformational changes on actual enveloped virus surfaces are generally scarce, challenging, and time-consuming. Our model, Nipah virus (NiV), is a syncytium-forming biosafety level 4 pathogen with a high mortality rate (40 to 75%) in humans. Once the NiV attachment glycoprotein (G) (NiV-G) binds the cell receptor ephrinB2 or -B3, G triggers conformational changes in the fusion glycoprotein (F) that result in membrane fusion and viral entry. We demonstrate that confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can, within minutes, simultaneously identify specific G and F glycoprotein signals and receptor-induced conformational changes in NiV-F on NiV virus-like particles (VLPs). First, we identified reproducible G- and F-specific Raman spectral features on NiV VLPs containing M (assembly matrix protein), G, and/or F or on NiV/vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotyped virions via second-derivative transformations and principal component analysis (PCA). Statistical analyses validated our PCA models. Dynamic temperature-induced conformational changes in F and G or receptor-induced target membrane-dependent conformational changes in F were monitored in NiV pseudovirions in situ in real time by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Advantageously, Raman spectroscopy can identify specific protein signals in relatively impure samples. Thus, this proof-of-principle technological development has implications for the rapid identification and biostability characterization of viruses in medical, veterinary, and food samples and for the analysis of virion glycoprotein conformational changes in situ during viral entry. PMID:23283947

  3. Energetics of the Cleft Closing Transition and the Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Conformational Rearrangements of the Glutamate Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mamonova, Tatyana; Yonkunas, Michael J.; Kurnikova, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors are localized in the pre- and postsynaptic membrane of neurons in the brain. Activation by the principal excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate allows the ligand binding domain to change conformation, communicating opening of the channel for ion conduction. The free energy of the GluR2 S1S2 ligand binding domain (S1S2) closure transition was computed using a combination of thermodynamic integration and umbrella sampling modeling methods. A path that involves lowering the charge on E705 was chosen to clarify the role of this binding site residue. A continuum electrostatic approach in S1S2 is used to show E705, located in the ligand binding cleft, stabilizes the closed conformation of S1S2. In the closed conformation, in the absence of a ligand, S1S2 is somewhat more closed than reported from X-ray structures. A semi-open conformation has been identified which is characterized by disruption of a single cross-cleft interaction and differs only slightly in energy from the fully closed S1S2. The fully open S1S2 conformation exhibits a wide energy well and shares structural similarity to the apo S1S2 crystal structure. Hybrid continuum electrostatics/MD calculations along the chosen closure transition pathway reveal solvation energies, as well as electrostatic interaction energies between two lobes of the protein increase the relative energetic difference between the open and the closed conformational states. By analyzing the role of several cross-cleft contacts as well as other binding site residues we demonstrate how S1S2 interactions facilitate formation of the closed conformation of the ligand binding domain. PMID:18823129

  4. Structural Basis for Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Binding to the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and Design of Conformation-selective Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) are two related peptides that control calcium/phosphate homeostasis and bone development, respectively, through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R), a class B G protein-coupled receptor. Both peptides hold clinical interest for their capacities to stimulate bone formation. PTH and PTHrP display different selectivity for two distinct PTH1R conformations, but how their binding to the receptor differs is unclear. The high resolution crystal structure of PTHrP bound to the extracellular domain (ECD) of PTH1R reveals that PTHrP binds as an amphipathic {alpha}-helix to the same hydrophobic groove in the ECD as occupied by PTH, but in contrast to a straight, continuous PTH helix, the PTHrP helix is gently curved and C-terminally 'unwound.' The receptor accommodates the altered binding modes by shifting the side chain conformations of two residues within the binding groove: Leu-41 and Ile-115, the former acting as a rotamer toggle switch to accommodate PTH/PTHrP sequence divergence, and the latter adapting to the PTHrP curvature. Binding studies performed with PTH/PTHrP hybrid ligands having reciprocal exchanges of residues involved in different contacts confirmed functional consequences for the altered interactions and enabled the design of altered PTH and PTHrP peptides that adopt the ECD-binding mode of the opposite peptide. Hybrid peptides that bound the ECD poorly were selective for the G protein-coupled PTH1R conformation. These results establish a molecular model for better understanding of how two biologically distinct ligands can act through a single receptor and provide a template for designing better PTH/PTHrP therapeutics.

  5. Best Matching Protein Conformations and Docking Programs for a Virtual Screening Campaign Against SMO Receptor.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Giorgio; Di Maio, Danilo; La Pietra, Valeria; Cosconati, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    SMO receptor is one of the main components of the Hedgehog biochemical pathway. In the last decades compelling body of evidence demonstrated that this receptor is a pertinent target for the treatment of various types of solid tumors. Recently, the X-ray determination of the three-dimensional structure of SMO in complex with different antagonists opened up the way for the structure-based design of new antagonists for this receptor that could possibly overcome the limitations connected with the induction of acquired tumor resistance. Herein, taking advantage of three different docking software (namely Glide, PLANTS, and Vina) and of the available SMO structures we set up a retrospective virtual screening (VS) protocol. A database, made up by known SMO antagonists and compounds with no alleged activity against the receptor was created and screened against the different SMO structures. To evaluate the performance of the ranking in VS calculations different statistical metrics (EF, AUAC and BEDROC) were employed allowing to identify the best performing VS docking protocol. Results of these studies will serve as a platform for the application of structure-based VS against the pharmaceutically relevant SMO receptor. PMID:27546038

  6. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  7. Interaction between cyclodextrin and neuronal membrane results in modulation of GABAA receptor conformational transitions

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are nanostructures widely applied in biotechnology and chemistry. Owing to partially hydrophobic character, CDs interact with biological membranes. While the mechanisms of CDs interactions with lipids were widely studied, their effects on proteins are less understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of beta cyclodextrin (βCD) on GABAA receptor (GABAAR) gating. To reliably resolve the kinetics of conformational transitions, currents were elicited by ultrafast gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) applications to outside-out patches from rat cultured hippocampal neurons. βCD increased the amplitude of responses to saturating GABA concentration ([GABA]) in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by profound alterations in the current kinetics. Current deactivation was slowed down by βCD but this effect was biphasic with a maximum at around 0.5 mM βCD. While the fast deactivation time constant was monotonically slowed down within considered βCD concentration range, the slow component first increased and then, at millimolar βCD concentration, decreased. The rate and extent of desensitization was decreased by βCD in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of current responses to nonsaturating [GABA] indicated that βCD affected the GABAAR agonist binding site by slowing down the unbinding rate. Modulation of GABAAR desensitization and binding showed different concentration-dependence suggesting different modualtory sites with higher affinity of the latter one. All the βCD effects were fully reversible indicating that cholesterol uptake into βCD was not the primary mechanism. We conclude that βCD is a strong modulator of GABAAR conformational transitions. PMID:16702996

  8. Interaction between cyclodextrin and neuronal membrane results in modulation of GABA(A) receptor conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-06-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are nanostructures widely applied in biotechnology and chemistry. Owing to partially hydrophobic character, CDs interact with biological membranes. While the mechanisms of CDs interactions with lipids were widely studied, their effects on proteins are less understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of beta cyclodextrin (betaCD) on GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) gating. To reliably resolve the kinetics of conformational transitions, currents were elicited by ultrafast gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) applications to outside-out patches from rat cultured hippocampal neurons. betaCD increased the amplitude of responses to saturating GABA concentration ([GABA]) in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by profound alterations in the current kinetics. Current deactivation was slowed down by betaCD but this effect was biphasic with a maximum at around 0.5 mM betaCD. While the fast deactivation time constant was monotonically slowed down within considered betaCD concentration range, the slow component first increased and then, at millimolar betaCD concentration, decreased. The rate and extent of desensitization was decreased by betaCD in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of current responses to nonsaturating [GABA] indicated that betaCD affected the GABA(A)R agonist binding site by slowing down the unbinding rate. Modulation of GABA(A)R desensitization and binding showed different concentration-dependence suggesting different modualtory sites with higher affinity of the latter one. All the betaCD effects were fully reversible indicating that cholesterol uptake into betaCD was not the primary mechanism. We conclude that betaCD is a strong modulator of GABA(A)R conformational transitions.

  9. Distinct Conformations of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors Mediate MHC Class I Recognition in Trans and Cis

    SciTech Connect

    Back, J.; Malchiodi, E; Cho, S; Scarpellino, L; Schneider, P; Kerzic, M; Mariuzza, R; Held, W

    2009-01-01

    Certain cell-surface receptors engage ligands expressed on juxtaposed cells and ligands on the same cell. The structural basis for trans versus cis binding is not known. Here, we showed that Ly49 natural killer (NK) cell receptors bound two MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules in trans when the two ligand-binding domains were backfolded onto the long stalk region. In contrast, dissociation of the ligand-binding domains from the stalk and their reorientation relative to the NK cell membrane allowed monovalent binding of MHC-I in cis. The distinct conformations (backfolded and extended) define the structural basis for cis-trans binding by Ly49 receptors and explain the divergent functional consequences of cis versus trans interactions. Further analyses identified specific stalk segments that were not required for MHC-I binding in trans but were essential for inhibitory receptor function. These data identify multiple distinct roles of stalk regions for receptor function.

  10. The role of ECL2 in CGRP receptor activation: a combined modelling and experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Michael. J.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Taddese, Bruck; Karakullukcu, Z. Gamze; Barwell, James; Smith, Kevin J.; Hay, Debbie L.; Poyner, David R.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Conner, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor is a complex of a calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), which is a family B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1. The role of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CLR in binding CGRP and coupling to Gs was investigated using a combination of mutagenesis and modelling. An alanine scan of residues 271–294 of CLR showed that the ability of CGRP to produce cAMP was impaired by point mutations at 13 residues; most of these also impaired the response to adrenomedullin (AM). These data were used to select probable ECL2-modelled conformations that are involved in agonist binding, allowing the identification of the likely contacts between the peptide and receptor. The implications of the most likely structures for receptor activation are discussed. PMID:24047872

  11. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064

    SciTech Connect

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Navas, III, Frank; Parks, Derek J.; Spearing, Paul K.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  12. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  13. Structural insights into µ-opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N; Sanborn, Adrian L; Kato, Hideaki E; Livingston, Kathryn E; Thorsen, Thor S; Kling, Ralf C; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M; Traynor, John R; Weis, William I; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O; Kobilka, Brian K

    2015-08-20

    Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To shed light on the structural basis for μOR activation, here we report a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the murine μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and a G protein mimetic camelid antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor. Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:26245379

  14. Type I beta-turn conformation is important for biological activity of the melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues.

    PubMed

    Li, S Z; Lee, J H; Lee, W; Yoon, C J; Baik, J H; Lim, S K

    1999-10-01

    In order to define which structure of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) analogues plays a critical role for ligand-receptor interaction and selectivity, we analysed receptor-binding and cAMP-generating activity in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines stably transfected with rMC3R and hMC4R, as well as the NMR structures of chemically synthesized alpha-MSH analogues. Compared with [Ahx4]alpha-MSH, the linear MTII designated as alpha-MSH-ND revealed a preference for the MC4R, whereas its IC50 and EC50 values were comparable to those of MTII reported previously. Truncation of Ahx4 and Asp5 of alpha-MSH-ND remarkably decreased the receptor-binding and cAMP-generating activity. Meanwhile, maximum cAMP-generating activity was observed at a higher concentration (10(-5) M) of alpha-MSH-ND(6-10), and MC4R preference was changed into MC3R preference. In contrast, [Gln6]alpha-MSH-ND(6-10) lost its cAMP-generating activity almost completely, even though it bound to both receptors. Whereas the solution conformation of alpha-MSH-ND revealed a stable type I beta-turn structure, [Gln6]alpha-MSH-ND(6-10) revealed a tight gamma-turn composed of Gln6-D-Phe7-Arg8. Replacement of the His6 residue of alpha-MSH-ND by Gln, Asn, Arg or Lys decreased not only the receptor binding, but also the cAMP-generating activity in both the MC3R and the MC4R. The structure of [Gln6]alpha-MSH-ND exhibited a stable type I' beta-turn comprising Asp5, Gln6, D-Phe7 and Arg8. [Lys6]alpha-MSH-ND showed a greatly reduced binding affinity and cAMP-generating activity with the loss of MC4R selectivity. In NMR studies, [Lys6]alpha-MSH-ND also demonstrated a gamma-turn conformation around Lys6-DPhe7-Arg8. From the above results, we conclude that a type I beta-turn conformation comprising the residues Asp5-His6-(D-Phe7)-Arg8 was important for receptor binding and activation, as well as the selectivity of MSH analogues.

  15. Unprecedented conformational flexibility revealed in the ligand-binding domains of the Bovicola ovis ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP) subunits.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bin; Peat, Thomas S; Streltsov, Victor A; Pollard, Matthew; Fernley, Ross; Grusovin, Julian; Seabrook, Shane; Pilling, Pat; Phan, Tram; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George O; Graham, Lloyd D; Hill, Ronald J

    2014-07-01

    The heterodimeric ligand-binding region of the Bovicola ovis ecdysone receptor has been crystallized either in the presence of an ecdysteroid or a synthetic methylene lactam insecticide. Two X-ray crystallographic structures, determined at 2.7 Å resolution, show that the ligand-binding domains of both subunits of this receptor, like those of other nuclear receptors, can display significant conformational flexibility. Thermal melt experiments show that while ponasterone A stabilizes the higher order structure of the heterodimer in solution, the methylene lactam destabilizes it. The conformations of the EcR and USP subunits observed in the structure crystallized in the presence of the methylene lactam have not been seen previously in any ecdysone receptor structure and represent a new level of conformational flexibility for these important receptors. Interestingly, the new USP conformation presents an open, unoccupied ligand-binding pocket.

  16. HLA-F and MHC Class I Open Conformers Are Ligands for NK Cell Ig-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goodridge, Jodie P.; Burian, Aura; Lee, Ni

    2013-01-01

    Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) are innate immune receptors expressed by NK and T cells classically associated with the detection of missing self through loss of their respective MHC ligand. Some KIR specificities for allelic classical class I MHC (MHC-I) have been described, whereas other KIR receptor–ligand relationships, including those associated with nonclassical MHC-I, have yet to be clearly defined. We report in this article that KIR3DL2 and KIR2DS4 and the nonclassical Ag HLA-F, expressed as a free form devoid of peptide, physically and functionally interact. These interactions extend to include classical MHC-I open conformers as ligands, defining new relationships between KIR receptors and MHC-I. The data collectively suggest a broader, previously unrecognized interaction between MHC-I open conformers—including prototypical HLA-F—and KIR receptors, acting in an immunoregulatory capacity centered on the inflammatory response. PMID:24018270

  17. Analysis of the conformation of the androgen receptor in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Cato, Andrew C B

    2014-01-01

    Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) (also known as Kennedy's disease) is a motor degenerative disease caused by an amplification of the polyglutamine stretch at the N-terminus of the human androgen receptor (AR). Amplifications larger than 40 glutamine residues are thought to lead to the disease. A characteristic feature of this disease is a ligand-dependent misfolding and aggregation of the mutant receptor that lead to the death of motor neurons. Initially, large cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates reaching sizes of 6 μm were thought to be the pathogenic agents. Later studies have suggested that oligomeric species with sizes of less than 1 μm that occur prior to the formation of the larger aggregates are the toxic agents. However, there have been disagreements regarding the shape of these oligomers, as most studies have been carried out with peptide fragments of the androgen receptor containing different lengths of polyglutamine stretch. We have isolated the wild-type AR with a polyglutamine stretch of 22 (ARQ22) and a mutant receptor with a stretch of 65 (ARQ65) using a baculovirus system and have analyzed the oligomeric structures formed by these receptors with atomic force microscopy. This method has allowed us to determine the conformations of the full-length wild-type and mutant AR and revealed the conformation of the mutant AR that causes SBMA.

  18. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  19. Characterization of the Conformational Alterations, Reduced Anticoagulant Activity, and Enhanced Antiangiogenic Activity of Prelatent Antithrombin*

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Olson, Steven T.

    2008-01-01

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996–12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071–36081), since the 1H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  20. Transmembrane potential polarization, calcium influx, and receptor conformational state modulate the sensitivity of the imidacloprid-insensitive neuronal insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Marques, Olivier; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Thany, Steeve H; Lapied, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent studies revealed that their efficiency was altered by the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process and the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the regulation of nAChRs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology adapted for dissociated cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, we demonstrated that intracellular factors involved in the regulation of nAChR function modulated neonicotinoid sensitivity. DUM neurons were known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR subtypes: nAChR1 and nAChR2. Whereas nAChR1 was sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 was insensitive to this insecticide. Here, we demonstrated that, like nicotine, acetamiprid and clothianidin, other types of neonicotinoid insecticides, acted as agonists on the nAChR2 subtype. Using acetamiprid, we revealed that both steady-state depolarization and hyperpolarization affected nAChR2 sensitivity. The measurement of the input membrane resistance indicated that change in the acetamiprid-induced agonist activity was related to the receptor conformational state. Using cadmium chloride, ω-conotoxin GVIA, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-acetamide (LOE 908), we found that inhibition of calcium influx through high voltage-activated calcium channels and transient receptor potential γ (TRPγ) activated by both depolarization and hyperpolarization increased nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Finally, using N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W7), forskolin, and cAMP, we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase sensitive to the calcium/calmodulin complex regulated internal cAMP concentration, which in turn modulated TRPγ function and nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Similar TRPγ-induced modulatory effects were also obtained when clothianidin was tested. These findings bring insights into the signaling pathway modulating

  1. Transmembrane potential polarization, calcium influx, and receptor conformational state modulate the sensitivity of the imidacloprid-insensitive neuronal insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Marques, Olivier; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Thany, Steeve H; Lapied, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent studies revealed that their efficiency was altered by the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process and the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the regulation of nAChRs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology adapted for dissociated cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, we demonstrated that intracellular factors involved in the regulation of nAChR function modulated neonicotinoid sensitivity. DUM neurons were known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR subtypes: nAChR1 and nAChR2. Whereas nAChR1 was sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 was insensitive to this insecticide. Here, we demonstrated that, like nicotine, acetamiprid and clothianidin, other types of neonicotinoid insecticides, acted as agonists on the nAChR2 subtype. Using acetamiprid, we revealed that both steady-state depolarization and hyperpolarization affected nAChR2 sensitivity. The measurement of the input membrane resistance indicated that change in the acetamiprid-induced agonist activity was related to the receptor conformational state. Using cadmium chloride, ω-conotoxin GVIA, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-acetamide (LOE 908), we found that inhibition of calcium influx through high voltage-activated calcium channels and transient receptor potential γ (TRPγ) activated by both depolarization and hyperpolarization increased nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Finally, using N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W7), forskolin, and cAMP, we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase sensitive to the calcium/calmodulin complex regulated internal cAMP concentration, which in turn modulated TRPγ function and nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Similar TRPγ-induced modulatory effects were also obtained when clothianidin was tested. These findings bring insights into the signaling pathway modulating

  2. Conformation of the C1 phorbol-ester-binding domain participates in the activating conformational change of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C; Slater, S J; Stagliano, B A; Stubbs, C D

    1999-01-01

    The fluorescent phorbol ester 12-N-methylanthraniloylphorbol 13-acetate [sapintoxin D (SAPD)] was used as both the activator and the probe for the activating conformational change of the C1 domain of recombinant protein kinase C (PKC)alpha. Fluorescence emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy measurements of SAPD in fully active membrane-associated PKC show that there is a relatively hydrophobic environment and restricted motional freedom characterizing the phorbol-ester-binding site. SAPD also interacts with the membrane lipids so that it was necessary to resort to time-resolved anisotropy measurements to resolve the signals corresponding to PKC-bound SAPD from that associated with buffer and lipid. In the presence of membrane lipids (unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, 4:1 molar ratio) and Ca(2+), at a concentration sufficient to activate the enzyme fully, a long correlation time characteristic of highly restricted motion was observed for PKC-associated SAPD. The fraction of SAPD molecules displaying this restricted motion, in comparison with the total SAPD including that in lipids and in buffer, increased with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and paralleled the appearance of enzyme activity, whereas the rotational correlation time remained constant. This could be rationalized as an increase in the number of active PKC conformers in the total population of PKC molecules. It therefore seems that there is a distinct conformation of the C1 activator-binding domain associated with the active form of PKC. The addition of SAPD and dioleoyl-sn-glycerol together produced an activity higher than that achievable by either activator alone both at concentrations that alone induced maximal activity for the respective activator; this higher activity was associated with a further restriction in SAPD motion. Increasing the cholesterol concentration, the phosphatidylethanolamine concentration, the sn-2 unsaturation in phosphatidylcholine

  3. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  4. HLA-F and MHC-I Open Conformers Bind Natural Killer Cell Ig-Like Receptor KIR3DS1.

    PubMed

    Burian, Aura; Wang, Kevin L; Finton, Kathryn A K; Lee, Ni; Ishitani, Akiko; Strong, Roland K; Geraghty, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Based on previous findings supporting HLA-F as a ligand for KIR3DL2 and KIR2DS4, we investigated the potential for MHC-I open conformers (OCs) as ligands for KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 through interactions measured by surface plasmon resonance. These measurements showed physical binding of KIR3DS1 but not KIR3DL1 with HLA-F and other MHC-I OC while also confirming the allotype specific binding of KIR3DL1 with MHC-I peptide complex. Concordant results were obtained with biochemical pull-down from cell lines and biochemical heterodimerization experiments with recombinant proteins. In addition, surface binding of HLA-F and KIR3DS1 to native and activated NK and T cells was coincident with specific expression of the putative ligand or receptor. A functional response of KIR3DS1 was indicated by increased granule exocytosis in activated cells incubated with HLA-F bound to surfaces. The data extend a model for interaction between MHC-I open conformers and activating KIR receptors expressed during an inflammatory response, potentially contributing to communication between the innate and adaptive immune response. PMID:27649529

  5. HLA-F and MHC-I Open Conformers Bind Natural Killer Cell Ig-Like Receptor KIR3DS1

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Aura; Wang, Kevin L.; Finton, Kathryn A. K.; Lee, Ni; Ishitani, Akiko; Strong, Roland K.; Geraghty, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Based on previous findings supporting HLA-F as a ligand for KIR3DL2 and KIR2DS4, we investigated the potential for MHC-I open conformers (OCs) as ligands for KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 through interactions measured by surface plasmon resonance. These measurements showed physical binding of KIR3DS1 but not KIR3DL1 with HLA-F and other MHC-I OC while also confirming the allotype specific binding of KIR3DL1 with MHC-I peptide complex. Concordant results were obtained with biochemical pull-down from cell lines and biochemical heterodimerization experiments with recombinant proteins. In addition, surface binding of HLA-F and KIR3DS1 to native and activated NK and T cells was coincident with specific expression of the putative ligand or receptor. A functional response of KIR3DS1 was indicated by increased granule exocytosis in activated cells incubated with HLA-F bound to surfaces. The data extend a model for interaction between MHC-I open conformers and activating KIR receptors expressed during an inflammatory response, potentially contributing to communication between the innate and adaptive immune response. PMID:27649529

  6. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  7. Multiple N-methylation of MT-II backbone amide bonds leads to melanocortin receptor subtype hMC1R selectivity; pharmacological and conformational studies

    PubMed Central

    Doedens, Lucas; Opperer, Florian; Cai, Minying; Beck, Johannes G.; Dedek, Matt; Palmer, Erin; Hruby, Victor J.; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Multiple N-methylation is a novel technology to improve bioavailability of peptides and increase receptor subtype selectivity. This technique has been applied here to the superpotent but non-selective cyclic peptide MT-II. A library of all possible 31 backbone N-methylated derivatives has been synthesized and tested for binding and activation at melanocortin receptor subtypes 1, 3, 4 and 5. It turned out that selectivity is improved with every introduced N-methyl group, resulting in several N-methylated selective and potent agonists for the hMC1R. The most potent of these derivatives is N-methylated on four out of five amide bonds in the cyclic structure. Its solution structure indicates a strongly preferred backbone conformation which resembles other a-MSH analogs but possesses much less flexibility and in addition distinct differences in the spatial arrangement of individual amino acid side chains. PMID:20496895

  8. Structural insights into μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N.; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Kato, Hideaki E.; Livingston, Kathryn E.; Thorsen, Thor S.; Kling, Ralf; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M.; Traynor, John R.; Weis, William I.; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To understand the structural basis for μOR activation, we obtained a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and stabilized by a G protein-mimetic camelid-antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three GPCRs. PMID:26245379

  9. Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors correlates with the formation of a continuous internal water pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Vogel, Horst

    2014-09-09

    Recent crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have revealed ordered internal water molecules, raising questions about the functional role of those waters for receptor activation that could not be answered by the static structures. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulations to monitor--at atomic and high temporal resolution--conformational changes of central importance for the activation of three prototypical GPCRs with known crystal structures: the adenosine A2A receptor, the β2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin. Our simulations reveal that a hydrophobic layer of amino acid residues next to the characteristic NPxxY motif forms a gate that opens to form a continuous water channel only upon receptor activation. The highly conserved tyrosine residue Y(7.53) undergoes transitions between three distinct conformations representative of inactive, G-protein activated and GPCR metastates. Additional analysis of the available GPCR crystal structures reveals general principles governing the functional roles of internal waters in GPCRs.

  10. End-to-end conformational communication through a synthetic purinergic receptor by ligand-induced helicity switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert A.; Diemer, Vincent; Webb, Simon J.; Clayden, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    The long-range communication of information, exemplified by signal transduction through membrane-bound receptors, is a central biochemical function. Reversible binding of a messenger ligand induces a local conformational change that is relayed through the receptor, inducing a chemical effect typically several nanometres from the binding site. We report a synthetic receptor mimic that transmits structural information from a boron-based ligand binding site to a spectroscopic reporter located more than 2 nm away. Reversible binding of a diol ligand to the N-terminal binding site induces a screw-sense preference in a helical oligo(aminoisobutyric acid) foldamer, which is relayed to a reporter group at the remote C-terminus, communicating information about the structure and stereochemistry of the ligand. The reversible nature of boronate esterification was exploited to switch the receptor sequentially between left- and right-handed helices, while the exquisite conformational sensitivity of the helical relay allowed the reporter to differentiate even between purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as ligands.

  11. Conformation and activity of lipase B from Candida antarctica in bicontinuous microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Subinya, Mireia; Steudle, Anne K; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2015-07-01

    The paper at hand deals with the influence of the pH-value on the conformation and activity of the lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) which is incorporated in a bicontinuous microemulsion. The microemulsion used for this purpose consists of water/NaCl, n-octane, and the non-ionic surfactant penthaethylene glycol monodecylether (C10E5). The conformational study clearly shows (1) that CalB molecules are partitioned between the interfacial monolayer and the water domains and (2) that the pH-value of the microemulsion's water domains strongly influences the conformation of CalB at the interfacial monolayer. From these observations we conclude that there is a continuous exchange between the CalB molecules, which are located at the interfacial monolayer and those which are located in the water domains of the microemulsion. This exchange strongly influences the CalB conformation in both regions. In addition to the conformation, we also studied the catalytic activity of CalB. The catalytic measurements revealed a bell-shaped dependence between the CalB activity and the pH-value. The maximum catalytic activity of CalB in bicontinuous microemulsions was observed at pH=5.5. At this pH we observed the highest amount of α-helix conformation of the CalB molecules that are located at the interfacial monolayer, which, in turn, allows connecting the activity with the conformation.

  12. Structural insights into conformational stability of both wild-type and mutant EZH2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aier, Imlimaong; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Raj, Utkarsh

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have been observed to maintain the pattern of histone by methylation of the histone tail responsible for the gene expression in various cellular processes, of which enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) acts as tumor suppressor. Overexpression of EZH2 results in hyper activation found in a variety of cancer. Point mutation on two important residues were induced and the results were compared between the wild type and mutant EZH2. The mutation of Y641 and A677 present in the active region of the protein alters the interaction of the top ranked compound with the newly modeled binding groove of the SET domain, giving a GLIDE score of −12.26 kcal/mol, better than that of the wild type at −11.664 kcal/mol. In depth analysis were carried out for understanding the underlying molecular mechanism using techniques viz. molecular dynamics, principal component analysis, residue interaction network and free energy landscape analysis, which showed that the mutated residues changed the overall conformation of the system along with the residue-residue interaction network. The insight from this study could be of great relevance while designing new compounds for EZH2 enzyme inhibition and the effect of mutation on the overall binding mechanism of the system. PMID:27713574

  13. Closed conformation of the active site loop of rabbit muscle triosephosphate isomerase in the absence of substrate: evidence of conformational heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Ricardo; Ferreira, Sérgio T; Polikarpov, Igor

    2003-12-12

    The active site loop of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) exhibits a hinged-lid motion, alternating between the two well defined "open" and "closed" conformations. Until now the closed conformation had only been observed in protein complexes with substrate analogues. Here, we present the first rabbit muscle apo TIM structure, refined to 1.5A resolution, in which the active site loop is either in the open or in the closed conformation in different subunits of the enzyme. In the closed conformation described here, the lid loop residues participate in stabilizing hydrogen bonds characteristic of holo TIM structures, whereas chemical interactions observed in the open loop conformation are similar to those found in the apo structures of TIM. In the closed conformation, a number of water molecules are observed at the projected ligand atom positions that are hydrogen bonded to the active site residues. Additives used during crystallization (DMSO and Tris molecules and magnesium atoms) were modeled in the electron density maps. However, no specific binding of these molecules is observed at, or close to, the active site and the lid loop. To further investigate this unusual closed conformation of the apo enzyme, two more rabbit muscle TIM structures, one in the same and another in a different crystal form, were determined. These structures present the open lid conformation only, indicating that the closed conformation cannot be explained by crystal contact effects. To rationalize why the active site loop is closed in the absence of ligand in one of the subunits, extensive comparison with previously solved TIM structures was carried out, supported by the bulk of available experimental information about enzyme kinetics and reaction mechanism of TIM. The observation of both open and closed lid conformations in TIM crystals might be related to a persistent conformational heterogeneity of this protein in solution.

  14. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  15. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2'-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway. PMID:27657873

  16. Identification of a Conformational Equilibrium That Determines the Efficacy and Functional Selectivity of the μ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okude, Junya; Ueda, Takumi; Kofuku, Yutaka; Sato, Motohiko; Nobuyama, Naoyuki; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro; Mizumura, Takuya; Onishi, Kento; Natsume, Mei; Maeda, Masahiro; Tsujishita, Hideki; Kuranaga, Takefumi; Inoue, Masayuki; Shimada, Ichio

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands impart differing degrees of signaling in the G-protein and arrestin pathways, in phenomena called “biased signaling”. However, the mechanism underlying the biased signaling of GPCRs is still unclear, although crystal structures of GPCRs bound to the G protein or arrestin are available. In this study, we observed the NMR signals from methionine residues of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) in the balanced- and biased-ligand-bound states. We found that the intracellular cavity of μOR exists in an equilibrium between closed and multiple open conformations with coupled conformational changes on the transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7, and that the population of each open conformation determines the G-protein- and arrestin-mediated signaling levels in each ligand-bound state. These findings provide insight into the biased signaling of GPCRs and will be helpful for development of analgesics that stimulate μOR with reduced tolerance and dependence. PMID:26568421

  17. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  18. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  19. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  20. Helix 11 dynamics is critical for constitutive androstane receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Busby, Scott A; Wisecarver, Sarah; Vincent, Jeremy; Griffin, Patrick R; Fernandez, Elias J

    2011-01-12

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) transactivation can occur in the absence of exogenous ligand and this activity is enhanced by agonists TCPOBOP and meclizine. We use biophysical and cell-based assays to show that increased activity of CAR(TCPOBOP) relative to CAR(meclizine) corresponds to a higher affinity of CAR(TCPOBOP) for the steroid receptor coactivator-1. Additionally, steady-state fluorescence spectra suggest conformational differences between CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizine):RXR. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data indicate that the CAR activation function 2 (AF-2) is more stable in CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizine):RXR than in CAR:RXR. HDX kinetics also show significant differences between CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizine):RXR. Unlike CAR(meclizine):RXR, CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR shows a higher overall stabilization that extends into RXR. We identify residues 339-345 in CAR as an allosteric regulatory site with a greater magnitude reduction in exchange kinetics in CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR than CAR(meclizine):RXR. Accordingly, assays with mutations on CAR at leucine-340 and leucine-343 confirm this region as an important determinant of CAR activity. PMID:21220114

  1. Mapping the conformational transition in Src activation by cumulating the information from multiple molecular dynamics trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sichun; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Roux, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    The Src-family kinases are allosteric enzymes that play a key role in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. In response to cellular signals, they undergo large conformational changes to switch between distinct inactive and active states. A computational strategy for characterizing the conformational transition pathway is presented to bridge the inactive and active states of the catalytic domain of Hck. The information from a large number (78) of independent all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories with explicit solvent is combined together to assemble a connectivity map of the conformational transition. Two intermediate states along the activation pathways are identified, and their structural features are characterized. A coarse free-energy landscape is built in terms of the collective motions corresponding to the opening of the activation loop (A-loop) and the rotation of the αC helix. This landscape shows that the protein can adopt a multitude of conformations in which the A-loop is partially open, while the αC helix remains in the orientation characteristic of the inactive conformation. The complete transition leading to the active conformation requires a concerted movement involving further opening of the A-loop, the relative alignment of N-lobe and C-lobe, and the rotation of the αC helix needed to recruit the residues necessary for catalysis in the active site. The analysis leads to a dynamic view of the full-length kinase activation, whereby transitions of the catalytic domain to intermediate configurations with a partially open A-loop are permitted, even while the SH2-SH3 clamp remains fully engaged. These transitions would render Y416 available for the transphosphorylation event that ultimately locks down the active state. The results provide a broad framework for picturing the conformational transitions leading to kinase activation. PMID:19225111

  2. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  3. Modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on significant recent findings regarding modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) interact with androgen receptors (ARs), and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) interact with estrogen receptors (ERs), with variable tissue selectivity. SERMs, which interact with both ERб and ERв in a tissue-specific manner to produce diverse outcomes in multiple tissues, continue to generate significant interest for clinical application. Development of SARMs for clinical application has been slower to date because of potential adverse effects, but these diverse compounds continue to be investigated for use in disorders in which modulation of the AR is important. SARMs have been investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level to date, with few human clinical trials published. These compounds have been evaluated mostly for application in different stages of prostate cancer to date, but they hold promise for multiple other applications. Publication of the large STAR and RUTH clinical trials demonstrated that the SERMs tamoxifen and raloxifene have interesting similarities and differences in tissues that contain ERs. Lasofoxifene, bazedoxifene, and arzoxifene are newer SERMs that have been demonstrated in clinical trials to more potently increase bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values than tamoxifen or raloxifene. Both SARMs and SERMs hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple disorders in which tissue-specific effects are mediated by their respective receptors.

  4. Antigen conformation determines processing requirements for T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, H Z; Berkower, I J; Busch, M; Gurd, F R; Berzofsky, J A

    1984-01-01

    We studied the difference in requirements for processing and presentation to a single T-cell clone of four different forms of the same epitope of sperm whale myoglobin--namely, on the native protein, on two conformationally altered forms of the protein, or as a 22-residue antigenic peptide fragment. The T-cell clone was I-Ed-restricted and specific for an epitope on the CNBr fragment 132-153 involving Lys-140. As inhibitors of macrophage processing of antigen, we used several agents that inhibit lysosomal function: the weak bases chloroquine and NH4Cl, the cationic ionophore monensin, and the competitive protease inhibitor leupeptin. When these agents were used to inhibit processing of antigen by presenting cells and then washed out before T cells were added to culture, they inhibited the presentation of native antigen but not of fragment 132-153. To our surprise, the intact but denatured form, S-methylmyoglobin, behaved like the fragment not like the native protein. Apomyoglobin was intermediate in susceptibility to inhibition. Thus, native myoglobin requires a processing step that appears to involve lysosomal proteolysis, which is not required by fragment 132-153 or the denatured unfolded forms. For an antigen the size of myoglobin (Mr 17,800), it appears that unfolding of the native conformation, rather than further reduction in size, is the critical parameter determining the need for processing. Since a major difference between native myoglobin and the other forms is the greater accessibility in the latter of sites, such as hydrophobic residues, buried in the native protein, we propose that processing may be necessary to expose these sites, perhaps for interaction with the cell membrane or the Ia of the antigen-presenting cell. PMID:6333686

  5. Role of the C-terminus in the activity, conformation, and stability of interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, L. D.; Hammacher, A.; Zhang, J. G.; Weinstock, J.; Yasukawa, K.; Morton, C. J.; Norton, R. S.; Simpson, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two murine interleukin-6 (mIL-6) variants were constructed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one lacking the last five residues (183-187) at the C-terminus (pMC5) and another with the last five residues of mIL-6 substituted by the corresponding residues of human IL-6 (pMC5H). The growth stimulatory activity of pMC5 on the mouse hybridoma cell line 7TD1 was < 0.05% of mIL-6, whereas pMC5H and mIL-6 were equipotent. The loss of biological activity of pMC5 correlated with its negligible receptor binding affinity on 7TD1 cells, while the binding of pMC5H was comparable to that of mIL-6. Both pMC5 and pMC5H, like mIL-6, failed to interact with recombinant soluble human IL-6 receptor when assayed by surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor analysis. These studies suggest that the C-terminal seven amino acids of human IL-6, alone, do not define species specificity for receptor binding. A variety of biophysical techniques, as well as the binding of a conformational-specific monoclonal antibody, indicated that the global fold of the mIL-6 variants was similar to that of mIL-6, although small changes in the NMR spectra, particularly for pMC5, were observed. Some of these changes involved residues widely separated in the primary structure. For instance, interactions involving Tyr-22 were influenced by the C-terminal amino acids suggesting that the N- and C-termini of mIL-6 are in close proximity. Equilibrium unfolding experiments indicated that pMC5 was 0.8 kcal/mol less stable than mIL-6, whereas pMC5H was 1.4 kcal/mol more stable. These studies emphasize the structural importance of the C-terminal amino acids of IL-6 and suggest that truncation or mutation of this region could lead to small but significant alterations in other regions of the molecule. PMID:8401231

  6. Multiple receptor conformation docking and dock pose clustering as tool for CoMFA and CoMSIA analysis - a case study on HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2012-02-01

    Multiple receptors conformation docking (MRCD) and clustering of dock poses allows seamless incorporation of receptor binding conformation of the molecules on wide range of ligands with varied structural scaffold. The accuracy of the approach was tested on a set of 120 cyclic urea molecules having HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity using 12 high resolution X-ray crystal structures and one NMR resolved conformation of HIV-1 protease extracted from protein data bank. A cross validation was performed on 25 non-cyclic urea HIV-1 protease inhibitor having varied structures. The comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were generated using 60 molecules in the training set by applying leave one out cross validation method, r (loo) (2) values of 0.598 and 0.674 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively and non-cross validated regression coefficient r(2) values of 0.983 and 0.985 were obtained for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The predictive ability of these models was determined using a test set of 60 cyclic urea molecules that gave predictive correlation (r (pred) (2) ) of 0.684 and 0.64 respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA indicating good internal predictive ability. Based on this information 25 non-cyclic urea molecules were taken as a test set to check the external predictive ability of these models. This gave remarkable out come with r (pred) (2) of 0.61 and 0.53 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The results invariably show that this method is useful for performing 3D QSAR analysis on molecules having different structural motifs.

  7. Conformal Prediction Classification of a Large Data Set of Environmental Chemicals from ToxCast and Tox21 Estrogen Receptor Assays.

    PubMed

    Norinder, Ulf; Boyer, Scott

    2016-06-20

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) are critical to exploitation of the chemical information in toxicology databases. Exploitation can be extraction of chemical knowledge from the data but also making predictions of new chemicals based on quantitative analysis of past findings. In this study, we analyzed the ToxCast and Tox21 estrogen receptor data sets using Conformal Prediction to enhance the full exploitation of the information in these data sets. We applied aggregated conformal prediction (ACP) to the ToxCast and Tox21 estrogen receptor data sets using support vector machine classifiers to compare overall performance of the models but, more importantly, to explore the performance of ACP on data sets that are significantly enriched in one class without employing sampling strategies of the training set. ACP was also used to investigate the problem of applicability domain using both data sets. Comparison of ACP to previous results obtained on the same data sets using traditional QSAR approaches indicated similar overall balanced performance to methods in which careful training set selections were made, e.g., sensitivity and specificity for the external Tox21 data set of 70-75% and far superior results to those obtained using traditional methods without training set sampling where the corresponding results showed a clear imbalance of 50 and 96%, respectively. Application of conformal prediction to imbalanced data sets facilitates an unambiguous analysis of all data, allows accurate predictive models to be built which display similar accuracy in external validation to external validation, and, most importantly, allows an unambiguous treatment of the applicability domain.

  8. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  9. Molecular details of the activation of the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jihyun; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    Molecular details of μ opioid receptor activations were obtained using molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor in the presence of three agonists, three antagonists, and a partial agonist and on the constitutively active T279K mutant. Agonists have a higher probability of direct interactions of their basic nitrogen (N) with Asp147 as compared with antagonists, indicating that direct ligand-Asp147 interactions modulate activation. Medium-size substituents on the basic N of antagonists lead to steric interactions that perturb N-Asp147 interactions, while additional favorable interactions occur with larger basic N substituents, such as in N-phenethylnormorphine, restoring N-Asp147 interactions, leading to agonism. With the orvinols, the increased size of the C19 substituent in buprenorphine over diprenorphine leads to increased interactions with residues adjacent to Asp147, partially overcoming the presence of the cyclopropyl N substituent, such that buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Results also indicate different conformational properties of the intracellular regions of the transmembrane helices in agonists versus antagonists. PMID:23758404

  10. Evidence for activity-regulated hormone-binding cooperativity across glycoprotein hormone receptor homomers.

    PubMed

    Zoenen, Maxime; Urizar, Eneko; Swillens, Stéphane; Vassart, Gilbert; Costagliola, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormone receptors show strong negative cooperativity. As a consequence, at physiological hormone concentrations, a single agonist binds to a receptor dimer. Here we present evidence that constitutively active receptors lose cooperative allosteric regulation in direct relation with their basal activity. The most constitutive mutants lost nearly all cooperativity and showed an increase of initial tracer binding, reflecting the ability of each protomer to bind with equal affinity. Allosteric interaction between the protomers takes place at the transmembrane domain. The allosteric message resulting from hormone binding to the ectodomain of one protomer travels 'downward' to its transmembrane domain, before affecting the transmembrane domain of the other protomer. This results in transmission of an 'upward' message lowering the binding affinity of the ectodomain of the second protomer. Our results demonstrate a direct relation between the conformational changes associated with activation of the transmembrane domain and the allosteric behaviour of glycoprotein hormone receptors dimers.

  11. Activation loop 3 and the 170 loop interact in the active conformation of coagulation factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon; Olsen, Ole H

    2009-06-01

    The initiation of blood coagulation involves tissue factor (TF)-induced allosteric activation of factor VIIa (FVIIa), which circulates in a zymogen-like state. In addition, the (most) active conformation of FVIIa presumably relies on a number of intramolecular interactions. We have characterized the role of Gly372(223) in FVIIa, which is the sole residue in activation loop 3 that is capable of forming backbone hydrogen bonds with the unusually long 170 loop and with activation loop 2, by studying the effects of replacement with Ala [G372(223)A]. G372A-FVIIa, both in the free and TF-bound form, exhibited reduced cleavage of factor X (FX) and of peptidyl substrates, and had increased K(m) values compared with wild-type FVIIa. Inhibition of G372A-FVIIa.sTF by p-aminobenzamidine was characterized by a seven-fold higher K(i) than obtained with FVIIa.sTF. Crystallographic and modelling data suggest that the most active conformation of FVIIa depends on the backbone hydrogen bond between Gly372(223) and Arg315(170C) in the 170 loop. Despite the reduced activity and inhibitor susceptibility, native and active site-inhibited G372A-FVIIa bound sTF with the same affinity as the corresponding forms of FVIIa, and burial of the N-terminus of the protease domain increased similarly upon sTF binding to G372A-FVIIa and FVIIa. Thus Gly372(223) in FVIIa appears to play a critical role in maturation of the S1 pocket and adjacent subsites, but does not appear to be of importance for TF binding and the ensuing allostery. PMID:19490111

  12. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ ions stabilize the active state, PO43- ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13662.001 PMID:27434672

  13. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-Chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca(2+) ions stabilize the active state, PO4(3-) ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. PMID:27434672

  14. Conformational change and enhanced stabilization of the vitamin D receptor by the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 analog KH1060.

    PubMed Central

    van den Bemd, G C; Pols, H A; Birkenhäger, J C; van Leeuwen, J P

    1996-01-01

    The 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3] analog KH1060 exerts very potent effects on cell proliferation and cell differentiation via the vitamin D receptor (VDR). However, the activities of KH1060 are not associated with an increased affinity for the VDR. We now show that increased stabilization of the VDR-KH1060 complex could be an explanation for its high potencies. VDR half-life studies performed with cycloheximide-translational blocked rat osteoblast-like ROS 17/2.8 cells demonstrated that, in the absence of ligand, VDR levels rapidly decreased. After 2 hr, less than 10% of the initial VDR level could be measured. In the presence of 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3, the VDR half-life was 15 hr. After 24 hr. less than 20% of the initial VDR content was detectable, whereas, at this time-point, when the cells were incubated with KH1060 80% of the VDR was still present. Differences in 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3- and KH1060-induced conformational changes of the VDR could underlie the increased VDR stability. As assessed by limited proteolytic digestion analysis, both 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3 and KH1060 caused a specific conformational change of the VDR. Compared with 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3, KH1060 induced a conformational change that led to a far more dramatic protection of the VDR against proteolytic degradation. In conclusion, the altered VDR stability and the possibly underlying change in VDR conformation caused by KH1060 could be an explanation for its enhanced bioactivity. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8855240

  15. Active conformation control of unfolded proteins by hyperthermal collision with a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Gordon; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Harnau, Ludger; Albarghash, Alyazan; Pauly, Matthias; Kern, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    The physical and chemical properties of macromolecules like proteins are strongly dependent on their conformation. The degrees of freedom of their chemical bonds generate a huge conformational space, of which, however, only a small fraction is accessible in thermal equilibrium. Here we show that soft-landing electrospray ion beam deposition (ES-IBD) of unfolded proteins allows to control their conformation. The dynamics and result of the deposition process can be actively steered by selecting the molecular ion beam's charge state or tuning the incident energy. Using these parameters, protein conformations ranging from fully extended to completely compact can be prepared selectively on a surface, as evidenced on the subnanometer/amino acid resolution level by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Supported by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, our results demonstrate that the final conformation on the surface is reached through a mechanical deformation during the hyperthermal ion surface collision. Our experimental results independently confirm the findings of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) studies of protein gas phase conformations. Moreover, we establish a new route for the processing of macromolecular materials, with the potential to reach conformations that would be inaccessible otherwise. PMID:25198655

  16. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A.; Warner, Margaret L.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Harris, Paul W.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Poyner, David R.; Hay, Debbie L.; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  17. In silico Exploration of the Conformational Universe of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espigares, Ismael; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The structural plasticity of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a conformational universe going from inactive to active receptor states with several intermediate states. Many of them have not been captured yet and their role for GPCR activation is not well understood. The study of this conformational space and the transition dynamics between different receptor populations is a major challenge in molecular biophysics. The rational design of effector molecules that target such receptor populations allows fine-tuning receptor signalling with higher specificity to produce drugs with safer therapeutic profiles. In this minireview, we outline highly conserved receptor regions which are considered determinant for the establishment of distinct receptor states. We then discuss in-silico approaches such as dimensionality reduction methods and Markov State Models to explore the GPCR conformational universe and exploit the obtained conformations through structure-based drug design. PMID:27492237

  18. In silico Exploration of the Conformational Universe of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espigares, Ismael; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The structural plasticity of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a conformational universe going from inactive to active receptor states with several intermediate states. Many of them have not been captured yet and their role for GPCR activation is not well understood. The study of this conformational space and the transition dynamics between different receptor populations is a major challenge in molecular biophysics. The rational design of effector molecules that target such receptor populations allows fine-tuning receptor signalling with higher specificity to produce drugs with safer therapeutic profiles. In this minireview, we outline highly conserved receptor regions which are considered determinant for the establishment of distinct receptor states. We then discuss in-silico approaches such as dimensionality reduction methods and Markov State Models to explore the GPCR conformational universe and exploit the obtained conformations through structure-based drug design.

  19. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  20. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally.

  1. Insights into mechanism of glucokinase activation: observation of multiple distinct protein conformations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenping; Ammirati, Mark J; Song, Xi; Knafels, John D; Zhang, Jeff; Greasley, Samantha E; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Qiu, Xiayang

    2012-04-20

    Human glucokinase (GK) is a principal regulating sensor of plasma glucose levels. Mutations that inactivate GK are linked to diabetes, and mutations that activate it are associated with hypoglycemia. Unique kinetic properties equip GK for its regulatory role: although it has weak basal affinity for glucose, positive cooperativity in its binding of glucose causes a rapid increase in catalytic activity when plasma glucose concentrations rise above euglycemic levels. In clinical trials, small molecule GK activators (GKAs) have been efficacious in lowering plasma glucose and enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but they carry a risk of overly activating GK and causing hypoglycemia. The theoretical models proposed to date attribute the positive cooperativity of GK to the existence of distinct protein conformations that interconvert slowly and exhibit different affinities for glucose. Here we report the respective crystal structures of the catalytic complex of GK and of a GK-glucose complex in a wide open conformation. To assess conformations of GK in solution, we also carried out small angle x-ray scattering experiments. The results showed that glucose dose-dependently converts GK from an apo conformation to an active open conformation. Compared with wild type GK, activating mutants required notably lower concentrations of glucose to be converted to the active open conformation. GKAs decreased the level of glucose required for GK activation, and different compounds demonstrated distinct activation profiles. These results lead us to propose a modified mnemonic model to explain cooperativity in GK. Our findings may offer new approaches for designing GKAs with reduced hypoglycemic risk.

  2. Transition of arrestin into the active receptor-binding state requires an extended interdomain hinge.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Hirsch, Joel A; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Gurevich, Yulia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2002-11-15

    Arrestins selectively bind to the phosphorylated activated form of G protein-coupled receptors, thereby blocking further G protein activation. Structurally, arrestins consist of two domains topologically connected by a 12-residue long loop, which we term the "hinge" region. Both domains contain receptor-binding elements. The relative size and shape of arrestin and rhodopsin suggest that dramatic changes in arrestin conformation are required to bring all of its receptor-binding elements in contact with the cytoplasmic surface of the receptor. Here we use the visual arrestin/rhodopsin system to test the hypothesis that the transition of arrestin into its active receptor-binding state involves a movement of the two domains relative to each other that might be limited by the length of the hinge. We have introduced three insertions and 24 deletions in the hinge region and measured the binding of all of these mutants to light-activated phosphorylated (P-Rh*), dark phosphorylated (P-Rh), dark unphosphorylated (Rh), and light-activated unphosphorylated rhodopsin (Rh*). The addition of 1-3 extra residues to the hinge has no effect on arrestin function. In contrast, sequential elimination of 1-8 residues results in a progressive decrease in P-Rh* binding without changing arrestin selectivity for P-Rh*. These results suggest that there is a minimum length of the hinge region necessary for high affinity binding, consistent with the idea that the two domains move relative to each other in the process of arrestin transition into its active receptor-binding state. The same length of the hinge is also necessary for the binding of "constitutively active" arrestin mutants to P-Rh*, dark P-Rh, and Rh*, suggesting that the active (receptor-bound) arrestin conformation is essentially the same in both wild type and mutant forms.

  3. Insulin receptor activation in solitary fibrous tumours.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Chang, Q; Rubin, B P; Fletcher, C D M; Morgan, T W; Mentzer, S J; Sugarbaker, D J; Fletcher, J A; Xiao, S

    2007-04-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are known to overexpress insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2). The down-stream oncogenic pathways of IGF-2, however, are not clear. Here we report uniform activation of the insulin receptor (IR) pathway in SFTs, which are mesenchymal tumours frequently associated with hypoglycaemia. Whereas the IR and its downstream signalling pathways were constitutively activated in SFTs, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was not expressed in these tumours. We also find that SFT cells secrete IGF-2 and proliferate in serum-free medium, consistent with an IGF-2/IR autocrine loop. The aetiological relevance of IGF-2 is supported by expression of IR-A, the IR isoform with high affinity for IGF-2, in all SFTs. Our studies suggest that IR activation plays an oncogenic role in SFTs.

  4. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  5. Visualization of Activated Platelets by Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Utilizing Conformation-Specific Antibodies against Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa

    PubMed Central

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Peter, Karlheinz; Ali, Ziad A.; Schneider, Jürgen E.; McAteer, Martina A.; Neubauer, Stefan; Channon, Keith M.; Bode, Christoph; Choudhury, Robin P.

    2009-01-01

    Ruptured atherosclerotic plaques, lined with activated platelets, constitute an attractive target for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study evaluated whether microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the activated conformation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa could be used to image platelets. MPIO (size: 1 μm) were conjugated to anti-LIBS or control single-chain antibody. Following guidewire injury to mouse femoral artery, platelet adhesion was present after 24 h. Mice were perfused with anti-LIBS-MPIO (or control MPIO) via the left ventricle and 11.7-tesla MRI was performed on femoral arteries ex vivo. A 3D gradient echo sequence attained an isotropic resolution of 25 μm. MPIO binding, quantified by MRI, was 4-fold higher with anti-LIBS-MPIO in comparison to control MPIO (p < 0.01). In histological sections, low signal zones on MRI and MPIO correlated strongly (R2 = 0.72; p < 0.001), indicating accurate MR quantification. In conclusion, anti-LIBS-MPIO bind to activated platelets in mouse arteries, providing a basis for the use of function-specific single-chain antibody-MPIO conjugates for molecular MRI, and represent the first molecular imaging of a conformational change in a surface receptor. This presents an opportunity to specifically image activated platelets involved in acute atherothrombosis with MRI. PMID:18515970

  6. Modulation of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium tunes adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ådén, Jörgen; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-10-10

    Structural plasticity is often required for distinct microscopic steps during enzymatic reaction cycles. Adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli (AK(eco)) populates two major conformations in solution; the open (inactive) and closed (active) state, and the overall turnover rate is inversely proportional to the lifetime of the active conformation. Therefore, structural plasticity is intimately coupled to enzymatic turnover in AK(eco). Here, we probe the open to closed conformational equilibrium in the absence of bound substrate with NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational equilibrium in absence of substrate and, in turn, the turnover number can be modulated with mutational- and osmolyte-driven perturbations. Removal of one hydrogen bond between the ATP and AMP binding subdomains results in a population shift toward the open conformation and a resulting increase of k(cat). Addition of the osmolyte TMAO to AK(eco) results in population shift toward the closed conformation and a significant reduction of k(cat). The Michaelis constants (K(M)) scale with the change in k(cat), which follows from the influence of the population of the closed conformation for substrate binding affinity. Hence, k(cat) and K(M) are mutually dependent, and in the case of AK(eco), any perturbation that modulates k(cat) is mirrored with a proportional response in K(M). Thus, our results demonstrate that the equilibrium constant of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium directly affects enzymatic catalysis. From an evolutionary perspective, our findings suggest that, for AK(eco), there exists ample flexibility to obtain a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(M)) that commensurate with the exerted cellular selective pressure.

  7. Equivalent Activities of Repulsive Axon Guidance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong; Yoshikawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on the growth cone at the leading edge of elongating axons play critical guidance roles by recognizing cues via their extracellular domains and transducing signals via their intracellular domains, resulting in changes in direction of growth. An important concept to have emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a major guidance mechanism. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are likely to be qualitative differences in the signals they transduce. However, the nature of these possible differences is unknown. By creating chimeras using the extracellular and intracellular domains of three different Drosophila repulsive receptors, Unc5, Roundabout (Robo), and Derailed (Drl) and expressing them in defined cells within the embryonic nervous system, we examined the responses elicited by their intracellular domains systematically. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative differences in growth cone response or axon growth, suggesting that, despite their highly diverged sequences, each intracellular domain elicits repulsion via a common pathway. In terms of the signaling pathway(s) used by the repulsive receptors, mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio strongly enhance the repulsive activity of all three intracellular domains, suggesting that repulsion by Unc5, Robo, and Drl, and perhaps repulsion in general, involves Trio activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A prevailing concept that has emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a guidance mechanism for steering axons to their appropriate targets. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are differences in the signals that they transduce. However, this has never been tested directly. We have used the advanced genetics of Drosophila to compare directly the outputs of different repulsive receptors. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative

  8. Nectin-Like Interactions between Poliovirus and Its Receptor Trigger Conformational Changes Associated with Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Belnap, David M.; Cheng, Naiqian; Noel, Roane T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliovirus infection is initiated by attachment to a receptor on the cell surface called Pvr or CD155. At physiological temperatures, the receptor catalyzes an irreversible expansion of the virus to form an expanded form of the capsid called the 135S particle. This expansion results in the externalization of the myristoylated capsid protein VP4 and the N-terminal extension of the capsid protein VP1, both of which become inserted into the cell membrane. Structures of the expanded forms of poliovirus and of several related viruses have recently been reported. However, until now, it has been unclear how receptor binding triggers viral expansion at physiological temperature. Here, we report poliovirus in complex with an enzymatically partially deglycosylated form of the 3-domain ectodomain of Pvr at a 4-Å resolution, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The interaction of the receptor with the virus in this structure is reminiscent of the interactions of Pvr with its natural ligands. At a low temperature, the receptor induces very few changes in the structure of the virus, with the largest changes occurring within the footprint of the receptor, and in a loop of the internal protein VP4. Changes in the vicinity of the receptor include the displacement of a natural lipid ligand (called “pocket factor”), demonstrating that the loss of this ligand, alone, is not sufficient to induce particle expansion. Finally, analogies with naturally occurring ligand binding in the nectin family suggest which specific structural rearrangements in the virus-receptor complex could help to trigger the irreversible expansion of the capsid. IMPORTANCE The cell-surface receptor (Pvr) catalyzes a large structural change in the virus that exposes membrane-binding protein chains. We fitted known atomic models of the virus and Pvr into three-dimensional experimental maps of the receptor-virus complex. The molecular interactions we see between poliovirus and its receptor are

  9. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  10. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  11. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  12. Activity and Conformation of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase (YADH) Entrapped in Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Das; Mozumdar; Maitra

    2000-10-15

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) solubilized in reverse micelles of aerosol OT (i.e., AOT or sodium bis (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate) in isooctane has been shown to be catalytically more active than that in aqueous buffer under optimum conditions of pH, temperature, and water content in reverse micelles. Studies of the secondary structure conformational changes of the enzyme in reverse micelles have been made from circular dichroism spectroscopy. It has been seen that the conformation of YADH in reverse micelles is extremely sensitive to pH, temperature, and water content. A comparison has been made between the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the alpha-helix content in the conformation and it has been observed that the enzyme is most active at the maximum alpha-helix content. While the beta-sheet content in the conformation of the entrapped enzyme was found to be dependent on the enzyme-micelle interface interaction, the alpha-helix and random coil conformations are governed by the degree of entrapment and the extent of rigidity provided by the micelle core to the enzyme structure. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, F; Straface, G; Pitocco, D; Zaccardi, F; Ghirlanda, G; Flex, A

    2009-12-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a group of three nuclear receptor isoforms, PPARalpha, PPARgamma and PPARdelta, encoded by different genes, and they form a subfamily of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The clinical interest in PPARs originates with fibrates and thiazolidinediones, which, respectively, act on PPARalpha and PPARgamma and are used to ameliorate hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). PPARs play a central role in these patients due to their ability to regulate the expression of numerous genes involved in glycaemic control, lipid metabolism, vascular tone and inflammation. Abnormal angiogenesis is implicated in several of the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus, characterized by vasculopathy associated with aberrant growth of new blood vessels. This pathological process plays a crucial role in diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, impaired wound healing and impaired coronary collateral vessel development. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of the fact that PPARs might be involved in the molecular mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis through the action of growth factors and cytokines that stimulate migration, proliferation and survival of endothelial cells. During the last few years direct comparative analyses have been performed, using selective PPARs agonists, to clarify the angiogenic properties of the different members of the PPAR family. Lately, the findings provide new information to order to understand the biological, clinical and therapeutic effects of PPARs, and the role of these nuclear receptors in angiogenesis, with potentially important implications for the management of subjects affected by T2DM. PMID:19628379

  14. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  15. The analgesic-like properties of the alpha7 nAChR silent agonist NS6740 is associated with non-conducting conformations of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Roger L.; Bagdas, Deniz; Kulkarni, Abhijit R.; Gould, Timothy; AlSharari, Shakir D.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of neurological disorders including chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Since α7 can function as a ligand-gated ion channel, drug development initially focused on ligands that were selective activators of the α7 ion channel. However, the best α7 drugs for chronic pain and inflammation indications may not be ion channel activators but rather “silent agonists”, which bind to the receptor but preferentially induce non-conducting states that modulate signal transduction in non-neuronal cells. One such compound is NS6740. We show that NS6740 selectively induces prolonged desensitization of α7 nAChRs. There are two forms of α7 desensitization that can be distinguished by their sensitivity to the positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). At high concentrations, NS6740 preferentially induces PAM-insensitive desensitization, which over the course of several minutes reverts to the sensitive form. NS6740 was tested in several pain models after in vivo administration in the mouse. Although it had no effects in acute thermal pain, NS6740 induced significant dose- and time-dependent antinociceptive activity in formalin- and acetic acid-induced nociceptive behaviors as well as in the chronic constrictive nerve injury (CCI) model for neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive activity of NS6740 in these models was α7-dependent. In addition, NS6740 administration reversed pain-induced aversion, an important affective component of pain. The time and concentration dependence of the effects were consistent with NS6740 induction of PAM-insensitive non-conducting states, suggesting that signal transduction required for analgesia is accomplished by α7 receptors in that conformation. PMID:25497451

  16. Helix 3 acts as a conformational hinge in Class A GPCR activation: An analysis of interhelical interaction energies in crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Lans, Isaias; Dalton, James A R; Giraldo, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    A collection of crystal structures of rhodopsin, β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors in active, intermediate and inactive states were selected for structural and energetic analyses to identify the changes involved in the activation/deactivation of Class A GPCRs. A set of helix interactions exclusive to either inactive or active/intermediate states were identified. The analysis of these interactions distinguished some local conformational changes involved in receptor activation, in particular, a packing between the intracellular domains of transmembrane helices H3 and H7 and a separation between those of H2 and H6. Also, differential movements of the extracellular and intracellular domains of these helices are apparent. Moreover, a segment of residues in helix H3, including residues L/I3.40 to L3.43, is identified as a key component of the activation mechanism, acting as a conformational hinge between extracellular and intracellular regions. Remarkably, the influence on the activation process of some glutamic and aspartic acidic residues and, as a consequence, the influence of variations on local pH is highlighted. Structural hypotheses that arose from the analysis of rhodopsin, β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors were tested on the active and inactive M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor structures and further discussed in the context of the new mechanistic insights provided by the recently determined active and inactive crystal structures of the μ-opioid receptor. Overall, the structural and energetic analyses of the interhelical interactions present in this collection of Class A GPCRs suggests the existence of a common general activation mechanism featuring a chemical space useful for drug discovery exploration.

  17. Conformations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) orchestrate neuronal survival by a crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, T; Lesept, F; Chevilley, A; Lenoir, S; Aimable, M; Briens, A; Hommet, Y; Bardou, I; Parcq, J; Vivien, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a pleiotropic serine protease of the central nervous system (CNS) with reported neurotrophic and neurotoxic functions. Produced and released under its single chain form (sc), the sc-tPA can be cleaved by plasmin or kallikrein in a two chain form, tc-tPA. Although both sc-tPA and tc-tPA display a similar fibrinolytic activity, we postulated here that these two conformations of tPA (sc-tPA and tc-tPA) could differentially control the effects of tPA on neuronal survival. Using primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons, our present study reveals that sc-tPA is the only one capable to promote N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced calcium influx and subsequent excitotoxicity. In contrast, both sc-tPA and tc-tPA are capable to activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), a mechanism mediating the antiapoptotic effects of tPA. Interestingly, we revealed a tPA dependent crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR in which a tPA-dependent activation of EGFRs leads to downregulation of NMDAR signaling and to subsequent neurotrophic effects. PMID:26469972

  18. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  19. Buried ionizable networks are an ancient hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Daniel G.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2015-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) have evolved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes over hundreds of millions of years. Comparative structural analysis suggests that these receptors may share a remote evolutionary origin, despite their lack of sequence similarity. Here we used structure-based computations to compare 221 7TMRs from all domains of life. Unexpectedly, we discovered that these receptors contain spatially conserved networks of buried ionizable groups. In microbial 7TMRs these networks are used to pump ions across the cell membrane in response to light. In animal 7TMRs, which include light- and ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), homologous networks were found to be characteristic of activated receptor conformations. These networks are likely relevant to receptor function because they connect the ligand-binding pocket of the receptor to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein. We propose that agonist and G protein binding facilitate the formation of these electrostatic networks and promote important structural rearrangements such as the displacement of transmembrane helix-6. We anticipate that robust classification of activated GPCR structures will aid the identification of ligands that target activated GPCR structural states. PMID:25902551

  20. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  1. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side‐chains were quantified by NMR spin‐relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand‐bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side‐chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  2. Analysis of the conformation and thermal stability of the high-affinity IgE Fc receptor β chain polymorphic proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tomoyoshi; Takahashi, Teppei; Arikawa, Hajime; Era, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    The high-affinity IgE Fc receptor (FcεRI) β chain acts as a signal amplifier through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in its C-terminal intracellular region. Polymorphisms in FcεRI β have been linked to atopy, asthma, and allergies. We investigated the secondary structure, conformation, and thermal stability of FcεRI β polymorphic (β-L172I, β-L174V, and β-E228G) proteins. Polymorphisms did not affect the secondary structure and conformation of FcεRI β. However, we calculated Gibbs free energy of unfolding (ΔGunf) and significant differences were observed in ΔGunf values between the wild-type FcεRI β (β-WT) and β-E228G. These results suggested that β-E228G affected the thermal stability of FcεRI β. The role of β-E228G in biological functions and its involvement in allergic reactions have not yet been elucidated in detail; therefore, differences in the thermal stability of β-E228G may affect the function of FcεRI β.

  3. The effect of citric acid on the activity, thermodynamics and conformation of mushroom polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Li-qiang; Liu, Jun-ping; Zhang, Zhao-qin; Liu, Cheng-mei; Liang, Rui-hong

    2013-09-01

    Few reports have focused on the effect of citric acid on thermodynamics and conformation of polyphenoloxidase (PPO). In this study, variations on activity, thermodynamics and conformation of mushroom PPO induced by citric acid (1-60mM) and relationships among these were investigated. It showed that with the increasing concentration of citric acid, the activity of PPO decreased gradually to an inactivity condition; inactivation rate constant (k) of PPO increased and the activation energy (Ea) as well as thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) decreased, which indicated that the thermosensitivity, stability and number of non-covalent bonds of PPO decreased. The conformation was gradually unfolded, which was reflected in the decrease of α-helix contents, increase of β-sheet and exposure of aromatic amino acid residuals. Moreover, two linear relationships of relative activities, enthalpies (ΔH) against α-helix contents were obtained. It indicated that changes of activity and thermodynamics might correlate to the unfolding of conformation.

  4. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  5. Methyl-Substituted Conformationally Constrained Rexinoid Agonists for the Retinoid X Receptors Demonstrate Improved Efficacy for Cancer Therapy and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Desphande, Anil; Xia, Gang; Boerma, LeeAnn J.; Vines, Kimberly K; Atigadda, Venkatram R.; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Moeinpour, Fariba L; Smith, Craig D.; Christov, Konstantin; Brouillette, Wayne J.; Muccio, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8Z)-8-(3’,4’-Dihydro-1’(2H)-naphthalen-1’-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,3,6-octatrienoinic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid for the retinoid X nuclear receptors (RXR). 9cUAB30 displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity and is being translated to the clinic as a novel cancer prevention agent. To improve on the potency of 9cUAB30, we synthesized 4-methyl analogs of 9cUAB30, which introduced chirality at the 4-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of the racemic homolog and enantiomers are reported. We demonstrate that the S-enantiomer is the most potent and least toxic even though these enantiomers bind in a similar conformation in the ligand binding domain of RXR. PMID:24359708

  6. Methyl-substituted conformationally constrained rexinoid agonists for the retinoid X receptors demonstrate improved efficacy for cancer therapy and prevention.

    PubMed

    Desphande, Anil; Xia, Gang; Boerma, LeeAnn J; Vines, Kimberly K; Atigadda, Venkatram R; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J; Moeinpour, Fariba L; Smith, Craig D; Christov, Konstantin; Brouillette, Wayne J; Muccio, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8Z)-8-(3',4'-Dihydro-1'(2H)-naphthalen-1'-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,3,6-octatrienoinic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid for the retinoid X nuclear receptors (RXR). 9cUAB30 displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity and is being translated to the clinic as a novel cancer prevention agent. To improve on the potency of 9cUAB30, we synthesized 4-methyl analogs of 9cUAB30, which introduced chirality at the 4-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of the racemic homolog and enantiomers are reported. We demonstrate that the S-enantiomer is the most potent and least toxic even though these enantiomers bind in a similar conformation in the ligand binding domain of RXR.

  7. Docking and free energy simulations to predict conformational domains involved in hCG-LH receptor interactions using recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Railkar, Reema; Dighe, Rajan R

    2011-11-01

    Single chain fragment variables (ScFvs) have been extensively employed in studying the protein-protein interactions. ScFvs derived from phage display libraries have an additional advantage of being generated against a native antigen, circumventing loss of information on conformational epitopes. In the present study, an attempt has been made to elucidate human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor interactions by using a neutral and two inhibitory ScFvs against hCG. The objective was to dock a computationally derived model of these ScFvs onto the crystal structure of hCG and understand the differential roles of the mapped epitopes in hCG-LH receptor interactions. An anti-hCG ScFv, whose epitope was mapped previously using biochemical tools, served as the positive control for assessing the quality of docking analysis. To evaluate the role of specific side chains at the hCG-ScFv interface, binding free energy as well as residue interaction energies of complexes in solution were calculated using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area method after performing the molecular dynamic simulations on the selected hCG-ScFv models and validated using biochemical and SPR analysis. The robustness of these calculations was demonstrated by comparing the theoretically determined binding energies with the experimentally obtained kinetic parameters for hCG-ScFv complexes. Superimposition of hCG-ScFv model onto a model of hCG complexed with the 51-266 residues of LH receptor revealed importance of the residues previously thought to be unimportant for hormone binding and response. This analysis provides an alternate tool for understanding the structure-function analysis of ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:21989932

  8. Communication over the Network of Binary Switches Regulates the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonji; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics and functions of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are accurately regulated by the type of ligands that bind to the orthosteric or allosteric binding sites. To glean the structural and dynamical origin of ligand-dependent modulation of GPCR activity, we performed total ~ 5 μsec molecular dynamics simulations of A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) in its apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound forms in an explicit water and membrane environment, and examined the corresponding dynamics and correlation between the 10 key structural motifs that serve as the allosteric hotspots in intramolecular signaling network. We dubbed these 10 structural motifs “binary switches” as they display molecular interactions that switch between two distinct states. By projecting the receptor dynamics on these binary switches that yield 210 microstates, we show that (i) the receptors in apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound states explore vastly different conformational space; (ii) among the three receptor states the apo state explores the broadest range of microstates; (iii) in the presence of the agonist, the active conformation is maintained through coherent couplings among the binary switches; and (iv) to be most specific, our analysis shows that W246, located deep inside the binding cleft, can serve as both an agonist sensor and actuator of ensuing intramolecular signaling for the receptor activation. Finally, our analysis of multiple trajectories generated by inserting an agonist to the apo state underscores that the transition of the receptor from inactive to active form requires the disruption of ionic-lock in the DRY motif. PMID:25664580

  9. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors.

  10. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  11. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  12. Exploring the Role of Conformational Heterogeneity in cis-Autoproteolytic Activation of ThnT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been major achievements in understanding the relationship between enzyme catalysis and protein structural plasticity. In autoprocessing systems, however, there is a sparsity of direct evidence of the role of conformational dynamics, which are complicated by their intrinsic chemical reactivity. ThnT is an autoproteolytically activated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic thienamycin. Conservative mutation of ThnT results in multiple conformational states that can be observed via X-ray crystallography, establishing ThnT as a representative and revealing system for studing how conformational dynamics control autoactivation at a molecular level. Removal of the nucleophile by mutation to Ala disrupts the population of a reactive state and causes widespread structural changes from a conformation that promotes autoproteolysis to one associated with substrate catalysis. Finer probing of the active site polysterism was achieved by EtHg derivatization of the nucleophile, which indicates the active site and a neighboring loop have coupled dynamics. Disruption of these interactions by mutagenesis precludes the ability to observe a reactive state through X-ray crystallography, and application of this insight to other autoproteolytically activated enzymes offers an explanation for the widespread crystallization of inactive states. We suggest that the N → O(S) acyl shift in cis-autoproteolysis might occur through a si-face attack, thereby unifying the fundamental chemistry of these enzymes through a common mechanism. PMID:24933323

  13. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  14. Peripheral sensitization increases opioid receptor expression and activation by crotalphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids.

  15. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  16. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016.

  17. Activation Barrier-Limited Folding and Conformational Sampling of a Dynamic Protein Domain.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Jakob; Toto, Angelo; Andersson, Eva; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-09-20

    Folding reaction mechanisms of globular protein domains have been extensively studied by both experiment and simulation and found to be highly concerted chemical reactions in which numerous noncovalent bonds form in an apparent two-state fashion. However, less is known regarding intrinsically disordered proteins because their folding can usually be studied only in conjunction with binding to a ligand. We have investigated by kinetics the folding mechanism of such a disordered protein domain, the nuclear coactivator-binding domain (NCBD) from CREB-binding protein. While a previous computational study suggested that NCBD folds without an activation free energy barrier, our experimental data demonstrate that NCBD, despite its highly dynamic structure, displays relatively slow folding (∼10 ms at 277 K) consistent with a barrier-limited process. Furthermore, the folding kinetics corroborate previous nuclear magnetic resonance data showing that NCBD exists in two folded conformations and one more denatured conformation at equilibrium and, thus, that the folding mechanism is a three-state mechanism. The refolding kinetics is limited by unfolding of the less populated folded conformation, suggesting that the major route for interconversion between the two folded states is via the denatured state. Because the two folded conformations have been suggested to bind distinct ligands, our results have mechanistic implications for conformational sampling in protein-protein interactions. PMID:27542287

  18. S-SAD phasing study of death receptor 6 and its solution conformation revealed by SAXS

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, Heng; Zhao, Lixia; Ding, Wei; Jiao, Lianying; Shaw, Neil; Liang, Wenguang; Zhang, Liguo; Hung, Li-Wei; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-05-01

    A comparative analysis of sulfur phasing of death receptor 6 (DR6) using data collected at wavelengths of 2.0 and 2.7 Å is presented. SAXS analysis of unliganded DR6 defines a dimer as the minimum physical unit in solution. A subset of tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members contain death domains in their cytoplasmic tails. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is one such member and can trigger apoptosis upon the binding of a ligand by its cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). The crystal structure of the ectodomain (amino acids 1–348) of human death receptor 6 (DR6) encompassing the CRD region was phased using the anomalous signal from S atoms. In order to explore the feasibility of S-SAD phasing at longer wavelengths (beyond 2.5 Å), a comparative study was performed on data collected at wavelengths of 2.0 and 2.7 Å. In spite of sub-optimal experimental conditions, the 2.7 Å wavelength used for data collection showed potential for S-SAD phasing. The results showed that the R{sub ano}/R{sub p.i.m.} ratio is a good indicator for monitoring the anomalous data quality when the anomalous signal is relatively strong, while d′′/sig(d′′) calculated by SHELXC is a more sensitive and stable indicator applicable for grading a wider range of anomalous data qualities. The use of the ‘parameter-space screening method’ for S-SAD phasing resulted in solutions for data sets that failed during manual attempts. SAXS measurements on the ectodomain suggested that a dimer defines the minimal physical unit of an unliganded DR6 molecule in solution.

  19. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Tropsha, Alexander; Varnek, Alexandre; Zakharov, Alexey; Worth, Andrew; Richard, Ann M.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Fourches, Denis; Horvath, Dragos; Benfenati, Emilio; Muratov, Eugene; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Grisoni, Francesca; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Incisivo, Giuseppina M.; Hong, Huixiao; Ng, Hui W.; Tetko, Igor V.; Balabin, Ilya; Kancherla, Jayaram; Shen, Jie; Burton, Julien; Nicklaus, Marc; Cassotti, Matteo; Nikolov, Nikolai G.; Nicolotti, Orazio; Andersson, Patrik L.; Zang, Qingda; Politi, Regina; Beger, Richard D.; Todeschini, Roberto; Huang, Ruili; Farag, Sherif; Rosenberg, Sine A.; Slavov, Svetoslav; Hu, Xin; Judson, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Objectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure–activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were evaluated on a set of 7,522 chemicals curated from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built by weighting models on scores based on their evaluated accuracies. Results: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. Conclusion: This project demonstrated the possibility to screen large libraries of chemicals using a consensus of different in silico approaches. This concept will be applied in future projects related to other

  20. Coupling of Conformational Transitions in the N-terminal Domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding Protein (FKBP51) Near Its Site of Interaction with the Steroid Receptor Proteins.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Mustafi, Sourajit M; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Héroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2015-06-19

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β4-β5 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β4-β5 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centered near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. The contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.

  1. Albumin receptor effect may be due to a surface-induced conformational change in albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.G.; Burrington, C.M.

    1989-06-15

    To determine whether equilibrium binding between albumin and hepatocytes involves a cell surface receptor for albumin, we incubated freshly isolated rat hepatocytes with /sup 125/I-albumin and determined the amount of albumin associated with the cells as a function of the total albumin concentration. The resulting two-phase binding curve showed the rat albumin-hepatocyte interaction to consist of a saturable binding interaction with a dissociation constant of 1.1 microM and 2 X 10(6) sites/cell in addition to a weak, nonsaturable binding interaction. However, the saturable binding of albumin to hepatocytes did not appear to result from the presence of an albumin receptor on the cell surface; the interaction was the same for different species of albumin, for chemically modified albumins, and for fragments of albumin representing mutually exclusive domains of the molecule. The saturable binding was, instead, found to involve a subpopulation of albumin with an enhanced affinity for the cell surface. We show that this subpopulation of albumin is generated upon contact with either solid surfaces or cell surfaces and can be transferred from one surface to another. We propose that the two-phase Scatchard binding curve and the ''albumin receptor effect'' reflect two populations of albumin that bind to the cell surface with different affinities rather than one population of albumin that binds to two classes of binding sites.

  2. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its prokaryotic homologues: Structure, conformational transitions & allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marco; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger - a neurotransmitter - into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism boosted by X-ray crystallography of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologues of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in conjunction with time-resolved analyses based on single-channel electrophysiology and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The available data consistently point to a global mechanism of gating that involves a large reorganization of the receptor mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions: a global twisting and a radial expansion/contraction of the extracellular domain. These transitions profoundly modify the organization of the interface between subunits, which host several sites for orthosteric and allosteric modulatory ligands. The same mechanism may thus mediate both positive and negative allosteric modulations of pLGICs ligand binding at topographically distinct sites. The emerging picture of signal transduction is expected to pave the way to new pharmacological strategies for the development of allosteric modulators of nAChR and pLGICs in general. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  3. Insights into the conformation of aminofluorene-deoxyguanine adduct in a DNA polymerase active site.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Vaidyanathan G; Liang, Fengting; Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Wilson, Samuel H; Cho, Bongsup P

    2013-08-01

    The active site conformation of the mutagenic fluoroaminofluorene-deoxyguanine adduct (dG-FAF, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene) has been investigated in the presence of Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Kfexo(-)) and DNA polymerase β (pol β) using (19)F NMR, insertion assay, and surface plasmon resonance. In a single nucleotide gap, the dG-FAF adduct adopts both a major-groove- oriented and base-displaced stacked conformation, and this heterogeneity is retained upon binding pol β. The addition of a non-hydrolysable 2'-deoxycytosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate (dCMPcPP) nucleotide analog to the binary complex results in an increase of the major groove conformation of the adduct at the expense of the stacked conformation. Similar results were obtained with the addition of an incorrect dAMPcPP analog but with formation of the minor groove binding conformer. In contrast, dG-FAF adduct at the replication fork for the Kfexo(-) complex adopts a mix of the major and minor groove conformers with minimal effect upon the addition of non-hydrolysable nucleotides. For pol β, the insertion of dCTP was preferred opposite the dG-FAF adduct in a single nucleotide gap assay consistent with (19)F NMR data. Surface plasmon resonance binding kinetics revealed that pol β binds tightly with DNA in the presence of correct dCTP, but the adduct weakens binding with no nucleotide specificity. These results provide molecular insights into the DNA binding characteristics of FAF in the active site of DNA polymerases and the role of DNA structure and sequence on its coding potential.

  4. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  5. Spongian diterpenoids inhibit androgen receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu Chi; Meimetis, Labros G; Tien, Amy H; Mawji, Nasrin R; Carr, Gavin; Wang, Jun; Andersen, Raymond J; Sadar, Marianne D

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer. Antiandrogens compete with physiological ligands for AR ligand-binding domain (LBD). High-throughput screening of a marine natural product library for small molecules that inhibit AR transcriptional activity yielded the furanoditerpenoid spongia-13(16),-14-dien-19-oic acid, designated terpene 1 (T1). Characterization of T1 and the structurally related semi-synthetic analogues (T2 and T3) revealed that these diterpenoids have antiandrogen properties that include inhibition of both androgen-dependent proliferation and AR transcriptional activity by a mechanism that involved competing with androgen for AR LBD and blocking essential N/C interactions required for androgen-induced AR transcriptional activity. Structure activity relationship analyses revealed some chemical features of T1 that are associated with activity and yielded T3 as the most potent analogue. In vivo, T3 significantly reduced the weight of seminal vesicles, which are an androgen-dependent tissue, thereby confirming T3’s on-target activity. The ability to create analogues of diterpenoids that have varying antiandrogen activity represents a novel class of chemical compounds for the analysis of AR ligand-binding properties and therapeutic development. PMID:23443807

  6. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  7. Conformational Stability and Catalytic Activity of PTEN Variants Linked to Cancers and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sean B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are membrane components that play critical regulatory roles in mammalian cells. The enzyme PTEN, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of the phosphoinositide PIP3, is damaged in most sporadic tumors. Mutations in the PTEN gene have also been linked to autism spectrum disorders and other forms of delayed development. Here, human PTEN is shown to be on the cusp of unfolding under physiological conditions. Variants of human PTEN linked to somatic cancers and disorders on the autism spectrum are shown to be impaired in their conformational stability, catalytic activity, or both. Those variants linked only to autism have higher activity than those linked to cancers. PTEN-L, which is a secreted trans-active isoform, has greater conformational stability than does the wild-type enzyme. These data indicate that PTEN is a fragile enzyme cast in a crucial role in cellular metabolism, and suggest that PTEN-L is a repository for a critical catalytic activity. PMID:25647146

  8. Intrinsic relative activities of κ opioid agonists in activating Gα proteins and internalizing receptor: Differences between human and mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    DiMattio, Kelly M; Ehlert, Frederick J; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-08-15

    Several investigators recently identified biased κ opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi-G) and receptor internalization (RAi-I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi-G - logRAi-I, RAi-G/RAi-I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1-17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed.

  9. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  10. Exploiting conformational dynamics in drug discovery: design of C-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 with improved activities

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Elisabetta; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction that occurs between molecules is a dynamic process that impacts both structural and conformational properties of the ligand and the ligand binding site. Herein, we investigate the dynamic cross-talk between a protein and the ligand as a source for new opportunities in ligand design. Analysis of the formation/disappearance of protein pockets produced in response to a first-generation inhibitor assisted in the identification of functional groups that could be introduced onto scaffolds to facilitate optimal binding, which allowed for increased binding with previously uncharacterized regions. MD simulations were used to elucidate primary changes that occur in the Hsp90 C-terminal binding pocket in the presence of first-generation ligands. This data was then used to design ligands that adapt to these receptor conformations, which provides access to an energy landscape that is not visible in a static model. The newly synthesized compounds demonstrated anti-proliferative activity at ~150 nanomolar concentration. The method identified herein may be used to design chemical probes that provide additional information on structural variations of Hsp90 C-terminal binding site. PMID:24397468

  11. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  12. Signaling pathways engaged by NK cell receptors: double concerto for activating receptors, inhibitory receptors and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, E; Bléry, M; Vély, F; Vivier, E

    2000-04-01

    Despite the absence of antigen-specific receptors at their surface, NK cells can selectively eliminate virus-infected cells, tumor cells and allogenic cells. A dynamic and precisely coordinated balance between activating and inhibitory receptors governs NK cell activation programs. Multiple activating and inhibitory NK cell surface molecules have been described, a group of them acting as receptors for MHC class I molecules. In spite of their heterogeneity, activating NK cell receptors present remarkable structural and functional homologies with T cell- and B cell-antigen receptors. Inhibitory NK cell receptors operate at early stages of activating cascades by recruiting protein tyrosine phosphatases via intra- cytoplasmic motifs (ITIM), a strategy which is widely conserved in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells.

  13. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, Pavlína; Srb, Pavel; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Tošner, Zdeněk; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II are closely related protein hormones. Their distinct evolution has resulted in different yet overlapping biological functions with insulin becoming a key regulator of metabolism, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I/II are major growth factors. Insulin and IGFs cross-bind with different affinities to closely related insulin receptor isoforms A and B (IR-A and IR-B) and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-1R). Identification of structural determinants in IGFs and insulin that trigger their specific signaling pathways is of increasing importance in designing receptor-specific analogs with potential therapeutic applications. Here, we developed a straightforward protocol for production of recombinant IGF-II and prepared six IGF-II analogs with IGF-I-like mutations. All modified molecules exhibit significantly reduced affinity toward IR-A, particularly the analogs with a Pro-Gln insertion in the C-domain. Moreover, one of the analogs has enhanced binding affinity for IGF-1R due to a synergistic effect of the Pro-Gln insertion and S29N point mutation. Consequently, this analog has almost a 10-fold higher IGF-1R/IR-A binding specificity in comparison with native IGF-II. The established IGF-II purification protocol allowed for cost-effective isotope labeling required for a detailed NMR structural characterization of IGF-II analogs that revealed a link between the altered binding behavior of selected analogs and conformational rearrangement of their C-domains. PMID:27510031

  14. 19F NMR study on the complex of fluorinated vitamin D derivatives with vitamin D receptor: elucidation of the conformation of vitamin D ligands accommodated in the receptor.

    PubMed

    Morizono, Daisuke

    2011-12-28

    Nuclear receptors mediate allosteric communications where ligand binding initiates a cascade of signal transduction. The interaction of vitamin D with vitamin D receptor (VDR) was investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the complexes of three fluorinated vitamin D derivatives with the full-length rat VDR-LBD. In the (19)F NMR spectra of the VDR-ligand complexes, the A-ring of 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3 was revealed to adopt β-conformation in the VDR in solution, and the spectra were shown to be dependent on the dissociation constant. While the complex of 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3 with VDR exhibited a clear distinguishable (19)F NMR spectrum, those of (19)F-1,25(OH)2D3 stereoisomers, which have 10-fold higher VDR affinity than 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3, did not. The solid-phase NMR technique was useful for (19)F-1,25(OH)2D3 stereoisomers. The fluorinated vitamin D derivatives showed marked changes in the chemical shift (Δ4-19.7 ppm) upon VDR-complex formation, and the ab initio MO method suggested that van der Waals interactions play a major role in the complex formation.

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  16. Rearrangement of the Extracellular Domain/Extracellular Loop 1 Interface Is Critical for Thyrotropin Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Joerg; Nagel, Marcus B M; Huth, Sandra; Jaeschke, Holger; Moretti, Rocco; Hintze, Vera; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Meiler, Jens; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with a characteristic large extracellular domain (ECD). TSHR activation is initiated by binding of the hormone ligand TSH to the ECD. How the extracellular binding event triggers the conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) necessary for intracellular G protein activation is poorly understood. To gain insight in this process, the knowledge on the relative positioning of ECD and TMD and the conformation of the linker region at the interface of ECD and TMD are of particular importance. To generate a structural model for the TSHR we applied an integrated structural biology approach combining computational techniques with experimental data. Chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry yielded 17 unique distance restraints within the ECD of the TSHR, its ligand TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex. These structural restraints generally confirm the expected binding mode of TSH to the ECD as well as the general fold of the domains and were used to guide homology modeling of the ECD. Functional characterization of TSHR mutants confirms the previously suggested close proximity of Ser-281 and Ile-486 within the TSHR. Rigidifying this contact permanently with a disulfide bridge disrupts ligand-induced receptor activation and indicates that rearrangement of the ECD/extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) interface is a critical step in receptor activation. The experimentally verified contact of Ser-281 (ECD) and Ile-486 (TMD) was subsequently utilized in docking homology models of the ECD and the TMD to create a full-length model of a glycoprotein hormone receptor. PMID:27129207

  17. A common model for cytokine receptor activation: combined scissor-like rotation and self-rotation of receptor dimer induced by class I cytokine.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The precise mechanism by which the binding of a class I cytokine to the extracellular domain of its corresponding receptor transmits a signal through the cell membrane remains unclear. Receptor activation involves a cytokine-receptor complex with a 1∶2 stoichiometry. Previously we used our transient-complex theory to calculate the rate constant of the initial cytokine-receptor binding to form a 1∶1 complex. Here we computed the binding pathway leading to the 1∶2 activation complex. Three cytokine systems (growth hormone, erythropoietin, and prolactin) were studied, and the focus was on the binding of the extracellular domain of the second receptor molecule after forming the 1∶1 complex. According to the transient-complex theory, translational and rotation diffusion of the binding entities bring them together to form a transient complex, which has near-native relative separation and orientation but not the short-range specific native interactions. Subsequently conformational rearrangement leads to the formation of the native complex. We found that the changes in relative orientations between the two receptor molecules from the transient complex to the 1∶2 native complex are similar for the three cytokine-receptor systems. We thus propose a common model for receptor activation by class I cytokines, involving combined scissor-like rotation and self-rotation of the two receptor molecules. Both types of rotations seem essential: the scissor-like rotation separates the intracellular domains of the two receptor molecules to make room for the associated Janus kinase molecules, while the self-rotation allows them to orient properly for transphosphorylation. This activation model explains a host of experimental observations. The transient-complex based approach presented here may provide a strategy for designing antagonists and prove useful for elucidating activation mechanisms of other receptors.

  18. Interacting residues in an activated state of a G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hun; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-27

    Ste2p, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the tridecapeptide pheromone alpha-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was used as a model GPCR to investigate the role of specific residues in the resting and activated states of the receptor. Using a series of biological and biochemical analyses of wild-type and site-directed mutant receptors, we identified Asn(205) as a potential interacting partner with the Tyr(266) residue. An N205H/Y266H double mutant showed pH-dependent functional activity, whereas the N205H receptor was non-functional and the Y266H receptor was partially active indicating that the histidine 205 and 266 residues interact in an activated state of the receptor. The introduction of N205K or Y266D mutations into the P258L/S259L constitutively active receptor suppressed the constitutive activity; in contrast, the N205K/Y266D/P258L/S259L quadruple mutant was fully constitutively active, again indicating an interaction between residues at the 205 and 206 positions in the receptor-active state. To further test this interaction, we introduced the N205C/Y266C, F204C/Y266C, and N205C/A265C double mutations into wild-type and P258L/S259L constitutively active receptors. After trypsin digestion, we found that a disulfide-cross-linked product, with the molecular weight expected for a receptor fragment with a cross-link between N205C and Y266C, formed only in the N205C/Y266C constitutively activated receptor. This study represents the first experimental demonstration of an interaction between specific residues in an active state, but not the resting state, of Ste2p. The information gained from this study should contribute to an understanding of the conformational differences between resting and active states in GPCRs. PMID:16314417

  19. Non-enzymatic Glycation of Almond Cystatin Leads to Conformational Changes and Altered Activity.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azad A; Sohail, Aamir; Bhat, Sheraz A; Rehman, Md T; Bano, Bilqees

    2015-01-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and reducing sugars, known as glycation, leads to the formation of inter and intramolecular cross-links of proteins. Stable end products called as advanced Maillard products or advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received tremendous attention since last decades. It was suggested that the formation of AGEs not only modify the conformation of proteins but also induces altered biological activity. In this study, cystatin purified from almond was incubated with three different sugars namely D-ribose, fructose and lactose to monitor the glycation process. Structural changes induced in cystatin on glycation were studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD and FTIR techniques. Glycated cystatin was found to migrate slower on electrophoresis as compared to control cystatin. Biological activity data of glycated cystatin showed that D-ribose was most effective in inducing conformational changes with maximum altered activity.

  20. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  1. Principles of antibody-mediated TNF receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Wajant, H

    2015-01-01

    From the beginning of research on receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), agonistic antibodies have been used to stimulate TNFRSF receptors in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, CD95, one of the first cloned TNFRSF receptors, was solely identified as the target of cell death-inducing antibodies. Early on, it became evident from in vitro studies that valency and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding of antibodies targeting TNFRSF receptors can be of crucial relevance for agonistic activity. TNFRSF receptor-specific antibodies of the IgM subclass and secondary cross-linked or aggregation prone dimeric antibodies typically display superior agonistic activity compared with dimeric antibodies. Likewise, anchoring of antibodies to cell surface-expressed FcγRs potentiate their ability to trigger TNFRSF receptor signaling. However, only recently has the relevance of oligomerization and FcγR binding for the in vivo activity of antibody-induced TNFRSF receptor activation been straightforwardly demonstrated in vivo. This review discusses the crucial role of oligomerization and/or FcγR binding for antibody-mediated TNFRSF receptor stimulation in light of current models of TNFRSF receptor activation and especially the overwhelming relevance of these issues for the rational development of therapeutic TNFRSF receptor-targeting antibodies. PMID:26292758

  2. A statistical analysis of acetylcholine receptor activation in Xenopus myocytes: stepwise versus concerted models of gating.

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, A

    1993-01-01

    1. The kinetic properties of single channel currents from fetal-type acetylcholine receptors in embryonic Xenopus myocytes (60 h old) have been analysed by a maximum-likelihood method. 2. At very high acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations (up to 5 mM) the effective opening rate appears to saturate at approximately 30,000 s-1. 3. The kinetics were analysed according to the standard concerted scheme that postulates a single channel-opening conformational change after two agonists are bound, and a rarely invoked stepwise scheme that postulates semi-independent conformational changes in two distinct gating domains. Both models assume that agonist cannot escape from a channel (or domain) that is in its activated conformation. 4. With either activation scheme the kinetic analyses indicate that ACh binds at a rate of approximately 2 x 10(8) s-1 M-1 and dissociates from doubly liganded receptors at a rate of approximately 28,000 s-1, and that the activation process is asymmetric, i.e. the binding (concerted model) or gating (stepwise model) transitions are not equal and independent. 5. In eighteen of twenty-seven file-by-file comparisons, the likelihood of the stepwise model was greater than that of the concerted model. In seven such comparisons, the likelihood of the concerted model was greater than that of the stepwise model, and in two there was no difference. Log likelihood ratio distributions were obtained from three files (those with the most events) by multiple cycles of resampling and fitting. The means of these distributions were significantly greater than zero, indicating that the stepwise scheme was as good as, or better than, the concerted scheme in describing receptor activation. 6. According to the stepwise view, two binding sites must be occupied and two 'gates' activated for conduction to occur. Although equivalent binding is not an essential aspect of stepwise activation, the binding sites can be identical and have a low affinity for ACh (Kd approximately 130

  3. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  4. Crystal structure of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in an active conformation with normal thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Thompson, Lawrence C; Bucci, Joel C; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G W; Peterson, Cynthia B; Andreasen, Peter A; Morth, J Preben

    2011-08-26

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 3(10)-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1.

  5. Crystal Structure of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in an Active Conformation with Normal Thermodynamic Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan K.; Thompson, Lawrence C.; Bucci, Joel C.; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Peterson, Cynthia B.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Morth, J. Preben

    2011-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 310-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1. PMID:21697084

  6. Agonist induced constitutive receptor activation as a novel regulatory mechanism. Mu receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Sadée, W; Wang, Z

    1995-01-01

    We propose the hypothesis that certain G protein coupled receptors can become constitutively activated during agonist stimulation so that the receptor remains active even after the agonist is removed. This new paradigm of receptor regulation may account for some long term effects of neurotransmitters and hormones. We have tested the hypothesis that constitutive mu receptor activation represents a crucial step driving narcotic tolerance and dependence. Our results indeed support the conversion of mu to a constitutively active state, mu*, observed in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y tissue culture, in U293 cells transfected with the mu receptor gene, and in vivo. Constitutive mu activation may result from receptor phosphorylation to yield mu*, and further, in vivo studies indicate that formation of mu* could account for narcotic tolerance and dependence.

  7. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  8. Structural Basis of Interaction Between Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator and its Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka,C.; Parry, G.; Callahan, J.; Shaw, D.; Kuo, A.; Cines, B.; Mazar, A.; Lubkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its high-affinity receptor (uPAR) orchestrates uPAR interactions with other cellular components that play a pivotal role in diverse (patho-)physiological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. However, notwithstanding the wealth of biochemical data available describing the activities of uPAR, little is known about the exact mode of uPAR/uPA interactions or the presumed conformational changes that accompany uPA/uPAR engagement. Here, we report the crystal structure of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which contains the three domains of the wild-type receptor but lacks the cell-surface anchoring sequence, in complex with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (ATF), at the resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of free ATF. Our results provide a structural basis, represented by conformational changes induced in uPAR, for several published biochemical observations describing the nature of uPAR/uPA interactions and provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for the cellular responses induced by uPA binding.

  9. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  10. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein–coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state–like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state. PMID:25745166

  11. Structure-Activity Relationships of Constrained Phenylethylamine Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Isberg, Vignir; Paine, James; Leth-Petersen, Sebastian; Kristensen, Jesper L.; Gloriam, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic ligands have proven effective drugs in the treatment of migraine, pain, obesity, and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. There is a clinical need for more highly 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands and the most attention has been given to the phenethylamine class. Conformationally constrained phenethylamine analogs have demonstrated that for optimal activity the free lone pair electrons of the 2-oxygen must be oriented syn and the 5-oxygen lone pairs anti relative to the ethylamine moiety. Also the ethyl linker has been constrained providing information about the bioactive conformation of the amine functionality. However, combined 1,2-constriction by cyclization has only been tested with one compound. Here, we present three new 1,2-cyclized phenylethylamines, 9–11, and describe their synthetic routes. Ligand docking in the 5-HT2B crystal structure showed that the 1,2-heterocyclized compounds can be accommodated in the binding site. Conformational analysis showed that 11 can only bind in a higher-energy conformation, which would explain its absent or low affinity. The amine and 2-oxygen interactions with D3.32 and S3.36, respectively, can form but shift the placement of the core scaffold. The constraints in 9–11 resulted in docking poses with the 4-bromine in closer vicinity to 5.46, which is polar only in the human 5-HT2A subtype, for which 9–11 have the lowest affinity. The new ligands, conformational analysis and docking expand the structure-activity relationships of constrained phenethylamines and contributes towards the development of 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands. PMID:24244317

  12. Novel human D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors stabilize an active-site lid-open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T.; Chun, Lawrence E.; Brown, Scott P.; Heffernan, Michele L. R.; Fang, Q. Kevin; Orsini, Michael A.; Pollegioni, Loredano; Hardy, Larry W.; Spear, Kerry L.; Large, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) is a central regulator of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. hDAAO (human D-amino acid oxidase) indirectly reduces NMDAR activity by degrading the NMDAR co-agonist D-serine. Since NMDAR hypofunction is thought to be a foundational defect in schizophrenia, hDAAO inhibitors have potential as treatments for schizophrenia and other nervous system disorders. Here, we sought to identify novel chemicals that inhibit hDAAO activity. We used computational tools to design a focused, purchasable library of compounds. After screening this library for hDAAO inhibition, we identified the structurally novel compound, ‘compound 2’ [3-(7-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)propanoic acid], which displayed low nM hDAAO inhibitory potency (Ki=7 nM). Although the library was expected to enrich for compounds that were competitive for both D-serine and FAD, compound 2 actually was FAD uncompetitive, much like canonical hDAAO inhibitors such as benzoic acid. Compound 2 and an analog were independently co-crystalized with hDAAO. These compounds stabilized a novel conformation of hDAAO in which the active-site lid was in an open position. These results confirm previous hypotheses regarding active-site lid flexibility of mammalian D-amino acid oxidases and could assist in the design of the next generation of hDAAO inhibitors. PMID:25001371

  13. Conformational changes in the amino-terminal helix of the G protein alpha(i1) following dissociation from Gbetagamma subunit and activation.

    PubMed

    Medkova, Martina; Preininger, Anita M; Yu, Nan-Jun; Hubbell, Wayne L; Hamm, Heidi E

    2002-08-01

    G protein alpha subunits mediate activation of signaling pathways through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) by virtue of GTP-dependent conformational rearrangements. It is known that regions of disorder in crystal structures can be indicative of conformational flexibility within a molecule, and there are several such regions in G protein alpha subunits. The amino-terminal 29 residues of Galpha are alpha-helical only in the heterotrimer, where they contact the side of Gbeta, but little is known about the conformation of this region in the active GTP bound state. To address the role of the Galpha amino-terminus in G-protein activation and to investigate whether this region undergoes activation-dependent conformational changes, a site-directed cysteine mutagenesis study was carried out. Engineered Galpha(i1) proteins were created by first removing six native reactive cysteines to yield a mutant Galpha(i1)-C3S-C66A-C214S-C305S-C325A-C351I that no longer reacts with cysteine-directed labels. Several cysteine substitutions along the amino-terminal region were then introduced. All mutant proteins were shown to be folded properly and functional. An environmentally sensitive probe, Lucifer yellow, linked to these sites showed a fluorescence change upon interaction with Gbetagamma and with activation by AlF(4)(-). Other fluorescent probes of varying charge, size, and hydrophobicity linked to amino-terminal residues also revealed changes upon activation with bulkier probes reporting larger changes. Site-directed spin-labeling studies showed that the N-terminus of the Galpha subunit is dynamically disordered in the GDP bound state, but adopts a structure consistent with an alpha-helix upon interaction with Gbetagamma. Interaction of the resulting spin-labeled Galphabetagamma with photoactivated rhodopsin, followed by rhodopsin-catalyzed GTPgammaS binding, caused the amino-terminal domain of Galpha to revert to a dynamically disordered state similar to that of the GDP

  14. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally restricted acetanilides as potent and selective β3 adrenergic receptor agonists for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Christopher R; Berger, Richard; Goble, Stephen D; Harper, Bart; Shen, Dong-Ming; Wang, Liping; Bansal, Alka; Brown, Patricia N; Chen, Airu S; Dingley, Karen H; Di Salvo, Jerry; Fitzmaurice, Aileen; Gichuru, Loise N; Hurley, Amanda L; Jochnowitz, Nina; Miller, Randall R; Mistry, Shruty; Nagabukuro, Hiroshi; Salituro, Gino M; Sanfiz, Anthony; Stevenson, Andra S; Villa, Katherine; Zamlynny, Beata; Struthers, Mary; Weber, Ann E; Edmondson, Scott D

    2014-02-27

    A series of conformationally restricted acetanilides were synthesized and evaluated as β3-adrenergic receptor agonists (β3-AR) for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Optimization studies identified a five-membered ring as the preferred conformational lock of the acetanilide. Further optimization of both the aromatic and thiazole regions led to compounds such as 19 and 29, which have a good balance of potency and selectivity. These compounds have significantly reduced intrinsic clearance compared to our initial series of pyridylethanolamine β3-AR agonists and thus have improved unbound drug exposures. Both analogues demonstrated dose dependent β3-AR mediated responses in a rat bladder hyperactivity model. PMID:24437735

  15. A neglected modulator of insulin-degrading enzyme activity and conformation: The pH.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Satriano, Cristina; Milardi, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, has multiple activities in addition to insulin degradation and its malfunction is believed to connect type 2 diabetes with Alzheimer's disease. IDE has been found in many different cellular compartments, where it may experience significant physio-pathological pH variations. However, the exact role of pH variations on the interplay between enzyme conformations, stability, oligomerization state and catalysis is not understood. Here, we use ESI mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism to investigate the structure-activity relationship of IDE at different pH values. We show that acidic pH affects the ability of the enzyme to bind the substrate and decrease the stability of the protein by inducing an α-helical bundle conformation with a concomitant dissociation of multi-subunit IDE assemblies into monomeric units and loss of activity. These effects suggest a major role played by electrostatic forces in regulating multi-subunit enzyme assembly and function. Our results clearly indicate a pH dependent coupling among enzyme conformation, assembly and stability and suggest that cellular acidosis can have a large effect on IDE oligomerization state, inducing an enzyme inactivation and an altered insulin degradation that could have an impact on insulin signaling.

  16. Modulation of Glucagon Receptor Pharmacology by Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-2 (RAMP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Lu, Jing; Li, Naichang; Barkan, Kerry; Richards, Gareth O.; Roberts, David J.; Skerry, Timothy M.; Poyner, David; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Dowell, Simon J.; Willars, Gary B.; Ladds, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors play important, opposing roles in regulating blood glucose levels. Consequently, these receptors have been identified as targets for novel diabetes treatments. However, drugs acting at the GLP-1 receptor, although having clinical efficacy, have been associated with severe adverse side-effects, and targeting of the glucagon receptor has yet to be successful. Here we use a combination of yeast reporter assays and mammalian systems to provide a more complete understanding of glucagon receptor signaling, considering the effect of multiple ligands, association with the receptor-interacting protein receptor activity-modifying protein-2 (RAMP2), and the role of individual G protein α-subunits. We demonstrate that RAMP2 alters both ligand selectivity and G protein preference of the glucagon receptor. Importantly, we also uncover novel cross-reactivity of therapeutically used GLP-1 receptor ligands at the glucagon receptor that is abolished by RAMP2 interaction. This study reveals the glucagon receptor as a previously unidentified target for GLP-1 receptor agonists and highlights a role for RAMP2 in regulating its pharmacology. Such previously unrecognized functions of RAMPs highlight the need to consider all receptor-interacting proteins in future drug development. PMID:26198634

  17. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 by Triton X-100--identification of two consecutive conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Declerck, P J

    1998-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily because of its conformational and functional flexibility. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the functional stability and conformational transitions of PAI-1. At 37 degrees C, TX-100 induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the functional half-life of PAI-1 resulting in half-lives of 177 +/- 54 min (mean +/- SD, n = 3), 19 +/- 2 min, 1.7 +/- 0.3 min and 0.53 +/- 0.03 min in the presence of 0.005, 0.010, 0.020 and 0.2% TX-100, respectively, compared to a half-life of 270 +/- 146 min in the absence of TX-100. Conformational analysis at various time points and at different temperatures (0 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C) revealed that this inactivation proceeds through the formation of a substrate-like intermediate followed by the formation of the latent form. Kinetic evaluation demonstrated that this conversion fits to two consecutive first-order transitions, i.e. active k1--> substrate k2--> latent. The k1 value was strongly dependent on the concentration of TX-100 (e.g. 0.002 +/- 0.0006 s(-1) and 0.029 +/- 0.003 s(-1) for 0.01% and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C) whereas the conversion of substrate to latent (k2) was virtually independent of the TX-100 concentration (i.e. 0.012 +/- 0.002 s(-1) and 0.011 +/- 0.001 s(-1) for 0.01 and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C). Experiments with a variety of other non-ionic amphiphilic compounds revealed that the amphiphilic character of the compound is, at least in part, responsible for the observed effects and strongly indicate that the currently reported mechanism of inactivation is of general importance for the conformational transitions in PAI-1. In conclusion, TX- 100 changes the initial conformation of PAI-1 resulting in altered functional properties. This observation allows us to develop a new model for the mechanism involved in the conformational flexibility of

  18. Activation function 2 (AF-2) of retinoic acid receptor and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor: presence of a conserved autonomous constitutive activating domain and influence of the nature of the response element on AF-2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, B; Saunders, M; Gaudon, C; Roy, B; Losson, R; Chambon, P

    1994-01-01

    A motif essential for the transcriptional activation function 2 (AF-2) present in the E region of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) alpha and 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) alpha has been characterized as an amphipathic alpha-helix whose main features are conserved between transcriptionally active members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This conserved motif, which can activate autonomously in the absence of ligand in animal and yeast cells, can be swapped between nuclear receptors without affecting the ligand dependency for activation of transcription, thus indicating that a ligand-dependent conformational change is necessary to reveal the AF-2 activation potential within the E region of the nuclear receptor. Interestingly, we show that the precise nature of the direct repeat response element to which RAR/RXR heterodimers are bound can affect the activity of the AF-2s of the heterodimeric partners, as well as the relative efficiency with which all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acids activate the RAR partner. Images PMID:7957103

  19. Activation-induced structural change in the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; Takahashi, Hirohide; Srivats, Shyam; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We studied the response of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor to activation. • GluN1 and GluN3A subunits interacted within transfected cells. • The GluN1/GluN3A receptor was functionally active. • Glycine or D-serine caused a ∼1 nm height reduction in bilayer-integrated receptors. • This height reduction was abolished by the glycine antagonist DCKA. - Abstract: Unlike GluN2-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which require both glycine and glutamate for activation, receptors composed of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits are activated by glycine alone. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging to examine the response to activation of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor. GluN1 and GluN3A subunits were shown to interact intimately within transfected tsA 201 cells. Isolated GluN1/GluN3A receptors integrated into lipid bilayers responded to addition of either glycine or D-serine, but not glutamate, with a ∼1 nm reduction in height of the extracellular domain. The height reduction in response to glycine was abolished by the glycine antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid. Our results represent the first demonstration of the effect of activation on the conformation of this receptor.

  20. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  1. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  2. 1,4-disubstituted-[1,2,3]triazolyl-containing analogues of MT-II: design, synthesis, conformational analysis, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Testa, Chiara; Scrima, Mario; Grimaldi, Manuela; D'Ursi, Anna M; Dirain, Marvin L; Lubin-Germain, Nadège; Singh, Anamika; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Chorev, Michael; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna M

    2014-11-26

    Side chain-to-side chain cyclizations represent a strategy to select a family of bioactive conformations by reducing the entropy and enhancing the stabilization of functional ligand-induced receptor conformations. This structural manipulation contributes to increased target specificity, enhanced biological potency, improved pharmacokinetic properties, increased functional potency, and lowered metabolic susceptibility. The Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar Huisgen's cycloaddition, the prototypic click reaction, presents a promising opportunity to develop a new paradigm for an orthogonal bioorganic and intramolecular side chain-to-side chain cyclization. In fact, the proteolytic stable 1,4- or 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazolyl moiety is isosteric with the peptide bond and can function as a surrogate of the classical side chain-to-side chain lactam forming bridge. Herein we report the design, synthesis, conformational analysis, and functional biological activity of a series of i-to-i+5 1,4- and 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazole-bridged cyclopeptides derived from MT-II, the homodetic Asp(5) to Lys(10) side chain-to-side chain bridged heptapeptide, an extensively studied agonist of melanocortin receptors. PMID:25347033

  3. 1,4-Disubstituted-[1,2,3]triazolyl-Containing Analogues of MT-II: Design, Synthesis, Conformational Analysis, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Side chain-to-side chain cyclizations represent a strategy to select a family of bioactive conformations by reducing the entropy and enhancing the stabilization of functional ligand-induced receptor conformations. This structural manipulation contributes to increased target specificity, enhanced biological potency, improved pharmacokinetic properties, increased functional potency, and lowered metabolic susceptibility. The CuI-catalyzed azide–alkyne 1,3-dipolar Huisgen’s cycloaddition, the prototypic click reaction, presents a promising opportunity to develop a new paradigm for an orthogonal bioorganic and intramolecular side chain-to-side chain cyclization. In fact, the proteolytic stable 1,4- or 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazolyl moiety is isosteric with the peptide bond and can function as a surrogate of the classical side chain-to-side chain lactam forming bridge. Herein we report the design, synthesis, conformational analysis, and functional biological activity of a series of i-to-i+5 1,4- and 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazole-bridged cyclopeptides derived from MT-II, the homodetic Asp5 to Lys10 side chain-to-side chain bridged heptapeptide, an extensively studied agonist of melanocortin receptors. PMID:25347033

  4. Probing conformational changes in orphan nuclear receptor: the NGFI-B intermediate is a partially unfolded dimer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Wanius; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; de Guzzi, Carolina A; Buzzá, Hilde H; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Calgaro, Marcos R; Polikarpov, Igor

    2008-10-01

    Human nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) is a member of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors (NRs). Lacking identified ligands, orphan NRs show particular co-regulator proteins binding properties, different from other NRs, and they might have a non-classical quaternary organization. A body of evidence suggests that NRs recognition of and binding to ligands, DNA, homo- and heterodimerization partners and co-regulator proteins involve significant conformational changes of the NR ligand-binding domains (LBDs). To shed light on largely unknown biophysical properties of NGFI-B, here we studied structural organization and unfolding properties of NGFI-B ligand (like)-binding domain induced by chemical perturbation. Our results show that NGFI-B LBD undergoes a two-state guanidine hydrochloride (GndHCl) induced denaturation, as judged by changes in the alpha-helical content of the protein monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). In contrast, changes in the tertiary structure of NGFI-B LBD, reported by intrinsic fluorescence, reveal a clear intermediate state. Additionally, SAXS results demonstrate that the intermediate observed by intrinsic fluorescence is a partially folded homodimeric structure, which further unfolds without dissociation at higher GndHCl concentrations. This partially unfolded dimeric assembly of NGFI-B LBD might resemble an intermediate that this domain access momentarily in the native state upon interactions with functional partners.

  5. Effect of size and conformation of the ligand on asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated ligand internalization and degradation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Chang, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/-I-labeled desialylated cyanogen bromide fragment I of orosomucoid (AS-CNBr-I) and its reduced and carboxymethylated derivative (AS-RC-CNBr-I) were compared with those of /sup 125/I-labeled asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in rat hepatocytes. At 30 nM the rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-AS-CNBr-I were greater than those of /sup 125/I-ASOR. /sup 125/I-AS-RC-CNBr-I also had a lower rate of internalization and degradation. In contrast to /sup 125/I-ASOR, when degradation was inhibited by 5 ..mu..M colchicine there was a significant intracellular accumulation of the smaller ligands. At 4/sup 0/C the hepatocytes were found to bind the fragmented ligands more than /sup 125/I-ASOR. Incubation of the cells with bound ligand at 37/sup 0/ indicated that diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR was greater than the smaller ligands. Colchincine markedly enhanced diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR. On the other hand, there were marked accumulation of the smaller ligands by colchicine. These results suggest that the rates of internalization, degradation and diacytosis of the ligand are affected by the size and conformation of the ligand through different rates of receptor binding and intracellular transport.

  6. A widely used retinoic acid receptor antagonist induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Michael; Curtin, Joshua C; Kim, Roy J; Billin, Andrew N; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors whose activity is regulated by the binding of small lipophilic ligands, including hormones, vitamins, and metabolites. Pharmacological NR ligands serve as important therapeutic agents; for example, all-trans retinoic acid, an activating ligand for retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha), is used to treat leukemia. Another RARalpha ligand, (E)-S,S-dioxide-4-(2-(7-(heptyloxy)-3,4-dihydro-4,4-dimethyl-2H-1-benzothiopyran-6-yl)-1-propenyl)-benzoic acid (Ro 41-5253), is a potent antagonist that has been a useful and purportedly specific probe of RARalpha function. Here, we report that Ro 41-5253 also activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and target of widely prescribed antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs). Ro 41-5253 enhanced differentiation of mouse and human preadipocytes and activated PPARgamma target genes in mature adipocytes. Like the TZDs, Ro 41-5253 also down-regulated PPARgamma protein expression in adipocytes. In addition, Ro 41-5253 activated the PPARgamma-ligand binding domain in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. These effects were not prevented by a potent RARalpha agonist or by depleting cells of RARalpha, indicating that PPARgamma activation was not related to RARalpha antagonism. Indeed, Ro 41-5253 was able to compete with TZD ligands for binding to PPARgamma, suggesting that Ro 41-5253 directly affects PPAR activity. These results vividly demonstrate that pharmacological NR ligands may have "off-target" effects on other NRs. Ro 41-5253 is a PPARgamma agonist as well as an RARalpha antagonist whose pleiotropic effects on NRs may signify a unique spectrum of biological responses.

  7. Calcium Activation of the Ca-ATPase Enhances Conformational Heterogeneity Between Nucleotide Binding and Phosphorylation Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2004-04-13

    High-resolution crystal structures obtained in two conformations of the Ca-ATPase suggest that a large-scale rigid-body domain reorientation of approximately 50 involving the nucleotide-binding (N) domain is required to permit the transfer of the -phosphoryl group of ATP to Asp351 in the phosphorylation (P) domain during coupled calcium transport. However, variability observed in the orientation of the N-domain relative to the P-domain in both different crystal structures of the Ca-ATPase following calcium activation, and structures of other P-type ATPases, suggests the presence of conformational heterogeneity in solution which may be modulated by contact interactions within the crystal. Therefore, to address the extent of conformational heterogeneity between these domains in solution, we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between donor (i.e., 5-[[2-[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]amino] naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) and acceptor (i.e., fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate) chromophores covalently bound to the P- and N-domains, respectively, within the Ca-ATPase stabilized in different enzymatic states associated with the transport cycle. In comparison to the unliganded enzyme, the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between these domains is unaffected by enzyme phosphorylation. However, calcium-activation results in a 3.4 increase in the average spatial separation, which increases from 29.4 to 32.8 , in good agreement with the high-resolution structures where these sites are respectively separated by 31.6 (1 IWO.pdb) and 35.9 (1EUL.pdb). Thus, the crystal structures accurately reflect the average solution structures of the Ca-ATPase. However, there is substantial conformational heterogeneity for all enzyme states measured, indicating that formation of catalytically important transition states involves a subpopulation of enzyme intermediates. These results suggest that the

  8. Synthesis and biological activity of conformationally restricted gypsy moth pheromone mimics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Gong, Yongmei; Gries, Regine M; Plettner, Erika

    2010-04-15

    The design and synthesis of a series of conformationally constrained mimics of gypsy moth sex pheromone, (+)-disparlure (7R,8S)-2-methyl-7,8-epoxyoctadecane, are described. The core structure of the mimics is derived from 5-(2'-hydroxyethyl)cyclopent-2-en-1-ol. Substituent optimization of the analogs was accomplished through the synthesis of mini-libraries and pure individual compounds, followed by electrophysiological experiments with male gypsy moth antennae. The electroantennogram results show that the analogs elicited weak to no antennal responses themselves. There was a clear structure-activity pattern for odorant activity, with ethyl substituents being best. Further, when puffed simultaneously with the pheromone, some of the compounds gave a significant enhancement of the antennal depolarization, indicating an additive or synergistic effect. A pure pheromone stimulus following a mixed compound/pheromone stimulus was generally not affected, with two exceptions: one compound enhanced and another inhibited a subsequent stimulus. The compounds also prolonged the stimulation of the antenna, which manifested itself in widened electroantennogram peaks. We tested the hypothesis that this prolonged stimulation may be due to the stabilization of a particular conformer of the pheromone-binding protein (PBP). Compounds that caused PBP2 to adopt a similar conformation than in the presence of pheromone also caused peak widening. This was not the case with PBP1.

  9. Salivary histatin 5: dependence of sequence, chain length, and helical conformation for candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Raj, P A; Edgerton, M; Levine, M J

    1990-03-01

    Histatin 5 (Asp1-Ser-His-Ala4-Lys-Arg-His-His8-Gly-Tyr-Lys-Arg12-Lys-Ph e-His-Glu16-Lys-His - His-Ser20-His-Arg-Gly-Tyr24), one of the basic histidine-rich peptides present in human parotid saliva and several of its fragments, 1-16 (N16), 9-24 (C16), 11-24 (C14), 13-24 (C12), 15-24 (C10), and 7-16 (M10), were synthesized by solid-phase procedures. Native histatin 5 from human parotid saliva was also purified. Their antifungal activities on two strains of Candida albicans have been studied and their conformational preferences both in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions examined by circular dichroism. The synthetic histatin 5, C16, and C14 peptides were highly active and inhibited the growth of C. albicans. The candidacidal activity data of synthetic histatin 5 were comparable to the values of the native histatin 5 isolated from parotid saliva and those reported previously, although the assay system used and the strains examined were different. The C16 fragment was as active as the whole peptide itself, whereas the N16 fragment was far less active than C14, suggesting that the sequence at the C-terminal is important for its fungicidal activity. An increase in the chain length of the C-terminal sequence from 12 to 16 residues increased the candidacidal activity, thereby indicating that a peptide chain length of at least 12 residues is necessary to elicit optimum biological activity. The CD spectra of these linear peptides showed that they are structurally more flexible, and they adopt different conformations depending on the solvent environment. CD studies provided evidence that histatin 5 and the longer fragments, C16, N16, and C14 preferred alpha-helical conformations in non-aqueous solvents such as trifluoroethanol and methanol, while in water and pH 7.4 phosphate buffers, they favored random coil structures. The shorter sequences seemed to adopt either turn structures or unordered structures both in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. It appears that the sequence at

  10. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  11. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution.

  12. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  13. The chemokine receptor CCR1 is constitutively active, which leads to G protein-independent, β-arrestin-mediated internalization.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M

    2013-11-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation.

  14. Mineralocorticoid receptor activation in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome have become major public health concerns. Nowadays, aldosterone is recognized as an important mediator of cardiovascular and renal damage. In the kidney, aldosterone injures glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes), the final filtration barrier to plasma macromolecules, leading to proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists effectively ameliorate proteinuria in patients or in animal models of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as in patients who experience 'aldosterone breakthrough.' Recently, clinical and experimental studies have shown that plasma aldosterone concentration is associated with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome. We showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/cp, an experimental model of obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome, are prone to glomerular podocyte injury, proteinuria and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, especially when the animals are fed a high-salt diet. Inappropriate activation of the aldosterone/MR system underlies the renal and cardiac injuries. Adipocyte-derived aldosterone-releasing factors (ARFs), although still unidentified, may account for aldosterone excess and the resultant target organ complication in SHR/cp. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that MR activation triggers target organ disease even in normal or low aldosterone states. We identified a small GTP (guanosine triphosphate)-binding protein, Rac1, as a novel activator of MR, and showed that this ligand-independent MR activation by Rac1 contributes to the nephropathy of several CKD models. We expect that ARFs and Rac1 can be novel therapeutic targets for metabolic syndrome and CKD. Future large-scale clinical trials are awaited to prove the efficacy of MR blockade in patients with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  16. RELAXIN ACTIVATES PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR GAMMA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Bennett, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Relaxin is a polypeptide hormone that triggers multiple signaling pathways through its receptor RXFP1. Many of relaxin’s functions, including vascular and antifibrotic effects, are similar to those induced by activation of PPARγ. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that relaxin signaling through RXFP1 would activate PPARγ activity. In cells overexpressing RXFP1 (HEK-RXFP1), relaxin increased transcriptional activity through a PPAR response element (PPRE) in a concentration-dependent manner. In cells lacking RXFP1, relaxin had no effect. Relaxin increased both the baseline activity and the response to the PPARγ agonists rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2, but not to agonists of PPARα or PPARδ. In HEK-RXFP1 cells infected with adenovirus expressing PPARγ, relaxin increased transcriptional activity through PPRE, and this effect was blocked with an adenovirus expressing a dominant-negative PPARγ. Knockdown of PPARγ using siRNA resulted in a decrease in the response to both relaxin and rosiglitazone. Both relaxin and rosiglitazone increased expression of the PPARγ target genes CD36 and LXRα in HEK-RXFP1 and in THP-1 cells naturally expressing RXFP1. Relaxin did not increase PPARγ mRNA or protein levels. Treatment of cells with GW9662, an inhibitor of PPARγ ligand binding, effectively blocked rosiglitazone-induced PPARγ activation, but had no effect on relaxin activation of PPARγ. These results suggest that relaxin activates PPARγ activity, and increases the overall response in the presence PPARγ agonists. This activation is dependent on the presence of RXFP1. Furthermore, relaxin activates PPARγ via a ligand-independent mechanism. These studies represent the first report that relaxin can activate the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. PMID:19712722

  17. The Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted 4-Substituted-2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Multi-targeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Microtubule Inhibitors as Potential Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Ihnat, Michael; Hamel, Ernest; Zammiello, Cynthia; Bastian, Anja; Mooberry, Susan L.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-01-01

    A series of eleven conformationally restricted, 4-substituted 2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines was designed to explore the bioactive conformation required for dual inhibition of microtubule assembly and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and their biological activities are reported. All three rotatable single bonds in the lead compound 1 were sequentially restricted to address the role of each in SAR for microtubule and RTK inhibitory effects. Compounds 2, 3, 7 and 10 showed microtubule depolymerizing activity comparable to or better than the lead 1, some with nanomolar EC50 values. While compound 8 had no effect on microtubules, 8 and 10 both showed potent RTK inhibition with nanomolar IC50s. These compounds confirm that the bioactive conformation for RTK inhibition is different from that for tubulin inhibition. The tetrahydroquinoline analog 10 showed the most potent dual tubulin and RTK inhibitory activities (low nanomolar inhibition of EGFR, VEGFR2 and PDGFR-β). Compound 10 is highly potent activity against many NCI cancer cell lines, including several chemo-resistant cell lines, and could serve as a lead for further preclinical studies. PMID:25882519

  18. Block of NMDA receptor channels by endogenous neurosteroids: implications for the agonist induced conformational states of the channel vestibule

    PubMed Central

    Vyklicky, Vojtech; Krausova, Barbora; Cerny, Jiri; Balik, Ales; Zapotocky, Martin; Novotny, Marian; Lichnerova, Katarina; Smejkalova, Tereza; Kaniakova, Martina; Korinek, Miloslav; Petrovic, Milos; Kacer, Petr; Horak, Martin; Chodounska, Hana; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction is implicated in multiple brain disorders. NMDARs can be allosterically modulated by numerous compounds, including endogenous neurosteroid pregnanolone sulfate. Here, we identify the molecular basis of the use-dependent and voltage-independent inhibitory effect of neurosteroids on NMDAR responses. The site of action is located at the extracellular vestibule of the receptor’s ion channel pore and is accessible after receptor activation. Mutations in the extracellular vestibule in the SYTANLAAF motif disrupt the inhibitory effect of negatively charged steroids. In contrast, positively charged steroids inhibit mutated NMDAR responses in a voltage-dependent manner. These results, in combination with molecular modeling, characterize structure details of the open configuration of the NMDAR channel. Our results provide a unique opportunity for the development of new therapeutic neurosteroid-based ligands to treat diseases associated with dysfunction of the glutamate system. PMID:26086919

  19. Allosteric Effects of Sodium Ion Binding on Activation of the M3 Muscarinic G-Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Caliman, Alisha D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important membrane proteins that mediate cellular signaling and represent primary targets for about one-third of currently marketed drugs. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies identified distinct conformations of GPCRs in the active and inactive states. An allosteric sodium ion was found bound to a highly conserved D2.50 residue in inactive GPCRs, whereas the D2.50 allosteric pocket became collapsed in active GPCR structures. However, the dynamic mechanisms underlying these observations remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanistic effects of sodium ion binding on dynamic activation of the M3 muscarinic GPCR through long-timescale accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations. Results showed that with the D2.50 residue deprotonated, the M3 receptor is bound by an allosteric sodium ion and confined mostly in the inactive state with remarkably reduced flexibility. In contrast, the D2.50-protonated receptor does not exhibit sodium ion binding to the D2.50 allosteric site and samples a significantly larger conformational space. The receptor activation is captured and characterized by large-scale structural rearrangements of the transmembrane helices via dynamic hydrogen bond and salt bridge interactions. The residue motions are highly correlated during receptor activation. Further network analysis revealed that the allosteric signaling between residue D2.50 and key residues in the intracellular, extracellular, and orthosteric pockets is significantly weakened upon sodium ion binding. PMID:25863070

  20. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.

  1. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist withmore » residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.« less

  2. Discovery of potent cholecystokinin-2 receptor antagonists: elucidation of key pharmacophore elements by X-ray crystallographic and NMR conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mark D; Hack, Michael D; Allison, Brett D; Phuong, Victor K; Woods, Craig R; Morton, Magda F; Prendergast, Clodagh E; Barrett, Terrance D; Schubert, Carsten; Li, Lina; Wu, Xiaodong; Wu, Jiejun; Freedman, Jamie M; Shankley, Nigel P; Rabinowitz, Michael H

    2008-04-01

    A novel series of cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK-2R) antagonists has been identified, as exemplified by anthranilic sulfonamide 1 (pK(i)=7.6). Pharmacokinetic and stability studies indicated that this series of compounds suffered from metabolic degradation, and that both the benzothiadiazole and piperidine rings were rapidly oxidized by liver enzymes. A combination of synthesis, computational methods, (1)H NMR conformational studies, and X-ray crystallographic analyses were applied to elucidate key pharmacophore elements, and to discover analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and high receptor binding affinity and selectivity.

  3. Magnesium impacts myosin V motor activity by altering key conformational changes in the mechanochemical cycle.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Darshan V; Muretta, Joseph M; Swenson, Anja M; Thomas, David D; Yengo, Christopher M

    2013-07-01

    We investigated how magnesium (Mg) impacts key conformational changes during the ADP binding/release steps in myosin V and how these alterations impact the actomyosin mechanochemical cycle. The conformation of the nucleotide binding pocket was examined with our established FRET system in which myosin V labeled with FlAsH in the upper 50 kDa domain participates in energy transfer with mant labeled nucleotides. We examined the maximum actin-activated ATPase activity of MV FlAsH at a range of free Mg concentrations (0.1-9 mM) and found that the highest activity occurs at low Mg (0.1-0.3 mM), while there is a 50-60% reduction in activity at high Mg (3-9 mM). The motor activity examined with the in vitro motility assay followed a similar Mg-dependence, and the trend was similar with dimeric myosin V. Transient kinetic FRET studies of mantdADP binding/release from actomyosin V FlAsH demonstrate that the transition between the weak and strong actomyosin.ADP states is coupled to movement of the upper 50 kDa domain and is dependent on Mg with the strong state stabilized by Mg. We find that the kinetics of the upper 50 kDa conformational change monitored by FRET correlates well with the ATPase and motility results over a wide range of Mg concentrations. Our results suggest the conformation of the upper 50 kDa domain is highly dynamic in the Mg free actomyosin.ADP state, which is in agreement with ADP binding being entropy driven in the absence of Mg. Overall, our results demonstrate that Mg is a key factor in coupling the nucleotide- and actin-binding regions. In addition, Mg concentrations in the physiological range can alter the structural transition that limits ADP dissociation from actomyosin V, which explains the impact of Mg on actin-activated ATPase activity and in vitro motility.

  4. The molecular structure and conformational characteristics of some specific benzodiazepine receptor ligands: A molecular orbital study of C3-substituted betacarboline derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Gynther, J. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    The molecular structures of the benzodiazepine receptor ligands {beta}-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (BCCA), its methyl, ethyl, and propyl esters (BCCM, BCCE, and BCCP, respectively), and 3-CN-{beta}-carboline (BC-3-CN) have been investigated on a minimal basis STO-3G level of accuracy. For BCCM, BCCE, and BCCP semiempirical AM 1 calculations have also been performed. Fully optimized molecular geometries are reported. Comparisons with available experimental structures indicate that minimal basis results may have a useful predictive value. For the mobile ester side chains, a study of chosen points on the conformational surface was made. Both the STO-3G and the AM 1 results give the planar conformers is the most stable structures with small barriers to internal rotation, provided the ester side chain remains extended. The calculated STO-3G rotational barriers are higher than are the corresponding AM 1 barriers. Partial optimization, i.e., of side-chain structure parameters only, seems sufficient to map the conformational characteristics of these compounds. The orientation of the dipole moment vector and its magnitude may have consequences for possible interaction with a receptor. On the basis of the sidechain internal dynamics, the intramolecular flexibility tends to be confined to certain regions of conformational space.

  5. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  6. Neuropeptide Y receptor mediates activation of ERK1/2 via transactivation of the IGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Belemnaba, Lazare; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Bucher, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y binds to G-protein coupled receptors whose action results in inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Using HEK293 cells stably expressing the native neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors, we found that the NPY agonist elicits a transient phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). We first show that ERK1/2 activation following Y1 receptor stimulation is dependent on heterotrimeric Gi/o since it is completely inhibited by pre-treatment with pertussis toxin. In addition, ERK1/2 activation is internalization-independent since mutant Y1 receptors unable to recruit β-arrestins, can still activate ERK signaling to the same extent as wild-type receptors. We next show that this activation of the MAPK pathway is inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126, is not dependent on calcium signaling at the Y1 receptor (no effect upon inhibition of phospholipase C, protein kinase C or protein kinase D) but instead dependent on Gβ/γ and associated signaling pathways that activate PI3-kinase. Although inhibition of the epidermal-growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase did not influence NPY-induced ERK1/2 activation, we show that the inhibition of insulin growth factor receptor IGFR by AG1024 completely blocks activation of ERK1/2 by the Y1 receptor. This Gβ/γ-PI3K-AG1024-sensitive pathway does not involve activation of IGFR through the release of a soluble ligand by metalloproteinases since it is not affected by the metalloproteinase inhibitor marimastat. Finally, we found that a similar pathway, sensitive to wortmannin-AG1024 but insensitive to marimastat, is implicated in activation of ERK signaling in HEK293 cells by endogenously expressed GPCRs coupled to Gq-protein (muscarinic M3 receptors) or coupled to Gs-protein (endothelin ETB receptors). Our analysis is the first to show that β-arrestin recruitment to the NPY Y1 receptor is not necessary for MAPK activation by this receptor but that transactivation of the IGFR receptor is required.

  7. The growth hormone receptor: mechanism of activation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Andrew J; Waters, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Growth hormone is widely used clinically to promote growth and anabolism and for other purposes. Its actions are mediated via the growth hormone receptor, both directly by tyrosine kinase activation and indirectly by induction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Insensitivity to growth hormone (Laron syndrome) can result from mutations in the growth hormone receptor and can be treated with IGF-1. This treatment is, however, not fully effective owing to the loss of the direct actions of growth hormone and altered availability of exogenous IGF-1. Excessive activation of the growth hormone receptor by circulating growth hormone results in gigantism and acromegaly, whereas cell transformation and cancer can occur in response to autocrine activation of the receptor. Advances in understanding the mechanism of receptor activation have led to a model in which the growth hormone receptor exists as a constitutive dimer. Binding of the hormone realigns the subunits by rotation and closer apposition, resulting in juxtaposition of the catalytic domains of the associated tyrosine-protein kinase JAK2 below the cell membrane. This change results in activation of JAK2 by transphosphorylation, then phosphorylation of receptor tyrosines in the cytoplasmic domain, which enables binding of adaptor proteins, as well as direct phosphorylation of target proteins. This model is discussed in the light of salient information from closely related class 1 cytokine receptors, such as the erythropoietin, prolactin and thrombopoietin receptors. PMID:20664532

  8. Structural Analysis of an Open Active Site Conformation of Nonheme Iron Halogenase CytC3

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cintyu; Galonic Fujimori, Danica; Walsh, Christopher T.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2009-04-28

    CytC3, a member of the recently discovered class of nonheme Fe(II) and {alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}KG)-dependent halogenases, catalyzes the double chlorination of l-2-aminobutyric acid (Aba) to produce a known Streptomyces antibiotic, {gamma},{gamma}-dichloroaminobutyrate. Unlike the majority of the Fe(II)-{alpha}KG-dependent enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation reactions, halogenases catalyze a transfer of halides. To examine the important enzymatic features that discriminate between chlorination and hydroxylation, the crystal structures of CytC3 both with and without {alpha}KG/Fe(II) have been solved to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. These structures capture CytC3 in an open active site conformation, in which no chloride is bound to iron. Comparison of the open conformation of CytC3 with the closed conformation of another nonheme iron halogenase, SyrB2, suggests two important criteria for creating an enzyme-bound FeCl catalyst: (1) the presence of a hydrogen-bonding network between the chloride and surrounding residues, and (2) the presence of a hydrophobic pocket in which the chloride resides.

  9. Synthetic peptide models for the redox-active disulfide loop of glutaredoxin. Conformational studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore, R.; Raghothama, S.; Balaram, P.

    1988-04-05

    Two cyclic peptide disulfides have been synthesized as models for the 14-membered redox-active disulfide loop glutaredoxin. /sup 1/H NMR studies at 270 MHz in chloroform solutions establish a type I ..beta..-turn conformation for the Pro-X segment in both peptides, stabilized by a 4 ..-->.. 1 hydrogen bond between the Cys(1) CO and Cys(4) NH groups. Nuclear Overhauser effects establish that the aromatic ring in the X = Phe peptide is oriented over the central peptide unit. In dimethyl sulfoxide solutions two conformational species are observed in slow exchange on the NMR time scale, for both peptides. These are assigned to type I and type II ..beta..-turn structures with -Pro-Tyr(Phe)-as the corner resides. The structural assignments are based on correlation of NMR parameters with model 14-membered cyclic cystine peptides with Pro-X spacers. Circular dichroism studies based on the -S-S-n-sigma* transition suggest a structural change in the disulfide bridge with changing solvent polarity, establishing conformational coupling between the peptide backbone and the disulfide linkage in these systems.

  10. A Two-Metal-Ion-Mediated Conformational Switching Pathway for HDV Ribozyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K.; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA enzymes serve as a potentially powerful platform from which to design catalysts and engineer new biotechnology. A fundamental understanding of these systems provides insight to guide design. The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) is a small, self-cleaving RNA motif widely distributed in nature, that has served as a paradigm for understanding basic principles of RNA catalysis. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the precise roles of divalent metal ions and key nucleotides in catalysis. In an effort to establish a reaction mechanism model consistent with available experimental data, we utilize molecular dynamics simulations to explore different conformations and metal ion binding modes along the HDVr reaction path. Building upon recent crystallographic data, our results provide a dynamic model of the HDVr reaction mechanism involving a conformational switch between multiple non-canonical G25:U20 base pair conformations in the active site. These local nucleobase dynamics play an important role in catalysis by modulating the metal binding environments of two Mg2+ ions that support catalysis at different steps of the reaction pathway. The first ion plays a structural role by inducing a base pair flip necessary to obtain the catalytic fold in which C75 moves towards to the scissile phosphate in the active site. Ejection of this ion then permits a second ion to bind elsewhere in the active site and facilitate nucleophile activation. The simulations collectively describe a mechanistic scenario that is consistent with currently available experimental data from crystallography, phosphorothioate substitutions, and chemical probing studies. Avenues for further experimental verification are suggested. PMID:27774349

  11. Antigenicity, catalytic activity and conformation of Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase: interaction of conformation-directed antibodies with the native and irradiated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Khan, I A; Ali, R

    1986-02-01

    The antiferromagnetically spin-coupled Cu2+ pair present in the active center of tyrosinase was found to be indispensable for its catalytic function. However, the metal ion did not contribute to the conformational integrity or antigenicity of the enzyme molecule. Irradiation of tyrosinase with 254 nm light resulted in dose dependent, essentially irreversible losses of its catalytic and antigenic functions. The apparent first order rate constants for the two processes were 17.6 X 10(-2) min-1 and 28.1 X 10(-2) min-1, respectively. The approximately 1.6-fold difference between the two rate constants suggests that the sites of antigenic determinants in tyrosinase are distinguishable from the enzymic active site by their higher photosensitivity. Kinetic analysis of the data as to photoinactivation, and the UV induced losses of antigenicity and structural integrity revealed that UV radiation disrupts the short-range noncovalent interactions occurring within the enzyme molecule. The disruption of the noncovalent interactions results in partial unfolding of the tyrosinase structure which in turn leads to the progressive loss of its catalytic activity and antigenicity. The anti-tyrosinase antibodies raised in rabbits were found to be directed against the native conformation of the enzyme. It is speculated that these antibodies might be useful in exploring the tyrosinase conformation and in studying the effects of various factors on the enzyme surface and molecular structure. PMID:3084463

  12. Deciphering activation of olfactory receptors using heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Guenhaël; Pajot-Augy, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Hetero- and homo-oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been addressed in the past years using various approaches such as co-immunoprecipitation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Here, we report the methodological details from a previously published study to investigate the relationships between oligomerization and activation states of olfactory receptors (ORs). This methodology combines heterologous expression of ORs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and BRET assays on membrane fractions, in particular, upon odorant stimulation. We have demonstrated that ORs constitutively homodimerize at the plasma membrane and that high odorant concentrations promote a conformational change of the dimer, which becomes inactive. We proposed a model in which one odorant molecule binding the dimer would induce activation, while two odorant molecules, each binding one protomer of the dimer, would blunt signaling.

  13. Novel analogs of alloferon: Synthesis, conformational studies, pro-apoptotic and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Majewska, Anna; Różanowska, Maria; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Lisowski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the structure-activity relationships of novel derivatives of the insect peptide alloferon (H-His-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH). The peptide structure was modified by exchanging His at position 9 or 12 for natural or non-natural amino acids. Biological properties of these peptides were determined in antiviral in vitro test against Human Herpes Virus 1 McIntrie strain (HHV-1MC) using a Vero cell line. The peptides were also evaluated for the pro-apoptotic action in vivo on hemocytes of the Tenebrio molitor beetle. Additionally, the structural properties of alloferon analogs were examined by the circular dichroism in water and methanol. It was found that most of the evaluated peptides can reduce the HHV-1 titer in Vero cells. [Ala(9)]-alloferon exhibits the strongest antiviral activity among the analyzed compounds. However, no cytotoxic activity against Vero cell line was observed for all the studied peptides. In vivo assays with hemocytes of T. molitor showed that [Lys(9)]-, [Phg(9)]-, [Lys(12)]-, and [Phe(12)]-alloferon exhibit a twofold increase in caspases activity in comparison with the native peptide. The CD conformational studies indicate that the investigated peptides seem to prefer the unordered conformation. PMID:26986636

  14. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  15. Active-State Model of a Dopamine D2 Receptor - Gαi Complex Stabilized by Aripiprazole-Type Partial Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Ralf C.; Tschammer, Nuska; Lanig, Harald; Clark, Timothy; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Partial agonists exhibit a submaximal capacity to enhance the coupling of one receptor to an intracellular binding partner. Although a multitude of studies have reported different ligand-specific conformations for a given receptor, little is known about the mechanism by which different receptor conformations are connected to the capacity to activate the coupling to G-proteins. We have now performed molecular-dynamics simulations employing our recently described active-state homology model of the dopamine D2 receptor-Gαi protein-complex coupled to the partial agonists aripiprazole and FAUC350, in order to understand the structural determinants of partial agonism better. We have compared our findings with our model of the D2R-Gαi-complex in the presence of the full agonist dopamine. The two partial agonists are capable of inducing different conformations of important structural motifs, including the extracellular loop regions, the binding pocket and, in particular, intracellular G-protein-binding domains. As G-protein-coupling to certain intracellular epitopes of the receptor is considered the key step of allosterically triggered nucleotide-exchange, it is tempting to assume that impaired coupling between the receptor and the G-protein caused by distinct ligand-specific conformations is a major determinant of partial agonist efficacy. PMID:24932547

  16. Mutation in the SH1 helix reduces the activation energy of the ATP-induced conformational transition of myosin.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Chaen, Shigeru

    2007-05-25

    The SH1 helix is a joint that links the converter subdomain to the rest of the myosin motor domain. Recently, we showed that a mutation within the SH1 helix in Dictyostelium myosin II (R689H) reduced the elasticity and thermal stability of the protein. To reveal the involvement of the SH1 helix in ATP-dependent conformational changes of the motor domain, we have investigated the effects of the R689H mutation on the conformational changes of the converter, using a GFP-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer method. Although the mutation does not seem to strongly affect conformations, we found that it significantly reduced the activation energy required for the ATP-induced conformational transition corresponding to the recovery stroke. Given the effects of the mutation on the mechanical properties of myosin, we propose that the SH1 helix plays an important role in the mechanochemical energy conversion underlying the conformational change of the myosin motor domain.

  17. Structural Determinants for the Selective Anti-HIV-1 Activity of the All-β Alternative Conformer of XCL1

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo, Christina; Fox, Jamie C.; Miao, Huiyi; Volkman, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 replication is regulated in vivo by a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. XCL1/lymphotactin, a unique metamorphic chemokine, was recently identified as a broad-spectrum endogenous HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entry via direct interaction with the gp120 envelope glycoprotein. HIV-1 inhibition by XCL1 requires access to the alternative all-β conformation, which interacts with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but not with the specific XCL1 receptor, XCR1. To investigate the structural determinants of the HIV-inhibitory function of XCL1, we performed a detailed structure-function analysis of a stabilized all-β variant, XCL1 W55D. Individual alanine substitutions of two basic residues within the 40s' loop, K42 and R43, abrogated the ability of XCL1 to bind to the viral envelope and block HIV-1 infection; moreover, a loss of HIV-inhibitory function, albeit less marked, was seen upon individual mutation of three additional basic residues: R18, R35, and K46. In contrast, mutation of K42 to arginine did not cause any loss of function, suggesting that the interaction with gp120 is primarily electrostatic in nature. Strikingly, four of these five residues cluster to form a large (∼350 Å2) positively charged surface in the all-β XCL1 conformation, whereas they are dissociated in the classic chemokine fold, which is inactive against HIV-1, providing a structural basis for the selective antiviral activity of the alternatively folded XCL1. Furthermore, we observed that changes to the N-terminal domain, which is proximal to the cluster of putative HIV-1 gp120-interacting residues, also affect the antiviral activity of XCL1. Interestingly, the complement of residues involved in HIV-1 blockade is partially overlapping, but distinct from those involved in the GAG-binding function of XCL1. These data identify key structural determinants of anti-HIV activity in XCL1, providing new templates for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. IMPORTANCE The host

  18. Mechanical Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein Through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Botello, Eric; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela L.; Frey, Eric W.; Patel, Jay M.; Nolasco, Leticia; Turner, Nancy A.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical force-induced activation of the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experiences high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force-induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF’s crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates plasma VWF (PVWF) multimers to bind platelets. Here, we showed that a pathological level of high shear stress exposure of PVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of the multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated PVWF multimers are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than nonsheared PVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of PVWF multimers.

  19. Force Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne Sithara S

    The force-induced activation of adhesive proteins such as von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experience high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF's crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates pVWF multimers to bind platelets. Here we showed that a pathological level of high shear flow exposure of pVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated pVWF multimers (spVWF) are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than non-sheared pVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of pVWF multimers.

  20. [Synthesis, conformation, and spectroscopy of nucleoside analogues concerning their antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Jarosław T; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified analogues of nucleosides and nucleotides, have been thoroughly investigated since the discovery of DNA double helix by Watson and Crick in 1953 (Nature 171: 737). Chemical structures, first of all tautomerism, of the nucleic acid bases, as well as the conformations of the nucleic acids constituents, determine the secondary and tertiary structures of DNA and RNA polymers. Similarly, structural and dynamic parameters of nucleoside derivatives determine their biological activity in mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation, as well as antiviral or anticancer properties. In this review, a multidisciplinary approach of Prof. David Shugar's group is presented in the studies on nucleosides and nucleotides. It consists in chemical syntheses of suitable analogues, measurements of physicochemical and spectral parameters, conformational analysis by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction, as well as characteristics of the nucleoside analogues as inhibitors of some selected, target enzymes, crucial in respect to antiviral activity of the analogues. These long-lasting studies follows upon the line of the main paradigm of molecular biophysics, i. e. structure-activity relationship. PMID:26677575

  1. Structural Insights into NEDD8 Activation of Cullin-RING Ligases: Conformational Control of Conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Duda,D.; Borg, L.; Scott, D.; Hunt, H.; Hammel, M.; Schulman, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) comprise the largest ubiquitin E3 subclass, in which a central cullin subunit links a substrate-binding adaptor with an E2-binding RING. Covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to a conserved C-terminal domain (ctd) lysine stimulates CRL ubiquitination activity and prevents binding of the inhibitor CAND1. Here we report striking conformational rearrangements in the crystal structure of NEDD8{approx}Cul5ctd-Rbx1 and SAXS analysis of NEDD8{approx}Cul1ctd-Rbx1 relative to their unmodified counterparts. In NEDD8ylated CRL structures, the cullin WHB and Rbx1 RING subdomains are dramatically reoriented, eliminating a CAND1-binding site and imparting multiple potential catalytic geometries to an associated E2. Biochemical analyses indicate that the structural malleability is important for both CRL NEDD8ylation and subsequent ubiquitination activities. Thus, our results point to a conformational control of CRL activity, with ligation of NEDD8 shifting equilibria to disfavor inactive CAND1-bound closed architectures, and favor dynamic, open forms that promote polyubiquitination.

  2. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 structures reveal a metastable open conformation fostering robust core-free basal activity.

    PubMed

    Wynn, R Max; Kato, Masato; Chuang, Jacinta L; Tso, Shih-Chia; Li, Jun; Chuang, David T

    2008-09-12

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is down-regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoforms 1-4. PDK4 is overexpressed in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes, resulting in impaired glucose utilization. Here we show that human PDK4 has robust core-free basal activity, which is considerably higher than activity levels of other PDK isoforms stimulated by the PDC core. PDK4 binds the L3 lipoyl domain, but its activity is not significantly stimulated by any individual lipoyl domains or the core of PDC. The 2.0-A crystal structures of the PDK4 dimer with bound ADP reveal an open conformation with a wider active-site cleft, compared with that in the closed conformation epitomized by the PDK2-ADP structure. The open conformation in PDK4 shows partially ordered C-terminal cross-tails, in which the conserved DW (Asp(394)-Trp(395)) motif from one subunit anchors to the N-terminal domain of the other subunit. The open conformation fosters a reduced binding affinity for ADP, facilitating the efficient removal of product inhibition by this nucleotide. Alteration or deletion of the DW-motif disrupts the C-terminal cross-tail anchor, resulting in the closed conformation and the nearly complete inactivation of PDK4. Fluorescence quenching and enzyme activity data suggest that compounds AZD7545 and dichloroacetate lock PDK4 in the open and the closed conformational states, respectively. We propose that PDK4 with bound ADP exists in equilibrium between the open and the closed conformations. The favored metastable open conformation is responsible for the robust basal activity of PDK4 in the absence of the PDC core. PMID:18658136

  3. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  4. tBid Undergoes Multiple Conformational Changes at the Membrane Required for Bax Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Bindner, Scott; Zhu, Weijia; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Campbell, Clinton; Gross, Atan; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David W.; Fradin, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Bid is a Bcl-2 family protein that promotes apoptosis by activating Bax and eliciting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Full-length Bid is cleaved in response to apoptotic stimuli into two fragments, p7 and tBid (p15), that are held together by strong hydrophobic interactions until the complex binds to membranes. The detailed mechanism(s) of fragment separation including tBid binding to membranes and release of the p7 fragment to the cytoplasm remain unclear. Using liposomes or isolated mitochondria with fluorescently labeled proteins at physiological concentrations as in vitro models, we report that the two components of the complex quickly separate upon interaction with a membrane. Once tBid binds to the membrane, it undergoes slow structural rearrangements that result in an equilibrium between two major tBid conformations on the membrane. The conformational change of tBid is a prerequisite for interaction with Bax and is, therefore, a novel step that can be modulated to promote or inhibit MOMP. Using automated high-throughput image analysis in cells, we show that down-regulation of Mtch2 causes a significant delay between tBid and Bax relocalization in cells. We propose that by promoting insertion of tBid via a conformational change at the mitochondrial outer membrane, Mtch2 accelerates tBid-mediated Bax activation and MOMP. Thus the interaction of Mtch2 and tBid is a potential target for therapeutic control of Bid initiated cell death. PMID:23744079

  5. Thalidomide increases human hepatic cytochrome P450 3A enzymes by direct activation of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Norie; van Beuningen, Rinie; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Shibata, Norio; Yajima, Kanako; Utoh, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Chesné, Christophe; Nakamura, Masato; Guengerich, F Peter; Houtman, René; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-17

    Heterotropic cooperativity of human cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4/3A5 by the teratogen thalidomide was recently demonstrated by H. Yamazaki et al. ( ( 2013 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 26 , 486 - 489 ) using the model substrate midazolam in various in vitro and in vivo models. Chimeric mice with humanized liver also displayed enhanced midazolam clearance upon pretreatment with orally administered thalidomide, presumably because of human P450 3A induction. In the current study, we further investigated the regulation of human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Thalidomide enhanced levels of P450 3A4 and 2B6 mRNA, protein expression, and/or oxidation activity in human hepatocytes, indirectly suggesting the activation of upstream transcription factors involved in detoxication, e.g., the nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). A key event after ligand binding is an alteration of nuclear receptor conformation and recruitment of coregulator proteins that alter chromatin accessibility of target genes. To investigate direct engagement and functional alteration of PXR and CAR by thalidomide, we utilized a peptide microarray with 154 coregulator-derived nuclear receptor-interaction motifs and coregulator and nuclear receptor boxes, which serves as a sensor for nuclear receptor conformation and activity status as a function of ligand. Thalidomide and its human proximate metabolite 5-hydroxythalidomide displayed significant modulation of coregulator interaction with PXR and CAR ligand-binding domains, similar to established agonists for these receptors. These results collectively suggest that thalidomide acts as a ligand for PXR and CAR and causes enzyme induction leading to increased P450 enzyme activity. The possibilities of drug interactions during thalidomide therapy in humans require further evaluation.

  6. New brominated flame retardants and their metabolites as activators of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Tomašič, Tihomir; Carino, Adriana; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija

    2016-09-30

    The present study investigated the activities on different nuclear receptors of the new brominated flame retardants 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and their main carboxylic acid metabolites 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEPH). None of selected chemicals exhibited marked activity towards PPARα and PPARγ by the use of transactivation assays in HepG2 cells transfected with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. In contrast, selected flame retardants all exhibited potent agonist activity on pregnane X receptor (PXR), with EC50 values of 5.5μM for TBPH and 2.0μM for its metabolite TBMEPH. Molecular docking of TBPH and TBMEPH to the PXR ligand binding site revealed similar interactions, with differences only for conformation and orientation of the alkyl chains. Additionally, TBPH showed antagonist activity on PXR (IC50, 13.9μM). Moreover, there was significant up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression via PXR activation for TBB and TBPH and their metabolites. Induction of CYP3A4 might cause undesired drug-drug interactions, lower bioavailability of pharmaceutical drugs, higher formation of reactive toxic metabolites, or enhanced elimination of endogenous hormones, such as T3/T4, to lead to endocrine disruption. These data provide new and important insights into the toxicity of these new polybrominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH, and their metabolites.

  7. New brominated flame retardants and their metabolites as activators of the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Tomašič, Tihomir; Carino, Adriana; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija

    2016-09-30

    The present study investigated the activities on different nuclear receptors of the new brominated flame retardants 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and their main carboxylic acid metabolites 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) and mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEPH). None of selected chemicals exhibited marked activity towards PPARα and PPARγ by the use of transactivation assays in HepG2 cells transfected with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. In contrast, selected flame retardants all exhibited potent agonist activity on pregnane X receptor (PXR), with EC50 values of 5.5μM for TBPH and 2.0μM for its metabolite TBMEPH. Molecular docking of TBPH and TBMEPH to the PXR ligand binding site revealed similar interactions, with differences only for conformation and orientation of the alkyl chains. Additionally, TBPH showed antagonist activity on PXR (IC50, 13.9μM). Moreover, there was significant up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression via PXR activation for TBB and TBPH and their metabolites. Induction of CYP3A4 might cause undesired drug-drug interactions, lower bioavailability of pharmaceutical drugs, higher formation of reactive toxic metabolites, or enhanced elimination of endogenous hormones, such as T3/T4, to lead to endocrine disruption. These data provide new and important insights into the toxicity of these new polybrominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH, and their metabolites. PMID:27506419

  8. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M.; Ishii, K.; Kuo, W. L.; Piper, M.; Connolly, A.; Shi, Y. P.; Wu, R.; Lin, C. C.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. RESULTS: Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating

  9. Structural biology. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Burg, John S; Ingram, Jessica R; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Jude, Kevin M; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O; Ploegh, Hidde L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor's inactive state. PMID:25745166

  10. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  11. Cell Surface Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Increase Src and c-Cbl Activity and Receptor Ubiquitylation*

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Eileen E.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an established role for the endocytic pathway in regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to downstream effectors. However, because ligand-mediated EGFR endocytosis utilizes multiple “moving parts,” dissecting the spatial versus temporal contributions has been challenging. Blocking all endocytic trafficking can have unintended effects on other receptors as well as give rise to compensatory mechanisms, both of which impact interpretation of EGFR signaling. To overcome these limitations, we used epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated to polystyrene beads (EGF beads). EGF beads simultaneously activate the EGFR while blocking its endocytosis and allow analysis of EGFR signaling from the plasma membrane. Human telomerase immortalized corneal epithelial (hTCEpi) cells were used to model normal epithelial cell biology. In hTCEpi cells, both cell surface and intracellular EGFRs exhibited dose-dependent increases in effector activity after 15 min of ligand stimulation, but only the serine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was statistically significant when accounting for receptor phosphorylation. However, over time with physiological levels of receptor phosphorylation, cell surface receptors produced either enhanced or sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl), and the pro-oncogene Src activity. These increases in effector communication by cell surface receptors resulted in an increase in EGFR ubiquitylation with sustained ligand incubation. Together, these data indicate that spatial regulation of EGFR signaling may be an important regulatory mechanism in receptor down-regulation. PMID:25074934

  12. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  13. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells.

  14. Biological activity of a polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, I A; Andreev, Ya A; Logashina, Yu A; Murashev, A N; Grishin, E V

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents data on the activity of a new APHC2 polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptors, which was isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. It has been shown that APHC2 has an analgesic activity, does not impair normal motor activity, and does not change body temperature of experimental animals, which has a great practical value for design of potent analgesics of a new generation. Further study of the characteristics of binding of the polypeptide to the TRPV1 receptor may show approaches to the development of other antagonists of this receptor that do not influence the body temperature. PMID:26725234

  15. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  16. Regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide: Solution conformation and antioxidant activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Wen; Tang, YinYing; Xu, Qing; Huang, Shengli; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-01-20

    Regioselective modification is an effective approach to synthesize polysaccharides with different structure features and improved properties. In this study, regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide (SRSASP) was prepared by using triphenylchloromethane (TrCl) as protecting precursor. The decrease in fractal dimension (df) values (1.56-2.04) of SRSASP was observed in size-exclusion chromatography combined with multi angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) analysis. Compared to sample substituted at C-6, SRSASP showed a more expanded conformation of random coil, which was attributed to the breakup of hydrogen bonds and elastic contributions. Circular dichroism (CD), methylene blue (MB) and congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed the conformational transition and stiffness of the chains after sulfation. SRSASP exhibited enhanced antioxidant activities in the DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging assay. Sulfation at C-2 or C-3 was favorable for the chelation which might prevent the generation of hydroxyl radicals. It concluded that the degree of substitution and substitution position were the factors influencing biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides. PMID:26572384

  17. Regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide: Solution conformation and antioxidant activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Wen; Tang, YinYing; Xu, Qing; Huang, Shengli; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-01-20

    Regioselective modification is an effective approach to synthesize polysaccharides with different structure features and improved properties. In this study, regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide (SRSASP) was prepared by using triphenylchloromethane (TrCl) as protecting precursor. The decrease in fractal dimension (df) values (1.56-2.04) of SRSASP was observed in size-exclusion chromatography combined with multi angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) analysis. Compared to sample substituted at C-6, SRSASP showed a more expanded conformation of random coil, which was attributed to the breakup of hydrogen bonds and elastic contributions. Circular dichroism (CD), methylene blue (MB) and congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed the conformational transition and stiffness of the chains after sulfation. SRSASP exhibited enhanced antioxidant activities in the DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging assay. Sulfation at C-2 or C-3 was favorable for the chelation which might prevent the generation of hydroxyl radicals. It concluded that the degree of substitution and substitution position were the factors influencing biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides.

  18. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  19. A Potential Substrate Binding Conformation of β-Lactams and Insight into the Broad Spectrum of NDM-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1. PMID:22825119

  20. The activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by the transmitter.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D B; Spivak, C E

    1985-02-01

    Experimental evidence has been published from isolated guinea pig muscle in vitro, and from direct ligand binding to receptors from T. californica, indicating that two agonist ions react with the nicotinic receptor by exchanging for one magnesium ion. It is the basis of the ion exchange receptor pair model, in which two acetylcholine ions exchange for one magnesium ion in contact with and between a pair of negatively charged receptor groups about 4 A apart. In the resting state the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged receptor groups and the Mg2+ ion exerts a binding force. This binding force is opposed by the quantum mechanical repulsions of the electron clouds of the charged groups and ions in contact, together with the mutual repulsion of the pair of receptor oxyanions. When the Mg2+ ion is replaced by two acetylcholine ions the quaternary heads of the latter are positioned so that they form two mutually repelling ACh+ receptor group dipoles. As the Mg2+ ion leaves, its rehydration energy contributes to the sum of the electron cloud repulsions and the ACh+ receptor group dipole repulsions, causing the receptor groups to be forced apart activating the receptor macromolecule. The subsequent decrease in ACh+ concentration results in the reestablishment of the resting state. The coulombic electrostatic energy, the Born repulsion energy, the London attraction energy and the oxyanion ACh+ dipole repulsion energies have been calculated and shown to be consistent with the model. The displacement of the Mg2+ by two ACh+ ions makes several hundred kcals of energy available for receptor group separation and receptor activation.

  1. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  2. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  3. De novo design and in vivo activity of conformationally restrained antimicrobial arylamide foldamers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungwook; Isaacs, Andre; Clements, Dylan; Liu, Dahui; Kim, Hyemin; Scott, Richard W.; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; DeGrado, William F.

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria has compromised the use of many conventional antibiotics, leading to heightened interest in a variety of antimicrobial peptides. Although these peptides have attractive potential as antibiotics, their size, stability, tissue distribution, and toxicity have hampered attempts to harness these capabilities. To address such issues, we have developed small (molecular mass <1,000 Da) arylamide foldamers that mimic antimicrobial peptides. Hydrogen-bonded restraints in the arylamide template rigidify the conformation via hydrogen bond formation and increase activity toward Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The designed foldamers are highly active against S. aureus in an animal model. These results demonstrate the application of foldamer templates as therapeutics. PMID:19359494

  4. Activation of antibody Fc function by antigen-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J C; Koshland, M E

    1975-01-01

    IgM antibody directed against the pheny-beta-lactoside hapten was examined for its capacity to fix complement in the presence of the hapten, monohapten-substituted antigen, and multihapten-substituted antigen. Hapten was found to have no effect; monovalent antigen induced an excellent response which could be inhibited by hapten; and multivalent antigen also induced an excellent response which was related to the number of determinants added and not to the formation of antigen-antibody aggregates. The difference between the activities of hapten and monovalent antigen was reflected in their affinities for the IgM antibody. The monovalent antigen had a lower Ka, indicating that energy from binding was used to activate the Fc complement binding sites. These data show that the expression of IgM Fc function depends on a change in Fc conformation produced by the binding of antigen at the distant Fab combining sites. PMID:1061094

  5. Activation of antibody Fc function by antigen-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Koshland, M E

    1975-12-01

    IgM antibody directed against the pheny-beta-lactoside hapten was examined for its capacity to fix complement in the presence of the hapten, monohapten-substituted antigen, and multihapten-substituted antigen. Hapten was found to have no effect; monovalent antigen induced an excellent response which could be inhibited by hapten; and multivalent antigen also induced an excellent response which was related to the number of determinants added and not to the formation of antigen-antibody aggregates. The difference between the activities of hapten and monovalent antigen was reflected in their affinities for the IgM antibody. The monovalent antigen had a lower Ka, indicating that energy from binding was used to activate the Fc complement binding sites. These data show that the expression of IgM Fc function depends on a change in Fc conformation produced by the binding of antigen at the distant Fab combining sites.

  6. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  7. Tie2 and Eph Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barton, William A.; Dalton, Annamarie C.; Seegar, Tom C.M.; Himanen, Juha P.

    2014-01-01

    The Eph and Tie cell surface receptors mediate a variety of signaling events during development and in the adult organism. As other receptor tyrosine kinases, they are activated on binding of extracellular ligands and their catalytic activity is tightly regulated on multiple levels. The Eph and Tie receptors display some unique characteristics, including the requirement of ligand-induced receptor clustering for efficient signaling. Interestingly, both Ephs and Ties can mediate different, even opposite, biological effects depending on the specific ligand eliciting the response and on the cellular context. Here we discuss the structural features of these receptors, their interactions with various ligands, as well as functional implications for downstream signaling initiation. The Eph/ephrin structures are already well reviewed and we only provide a brief overview on the initial binding events. We go into more detail discussing the Tie-angiopoietin structures and recognition. PMID:24478383

  8. A sandwich ELISA for the conformation-specific quantification of the activated form of human Bax.

    PubMed

    Teijido, Oscar; Ganesan, Yogesh Tengarai; Llanos, Raul; Peton, Ashley; Urtecho, Jean-Baptiste; Soprani, Adauri; Villamayor, Aimee; Antonsson, Bruno; Manon, Stéphen; Dejean, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins are critical regulators of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which represents the point of no return of apoptotic cell death. The exposure of the Bax N-terminus at the mitochondria reflects Bax activation; and this activated configuration of the Bax protein is associated with MOMP. N-terminal exposure can be detected using specific monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies, and the onset of activated Bax has extensively been used as an early marker of apoptosis. The protocols of immunoprecipitation and/or immunocytochemistry commonly used to detect activated Bax are long and tedious, and allow semiquantification of the antigen at best. The sandwich ELISA protocol we developed has a 5 ng/mL detection limit and is highly specific for the activated conformation of Bax. This ELISA allows a rapid quantification of activated human Bax in whole cells and isolated mitochondria protein extracts. These properties grant this assay the potential to further clarify the prognostic and diagnostic value of activated Bax in disorders associated with deregulated apoptotic pathways such as degenerative diseases or cancer. PMID:26748144

  9. Conformational states of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica induced by the binding of agonists, antagonists, and local anesthetics. Equilibrium measurements using tritium-hydrogen exchange

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.P.; Stroud, R.M.

    1989-01-10

    The tritium-hydrogen exchange kinetics of Torpedo californica AChR, in native membrane vesicles at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, have been analyzed in the presence of agonists, partial agonists, local anesthetics, and competitive antagonists. The agonists carbamylcholine (10 microM-1 mM) and suberyldicholine (10 microM) and the partial agonists decamethonium (25 microM and 1 mM) and hexamethonium (1 mM) have no effect on the exchange kinetics, although at lower concentration carbamylcholine may slightly accelerate exchange. Nondesensitizing local anesthetics do affect the exchange behavior, dependent on concentration. Procaine at 500 microM moderately retards exchange while procaine at 10 mM and tetracaine at 5 mM slightly accelerate exchange. The competitive antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin retards exchange significantly, as does d-tubocurarine although to a lesser extent. These results suggest that the resting and desensitized conformations of the AChR are very similar in overall solvent accessibility and that at lower concentrations noncompetitive blockers such as procaine may stabilize a less solvent-accessible state of the AChR. The competitive antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurare also stabilize a dynamically restricted, less solvent-accessible conformation of the acetylcholine receptor, demonstrating that a large conformational change accompanies binding of these toxins. Any change in conformation which may accompany desensitization is very different from these effects.

  10. Activation of trimeric P2X2 receptors by fewer than three ATP molecules.

    PubMed

    Stelmashenko, Olga; Lalo, Ulyana; Yang, Yue; Bragg, Laricia; North, R Alan; Compan, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric membrane proteins. When they bind extracellular ATP, a conformational change occurs that opens a transmembrane ion channel. The ATP-binding pocket is formed in a cleft between two subunits, and a critical amino acid residue for ATP contact is Lys⁶⁹ (P2X2 numbering). In the present work, we sought to determine whether the binding of fewer than three ATP molecules could open the ion channel. We expressed eight concatenated cDNAs in human embryonic kidney cells, which encoded three serially joined, epitope-tagged, subunits with either Lys or Ala at position 69 (denoted as KKK, KKA, KAK, AKK, KAA, AKA, AAK, and AAA). Western blotting of surface-biotinylated proteins indicated that breakdown of concatemers to individual subunits was minimal. Recording of membrane currents in response to ATP (whole cell and excised outside-out patch) showed that all formed functional channels except AAK, AKA, and AAA. There was no difference in the kinetics of activation and deactivation among KKK, KKA, KAK, and AKK channels, and amplitude of the unitary conductances was in all cases not different from that found after expression of a single wild-type subunit. Currents through KKA and KAK receptors were larger than those observed for AKK receptors. The results indicate that trimeric P2X receptors containing only two intact binding sites can be readily activated by ATP.

  11. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    DOE PAGES

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John; Skaja Robinson, Anne

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, ormore » DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  12. The amino terminal helix modulates light activated conformational changes in AsLOV2

    PubMed Central

    Zayner, Josiah P.; Antoniou, Chloe; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of light-triggered conformational change and signaling in light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domains remains elusive in spite of extensive investigation and their use in optogenetic studies. The LOV2 domain of Avena Sativa phototropin1 (AsLOV2), a member of the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) family, contains an FMN chromophore that forms a covalent bond with a cysteine upon illumination. This event leads to the release of the carboxy terminal Jα helix, the biological output signal. Using mutational analysis, circular dichroism and NMR, we find that the largely ignored amino terminal helix is a control element in AsLOV2’s light-activated conformational change. We further identify a direct amino-to-carboxy terminal “input-output” signaling pathway. These findings provide a framework to rationalize the LOV domain architecture, as well as the signaling mechanisms in both isolated and tandem arrangements of PAS domains. This knowledge can be applied in engineering LOV-based photoswitches, opening up new design strategies and improving existing ones. PMID:22406525

  13. Interactions of a designed peptide with lipopolysaccharide: Bound conformation and anti-endotoxic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, Anirban; Chua, Geok Lin; Domadia, Prerna N.; Warshakoon, Hemamali; Cromer, Jens R.; David, Sunil A.; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2008-05-09

    Designed peptides that would selectively interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or endotoxin and fold into specific conformations could serve as important scaffolds toward the development of antisepsis compounds. Here, we describe solution structure of a designed amphipathic peptide, H{sub 2}N-YVKLWRMIKFIR-CONH{sub 2} (YW12D) in complex with endotoxin as determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. The conformation of the isolated peptide is highly flexible, but undergoes a dramatic structural stabilization in the presence of LPS. Structure calculations reveal that the peptide presents two amphipathic surfaces in its bound state to LPS whereby each surface is characterized by two positive charges and a number of aromatic and/or aliphatic residues. ITC data suggests that peptide interacts with two molecules of lipid A. In activity assays, YW12D exhibits neutralization of LPS toxicity with very little hemolysis of red blood cells. Structural and functional properties of YW12D would be applicable in designing low molecular weight non-toxic antisepsis molecules.

  14. Detecting the Active Conformation of Calpain with Calpastatin-Based Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Croall, Dorothy E.; Vanhooser, Lisa M.; Cashon, Robert

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The specific, calcium dependent, high affinity interaction between calpain and its endogenous inhibitor calpastatin was exploited to selectively detect the calcium-bound, catalytically competent, conformation of calpain in vitro. Modification of calpastatin-domain-1 (Val114-Ser270) or its N-terminal fragment (Val114-Pro202), at selected unique cysteine residues with maleimide–AlexaFluor546 did not compromise calpastatin function (inhibition of calpain) or its binding with calpain. Ca2+-dependent binding between catalytically–dead calpain-2 (Cys105Ala) fused with eGFP and these fluorigenic calpastatin peptides generates fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET). The FRET signal documents proximity of calpain-2-C-terminally linked fluorophore to specific sites within calpastatin when the proteins form a complex. These results provide important insights into the calcium dependent interaction between calpain and calpastatin and for holo-calpain-2 in solution experimentally validate some key features of their predicted interactions. These data also provide proof of concept that the calpastatin based reagents may be useful to selectively detect the active conformation of calpain. PMID:18793761

  15. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  16. Elucidation of the active conformation of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPS synthetase 1.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Nikolina; Dietrich, Kristen; Paarmann, Ingo; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2007-03-23

    Bifunctional human PAPS synthetase (PAPSS) catalyzes, in a two-step process, the formation of the activated sulfate carrier 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). The first reaction involves the formation of the 5'-adenosine phosphosulfate (APS) intermediate from ATP and inorganic sulfate. APS is then further phosphorylated on its 3'-hydroxyl group by an additional ATP molecule to generate PAPS. The former reaction is catalyzed by the ATP-sulfurylase domain and the latter by the APS-kinase domain. Here, we report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of PAPSS isoform 1 (PAPSS1) representing the Michaelis complex with the products ADP-Mg and PAPS. This structure provides a rare glimpse of the active conformation of an enzyme catalyzing phosphoryl transfer without resorting to substrate analogs, inactivating mutations, or catalytically non-competent conditions. Our structure shows the interactions involved in the binding of the magnesium ion and PAPS, thereby revealing residues critical for catalysis. The essential magnesium ion is observed bridging the phosphate groups of the products. This function of the metal ion is made possible by the DGDN-loop changing its conformation from that previously reported, and identifies these loop residues unambiguously as a Walker B motif. Furthermore, the second aspartate residue of this motif is the likely candidate for initiating nucleophilic attack on the ATP gamma-phosphate group by abstracting the proton from the 3'-hydroxyl group of the substrate APS. We report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPSS1 in complex with two APS molecules, demonstrating the ability of the ATP/ADP-binding site to bind APS. Both structures reveal extended N termini that approach the active site of the neighboring monomer. Together, these results significantly increase our understandings of how catalysis is achieved by APS-kinase.

  17. QSAR study and conformational analysis of 4-arylthiazolylhydrazones derived from 1-indanones with anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    PubMed

    Noguera, Guido J; Fabian, Lucas E; Lombardo, Elisa; Finkielsztein, Liliana

    2015-10-12

    A set of 4-arylthiazolylhydrazones derived from 1-indanones (TZHs) previously synthesized and assayed against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, were explored in terms of conformational analysis. We found that TZHs can adopt four minimum energy conformations: cis (A, B and C) and trans. The possible bioactive conformation was selected by a 3D-QSAR model. Different molecular parameters were calculated to produce QSAR second-generation models. These QSAR results are discussed in conjunction with conformational analysis from molecular modeling studies. The main factor to determine the activity of the compounds was the partial charge at the N(3) atom (qN3). The predictive ability of the QSAR equations proposed was experimentally validated. The QSAR models developed in this study will be helpful to design novel potent TZHs.

  18. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a "gatekeeper" domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91-379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics.

  19. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S.; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a “gatekeeper” domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91–379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics. PMID:26618408

  20. Receptor-G Protein Interaction Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Lessons from Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Since its development, the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) approach has been extensively applied to study G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in real-time and in live cells. One of the major aspects of GPCRs investigated in considerable details is their physical coupling to the heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, new concepts have emerged, but few questions are still a matter of debate illustrating the complexity of GPCR-G protein interactions and coupling. Here, we summarized the recent advances on our understanding of GPCR-G protein coupling based on BRET approaches and supported by other FRET-based studies. We essentially focused on our recent studies in which we addressed the concept of preassembly vs. the agonist-dependent interaction between the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and its cognate G proteins. We discussed the concept of agonist-induced conformational changes within the preassembled PAR1-G protein complexes as well as the critical question how the multiple coupling of PAR1 with two different G proteins, Gαi1 and Gα12, but also β-arrestin 1, can be regulated. PMID:22737145

  1. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  2. Retinobenzoic acids. 4. Conformation of aromatic amides with retinoidal activity. Importance of trans-amide structure for the activity.

    PubMed

    Kagechika, H; Himi, T; Kawachi, E; Shudo, K

    1989-10-01

    N-Methylation of two retinoidal amide compounds, 4-[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)carbamoyl]benz oic acid (3, Am80) and 4-[[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2- naphthalenyl)carbonyl]amino]benzoic acid (5, Am580), resulted in the disappearance of their potent differentiation-inducing activity on human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60. Studies with 1H NMR and UV spectroscopy indicated that large conformational differences exist between the active secondary amides and the inactive N-methyl amides. From a comparison of the spectroscopic results of these amides with those of stilbene derivatives, the conformations of the active amides are expected to resemble that of (E)-stilbene, whereas the inactive amides resemble the Z isomer: 3 (Am80) and 5 (Am580) have a trans-amide bond and their whole structures are elongated, while the N-methylated compounds [4 (Am90) and 6 (Am590)] have a cis-amide bond, resulting in the folding of the two benzene rings. These structures in the crystals were related to those in solution by 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison between the two phases (solid and solution).

  3. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  4. c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase Adopts Multiple Active Conformational States in Solution.

    PubMed

    Badger, John; Grover, Prerna; Shi, Haibin; Panjarian, Shoghag B; Engen, John R; Smithgall, Thomas E; Makowski, Lee

    2016-06-14

    Protein tyrosine kinases of the Abl family have diverse roles in normal cellular regulation and drive several forms of leukemia as oncogenic fusion proteins. In the crystal structure of the inactive c-Abl kinase core, the SH2 and SH3 domains dock onto the back of the kinase domain, resulting in a compact, assembled state. This inactive conformation is stabilized by the interaction of the myristoylated N-cap with a pocket in the C-lobe of the kinase domain. Mutations that perturb these intramolecular interactions result in kinase activation. Here, we present X-ray scattering solution structures of multidomain c-Abl kinase core proteins modeling diverse active states. Surprisingly, the relative positions of the regulatory N-cap, SH3, and SH2 domains in an active myristic acid binding pocket mutant (A356N) were virtually identical to those of the assembled wild-type kinase core, indicating that Abl kinase activation does not require dramatic reorganization of the downregulated core structure. In contrast, the positions of the SH2 and SH3 domains in a clinically relevant imatinib-resistant gatekeeper mutant (T315I) appear to be reconfigured relative to their positions in the wild-type protein. Our results demonstrate that c-Abl kinase activation can occur either with (T315I) or without (A356N) global allosteric changes in the core, revealing the potential for previously unrecognized signaling diversity. PMID:27166638

  5. c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase Adopts Multiple Active Conformational States in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases of the Abl family have diverse roles in normal cellular regulation and drive several forms of leukemia as oncogenic fusion proteins. In the crystal structure of the inactive c-Abl kinase core, the SH2 and SH3 domains dock onto the back of the kinase domain, resulting in a compact, assembled state. This inactive conformation is stabilized by the interaction of the myristoylated N-cap with a pocket in the C-lobe of the kinase domain. Mutations that perturb these intramolecular interactions result in kinase activation. Here, we present X-ray scattering solution structures of multidomain c-Abl kinase core proteins modeling diverse active states. Surprisingly, the relative positions of the regulatory N-cap, SH3, and SH2 domains in an active myristic acid binding pocket mutant (A356N) were virtually identical to those of the assembled wild-type kinase core, indicating that Abl kinase activation does not require dramatic reorganization of the downregulated core structure. In contrast, the positions of the SH2 and SH3 domains in a clinically relevant imatinib-resistant gatekeeper mutant (T315I) appear to be reconfigured relative to their positions in the wild-type protein. Our results demonstrate that c-Abl kinase activation can occur either with (T315I) or without (A356N) global allosteric changes in the core, revealing the potential for previously unrecognized signaling diversity. PMID:27166638

  6. Lipopeptaibol metabolites of tolypocladium geodes: total synthesis, preferred conformation, and membrane activity.

    PubMed

    Rainaldi, Mario; Moretto, Alessandro; Peggion, Cristina; Formaggio, Fernando; Mammi, Stefano; Peggion, Evaristo; Galvez, José Antonio; Díaz-de-Villegas, Maria Dolores; Cativiela, Carlos; Toniolo, Claudio

    2003-08-01

    We have synthesized by solution methods and characterized the lipopeptaibol metabolite LP237-F8 extracted from the fungus Tolypocladium geodes and five selected analogues with the Etn-->Aib or Etn-->Nva replacement at position 8 and/or a triple Gln-->Glu(OMe) replacement at positions 5, 6, and 9 (Etn=Calpha-ethylnorvaline, Aib=alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, Nva=norvaline). Conformation analysis, performed by FT-IR absorption, NMR, and CD techniques, strongly supports the view that the six terminally blocked decapeptides are highly helical in solution. Helix topology and amphiphilic character are responsible for their remarkable membrane activity. At position 8 the combination of high hydrophobicity and Calpha tetrasubstitution, as in the Etn-containing LP237-F8 metabolite, has a positive effect on membrane interaction.

  7. Structural basis for stem cell factor–KIT signaling and activation of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Heli; Chen, Xiaoyan; Focia, Pamela J; He, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) binds to and activates the KIT receptor, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), to stimulate diverse processes including melanogenesis, gametogenesis and hematopoeisis. Dysregulation of KIT activation is associated with many cancers. We report a 2.5 Å crystal structure of the functional core of SCF bound to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of KIT. The structure reveals a ‘wrapping' SCF-recognition mode by KIT, in which KIT adopts a bent conformation to facilitate each of its first three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains to interact with SCF. Three surface epitopes on SCF, an extended loop, the B and C helices, and the N-terminal segment, contact distinct KIT domains, with two of the epitopes undergoing large conformational changes upon receptor binding. The SCF/KIT complex reveals a unique RTK dimerization assembly, and a novel recognition mode between four-helix bundle cytokines and Ig-family receptors. It serves as a framework for understanding the activation mechanisms of class III RTKs. PMID:17255936

  8. TonB induces conformational changes in surface-exposed loops of FhuA, outer membrane receptor of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    James, Karron J.; Hancock, Mark A.; Moreau, Violaine; Molina, Franck; Coulton, James W.

    2008-01-01

    FhuA, outer membrane receptor of Escherichia coli, transports hydroxamate-type siderophores into the periplasm. Cytoplasmic membrane–anchored TonB transduces energy to FhuA to facilitate siderophore transport. Because the N-terminal cork domain of FhuA occludes the C-terminal β-barrel lumen, conformational changes must occur to enable siderophore passage. To localize conformational changes at an early stage of the siderophore transport cycle, four anti-FhuA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were purified to homogeneity, and the epitopes that they recognize were determined by phage display. We mapped continuous and discontinuous epitopes to outer surface-exposed loops 3, 4, and 5 and to β-barrel strand 14. To probe for conformational changes of FhuA, surface plasmon resonance measured mAb binding to FhuA in its apo- and siderophore-bound states. Changes in binding kinetics were observed for mAbs whose epitopes were mapped to outer surface-exposed loops. Further, we measured mAb binding in the absence and presence of TonB. After forming immobilized FhuA–TonB complexes, changes in kinetics of mAb binding to FhuA were even more pronounced compared with kinetics of binding in the absence of TonB. Measurement of extrinsic fluorescence of the dye MDCC conjugated to residue 336 in outer surface-exposed loop 4 revealed 33% fluorescence quenching upon ferricrocin binding and up to 56% quenching upon TonB binding. Binding of mAbs to apo- and ferricrocin-bound FhuA complemented by fluorescence spectroscopy studies showed that their cognate epitopes on loops 3, 4, and 5 undergo conformational changes upon siderophore binding. Further, our data demonstrate that TonB binding promotes conformational changes in outer surface-exposed loops of FhuA. PMID:18653801

  9. Effect of copper oxide nanoparticles on the conformation and activity of β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Mohd Jahir; Ahmad, Abrar; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to explore the interaction of β-galactosidase with copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs). Steady-state absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to unveil the conformational changes of β-galactosidase induced by the binding of CuO NPs. Temperature dependent fluorescence quenching results indicates a static quenching mechanism in the present case. The binding thermodynamic parameters delineate the predominant role of H-bonding and van der Waals forces between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs binding process. The binding was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the result revealed that the complexation is enthalpy driven, the ΔH°<0, ΔS°<0 indicates the formation of hydrogen bonds between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs occurs. Disruption of the native conformation of the protein upon binding with CuO NPs is reflected through a reduced functionality (in terms of hydrolase activity) of the protein CuO NPs conjugate system in comparison to the native protein and CuO NPs exhibited a competitive mode of inhibition. This also supports the general belief that H-bond formation occurs with NPs is associated with a lesser extent of modification in the native structure. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Additionally the considerable increase in the Rh following the addition of CuO NPs accounts for the unfolding of β-galactosidase. Chemical and thermal unfolding of β-galactosidase, when carried out in the presence of CuO NPs, also indicated a small perturbation in the protein structure. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound β-galactosidase which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  10. Effect of copper oxide nanoparticles on the conformation and activity of β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Mohd Jahir; Ahmad, Abrar; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to explore the interaction of β-galactosidase with copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs). Steady-state absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to unveil the conformational changes of β-galactosidase induced by the binding of CuO NPs. Temperature dependent fluorescence quenching results indicates a static quenching mechanism in the present case. The binding thermodynamic parameters delineate the predominant role of H-bonding and van der Waals forces between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs binding process. The binding was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the result revealed that the complexation is enthalpy driven, the ΔH°<0, ΔS°<0 indicates the formation of hydrogen bonds between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs occurs. Disruption of the native conformation of the protein upon binding with CuO NPs is reflected through a reduced functionality (in terms of hydrolase activity) of the protein CuO NPs conjugate system in comparison to the native protein and CuO NPs exhibited a competitive mode of inhibition. This also supports the general belief that H-bond formation occurs with NPs is associated with a lesser extent of modification in the native structure. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Additionally the considerable increase in the Rh following the addition of CuO NPs accounts for the unfolding of β-galactosidase. Chemical and thermal unfolding of β-galactosidase, when carried out in the presence of CuO NPs, also indicated a small perturbation in the protein structure. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound β-galactosidase which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25260221

  11. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding. PMID:25239139

  12. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  13. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  14. Cofactor bypass variants reveal a conformational control mechanism governing cell wall polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Markovski, Monica; Bohrhunter, Jessica L; Lupoli, Tania J; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel E; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-04-26

    To fortify their cytoplasmic membrane and protect it from osmotic rupture, most bacteria surround themselves with a peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton synthesized by the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). As their name implies, these proteins are the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics. We and others have shown that the PG synthases PBP1b and PBP1a of Escherichia coli require the outer membrane lipoproteins LpoA and LpoB, respectively, for their in vivo function. Although it has been demonstrated that LpoB activates the PG polymerization activity of PBP1b in vitro, the mechanism of activation and its physiological relevance have remained unclear. We therefore selected for variants of PBP1b (PBP1b*) that bypass the LpoB requirement for in vivo function, reasoning that they would shed light on LpoB function and its activation mechanism. Several of these PBP1b variants were isolated and displayed elevated polymerization activity in vitro, indicating that the activation of glycan polymer growth is indeed one of the relevant functions of LpoB in vivo. Moreover, the location of amino acid substitutions causing the bypass phenotype on the PBP1b structure support a model in which polymerization activation proceeds via the induction of a conformational change in PBP1b initiated by LpoB binding to its UB2H domain, followed by its transmission to the glycosyl transferase active site. Finally, phenotypic analysis of strains carrying a PBP1b* variant revealed that the PBP1b-LpoB complex is most likely not providing an important physical link between the inner and outer membranes at the division site, as has been previously proposed. PMID:27071112

  15. Transcriptional activation of nuclear estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qi-Liang; Qiu, Jing-Tao; Cui, Sheng; Xia, Guo-Liang; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) are two important members of steroid receptors family, an evolutionarily conserved family of transcription factors. Upon binding to their ligands, ER and PR enter cell nucleus to interact with specific DNA element in the context of chromatin to initiate the transcription of diverse target genes, which largely depends on the timely recruitment of a wide range of cofactors. Moreover, the interactions between steroid hormones and their respective receptors also trigger post-translational modifications on these receptors to fine-tune their transcriptional activities. Besides the well-known phosphorylation modifications on tyrosine and serine/threonine residues, recent studies have identified several other covalent modifications, such as ubiquitylation and sumoylation. These post-translational modifications of steroid receptors affect its stability, subcellular localization, and/or cofactor recruitment; eventually influence the duration and extent of transcriptional activation. This review is to focus on the recent research progress on the transcriptional activation of nuclear ER and PR as well as their physiological functions in early pregnancy, which may help us to better understand related female reproductive diseases. PMID:27546504

  16. Structure of a mitochondrial cytochrome c conformer competent for peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Levi J.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of apoptosis, the peroxidation of cardiolipin at the inner mitochondrial membrane by cytochrome c requires an open coordination site on the heme. We report a 1.45-Å resolution structure of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with the Met80 heme ligand swung out of the heme crevice and replaced by a water molecule. This conformational change requires modest adjustments to the main chain of the heme crevice loop and is facilitated by a trimethyllysine 72-to-alanine mutation. This mutation also enhances the peroxidase activity of iso-1-cytochrome c. The structure shows a buried water channel capable of facilitating peroxide access to the active site and of moving protons produced during peroxidase activity to the protein surface. Alternate positions of the side chain of Arg38 appear to mediate opening and closing of the buried water channel. In addition, two buried water molecules can adopt alternate positions that change the network of hydrogen bonds in the buried water channel. Taken together, these observations suggest that low and high proton conductivity states may mediate peroxidase function. Comparison of yeast and mammalian cytochrome c sequences, in the context of the steric factors that permit opening of the heme crevice, suggests that higher organisms have evolved to inhibit peroxidase activity, providing a more stringent barrier to the onset of apoptosis. PMID:24760830

  17. Immunohistochemical quantitation of oestrogen receptors and proliferative activity in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To evaluate the effect of the duration of formalin fixation and of tumour heterogeneity on quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content (oestrogen receptor index) and proliferative activity (MIB-1 index) in breast cancer. METHODS--Two monoclonal antibodies, MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor, were applied to formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue from 25 prospectively collected oestrogen receptor positive breast carcinomas, using a microwave antigen retrieval method. Tumour tissue was allocated systematically to different periods of fixation to ensure minimal intraspecimen variation. The percentages of MIB-1 positive and oestrogen receptor positive nuclei were estimated in fields of vision sampled systematically from the entire specimen and from the whole tumour area of one "representative" cross-section. RESULTS--No correlation was found between the oestrogen receptor and MIB-1 indices and the duration of formalin fixation. The estimated MIB-1 and oestrogen receptor indices in tissue sampled systematically from the entire tumour were closely correlated with estimates obtained in a "representative" section. The intra- and interobserver correlation of the MIB-1 index was good, although a slight systematical error at the second assessment of the intraobserver study was noted. CONCLUSION--Quantitative estimates of oestrogen receptor content and proliferative activity are not significantly influenced by the period of fixation in formalin, varying from less than four hours to more than 48 hours. The MIB-1 and the oestrogen receptor indices obtained in a "representative" section do not deviate significantly from average indices determined in tissue samples from the entire tumour. Finally, the estimation of MIB-1 index is reproducible, justifying its routine use. PMID:7629289

  18. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  19. Insulin and rabbit anti-insulin receptor antibodies stimulate additively the intrinsic receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ponzio, G; Dolais-Kitabgi, J; Louvard, D; Gautier, N; Rossi, B

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the properties of rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against purified human insulin receptor which strongly stimulate the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. The stimulatory effect of the antibodies on the kinase activity was obtained on the insulin receptor autophosphorylation as well as on the kinase activity towards a synthetic substrate. This stimulation is additive to that induced by insulin. Moreover, rabbit antibodies do not impair insulin binding. These data strongly suggest that antibodies and insulin act through separate pathways. This conclusion is reinforced by the differences observed on the phosphopeptide maps of the receptor's beta subunit whose phosphorylation was performed either in the presence of insulin or rabbit antibodies. Interestingly, these polyclonal antibodies can also induce an activation of the receptor autophosphorylation by interacting only with extracellular determinants. The anti-insulin receptor antibodies mimic insulin in their stimulatory effect on amino acid (AIB) uptake, but they have a different effect to that found on the kinase activity; the simultaneous addition of the antiserum and insulin failed to stimulate this amino acid transport over the level induced by a saturating concentration of hormone. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3034584

  20. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold.

  1. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold. PMID:18434362

  2. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  3. Conformation analysis of a surface loop that controls active site access in the GH11 xylanase A from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Davi Serradella; Ward, Richard John

    2012-04-01

    Xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8 endo-1,4-glycosyl hydrolase) catalyze the hydrolysis of xylan, an abundant hemicellulose of plant cell walls. Access to the catalytic site of GH11 xylanases is regulated by movement of a short β-hairpin, the so-called thumb region, which can adopt open or closed conformations. A crystallographic study has shown that the D11F/R122D mutant of the GH11 xylanase A from Bacillus subtilis (BsXA) displays a stable "open" conformation, and here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study comparing this mutant with the native enzyme over a range of temperatures. The mutant open conformation was stable at 300 and 328 K, however it showed a transition to the closed state at 338 K. Analysis of dihedral angles identified thumb region residues Y113 and T123 as key hinge points which determine the open-closed transition at 338 K. Although the D11F/R122D mutations result in a reduction in local inter-intramolecular hydrogen bonding, the global energies of the open and closed conformations in the native enzyme are equivalent, suggesting that the two conformations are equally accessible. These results indicate that the thumb region shows a broader degree of energetically permissible conformations which regulate the access to the active site region. The R122D mutation contributes to the stability of the open conformation, but is not essential for thumb dynamics, i.e., the wild type enzyme can also adapt to the open conformation.

  4. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  5. An activating mutation of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor autonomously sustains spermatogenesis in a hypophysectomized man

    SciTech Connect

    Gromoll, J.; Simoni, M.; Nieschlag, E.

    1996-04-01

    As both gonadotropins, LH and FSH, are required for normal spermatogenesis, patients with pituitary insufficiency need hCG plus human menopausal gonadotropin therapy to induce spermatogenesis and establish fertility. In a patient hypophysectomized because of a pituitary tumor, who, despite undetectable serum gonadotropin levels, had normal testis volume and semen parameters and fathered three children under testosterone substitution alone, we hypothesized an activating mutation of the FSH receptor. Exon 10 of the FSH receptor gene was amplified from genomic DNA by PCR, screened by single stranded conformation polymorphism gel electrophoresis, and sequenced. We identified a heterozygous A{r_arrow}G base change at nucleotide position 1700, leading to an Asp,Gly transition in codon 567 in the third intracytoplasmatic loop. COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the mutated receptor displayed a 1.5-fold increase in basal cAMP production compared to wild-type receptor, indicating that this mutation leads to ligand-independent constitutive activation of the FSH receptor. We conclude that this activating mutation of the FSH receptor, the first ever described, autonomously sustains spermatogenesis in the absence of gonadotropins. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model.

    PubMed

    Bernoux, Maud; Burdett, Hayden; Williams, Simon J; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Anderson, Peter A; Dodds, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  8. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  9. Enhanced meta-analysis of acetylcholine binding protein structures reveals conformational signatures of agonism in nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stober, Spencer T; Abrams, Cameron F

    2012-01-01

    The soluble acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) is the default structural proxy for pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs). Unfortunately, it is difficult to recognize conformational signatures of LGIC agonism and antagonism within the large set of AChBP crystal structures in both apo and ligand-bound states, primarily because AChBP conformations in this set are nearly superimposable (root mean square deviation < 1.5 Å). We have undertaken a systematic, alignment-free approach to elucidate conformational differences displayed by AChBP that cleanly differentiate apo/antagonist-bound from agonist-bound states. Our approach uses statistical inference based on both crystallographic states and conformations sampled during long molecular dynamics simulations to select important inter-Cα distances and map their collective values onto functional states. We observe that binding of (nAChR) agonists to AChBP elicits clockwise rotation of the inner β-sheet with respect to the outer β-sheet, causing tilting of the cys-loop away from the five-fold axis, in a manner quite similar to that speculated for α-subunits of the heteromeric nAChR structure (Unwin, J Mol Biol 2005;346:967), making this motion potentially important in transmission of the gating signal to the transmembrane domain of a LGIC. The method is also successful at discriminating partial from full agonists and supports the hypothesis that a particularly controversial ligand, lobeline, is in fact an LGIC antagonist. PMID:22170867

  10. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  11. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and human Mrgpr family members. This expansion of our understanding by which proteases interact with GPCRs redefines the concept of what constitutes a protease-activated receptor. The findings also implicate proteases as ligands to members of this orphan receptor family while providing new insights into how cysteine proteases contribute to itch. PMID:26216096

  12. Different conformations of ribosomal DNA in active and inactive chromatin in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, C; Riccardi, P

    1985-12-20

    The chromatin structure of the ribosomal DNA in Xenopus laevis was studied by micrococcal nuclease digestions of blood, liver and embryonic cell nuclei. We have found that BglI-restricted DNA from micrococcal nuclease-digested blood cell nuclei has an increased electrophoretic mobility compared to the undigested control. Micrococcal nuclease digestion of liver cell nuclei causes a very slight shift in mobility, only in the region of the spacer containing the "Bam Islands". In contrast, the mobility of ribosomal DNA in chromatin of embryonic cells, under identical digestion conditions, remains unaffected by the nuclease activity. Denaturing gels or ligase action on the nuclease-treated DNA abolishes the differences in the electrophoretic mobility. Ionic strength and ethidium bromide influence the relative electrophoretic migration of the two DNA fragment populations, suggesting that secondary structure may play an important role in the observed phenomena. In addition, restriction analysis under native electrophoretic conditions of DNA prepared from blood, liver and embryonic cells shows that blood cell DNA restriction fragments always have a faster mobility than the corresponding fragments of liver and embryo cell DNA. We therefore propose that nicking activity by micrococcal nuclease modifies the electrophoretic mobility of an unusual DNA conformation, present in blood cell, and to a lesser extent, in liver cell ribosomal chromatin. A possible function for these structures is discussed. The differences of the ribosomal chromatin structures in adult and embryonic tissues may reflect the potential of the genes to be expressed.

  13. Asymmetry of the active site loop conformation between subunits of glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase in solution.

    PubMed

    Campanini, Barbara; Bettati, Stefano; di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Contestabile, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM) is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data.

  14. Steroid signaling activation and intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Tiziana; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2010-12-01

    In addition to stimulating gene transcription, sex steroids trigger rapid, non-genomic responses in the extra-nuclear compartment of target cells. These events take place within seconds or minutes after hormone administration and do not require transcriptional activity of sex steroid receptors. Depending on cell systems, activation of extra-nuclear signaling pathways by sex steroids fosters cell cycle progression, prevents apoptosis, leads to epigenetic modifications and increases cell migration through cytoskeleton changes. These findings have raised the question of intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors mediating these responses. During the past years, increasing evidence has shown that classical sex steroid receptors localized in the extra-nuclear compartment or close to membranes of target cells induce these events. The emerging picture is that a process of bidirectional control between signaling activation and sex steroid receptor localization regulates the outcome of hormonal responses in target cells. This mechanism ensures cell cycle progression in estradiol-treated breast cancer cells, and its derangement might occur in progression of human proliferative diseases. These findings will be reviewed here together with unexpected examples of the relationship between sex steroid receptor localization, signaling activation and biological responses in target cells. We apologize to scientists whose reports are not mentioned or extensively discussed owing to space limitations.

  15. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  16. Overexpression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor in hemangioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gregory J.; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

    2010-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas frequently develop in patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, an autosomal dominant genetic disorder. The tumors are characterized by a dense network of blood capillaries, often in association with cysts. Although activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in the development of malignant brain tumors such as high-grade gliomas, little is known about the role of RTK signaling in hemangioblastomas. To address this issue, we examined hemangioblastoma tumor specimens using receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation profiling and immunohistochemistry. Six human hemangioblastomas were analyzed with a phospho-RTK antibody array, revealing EGFR phosphorylation in all tumors. EGFR expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in all tumors analyzed and downstream effector pathway activation was demonstrated by positive staining for phospho-AKT. Our findings suggest that, in primary hemangioblastomas, RTK upregulation and signaling predominantly involves EGFR, providing an attractive molecular target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20730556

  17. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  18. Histamine 3 receptor activation reduces the expression of neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H₃) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT₁) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H₃ receptors and AT₁ receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H₃/AT₁ receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H₃ receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT₁ receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-methyl-L-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H₃ receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H₃ receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT₁ receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H₃ receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT₁ receptor expression. Thus, H₃ receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT₁ receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined

  19. Histamine 3 Receptor Activation Reduces the Expression of Neuronal Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H3) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H3 receptors and AT1 receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H3/AT1 receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H3 receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT1 receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-l-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H3 receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H3 receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT1 receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H3 receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT1 receptor expression. Thus, H3 receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT1 receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined attenuation of angiotensin II and

  20. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  1. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by α-subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    PubMed Central

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. FoF1 ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F1 performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate. PMID:23345443

  2. Jatrophidin I, a cyclic peptide from Brazilian Jatropha curcas L.: isolation, characterization, conformational studies and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Altei, Wanessa F; Picchi, Douglas G; Abissi, Barbara M; Giesel, Guilherme M; Flausino, Otavio; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle; Verli, Hugo; Crusca, Edson; Silveira, Edilberto R; Cilli, Eduardo M; Bolzani, Vanderlan S

    2014-11-01

    A cyclic peptide, jatrophidin I, was isolated from the latex of Jatropha curcas L. Its structure was elucidated by extensive 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, with additional conformational studies performed using Molecular Dynamics/Simulated Annealing (MD/SA). Jatrophidin I had moderate protease inhibition activity when compared with pepstatin A; however, the peptide was inactive in antimalarial, cytotoxic and antioxidant assays.

  3. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by α-subunit motif controlling active site conformation.

    PubMed

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2013-02-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate. PMID:23345443

  4. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  5. The cytoplasmic tails of protease-activated receptor-1 and substance P receptor specify sorting to lysosomes versus recycling.

    PubMed

    Trejo, J; Coughlin, S R

    1999-01-22

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin, protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), is activated when thrombin cleaves its amino-terminal exodomain. The irreversibility of this proteolytic mechanism raises the question of how desensitization and resensitization are accomplished for thrombin signaling. PAR1 is phosphorylated, uncoupled from signaling, and internalized after activation like classic GPCRs. However, unlike classic GPCRs, which internalize and recycle, activated PAR1 is sorted to lysosomes. To identify the signals that specify the distinct sorting of PAR1, we constructed chimeras between PAR1 and the substance P receptor. Wild-type substance P receptor internalized and recycled after activation; PAR1 bearing the cytoplasmic tail of the substance P receptor (P/S) behaved similarly. By contrast, wild-type PAR1 and a substance P receptor bearing the cytoplasmic tail of PAR1 (S/P) sorted to lysosomes after activation. Consistent with these observations, PAR1 and the S/P chimera were effectively down-regulated by their respective agonists as assessed by both receptor protein levels and signaling. Substance P receptor and the P/S chimera showed little down-regulation. These data suggest that the cytoplasmic tails of PAR1 and substance P receptor specify their distinct intracellular sorting patterns after activation and internalization. Moreover, by altering the trafficking fates of PAR1 and substance P receptor, one can dictate the efficiency with which a cell maintains responsiveness to PAR1 or substance P receptor agonists over time.

  6. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  7. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors interacting with pan agonist sodelglitazar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Yuan; Wang, Run-Ling; Xu, Wei-Ren; Tang, Li-Da; Wang, Shu-Qing; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-10-01

    PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) pan agonists play a critical role in treating metabolic diseases, especially the Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GlaxoSmithKline's sodelglitazar (GW677954) is one of the potent PPAR pan agonists, which is currently being investigated in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of T2DM and its complications. The present study was aimed at investigation into the effect of sodelglitazar at the binding pockets of PPARs. The Schrodinger Suite program (2009) was used for the molecular docking, while the GROMACS program used for the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results thus obtained showed that sodelglitazar being docked well in the active site of PPARs. It was revealed by the MD simulations that the structures of the receptors remained quite stable during the simulations and that the important AF-2 helix showed less flexibility after binding with sodelglitazar. Also, it was observed that sodelglitazar could periodically form hydrogen bonds with the AF-2 helix of PPARs to stabilize the AF-2 helix in an active conformation. Our findings have confirmed that GlaxoSmithKline's sodelglitazar can activate the PPARs, which is quite consistent with the previous biological studies. PMID:21592078

  8. Conformable actively multiplexed high-density surface electrode array for brain interfacing

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan

    2015-01-13

    Provided are methods and devices for interfacing with brain tissue, specifically for monitoring and/or actuation of spatio-temporal electrical waveforms. The device is conformable having a high electrode density and high spatial and temporal resolution. A conformable substrate supports a conformable electronic circuit and a barrier layer. Electrodes are positioned to provide electrical contact with a brain tissue. A controller monitors or actuates the electrodes, thereby interfacing with the brain tissue. In an aspect, methods are provided to monitor or actuate spatio-temporal electrical waveform over large brain surface areas by any of the devices disclosed herein.

  9. Modulation of Receptor Phosphorylation Contributes to Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor α by Dehydroepiandrosterone and Other Peroxisome Proliferators

    PubMed Central

    Tamasi, Viola; Miller, Kristy K. Michael; Ripp, Sharon L.; Vila, Ermin; Geoghagen, Thomas E.; Prough, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a C19 human adrenal steroid, activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in vivo but does not ligand-activate PPARα in transient transfection experiments. We demonstrate that DHEA regulates PPARα action by altering both the levels and phosphorylation status of the receptor. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) were transiently transfected with the expression plasmid encoding PPARα and a plasmid containing two copies of fatty acyl coenzyme oxidase (FACO) peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor responsive element consensus oligonucleotide in a luciferase reporter gene. Nafenopin treatment increased reporter gene activity in this system, whereas DHEA treatment did not. Okadaic acid significantly decreased nafenopin-induced reporter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Okadaic acid treatment of primary rat hepatocytes decreased both DHEA- and nafenopin-induced FACO activity in primary rat hepatocytes. DHEA induced both PPARα mRNA and protein levels, as well as PP2A message in primary rat hepatocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the serines at positions 12 and 21 were rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment with DHEA and nafenopin. Results using specific protein phosphatase inhibitors suggested that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is responsible for DHEA action, and protein phosphatase 1 might be involved in nafenopin induction. Mutation of serines at position 6, 12, and 21 to an uncharged alanine residue significantly increased transcriptional activity, whereas mutation to negative charged aspartate residues (mimicking receptor phosphorylation) decreased transcriptional activity. DHEA action involves induction of PPARα mRNA and protein levels as well as increased PPARα transcriptional activity through decreasing receptor phosphorylation at serines in the AF1 region. PMID:18079279

  10. HAMP domain conformers that propagate opposite signals in bacterial chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Airola, Michael V; Sukomon, Nattakan; Samanta, Dipanjan; Borbat, Peter P; Freed, Jack H; Watts, Kylie J; Crane, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between "on" and "off" conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses.

  11. Liver X Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonist from Cornus alternifolia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yang-Qing; Ma, Guo-Yi; Peng, Jiang-nan; Ma, Zhan-Ying; Hamann, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptors superfamily and are transcription factors activated by specific ligands. Liver X receptors (LXR) belong to the nuclear hormone receptors and have been shown to play an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. From the previous screening of several medicinal plants for potential partial PPARγ agonists, the extracts of Cornus alternifolia were found to exhibit promising bioactivity. In this paper, we report the isolation and structural elucidation of four new compounds and their potential as ligands for PPAR. Methods The new compounds were extracted from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia and fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and analysis of their hydrolysis products. Results Three new iridoid glycosides including an iridolactone, alternosides A-C (1–3), a new megastigmane glycoside, cornalternoside (4) and 10 known compounds, were obtained from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia. Kaempferol-3-O-β-glucopyranoside (5) exhibited potent agonistic activities for PPARα, PPARγ and LXR with EC50 values of 0.62, 3.0 and 1.8 μ M, respectively. Conclusions We isolated four new and ten known compounds from Cornus alternifolia, and one known compound showed agonistic activities for PPARα, PPARγ and LXR. General significance Compound 1 is the first example of a naturally occurring iridoid glycoside containing a β-glucopyranoside moiety at C-6. PMID:22353334

  12. The impact of active site protonation on substrate ring conformation in Melanocarpus albomyces cellobiohydrolase Cel7B.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Timothy C; Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Granum, David M; Maupin, C Mark

    2015-07-14

    The ability to utilize biomass as a feedstock for liquid fuel and value-added chemicals is dependent on the efficient and economic utilization of lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. In current bioreactors, cellulases are used to convert crystalline and amorphous cellulose to smaller oligomers and eventually glucose by means of cellulase enzymes. A critical component of the enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis reaction is the degree to which the enzyme can facilitate substrate ring deformation from the chair to a more catalytically active conformation (e.g. skewed boat) at the -1 subsite. Presented here is an evaluation of the impact of the protonation state for critical active site residues (i.e. Glu212, Asp214, Glu217, and His228) in Melanocarpus albomyces (Ma) Cellobiohydrolase Cel7B on the substrate's orientation and ring conformation. It is found that the protonation state of the active site can disrupt the intra-enzyme hydrogen bonding network and enhance the sampling of various ring puckering conformations for the substrate ring at the +1 and -1 subsites. In particular it is observed that the protonation state of Asp214 dictates the accessibility of the glycosidic bond to the catalytic acid/base Glu217 by influencing the φ/ψ dihedral angles and the puckering of the ring structure. The protonation-orientation-conformation analysis has revealed an active site that primarily utilizes two highly coupled protonation schemes; one protonation scheme to orient the substrate and generate catalytically favorable substrate geometries and ring puckering conformations and another protonation scheme to hydrolyze the glycosidic bond. In addition to identifying how enzymes utilize protonation state to manipulate substrate geometry, this study identifies possible directions for improving catalytic activity through protein engineering. PMID:26061383

  13. Metal-Dependent Conformational Activation Explains Highly Promutagenic Replication across O6-Methylguanine by Human DNA Polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase β (polβ) inserts, albeit slowly, T opposite the carcinogenic lesion O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) ∼30-fold more frequently than C. To gain insight into this promutagenic process, we solved four ternary structures of polβ with an incoming dCTP or dTTP analogue base-paired with O6MeG in the presence of active-site Mg2+ or Mn2+. The Mg2+-bound structures show that both the O6MeG·dCTP/dTTP–Mg2+ complexes adopt an open protein conformation, staggered base pair, and one active-site metal ion. The Mn2+-bound structures reveal that, whereas the O6Me·dCTP–Mn2+ complex assumes the similar altered conformation, the O6MeG·dTTP–Mn2+ complex adopts a catalytically competent state with a closed protein conformation and pseudo-Watson–Crick base pair. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that polβ slows nucleotide incorporation opposite O6MeG by inducing an altered conformation suboptimal for catalysis and promotes mutagenic replication by allowing Watson–Crick-mode for O6MeG·T but not for O6MeG·C in the enzyme active site. The O6MeG·dTTP–Mn2+ ternary structure, which represents the first structure of mismatched polβ ternary complex with a closed protein conformation and coplanar base pair, the first structure of pseudo-Watson–Crick O6MeG·T formed in the active site of a DNA polymerase, and a rare, if not the first, example of metal-dependent conformational activation of a DNA polymerase, indicate that catalytic metal-ion coordination is utilized as a kinetic checkpoint by polβ and is crucial for the conformational activation of polβ. Overall, our structural studies not only explain the promutagenic polβ catalysis across O6MeG but also provide new insights into the replication fidelity of polβ. PMID:24694247

  14. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory. PMID:25553430

  15. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  16. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  17. Novel positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors with anesthetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Maldifassi, Maria C.; Baur, Roland; Pierce, David; Nourmahnad, Anahita; Forman, Stuart A.; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    GABAA receptors are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are targets for numerous clinically important drugs such as benzodiazepines, anxiolytics and anesthetics. We previously identified novel ligands of the classical benzodiazepine binding pocket in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors using an experiment-guided virtual screening (EGVS) method. This screen also identified novel ligands for intramembrane low affinity diazepam site(s). In the current study we have further characterized compounds 31 and 132 identified with EGVS as well as 4-O-methylhonokiol. We investigated the site of action of these compounds in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using voltage-clamp electrophysiology combined with a benzodiazepine site antagonist and transmembrane domain mutations. All three compounds act mainly through the two β+/α− subunit transmembrane interfaces of the GABAA receptors. We then used concatenated receptors to dissect the involvement of individual β+/α− interfaces. We further demonstrated that these compounds have anesthetic activity in a small aquatic animal model, Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The newly identified compounds may serve as scaffolds for the development of novel anesthetics. PMID:27198062

  18. Cofactoring and Dimerization of Proteinase-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Liu, Allen P.; Smith, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein–coupled receptors that transmit cellular responses to extracellular proteases and have important functions in vascular physiology, development, inflammation, and cancer progression. The established paradigm for PAR activation involves proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus, which reveals a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand by binding intramolecularly to the receptor to trigger transmembrane signaling. Most cells express more than one PAR, which can influence the mode of PAR activation and signaling. Clear examples include murine PAR3 cofactoring of PAR4 and transactivation of PAR2 by PAR1. Thrombin binds to and cleaves murine PAR3, which facilitates PAR4 cleavage and activation. This process is essential for thrombin signaling and platelet activation, since murine PAR3 cannot signal alone. Although PAR1 and PAR4 are both competent to signal, PAR1 is able to act as a cofactor for PAR4, facilitating more rapid cleavage and activation by thrombin. PAR1 can also facilitate PAR2 activation through a different mechanism. Cleavage of the PAR1 N terminus by thrombin generates a tethered ligand domain that can bind intermolecularly to PAR2 to activate signaling. Thus, PARs can regulate each other’s activity by localizing thrombin when in complex with PAR3 and PAR4 or by cleaved PAR1, providing its tethered ligand domain for PAR2 activation. The ability of PARs to cofactor or transactivate other PARs would necessitate that the two receptors be in close proximity, likely in the form of a heterodimer. Here, we discuss the cofactoring and dimerization of PARs and the functional consequences on signaling. PMID:24064459

  19. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-12-25

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys(19)-Pro(20)-Trp(21)-Cys(22) motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a "closed" compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an "open" conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily.

  20. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-12-25

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys(19)-Pro(20)-Trp(21)-Cys(22) motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a "closed" compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an "open" conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily. PMID:26546681

  1. The impact of β-azido(or 1-piperidinyl)methylamino acids in position 2 or 3 on biological activity and conformation of dermorphin analogues.

    PubMed

    Maciejczyk, Maciej; Lasota, Anika; Frączak, Oliwia; Kosson, Piotr; Misicka, Aleksandra; Nowakowski, Michał; Ejchart, Andrzej; Olma, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of new dermorphin analogues is described. The (R)-alanine or phenylalanine residues of natural dermorphin were substituted by the corresponding α-methyl-β-azidoalanine or α-benzyl-β-azido(1-piperidinyl)alanine residues. The potency and selectivity of the new analogues were evaluated by a competitive receptor binding assay in rat brain using [(3) H]DAMGO (a μ ligand) and [(3) H]DELT (a δ ligand). The most active analogue in this series, Tyr-(R)-Ala-(R)-α-benzyl-β-azidoAla-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH2 and its epimer were analysed by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics simulations. The dominant conformation of the investigated peptides depended on the absolute configuration around C(α) in the α-benzyl-β-azidoAla residue in position 3. The (R) configuration led to the formation of a type I β-turn, whilst switching to the (S) configuration gave rise to an inverse β-turn of type I', followed by the formation of a very short β-sheet. The selectivity of Tyr-(R)-Ala-(R) and (S)-α-benzyl-β-azidoAla-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH2 was shown to be very similar; nevertheless, the two analogues exhibited different conformational preferences. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443980

  2. The impact of β-azido(or 1-piperidinyl)methylamino acids in position 2 or 3 on biological activity and conformation of dermorphin analogues.

    PubMed

    Maciejczyk, Maciej; Lasota, Anika; Frączak, Oliwia; Kosson, Piotr; Misicka, Aleksandra; Nowakowski, Michał; Ejchart, Andrzej; Olma, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of new dermorphin analogues is described. The (R)-alanine or phenylalanine residues of natural dermorphin were substituted by the corresponding α-methyl-β-azidoalanine or α-benzyl-β-azido(1-piperidinyl)alanine residues. The potency and selectivity of the new analogues were evaluated by a competitive receptor binding assay in rat brain using [(3) H]DAMGO (a μ ligand) and [(3) H]DELT (a δ ligand). The most active analogue in this series, Tyr-(R)-Ala-(R)-α-benzyl-β-azidoAla-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH2 and its epimer were analysed by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics simulations. The dominant conformation of the investigated peptides depended on the absolute configuration around C(α) in the α-benzyl-β-azidoAla residue in position 3. The (R) configuration led to the formation of a type I β-turn, whilst switching to the (S) configuration gave rise to an inverse β-turn of type I', followed by the formation of a very short β-sheet. The selectivity of Tyr-(R)-Ala-(R) and (S)-α-benzyl-β-azidoAla-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH2 was shown to be very similar; nevertheless, the two analogues exhibited different conformational preferences. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Bishop-Bailey, David

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)s are a family of three nuclear hormone receptors, PPARα, -δ, and -γ, which are members of the steriod receptor superfamily. The first member of the family (PPARα) was originally discovered as the mediator by which a number of xenobiotic drugs cause peroxisome proliferation in the liver. Defined functions for all these receptors, until recently, mainly concerned their ability to regulate energy balance, with PPARα being involved in β-oxidation pathways, and PPARγ in the differentiation of adipocytes. Little is known about the functions of PPARδ, though it is the most ubiquitously expressed. Since their discovery, PPARs have been shown to be expressed in monocytes/macrophages, the heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and in atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, PPARs can be activated by a vast number of compounds including synthetic drugs, of the clofibrate, and anti-diabetic thiazoldinedione classes, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a number of eicosanoids, including prostaglandins, lipoxygenase products, and oxidized low density lipoprotein. This review will aim to introduce the field of PPAR nuclear hormone receptors, and discuss the discovery and actions of PPARs in the cardiovascular system, as well as the source of potential ligands. PMID:10696077

  4. A Second Class of Nuclear Receptors for Oxysterols: Regulation of RORα and RORγ activity by 24S-Hydroxycholesterol (Cerebrosterol)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Crumbley, Christine; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γ (RORα [NR1F1] and RORγ [NR1F3]) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. These 2 receptors regulate many physiological processes including development, metabolism and immunity. We recently found that certain oxysterols, namely the 7-substituted oxysterols, bound to the ligand binding domains (LBDs) of RORα and RORγ with high affinity, altered the LBD conformation and reduced coactivator binding resulting in suppression of the constitutive transcriptional activity of these two receptors. Here, we show that another oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC), is also a high affinity ligand for RORα and RORγ (Ki ∼ 25 nM). 24S-OHC is also known as cerebrosterol due to its high level in the brain where it plays an essential role as an intermediate in cholesterol elimination from the CNS. 24S-OHC functions as a RORα/γ inverse agonist suppressing the constitutive transcriptional activity of these receptors in cotransfection assays. Additionally, 24S-OHC suppressed the expression of several RORα target genes including BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in a ROR-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that 24S-OHC decreases the ability of RORα to recruit the coactivator SRC-2 when bound to the BMAL1 promoter. We also noted that 24(S), 25-epoxycholesterol selectively suppressed the activity of RORγ. These data indicate that RORα and RORγ may serve as sensors of oxsterols. Thus, RORα and RORγ display an overlapping ligand preference with another class of oxysterol nuclear receptors, the liver X receptors (LXRα [NR1H3] and LXRβ [NR1H2]). PMID:20211758

  5. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  6. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  7. Cholesterol inhibits the nuclear entry of estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) and its dimerization with the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER) in goat uterus.

    PubMed

    Thampan, R V; Zafar, A; Imam, N S; Sreeja, S; Suma, K; Vairamani, M

    2000-04-01

    An alternative form of estrogen receptor isolated from goat uterus, the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER), has no DNA-binding function, although it is closely similar to the classical estrogen receptor (ER) in its hormone binding affinity and specificity. The naER dimerizes with a DNA binding protein, estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF). The heterodimer binds to the DNA. Assays carried out during the purification of E-RAF showed that an endogenous inhibitor that is heat stable and dialyzable bound to the E-RAF and prevented the formation of the heterodimer. The inhibitor has been isolated and purified. GC-MS analysis identifies this molecule to be cholesterol. Circular dichroism measurement has shown that the high-affinity binding of cholesterol to E-RAF results in subtle changes in the secondary and the tertiary structure of the protein. The E-RAF with altered conformation fails to dimerize with the naER. Instead of facilitating E-RAF entry into the nucleus, dimerization with the naER prevents it. Similarly, cholesterol binding blocks the nuclear entry of the protein, showing that E-RAF with altered conformation is incapable of interaction with the nuclear pore complex/membrane proteins. The naER-E-RAF heterodimer remains at the nuclear periphery, incapable of further transport. These results indicate the possibility that the dimerization between naER and the E-RAF takes place only within the nuclear compartment. The observation that cholesterol binding prevents nuclear entry of the E-RAF reflects the similarity of E-RAF with the sterol regulatory element (SRE) binding protein that enters the nucleus and binds to SRE only when the intracellular level of cholesterol remains low. PMID:10760947

  8. Cholesterol inhibits the nuclear entry of estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) and its dimerization with the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER) in goat uterus.

    PubMed

    Thampan, R V; Zafar, A; Imam, N S; Sreeja, S; Suma, K; Vairamani, M

    2000-04-01

    An alternative form of estrogen receptor isolated from goat uterus, the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER), has no DNA-binding function, although it is closely similar to the classical estrogen receptor (ER) in its hormone binding affinity and specificity. The naER dimerizes with a DNA binding protein, estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF). The heterodimer binds to the DNA. Assays carried out during the purification of E-RAF showed that an endogenous inhibitor that is heat stable and dialyzable bound to the E-RAF and prevented the formation of the heterodimer. The inhibitor has been isolated and purified. GC-MS analysis identifies this molecule to be cholesterol. Circular dichroism measurement has shown that the high-affinity binding of cholesterol to E-RAF results in subtle changes in the secondary and the tertiary structure of the protein. The E-RAF with altered conformation fails to dimerize with the naER. Instead of facilitating E-RAF entry into the nucleus, dimerization with the naER prevents it. Similarly, cholesterol binding blocks the nuclear entry of the protein, showing that E-RAF with altered conformation is incapable of interaction with the nuclear pore complex/membrane proteins. The naER-E-RAF heterodimer remains at the nuclear periphery, incapable of further transport. These results indicate the possibility that the dimerization between naER and the E-RAF takes place only within the nuclear compartment. The observation that cholesterol binding prevents nuclear entry of the E-RAF reflects the similarity of E-RAF with the sterol regulatory element (SRE) binding protein that enters the nucleus and binds to SRE only when the intracellular level of cholesterol remains low.

  9. Protease-activated-receptor-2 affects protease-activated-receptor-1-driven breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohammad; Maoz, Miriam; Kancharla, Arun; Agranovich, Daniel; Peretz, Tamar; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian protease-activated-receptor-1 and -2 (PAR1 and PAR2) are activated by proteases found in the flexible microenvironment of a tumor and play a central role in breast cancer. We propose in the present study that PAR1 and PAR2 act together as a functional unit during malignant and physiological invasion processes. This notion is supported by assessing pro-tumor functions in the presence of short hairpin; shRNA knocked-down hPar2 or by the use of a truncated PAR2 devoid of the entire cytoplasmic tail. Silencing of hPar2 by shRNA-attenuated thrombin induced PAR1 signaling as recapitulated by inhibiting the assembly of Etk/Bmx or Akt onto PAR1-C-tail, by thrombin-instigated colony formation and invasion. Strikingly, shRNA-hPar2 also inhibited the TFLLRN selective PAR1 pro-tumor functions. In addition, while evaluating the physiological invasion process of placenta extravillous trophoblast (EVT) organ culture, we observed inhibition of both thrombin or the selective PAR1 ligand; TFLLRNPNDK induced EVT invasion by shRNA-hPar2 but not by scrambled shRNA-hPar2. In parallel, when a truncated PAR2 was utilized in a xenograft mouse model, it inhibited PAR1-PAR2-driven tumor growth in vivo. Similarly, it also attenuated the interaction of Etk/Bmx with the PAR1-C-tail in vitro and decreased markedly selective PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion. Confocal images demonstrated co-localization of PAR1 and PAR2 in HEK293T cells over-expressing YFP-hPar2 and HA-hPar1. Co-immuno-precipitation analyses revealed PAR1-PAR2 complex formation but no PAR1-CXCR4 complex was formed. Taken together, our observations show that PAR1 and PAR2 act as a functional unit in tumor development and placenta-uterus interactions. This conclusion may have significant consequences on future breast cancer therapeutic modalities and improved late pregnancy outcome. PMID:24177339

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  11. Lysophosphatidylserine analogues differentially activate three LysoPS receptors.

    PubMed

    Uwamizu, Akiharu; Inoue, Asuka; Suzuki, Kensuke; Okudaira, Michiyo; Shuto, Akira; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Makide, Kumiko; Ikubo, Masaya; Nakamura, Sho; Jung, Sejin; Sayama, Misa; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Aoki, Junken

    2015-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylserine (1-oleoyl-2 R-lysophosphatidylserine, LysoPS) has been shown to have lipid mediator-like actions such as stimulation of mast cell degranulation and suppression of T lymphocyte proliferation, although the mechanisms of LysoPS actions have been elusive. Recently, three G protein-coupled receptors (LPS1/GPR34, LPS2/P2Y10 and LPS3/GPR174) were found to react specifically with LysoPS, raising the possibility that LysoPS serves as a lipid mediator that exerts its role through these receptors. Previously, we chemically synthesized a number of LysoPS analogues and evaluated them as agonists for mast-cell degranulation. Here, we used a transforming growth factor-α (TGFα) shedding assay to see if these LysoPS analogues activated the three LysoPS receptors. Modification of the serine moiety significantly reduced the ability of the analogues to activate the three LysoPS receptors, whereas modification of other parts resulted in loss of activity in receptor-specific manner. We found that introduction of methyl group to serine moiety (1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and removal of sn-2 hydroxyl group (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-LysoPS) resulted in reduction of reactivity with LPS1 and LPS3, respectively. Accordingly, we synthesized a LysoPS analogue with the two modifications (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and found it to be an LPS2-selective agonist. These pharmacological tools will definitely help to identify the biological roles of these LysoPS receptors. PMID:25320102

  12. The Search for Endogenous Activators of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest aspect, this review is an attempt to describe the major ligand classes of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). A grander objective is to provide models that may help define the physiological activator or “endogenous ligand” of the AHR. We begin by presenting evidence that supports a developmental function for the AHR. This is followed by proposing mechanisms by which an endogenous ligand and consequent AHR activation might be important during normal physiology and development. With this background, we then present a survey of the known xenobiotic, endogenous, dietary and “un-conventional” activators of the AHR. When possible, this includes information about their induction potency, receptor binding affinity and potential for exposure. Because of the essential function of the AHR in embryonic development, we discuss the candidacy of each of these compounds as physiologically important activators. PMID:18076143

  13. Receptor antagonism/agonism can be uncoupled from pharmacoperone activity.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Spicer, Timothy P; Smith, Emery; Bannister, Thomas D; Kenakin, Terry; Scampavia, Louis; Conn, P Michael

    2016-10-15

    Pharmacoperones rescue misrouted mutants of the vasopressin receptor type 2 (V2R) and enable them to traffic to the correct biological locus where they function. Previously, a library of nearly 645,000 structures was interrogated with a high throughput screen; pharmacoperones were identified for V2R mutants with a view toward correcting the underlying mutational defects in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In the present study, an orthologous assay was used to evaluate hits from the earlier study. We found no consistent relation between antagonism or agonism and pharmacoperone activity. Active pharmacoperones were identified which had minimal antagonistic activity. This increases the therapeutic reach of these drugs, since virtually all pharmacoperone drugs reported to date were selected from peptidomimetic antagonists. Such mixed-activity drugs have a complex pharmacology limiting their therapeutic utility and requiring their removal prior to stimulation of the receptor with agonist. PMID:27389877

  14. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Cameron D; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Wall, Daniel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  15. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  16. Mechanisms of NOD-like receptor-associated inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haitao; Miao, Edward A; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2013-09-19

    A major function of a subfamily of NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing, or NOD-like receptor) proteins is in inflammasome activation, which has been implicated in a multitude of disease models and human diseases. This work will highlight key progress in understanding the mechanisms that activate the best-studied NLRs (NLRP3, NLRC4, NAIP, and NLRP1) and in uncovering inflammasome NLRs. PMID:24054327

  17. A transgenic zebrafish model for monitoring glucocorticoid receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Krug, R G; Poshusta, T L; Skuster, K J; Berg, M R; Gardner, S L; Clark, K J

    2014-06-01

    Gene regulation resulting from glucocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid response element interactions is a hallmark feature of stress response signaling. Imbalanced glucocorticoid production and glucocorticoid receptor activity have been linked to socioeconomically crippling neuropsychiatric disorders, and accordingly there is a need to develop in vivo models to help understand disease progression and management. Therefore, we developed the transgenic SR4G zebrafish reporter line with six glucocorticoid response elements used to promote expression of a short half-life green fluorescent protein following glucocorticoid receptor activation. Herein, we document the ability of this reporter line to respond to both chronic and acute exogenous glucocorticoid treatment. The green fluorescent protein expression in response to transgene activation was high in a variety of tissues including the brain, and provided single-cell resolution in the effected regions. The specificity of these responses is demonstrated using the partial agonist mifepristone and mutation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Importantly, the reporter line also modeled the temporal dynamics of endogenous stress response signaling, including the increased production of the glucocorticoid cortisol following hyperosmotic stress and the fluctuations of basal cortisol concentrations with the circadian rhythm. Taken together, these results characterize our newly developed reporter line for elucidating environmental or genetic modifiers of stress response signaling, which may provide insights to the neuronal mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder.

  18. The conformational dynamics of H2-H3n and S2-H6 in gating ligand entry into the buried binding cavity of vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Wei-Ven; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of holo vitamin D receptor (VDR) revealed a canonical conformation in which the ligand is entrapped in a hydrophobic cavity buried in the ligand-binding domain (LBD). The mousetrap model postulates that helix 12 is positioned away from the domain to expose the interior cavity. However, the extended form of helix 12 is likely due to artifacts during crystallization. In this study, we set out to investigate conformational dynamics of apo VDR using molecular dynamics simulation on microsecond timescale. Here we show the neighboring backbones of helix 2-helix 3n and beta strand 2-helix 6 of LBD, instead of the helix 12, undergo large-scale motion, possibly gating the entrance of ligand to the ligand binding domain. Docking analysis to the simulated open structure of VDR with the estimated free energy of −37.0 kJ/mol, would emphasise the role of H2-H3n and S2-H6 in facilitating the entrance of calcitriol to the LBD of VDR. PMID:27786277

  19. Orvinols with Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonist Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [35S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile. PMID:23438330

  20. Orvinols with mixed kappa/mu opioid receptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Greedy, Benjamin M; Bradbury, Faye; Thomas, Mark P; Grivas, Konstantinos; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Archambeau, Ashley; Bosse, Kelly; Clark, Mary J; Aceto, Mario; Lewis, John W; Traynor, John R; Husbands, Stephen M

    2013-04-25

    Dual-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist and mu opioid receptor (MOR) partial agonist ligands have been put forward as potential treatment agents for cocaine and other psychostimulant abuse. Members of the orvinol series of ligands are known for their high binding affinity to both KOR and MOR, but efficacy at the individual receptors has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, it is shown that a predictive model for efficacy at KOR can be derived, with efficacy being controlled by the length of the group attached to C20 and by the introduction of branching into the side chain. In vivo evaluation of two ligands with the desired in vitro profile confirms both display KOR, and to a lesser extent MOR, activity in an analgesic assay suggesting that, in this series, in vitro measures of efficacy using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay are predictive of the in vivo profile.

  1. Membrane-induced helical conformation of an active candidacidal fragment of salivary histatins.

    PubMed

    Raj, P A; Soni, S D; Levine, M J

    1994-04-01

    The conformational preference of the candidacidal C-terminal 16 residue fragment (9-24; G-Y-K-R-K-F-H-E-K-H-H-S-H-R-G-Y) of salivary histatin 5 was examined in water, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions using 500 MHz two-dimensional-NMR. Fourier transform infrared and CD spectroscopy were used to delineate its membrane-bound conformation in lipid vesicles. The peptide backbone and side-chain proton resonance assignments were accomplished by two-dimensional total correlated and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectra. The coupling constant (JNH-C alpha H) values determined from the double quantum-filtered correlated spectra, temperature coefficients of NH chemical shifts (d delta/dT), 1H/2H exchange rates on amide resonances, and the set of NOE connectivities were used to delineate backbone conformational features. The high JNH-C alpha H values (> or = 7.4 Hz), absence of any characteristic NH-NH (i, i + 1) or C alpha H-C beta H (i, i + 3) NOE connectivities, high d delta/dT values (> or = 0.004), and the fast 1H/2H amide exchange suggest that the histatin peptide favors unfolded random conformations in aqueous solution at pH 3.8. In contrast, the JNH-C alpha H values (< or = 6.5 Hz), slow 1H/2H exchange, low d delta/dT values (< or = 0.003) observed for amide resonances of residues 5-16, and the characteristic NH-NH (i, i + 1), C alpha H-C beta H (i, i + 3) NOE connectivities, provide evidence for the presence of largely alpha-helical conformations in dimethyl sulfoxide, which mimics the polar aprotic membrane environment. In methanolic solutions, 3(10)-helical conformations could exist as a minor population together with the major alpha-helical conformations. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and CD data indicate that lipid environments such as dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles could induce the peptide to fold into predominantly alpha-helical conformation. The results suggest that in dimethyl sulfoxide and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles

  2. Interaction of receptor-activity-modifying protein1 with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Thomas H; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Schwerdtfeger, Kerstin; Kleinert, Peter; Troxler, Heinz; Kelm, Jens M; Ittner, Lars M; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 is an accessory protein of the G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). The CLR/RAMP1 heterodimer defines a receptor for the potent vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide. A wider tissue distribution of RAMP1, as compared to that of the CLR, is consistent with additional biological functions. Here, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments identified beta-tubulin as a novel RAMP1-interacting protein. GST pull-down experiments indicated interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the interaction between the N-terminal region of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Interestingly, alpha-tubulin was co-extracted with beta-tubulin in pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation of RAMP1 coprecipitated alpha- and beta-tubulin. Confocal microscopy indicated colocalization of RAMP1 and tubulin predominantly in axon-like processes of neuronal differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, the findings point to biological roles of RAMP1 beyond its established interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17493758

  3. Investigation of the N-substituent conformation governing potency and mu receptor subtype-selectivity in (+)-(3R, 4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonists.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J B; Mascarella, S W; Rothman, R B; Partilla, J S; Xu, H; McCullough, K B; Dersch, C M; Cantrell, B E; Zimmerman, D M; Carroll, F I

    1998-05-21

    A study of the binding site requirements associated with the N-substituent of (+)-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine (4) derivatives was undertaken using a set of rigid vs flexible N-substituents. The study showed that compounds 7-9 bearing the trans-cinnamyl N-substituent most closely reproduced the potency at the opioid receptor of the flexible N-propylphenyl or N-propylcyclohexyl analogues previously reported. Neither the N-substituted cis-cinnamyl nor the cis-phenylcyclopropylmethyl compounds 10 and 11, respectively, showed high affinity for the opioid receptor. However, the N-trans-phenylcyclopropylmethyl compound 12 closely approximated the affinity of compounds 7-9. Additionally, we found that free rotation of the phenyl ring is necessary for high affinity binding and mu receptor subtype selectivity as the planar N-substituted thianaphthylmethyl and benzofuranylmethyl compounds 13 and 14 had significantly lower binding affinities. Altogether, these findings suggest that the high binding affinity, selectivity, and antagonist potency of N-propylphenyl or N-propylcyclohexyl analogues of (+)-(3R, 4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine (4) are achieved via a conformation wherein the connecting chain of the N-substituents is extended away from piperidine nitrogen with the appended ring system rotated out-of-plane relative to the connecting chain atoms. This conformation is quite similar to that observed in the solid state for 5, as determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Additionally, it was found that, unlike naltrexone, N-substituents bearing secondary carbons attached directly to the piperidine nitrogen of 4 suffer dramatic losses of potency vs analogues not substituted in this manner. Using a functional assay which measured stimulation or inhibition of [35S]GTP-gamma-S binding, we show that the trans-cinnamyl analogues of (+)-(3R, 4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine (4) retain opioid pure antagonist activity and possess picomolar

  4. Conformationally selective RNA aptamers allosterically modulate the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Kahsai, Alem W; Wisler, James W; Lee, Jungmin; Ahn, Seungkirl; Cahill Iii, Thomas J; Dennison, S Moses; Staus, Dean P; Thomsen, Alex R B; Anasti, Kara M; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wingler, Laura M; Desai, Hemant; Bompiani, Kristin M; Strachan, Ryan T; Qin, Xiaoxia; Alam, S Munir; Sullenger, Bruce A; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands function by stabilizing multiple, functionally distinct receptor conformations. This property underlies the ability of 'biased agonists' to activate specific subsets of a given receptor's signaling profile. However, stabilizing distinct active GPCR conformations to enable structural characterization of mechanisms underlying GPCR activation remains difficult. These challenges have accentuated the need for receptor tools that allosterically stabilize and regulate receptor function through unique, previously unappreciated mechanisms. Here, using a highly diverse RNA library combined with advanced selection strategies involving state-of-the-art next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, we identify RNA aptamers that bind a prototypical GPCR, the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR). Using biochemical, pharmacological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that these aptamers bind with nanomolar affinity at defined surfaces of the receptor, allosterically stabilizing active, inactive, and ligand-specific receptor conformations. The discovery of RNA aptamers as allosteric GPCR modulators significantly expands the diversity of ligands available to study the structural and functional regulation of GPCRs. PMID:27398998

  5. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  6. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  7. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  8. Normal Activation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mutants with Disulfide Cross-links, Insertions, or Deletions in the Extracellular Juxtamembrane Region

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Abe, Takemoto; Liu, Justin K. H.; Zalivina, Irina; Hohenester, Erhard; Leitinger, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by collagen. DDR activation does not appear to occur by the common mechanism of ligand-induced receptor dimerization: the DDRs form stable noncovalent dimers in the absence of ligand, and ligand-induced autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosines is unusually slow and sustained. Here we sought to identify functionally important dimer contacts within the extracellular region of DDR1 by using cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. Cysteine substitutions close to the transmembrane domain resulted in receptors that formed covalent dimers with high efficiency, both in the absence and presence of collagen. Enforced covalent dimerization did not result in constitutive activation and did not affect the ability of collagen to induce receptor autophosphorylation. Cysteines farther away from the transmembrane domain were also cross-linked with high efficiency, but some of these mutants could no longer be activated. Furthermore, the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 tolerated large deletions as well as insertions of flexible segments, with no adverse effect on activation. These findings indicate that the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 is exceptionally flexible and does not constrain the basal or ligand-activated state of the receptor. DDR1 transmembrane signaling thus appears to occur without conformational coupling through the juxtamembrane region, but requires specific receptor interactions farther away from the cell membrane. A plausible mechanism to explain these findings is signaling by DDR1 clusters. PMID:24671415

  9. Solubilization of a functionally active platelet-activating factor receptor from rabbit platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J E; Duronio, V; Wong, S I; McNeil, M; Salari, H

    1991-01-01

    Binding of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to a specific high-affinity membrane receptor has been demonstrated in numerous cell types, but very little is known about the molecular nature of this receptor. The receptor from rabbit platelets was solubilized using CHAPS, digitonin, octyl glucoside, Nonidet P-40 or sodium cholate, either with pre-bound [3H]PAF or in the absence of ligand. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that the receptor solubilized with CHAPS, in the absence of ligand, could retain its binding activity. It migrated as a high molecular mass complex (greater than 350 kDa) on a Bio-Gel A-0.5 m gel filtration column. Binding to solubilized receptor rapidly reached an equilibrium at room temperature, but was much slower at 0 degrees C. Scatchard plots were used to calculate the number (approx. 100 per cell) and the affinity (Kd 2.5 +/- 1.4 nM) of the solubilized receptors. These values were comparable with those obtained from whole-cell binding experiments. Competition by PAF antagonists also verified that the assay was measuring PAF receptor binding activity. The presence of a protein in the receptor complex was demonstrated by heat and trypsin inactivation of binding activity. Trypsin had no effect on binding of PAF to whole cells, but was able to decrease binding activity in solubilized receptor preparations. Attempts to demonstrate the involvement of a glycoprotein by use of various lectin columns proved unsuccessful. The latter results are consistent with findings suggesting that the binding site of the PAF receptor may not be exposed at the cell surface. PMID:1654881

  10. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  11. Molecular docking studies of banana flower flavonoids as insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activators as a cure for diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ganugapati, Jayasree; Baldwa, Aashish; Lalani, Sarfaraz

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder caused due to insulin deficiency. Banana flower is a rich source of flavonoids that exhibit anti diabetic activity. Insulin receptor is a tetramer that belongs to a family of receptor tyrosine kinases. It contains two alpha subunits that form the extracellular domain and two beta subunits that constitute the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Insulin binds to the extracellular region of the receptor and causes conformational changes that lead to the activation of the tyrosine kinase. This leads to autophosphorylation, a step that is crucial in insulin signaling pathway. Hence, compounds that augment insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity would be useful in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The 3D structure of IR tyrosine kinase was obtained from PDB database. The list of flavonoids found in banana flower was obtained from USDA database. The structures of the flavonoids were obtained from NCBI Pubchem. Docking analysis of the flavonoids was performed using Autodock 4.0 and Autodock Vina. The results indicate that few of the flavonoids may be potential activators of IR tyrosine kinase. PMID:22493522

  12. Molecular docking studies of banana flower flavonoids as insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activators as a cure for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ganugapati, Jayasree; Baldwa, Aashish; Lalani, Sarfaraz

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder caused due to insulin deficiency. Banana flower is a rich source of flavonoids that exhibit anti diabetic activity. Insulin receptor is a tetramer that belongs to a family of receptor tyrosine kinases. It contains two alpha subunits that form the extracellular domain and two beta subunits that constitute the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Insulin binds to the extracellular region of the receptor and causes conformational changes that lead to the activation of the tyrosine kinase. This leads to autophosphorylation, a step that is crucial in insulin signaling pathway. Hence, compounds that augment insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity would be useful in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The 3D structure of IR tyrosine kinase was obtained from PDB database. The list of flavonoids found in banana flower was obtained from USDA database. The structures of the flavonoids were obtained from NCBI Pubchem. Docking analysis of the flavonoids was performed using Autodock 4.0 and Autodock Vina. The results indicate that few of the flavonoids may be potential activators of IR tyrosine kinase.

  13. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  14. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response.

  15. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  16. Design and synthesis of conformationally restricted inhibitors of active thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Brink, Mikael; Dahlén, Anders; Olsson, Thomas; Polla, Magnus; Svensson, Tor

    2014-04-01

    A series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-7-carboxylic acid derivatives designed as inhibitors of TAFIa has been prepared via a common hydrogenation-alkylation sequence starting from the appropriate benzimidazole and imidazopyridine system. We present a successful design strategy using a conformational restriction approach resulting in potent and selective inhibitors of TAFIa. The X-ray structure of compound 5 in complex with a H333Y/H335Q double mutant TAFI indicate that the conformational restriction is responsible for the observed potency increase. PMID:24588961

  17. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules.

  18. Small Molecule Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) Ligands That Inhibit Phosphatase Activity via Perturbation of the Tryptophan-Proline-Aspartate (WPD) Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sheriff, Steven; Beno, Brett R; Zhai, Weixu; Kostich, Walter A; McDonnell, Patricia A; Kish, Kevin; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Kiefer, Susan E; Yanchunas, Joseph; Huang, Yanling; Shi, Shuhao; Zhu, Shirong; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E; Appiah, Kingsley K; Westphal, Ryan S; O’Connell, Jonathan; Gerritz, Samuel W

    2012-11-09

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) catalyze the dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues, a process that involves a conserved tryptophan-proline-aspartate (WPD) loop in catalysis. In previously determined structures of PTPs, the WPD-loop has been observed in either an 'open' conformation or a 'closed' conformation. In the current work, X-ray structures of the catalytic domain of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) revealed a ligand-induced 'superopen' conformation not previously reported for PTPs. In the superopen conformation, the ligand acts as an apparent competitive inhibitor and binds in a small hydrophobic pocket adjacent to, but distinct from, the active site. In the open and closed WPD-loop conformations of RPTPγ, the side chain of Trp1026 partially occupies this pocket. In the superopen conformation, Trp1026 is displaced allowing a 3,4-dichlorobenzyl substituent to occupy this site. The bound ligand prevents closure of the WPD-loop over the active site and disrupts the catalytic cycle of the enzyme.

  19. ATPase active-site electrostatic interactions control the global conformation of the 100 kDa SecA translocase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dorothy M; Zheng, Haiyan; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John F

    2013-02-27

    SecA is an intensively studied mechanoenzyme that uses ATP hydrolysis to drive processive extrusion of secreted proteins through a protein-conducting channel in the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria. The ATPase motor of SecA is strongly homologous to that in DEAD-box RNA helicases. It remains unclear how local chemical events in its ATPase active site control the overall conformation of an ~100 kDa multidomain enzyme and drive protein transport. In this paper, we use biophysical methods to establish that a single electrostatic charge in the ATPase active site controls the global conformation of SecA. The enzyme undergoes an ATP-modulated endothermic conformational transition (ECT) believed to involve similar structural mechanics to the protein transport reaction. We have characterized the effects of an isosteric glutamate-to-glutamine mutation in the catalytic base, a mutation which mimics the immediate electrostatic consequences of ATP hydrolysis in the active site. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that this mutation facilitates the ECT in Escherichia coli SecA and triggers it completely in Bacillus subtilis SecA. Consistent with the substantial increase in entropy observed in the course of the ECT, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrates that it increases protein backbone dynamics in domain-domain interfaces at remote locations from the ATPase active site. The catalytic glutamate is one of ~250 charged amino acids in SecA, and yet neutralization of its side chain charge is sufficient to trigger a global order-disorder transition in this 100 kDa enzyme. The intricate network of structural interactions mediating this effect couples local electrostatic changes during ATP hydrolysis to global conformational and dynamic changes in SecA. This network forms the foundation of the allosteric mechanochemistry that efficiently harnesses the chemical energy stored in ATP to drive complex mechanical processes. PMID:23167435

  20. The ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: core sequence changes that perturb folding into the active conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, G S; Murchie, A I; Lilley, D M

    1996-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme undergoes an ion-dependent folding process into the active conformation. We find that the folding can be blocked at specific stages by changes of sequence or functionality within the core. In the the absence of added metal ions, the global structure of the hammerhead is extended, with a large angle subtended between stems I and II. No core sequence changes appear to alter this geometry, consistent with an unstructured core under these conditions. Upon addition of low concentrations of magnesium ions, the hammerhead folds by an association of stems II and III, to include a large angle between them. This stage is inhibited or altered by mutations within the oligopurine sequence lying between stems II and III, and folding is completely prevented by an A14G mutation. Further increase in magnesium ion concentration brings about a second stage of folding in the natural sequence hammerhead, involving a reorientation of stem I, which rotates around into the same direction of stem II. Because this transition occurs over the same range of magnesium ion concentration over which the hammerhead ribozyme becomes active, it is likely that the final conformation is most closely related to the active form of the structure. Magnesium ion-dependent folding into this conformation is prevented by changes at G5, notably removal of the 2'-hydroxyl group and replacement of the base by cytidine. The ability to dissect the folding process by means of sequence changes suggests that two separate ion-dependent stages are involved in the folding of the hammerhead ribozyme into the active conformation. PMID:8752086

  1. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  2. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates PXR and examined selected BPA analogues to determine whether they bind to and activate PXR. Methods: Cell-based reporter assays, in silico ligand–PXR docking studies, and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to study the interaction between BPA and PXR. We also investigated the influence of BPA and its analogues on the regulation of PXR target genes in human LS180 cells. Results: We found that BPA and several of its analogues are potent agonists for human PXR (hPXR) but do not affect mouse PXR activity. We identified key residues within hPXR’s ligand-binding pocket that constitute points of interaction with BPA. We also deduced the structural requirements of BPA analogues that activate hPXR. BPA and its analogues can also induce PXR target gene expression in human LS180 cells. Conclusions: The present study advances our understanding of the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates human PXR. Activation of PXR by BPA may explain some of the adverse effects of BPA in humans. PMID:22214767

  3. An integrative framework of the skin receptors activation: mechanoreceptors activity patterns versus "labeled lines".

    PubMed

    Zeveke, Alexander V; Efes, Ekaterina D; Polevaya, Sofia A

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents a review of electrophysiological data which indicate the integrative mechanisms of information coded in the human and animal peripheral skin receptors. The activity of the skin sensory receptors was examined by applying various natural stimuli. It was revealed that numerous identical receptors respond to various stimuli (mechanical, temperature, and pain ones), but the spike patterns of these receptors were found to be specific for each stimulus. The description of characteristic structures of spike patterns in the cutaneous nerve fibers in response to five major modalities, namely: "touch", "pain", "vibration/breath", "cold", and "heat", is being presented. The recordings of the cutaneous physical state revealed a correlation between the patterns of spatiotemporal skin deformation and the receptors activity. A rheological state of the skin can be changed either in response to external temperature variation or by the sympathetic pilomotor activation. These results indicate that the skin sensory receptors activity may be considered as an integrative process. It depends not only on the receptors themselves, but also on the changes in the surrounding tissue and on the adaptive influence of the central nervous system. A new framework for the sensory channel system related to the skin is proposed on the basis of experimental results.

  4. Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor mRNA and protein expression during development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are nuclear hormone receptors that regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis and are important in reproduction and development. PPARs are targets ofpharmaceuticals and are also activated by environmental contaminants, including ...

  5. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  6. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  7. Structural Determinants of the Transient Receptor Potential 1 (TRPV1) Channel Activation by Phospholipid Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L.; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  8. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1.

  9. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Druszczynska, Magdalena; Wlodarczyk, Marcin; Janiszewska-Drobinska, Beata; Kielnierowski, Grzegorz; Zawadzka, Joanna; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Fol, Marek; Szpakowski, Piotr; Rudnicka, Karolina; Chmiela, Magdalena; Rudnicka, Wieslawa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms. PMID:23401703

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 reporter mice reveal receptor activation sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Mari; Tucker, Ana E.; Tran, Jennifer; Bergner, Jennifer B.; Turner, Ewa M.; Proia, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the GPCR sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates key physiological processes. S1P1 activation also has been implicated in pathologic processes, including autoimmunity and inflammation; however, the in vivo sites of S1P1 activation under normal and disease conditions are unclear. Here, we describe the development of a mouse model that allows in vivo evaluation of S1P1 activation. These mice, known as S1P1 GFP signaling mice, produce a S1P1 fusion protein containing a transcription factor linked by a protease cleavage site at the C terminus as well as a β-arrestin/protease fusion protein. Activated S1P1 recruits the β-arrestin/protease, resulting in the release of the transcription factor, which stimulates the expression of a GFP reporter gene. Under normal conditions, S1P1 was activated in endothelial cells of lymphoid tissues and in cells in the marginal zone of the spleen, while administration of an S1P1 agonist promoted S1P1 activation in endothelial cells and hepatocytes. In S1P1 GFP signaling mice, LPS-mediated systemic inflammation activated S1P1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes via hematopoietically derived S1P. These data demonstrate that S1P1 GFP signaling mice can be used to evaluate S1P1 activation and S1P1-active compounds in vivo. Furthermore, this strategy could be potentially applied to any GPCR to identify sites of receptor activation during normal physiology and disease. PMID:24667638

  11. Retinal Conformation Changes Rhodopsin's Dynamic Ensemble.

    PubMed

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Romo, Tod D; Danial, Shairy Azmy; Grossfield, Alan

    2015-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are vital membrane proteins that allosterically transduce biomolecular signals across the cell membrane. However, the process by which ligand binding induces protein conformation changes is not well understood biophysically. Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim-light receptor, is a unique test case for understanding these processes because of its switch-like activity; the ligand, retinal, is bound throughout the activation cycle, switching from inverse agonist to agonist after absorbing a photon. By contrast, the ligand-free opsin is outside the activation cycle and may behave differently. We find that retinal influences rhodopsin dynamics using an ensemble of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that in aggregate contain 100 μs of sampling. Active retinal destabilizes the inactive state of the receptor, whereas the active ensemble was more structurally homogenous. By contrast, simulations of an active-like receptor without retinal present were much more heterogeneous than those containing retinal. These results suggest allosteric processes are more complicated than a ligand inducing protein conformational changes or simply capturing a shifted ensemble as outlined in classic models of allostery.

  12. N2-benzyl-N1-(1-(1-naphthyl)ethyl)-3-phenylpropane-1,2-diamines and conformationally restrained indole analogues: development of calindol as a new calcimimetic acting at the calcium sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Albane; Faure, Hélène; Petrel, Christophe; Ruat, Martial; Dauban, Philippe; Dodd, Robert H

    2004-06-21

    The synthesis and calcimimetic activities of two new families of compounds are described. The most active derivatives of the first family, N(2)-(2-chloro-(or 4-fluoro-)benzyl)-N(1)-(1-(1-naphthyl)ethyl)-3-phenylpropane-1,2-diamine (4b and 4d, respectively, tested at 10 microM) produced 98+/-6% and 95+/-4%, respectively, of the maximal stimulation of [(3)H]inositol phosphates production obtained by 10mM Ca(2+) in CHO cells expressing the rat calcium sensing receptor (CaSR). The second family of calcimimetics was obtained by conformationally restraining the compounds of type 4 to provide the 2-aminomethyl derivatives 5. One of these compounds, (R)-2-[N-(1-(1-naphthyl)ethyl)aminomethyl]indole ((R)-5a, calindol), displayed improved calcimimetic activity compared to 4b and 4d as well as stereoselectivity. In the presence of 2mM Ca(2+), calindol stimulated [(3)H]inositol phosphates accumulation with an EC(50) of 1.0+/-0.1 or 0.31+/-0.05 microM in cells expressing the rat or the human CaSR, respectively. The calcimimetic activities of these novel compounds were shown to be due to a specific interaction with the CaSR. PMID:15149704

  13. Activation of signalling by the activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Montalvo, E; Massagué, J

    1996-01-01

    Activin exerts its effects by simultaneously binding to two types of p rotein serine/threonine kinase receptors, each type existing in various isoforms. Using the ActR-IB and ActR-IIB receptor isoforms, we have investigated the mechanism of activin receptor activation. ActR-IIB are phosphoproteins with demonstrable affinity for each other. However, activin addition strongly promotes an interaction between these two proteins. Activin binds directly to ActR-IIB, and this complex associates with ActR-IB, which does not bind ligand on its own. In the resulting complex, ActR-IB becomes hyperphosphorylated, and this requires the kinase activity of ActR-IIB. Mutation of conserved serines and threonines in the GS domain, a region just upstream of the kinase domain in ActR-IB, abrogates both phosphorylation and signal propagation, suggesting that this domain contains phosphorylation sites required for signalling. ActR-IB activation can be mimicked by mutation of Thr-206 to aspartic acid, which yields a construct, ActR-IB(T206D), that signals in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the signalling activity of this mutant construct is undisturbed by overexpression of a dominant negative kinase-defective ActR-IIB construct, indicating that ActR-IB(T206D) can signal independently of ActR-IIB. The evidence suggests that ActR-IIB acts as a primary activin receptor and ActR-IB acts as a downstream transducer of activin signals. PMID:8622651

  14. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  15. Androgen receptor antagonists (antiandrogens): structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Gauthier, S; Labrie, F

    2000-02-01

    Prostate cancer, acne, seborrhea, hirsutism, and androgenic alopecia are well recognized to depend upon an excess or increased sensitivity to androgens or to be at least sensitive to androgens. It thus seems logical to use antiandrogens as therapeutic agents to prevent androgens from binding to the androgen receptor. The two predominant naturally occurring androgens are testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT is the more potent androgen in vivo and in vitro. All androgen-responsive genes are activated by androgen receptor (AR) bound to either T or DHT and it is believed that AR is more transcriptionally active when bound to DHT than T. The two classes of antiandrogens, presently available, are the steroidal derivatives, all of which possess mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities, and the pure non-steroidal antiandrogens of the class of flutamide and its derivatives. The intrinsic androgenic, estrogenic and glucocorticoid activities of steroidal derivatives have limited their use in the treatment of prostate cancer. The non-steroidal flutamide and its derivatives display pure antiandrogenic activity, without exerting agonistic or any other hormonal activity. Flutamide (89) and its derivatives, Casodex (108) and Anandron (114), are highly effective in the treatment of prostate cancer. The combination of flutamide and Anandron with castration has shown prolongation of life in prostate cancer. Furthermore, combined androgen blockade in association with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very effective in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Such an approach certainly raises the hope of a further improvement in prostate cancer therapy. However, all antiandrogens, developed so-far display moderate affinity for the androgen receptor, and thus moderate efficacy in vitro and in vivo. There is thus a need for next-generation antiandrogens, which could display an equal or even higher affinity for AR compared to the natural androgens, and at the

  16. GRK2 Constitutively Governs Peripheral Delta Opioid Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Allison Doyle; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2016-09-01

    Opioids remain the standard for analgesic care; however, adverse effects of systemic treatments contraindicate long-term administration. While most clinical opioids target mu opioid receptors (MOR), those that target the delta class (DOR) also demonstrate analgesic efficacy. Furthermore, peripherally restrictive opioids represent an attractive direction for analgesia. However, opioid receptors including DOR are analgesically incompetent in the absence of inflammation. Here, we report that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) naively associates with plasma membrane DOR in peripheral sensory neurons to inhibit analgesic agonist efficacy. This interaction prevents optimal Gβ subunit association with the receptor, thereby reducing DOR activity. Importantly, bradykinin stimulates GRK2 movement away from DOR and onto Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP). protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent RKIP phosphorylation induces GRK2 sequestration, restoring DOR functionality in sensory neurons. Together, these results expand the known function of GRK2, identifying a non-internalizing role to maintain peripheral DOR in an analgesically incompetent state. PMID:27568556

  17. Ultrastructural and biochemical analysis of fibrinogen receptors on activated thrombocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present studies have been concerned with the role of fibrinogen and its receptor, GP IIb/IIIa, during the activation and early aggregation of pigeon thrombocytes. Thrombocytes were surface labeled with {sup 125}I then separated on SDS-PAGE. Analysis by gel autoradiography revealed major bands at MW 145 kd and 98 kd, which corresponded to human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Immunologic similarity of the pigeon and human receptor components was established by dot blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies directed against human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Pigeon fibrinogen, isolated by plasma precipitation with PEG-1000 and purified over Sepharose 4B, was used to study receptor-ligand interaction. Separation of pigeon fibrinogen on SDS-PAGE resulted in three peptides having apparent MW of 62kd, 55kd, and 47kd which are comparable to human fibrinogen. Further similarity of human and pigeon fibrinogen was verified by immonodiffusion against an antibody specific for the human protein. The role of fibrinogen and its receptor in thrombocyte function was established by turbidimetric aggregation using thrombin as an agonist under conditions requiring Ca++ and fibrinogen.

  18. Solution conformation of alpha-conotoxin GIC, a novel potent antagonist of alpha3beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Olivera, Baldomero M; McIntosh, J Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-conotoxin GIC is a 16-residue peptide isolated from the venom of the cone snail Conus geographus. Alpha-conotoxin GIC potently blocks the alpha3beta2 subtype of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, showing a high selectivity for neuronal versus muscle subtype [McIntosh, Dowell, Watkins, Garrett, Yoshikami, and Olivera (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 33610-33615]. We have now determined the three-dimensional solution structure of alpha-conotoxin GIC by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of alpha-conotoxin GIC is well defined with backbone and heavy atom root mean square deviations (residues 2-16) of 0.53 A and 0.96 A respectively. Structure and surface comparison of alpha-conotoxin GIC with the other alpha4/7 subfamily conotoxins reveals unique structural aspects of alpha-conotoxin GIC. In particular, the structural comparison between alpha-conotoxins GIC and MII indicates molecular features that may confer their similar receptor specificity profile, as well as those that provide the unique binding characteristics of alpha-conotoxin GIC. PMID:14992691

  19. Liver X Receptor β and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ regulate cholesterol transport in cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuefeng; Jung, Dongju; Webb, Paul; Zhang, Aijun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Lifei; Ayers, Stephen D.; Gabbi, Chiara; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Alpini, Gianfranco; Moore, David D.; LeSage, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) play crucial roles in regulation of hepatic cholesterol synthesis, metabolism and conversion to bile acids, but their actions in cholangiocytes have not been examined. In this study, we investigated the roles of NRs in cholangiocyte physiology and cholesterol metabolism and flux. We examined the expression of NRs and other genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in freshly isolated and cultured rodent cholangiocytes and found that these cells express a specific subset of NRs which includes Liver X Receptor β (LXRβ) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ (PPARδ). Activation of LXRβ and/or PPARδ in cholangiocytes induces ATP-binding cassette cholesterol transporter A1 (ABCA1) and increases cholesterol export at the basolateral compartment in polarized cultured cholangiocytes. In addition, PPARδ induces Niemann Pick C1 Like L1 (NPC1L1), which imports cholesterol into cholangiocytes and is expressed on the apical cholangiocyte membrane, via specific interaction with a PPRE within the NPC1L1 promoter. Based on these studies, we propose that (i) LXRβ and PPARδ coordinate NPC1L1/ABCA1 dependent vectorial cholesterol flux from bile through cholangiocytes and (ii) manipulation of these processes may influence bile composition with important applications in cholestatic liver disease and gallstone disease, serious health concerns for humans. PMID:22729460

  20. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation it