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Sample records for active receptor conformations

  1. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  2. The biologically active conformations of ligand CCK B receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Kuznetsova, Nina B.; Schulgin, Sergey V.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Sinyakov, Valeriy V.; Kovtun, Viktor A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed literature data about structures of ligands of CCK B receptor. The structure of the binding site (fragments of the third extracellular loop and the seventh transmembrane helix of CCK B receptor) was determined recently by experiments. We were finding presumable biologically active conformations (BAC) of the ligands by two methods. One of them is based on the fact that the most stable conformations of the biologically active peptide on the phase interface "water-lipophilic medium" are often similar to the BAC. Another method is based on the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure. We used Monte-Carlo method with the fixed geometry of the receptor and the optimized geometry of tetrapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-4). It has been shown, that the first method should be used to find BAC of antagonists of CCK B receptor. The strategy of the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure can be used for the designing of peptide agonists of CCK B receptor.

  3. Propagation of conformational changes during μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sounier, Rémy; Mas, Camille; Steyaert, Jan; Laeremans, Toon; Manglik, Aashish; Huang, Weijiao; Kobilka, Brian; Déméné, Héléne; Granier, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptors (μOR) are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by a structurally diverse spectrum of natural and synthetic agonists including endogenous endorphin peptides, morphine and methadone. The recent structures of the μOR in inactive1 and agonist-induced active states (companion article) provide snapshots of the receptor at the beginning and end of a signaling event, but little is known about the dynamic sequence of events that span these two states. Here we report the use of solution-state NMR to examine the process of μOR activation. We obtained spectra of the μOR in the absence of ligand, and in the presence of the high-affinity agonist BU72 alone, or with BU72 and a G protein mimetic nanobody. Our results show that conformational changes in transmembrane segments (TM) 5 and 6, which are required for the full engagement of a G protein, are almost completely dependent on the presence of both the agonist and the G protein mimetic nanobody revealing a weak allosteric coupling between the agonist binding pocket and the G protein coupling interface (TM5 and TM6) similar to what has been observed for the β2-adrenergic receptor2. Unexpectedly, in the presence of agonist alone, we observe larger spectral changes involving intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) and helix 8 (H8), when compared to changes in TM5 and TM6. These results suggest that one or both of these domains may play a role in the initial interaction with the G protein, and that TM5 and TM6 are only engaged later in the process of complex formation. The initial interactions between the G protein and ICL1 and/or H8 may play a role in G protein coupling specificity as has been suggested for other family A GPCRs. PMID:26245377

  4. Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Libin; Van Eps, Ned; Zimmer, Marco; Ernst, Oliver P; Prosser, R Scott

    2016-05-12

    Conformational selection and induced fit are two prevailing mechanisms to explain the molecular basis for ligand-based activation of receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets. A molecular understanding of their activation mechanism is critical for drug discovery and design. However, direct evidence that addresses how agonist binding leads to the formation of an active receptor state is scarce. Here we use (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance to quantify the conformational landscape occupied by the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), a prototypical class A G-protein-coupled receptor. We find an ensemble of four states in equilibrium: (1) two inactive states in millisecond exchange, consistent with a formed (state S1) and a broken (state S2) salt bridge (known as 'ionic lock') between transmembrane helices 3 and 6; and (2) two active states, S3 and S3', as identified by binding of a G-protein-derived peptide. In contrast to a recent study of the β2-adrenergic receptor, the present approach allowed identification of a second active state for A2AR. Addition of inverse agonist (ZM241385) increases the population of the inactive states, while full agonists (UK432097 or NECA) stabilize the active state, S3', in a manner consistent with conformational selection. In contrast, partial agonist (LUF5834) and an allosteric modulator (HMA) exclusively increase the population of the S3 state. Thus, partial agonism is achieved here by conformational selection of a distinct active state which we predict will have compromised coupling to the G protein. Direct observation of the conformational equilibria of ligand-dependent G-protein-coupled receptor and deduction of the underlying mechanisms of receptor activation will have wide-reaching implications for our understanding of the function of G-protein-coupled receptor in health and disease. PMID:27144352

  5. The Importance of Odorant Conformation to the Binding and Activation of a Representative Olfactory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Peterlin, Zita; Li, Yadi; Sun, Guangxing; Shah, Rohan; Firestein, Stuart; Ryan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory receptors (ORs) form a large family of G-protein coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs) responsible for sensing the ambient chemical environment. The molecular recognition strategies used by ORs to detect and distinguish odorant molecules are unclear. Here, we investigated the variable of odorant carbon chain conformation for an established odorant-OR pair: n-octanal and rat OR-I7. A series of conformationally restricted octanal mimics were tested on live olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Our results support a model in which unactivated OR-I7 binds aliphatic aldehydes indiscriminately, and then applies conformational and length filters to distinguish agonists from antagonists. Specific conformers are proposed to activate OR-I7 by steric buttressing of an OR activation pocket. Probing endogenously expressed rat OSNs with octanal and constrained mimics furnished evidence that odorant conformation contributes to an odorant’s unique olfactory code signature. PMID:19101476

  6. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%), the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%), the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86%) and 8/9 (89%) for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71%) and 7/9 (78%) for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by photochemical isomerization

  7. Activation and conformational dynamics of a class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Jixue; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2016-05-14

    The human glucagon receptor (GCGR) is a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The GCGR can be activated by glucagon and regulates the release of glucose. The GCGR has been proposed to be an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Based on the structural model of a full-length glucagon-bound GCGR (glu-GCGR), we performed accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, potential of mean force (PMF) calculations, cross-correlation analysis and community network analysis to study the activation mechanism and the conformational dynamics during the activation process. The PMF map depicts three different conformational states of the GCGR: the inactive, intermediate and active states. The activation of the GCGR is characterized by the outward movement of the intracellular side of helix VI. In the active state of the GCGR, the Arg173(2.46)-Ser350(6.41) and Glu245(3.50)-Thr351(6.42) hydrogen bonds break, and the χ1 rotamer of Phe322(5.54) changes from perpendicular to parallel to helix VI. The binding of the agonist glucagon decreases the correlated motions of the extracellular loops (ELCs) and the helices around the glucagon-binding site. During the activation of the GCGR, the connections between the intracellular sides of helices become weaker, and the connections between glucagon and ECLs and the extracellular sides of helices become stronger. These facilitate G-protein coupling on the intracellular side and glucagon binding on the extracellular side, and stabilize the GCGR in the active state. We expect that this study can provide useful information on the activation mechanism of the GCGR and facilitate the future design of GCGR inhibitors. PMID:27094704

  8. The conformation and activity relationship of benzofuran type of angiotensin II receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S E; Kim, S K; Lee, S H; Kim, N J; Lee, D W

    2000-09-01

    As a continuing effort to establish the structure and activity relationship in a benzofuran type of angiotensin II antagonist, we synthesized various regioisomers and performed a series of QSAR analyses. The conformational analyses of target isomers were carried out using molecular mechanics and fine-tuned using the information from the NMR NOE experiment. The conformations of compounds with a good binding activity are quite similar to that of DuP753, a prototype of AII antagonist, suggesting that these compounds also bind to the same site of AII receptor. We then studied the compounds with a varied length of the hydroxyl group bearing side chain to find out the optimum distance between the hydroxyl group and the imidazole ring. The CoMFA with these compounds gave acceptable statistical measures (cross-validated r2 and conventional r2 to be 0.881 and 0.974, respectively) and the map was well consistent with the previously proposed pharmacophore. PMID:11026543

  9. Potent and selective activation of abscisic acid receptors in vivo by mutational stabilization of their agonist-bound conformation

    PubMed Central

    Mosquna, Assaf; Peterson, Francis C.; Park, Sang-Youl; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrabactin resistance (PYR) 1 and its relatives belong to a family of soluble abscisic acid (ABA) receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) when in their agonist-stabilized conformation. Given their switch-like properties, we envisioned that mutations that stabilize their agonist-bound conformation could be used to activate signaling in vivo. To identify such mutations, we subjected PYR1 to site-saturation mutagenesis at 39 highly conserved residues that participate in ABA or PP2C contacts. All 741 possible single amino acid substitutions at these sites were tested to identify variants that increase basal PYR1-PP2C interactions, which uncovered activating mutations in 10 residues that preferentially cluster in PYR1's gate loop and C-terminal helix. The mutations cause measurable but incomplete receptor activation in vitro; however, specific triple and quadruple mutant combinations were constructed that promote an agonist-bound conformation, as measured by heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, and lead to full receptor activation. Moreover, these mutations retain functionality when introduced into divergent family members, and can therefore be used to dissect individual receptor function in vivo, which has been problematic because of redundancy and family size. Expression of activated PYL2 in Arabidopsis seeds activates ABA signaling by a number of measures: modulation of ABA-regulated gene expression, induction of hyperdormancy, and suppression of ABA deficiency phenotypes in the aba2-1 mutant. Our results set the stage for systematic gain-of-function studies of PYR1 and related ABA receptors and reveal that, despite the large number of receptors, activation of a single receptor is sufficient to activate signaling in planta. PMID:22139369

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Dimerization and Activation Require Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes in the Dimer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jessica P.; Berger, Mitchell B.; Lin, Chun-Chi; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemmon, Mark A.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies have shown that ligand-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) dimerization involves major domain rearrangements that expose a critical dimerization arm. However, simply exposing this arm is not sufficient for receptor dimerization, suggesting that additional ligand-induced dimer contacts are required. To map these contributions to the dimer interface, we individually mutated each contact suggested by crystallographic studies and analyzed the effects on receptor dimerization, activation, and ligand binding. We find that domain II contributes >90% of the driving energy for dimerization of the extracellular region, with domain IV adding little. Within domain II, the dimerization arm forms much of the dimer interface, as expected. However, a loop from the sixth disulfide-bonded module (immediately C-terminal to the dimerization arm) also makes a critical contribution. Specific ligand-induced conformational changes in domain II are required for this loop to contribute to receptor dimerization, and we identify a set of ligand-induced intramolecular interactions that appear to be important in driving these changes, effectively “buttressing” the dimer interface. Our data also suggest that similar conformational changes may determine the specificity of ErbB receptor homo- versus heterodimerization. PMID:16107719

  11. Conformational Dynamics of Kir3.1/Kir3.2 Channel Activation Via δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Nagi, Karim; Audet, Nicolas; Sleno, Rory; Amraei, Mohammad; Hogue, Mireille; Balboni, Gianfranco; Schiller, Peter W.; Bouvier, Michel; Hébert, Terence E.; Pineyro, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed how conformational information encoded by ligand binding to δ-opioid receptors (DORs) is transmitted to Kir3.1/Kir3.2 channels. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were transfected with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) donor/acceptor pairs that allowed us to evaluate independently reciprocal interactions among signaling partners. These and coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that DORs, Gβγ, and Kir3 subunits constitutively interacted with one another. GαoA associated with DORs and Gβγ, but despite being part of the complex, no evidence of its direct association with the channel was obtained. DOR activation by different ligands left DOR-Kir3 interactions unmodified but modulated BRET between DOR-GαoA, DOR-Gβγ, GαoA-Gβγ, and Gβγ-Kir3 interfaces. Ligand-induced BRET changes assessing Gβγ-Kir3.1 subunit interaction 1) followed similar kinetics to those monitoring the GαoA-Gβγ interface, 2) displayed the same order of efficacy as those observed at the DOR-Gβγ interface, 3) were sensitive to pertussis toxin, and 4) were predictive of whether a ligand could evoke channel currents. Conformational changes at the Gβγ/Kir3 interface were lost when Kir3.1 subunits were replaced by a mutant lacking essential sites for Gβγ-mediated activation. Thus, conformational information encoded by agonist binding to the receptor is relayed to the channel via structural rearrangements that involve repositioning of Gβγ with respect to DORs, GαoA, and channel subunits. Further, the fact that BRET changes at the Gβγ-Kir3 interface are predictive of a ligand’s ability to induce channel currents points to these conformational biosensors as screening tools for identifying GPCR ligands that induce Kir3 channel activation. PMID:23175530

  12. Conformational Restriction Leading to a Selective CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist Orally Active Against Colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The CB2 cannabinoid receptor has been implicated in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Following on from the promising activity of a series of 4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide, we developed constrained analogues based on a 2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one scaffold, with improved affinity for the hCB2 receptor and had very high selectivity over the hCB1 receptor. Importantly, the lead of this series (26, hCB2: Ki = 0.39 nM, hCB1: Ki > 3000 nM) was found to protect mice against experimental colitis after oral administration. PMID:25699149

  13. Structure-activity relationship of ibogaine analogs interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2011-09-01

    The interaction of ibogaine analogs with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that ibogaine analogs: (a) inhibit (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca²⁺ influx in human embryonic muscle AChRs with the following potency sequence (IC(50) in μM): (±)-18-methylaminocoronaridine (5.9±0.3)∼(±)-18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) (6.8±0.8)>(-)-ibogaine (17±3)∼(+)-catharanthine (20±1)>(±)-albifloranine (46±13), (b) bind to the [³H]TCP binding site with higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to that in the resting state. Similar results were obtained using [³H]18-MC. These and docking results suggest a steric interaction between TCP and ibogaine analogs for the same site, (c) enhance [³H]cytisine binding to resting but not to desensitized AChRs, with desensitizing potencies (apparent EC₅₀) that correlate very well with the pK(i) values in the desensitized state, and (d) there are good bilinear correlations between the ligand molecular volumes and their affinities in the desensitized and resting states, with an optimal volume of ∼345 ų for the ibogaine site. These results indicate that the size of the binding sites for ibogaine analogs, located between the serine and nonpolar rings and shared with TCP, is an important structural feature for binding and for inducing desensitization. PMID:21642011

  14. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  15. Difference and Influence of Inactive and Active States of Cannabinoid Receptor Subtype CB2: From Conformation to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Feng, Zhiwei; Ma, Shifan; Zhang, Yu; Tong, Qin; Alqarni, Mohammed Hamed; Gou, Xiaojun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-06-27

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain, osteoporosis, immune system, cancer, and drug abuse. The lack of an experimental three-dimensional CB2 structure has hindered not only the development of studies of conformational differences between the inactive and active CB2 but also the rational discovery of novel functional compounds targeting CB2. In this work, we constructed models of both inactive and active CB2 by homology modeling. Then we conducted two comparative 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the two systems-the active CB2 bound with both the agonist and G protein and the inactive CB2 bound with inverse agonist-to analyze the conformational difference of CB2 proteins and the key residues involved in molecular recognition. Our results showed that the inactive CB2 and the inverse agonist remained stable during the MD simulation. However, during the MD simulations, we observed dynamical details about the breakdown of the "ionic lock" between R131(3.50) and D240(6.30) as well as the outward/inward movements of transmembrane domains of the active CB2 that bind with G proteins and agonist (TM5, TM6, and TM7). All of these results are congruent with the experimental data and recent reports. Moreover, our results indicate that W258(6.48) in TM6 and residues in TM4 (V164(4.56)-L169(4.61)) contribute greatly to the binding of the agonist on the basis of the binding energy decomposition, while residues S180-F183 in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) may be of importance in recognition of the inverse agonist. Furthermore, pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening were carried out for the inactive and active CB2 models in parallel. Among all 10 hits, two compounds exhibited novel scaffolds and can be used as novel chemical probes for future studies of CB2. Importantly, our studies show that the hits obtained from the inactive CB2 model mainly act as inverse agonist(s) or neutral

  16. Changes to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor extracellular loops differentially affect GnRH analog binding and activation: evidence for distinct ligand-stabilized receptor conformations.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, Kevin D G; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P

    2008-06-01

    GnRH and its structural variants bind to GnRH receptors from different species with different affinities and specificities. By investigating chimeric receptors that combine regions of mammalian and nonmammalian GnRH receptors, a greater understanding of how different domains influence ligand binding and receptor activation can be achieved. Using human-catfish and human-chicken chimeric receptors, we demonstrate the importance of extracellular loop conformation for ligand binding and agonist potency, providing further evidence for GnRH and GnRH II stabilization of distinct active receptor conformations. We demonstrate examples of GnRH receptor gain-of-function mutations that apparently improve agonist potency independently of affinity, implicating a role for extracellular loops in stabilizing the inactive receptor conformation. We also show that entire extracellular loop substitution can overcome the detrimental effects of localized mutations, thereby demonstrating the importance of considering the conformation of entire domains when drawing conclusions from point-mutation studies. Finally, we present evidence implicating the configuration of extracellular loops 2 and 3 in combination differentiating GnRH analog binding modes. Because there are two endogenous forms of GnRH ligand but only one functional form of full-length GnRH receptor in humans, understanding how GnRH and GnRH II can elicit distinct functional effects through the same receptor is likely to provide important insights into how these ligands can have differential effects in both physiological and pathological situations. PMID:18356273

  17. Modulation of Constitutive Activity and Signaling Bias of the Ghrelin Receptor by Conformational Constraint in the Second Extracellular Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Mokrosiński, Jacek; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Schwartz, Thue W.; Holst, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Based on a rare, natural Glu for Ala-204(C+6) variant located six residues after the conserved Cys residue in extracellular loop 2b (ECL2b) associated with selective elimination of the high constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor, this loop was subjected to a detailed structure functional analysis. Introduction of Glu in different positions demonstrated that although the constitutive signaling was partly reduced when introduced in position 205(C+7) it was only totally eliminated in position 204(C+6). No charge-charge interaction partner could be identified for the Glu(C+6) variant despite mutational analysis of a number of potential partners in the extracellular loops and outer parts of the transmembrane segments. Systematic probing of position 204(C+6) with amino acid residues of different physicochemical properties indicated that a positively charged Lys surprisingly provided phenotypes similar to those of the negatively charged Glu residue. Computational chemistry analysis indicated that the propensity for the C-terminal segment of extracellular loop 2b to form an extended α-helix was increased from 15% in the wild type to 89 and 82% by introduction in position 204(C+6) of a Glu or a Lys residue, respectively. Moreover, the constitutive activity of the receptor was inhibited by Zn2+ binding in an engineered metal ion site, stabilizing an α-helical conformation of this loop segment. It is concluded that the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor is dependent upon flexibility in the C-terminal segment of extracellular loop 2 and that mutations or ligand binding that constrains this segment and thereby conceivably the movements of transmembrane domain V relative to transmembrane domain III inhibits the high constitutive signaling. PMID:22846991

  18. Monitoring Conformational Changes in the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EGFR.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christian; Öcal, Sinan; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Keul, Marina; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rauh, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR is regulated by complex conformational changes, and this conformational control is disturbed in certain types of cancer. Many ligands are known to bind EGFR in its active conformation, thereby preventing ATP from binding. Only a few ligands are known to stabilize EGFR in its inactive conformation, thus providing novel strategies for perturbing EGFR activity. We report a direct binding assay that enables the identification of novel ligands that bind to and stabilize the inactive conformation of EGFR. PMID:26991964

  19. Ligand-Dependent Conformations and Dynamics of the Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Determine Its Activation and Membrane-Driven Oligomerization Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jufang; Khelashvili, George; Mondal, Sayan; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    2012-01-01

    From computational simulations of a serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) model complexed with pharmacologically and structurally diverse ligands we identify different conformational states and dynamics adopted by the receptor bound to the full agonist 5-HT, the partial agonist LSD, and the inverse agonist Ketanserin. The results from the unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the three ligands affect differently the known GPCR activation elements including the toggle switch at W6.48, the changes in the ionic lock between E6.30 and R3.50 of the DRY motif in TM3, and the dynamics of the NPxxY motif in TM7. The computational results uncover a sequence of steps connecting these experimentally-identified elements of GPCR activation. The differences among the properties of the receptor molecule interacting with the ligands correlate with their distinct pharmacological properties. Combining these results with quantitative analysis of membrane deformation obtained with our new method (Mondal et al, Biophysical Journal 2011), we show that distinct conformational rearrangements produced by the three ligands also elicit different responses in the surrounding membrane. The differential reorganization of the receptor environment is reflected in (i)-the involvement of cholesterol in the activation of the 5-HT2AR, and (ii)-different extents and patterns of membrane deformations. These findings are discussed in the context of their likely functional consequences and a predicted mechanism of ligand-specific GPCR oligomerization. PMID:22532793

  20. Exposure of MC4R to agonist in the endoplasmic reticulum stabilizes an active conformation of the receptor that does not desensitize

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Susana; Molden, Brent M.; Baldini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in neurons of the hypothalamus where it regulates food intake. MC4R responds to an agonist, α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and to an antagonist/inverse agonist, agouti-related peptide (AgRP), which are released by upstream neurons. Binding to α-MSH leads to stimulation of receptor activity and suppression of food intake, whereas AgRP has opposite effects. MC4R cycles constantly between the plasma membrane and endosomes and undergoes agonist-mediated desensitization by being routed to lysosomes. MC4R desensitization and increased AgRP expression are thought to decrease the effectiveness of MC4R agonists as an antiobesity treatment. In this study, α-MSH, instead of being delivered extracellularly, is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of neuronal cells and cultured hypothalamic neurons. We find that the ER-targeted agonist associates with MC4R at this location, is transported to the cell surface, induces constant cAMP and AMP kinase signaling at maximal amplitude, abolishes desensitization of the receptor, and promotes both cell-surface expression and constant signaling by an obesity-linked MC4R variant, I316S, that otherwise is retained in the ER. Formation of the MC4R/agonist complex in the ER stabilizes the receptor in an active conformation that at the cell surface is insensitive to antagonism by AgRP and at the endosomes is refractory to routing to the lysosomes. The data indicate that targeting agonists to the ER can stabilize an active conformation of a G protein-coupled receptor that does not become desensitized, suggesting a target for therapy. PMID:24248383

  1. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G protein-independent effectors upon ligand binding suggesting the existence of multiple ligand-specific active states. These active-state conformations are unstable in the absence of specific cytosolic signaling partners representing new challenges for structural biology. Camelid single chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) show promise for stabilizing active GPCR conformations and as chaperones for crystallogenesis. PMID:21782416

  2. Systematic Exploitation of Multiple Receptor Conformations for Virtual Ligand Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bottegoni, Giovanni; Rocchia, Walter; Rueda, Manuel; Abagyan, Ruben; Cavalli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The role of virtual ligand screening in modern drug discovery is to mine large chemical collections and to prioritize for experimental testing a comparatively small and diverse set of compounds with expected activity against a target. Several studies have pointed out that the performance of virtual ligand screening can be improved by taking into account receptor flexibility. Here, we systematically assess how multiple crystallographic receptor conformations, a powerful way of discretely representing protein plasticity, can be exploited in screening protocols to separate binders from non-binders. Our analyses encompass 36 targets of pharmaceutical relevance and are based on actual molecules with reported activity against those targets. The results suggest that an ensemble receptor-based protocol displays a stronger discriminating power between active and inactive molecules as compared to its standard single rigid receptor counterpart. Moreover, such a protocol can be engineered not only to enrich a higher number of active compounds, but also to enhance their chemical diversity. Finally, some clear indications can be gathered on how to select a subset of receptor conformations that is most likely to provide the best performance in a real life scenario. PMID:21625529

  3. Conformational Fluctuations in G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael F.

    2014-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise almost 50% of pharmaceutical drug targets, where rhodopsin is an important prototype and occurs naturally in a lipid membrane. Rhodopsin photoactivation entails 11-cis to all-trans isomerization of the retinal cofactor, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Two important questions are: (1) Is rhodopsin is a simple two-state switch? Or (2) does isomerization of retinal unlock an activated conformational ensemble? For an ensemble-based activation mechanism (EAM) a role for conformational fluctuations is clearly indicated. Solid-state NMR data together with theoretical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations detect increased local mobility of retinal after light activation. Resultant changes in local dynamics of the cofactor initiate large-scale fluctuations of transmembrane helices that expose recognition sites for the signal-transducing G-protein. Time-resolved FTIR studies and electronic spectroscopy further show the conformational ensemble is strongly biased by the membrane lipid composition, as well as pH and osmotic pressure. A new flexible surface model (FSM) describes how the curvature stress field of the membrane governs the energetics of active rhodopsin, due to the spontaneous monolayer curvature of the lipids. Furthermore, influences of osmotic pressure dictate that a large number of bulk water molecules are implicated in rhodopsin activation. Around 60 bulk water molecules activate rhodopsin, which is much larger than the number of structural waters seen in X-ray crystallography, or inferred from studies of bulk hydrostatic pressure. Conformational selection and promoting vibrational motions of rhodopsin lead to activation of the G-protein (transducin). Our biophysical data give a paradigm shift in understanding GPCR activation. The new view is: dynamics and conformational fluctuations involve an ensemble of substates that activate the cognate G-protein in the amplified visual

  4. Design, synthesis and biological activity of new neurohypophyseal hormones analogues conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. Highly potent OT receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ptach, Monika; Borovičková, Lenka; Slaninová, Jiřina; Lammek, Bernard; Prahl, Adam

    2012-08-01

    In this study we present the synthesis and some pharmacological properties of fourteen new analogues of neurohypophyseal hormones conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. All new peptides were substituted at position 2 with cis-1-amino-4-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Apc). Moreover, one of the new analogues: [cis-Apc(2), Val(4)]AVP was also prepared in N-acylated forms with various bulky acyl groups. All the peptides were tested for pressor, antidiuretic, and in vitro uterotonic activities. We also determined the binding affinity of the selected compounds to human OT receptor. Our results showed that introduction of cis -Apc(2) in position 2 of either AVP or OT resulted in analogues with high antioxytocin potency. Two of the new compounds, [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2)]AVP and [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP, were exceptionally potent antiuterotonic agents (pA(2) = 8.46 and 8.40, respectively) and exhibited higher affinities for the human OT receptor than Atosiban (K (i) values 5.4 and 9.1 nM). Moreover, we have demonstrated for the first time that N -terminal acylation of AVP analogue can improve its selectivity. Using this approach, we obtained compound Aba[cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP (XI) which turned out to be a moderately potent and exceptionally selective OT antagonist (pA(2) = 7.26). PMID:22038179

  5. Stimulatory effects of opioid neuropeptides on locomotory activity and conformational changes in invertebrate and human immunocytes: evidence for a subtype of delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Cadet, P; Scharrer, B

    1989-08-01

    The presence of opioid neuropeptides was shown to stimulate conformational changes and locomotory activity in immunocytes of two representatives of invertebrates as well as in human leukocytes. Cells were examined by use of phase-contrast and Nomarski optics coupled with a Zeiss Axiophot microscope, and of the Zeiss Videoplan/Vidas Image Analysis system. Immunocompetent blood cells, activated by exogenous opioids or stressful stimuli presumed to engage endogenous opioids, showed flattening, elongation, and formation of pseudopodia. In the mollusc Mytilus edulis, ameboid movements resulted in the formation of cell clusters, an activity not observed in untreated controls, or in immunocytes simultaneously exposed to opioid and naloxone. Tests with nine immunoreactive substances revealed immunocyte stimulation by delta, mu-, kappa-, and epsilon(?)-selective ligands. One of these, [D-Ala2,D-Met5]enkephalinamide (DAMA), active at a concentration of 10 pM, proved to be considerably more effective than the rest. The high pharmacological potency of DAMA, observed in both human and invertebrate immunocytes, sets this opioid apart from the closely related [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin, a discrepancy not occurring in the mammalian nervous system. This suggests a specific function for [Met]enkephalin in immunoregulation, mediated perhaps by a special subtype of delta receptor. PMID:2548205

  6. Estrogen receptor alpha somatic mutations Y537S and D538G confer breast cancer endocrine resistance by stabilizing the activating function-2 binding conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa A; Novick, Scott J; Toy, Weiyi; Green, Bradley; Panchamukhi, Srinivas; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Griffin, Patrick R; Shen, Yang; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene (ESR1), especially Y537S and D538G, have been linked to acquired resistance to endocrine therapies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that these mutants confer ERα constitutive activity and antiestrogen resistance and suggest that ligand-binding domain dysfunction leads to endocrine therapy resistance. Here, we integrate biophysical and structural biology data to reveal how these mutations lead to a constitutively active and antiestrogen-resistant ERα. We show that these mutant ERs recruit coactivator in the absence of hormone while their affinities for estrogen agonist (estradiol) and antagonist (4-hydroxytamoxifen) are reduced. Further, they confer antiestrogen resistance by altering the conformational dynamics of the loop connecting Helix 11 and Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which leads to a stabilized agonist state and an altered antagonist state that resists inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12792.001 PMID:26836308

  7. Differentiation of agonist conformation and antagonist conformation in multiple opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Yamawaki, Y; Kuroda, H; Nukina, I; Ofuji, T

    1981-12-11

    To differentiate the opiate (naloxone) receptor and the enkephalin receptor in rat brain, we solubilized the receptor molecules by detergent and determined the molecular weights by gel filtration. The receptor preparation was bound to [3H] naloxone or [3H] Met5-enkephalin, and was solubilized by Triton X-100. On gel chromatography with a Sepharose 6B column, the agonist and the antagonist conformation of opioid receptors eluted as molecules with the molecular weights of 240,000, and 120,000 and with Stokes' radii of 5.5 nm and 4.3 nm, respectively. Further, it was also disclosed that Na+ was bound to the antagonist conformation of opioid receptors but not to the agonist conformation. PMID:6275320

  8. Spacer conformation in biologically active molecules. Part 2. Structure and conformation of 4-[2-(diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine and its diphenylmethoxy analog—potential 5-HT 1A receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak-Wojciechowska, J.; Fruziński, A.; Czylkowski, R.; Paluchowska, M. H.; Mokrosz, M. J.

    2003-09-01

    As a part of studies on biologically active molecule structures with aliphatic linking chain, the structures of 4-[2-diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride ( 1) and 4-[2-diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine fumarate ( 2) have been reported. In both compounds, four atomic non-all-carbons linking chains (N)C-C-X-C are present. The conformation of that linking spacer depends on the nature of the X-atom. The preferred conformation for chain with XNH has been found to be fully extended while for that with XO—the bend one. It was confirmed by conformational calculations (strain energy distribution and random search) and crystallographic data, including statistics from CCDC.

  9. Conformational activation of visual rhodopsin in native disc membranes.

    PubMed

    Malmerberg, Erik; M Bovee-Geurts, Petra H; Katona, Gergely; Deupi, Xavier; Arnlund, David; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Johansson, Linda C; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Menzel, Andreas; de Grip, Willem J; Neutze, Richard

    2015-03-10

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that serves as a dim-light receptor for vision in vertebrates. We probed light-induced conformational changes in rhodopsin in its native membrane environment at room temperature using time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering. We observed a rapid conformational transition that is consistent with an outward tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 6 concomitant with an inward movement of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 5. These movements were considerably larger than those reported from the basis of crystal structures of activated rhodopsin, implying that light activation of rhodopsin involves a more extended conformational change than was previously suggested. PMID:25759477

  10. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  11. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:26227798

  12. Antibodies to the extracellular receptor domain restore the hormone-insensitive kinase and conformation of the mutant insulin receptor valine 382.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, C; Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Dolais-Kitabgi, J; Taylor, S; Accili, D; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-05-25

    A mutation substituting a valine for phenylalanine at residue 382 in the insulin receptor alpha-subunit has been found in two sisters with a genetic form of extreme insulin resistance. This receptor mutation impairs the ability of the hormone to activate autophosphorylation of solubilized receptors and phosphorylation of substrates (Accili, D., Mosthaf, L., Ullrich, A., and Taylor, S. I. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 434-439). We have previously demonstrated that in native receptors insulin induces a conformational change in the receptor beta-subunit, which is thought to be necessary for receptor activation (Baron, V., Gautier, N., Komoriya, A., Hainaut, P., Scimeca, J. C., Mervic, M., Lavielle, S., Dolais-Kitabgi, J., and Van Obberghen, E. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4634-4641). Hence, it was thought that a defect in this conformational change might explain the functional defect of the mutant receptor. This appears to be the case, as we demonstrate here that the mutant receptor is locked in its inactive configuration. However, we found two monoclonal antibodies, directed to the extracellular domain, which are capable of restoring the mutant receptor kinase activity. The activation of the mutant receptor was accompanied by restoration of conformational changes in the beta-subunit C terminus. From these data, we draw the two following conclusions. (i) A causal link exists between receptor kinase activation and the occurrence of conformational changes. (ii) Ligands other than insulin, such as antibodies, which perturb the extracellular domain, can function as alternative ways to restore the mutant receptor kinase. PMID:8388389

  13. Conformational nanobodies reveal tethered epidermal growth factor receptor involved in EGFR/ErbB2 predimers.

    PubMed

    Nevoltris, Damien; Lombard, Benjamin; Dupuis, Elodie; Mathis, Gérard; Chames, Patrick; Baty, Daniel

    2015-02-24

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cell-surface receptor with a single transmembrane domain and tyrosine kinase activity carried by the intracellular domain. This receptor is one of the four members of the ErbB family including ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4. Ligand binding, like EGF binding, induces a conformational rearrangement of the receptor and induces a homo/hetero dimerization essentially with ErbB family receptors that leads to the phosphorylation of the kinase domain, triggering a signaling cascade. EGFR can also form inactive dimers in a ligand-independent way through interactions between cytoplasmic domains. To date, the conformation of EGFR extracellular domain engaged in these inactive dimers remains unclear. In this study, we describe the successful selection and characterization of llama anti-EGFR nanobodies and their use as innovative conformational sensors. We isolated three different specific anti-EGFR clones binding to three distinct epitopes. Interestingly, the binding of all three nanobodies was found highly sensitive to ligand stimulation. Two nanobodies, D10 and E10, can only bind the ligand-free EGFR conformation characterized by an intramolecular tether between domains II and IV, whereas nanobody G10 binds both ligand-free and ligand activated EGFR, with an 8-fold higher affinity for the extended conformation in the presence of ligand. Here we took advantage of these conformational probes to reveal the existence of tethered EGFR in EGFR/ErbB2 predimers. These biosensors represent important tools allowing the determination of EGFR conformations and should help the design of relevant inhibitors. PMID:25603171

  14. Conformationally restrained analogs of sympathomimetic catecholamines. Synthesis, conformational analysis, and adrenergic activity of isochroman derivatives.

    PubMed

    Macchia, B; Balsamo, A; Breschi, M C; Chiellini, G; Lapucci, A; Macchia, M; Manera, C; Martinelli, A; Martini, C; Scatizzi, R

    1993-10-15

    In previous papers dealing with the study of the conformations and the biopharmacological activity of conformationally restrained analogs of sympathomimetic catecholamines (NE and ISO), proposals were advanced for the three-dimensional molecular models A, B, and C; these models provided information about the steric requirements for the direct activation of alpha 1, alpha 2,beta 1, and beta 2 adrenoceptors, respectively. The 1-(aminomethyl)-6,7-dihydroxyisochromans 11 and 12 and the 1-(aminomethyl)-5,6-dihydroxyisochromans 13 and 14 (1-AMDICs) are two different types of semirigid analogs of NE and ISO. The alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1, and beta 2 adrenergic properties of the 1-AMDICs 11-14 were evaluated in vitro, both by radioligand binding assays and by functional tests on isolated preparations, and were compared with those of their parent compounds (NE and ISO). The results of a conformational study carried out by means of both 1H NMR spectrometry and theoretical calculations indicated that, in these 1-AMDICs, the presumed active groups (aryl moiety, amine nitrogen and benzylic ethereal oxygen) are in a spatial relationship corresponding to the one found for NE and ISO in their preferred conformations, which also proved to be the pharmacophoric conformation in the models A-C. By means of a comparison of the stereostructures of the 1-AMDICs 11-14 with their biopharmacological properties, it was possible to obtain a further definition of the model B with respect to the activation of the alpha 2 adrenoceptors; the superimposition of the 1-AMDICs 11 and 12 with the molecular model C made it possible to detect an area of the beta-adrenergic receptors which might hinder the fit of adrenergic drugs that are analogs of catecholamines with these receptors. PMID:8230093

  15. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  16. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  17. PTH and PTH Antagonist Induce Different Conformational Changes in the PTHR1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Beena E.; Sharma, Sandhya; Mierke, Dale F.; Rosenblatt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of ligands with their specific receptors is accompanied by conformational shifts culminating in receptor activation and expression of hormonal activity. Using an engineered disulfide bond formation strategy, we characterized the relative conformational changes taking place within the PTH type 1 receptor (PTHR1) at the interface of transmembrane (TM)5 and TM6 on binding the PTH agonist, PTH(1-34), compared with the antagonist PTH(7-34). Cysteines were singly incorporated into a portion of the extracellular-facing region of TM5 (365–370), while simultaneously a second cysteine was introduced at position 420, 423, or 425 at the extracellular end of TM6, leading to a total of 18 double cysteine-containing PTHR1 mutants. All mutants, except P366C/V423C and P366C/M425C, were expressed in the cell membrane preparations. In the presence of agonist, H420C and M425C in TM6 formed disulfide bonds with all and with most, respectively, of the substituted cysteines incorporated in TM5. In contrast to the conformational shift induced (or stabilized) by agonist in activating the receptor, antagonist binding produced no detectable change from the basal (inactive) conformation of PTHR1. Our studies provide physicochemical evidence that the extracellular-facing ligand binding regions of receptor, TM5 and TM6, are dynamic and move relative to each other on ligand binding. The distinct differences in receptor conformation induced (or stabilized) by agonist PTH(1-34) compared with antagonist PTH(7-34) begin to provide insight into the early events in and mechanism of PTHR1 activation. PMID:19063682

  18. Design and synthesis of side-chain conformationally restricted phenylalanines and their use for structure-activity studies on tachykinin NK-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Josien, H; Lavielle, S; Brunissen, A; Saffroy, M; Torrens, Y; Beaujouan, J C; Glowinski, J; Chassaing, G

    1994-05-27

    Constrained analogues of phenylalanine have been conceptually designed for analyzing the binding pockets of Phe7 (S7) and Phe8 (S8), two aromatic residues important for the pharmacological properties of SP, i.e., L-tetrahydroisoquinoleic acid, L-diphenylalanine, L-9-fluorenylglycine (Flg), 2-indanylglycine, the diastereomers of L-1-indanylglycine (Ing) and L-1-benz[f]indanylglycine (Bfi), and the Z and E isomers of dehydrophenylalanine (delta ZPhe, delta EPhe). Binding studies were performed with appropriate ligands and tissue preparations allowing the discrimination of the three tachykinin binding sites, NK-1, NK-2, and NK-3. The potencies of these agonists were evaluated in the guinea pig ileum bioassay. According to the binding data, we can conclude that the S7 subsite is small, only the gauche (-) probe [(2S,3S)-Ing7]SP presents a high affinity for specific NK-1 binding sites. Surprisingly, the [delta EPhe7]SP analogue, which projects the aromatic ring toward the trans orientation, is over 40-fold more potent than the Z isomer, [delta ZPhe7]SP. A plausible explanation of these conflictual results is that either the binding protein quenches the minor trans rotamer of [(2S,3S)-Ing7]SP in solution or this constrained amino acid side chain rotates when inserted in the protein. In position 8, the high binding affinities of [Flg8]SP and [(2S,3S)-Bfi8]SP suggest that the S8 subsite is large enough to accept two aromatic rings in the gauche (-) and one aromatic ring in the trans direction. Peptides bearing two conformational probes in positions 7, 8, or 9 led to postulate that S7, S8, and S9 subsites are independent from each other. The volumes available for side chains 7 and 8 can be estimated to be close to 110 and 240 A3, respectively. The large volume of the S8 subsite raises question on the localization of the SP-binding site in the NK-1 receptor. If SP were to bind in the transmembrane domains, the cleft defined by the seven transmembrane segments must rearrange

  19. Architecture and conformational switch mechanism of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction is initiated by the release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm of myocytes through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). RyRs are homotetrameric channels with a molecular mass of more than 2.2 megadaltons that are regulated by several factors, including ions, small molecules and proteins. Numerous mutations in RyRs have been associated with human diseases. The molecular mechanism underlying the complex regulation of RyRs is poorly understood. Using electron cryomicroscopy, here we determine the architecture of rabbit RyR1 at a resolution of 6.1 Å. We show that the cytoplasmic moiety of RyR1 contains two large α-solenoid domains and several smaller domains, with folds suggestive of participation in protein-protein interactions. The transmembrane domain represents a chimaera of voltage-gated sodium and pH-activated ion channels. We identify the calcium-binding EF-hand domain and show that it functions as a conformational switch allosterically gating the channel. PMID:25470059

  20. Identification of in vitro autophosphorylation sites and effects of phosphorylation on the Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) receptor-like kinase intracellular domain: insights into conformation, oligomerization, and activity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthew R; Lichti, Cheryl F; Townsend, R Reid; Rao, A Gururaj

    2011-03-29

    Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) is a receptor-like kinase (RLK) that consists of an extracellular domain and an intracellular domain (ICD) with serine/threonine kinase activity. While genetic and cell biology experiments have demonstrated that ACR4 is important in cell fate specification and overall development of the plant, little is known about the biochemical properties of the kinase domain and the mechanisms that underlie the overall function of the receptor. To complement in planta studies of the function of ACR4, we have expressed the ICD in Escherichia coli as a soluble C-terminal fusion to the N-utilization substance A (NusA) protein, purified the recombinant protein, and characterized the enzymatic and conformational properties. The protein autophosphorylates via an intramolecular mechanism, prefers Mn(2+) over Mg(2+) as the divalent cation, and displays typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to ATP with an apparent K(m) of 6.67 ± 2.07 μM and a V(max) of 1.83 ± 0.18 nmol min(-1) mg(-1). Autophosphorylation is accompanied by a conformational change as demonstrated by circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and limited proteolysis with trypsin. Analysis by nanoliquid chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed 16 confirmed sites of phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues. Sedimentation velocity and gel filtration experiments indicate that the ICD has a propensity to oligomerize and that this property is lost upon autophosphorylation. PMID:21294549

  1. Conformational dynamics of a class C G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Levitz, Joshua; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2015-08-27

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors in eukaryotes. Crystal structures have provided insight into GPCR interactions with ligands and G proteins, but our understanding of the conformational dynamics of activation is incomplete. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are dimeric class C GPCRs that modulate neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and serve as drug targets for neurological disorders. A 'clamshell' ligand-binding domain (LBD), which contains the ligand-binding site, is coupled to the transmembrane domain via a cysteine-rich domain, and LBD closure seems to be the first step in activation. Crystal structures of isolated mGluR LBD dimers led to the suggestion that activation also involves a reorientation of the dimer interface from a 'relaxed' to an 'active' state, but the relationship between ligand binding, LBD closure and dimer interface rearrangement in activation remains unclear. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to probe the activation mechanism of full-length mammalian group II mGluRs. We show that the LBDs interconvert between three conformations: resting, activated and a short-lived intermediate state. Orthosteric agonists induce transitions between these conformational states, with efficacy determined by occupancy of the active conformation. Unlike mGluR2, mGluR3 displays basal dynamics, which are Ca(2+)-dependent and lead to basal protein activation. Our results support a general mechanism for the activation of mGluRs in which agonist binding induces closure of the LBDs, followed by dimer interface reorientation. Our experimental strategy should be widely applicable to study conformational dynamics in GPCRs and other membrane proteins. PMID:26258295

  2. Conformational dynamics of a class C G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Levitz, Joshua; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors in eukaryotes. Crystal structures have provided insight into GPCR interaction with ligands and G-proteins1,2, but our understanding of the conformational dynamics of activation is incomplete. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are dimeric class C GPCRs that modulate neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and serve as drug targets for neurological disorders3,4. A “clamshell” ligand-binding domain (LBD), which contains the ligand binding site, is coupled to the transmembrane domain (TMD) via a cysteine rich domain, and LBD closure appears to be the first step in activation5,6. Crystal structures of isolated mGluR LBD dimers led to the suggestion that activation also involves a reorientation of the dimer interface from a “relaxed” to an “active” state7,8, but the relationship between ligand binding, LBD closure and dimer interface rearrangement in activation remains unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe the activation mechanism of full-length mammalian group II mGluRs. We find that the LBDs interconvert between three conformations: resting, activated and a short-lived intermediate state. Orthosteric agonists induce transitions between these conformational states with efficacy determined by occupancy of the active conformation. Unlike mGluR2, mGluR3 displays basal dynamics, which are Ca2+ dependent and lead to basal protein activation. Our results support a general mechanism for the activation of mGluRs in which agonist binding induces closure of the LBDs followed by dimer interface reorientation. Our experimental strategy should be widely applicable to study conformational dynamics in GPCRs and other membrane proteins. PMID:26258295

  3. Elucidation of the receptor-bound conformation of the enkephalins.

    PubMed

    Gorin, F A; Balasubramanian, T M; Barry, C D; Marshall, G R

    1978-01-01

    The biologically relevant conformers of enkephalin predicted by solid state, solution state, and theoretical energy studies have been compared with the published structure-activity data on these compounds. No conformational technique proposes a model consistent with all the pharmacological data; the shortcomings of each approach are evaluated. An alternative approach, which correlates the structure-activity data of opiate compounds with that of the enkephalins, is described and shown to produce a model consistent with the available structure-activity data. PMID:743340

  4. Domain Architecture of a Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptor in a Ligand-Free Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Charles R.; Gill, Avinash; Madden, Dean R.

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels couple the free energy of agonist binding to the gating of selective transmembrane ion pores, permitting cells to regulate ion flux in response to external chemical stimuli. However, the stereochemical mechanisms responsible for this coupling remain obscure. In the case of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the modular nature of receptor subunits has facilitated structural analysis of the N-terminal domain (NTD), and of multiple conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Recently, the crystallographic structure of an antagonist-bound form of the receptor was determined. However, disulfide trapping of this conformation blocks channel opening, suggesting that channel activation involves additional quaternary packing arrangements. To explore the conformational space available to iGluR channels, we report here a second, clearly distinct domain architecture of homotetrameric, calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, determined by single-particle electron microscopy of untagged and fluorescently tagged constructs in a ligand-free state. It reveals a novel packing of NTD dimers, and a separation of LBD dimers across a central vestibule. In this arrangement, which reconciles diverse functional observations, agonist-induced cleft closure across LBD dimers can be converted into a twisting motion that provides a basis for receptor activation. PMID:22232575

  5. Different agonist- and antagonist-induced conformational changes in retinoic acid receptors analyzed by protease mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, S; LeMotte, P; Apfel, C

    1994-01-01

    The pleiotropic effects of retinoic acid on cell differentiation and proliferation are mediated by two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Recently the synthetic retinoid Ro 41-5253 was identified as a selective RAR alpha antagonist. As demonstrated by gel retardation assays, Ro 41-5253 and two related new RAR alpha antagonists do not influence RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimerization and DNA binding. In a limited trypsin digestion assay, complexation of RAR alpha with retinoic acid or several other agonistic retinoids altered the degradation of the receptor such that a 30-kDa proteolytic fragment became resistant to proteolysis. This suggests a ligand-induced conformational change, which may be necessary for the interaction of the DNA-bound RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimer with other transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that antagonists compete with agonists for binding to RAR alpha and may induce a different structural alteration, suggested by the tryptic resistance of a shorter 25-kDa protein fragment in the digestion assay. This RAR alpha conformation seems to allow RAR alpha/RXR alpha binding to DNA but not the subsequent transactivation of target genes. Protease mapping with C-terminally truncated receptors revealed that the proposed conformational changes mainly occur in the DE regions of RAR alpha. Complexation of RAR beta, RAR gamma, and RXR alpha, as well as the vitamin D3 receptor, with their natural ligands resulted in a similar resistance of fragments to proteolytic digestion. This could mean that ligand-induced conformational changes are a general feature in the hormonal activation of vitamin D3 and retinoid receptors. Images PMID:8264595

  6. Open conformers of HLA-F are high-affinity ligands of the activating NK-cell receptor KIR3DS1.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Hölzemer, Angelique; Martrus, Gloria; Chung, Amy W; Pacheco, Yovana; Simoneau, Camille R; Rucevic, Marijana; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro A; Pertel, Thomas; Kim, Tae-Eun; Dugan, Haley; Alter, Galit; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Jost, Stephanie; Carrington, Mary; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The activating natural killer (NK)-cell receptor KIR3DS1 has been linked to the outcome of various human diseases, including delayed progression of disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet a ligand that would account for its biological effects has remained unknown. We screened 100 HLA class I proteins and found that KIR3DS1 bound to HLA-F, a result we confirmed biochemically and functionally. Primary human KIR3DS1(+) NK cells degranulated and produced antiviral cytokines after encountering HLA-F and inhibited HIV-1 replication in vitro. Activation of CD4(+) T cells triggered the transcription and surface expression of HLA-F mRNA and HLA-F protein, respectively, and induced binding of KIR3DS1. HIV-1 infection further increased the transcription of HLA-F mRNA but decreased the binding of KIR3DS1, indicative of a mechanism for evading recognition by KIR3DS1(+) NK cells. Thus, we have established HLA-F as a ligand of KIR3DS1 and have demonstrated cell-context-dependent expression of HLA-F that might explain the widespread influence of KIR3DS1 in human disease. PMID:27455421

  7. Conformational Changes in the GM-CSF Receptor Suggest a Molecular Mechanism for Affinity Conversion and Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Dhagat, Urmi; Taing, Houng; Gorman, Michael A; King-Scott, Jack; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    The GM-CSF, IL-3, and IL-5 receptors constitute the βc family, playing important roles in inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Typical of heterodimeric type I cytokine receptors, signaling requires recruitment of the shared subunit to the initial cytokine:α subunit binary complex through an affinity conversion mechanism. This critical process is poorly understood due to the paucity of crystal structures of both binary and ternary receptor complexes for the same cytokine. We have now solved the structure of the binary GM-CSF:GMRα complex at 2.8-Å resolution and compared it with the structure of the ternary complex, revealing distinct conformational changes. Guided by these differences we performed mutational and functional studies that, importantly, show GMRα interactions playing a major role in receptor signaling while βc interactions control high-affinity binding. These results support the notion that conformational changes underlie the mechanism of GM-CSF receptor activation and also suggest how related type I cytokine receptors signal. PMID:27396825

  8. A biophysical approach to IL-2 and IL-15 receptor function: localization, conformation and interactions.

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Andrea; Nizsalóczki, Eniko; Mocsár, Gábor; Szalóki, Nikoletta; Waldmann, Thomas A; Damjanovich, Sándor; Vámosi, György

    2008-03-15

    Interleukin-2 and interleukin-15 (IL-2, IL-15) are key participants in T and NK cell activation and function. Sharing the beta and gamma receptor subunits results in several common functions: e.g. the promotion of T cell proliferation. On the other hand, due to their distinct alpha receptor subunits, they also play opposing roles in immune processes such as activation induced cell death and immunological memory. Divergence of signaling pathways must ensue already at the plasma membrane where the cytokines interact with their receptors. Therefore understanding molecular details of receptor organization and mapping interactions with other membrane proteins that might influence receptor conformation and function, are of key importance. Biophysical/advanced microscopic methods (fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence crosscorrelation spectroscopy (FCCS), near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, NMR spectroscopy) have been instrumental in clarifying the details of receptor structure and organization from the atomic level to the assembly and dynamics of supramolecular clusters. In this short review some important contributions shaping our current view of IL-2 and IL-15 receptors are presented. PMID:18280585

  9. DISTINCT CONFORMATIONS OF THE CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR CCR4 WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS TARGETING IN ALLERGY

    PubMed Central

    Viney, Jonathan M.; Andrew, David P.; Phillips, Rhian M.; Meiser, Andrea; Patel, Pallavi; Lennartz-Walker, Melissa; Cousins, David J.; Barton, Nicholas P.; Hall, David A.; Pease, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed by Th2 and Tregs and directs their migration along gradients of the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22. Both chemokines and receptor are upregulated in allergic disease, making CCR4 a therapeutic target for the treatment of allergy. We set out to assess the mechanisms underlying a previous report that CCL22 is a dominant ligand of CCR4, which may have implications for its therapeutic targeting. Human T-cells expressing endogenous CCR4 and transfectants engineered to express CCR4 were assessed for receptor function using assays of calcium release, chemotaxis, receptor endocytosis and ligand binding. Despite the two ligands having equal potency in calcium flux and chemotaxis assays, CCL22 showed dominance in both receptor endocytosis assays and heterologous competitive binding assays. Using two different CCR4-specific antibodies, we showed that CCR4 exists in at least two distinct conformations, which are differentially activated by ligand. A major population is activated by both CCL17 and CCL22, whilst a minor population is activated only by CCL22. Mutation of a single C-terminal residue K310 within a putative CCR4 antagonist binding site, ablated activation of CCR4 by CCL17 but not by CCL22, despite having no effect on the binding of either ligand. We conclude that CCL17 and CCL22 are conformationally selective ligands of CCR4 and interact with the receptor by substantially different mechanisms. This suggests that the selective blockade of CCR4 in allergy may be feasible where one CCR4 ligand dominates, allowing the inhibition of Th2 signalling via one ligand whilst sparing Treg recruitment via another. PMID:24563252

  10. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF CONFORMATIONALLY-FLEXIBLE RETINOID RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoids and associated derivatives represent a class of endogenousr hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of normal vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXRs ligands is of i...

  11. Conformational Constraint of the Glycerol Moiety of Lysophosphatidylserine Affords Compounds with Receptor Subtype Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sejin; Inoue, Asuka; Nakamura, Sho; Kishi, Takayuki; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Sayama, Misa; Ikubo, Masaya; Otani, Yuko; Kano, Kuniyuki; Makide, Kumiko; Aoki, Junken; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2016-04-28

    Lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) is an endogenous lipid mediator that specifically activates membrane proteins of the P2Y and its related families of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), GPR34 (LPS1), P2Y10 (LPS2), and GPR174 (LPS3). Here, in order to increase potency and receptor selectivity, we designed and synthesized LysoPS analogues containing the conformational constraints of the glycerol moiety. These reduced structural flexibility by fixation of the glycerol framework of LysoPS using a 2-hydroxymethyl-3-hydroxytetrahydropyran skeleton, and related structures identified compounds which exhibited high potency and selectivity for activation of GPR34 or P2Y10. Morphing of the structural shape of the 2-hydroxymethyl-3-hydroxytetrahydropyran skeleton into a planar benzene ring enhanced the P2Y10 activation potentcy rather than the GPR34 activation. PMID:27077565

  12. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C) crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the

  13. Conformational signaling required for synaptic plasticity by the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Aow, Jonathan; Dore, Kim; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-11-24

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) is known to transmit important information by conducting calcium ions. However, some recent studies suggest that activation of NMDARs can trigger synaptic plasticity in the absence of ion flow. Does ligand binding transmit information to signaling molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity? Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins expressed in neurons, conformational signaling is identified within the NMDAR complex that is essential for downstream actions. Ligand binding transiently reduces FRET between the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd) and the associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), requiring NMDARcd movement, and persistently reduces FRET between the NMDARcd and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a process requiring PP1 activity. These studies directly monitor agonist-driven conformational signaling at the NMDAR complex required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:26553983

  14. A cytoplasmic peptide of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR: induction of apoptosis and NMR determined helical conformation.

    PubMed

    Hileman, M R; Chapman, B S; Rabizadeh, S; Krishnan, V V; Bredesen, D; Assa-Munt, N; Plesniak, L A

    1997-09-29

    The neurotrophin receptor (NTR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor family of receptors regulate apoptotic cell death during development and in adult tissues [Beutler and van Huffel, Science 264 (1994) 667-668]. We have examined a fragment of p75NTR from the carboxyl terminus of the receptor and a variant form of this peptide via NMR techniques and in vitro assays for apoptotic activity. The wild type peptide induces apoptosis and adopts a helical conformation oriented parallel to the surface of lipid micelles, whereas the variant form adopts a non-helical conformation in the presence of lipid and shows no activity. These experiments suggest a link between structure and function of the two peptides. PMID:9350985

  15. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  16. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of GH Receptor Conformational Changes by Split Luciferase Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Berry, Philip A.; Zhang, Yue; Jiang, Jing; Lobie, Peter E.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Langenheim, John F.; Chen, Wen Y.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane GH receptor (GHR) exists at least in part as a preformed homodimer on the cell surface. Structural and biochemical studies suggest that GH binds GHR in a 1:2 stoichiometry to effect acute GHR conformational changes that trigger the activation of the receptor-associated tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), and downstream signaling. Despite information about GHR-GHR association derived from elegant fluorescence resonance energy transfer/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer studies, an assessment of the dynamics of GH-induced GHR conformational changes has been lacking. To this end, we used a split luciferase complementation assay that allowed detection in living cells of specific ligand-independent GHR-GHR interaction. Furthermore, GH treatment acutely augmented complementation of enzyme activity between GHRs fused, respectively, to N- and C-terminal fragments of firefly luciferase. Analysis of the temporal pattern of GH-induced complementation changes, pharmacological manipulation, genetic alteration of JAK2 levels, and truncation of the GHR intracellular domain (ICD) tail suggested that GH acutely enhances proximity of the GHR homodimer partners independent of the presence of JAK2, phosphorylation of GHR-luciferase chimeras, or an intact ICD. However, subsequent reduction of complementation requires JAK2 kinase activity and the ICD tail. This conclusion is in contrast to existing models of the GHR activation process. PMID:25188449

  18. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  19. Agonist-Specific Conformational Changes in the α1-γ2 Subunit Interface of the GABAA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Megan M.; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2012-01-01

    The GABAA receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  20. Agonist-specific conformational changes in the α1-γ2 subunit interface of the GABA A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The GABA(A) receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  1. Co-Expression of GRK2 Reveals a Novel Conformational State of the µ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nickolls, Sarah A.; Humphreys, Sian; Clark, Mellissa; McMurray, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Agonists at the µ-opioid receptor are known to produce potent analgesic responses in the clinical setting, therefore, an increased understanding of the molecular interactions of ligands at this receptor could lead to improved analgesics. As historically morphine has been shown to be a poor recruiter of β-arrestin in recombinant cell systems and this can be overcome by the co-expression of GRK2, we investigated the effects of GRK2 co-expression, in a recombinant µ-opioid receptor cell line, on ligand affinity and intrinsic activity in both β-arrestin recruitment and [35S]GTPγS binding assays. We also investigated the effect of receptor depletion in the β-arrestin assay. GRK2 co-expression increased both agonist Emax and potency in the β-arrestin assay. The increase in agonist potency could not be reversed using receptor depletion, supporting that the effects were due to a novel receptor conformation not system amplification. We also observed a small but significant effect on agonist KL values. Potency values in the [35S]GTPγS assay were unchanged; however, inverse agonist activity became evident with GRK2 co-expression. We conclude that this is direct evidence that the µ-opioid receptor is an allosteric protein and the co-expression of signalling molecules elicits changes in its conformation and thus ligand affinity. This has implications when describing how ligands interact with the receptor and how efficacy is determined. PMID:24376730

  2. Conformational Transitions in the Glycine-Bound GluN1 NMDA Receptor LBD via Single-Molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, David R.; Dolino, Drew M.; Jaurich, Henriette; Shuang, Bo; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Nurik, Caitlin E.; Chen, Jixin; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Landes, Christy F.

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a member of the glutamate receptor family of proteins and is responsible for excitatory transmission. Activation of the receptor is thought to be controlled by conformational changes in the ligand binding domain (LBD); however, glutamate receptor LBDs can occupy multiple conformations even in the activated form. This work probes equilibrium transitions among NMDAR LBD conformations by monitoring the distance across the glycine-bound LBD cleft using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Recent improvements in photoprotection solutions allowed us to monitor transitions among the multiple conformations. Also, we applied a recently developed model-free algorithm called “step transition and state identification” to identify the number of states, their smFRET efficiencies, and their interstate kinetics. Reversible interstate conversions, corresponding to transitions among a wide range of cleft widths, were identified in the glycine-bound LBD, on much longer timescales compared to channel opening. These transitions were confirmed to be equilibrium in nature by shifting the distribution reversibly via denaturant. We found that the NMDAR LBD proceeds primarily from one adjacent smFRET state to the next under equilibrium conditions, consistent with a cleft-opening/closing mechanism. Overall, by analyzing the state-to-state transition dynamics and distributions, we achieve insight into specifics of long-lived LBD equilibrium structural dynamics, as well as obtain a more general description of equilibrium folding/unfolding in a conformationally dynamic protein. The relationship between such long-lived LBD dynamics and channel function in the full receptor remains an open and interesting question. PMID:26153703

  3. Conformational transitions in the glycine-bound GluN1 NMDA receptor LBD via single-molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David R; Dolino, Drew M; Jaurich, Henriette; Shuang, Bo; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Nurik, Caitlin E; Chen, Jixin; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Landes, Christy F

    2015-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a member of the glutamate receptor family of proteins and is responsible for excitatory transmission. Activation of the receptor is thought to be controlled by conformational changes in the ligand binding domain (LBD); however, glutamate receptor LBDs can occupy multiple conformations even in the activated form. This work probes equilibrium transitions among NMDAR LBD conformations by monitoring the distance across the glycine-bound LBD cleft using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Recent improvements in photoprotection solutions allowed us to monitor transitions among the multiple conformations. Also, we applied a recently developed model-free algorithm called "step transition and state identification" to identify the number of states, their smFRET efficiencies, and their interstate kinetics. Reversible interstate conversions, corresponding to transitions among a wide range of cleft widths, were identified in the glycine-bound LBD, on much longer timescales compared to channel opening. These transitions were confirmed to be equilibrium in nature by shifting the distribution reversibly via denaturant. We found that the NMDAR LBD proceeds primarily from one adjacent smFRET state to the next under equilibrium conditions, consistent with a cleft-opening/closing mechanism. Overall, by analyzing the state-to-state transition dynamics and distributions, we achieve insight into specifics of long-lived LBD equilibrium structural dynamics, as well as obtain a more general description of equilibrium folding/unfolding in a conformationally dynamic protein. The relationship between such long-lived LBD dynamics and channel function in the full receptor remains an open and interesting question. PMID:26153703

  4. Activation of pheromone-sensitive neurons is mediated by conformational activation of pheromone-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, John D; Ha, Tal Soo; Jones, David N M; Smith, Dean P

    2008-06-27

    Detection of volatile odorants by olfactory neurons is thought to result from direct activation of seven-transmembrane odorant receptors by odor molecules. Here, we show that detection of the Drosophila pheromone, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA), is instead mediated by pheromone-induced conformational shifts in the extracellular pheromone-binding protein, LUSH. We show that LUSH undergoes a pheromone-specific conformational change that triggers the firing of pheromone-sensitive neurons. Amino acid substitutions in LUSH that are predicted to reduce or enhance the conformational shift alter sensitivity to cVA as predicted in vivo. One substitution, LUSH(D118A), produces a dominant-active LUSH protein that stimulates T1 neurons through the neuronal receptor components Or67d and SNMP in the complete absence of pheromone. Structural analysis of LUSH(D118A) reveals that it closely resembles cVA-bound LUSH. Therefore, the pheromone-binding protein is an inactive, extracellular ligand converted by pheromone molecules into an activator of pheromone-sensitive neurons and reveals a distinct paradigm for detection of odorants. PMID:18585358

  5. The insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in regulation of the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Baron, V; Alengrin, F; Takata, Y; Webster, N J; Olefsky, J M; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-09-21

    During the insulin receptor activation process, ligand binding and autophosphorylation induce two distinct conformational changes in the C-terminal domain of the receptor beta-subunit. To analyze the role of this domain and the involvement of the C-terminal autophosphorylation sites (Tyr1316 and Tyr1322) in receptor activation, we used (i) antipeptide antibodies against three different C-terminal sequences (1270-1281, 1294-1317, and 1309-1326) and (ii) an insulin receptor mutant (Y/F2) where Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 have been replaced by Phe. We show that the autophosphorylation-induced C-terminal conformational change is preserved in the Y/F2 receptor, indicating that this change is not induced by phosphorylation of the C-terminal sites but most likely by phosphorylation of the major sites in the kinase domain (Tyr1146, Tyr1150, and Tyr1151). Binding of antipeptide antibodies to the C-terminal domain modulated (activated or inhibited) both mutant and wild-type receptor-mediated phosphorylation of poly(Glu/Tyr). In contrast to the wild-type receptor, Y/F2 exhibited the same C-terminal configuration before and after insulin binding, evidencing that mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 introduced conformational changes in the C-terminus. Finally, the mutant receptor was 2-fold more active than the wild-type receptor for poly(Glu/Tyr) phosphorylation. In conclusion, the whole C-terminal region of the insulin receptor beta-subunit is likely to exert a regulatory influence on the receptor kinase activity. Perturbations of the C-terminal region, such as binding of antipeptides or mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322, provoke alterations at the receptor kinase level, leading to activation or inhibition of the enzymic activity. PMID:7690586

  6. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms. PMID:25286859

  7. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Záková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M

    2014-10-01

    The structural characterization of the insulin-insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21-B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms. PMID:25286859

  8. Conformationally constrained analogs of BAY 59–3074 as novel cannabinoid receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Heidi; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    To obtain information on the pharmacophoric requirements of the CB1/CB2 partial agonist BAY 59–3074 we have synthesized a series of new conformationally constrained dibenzofuran (4a–d) and dibenzopyran analogs (5). All constrained analogs exhibited reduced binding affinity at both cannabinoid receptor subtypes, suggesting that planar conformations of these ligands are less favored by both receptors. We also found that 4c, 4d, and 5 exhibited 3- to 12-fold selectivity for hCB2 over rCB1 receptors and may serve as new chemotypes for the development of CB2-selective cannabinergics. PMID:21880487

  9. Refinement of the conformation of a critical region of charge-charge interaction between cholecystokinin and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xi-Qin; Pinon, Delia I; Furse, Kristina E; Lybrand, Terry P; Miller, Laurence J

    2002-05-01

    Insight into the molecular basis of cholecystokinin (CCK) binding to its receptor has come from receptor mutagenesis and photoaffinity labeling studies, with both contributing to the current hypothesis that the acidic Tyr-sulfate-27 residue within the peptide is situated adjacent to basic Arg(197) in the second loop of the receptor. Here, we refine our understanding of this region of interaction by examining a structure-activity series of these positions within both ligand and receptor and by performing three-dimensional molecular modeling of key pairs of modified ligand and receptor constructs. The important roles of Arg(197) and Tyr-sulfate-27 were supported by the marked negative impact on binding and biological response with their natural partner molecule when the receptor residue was replaced by acidic Asp or Glu and when the peptide residue was replaced by basic Arg, Lys, p-amino-Phe, p-guanidino-Phe, or p-methylamino-Phe. Complementary ligand-receptor charge-exchange experiments were unable to regain the lost function. This was supported by the molecular modeling, which demonstrated that the charge-reversed double mutants could not form a good interaction without extensive rearrangement of receptor conformation. The models further predicted that R197D and R197E mutations would lead to conformational changes in the extracellular domain, and this was experimentally supported by data showing that these mutations decreased peptide agonist and antagonist binding and increased nonpeptidyl antagonist binding. These receptor constructs also had increased susceptibility to trypsin degradation relative to the wild-type receptor. In contrast, the relatively conservative R197K mutation had modest negative impact on peptide agonist binding, again consistent with the modeling demonstration of loss of a series of stabilizing inter- and intramolecular bonds. The strong correlation between predicted and experimental results support the reported refinement in the three

  10. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  11. Conductance of P2X4 purinergic receptor is determined by conformational equilibrium in the transmembrane region.

    PubMed

    Minato, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shiho; Hara, Tomoaki; Kofuku, Yutaka; Kasuya, Go; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Igarashi, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Ei-Ichiro; Nureki, Osamu; Hattori, Motoyuki; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2016-04-26

    Ligand-gated ion channels are partially activated by their ligands, resulting in currents lower than the currents evoked by the physiological full agonists. In the case of P2X purinergic receptors, a cation-selective pore in the transmembrane region expands upon ATP binding to the extracellular ATP-binding site, and the currents evoked by α,β-methylene ATP are lower than the currents evoked by ATP. However, the mechanism underlying the partial activation of the P2X receptors is unknown although the crystal structures of zebrafish P2X4 receptor in the apo and ATP-bound states are available. Here, we observed the NMR signals from M339 and M351, which were introduced in the transmembrane region, and the endogenous alanine and methionine residues of the zebrafish P2X4 purinergic receptor in the apo, ATP-bound, and α,β-methylene ATP-bound states. Our NMR analyses revealed that, in the α,β-methylene ATP-bound state, M339, M351, and the residues that connect the ATP-binding site and the transmembrane region, M325 and A330, exist in conformational equilibrium between closed and open conformations, with slower exchange rates than the chemical shift difference (<100 s(-1)), suggesting that the small population of the open conformation causes the partial activation in this state. Our NMR analyses also revealed that the transmembrane region adopts the open conformation in the state bound to the inhibitor trinitrophenyl-ATP, and thus the antagonism is due to the closure of ion pathways, except for the pore in the transmembrane region: i.e., the lateral cation access in the extracellular region. PMID:27071117

  12. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  13. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  14. Conformational and Thermodynamic Landscape of GPCR Activation from Theory and Computation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sijia S; Goddard, William A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-06-21

    We present a hybrid computational methodology to predict multiple energetically accessible conformations for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that might play a role in binding to ligands and different signaling partners. To our knowledge, this method, termed ActiveGEnSeMBLE, enables the first quantitative energy profile for GPCR activation that is consistent with the qualitative profile deduced from experiments. ActiveGEnSeMBLE starts with a systematic coarse grid sampling of helix tilts/rotations (∼13 trillion transmembrane-domain conformations) and selects the conformational landscape based on energy. This profile identifies multiple potential active-state energy wells, with the TM3-TM6 intracellular distance as an approximate activation coordinate. These energy wells are then sampled locally using a finer grid to find locally minimized conformation in each energy well. We validate this strategy using the inactive and active experimental structures of β2 adrenergic receptor (hβ2AR) and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Structures of membrane-embedded hβ2AR along its activation coordinate are subjected to molecular-dynamics simulations for relaxation and interaction energy analysis to generate a quantitative energy landscape for hβ2AR activation. This landscape reveals several metastable states along this coordinate, indicating that for hβ2AR, the agonist alone is not enough to stabilize the active state and that the G protein is necessary, consistent with experimental observations. The method's application to somatostatin receptor SSTR5 (no experimental structure available) shows that to predict an active conformation it is better to start from an inactive structure template based on a close homolog than to start from an active template based on a distant homolog. The energy landscape for hSSTR5 activation is consistent with hβ2AR in the role of the G protein. These results demonstrate the utility of the ActiveGEnSeMBLE method for predicting

  15. Single-molecule view of basal activity and activation mechanisms of the G protein-coupled receptor β2AR.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Rajan; Liu, Jeffrey J; Pljevaljcic, Goran; White, Kate L; van der Schans, Edwin; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt; Millar, David P

    2015-11-17

    Binding of extracellular ligands to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates transmembrane signaling by inducing conformational changes on the cytoplasmic receptor surface. Knowledge of this process provides a platform for the development of GPCR-targeting drugs. Here, using a site-specific Cy3 fluorescence probe in the human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), we observed that individual receptor molecules in the native-like environment of phospholipid nanodiscs undergo spontaneous transitions between two distinct conformational states. These states are assigned to inactive and active-like receptor conformations. Individual receptor molecules in the apo form repeatedly sample both conformations, with a bias toward the inactive conformation. Experiments in the presence of drug ligands show that binding of the full agonist formoterol shifts the conformational distribution in favor of the active-like conformation, whereas binding of the inverse agonist ICI-118,551 favors the inactive conformation. Analysis of single-molecule dwell-time distributions for each state reveals that formoterol increases the frequency of activation transitions, while also reducing the frequency of deactivation events. In contrast, the inverse agonist increases the frequency of deactivation transitions. Our observations account for the high level of basal activity of this receptor and provide insights that help to rationalize, on the molecular level, the widely documented variability of the pharmacological efficacies among GPCR-targeting drugs. PMID:26578769

  16. Conformational memories and the endocannabinoid binding site at the cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Barnett-Norris, Judy; Hurst, Dow P; Lynch, Diane L; Guarnieri, Frank; Makriyannis, Alex; Reggio, Patricia H

    2002-08-15

    Endocannabinoid stucture-activity relationships (SAR) indicate that the CB1 receptor recognizes ethanolamides whose fatty acid acyl chains have 20 or 22 carbons, with at least three homoallylic double bonds and saturation in at least the last five carbons of the acyl chain. To probe the molecular basis for these acyl chain requirements, the method of conformational memories (CM) was used to study the conformations available to an n-6 series of ethanolamide fatty acid acyl chain congeners: 22:4, n-6 (K(i) = 34.4 +/- 3.2 nM); 20:4, n-6 (K(i) = 39.2 +/- 5.7 nM); 20:3, n-6 (K(i) = 53.4 +/- 5.5 nM); and 20:2, n-6 (K(i) > 1500 nM). CM studies indicated that each analogue could form both extended and U/J-shaped families of conformers. However, for the low affinity 20:2, n-6 ethanolamide, the higher populated family was the extended conformer family, while for the other analogues in the series, the U/J-shaped family had the higher population. In addition, the 20:2, n-6 ethanolamide U-shaped family was not as tightly curved as were those of the other analogues studied. To quantitate this variation in curvature, the radius of curvature (in the C-3 to C-17 region) of each member of each U/J-shaped family was measured. The average radii of curvature (with their 95% confidence intervals) were found to be 5.8 A (5.3-6.2) for 20:2, n-6; 4.4 A (4.1-4.7) for 20:3, n-6; 4.0 A (3.7-4.2) for 20:4, n-6; and 4.0 A (3.6-4.5) for 22:4, n-6. These results suggest that higher CB1 affinity is associated with endocannabinoids that can form tightly curved structures. Endocannabinoid SAR also indicate that the CB1 receptor does not tolerate large endocannabinoid headgroups; however, it does recognize both polar and nonpolar moieties in the headgroup region. To identify a headgroup orientation that results in high CB1 affinity, a series of dimethyl anandamide analogues (R)-N-(1-methyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-2-(R)-methyl-arachidonamide (K(i) = 7.42 +/- 0.86 nM), (R)-N-(1-methyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-2-(S

  17. GABA{sub A} receptor open-state conformation determines non-competitive antagonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ligong; Xue Ling; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Casida, John E.

    2011-02-01

    The {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA{sub A}R) is one of the most important targets for insecticide action. The human recombinant {beta}3 homomer is the best available model for this binding site and 4-n-[{sup 3}H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([{sup 3}H]EBOB) is the preferred non-competitive antagonist (NCA) radioligand. The uniquely high sensitivity of the {beta}3 homomer relative to the much-less-active but structurally very-similar {beta}1 homomer provides an ideal comparison to elucidate structural and functional features important for NCA binding. The {beta}1 and {beta}3 subunits were compared using chimeragenesis and mutagenesis and various combinations with the {alpha}1 subunit and modulators. Chimera {beta}3/{beta}1 with the {beta}3 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}1 subunit transmembrane helices retained the high [{sup 3}H]EBOB binding level of the {beta}3 homomer while chimera {beta}1/{beta}3 with the {beta}1 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}3 subunit transmembrane helices had low binding activity similar to the {beta}1 homomer. GABA at 3 {mu}M stimulated heteromers {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}1{beta}3 binding levels more than 2-fold by increasing the open probability of the channel. Addition of the {alpha}1 subunit rescued the inactive {beta}1/{beta}3 chimera close to wildtype {alpha}1{beta}1 activity. EBOB binding was significantly altered by mutations {beta}1S15'N and {beta}3N15'S compared with wildtype {beta}1 and {beta}3, respectively. However, the binding activity of {alpha}1{beta}1S15'N was insensitive to GABA and {alpha}1{beta}3N15'S was stimulated much less than wildtype {alpha}1{beta}3 by GABA. The inhibitory effect of etomidate on NCA binding was reduced more than 5-fold by the mutation {beta}3N15'S. Therefore, the NCA binding site is tightly regulated by the open-state conformation that largely determines GABA{sub A} receptor sensitivity. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights

  18. Post-translational Modifications Differentially Affect IgG1 Conformation and Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Damian; Peng, Yucai; Berkowitz, Steven A.; Engen, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) can have profound effects on protein structure and protein dynamics and thereby can influence protein function. To understand and connect PTM-induced functional differences with any resulting conformational changes, the conformational changes must be detected and localized to specific parts of the protein. We illustrate these principles here with a study of the functional and conformational changes that accompany modifications to a monoclonal immunoglobulin γ1 (IgG1) antibody. IgG1s are large and heterogeneous proteins capable of incorporating a multiplicity of PTMs both in vivo and in vitro. For many IgG1s, these PTMs can play a critical role in affecting conformation, biological function, and the ability of the antibody to initiate a potential adverse biological response. We investigated the impact of differential galactosylation, methionine oxidation, and fucosylation on solution conformation using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and probed the effects of IgG1 binding to the FcγRIIIa receptor. The results showed that methionine oxidation and galactosylation both impact IgG1 conformation, whereas fucosylation appears to have little or no impact to the conformation. FcγRIIIa binding was strongly influenced by both the glycan structure/composition (namely galactose and fucose) and conformational changes that were induced by some of the modifications. PMID:20103567

  19. Conformational Transition Pathways of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Domain from Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Bayesian Clustering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is aberrantly activated in various cancer cells and an important target for cancer treatment. Deep understanding of EGFR conformational changes between the active and inactive states is of pharmaceutical interest. Here we present a strategy combining multiply targeted molecular dynamics simulations, unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, and Bayesian clustering to investigate transition pathways during the activation/inactivation process of EGFR kinase domain. Two distinct pathways between the active and inactive forms are designed, explored, and compared. Based on Bayesian clustering and rough two-dimensional free energy surfaces, the energy-favorable pathway is recognized, though DFG-flip happens in both pathways. In addition, another pathway with different intermediate states appears in our simulations. Comparison of distinct pathways also indicates that disruption of the Lys745-Glu762 interaction is critically important in DFG-flip while movement of the A-loop significantly facilitates the conformational change. Our simulations yield new insights into EGFR conformational transitions. Moreover, our results verify that this approach is valid and efficient in sampling of protein conformational changes and comparison of distinct pathways. PMID:25136273

  20. Role of the conformational versatility of the neurotrophin N-terminal regions in their recognition by Trk receptors.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Francesca; Esposito, Luciana; Paladino, Antonella; Pedone, Carlo; Morelli, Giancarlo; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2010-10-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) represent a family of proteins that play an important role in the survival, development, and function of neurons. Extensive efforts are currently being made to develop small molecules endowed with agonist or antagonist NT activity. The structurally versatile N-termini of these proteins are considered regions of interest for the design of new molecules. By combining experimental and computational approaches, we analyzed the intrinsic conformational preferences of the N-termini of two of the most important NTs: NGF (NGF-Nter) and NT4 (NT4-Nter). Circular dichroism spectra clearly indicate that both peptides show a preference for random coil states. Because this finding does not preclude the possibility that structured forms may occur in solution as minor conformational states, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations to gain insights into the structural features of populated species. In line with the circular dichroism analysis, the simulations show a preference for unstructured states for both peptides. However, the simulations also show that for NT4-Nter, and to a lesser extent for NGF-Nter, helical conformations, which are required for binding to the Trk receptor, are present in the repertoire of structures that are intrinsically accessible to these peptides. Accordingly, molecular recognition of NTs by the Trk receptor is accomplished by the general mechanism known as population shift. These findings provide a structural rationale for the observed activity of synthetic peptides based on these NT regions. They also suggest strategies for the development of biologically active peptide-based compounds. PMID:20923662

  1. N-Glycosylation as determinant of epidermal growth factor receptor conformation in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kaszuba, Karol; Grzybek, Michał; Orłowski, Adam; Danne, Reinis; Róg, Tomasz; Simons, Kai; Coskun, Ünal; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) regulates several critical cellular processes and is an important target for cancer therapy. In lieu of a crystallographic structure of the complete receptor, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have recently shown that they can excel in studies of the full-length receptor. Here we present atomistic MD simulations of the monomeric N-glycosylated human EGFR in biomimetic lipid bilayers that are, in parallel, also used for the reconstitution of full-length receptors. This combination enabled us to experimentally validate our simulations, using ligand binding assays and antibodies to monitor the conformational properties of the receptor reconstituted into membranes. We find that N-glycosylation is a critical determinant of EGFR conformation, and specifically the orientation of the EGFR ectodomain relative to the membrane. In the absence of a structure for full-length, posttranslationally modified membrane receptors, our approach offers new means to structurally define and experimentally validate functional properties of cell surface receptors in biomimetic membrane environments. PMID:25805821

  2. An allosteric role for receptor activity-modifying proteins in defining GPCR pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    J Gingell, Joseph; Simms, John; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Pioszak, Augen A; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are allosteric proteins that control transmission of external signals to regulate cellular response. Although agonist binding promotes canonical G protein signalling transmitted through conformational changes, G protein-coupled receptors also interact with other proteins. These include other G protein-coupled receptors, other receptors and channels, regulatory proteins and receptor-modifying proteins, notably receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMPs have at least 11 G protein-coupled receptor partners, including many class B G protein-coupled receptors. Prototypic is the calcitonin receptor, with altered ligand specificity when co-expressed with RAMPs. To gain molecular insight into the consequences of this protein–protein interaction, we combined molecular modelling with mutagenesis of the calcitonin receptor extracellular domain, assessed in ligand binding and functional assays. Although some calcitonin receptor residues are universally important for peptide interactions (calcitonin, amylin and calcitonin gene-related peptide) in calcitonin receptor alone or with receptor activity-modifying protein, others have RAMP-dependent effects, whereby mutations decreased amylin/calcitonin gene-related peptide potency substantially only when RAMP was present. Remarkably, the key residues were completely conserved between calcitonin receptor and AMY receptors, and between subtypes of AMY receptor that have different ligand preferences. Mutations at the interface between calcitonin receptor and RAMP affected ligand pharmacology in a RAMP-dependent manner, suggesting that RAMP may allosterically influence the calcitonin receptor conformation. Supporting this, molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the calcitonin receptor extracellular N-terminal domain is more flexible in the presence of receptor activity-modifying protein 1. Thus, RAMPs may act in an allosteric manner to generate a spectrum of unique calcitonin receptor

  3. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Characterization of Dihydrotestosterone-Induced Conformational Perturbations in Androgen Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jasuja, Ravi; Ulloor, Jagadish; Yengo, Christopher M.; Choong, Karen; Istomin, Andrei Y.; Livesay, Dennis R.; Jacobs, Donald J.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Mikšovská, Jaroslava; Larsen, Randy W.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-induced conformational perturbations in androgen receptor (AR) are important in coactivator recruitment and transactivation. However, molecular rearrangements in AR ligand-binding domain (AR-LBD) associated with agonist binding and their kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are poorly understood. We used steady-state second-derivative absorption and emission spectroscopy, pressure and temperature perturbations, and 4,4′-bis-anilinonaphthalene 8-sulfonate (bis-ANS) partitioning to determine the kinetics and thermodynamics of the conformational changes in AR-LBD after dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding. In presence of DHT, the second-derivative absorption spectrum showed a red shift and a change in peak-to-peak distance. Emission intensity increased upon DHT binding, and center of spectral mass was blue shifted, denoting conformational changes resulting in more hydrophobic environment for tyrosines and tryptophans within a more compact DHT-bound receptor. In pressure perturbation calorimetry, DHT-induced energetic stabilization increased the Gibbs free energy of unfolding to 8.4 ± 1.3 kcal/mol from 3.5 ± 1.6 kcal/mol. Bis-ANS partitioning studies revealed that upon DHT binding, AR-LBD underwent biphasic rearrangement with a high activation energy (13.4 kcal/mol). An initial, molten globule-like burst phase (k ∼30 sec−1) with greater solvent accessibility was followed by rearrangement (k ∼0.01 sec−1), leading to a more compact conformation than apo-AR-LBD. Molecular simulations demonstrated unique sensitivity of tyrosine and tryptophan residues during pressure unfolding with rearrangement of residues in the coactivator recruitment surfaces distant from the ligand-binding pocket. In conclusion, DHT binding leads to energetic stabilization of AR-LBD domain and substantial rearrangement of residues distant from the ligand-binding pocket. DHT binding to AR-LBD involves biphasic receptor rearrangement including population of a molten globule

  4. Adenine Nucleotide Analogues Locked in a Northern Methanocarba Conformation: Enhanced Stability and Potency as P2Y1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. Gnana; Kim, Hak Sung; Servos, Jörg; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lee, Kyeong; Maddileti, Savitri; Boyer, José L.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Preference for the Northern (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of nucleotide 5′-triphosphate agonists at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y11 receptors, but not P2Y6 receptors, was established using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a 3.1.0-bicyclohexane) ring as a ribose substitute (Kim et al. J. Med. Chem. 2002, 45, 208–218.). We have now combined the ring-constrained (N)-methanocarba modification of adenine nucleotides with other functionalities known to enhance potency at P2 receptors. The potency of the newly synthesized analogues was determined in the stimulation of phospholipase C through activation of turkey erythrocyte P2Y1 or human P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors stably expressed in astrocytoma cells. An (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio-ADP analogue displayed an EC50 at the hP2Y1 receptor of 0.40 nM and was 55-fold more potent than the corresponding triphosphate and 16-fold more potent than the riboside 5′-diphosphate. 2-Cl–(N)-methanocarba-ATP and its N6-Me analogue were also highly selective, full agonists at P2Y1 receptors. The (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio and 2-chloromonophosphate analogues were full agonists exhibiting micromolar potency at P2Y1 receptors, while the corresponding ribosides were inactive. Although β,γ-methylene-ATP was inactive at P2Y receptors, β,γ-methylene-(N)-methanocarba-ATP was a potent hP2Y1 receptor agonist with an EC50 of 160 nM and was selective versus hP2Y2 and hP2Y4 receptors. The rates of hydrolysis of Northern (N) and Southern (S) methanocarba analogues of AMP by rat 5′-ectonucleotidase were negligible. The rates of hydrolysis of the corresponding triphosphates by recombinant rat NTPDase1 and 2 were studied. Both isomers were hydrolyzed by NTPDase 1 at about half the rate of ATP hydrolysis. The (N) isomer was hardly hydrolyzed by NTPDase 2, while the (S) isomer was hydrolyzed at one-third of the rate of ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that new, more stable and selective nucleotide agonists may be designed on the basis of

  5. Thermostabilisation of an agonist-bound conformation of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Guillaume; Bennett, Kirstie; Jazayeri, Ali; Tate, Christopher G

    2011-06-10

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that plays a key role in transmembrane signalling mediated by the agonist adenosine. The structure of A(2A)R was determined recently in an antagonist-bound conformation, which was facilitated by the T4 lysozyme fusion in cytoplasmic loop 3 and the considerable stabilisation conferred on the receptor by the bound inverse agonist ZM241385. Unfortunately, the natural agonist adenosine does not sufficiently stabilise the receptor for the formation of diffraction-quality crystals. As a first step towards determining the structure of A(2A)R bound to an agonist, the receptor was thermostabilised by systematic mutagenesis in the presence of the bound agonist [(3)H]5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA). Four thermostabilising mutations were identified that when combined to give mutant A(2A)R-GL26, conferred a greater than 200-fold decrease in its rate of unfolding compared to the wild-type receptor. Pharmacological analysis suggested that A(2A)R-GL26 is stabilised in an agonist-bound conformation because antagonists bind with up to 320-fold decreased affinity. None of the thermostabilising mutations are in the ZM241385 binding pocket, suggesting that the mutations affect ligand binding by altering the conformation of the receptor rather than through direct interactions with ligands. A(2A)R-GL26 shows considerable stability in short-chain detergents, which has allowed its purification and crystallisation. PMID:21501622

  6. Conformational Preferences Underlying Reduced Activity of a Thermophilic Ribonuclease H

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Trbovic, Nikola; Butterwick, Joel A.; Abel, Robert; Friesner, Richard A.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    The conformational basis for reduced activity of the thermophilic ribonuclease HI enzyme from Thermus thermophilus, compared to its mesophilic homolog from Escherichia coli, is elucidated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Explicit-solvent all-atom MD simulations of the two wild-type proteins and an E. coli mutant in which a glycine residue is inserted after position 80 to mimic the T. thermophilus protein reproduce the differences in conformational dynamics determined from 15N spin-relaxation NMR spectroscopy of three loop regions that surround the active site and contain functionally important residues: the glycine-rich region, the handle region, and the β5/αE loop. Examination of the MD trajectories indicates that the thermophilic protein samples conformations productive for substrate binding and activity less frequently than the mesophilic enzyme, although these differences may manifest as either increased or decreased relative flexibility of the different regions. Additional MD simulations indicate that mutations increasing activity of the T. thermophilus enzyme at mesophilic temperatures do so by reconfiguring the local environments of the mutated sites to more closely resemble active conformations. Taken together, the results show that both locally increased and decreased flexibility contribute to an overall reduction in activity of T. thermophilus ribonuclease H compared to its mesophilic E. coli homolog. PMID:25550198

  7. Ligands for pheromone-sensing neurons are not conformationally activated odorant binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Reina, Jaime H; Cambillau, Christian; Benton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Pheromones form an essential chemical language of intraspecific communication in many animals. How olfactory systems recognize pheromonal signals with both sensitivity and specificity is not well understood. An important in vivo paradigm for this process is the detection mechanism of the sex pheromone (Z)-11-octadecenyl acetate (cis-vaccenyl acetate [cVA]) in Drosophila melanogaster. cVA-evoked neuronal activation requires a secreted odorant binding protein, LUSH, the CD36-related transmembrane protein SNMP, and the odorant receptor OR67d. Crystallographic analysis has revealed that cVA-bound LUSH is conformationally distinct from apo (unliganded) LUSH. Recombinantly expressed mutant versions of LUSH predicted to enhance or diminish these structural changes produce corresponding alterations in spontaneous and/or cVA-evoked activity when infused into olfactory sensilla, leading to a model in which the ligand for pheromone receptors is not free cVA, but LUSH that is "conformationally activated" upon cVA binding. Here we present evidence that contradicts this model. First, we demonstrate that the same LUSH mutants expressed transgenically affect neither basal nor pheromone-evoked activity. Second, we compare the structures of apo LUSH, cVA/LUSH, and complexes of LUSH with non-pheromonal ligands and find no conformational property of cVA/LUSH that can explain its proposed unique activated state. Finally, we show that high concentrations of cVA can induce neuronal activity in the absence of LUSH, but not SNMP or OR67d. Our findings are not consistent with the model that the cVA/LUSH complex acts as the pheromone ligand, and suggest that pheromone molecules alone directly activate neuronal receptors. PMID:23637570

  8. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  9. Galpha-subunits differentially alter the conformation and agonist affinity of kappa-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Mosier, Philip D; Westkaemper, Richard B; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-02-12

    Although ligand-induced conformational changes in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well-documented, there is little direct evidence for G protein-induced changes in GPCR conformation. To investigate this possibility, the effects of overexpressing Galpha-subunits (Galpha16 or Galphai2) with the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) were examined. The changes in KOR conformation were subequently examined via the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) in transmembrane domains 6 (TM6) and 7 (TM7) and extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Significant conformational changes were observed on TM7, the extracellular portion of TM6, and EL2. Seven SCAM-sensitive residues (S3107.33, F3147.37, and I3167.39 to Y3207.43) on TM7 presented a cluster pattern when the KOR was exposed to baseline amounts of G protein, and additional residues became sensitive upon overexpression of various G proteins. In TM7, S3117.34 and N3267.49 were found to be sensitive in Galpha16-overexpressed cells and Y3137.36, N3227.45, S3237.46, and L3297.52 in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. In addition, the degree of sensitivity for various TM7 residues was augmented, especially in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. A similar phenomenon was also observed for residues in TM6 and EL2. In addition to an enhanced sensitivity of certain residues, our findings also indicated that a slight rotation was predicted to occur in the upper part of TM7 upon G protein overexpression. These relatively modest conformational changes engendered by G protein overexpression had both profound and differential effects on the abilities of agonists to bind to KOR. These data are significant because they demonstrate that Galpha-subunits differentially modulate the conformation and agonist affinity of a prototypical GPCR. PMID:18205395

  10. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  11. How IGF-1 activates its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kavran, Jennifer M; McCabe, Jacqueline M; Byrne, Patrick O; Connacher, Mary Katherine; Wang, Zhihong; Ramek, Alexander; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Hristova, Kalina; Cole, Philip A; Leahy, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) is involved in growth and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. A ligand-dependent conformational change is thought to regulate IGF1R activity, but the nature of this change is unclear. We point out an underappreciated dimer in the crystal structure of the related Insulin Receptor (IR) with Insulin bound that allows direct comparison with unliganded IR and suggests a mechanism by which ligand regulates IR/IGF1R activity. We test this mechanism in a series of biochemical and biophysical assays and find the IGF1R ectodomain maintains an autoinhibited state in which the TMs are held apart. Ligand binding releases this constraint, allowing TM association and unleashing an intrinsic propensity of the intracellular regions to autophosphorylate. Enzymatic studies of full-length and kinase-containing fragments show phosphorylated IGF1R is fully active independent of ligand and the extracellular-TM regions. The key step triggered by ligand binding is thus autophosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03772.001 PMID:25255214

  12. Conformational Rearrangement Within the Soluble Domains of the CD4 Receptor is Ligand-Specific

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish,F.; Juncadella, I.; Garg, R.; Boone, C.; Anguita, J.; Krueger, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ligand binding induces shape changes within the four modular ectodomains (D1-D4) of the CD4 receptor, an important receptor in immune signaling. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) on both a two-domain and a four-domain construct of the soluble CD4 (sCD4) is consistent with known crystal structures demonstrating a bilobal and a semi-extended tetralobal Z conformation in solution, respectively. Detection of conformational changes within sCD4 as a result of ligand binding was followed by SAXS on sCD4 bound to two different glycoprotein ligands: the tick saliva immunosuppressor Salp15 and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120. Ab initio modeling of these data showed that both Salp15 and gp120 bind to the D1 domain of sCD4 and yet induce drastically different structural rearrangements. Upon binding, Salp15 primarily distorts the characteristic lobal architecture of the sCD4 without significantly altering the semi-extended shape of the sCD4 receptor. In sharp contrast, the interaction of gp120 with sCD4 induces a shape change within sCD4 that can be described as a Z-to-U bi-fold closure of the four domains across its flexible D2-D3 linker. Placement of known crystal structures within the boundaries of the SAXS-derived models suggests that the ligand-induced shape changes could be a result of conformational changes within this D2-D3 linker. Functionally, the observed shape changes in CD4 receptor causes dissociation of lymphocyte kinase from the cytoplasmic domain of Salp15-bound CD4 and facilitates an interaction between the exposed V3 loops of CD4-bound gp120 molecule to the extracellular loops of its co-receptor, a step essential for HIV-1 viral entry.

  13. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  14. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  15. Effective application of bicelles for conformational analysis of G protein-coupled receptors by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS. PMID:25740347

  16. Quantitative conformationally sampled pharmacophore for delta opioid ligands: reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2007-04-19

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for delta opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of delta opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the delta opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 3103-3107) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of delta opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174 864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values>0.9, and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental values. PMID:17367120

  17. Interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation revealed by chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bill X; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2006-06-01

    Akt, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in cell survival. Upon growth factor receptor stimulation, cytosolic Akt is recruited to the plasma membrane by phospholipid binding and activated through phosphorylation at Thr(308) and Ser(473). Although crystal structures for the parts of Akt have been reported, neither the three-dimensional structure of the whole molecule nor sequential conformational changes during activation have been demonstrated. In this study, we demonstrated that Akt undergoes dramatic interdomain conformational changes during activation processes by probing the three-dimensional structure of full-length Akt in solution using chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry. The cross-linking results not only provided new structural information but also revealed distinctive spatial arrangements of individual domains in the Akt molecule in resting, membrane-interacted, phosphorylated, and substrate-bound states. Our data allowed a new model for stepwise interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation sequence, setting a stage for the further investigation on Akt-membrane, Akt-protein, and/or Akt-drug interactions in solution to understand molecular mechanisms involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes of cell survival. PMID:16531397

  18. Uropathogenic E. coli adhesin-induced host cell receptor conformational changes: implications in transmembrane signaling transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaibin; Min, Guangwei; Glockshuber, Rudi; Sun, Tung-Tien; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common infectious disease, and is caused predominantly by type 1-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). UPEC initiates infection by attaching to uroplakin Ia, its urothelial surface receptor, via the FimH adhesins capping the distal end of its fimbriae. Uroplakin Ia, together with uroplakins Ib, II and IIIa, forms a 16 nm receptor complex that is assembled into hexagonally packed two-dimensional crystals (urothelial plaques) covering >90% of the urothelial apical surface. Recent studies indicate that FimH is the invasin of UPEC as its attachment to the urothelial surface can induce cellular signaling events including calcium elevation and the phosphorylation of the uroplakin IIIa cytoplasmic tail, leading to cytoskeletal rearrangements and bacterial invasion. However, it remains unknown how the binding of FimH to the uroplakin receptor triggers a signal that can be transmitted through the highly impermeable urothelial apical membrane. We show here by cryo-electron microscopy that FimH-binding to the extracellular domain of UPIa induces global conformational changes in the entire uroplakin receptor complex, including a coordinated movement of the tightly bundled transmembrane helices. This movement of the transmembrane helix bundles can cause a corresponding lateral translocation of the uroplakin cytoplasmic tails, which can be sufficient to trigger downstream signaling events. Our results suggest a novel pathogen-induced transmembrane signal transduction mechanism that plays a key role in the initial stages of UPEC invasion and receptor-mediated bacterial invasion in general. PMID:19577575

  19. Cutting Edge: Il-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase 4 Structures Reveal Novel Features And Multiple Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuglstatter, A.; Villasenor, A.G.; Shaw, D.; Lee, S.W.; Tsing, S.; Niu, L.; Song, K.W.; Barnett, J.W.; Browner, M.F.

    2007-07-09

    L-1R-associated kinase (IRAK)4 plays a central role in innate and adaptive immunity, and is a crucial component in IL-1/TLR signaling. We have determined the crystal structures of the apo and ligand-bound forms of human IRAK4 kinase domain. These structures reveal several features that provide opportunities for the design of selective IRAK4 inhibitors. The N-terminal lobe of the IRAK4 kinase domain is structurally distinctive due to a loop insertion after an extended N-terminal helix. The gatekeeper residue is a tyrosine, a unique feature of the IRAK family. The IRAK4 structures also provide insights into the regulation of its activity. In the apo structure, two conformations coexist, differing in the relative orientation of the two kinase lobes and the position of helix C. In the presence of an ATP analog only one conformation is observed, indicating that this is the active conformation.

  20. Covalent agonists for studying G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Dietmar; Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Hiller, Christine; Zhang, Cheng; Hübner, Harald; Kobilka, Brian K.; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide important insights into the architecture and function of these important drug targets. However, the crystallization of GPCRs in active states is particularly challenging, requiring the formation of stable and conformationally homogeneous ligand-receptor complexes. Native hormones, neurotransmitters, and synthetic agonists that bind with low affinity are ineffective at stabilizing an active state for crystallogenesis. To promote structural studies on the pharmacologically highly relevant class of aminergic GPCRs, we here present the development of covalently binding molecular tools activating Gs-, Gi-, and Gq-coupled receptors. The covalent agonists are derived from the monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, and histamine, and they were accessed using a general and versatile synthetic strategy. We demonstrate that the tool compounds presented herein display an efficient covalent binding mode and that the respective covalent ligand-receptor complexes activate G proteins comparable to the natural neurotransmitters. A crystal structure of the β2-adrenoreceptor in complex with a covalent noradrenaline analog and a conformationally selective antibody (nanobody) verified that these agonists can be used to facilitate crystallogenesis. PMID:25006259

  1. Specific activation of the thyrotropin receptor by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Van Sande, J; Massart, C; Costagliola, S; Allgeier, A; Cetani, F; Vassart, G; Dumont, J E

    1996-05-31

    The identification of 16 different activating mutations in the TSH receptor, found in patients suffering from toxic autonomous adenomas or congenital hyperthyroidism, leads to the concept that this receptor is in a constrained conformation in its wild-type form. We used mild trypsin treatment of CHO-K1 cells or COS-7 cells, stably or transiently transfected with the human TSH receptor, respectively, and measured its consequences on the TSH receptor coupled cascades, i.e. cyclic AMP and inositol-phosphates accumulation. A 2-min, 0.01% trypsin treatment increased stably cyclic AMP but not inositol-phosphates formation. This was not observed after chymotrypsin, thrombin and endoproteinase glu C treatment. The TSH action on cyclic AMP was decreased by only 25%. The effect was also observed in cells expressing the dog TSH receptor. It was not observed in MSH receptor, LH receptor expressing or mock transfected cells (vector alone). It is therefore specific for the TSH receptor, for its action on the Gs/adenylate cyclase cascade, and for the proteolytic cleavage caused by trypsin. Using monoclonal (A. Johnstone and P. Shepherd, personal communication) and polyclonal antibodies directed against the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor, it was shown that treatment by trypsin removes or destroys a VFFEEQ epitope (residues 354-359) from the receptor. The effect mimics the action of TSH as it activates Gs alpha and enhances the action of forskolin. It is not reversible in 1 h. The results support the concept that activation of the receptor (by hormone, autoantibodies, mutations or mild proteolysis) might involve the relief of a built-in negative constrain. They suggest that the C-terminal portion of the large extracellular domain plays a role in the maintenance of this constrain. PMID:8807635

  2. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  3. The Crystal Structure of the Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR2E3/PNR Ligand Binding Domain Reveals a Dimeric Auto-Repressed Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. H. Eileen; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR, NR2E3) is a key transcriptional regulator of human photoreceptor differentiation and maintenance. Mutations in the NR2E3-encoding gene cause various retinal degenerations, including Enhanced S-cone syndrome, retinitis pigmentosa, and Goldman-Favre disease. Although physiological ligands have not been identified, it is believed that binding of small molecule agonists, receptor desumoylation, and receptor heterodimerization may switch NR2E3 from a transcriptional repressor to an activator. While these features make NR2E3 a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of retinal diseases, there has been a clear lack of structural information for the receptor. Here, we report the crystal structure of the apo NR2E3 ligand binding domain (LBD) at 2.8 Å resolution. Apo NR2E3 functions as transcriptional repressor in cells and the structure of its LBD is in a dimeric auto-repressed conformation. In this conformation, the putative ligand binding pocket is filled with bulky hydrophobic residues and the activation-function-2 (AF2) helix occupies the canonical cofactor binding site. Mutations designed to disrupt either the AF2/cofactor-binding site interface or the dimer interface compromised the transcriptional repressor activity of this receptor. Together, these results reveal several conserved structural features shared by related orphan nuclear receptors, suggest that most disease-causing mutations affect the receptor’s structural integrity, and allowed us to model a putative active conformation that can accommodate small ligands in its pocket. PMID:24069298

  4. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  5. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  6. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  7. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  8. Taste substance binding elicits conformational change of taste receptor T1r heterodimer extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Akiyama, Shuji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Ashikawa, Yuji; Kusakabe, Yuko; Krayukhina, Elena; Maruno, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nuemket, Nipawan; Yonekura, Koji; Shimizu, Madoka; Atsumi, Nanako; Yasui, Norihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Sweet and umami tastes are perceived by T1r taste receptors in oral cavity. T1rs are class C G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the extracellular ligand binding domains (LBDs) of T1r1/T1r3 and T1r2/T1r3 heterodimers are responsible for binding of chemical substances eliciting umami or sweet taste. However, molecular analyses of T1r have been hampered due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and protein purification, and thus little is known about mechanisms for taste perception. Here we show the first molecular view of reception of a taste substance by a taste receptor, where the binding of the taste substance elicits a different conformational state of T1r2/T1r3 LBD heterodimer. Electron microscopy has showed a characteristic dimeric structure. Förster resonance energy transfer and X-ray solution scattering have revealed the transition of the dimerization manner of the ligand binding domains, from a widely spread to compactly organized state upon taste substance binding, which may correspond to distinct receptor functional states. PMID:27160511

  9. A Conformational Analysis Study on the Melanocortin 4 Receptor Using Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Mousavi, Atefeh

    2015-09-01

    Taking into account the uncertainties involved in 3D model of biomolecule developed by homology modeling (HM), it is important to opportunely validate the initial structure before employing for different purposes such as drug design. Extended simulation times and the necessity of correct representation of interactions within the protein and the nearby molecules impose significant limitations on molecular dynamics (MD)-based refinement of structures developed by HM. Consequently, there is a pressing requirement for more efficient methods for HM and subsequent validation of developed structure. Multiple MD simulation runs are well suited for producing ensembles of structures. In this context, a computational investigation was presented to study the structure of melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit phospholipids bilayer. Several MD runs with different initial velocities were employed to sample conformations in the neighborhood of the native structure of receptor, collecting trajectories spanning 0.21 ms. The coherence between the results, different structural analysis, and the convergence of parameters derived by principal component analysis (PCA) shows that an accurate description of the MC4R conformational space around the native state was achieved by multiple MD trajectories. PMID:25487745

  10. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors. PMID:25046176

  11. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  12. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  13. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H Peter

    2015-11-10

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure-function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2-amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme-substrate interactions, enzyme-substrate active complex formation, and protein folding-binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  14. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  15. A Proline-Rich Motif Downstream of the Receptor Binding Domain Modulates Conformation and Fusogenicity of Murine Retroviral Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Maurice, Marielle; Roche, Catherine; Russell, Stephen J.; Sitbon, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    1998-01-01

    The entry of retroviruses into cells depends on receptor recognition by the viral envelope surface subunit SU followed by membrane fusion, which is thought to be mediated by a fusion peptide located at the amino terminus of the envelope transmembrane subunit TM. Several fusion determinants have been previously identified in murine leukemia virus (MLV) envelopes, but their functional interrelationships as well as the processes involved in fusion activation upon retroviral receptor recognition remain unelucidated. Despite both structural and functional similarities of their envelope glycoproteins, ecotropic and amphotropic MLVs display two different postbinding properties: (i) while amphotropic MLVs fuse the cells at neutral pH, penetration of ecotropic MLVs is relatively acid pH dependent and (ii) ecotropic envelopes are more efficient than amphotropic envelopes in inducing cell-to-cell fusion and syncytium formation. By exploiting the latter characteristic in the analysis of chimeras of ecotropic and amphotropic MLV envelopes, we show here that substitution of the ecotropic MLV proline-rich region (PRR), located in the SU between the amino-terminal receptor binding domain and the TM-interacting SU carboxy-terminal domains, is sufficient to revert the amphotropic low-fusogenic phenotype into a high-fusogenic one. Furthermore, we have identified potential β-turns in the PRR that control the stability of SU-TM associations as well as the thresholds required to trigger either cell-to-cell or virus-to-cell fusion. These data, demonstrating that the PRR functions as a signal which induces envelope conformational changes leading to fusion, have enabled us to derive envelopes which can infect cells harboring low levels of available amphotropic receptors. PMID:9811733

  16. Functional organization and conformational dynamics of the nicotinic receptor: a plausible structural interpretation of myasthenic mutations.

    PubMed

    Taly, Antoine; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    To understand the structural causes of myasthenic mutations, molecular models of the nicotinic acetycholine receptor were first constructed. Then, the gating transition between resting and open conformation was investigated in silico by normal mode analysis using a physically meaningful description of protein flexibility. This analysis revealed a global quaternary twist motion that opens the ion pore. Second, it was found that most (24/27) of the spontaneous mutations known to cause congenital myasthenia (and autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy) are located either at the interface between subunits or, within a given subunit, at the interface between rigid blocks. These interfaces are modified significantly by the twist mode together with significant changes of the tertiary organization of the subunits. These data provide a qualitative interpretation of the molecular phenotype of pathological mutations responsible for congenital myasthenia. PMID:18567852

  17. Detection of G Protein-selective G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Conformations in Live Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rabia U.; Ritt, Michael; DeVree, Brian T.; Neubig, Richard R.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2013-01-01

    Although several recent studies have reported that GPCRs adopt multiple conformations, it remains unclear how subtle conformational changes are translated into divergent downstream responses. In this study, we report on a novel class of FRET-based sensors that can detect the ligand/mutagenic stabilization of GPCR conformations that promote interactions with G proteins in live cells. These sensors rely on the well characterized interaction between a GPCR and the C terminus of a Gα subunit. We use these sensors to elucidate the influence of the highly conserved (E/D)RY motif on GPCR conformation. Specifically, Glu/Asp but not Arg mutants of the (E/D)RY motif are known to enhance basal GPCR signaling. Hence, it is unclear whether ionic interactions formed by the (E/D)RY motif (ionic lock) are necessary to stabilize basal GPCR states. We find that mutagenesis of the β2-AR (E/D)RY ionic lock enhances interaction with Gs. However, only Glu/Asp but not Arg mutants increase G protein activation. In contrast, mutagenesis of the opsin (E/D)RY ionic lock does not alter its interaction with transducin. Instead, opsin-specific ionic interactions centered on residue Lys-296 are both necessary and sufficient to promote interactions with transducin. Effective suppression of β2-AR basal activity by inverse agonist ICI 118,551 requires ionic interactions formed by the (E/D)RY motif. In contrast, the inverse agonist metoprolol suppresses interactions with Gs and promotes Gi binding, with concomitant pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Taken together, these studies validate the use of the new FRET sensors while revealing distinct structural mechanisms for ligand-dependent GPCR function. PMID:23629648

  18. Deleting the Redundant TSH Receptor C-Peptide Region Permits Generation of the Conformationally Intact Extracellular Domain by Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2015-07-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) extracellular domain (ECD) comprises a N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and an hinge region (HR), the latter contributing to ligand binding and critical for receptor activation. The crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain component has been solved, but previous attempts to generate conformationally intact complete ECD or the isolated HR component for structural analysis have failed. The TSHR HR contains a C-peptide segment that is removed during spontaneous TSHR intramolecular cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits. We hypothesized that deletion of the redundant C-peptide would overcome the obstacle to generating conformationally intact TSHR ECD protein. Indeed, lacking the C-peptide region, the TSHR ECD (termed ECD-D1) and the isolated HR (termed HR-D1) were secreted into medium of insect cells infected with baculoviruses coding for these modified proteins. The identities of TSHR ECD-D1 and HR-D1 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting using TSHR-specific monoclonal antibodies. The TSHR-ECD-D1 in conditioned medium was folded correctly, as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit radiolabeled TSH binding to the TSH holoreceptor. The TSHR ECD-D1 purification was accomplished in a single step using a TSHR monoclonal antibody affinity column, whereas the HR-D1 required a multistep protocol with a low yield. In conclusion, we report a novel approach to generate the TSHR ECD, as well as the isolated HR in insect cells, the former in sufficient amounts for structural studies. However, such studies will require previous complexing of the ECD with a ligand such as TSH or a thyroid-stimulating antibody. PMID:25860033

  19. Binding Selectivity of Abaloparatide for PTH-Type-1-Receptor Conformations and Effects on Downstream Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Gary; Dean, Thomas; Corbin, Braden A; Bahar, Hila; Gardella, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The PTH receptor type 1 (PTHR1) mediates the actions of two endogenous polypeptide ligands, PTH and PTHrP, and thereby plays key roles in bone biology. Based on its capacity to stimulate bone formation, the peptide fragment PTH (1-34) is currently in use as therapy for osteoporosis. Abaloparatide (ABL) is a novel synthetic analog of human PTHrP (1-34) that holds promise as a new osteoporosis therapy, as studies in animals suggest that it can stimulate bone formation with less of the accompanying bone resorption and hypercalcemic effects that can occur with PTH (1-34). Recent studies in vitro suggest that certain PTH or PTHrP ligand analogs can distinguish between two high-affinity PTHR1 conformations, R(0) and RG, and that efficient binding to R(0) results in prolonged signaling responses in cells and prolonged calcemic responses in animals, whereas selective binding to RG results in more transient responses. As intermittent PTH ligand action is known to favor the bone-formation response, whereas continuous ligand action favors the net bone-resorption/calcemic response, we hypothesized that ABL binds more selectively to the RG vs the R(0) PTHR1 conformation than does PTH (1-34), and thus induces more transient signaling responses in cells. We show that ABL indeed binds with greater selectivity to the RG conformation than does PTH (1-34), and as a result of this RG bias, ABL mediates more transient cAMP responses in PTHR1-expressing cells. The findings provide a plausible mechanism (ie, transient signaling via RG-selective binding) that can help account for the favorable anabolic effects that ABL has on bone. PMID:26562265

  20. Conformational ensembles explored dynamically from disordered peptides targeting chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Marian; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Tesauro, Diego; Accardo, Antonella; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Guillon, Jean; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Anna Maria; Ronga, Luisa; Rossi, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the design and the synthesis of two short linear peptides both containing a few amino acids with disorder propensity and an allylic ester group at the C-terminal end. Their structural properties were firstly analyzed by means of experimental techniques in solution such as CD and NMR methods that highlighted peptide flexibility. These results were further confirmed by MD simulations that demonstrated the ability of the peptides to assume conformational ensembles. They revealed a network of transient and dynamic H-bonds and interactions with water molecules. Binding assays with a well-known drug-target, i.e., the CXCR4 receptor, were also carried out in an attempt to verify their biological function and the possibility to use the assays to develop new specific targets for CXCR4. Moreover, our data indicate that these peptides represent useful tools for molecular recognition processes in which a flexible conformation is required in order to obtain an interaction with a specific target. PMID:26030674

  1. Conformational Ensembles Explored Dynamically from Disordered Peptides Targeting Chemokine Receptor CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Marian; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Tesauro, Diego; Accardo, Antonella; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Guillon, Jean; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Anna Maria; Ronga, Luisa; Rossi, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the design and the synthesis of two short linear peptides both containing a few amino acids with disorder propensity and an allylic ester group at the C-terminal end. Their structural properties were firstly analyzed by means of experimental techniques in solution such as CD and NMR methods that highlighted peptide flexibility. These results were further confirmed by MD simulations that demonstrated the ability of the peptides to assume conformational ensembles. They revealed a network of transient and dynamic H-bonds and interactions with water molecules. Binding assays with a well-known drug-target, i.e., the CXCR4 receptor, were also carried out in an attempt to verify their biological function and the possibility to use the assays to develop new specific targets for CXCR4. Moreover, our data indicate that these peptides represent useful tools for molecular recognition processes in which a flexible conformation is required in order to obtain an interaction with a specific target. PMID:26030674

  2. Conformational Changes in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor: Role of the Transmembrane Domain Investigated by Coarse-Grained MetaDynamics Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a dimeric membrane protein that regulates key aspects of cellular function. Activation of the EGFR is linked to changes in the conformation of the transmembrane (TM) domain, brought about by changes in interactions of the TM helices of the membrane lipid bilayer. Using an advanced computational approach that combines Coarse-Grained molecular dynamics and well-tempered MetaDynamics (CG-MetaD), we characterize the large-scale motions of the TM helices, simulating multiple association and dissociation events between the helices in membrane, thus leading to a free energy landscape of the dimerization process. The lowest energy state of the TM domain is a right-handed dimer structure in which the TM helices interact through the N-terminal small-X3-small sequence motif. In addition to this state, which is thought to correspond to the active form of the receptor, we have identified further low-energy states that allow us to integrate with a high level of detail a range of previous experimental observations. These conformations may lead to the active state via two possible activation pathways, which involve pivoting and rotational motions of the helices, respectively. Molecular dynamics also reveals correlation between the conformational changes of the TM domains and of the intracellular juxtamembrane domains, paving the way for a comprehensive understanding of EGFR signaling at the cell membrane. PMID:27459426

  3. Conformational Changes in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor: Role of the Transmembrane Domain Investigated by Coarse-Grained MetaDynamics Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lelimousin, Mickaël; Limongelli, Vittorio; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-24

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a dimeric membrane protein that regulates key aspects of cellular function. Activation of the EGFR is linked to changes in the conformation of the transmembrane (TM) domain, brought about by changes in interactions of the TM helices of the membrane lipid bilayer. Using an advanced computational approach that combines Coarse-Grained molecular dynamics and well-tempered MetaDynamics (CG-MetaD), we characterize the large-scale motions of the TM helices, simulating multiple association and dissociation events between the helices in membrane, thus leading to a free energy landscape of the dimerization process. The lowest energy state of the TM domain is a right-handed dimer structure in which the TM helices interact through the N-terminal small-X3-small sequence motif. In addition to this state, which is thought to correspond to the active form of the receptor, we have identified further low-energy states that allow us to integrate with a high level of detail a range of previous experimental observations. These conformations may lead to the active state via two possible activation pathways, which involve pivoting and rotational motions of the helices, respectively. Molecular dynamics also reveals correlation between the conformational changes of the TM domains and of the intracellular juxtamembrane domains, paving the way for a comprehensive understanding of EGFR signaling at the cell membrane. PMID:27459426

  4. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  5. Potent activity of a PK/PBAN analog with an (E)-alkene, trans-Pro mimic identifies the Pro orientation and core conformation during interaction with HevPBANR-C receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) family plays a multifunctional role in an array of important physiological processes in insects, including regulation of sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. A cyclic PK/PBAN analog (cyclo[NTSFTPRL]) retains significant activity...

  6. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  7. An Unusual Conformation of MSH Analogues Leads to a Selective Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor Antagonist for Targeting Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Minying; Stankova, Magda; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Mayorov, Alexander; Yang, Zhehui; Trivedi, Devendra; Cabello, Christopher; Hruby, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    γ-MSH (γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone: H-Tyr-Val-Met-Gly-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Asp-Arg-Phe-Gly-OH), with its exquisite specificity and potency, has recently created much excitement as a drug lead. However, this peptide like most peptides susceptible to proteolysis in vivo which potentially decreases its beneficial activities. In our continued effort to design a proteolytically stable with specific receptor binding ligand, we have engineered peptides by cyclizing γ-MSH using a thioether bridge. A number of novel cyclic truncated γ-MSH analogues were designed and synthesized, in which a thioether bridge was incorporated between a cysteine side chain and an N-terminal bromoacyl group. One of these peptides, cyclo-[(CH2)3CO-Gly1-His2-D-Phe3-Arg4-D-Trp5-Cys(S-)6]-Asp7-Arg8-Phe9-Gly10-NH2, demonstrated potent antagonist activity and receptor selectivity for the human melanocortin 1 receptor (hMC1R) (IC50 = 17 nM). This novel peptide is the most selective antagonist for the human hMC1R to date. Further pharmacological studies have shown that this peptide can specifically target melanoma cells. The NMR analysis of this peptide in a membrane–like environment revealed a new turn structure, specific to the hMC1R antagonist, at the C terminal, wherein the side chain and backbone conformation of D-Trp5 and Phe9 of the peptide are contributors to the hMC1R selectivity. Cyclization strategies represent an approach for stabilizing bioactive peptides while keeping their full potencies and should boost applications of peptide-based drugs in human medicine. PMID:23276279

  8. Synthesis, absolute configuration, conformational analysis and binding affinity properties of enantiomeric forms of DAU 5750, a novel M1-M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Turconi, M; Gozzo, A; Schiavi, G; Fronza, G; Mele, A; Bravo, P

    1994-12-01

    Both the enantiomeric forms of DAU 5750, a novel muscarinic receptor antagonist, have been synthesized in order to assess the relevance of configurational/conformational features for high affinity binding to muscarinic receptor subtypes. The attribution of absolute stereochemistry and conformational analysis by means of molecular modelling and NMR techniques are also reported. PMID:7788300

  9. Conformational Changes Leading to T7 DNA Delivery upon Interaction with the Bacterial Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Verónica A.; Pulido-Cid, Mar; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Bocanegra, Rebeca; van Raaij, Mark J.; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Cuervo, Ana; Carrascosa, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of bacteriophages protect their genetic material by packaging the nucleic acid in concentric layers to an almost crystalline concentration inside protein shells (capsid). This highly condensed genome also has to be efficiently injected into the host bacterium in a process named ejection. Most phages use a specialized complex (often a tail) to deliver the genome without disrupting cell integrity. Bacteriophage T7 belongs to the Podoviridae family and has a short, non-contractile tail formed by a tubular structure surrounded by fibers. Here we characterize the kinetics and structure of bacteriophage T7 DNA delivery process. We show that T7 recognizes lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli rough strains through the fibers. Rough LPS acts as the main phage receptor and drives DNA ejection in vitro. The structural characterization of the phage tail after ejection using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods revealed the major conformational changes needed for DNA delivery at low resolution. Interaction with the receptor causes fiber tilting and opening of the internal tail channel by untwisting the nozzle domain, allowing release of DNA and probably of the internal head proteins. PMID:25697363

  10. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Linda G; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G; Pickering, Darryl S; Plested, Andrew J R; Kristensen, Anders S

    2016-07-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  11. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  12. Conformational Restriction and Enantioseparation Increase Potency and Selectivity of Cyanoguanidine-Type Histamine H4 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Roland; Nordemann, Uwe; Strasser, Andrea; Wittmann, Hans-Joachim; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-04-14

    2-Cyano-1-[4-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)butyl]-3-[2-(phenylsulfanyl)ethyl]guanidine (UR-PI376, 1) is a potent and selective agonist of the human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R). To gain information on the active conformation, we synthesized analogues of 1 with a cyclopentane-1,3-diyl linker. Affinities and functional activities were determined at recombinant hHxR (x: 1-4) subtypes on Sf9 cell membranes (radioligand binding, [(35)S]GTPγS, or GTPase assays) and in part in luciferase assays on human or mouse H4R (HEK-293 cells). The most potent H4R agonists among 14 racemates were separated by chiral HPLC, yielding eight enantiomerically pure compounds. Configurations were assigned based on X-ray structures of intermediates and a stereocontrolled synthetic pathway. (+)-2-Cyano-1-{[trans-(1S,3S)-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopentyl]methyl}-3-[2-(phenylsulfanyl)ethyl]guanidine ((1S,3S)-UR-RG98, 39a) was the most potent H4R agonist in this series (EC50 11 nM; H4R vs H3R, >100-fold selectivity; H1R, H2R, negligible activities), whereas the optical antipode proved to be an H4R antagonist ([(35)S]GTPγS assay). MD simulations confirmed differential stabilization of the active and inactive H4R state by the enantiomers. PMID:27007611

  13. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α N-Terminus Conformation and Function by Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Rajbhandari, Prashant; Finn, Greg; Solodin, Natalia M.; Singarapu, Kiran K.; Sahu, Sarata C.; Markley, John L.; Kadunc, Kelley J.; Ellison-Zelski, Stephanie J.; Kariagina, Anastasia; Haslam, Sandra Z.; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), a key driver of growth in the majority of breast cancers, contains an unstructured transactivation domain (AF1) in its N terminus that is a convergence point for growth factor and hormonal activation. This domain is controlled by phosphorylation, but how phosphorylation impacts AF1 structure and function is unclear. We found that serine 118 (S118) phosphorylation of the ERα AF1 region in response to estrogen (agonist), tamoxifen (antagonist), and growth factors results in recruitment of the peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1. Phosphorylation of S118 is critical for Pin1 binding, and mutation of S118 to alanine prevents this association. Importantly, Pin1 isomerizes the serine118-proline119 bond from a cis to trans isomer, with a concomitant increase in AF1 transcriptional activity. Pin1 overexpression promotes ligand-independent and tamoxifen-inducible activity of ERα and growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. Pin1 expression correlates with proliferation in ERα-positive rat mammary tumors. These results establish phosphorylation-coupled proline isomerization as a mechanism modulating AF1 functional activity and provide insight into the role of a conformational switch in the functional regulation of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of ERα. PMID:22064478

  14. Detection of Receptor-Induced Glycoprotein Conformational Changes on Enveloped Virions by Using Confocal Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaonan; Liu, Qian; Benavides-Montano, Javier A.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Aston, D. Eric; Rasco, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Conformational changes in the glycoproteins of enveloped viruses are critical for membrane fusion, which enables viral entry into cells and the pathological cell-cell fusion (syncytia) associated with some viral infections. However, technological capabilities for identifying viral glycoproteins and their conformational changes on actual enveloped virus surfaces are generally scarce, challenging, and time-consuming. Our model, Nipah virus (NiV), is a syncytium-forming biosafety level 4 pathogen with a high mortality rate (40 to 75%) in humans. Once the NiV attachment glycoprotein (G) (NiV-G) binds the cell receptor ephrinB2 or -B3, G triggers conformational changes in the fusion glycoprotein (F) that result in membrane fusion and viral entry. We demonstrate that confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can, within minutes, simultaneously identify specific G and F glycoprotein signals and receptor-induced conformational changes in NiV-F on NiV virus-like particles (VLPs). First, we identified reproducible G- and F-specific Raman spectral features on NiV VLPs containing M (assembly matrix protein), G, and/or F or on NiV/vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotyped virions via second-derivative transformations and principal component analysis (PCA). Statistical analyses validated our PCA models. Dynamic temperature-induced conformational changes in F and G or receptor-induced target membrane-dependent conformational changes in F were monitored in NiV pseudovirions in situ in real time by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Advantageously, Raman spectroscopy can identify specific protein signals in relatively impure samples. Thus, this proof-of-principle technological development has implications for the rapid identification and biostability characterization of viruses in medical, veterinary, and food samples and for the analysis of virion glycoprotein conformational changes in situ during viral entry. PMID:23283947

  15. Small molecular probes for G-protein-coupled C5a receptors: conformationally constrained antagonists derived from the C terminus of the human plasma protein C5a.

    PubMed

    Wong, A K; Finch, A M; Pierens, G K; Craik, D J; Taylor, S M; Fairlie, D P

    1998-08-27

    Activation of the human complement system of plasma proteins in response to infection or injury produces a 4-helix bundle glycoprotein (74 amino acids) known as C5a. C5a binds to G-protein-coupled receptors on cell surfaces triggering receptor-ligand internalization, signal transduction, and powerful inflammatory responses. Since excessive levels of C5a are associated with autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders, inhibitors of receptor activation may have therapeutic potential. We now report solution structures and receptor-binding and antagonist activities for some of the first small molecule antagonists of C5a derived from its hexapeptide C terminus. The antagonist NMe-Phe-Lys-Pro-D-Cha-Trp-D-Arg-CO2H (1) surprisingly shows an unusually well-defined solution structure as determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This is one of the smallest acyclic peptides found to possess a defined solution conformation, which can be explained by the constraining role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding. NOE and coupling constant data, slow deuterium exchange, and a low dependence on temperature for the chemical shift of the D-Cha-NH strongly indicate an inverse gamma turn stabilized by a D-Cha-NH. OC-Lys hydrogen bond. Smaller conformational populations are associated with a hydrogen bond between Trp-NH.OC-Lys, defining a type II beta turn distorted by the inverse gamma turn incorporated within it. An excellent correlation between receptor-affinity and antagonist activity is indicated for a limited set of synthetic peptides. Conversion of the C-terminal carboxylate of 1 to an amide decreases antagonist potency 5-fold, but potency is increased up to 10-fold over 1 if the amide bond is made between the C-terminal carboxylate and a Lys/Orn side chain to form a cyclic analogue. The solution structure of cycle 6 also shows gamma and beta turns; however, the latter occurs in a different position, and there are clear conformational changes in 6 vs 1 that result in enhanced activity

  16. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  17. Differential Active Site Loop Conformations Mediate Promiscuous Activities in the Lactonase SsoPox

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Mikael; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263) that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability. PMID:24086491

  18. β-Arrestin biosensors reveal a rapid, receptor-dependent activation/deactivation cycle.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Lorenz, Kristina; Nuber, Andreas; Milligan, Graeme; Tobin, Andrew B; Lohse, Martin J; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2016-03-31

    (β-)Arrestins are important regulators of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). They bind to active, phosphorylated GPCRs and thereby shut off 'classical' signalling to G proteins, trigger internalization of GPCRs via interaction with the clathrin machinery and mediate signalling via 'non-classical' pathways. In addition to two visual arrestins that bind to rod and cone photoreceptors (termed arrestin1 and arrestin4), there are only two (non-visual) β-arrestin proteins (β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2, also termed arrestin2 and arrestin3), which regulate hundreds of different (non-visual) GPCRs. Binding of these proteins to GPCRs usually requires the active form of the receptors plus their phosphorylation by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). The binding of receptors or their carboxy terminus as well as certain truncations induce active conformations of (β-)arrestins that have recently been solved by X-ray crystallography. Here we investigate both the interaction of β-arrestin with GPCRs, and the β-arrestin conformational changes in real time and in living human cells, using a series of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based β-arrestin2 biosensors. We observe receptor-specific patterns of conformational changes in β-arrestin2 that occur rapidly after the receptor-β-arrestin2 interaction. After agonist removal, these changes persist for longer than the direct receptor interaction. Our data indicate a rapid, receptor-type-specific, two-step binding and activation process between GPCRs and β-arrestins. They further indicate that β-arrestins remain active after dissociation from receptors, allowing them to remain at the cell surface and presumably signal independently. Thus, GPCRs trigger a rapid, receptor-specific activation/deactivation cycle of β-arrestins, which permits their active signalling. PMID:27007855

  19. Structural Basis for Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Binding to the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and Design of Conformation-selective Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) are two related peptides that control calcium/phosphate homeostasis and bone development, respectively, through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R), a class B G protein-coupled receptor. Both peptides hold clinical interest for their capacities to stimulate bone formation. PTH and PTHrP display different selectivity for two distinct PTH1R conformations, but how their binding to the receptor differs is unclear. The high resolution crystal structure of PTHrP bound to the extracellular domain (ECD) of PTH1R reveals that PTHrP binds as an amphipathic {alpha}-helix to the same hydrophobic groove in the ECD as occupied by PTH, but in contrast to a straight, continuous PTH helix, the PTHrP helix is gently curved and C-terminally 'unwound.' The receptor accommodates the altered binding modes by shifting the side chain conformations of two residues within the binding groove: Leu-41 and Ile-115, the former acting as a rotamer toggle switch to accommodate PTH/PTHrP sequence divergence, and the latter adapting to the PTHrP curvature. Binding studies performed with PTH/PTHrP hybrid ligands having reciprocal exchanges of residues involved in different contacts confirmed functional consequences for the altered interactions and enabled the design of altered PTH and PTHrP peptides that adopt the ECD-binding mode of the opposite peptide. Hybrid peptides that bound the ECD poorly were selective for the G protein-coupled PTH1R conformation. These results establish a molecular model for better understanding of how two biologically distinct ligands can act through a single receptor and provide a template for designing better PTH/PTHrP therapeutics.

  20. Divalent cations activate TRPV1 through promoting conformational change of the extracellular region

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Ma, Linlin; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Divalent cations Mg2+ and Ba2+ selectively and directly potentiate transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 heat activation by lowering the activation threshold into the room temperature range. We found that Mg2+ potentiates channel activation only from the extracellular side; on the intracellular side, Mg2+ inhibits channel current. By dividing the extracellularly accessible region of the channel protein into small segments and perturbing the structure of each segment with sequence replacement mutations, we observed that the S1–S2 linker, the S3–S4 linker, and the pore turret are all required for Mg2+ potentiation. Sequence replacements at these regions substantially reduced or eliminated Mg2+-induced activation at room temperature while sparing capsaicin activation. Heat activation was affected by many, but not all, of these structural alternations. These observations indicate that extracellular linkers and the turret may interact with each other. Site-directed fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements further revealed that, like heat, Mg2+ also induces structural changes in the pore turret. Interestingly, turret movement induced by Mg2+ precedes channel activation, suggesting that Mg2+-induced conformational change in the extracellular region most likely serves as the cause of channel activation instead of a coincidental or accommodating structural adjustment. PMID:24344245

  1. Best Matching Protein Conformations and Docking Programs for a Virtual Screening Campaign Against SMO Receptor.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Giorgio; Di Maio, Danilo; La Pietra, Valeria; Cosconati, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    SMO receptor is one of the main components of the Hedgehog biochemical pathway. In the last decades compelling body of evidence demonstrated that this receptor is a pertinent target for the treatment of various types of solid tumors. Recently, the X-ray determination of the three-dimensional structure of SMO in complex with different antagonists opened up the way for the structure-based design of new antagonists for this receptor that could possibly overcome the limitations connected with the induction of acquired tumor resistance. Herein, taking advantage of three different docking software (namely Glide, PLANTS, and Vina) and of the available SMO structures we set up a retrospective virtual screening (VS) protocol. A database, made up by known SMO antagonists and compounds with no alleged activity against the receptor was created and screened against the different SMO structures. To evaluate the performance of the ranking in VS calculations different statistical metrics (EF, AUAC and BEDROC) were employed allowing to identify the best performing VS docking protocol. Results of these studies will serve as a platform for the application of structure-based VS against the pharmaceutically relevant SMO receptor. PMID:27546038

  2. The role of ECL2 in CGRP receptor activation: a combined modelling and experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Michael. J.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Taddese, Bruck; Karakullukcu, Z. Gamze; Barwell, James; Smith, Kevin J.; Hay, Debbie L.; Poyner, David R.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Conner, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor is a complex of a calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), which is a family B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1. The role of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CLR in binding CGRP and coupling to Gs was investigated using a combination of mutagenesis and modelling. An alanine scan of residues 271–294 of CLR showed that the ability of CGRP to produce cAMP was impaired by point mutations at 13 residues; most of these also impaired the response to adrenomedullin (AM). These data were used to select probable ECL2-modelled conformations that are involved in agonist binding, allowing the identification of the likely contacts between the peptide and receptor. The implications of the most likely structures for receptor activation are discussed. PMID:24047872

  3. RNA aptamers as conformational probes and regulatory agents for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Dupont, Daniel M; Andersen, Thomas B; Nielsen, Anne F; Sang, Lu; Brix, Ditte M; Jensen, Jan K; Broos, Thomas; Hendrickx, Maarten L V; Christensen, Anni; Kjems, Jørgen; Andreasen, Peter A

    2010-05-18

    The hallmark of serpins is the ability to undergo the so-called "stressed-to-relaxed" switch during which the surface-exposed reactive center loop (RCL) becomes incorporated as strand 4 in central beta-sheet A. RCL insertion drives not only the inhibitory reaction of serpins with their target serine proteases but also the conversion to the inactive latent state. RCL insertion is coupled to conformational changes in the flexible joint region flanking beta-sheet A. One interesting serpin is plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a fast and specific inhibitor of the serine proteases tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Via its flexible joints' region, native PAI-1 binds vitronectin and relaxed, protease-complexed PAI-1 certain endocytosis receptors. From a library of 35-nucleotides long 2'-fluoropyrimidine-containing RNA oligonucleotides, we have isolated two aptamers binding PAI-1 by the flexible joint region with low nanomolar K(D) values. One of the aptamers exhibited measurable binding to native PAI-1 only, while the other also bound relaxed PAI-1. While none of the aptamers inhibited the antiproteolytic effect of PAI-1, both aptamers inhibited vitronectin binding and the relaxed PAI-1-binding aptamer also endocytosis receptor binding. The aptamer binding exclusively to native PAI-1 increased the half-life for the latency transition to more than 6 h, manyfold more than vitronectin. Contact with Lys124 in the flexible joint region was critical for strong inhibition of the latency transition and the lack of binding to relaxed PAI-1. We conclude that aptamers yield important information about the serpin conformational switch and, because they can compete with high-affinity protein-protein interactions, may provide leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:20387790

  4. Distinct Conformations of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors Mediate MHC Class I Recognition in Trans and Cis

    SciTech Connect

    Back, J.; Malchiodi, E; Cho, S; Scarpellino, L; Schneider, P; Kerzic, M; Mariuzza, R; Held, W

    2009-01-01

    Certain cell-surface receptors engage ligands expressed on juxtaposed cells and ligands on the same cell. The structural basis for trans versus cis binding is not known. Here, we showed that Ly49 natural killer (NK) cell receptors bound two MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules in trans when the two ligand-binding domains were backfolded onto the long stalk region. In contrast, dissociation of the ligand-binding domains from the stalk and their reorientation relative to the NK cell membrane allowed monovalent binding of MHC-I in cis. The distinct conformations (backfolded and extended) define the structural basis for cis-trans binding by Ly49 receptors and explain the divergent functional consequences of cis versus trans interactions. Further analyses identified specific stalk segments that were not required for MHC-I binding in trans but were essential for inhibitory receptor function. These data identify multiple distinct roles of stalk regions for receptor function.

  5. Interaction of ibogaine with human alpha3beta4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Rosenberg, Avraham; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Feuerbach, Dominik; Yuan, Xiao Juan; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP) with human (h) alpha3beta4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was determined by functional and structural approaches including, radioligand binding assays, Ca2+ influx detections, and thermodynamic and kinetics measurements. The results established that (a) ibogaine inhibits (+/-)-epibatidine-induced Ca2+ influx in h(alpha)3beta4 AChRs with approximately 9-fold higher potency than that for PCP, (b) [3H]ibogaine binds to a single site in the h(alpha)3beta4 AChR ion channel with relatively high affinity (Kd = 0.46 +/- 0.06 microM), and ibogaine inhibits [3H]ibogaine binding to the desensitized h(alpha)3beta4 AChR with slightly higher affinity compared to the resting AChR. This is explained by a slower dissociation rate from the desensitized ion channel compared to the resting ion channel, and (c) PCP inhibits [3H]ibogaine binding to the h(alpha)3beta4 AChR, suggesting overlapping sites. The experimental results correlate with the docking simulations suggesting that ibogaine and PCP interact with a binding domain located between the serine (position 6') and valine/phenylalanine (position 13') rings. This interaction is mediated mainly by van der Waals contacts, which is in agreement with the observed enthalpic contribution determined by non-linear chromatography. However, the calculated entropic contribution also indicates local conformational changes. Collectively our data suggest that ibogaine and PCP bind to overlapping sites located between the serine and valine/phenylalanine rings, to finally block the AChR ion channel, and in the case of ibogaine, to probably maintain the AChR in the desensitized state for longer time. PMID:20684041

  6. Flexibility in the insulin receptor ectodomain enables docking of insulin in crystallographic conformation observed in a hormone-bound microreceptor.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Harish

    2014-01-01

    Insulin binding to the insulin receptor (IR) is the first key step in initiating downstream signaling cascades for glucose homeostasis in higher organisms. The molecular details of insulin recognition by IR are not yet completely understood, but a picture of hormone/receptor interactions at one of the epitopes (Site 1) is beginning to emerge from recent structural evidence. However, insulin-bound structures of truncated IR suggest that crystallographic conformation of insulin cannot be accommodated in the full IR ectodomain due to steric overlap of insulin with the first two type III fibronectin domains (F1 and F2), which are contributed to the insulin binding-pocket by the second subunit in the IR homodimer. A conformational change in the F1-F2 pair has thus been suggested. In this work, we present an all-atom structural model of complex of insulin and the IR ectodomain, where no structural overlap of insulin with the receptor domains (F1 and F2) is observed. This structural model was arrived at by flexibly fitting parts of our earlier insulin/IR all-atom model into the simulated density maps of crystallized constructs combined with conformational sampling from apo-IR solution conformations. Importantly, our experimentally-consistent model helps rationalize yet unresolved Site. PMID:25309993

  7. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  9. Conformationally Constrained Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3: Evaluation and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Pijus K.; Limbrick, Donald; Coleman, David R.; Dyer, Garrett A.; Ren, Zhiyong; Birtwistle, J. Sanderson; Xiong, Chiyi; Chen, Xiaomin; Briggs, James M.; McMurray, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is involved in aberrant growth and survival signals in malignant tumor cells and is a validated target for anti-cancer drug design. We are targeting its SH2 domain to prevent docking to cytokine and growth factor receptors and subsequent signaling. The amino acids of our lead phosphopeptide, Ac-pTyr-Leu-Pro-Gln-Thr-Val-NH2, were replaced with conformationally constrained mimics. Structure-affinity studies led to the peptidomimetic, pCinn-Haic-Gln-NHBn (21) which had an IC50 of 162 nM (fluorescence polarization), as compared to 290 nM for the lead phosphopeptide (pCinn = 4-phosphoryloxycinnamate, Haic = (2S,5S)-5-amino-1,2,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-4-oxo-azepino[3,2,1-hi]indole-2-carboxylic acid). pCinn-Haic-Gln-OH was docked to the SH2 domain (AUTODOCK) and the two highest populated clusters were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations. Both converged to a common peptide conformation. The complex exhibits unique hydrogen bonding between Haic and Gln and Stat3 as well as hydrophobic interactions between the protein and pCinn and Haic. PMID:19334714

  10. Conformational state of human cardiac 5-HT(4(g)) receptors influences the functional effects of polyclonal anti-5-HT(4) receptor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2007-04-01

    The functional effects of the anti-G21V antibody directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT(4) receptors can differ when the receptors are expressed in different cell lines. Here, we extend these studies to show variation in the responses of 5-HT(4(g)) receptors to the antibody within the same expression system. In a previous report no effect of the anti-G21V antibodies had been shown upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in CHO cells. Here the same antibodies alone or when added before 5-HT had a functional "inverse-agonist like" effect upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in a separate line of CHO cells. Although these CHO cells showed a lower efficacy of cAMP production evoked by 5-HT than the previous report they express a similar h5-HT(4(g)) receptor density. Inhibition of either phosphodiesterases or Gi proteins had no effect upon the action of the antibody. Conformational states of the 5-HT(4) receptor and/or equilibrium between different states of receptors may then determine the functional effect of antibodies against this receptor. PMID:17222392

  11. The electrostatic interactions of relaxin-3 with receptor RXFP4 and the influence of its B-chain C-terminal conformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yi; Guo, Yu-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Jie; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2014-07-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as insulin-like peptide 7) is an insulin/relaxin-superfamily peptide hormone that can bind and activate three relaxin-family peptide receptors: RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1. Recently, we identified key electrostatic interactions between relaxin-3 and its cognate receptor RXFP3 by using a charge-exchange mutagenesis approach. In the present study, the electrostatic interactions between relaxin-3 and RXFP4 were investigated with the same approach. Mutagenesis of the negatively charged extracellular residues of human RXFP4 identified a conserved EXXXD(100-104) motif that is essential for RXFP4 activation by relaxin-3. Mutagenesis of the conserved positively charged Arg residues of relaxin-3 demonstrated that B12Arg, B16Arg and B26Arg were all involved in the binding and activation of RXFP4, especially B26Arg. The activity complementation between the mutant ligands and the mutant receptors suggested two probable electrostatic interaction pairs: Glu100 of RXFP4 versus B26Arg of relaxin-3, and Asp104 of RXFP4 versus both B12Arg and B16Arg of relaxin-3. For interaction with the essential EXXXD motifs of both RXFP3 and RXFP4, a folding-back conformation of the relaxin-3 B-chain C-terminus seems to be critical, because it brings B26Arg sufficiently close to B12Arg and B16Arg. To test this hypothesis, we replaced the conserved B23Gly-B24Gly dipeptide of relaxin-3 with an Ala-Ser dipeptide that occupied the corresponding position of insulin-like peptide 5 and resulted in an extended helical conformation. The mutant relaxin-3 showed a significant decrease in receptor-activation potency towards both RXFP3 and RXFP4, suggesting that a folding-back conformation of the B-chain C-terminus was important for relaxin-3 to efficiently interact with the EXXXD motifs of both receptors. PMID:24802387

  12. Transmembrane potential polarization, calcium influx, and receptor conformational state modulate the sensitivity of the imidacloprid-insensitive neuronal insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Marques, Olivier; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Thany, Steeve H; Lapied, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent studies revealed that their efficiency was altered by the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process and the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the regulation of nAChRs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology adapted for dissociated cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, we demonstrated that intracellular factors involved in the regulation of nAChR function modulated neonicotinoid sensitivity. DUM neurons were known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR subtypes: nAChR1 and nAChR2. Whereas nAChR1 was sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 was insensitive to this insecticide. Here, we demonstrated that, like nicotine, acetamiprid and clothianidin, other types of neonicotinoid insecticides, acted as agonists on the nAChR2 subtype. Using acetamiprid, we revealed that both steady-state depolarization and hyperpolarization affected nAChR2 sensitivity. The measurement of the input membrane resistance indicated that change in the acetamiprid-induced agonist activity was related to the receptor conformational state. Using cadmium chloride, ω-conotoxin GVIA, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-acetamide (LOE 908), we found that inhibition of calcium influx through high voltage-activated calcium channels and transient receptor potential γ (TRPγ) activated by both depolarization and hyperpolarization increased nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Finally, using N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W7), forskolin, and cAMP, we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase sensitive to the calcium/calmodulin complex regulated internal cAMP concentration, which in turn modulated TRPγ function and nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Similar TRPγ-induced modulatory effects were also obtained when clothianidin was tested. These findings bring insights into the signaling pathway modulating

  13. Activation of NMDA receptors and the mechanism of inhibition by ifenprodil.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Nami; Karakas, Erkan; Grant, Timothy; Simorowski, Noriko; Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Furukawa, Hiro

    2016-06-01

    The physiology of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is fundamental to brain development and function. NMDA receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors that function as heterotetramers composed mainly of GluN1 and GluN2 subunits. Activation of NMDA receptors requires binding of neurotransmitter agonists to a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and structural rearrangement of an amino-terminal domain (ATD). Recent crystal structures of GluN1-GluN2B NMDA receptors bound to agonists and an allosteric inhibitor, ifenprodil, represent the allosterically inhibited state. However, how the ATD and LBD move to activate the NMDA receptor ion channel remains unclear. Here we applied X-ray crystallography, single-particle electron cryomicroscopy and electrophysiology to rat NMDA receptors to show that, in the absence of ifenprodil, the bi-lobed structure of GluN2 ATD adopts an open conformation accompanied by rearrangement of the GluN1-GluN2 ATD heterodimeric interface, altering subunit orientation in the ATD and LBD and forming an active receptor conformation that gates the ion channel. PMID:27135925

  14. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  15. Conformation of the C1 phorbol-ester-binding domain participates in the activating conformational change of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C; Slater, S J; Stagliano, B A; Stubbs, C D

    1999-01-01

    The fluorescent phorbol ester 12-N-methylanthraniloylphorbol 13-acetate [sapintoxin D (SAPD)] was used as both the activator and the probe for the activating conformational change of the C1 domain of recombinant protein kinase C (PKC)alpha. Fluorescence emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy measurements of SAPD in fully active membrane-associated PKC show that there is a relatively hydrophobic environment and restricted motional freedom characterizing the phorbol-ester-binding site. SAPD also interacts with the membrane lipids so that it was necessary to resort to time-resolved anisotropy measurements to resolve the signals corresponding to PKC-bound SAPD from that associated with buffer and lipid. In the presence of membrane lipids (unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, 4:1 molar ratio) and Ca(2+), at a concentration sufficient to activate the enzyme fully, a long correlation time characteristic of highly restricted motion was observed for PKC-associated SAPD. The fraction of SAPD molecules displaying this restricted motion, in comparison with the total SAPD including that in lipids and in buffer, increased with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and paralleled the appearance of enzyme activity, whereas the rotational correlation time remained constant. This could be rationalized as an increase in the number of active PKC conformers in the total population of PKC molecules. It therefore seems that there is a distinct conformation of the C1 activator-binding domain associated with the active form of PKC. The addition of SAPD and dioleoyl-sn-glycerol together produced an activity higher than that achievable by either activator alone both at concentrations that alone induced maximal activity for the respective activator; this higher activity was associated with a further restriction in SAPD motion. Increasing the cholesterol concentration, the phosphatidylethanolamine concentration, the sn-2 unsaturation in phosphatidylcholine

  16. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  17. Identification of hydrophobic interactions between relaxin-3 and its receptor RXFP3: implication for a conformational change in the B-chain C-terminus during receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng-Jun; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Jia-Hui; Wei, Dian; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide implicated in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. Their electrostatic interactions have been recently identified, and involves three positively charged B-chain residues (B12Arg, B16Arg, and B26Arg) of relaxin-3 and two negatively charged residues (Glu141 and Asp145) in a highly conserved ExxxD motif at the extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain of RXFP3. To investigate their hydrophobic interactions, in the present work we deleted the highly conserved B-chain C-terminal B27Trp residue of relaxin-3, and mutated four highly conserved aromatic residues (Phe137, Trp138, Phe146, and Trp148) around the ExxxD motif of RXFP3. The resultant [∆B27W]relaxin-3 exhibited approximately tenfold lower binding potency and ~1000-fold lower activation potency towards wild-type RXFP3, confirming its importance for relaxin-3 function. Although the RXFP3 mutants could be normally trafficked to cell membrane, they had quite different activities. [F137A]RXFP3 could normally distinguish wild-type relaxin-3 and [∆B27W]relaxin-3 in binding and activation assays, whereas [W138A]RXFP3 lost most of this capability, suggesting that the Trp138 residue of RXFP3 forms hydrophobic interactions with the B27Trp residue of relaxin-3. The hydrophobic Trp138 residue and the formerly identified negatively charged Glu141 and Asp145 residues in the highly conserved WxxExxxD motif may thus form a functional surface that is important for interaction with relaxin-3. We hypothesize that the relaxin-3 B-chain C-terminus changes from the original folding-back conformation to an extended conformation during binding with RXFP3, to allow its B27Trp and B26Arg residues to interact with the Trp138 and Glu141 residues of RXFP3, respectively. PMID:27193232

  18. Binding of Gq protein stabilizes the activated state of the muscarinic receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) induces various cellular responses through interactions with G proteins. The key trigger of GPCR activation is agonist binding. It is reportedly known that the agonist-bound active conformation of the GPCRs, such as the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 1 (M(1)R), can be affected by the coupling of G proteins and by depolarization of the membrane potential. Here we aimed at investigating their effects on the structural rearrangements of the M(1)Rs between the active and quiescent states, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. For this purpose, fluorescent M(1)R constructs that maintained intact activation of the Gq pathway and interaction with Gq were used. We captured the agonist-induced conformational changes of the M(1)R as the FRET decreases and found that the FRET decreases were enhanced by co-expression of the Gq subunits. In addition, co-expression of the Gq subunits decelerated the recovery of the declined FRET upon removal of the agonists, which was slower than the dissociation of the Gq subunits from the receptor. These results suggested that Gq binding stabilizes the agonist-induced activated conformation of the M(1)R. We also found that depolarization of the membrane potential slightly but significantly enhanced the agonist-induced FRET decrease, by accelerating the agonist-induced conformational changes. Thus, structural rearrangement analyses by FRET revealed that Gq coupling stabilizes the active conformation of the M(1)R and also suggested that depolarization accelerates the transition from quiescent to activation conformation. PMID:23085334

  19. Structural insights into μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N.; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Kato, Hideaki E.; Livingston, Kathryn E.; Thorsen, Thor S.; Kling, Ralf; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M.; Traynor, John R.; Weis, William I.; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To understand the structural basis for μOR activation, we obtained a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and stabilized by a G protein-mimetic camelid-antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three GPCRs. PMID:26245379

  20. Dynamic correlation networks in human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Fidelak, Jeremy; Ferrer, Silvia; Oberlin, Michael; Moras, Dino; Dejaegere, Annick; Stote, Roland H

    2010-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor (PPAR-γ) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptor proteins that function as ligand-dependent transcription factors and plays a specific physiological role as a regulator of lipid metabolism. A number of experimental studies have suggested that allostery plays an important role in the functioning of PPAR-γ. Here we use normal-mode analysis of PPAR-γ to characterize a network of dynamically coupled amino acids that link physiologically relevant binding surfaces such as the ligand-dependent activation domain AF-2 with the ligand binding site and the heterodimer interface. Multiple calculations were done in both the presence and absence of the agonist rosiglitazone, and the differences in dynamics were characterized. The global dynamics of the ligand binding domain were affected by the ligand, and in particular, changes to the network of dynamically correlated amino acids were observed with only small changes in conformation. These results suggest that changes in dynamic couplings can be functionally significant with respect to the transmission of allosteric signals. PMID:20496064

  1. Predictions Suggesting a Participation of β-Sheet Configuration in the M2 Domain of the P2X7 Receptor: A Novel Conformation?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; de Freitas, Mônica Santos; Foguel, Débora; Caffarena, Ernesto Raul; Alves, Luiz Anastacio

    2009-01-01

    Scanning experiments have shown that the putative TM2 domain of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) lines the ionic pore. However, none has identified an α-helix structure, the paradigmatic secondary structure of ion channels in mammalian cells. In addition, some researchers have suggested a β-sheet conformation in the TM2 domain of P2X2. These data led us to investigate a new architecture within the P2X receptor family. P2X7R is considered an intriguing receptor because its activation induces nonselective large pore formation, in contrast to the majority of other ionic channel proteins in mammals. This receptor has two states: a low-conductance channel (∼10 pS) and a large pore (>400 pS). To our knowledge, one fundamental question remains unanswered: Are the P2X7R channel and the pore itself the same entity or are they different structures? There are no structural data to help solve this question. Thus, we investigated the hydrophobic M2 domain with the aim of predicting the fitted position and the secondary structure of the TM2 segment from human P2X7R (hP2X7R). We provide evidence for a β-sheet conformation, using bioinformatics algorithms and molecular-dynamics simulation in conjunction with circular dichroism in different environments and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In summary, our study suggests the possibility that a segment composed of residues from part of the M2 domain and part of the putative TM2 segment of P2X7R is partially folded in a β-sheet conformation, and may play an important role in channel/pore formation associated with P2X7R activation. It is important to note that most nonselective large pores have a transmembrane β-sheet conformation. Thus, this study may lead to a paradigmatic change in the P2X7R field and/or raise new questions about this issue. PMID:19186133

  2. Solid-State Examination of Conformationally Diverse Sulfonamide Receptors Based on Bis(2-anilinoethynyl)pyridine, -Bipyridine, and -Thiophene

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Orion B.; Johnson, Charles A.; Vonnegut, Chris L.; Fajardo, Kevin A.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Johnson, Darren W.; Haley, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing an induced-fit model and taking advantage of rotatable acetylenic C(sp)–C(sp2) bonds, we disclose the synthesis and solid-state structures of a series of conformationally diverse bis-sulfonamide arylethynyl receptors using either pyridine, 2,2′-bipyridine, or thiophene as the core aryl group. Whereas the bipyridine and thiophene structures do not appear to bind guests in the solid state, the pyridine receptors form 2 + 2 dimers with water molecules, two halides, or one of each, depending on the protonation state of the pyridine nitrogen atom. Isolation of a related bis-sulfonimide derivative demonstrates the importance of the sulfonamide N–H hydrogen bonds in dimer formation. The pyridine receptors form monomeric structures with larger guests such as BF4− or HSO4−, where the sulfonamide arms rotate to the side opposite the pyridine N atom. PMID:26405435

  3. NMDA Receptor Activity in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Caro, Mario; Hadzimichalis, Norell

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a variety of physiologic roles and their proper signaling is essential for cellular homeostasis. Any disruption in this pathway, leading to either enhanced or decreased activity, may result in the manifestation of neuropsychiatric pathologies such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance induced psychosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we explore the notion that the overlap in activity of at least one biochemical pathway, the NMDA receptor pathway, may be the link to understanding the overlap in psychotic symptoms between diseases. This review intends to present a broad overview of those neuropsychiatric disorders for which alternations in NMDA receptor activity is prominent thus suggesting that continued direction of pharmaceutical intervention to this pathway may present a viable option for managing symptoms. PMID:23772215

  4. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  5. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  6. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  7. The Relaxin Receptor (RXFP1) Utilizes Hydrophobic Moieties on a Signaling Surface of Its N-terminal Low Density Lipoprotein Class A Module to Mediate Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Roy C. K.; Petrie, Emma J.; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ling, Jason; Lee, Jeremy C. Y.; Gooley, Paul R.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin is showing potential as a treatment for acute heart failure. Although it is known that relaxin mediates its actions through the G protein-coupled receptor relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which relaxin binding results in receptor activation. Previous studies have highlighted that the unique N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module of RXFP1 is essential for receptor activation, and it has been hypothesized that this module is the true “ligand” of the receptor that directs the conformational changes necessary for G protein coupling. In this study, we confirmed that an RXFP1 receptor lacking the LDLa module binds ligand normally but cannot signal through any characterized G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, we comprehensively examined the contributions of amino acids in the LDLa module to RXFP1 activity using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutational analysis together with NMR structural analysis of recombinant LDLa modules. Gain-of-function studies with an inactive RXFP1 chimera containing the LDLa module of the human LDL receptor (LB2) demonstrated two key N-terminal regions of the module that were able to rescue receptor signaling. Loss-of-function mutations of residues in these regions demonstrated that Leu-7, Tyr-9, and Lys-17 all contributed to the ability of the LDLa module to drive receptor activation, and judicious amino acid substitutions suggested this involves hydrophobic interactions. Our results demonstrate that these key residues contribute to interactions driving the active receptor conformation, providing further evidence of a unique mode of G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:23926099

  8. The relaxin receptor (RXFP1) utilizes hydrophobic moieties on a signaling surface of its N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A module to mediate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Roy C K; Petrie, Emma J; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ling, Jason; Lee, Jeremy C Y; Gooley, Paul R; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2013-09-27

    The peptide hormone relaxin is showing potential as a treatment for acute heart failure. Although it is known that relaxin mediates its actions through the G protein-coupled receptor relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which relaxin binding results in receptor activation. Previous studies have highlighted that the unique N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module of RXFP1 is essential for receptor activation, and it has been hypothesized that this module is the true "ligand" of the receptor that directs the conformational changes necessary for G protein coupling. In this study, we confirmed that an RXFP1 receptor lacking the LDLa module binds ligand normally but cannot signal through any characterized G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, we comprehensively examined the contributions of amino acids in the LDLa module to RXFP1 activity using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutational analysis together with NMR structural analysis of recombinant LDLa modules. Gain-of-function studies with an inactive RXFP1 chimera containing the LDLa module of the human LDL receptor (LB2) demonstrated two key N-terminal regions of the module that were able to rescue receptor signaling. Loss-of-function mutations of residues in these regions demonstrated that Leu-7, Tyr-9, and Lys-17 all contributed to the ability of the LDLa module to drive receptor activation, and judicious amino acid substitutions suggested this involves hydrophobic interactions. Our results demonstrate that these key residues contribute to interactions driving the active receptor conformation, providing further evidence of a unique mode of G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:23926099

  9. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: Their role in the catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Cui, Qiang; Lipscomb, William N.; Karplus, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer. PMID:11481470

  10. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  11. B cell activation involves nanoscale receptor reorganizations and inside-out signaling by Syk

    PubMed Central

    Kläsener, Kathrin; Maity, Palash C; Hobeika, Elias; Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Binding of antigen to the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) initiates a multitude of events resulting in B cell activation. How the BCR becomes signaling-competent upon antigen binding is still a matter of controversy. Using a high-resolution proximity ligation assay (PLA) to monitor the conformation of the BCR and its interactions with co-receptors at a 10–20 nm resolution, we provide direct evidence for the opening of BCR dimers during B cell activation. We also show that upon binding Syk opens the receptor by an inside-out signaling mechanism that amplifies BCR signaling. Furthermore, we found that on resting B cells, the coreceptor CD19 is in close proximity with the IgD-BCR and on activated B cells with the IgM-BCR, indicating nanoscale reorganization of receptor clusters during B cell activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02069.001 PMID:24963139

  12. Solution conformations of nucleoside analogues exhibiting antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Sandra; Benevides, James M.; Thomas, George J.

    1991-01-01

    The molecular-conformational basis for HIV-1 antiviral activity of dideoxynucleoside analogues is unknown. A recent proposal by van Roey [1] that furanose sugar puckering in the C2' -endo family (namely C3' -exo) may account for the enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity of azidothymidine (AZT), dideoxythymidine (ddT) and dideoxycytidine (ddC) has been tested by conformational analysis of these and related agents, using laser Raman spectroscopy of their solutions and crystal structures. The results show that nucleoside analogues exhibiting anti-HIV-1 activity, including AZT, ddT and ddC, exist in solution with C3' -endo as the predominating sugar pucker. The C3' -endo solution conformations differ fundamentally from the C3' -exo conformations observed in the corresponding crystal structures. Accordingly, the crystal conformation cannot be responsible for enhanced recognition of these agents, either by nucleoside kinase or reverse transcriptase, as a mechanism to explain antiviral activity. The present findings suggest that C3' -endo sugear pucker, rather than C3' -exo pucker, or other puckers of the C2' -endo family, is more probably the required conformation for antivaral activity. The present work also shows that nucleoside phosphorylation does not, in general, change the preferred solution conformation of a nucleoside. Therefore, C3' -endo sugar pucker is likely to be the preferred conformation for both nucleoside kinase and reverse transcriptase recognition. In this study, the list of thymidine nucleoside conformation markers available from Raman spectra is extended and additional group frequency assignments for C3' -azido, C3' -deoxy and related nucleoside derivatives are provided.

  13. Helix 11 dynamics is critical for constitutive androstane receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Busby, Scott A; Wisecarver, Sarah; Vincent, Jeremy; Griffin, Patrick R; Fernandez, Elias J

    2011-01-12

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) transactivation can occur in the absence of exogenous ligand and this activity is enhanced by agonists TCPOBOP and meclizine. We use biophysical and cell-based assays to show that increased activity of CAR(TCPOBOP) relative to CAR(meclizine) corresponds to a higher affinity of CAR(TCPOBOP) for the steroid receptor coactivator-1. Additionally, steady-state fluorescence spectra suggest conformational differences between CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizine):RXR. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data indicate that the CAR activation function 2 (AF-2) is more stable in CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizine):RXR than in CAR:RXR. HDX kinetics also show significant differences between CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizine):RXR. Unlike CAR(meclizine):RXR, CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR shows a higher overall stabilization that extends into RXR. We identify residues 339-345 in CAR as an allosteric regulatory site with a greater magnitude reduction in exchange kinetics in CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR than CAR(meclizine):RXR. Accordingly, assays with mutations on CAR at leucine-340 and leucine-343 confirm this region as an important determinant of CAR activity. PMID:21220114

  14. T Cell Receptor Engagement Triggers Its CD3ε and CD3ζ Subunits to Adopt a Compact, Locked Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Risueño, Ruth M.; Schamel, Wolfgang W. A.; Alarcón, Balbino

    2008-01-01

    How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) discriminates between molecularly related peptide/Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) ligands and converts this information into different possible signaling outcomes is still not understood. One current model proposes that strong pMHC ligands, but not weak ones, induce a conformational change in the TCR. Evidence supporting this comes from a pull-down assay that detects ligand-induced binding of the TCR to the N-terminal SH3 domain of the adapter protein Nck, and also from studies with a neoepitope-specific antibody. Both methods rely on the exposure of a polyproline sequence in the CD3ε subunit of the TCR, and neither indicates whether the conformational change is transmitted to other CD3 subunits. Using a protease-sensitivity assay, we now show that the cytoplasmic tails of CD3ε and CD3ζ subunits become fully protected from degradation upon TCR triggering. These results suggest that the TCR conformational change is transmitted to the tails of CD3ε and CD3ζ, and perhaps all CD3 subunits. Furthermore, the resistance to protease digestion suggests that CD3 cytoplasmic tails adopt a compact structure in the triggered TCR. These results are consistent with a model in which transduction of the conformational change induced upon TCR triggering promotes condensation and shielding of the CD3 cytoplasmic tails. PMID:18320063

  15. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, N; Kemp, N; Adeyemo, O; Buchanan, P; Stone, T W

    1995-10-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  16. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N.; Kemp, N.; Adeyemo, O.; Buchanan, P.; Stone, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  17. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  18. Photocatalytically Active Oligomeric Graphitic Carbon Nitride: Conformational Flexibility, Electronic Levels, Carrier Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Lau, Vincent; Botari, Tiago; Huhn, William; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-03-01

    Polymers consisting of bridged heptazine units (often called ``graphitic carbon nitride'' or ``g-C3N4'') show considerable promise as photocatalysts for solar hydrogen evolution. Recent experimental evidence suggests that oligomeric rather than fully polymerized ``g-C3N4'' exhibits increased intrinsic photocatalytic activity. Using density-functional theory (DFT; van der Waals corrected PBE functional for conformers, hybrid DFT and GW for electronic levels), we show that considerable conformational flexibility exists for the heptazine trimers and tetramers. Analysis of HOMO and LUMO locations as well as trends in photocatalytic activity among heptazine oligomers and polymers reveals the NH2 groups of the oligomers as potential charge-transfer sites. We show that conformational variations of the oligomers can lead to significant, electrostatically motivated carrier localization effects. We suggest that NH2 side groups and the intrinsic conformational variations of the oligomeric species lead to the observed enhanced catalytic activity.

  19. Progesterone receptors activation after acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Bing K; Fabian, Sosimo; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2006-12-18

    Cocaine modulates serum levels of progesterone in intact female and male rats, as well as in pregnant dams, and progesterone decreases or attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral and reward responses. It has been postulated that cocaine's modulation of serum progesterone levels may in turn alter progesterone receptor activity, thereby contributing to cocaine-induced alterations of neuronal functions and genomic regulations. To test this hypothesis, intact male rats received acute injections of saline or cocaine (15 or 30 mg/kg, dissolved in 0.9% saline, intraperitoneal). Progesterone serum levels, progesterone receptor (PR) protein levels, and PR-DNA binding complexes were measured in the striatum by radioimmunoassay, Western blot, and gel shift analyses, respectively. After injection of 15 mg/kg of cocaine, induction of progesterone serum levels was closely followed by an increase in receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes. After injection of 30 mg/kg of cocaine, similar effects were observed along with an attenuation of receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes at 60 min. Our results suggest that activation of progesterone receptors may be a mechanism by which cocaine mediates behavior through molecular alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:17109827

  20. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  1. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-Chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca(2+) ions stabilize the active state, PO4(3-) ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. PMID:27434672

  2. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P; Brennan, Sarah C; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D; Colecraft, Henry M; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R

    2016-01-01

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ ions stabilize the active state, PO43- ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13662.001 PMID:27434672

  3. Role of the C-terminus in the activity, conformation, and stability of interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, L. D.; Hammacher, A.; Zhang, J. G.; Weinstock, J.; Yasukawa, K.; Morton, C. J.; Norton, R. S.; Simpson, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two murine interleukin-6 (mIL-6) variants were constructed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one lacking the last five residues (183-187) at the C-terminus (pMC5) and another with the last five residues of mIL-6 substituted by the corresponding residues of human IL-6 (pMC5H). The growth stimulatory activity of pMC5 on the mouse hybridoma cell line 7TD1 was < 0.05% of mIL-6, whereas pMC5H and mIL-6 were equipotent. The loss of biological activity of pMC5 correlated with its negligible receptor binding affinity on 7TD1 cells, while the binding of pMC5H was comparable to that of mIL-6. Both pMC5 and pMC5H, like mIL-6, failed to interact with recombinant soluble human IL-6 receptor when assayed by surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor analysis. These studies suggest that the C-terminal seven amino acids of human IL-6, alone, do not define species specificity for receptor binding. A variety of biophysical techniques, as well as the binding of a conformational-specific monoclonal antibody, indicated that the global fold of the mIL-6 variants was similar to that of mIL-6, although small changes in the NMR spectra, particularly for pMC5, were observed. Some of these changes involved residues widely separated in the primary structure. For instance, interactions involving Tyr-22 were influenced by the C-terminal amino acids suggesting that the N- and C-termini of mIL-6 are in close proximity. Equilibrium unfolding experiments indicated that pMC5 was 0.8 kcal/mol less stable than mIL-6, whereas pMC5H was 1.4 kcal/mol more stable. These studies emphasize the structural importance of the C-terminal amino acids of IL-6 and suggest that truncation or mutation of this region could lead to small but significant alterations in other regions of the molecule. PMID:8401231

  4. Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

  5. Conformal Prediction Classification of a Large Data Set of Environmental Chemicals from ToxCast and Tox21 Estrogen Receptor Assays.

    PubMed

    Norinder, Ulf; Boyer, Scott

    2016-06-20

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) are critical to exploitation of the chemical information in toxicology databases. Exploitation can be extraction of chemical knowledge from the data but also making predictions of new chemicals based on quantitative analysis of past findings. In this study, we analyzed the ToxCast and Tox21 estrogen receptor data sets using Conformal Prediction to enhance the full exploitation of the information in these data sets. We applied aggregated conformal prediction (ACP) to the ToxCast and Tox21 estrogen receptor data sets using support vector machine classifiers to compare overall performance of the models but, more importantly, to explore the performance of ACP on data sets that are significantly enriched in one class without employing sampling strategies of the training set. ACP was also used to investigate the problem of applicability domain using both data sets. Comparison of ACP to previous results obtained on the same data sets using traditional QSAR approaches indicated similar overall balanced performance to methods in which careful training set selections were made, e.g., sensitivity and specificity for the external Tox21 data set of 70-75% and far superior results to those obtained using traditional methods without training set sampling where the corresponding results showed a clear imbalance of 50 and 96%, respectively. Application of conformal prediction to imbalanced data sets facilitates an unambiguous analysis of all data, allows accurate predictive models to be built which display similar accuracy in external validation to external validation, and, most importantly, allows an unambiguous treatment of the applicability domain. PMID:27152554

  6. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Booe, Jason M; Walker, Christopher S; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Warner, Margaret L; Bill, Roslyn M; Harris, Paul W; Brimble, Margaret A; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2015-06-18

    Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  7. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booe, Jason M.; Walker, Christopher S.; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A.; Warner, Margaret L.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Harris, Paul W.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Poyner, David R.; Hay, Debbie L.; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. PMID:25982113

  8. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  9. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  10. Conformational change and enhanced stabilization of the vitamin D receptor by the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 analog KH1060.

    PubMed Central

    van den Bemd, G C; Pols, H A; Birkenhäger, J C; van Leeuwen, J P

    1996-01-01

    The 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3] analog KH1060 exerts very potent effects on cell proliferation and cell differentiation via the vitamin D receptor (VDR). However, the activities of KH1060 are not associated with an increased affinity for the VDR. We now show that increased stabilization of the VDR-KH1060 complex could be an explanation for its high potencies. VDR half-life studies performed with cycloheximide-translational blocked rat osteoblast-like ROS 17/2.8 cells demonstrated that, in the absence of ligand, VDR levels rapidly decreased. After 2 hr, less than 10% of the initial VDR level could be measured. In the presence of 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3, the VDR half-life was 15 hr. After 24 hr. less than 20% of the initial VDR content was detectable, whereas, at this time-point, when the cells were incubated with KH1060 80% of the VDR was still present. Differences in 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3- and KH1060-induced conformational changes of the VDR could underlie the increased VDR stability. As assessed by limited proteolytic digestion analysis, both 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3 and KH1060 caused a specific conformational change of the VDR. Compared with 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3, KH1060 induced a conformational change that led to a far more dramatic protection of the VDR against proteolytic degradation. In conclusion, the altered VDR stability and the possibly underlying change in VDR conformation caused by KH1060 could be an explanation for its enhanced bioactivity. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8855240

  11. In silico Exploration of the Conformational Universe of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espigares, Ismael; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The structural plasticity of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a conformational universe going from inactive to active receptor states with several intermediate states. Many of them have not been captured yet and their role for GPCR activation is not well understood. The study of this conformational space and the transition dynamics between different receptor populations is a major challenge in molecular biophysics. The rational design of effector molecules that target such receptor populations allows fine-tuning receptor signalling with higher specificity to produce drugs with safer therapeutic profiles. In this minireview, we outline highly conserved receptor regions which are considered determinant for the establishment of distinct receptor states. We then discuss in-silico approaches such as dimensionality reduction methods and Markov State Models to explore the GPCR conformational universe and exploit the obtained conformations through structure-based drug design. PMID:27492237

  12. Activation Requirements for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viaene, Angela N.; Petrof, Iraklis; Sherman, S. Murray

    2013-01-01

    It has been common experimentally to use high frequency, tetanic, stimulation to activate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in cortex and thalamus. To determine what type of stimulation is actually necessary to activate mGluRs we examined the effects of varying stimulation duration and intensity on activating mGluR responses. We used a thalamocortical and an intracortical slice preparation from mice and performed whole cell recordings from neurons in the ventral posterior medial nucleus or in layer 4 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) while electrically stimulating in layer 6 of S1. Extracellular ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and GABAA receptor antagonists were used to isolate Group I or Group II mGluR responses. We observed that high frequency stimulation is not necessary for the activation of either Group I or Group II mGluRs. Either could be activated with as few as 2-3 pulses at stimulation frequencies around 15-20Hz. Additionally, increasing the number of pulses, intensity of stimulation, or stimulation frequency increased amplitude and duration of the mGluR response. PMID:23416319

  13. Opening the conformation is a master switch for the dual localization and phosphatase activity of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Yang, Jr-Ming; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Itoh, Kie; Rho, Elmer; Zhang, Qiang; Inoue, Takanari; Devreotes, Peter N.; Sesaki, Hiromi; Iijima, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN mainly functions at two subcellular locations, the plasma membrane and the nucleus. At the plasma membrane, PTEN dephosphorylates the tumorigenic second messenger PIP3, which drives cell proliferation and migration. In the nucleus, PTEN controls DNA repair and genome stability independently of PIP3. Whereas the concept that a conformational change regulates protein function through post-translational modifications has been well established in biology, it is unknown whether a conformational change simultaneously controls dual subcellular localizations of proteins. Here, we discovered that opening the conformation of PTEN is the crucial upstream event that determines its key dual localizations of this crucial tumor suppressor. We identify a critical conformational switch that regulates PTEN’s localization. Most PTEN molecules are held in the cytosol in a closed conformation by intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal tail and core region. Dephosphorylation of the tail opens the conformation and exposes the membrane-binding regulatory interface in the core region, recruiting PTEN to the membrane. Moreover, a lysine at residue 13 is also exposed and when ubiquitinated, transports PTEN to the nucleus. Thus, opening the conformation of PTEN is a key mechanism that enhances its dual localization and enzymatic activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer treatments. PMID:26216063

  14. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P.

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  15. Equivalent Activities of Repulsive Axon Guidance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong; Yoshikawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on the growth cone at the leading edge of elongating axons play critical guidance roles by recognizing cues via their extracellular domains and transducing signals via their intracellular domains, resulting in changes in direction of growth. An important concept to have emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a major guidance mechanism. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are likely to be qualitative differences in the signals they transduce. However, the nature of these possible differences is unknown. By creating chimeras using the extracellular and intracellular domains of three different Drosophila repulsive receptors, Unc5, Roundabout (Robo), and Derailed (Drl) and expressing them in defined cells within the embryonic nervous system, we examined the responses elicited by their intracellular domains systematically. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative differences in growth cone response or axon growth, suggesting that, despite their highly diverged sequences, each intracellular domain elicits repulsion via a common pathway. In terms of the signaling pathway(s) used by the repulsive receptors, mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio strongly enhance the repulsive activity of all three intracellular domains, suggesting that repulsion by Unc5, Robo, and Drl, and perhaps repulsion in general, involves Trio activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A prevailing concept that has emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a guidance mechanism for steering axons to their appropriate targets. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are differences in the signals that they transduce. However, this has never been tested directly. We have used the advanced genetics of Drosophila to compare directly the outputs of different repulsive receptors. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative

  16. Three-dimensional solution structure and conformational plasticity of the N-terminal scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain of human CD5.

    PubMed

    Garza-Garcia, Acely; Esposito, Diego; Rieping, Wolfgang; Harris, Richard; Briggs, Cherry; Brown, Marion H; Driscoll, Paul C

    2008-04-18

    The lymphocyte receptor CD5 influences cell activation by modifying the strength of the intracellular response initiated by antigen engagement. Regulation through CD5 involves the interaction of one or more of its three scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains present in the extracellular region. Here, we present the 3D solution structure of a non-glycosylated double mutant of the N-terminal domain of human CD5 expressed in Escherichia coli (eCD5d1m), which has enhanced solubility compared to the non-glycosylated wild-type (eCD5d1). In common with a glycosylated form expressed in Pichia pastoris, the [(15)N,(1)H]-correlation spectra of both eCD5d1 and eCD5d1m exhibit non-uniform temperature-dependent signal intensities, indicating extensive conformational fluctuations on the micro-millisecond timescale. Although approximately one half of the signals expected for the domain are absent at 298 K, essentially complete resonance assignments and a solution structure could be obtained at 318 K. Because of the sparse nature of the experimental restraint data and the potentially important contribution of conformational exchange to the nuclear Overhauser effect peak intensity, we applied inferential structure determination to calculate the eCD5d1m structure. The inferential structure determination ensemble has similar features to that obtained by traditional simulated annealing methods, but displays superior definition and structural quality. The eCD5d1m structure is similar to other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily, but the position of the lone alpha helix differs due to interactions with the unique N-terminal region of the domain. The availability of an experimentally tractable form of CD5d1, together with its 3D structure, provides new tools for further investigation of its function within intact CD5. PMID:18339402

  17. Visualization of Activated Platelets by Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Utilizing Conformation-Specific Antibodies against Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa

    PubMed Central

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Peter, Karlheinz; Ali, Ziad A.; Schneider, Jürgen E.; McAteer, Martina A.; Neubauer, Stefan; Channon, Keith M.; Bode, Christoph; Choudhury, Robin P.

    2009-01-01

    Ruptured atherosclerotic plaques, lined with activated platelets, constitute an attractive target for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study evaluated whether microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the activated conformation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa could be used to image platelets. MPIO (size: 1 μm) were conjugated to anti-LIBS or control single-chain antibody. Following guidewire injury to mouse femoral artery, platelet adhesion was present after 24 h. Mice were perfused with anti-LIBS-MPIO (or control MPIO) via the left ventricle and 11.7-tesla MRI was performed on femoral arteries ex vivo. A 3D gradient echo sequence attained an isotropic resolution of 25 μm. MPIO binding, quantified by MRI, was 4-fold higher with anti-LIBS-MPIO in comparison to control MPIO (p < 0.01). In histological sections, low signal zones on MRI and MPIO correlated strongly (R2 = 0.72; p < 0.001), indicating accurate MR quantification. In conclusion, anti-LIBS-MPIO bind to activated platelets in mouse arteries, providing a basis for the use of function-specific single-chain antibody-MPIO conjugates for molecular MRI, and represent the first molecular imaging of a conformational change in a surface receptor. This presents an opportunity to specifically image activated platelets involved in acute atherothrombosis with MRI. PMID:18515970

  18. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  19. Active-Site-Directed Inhibitors of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Abolish Its Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Herranz-Trillo, Fátima; Kotev, Martin; Gairí, Margarida; Guallar, Víctor; Bernadó, Pau; Millet, Oscar; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-05-17

    Deciphering conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding the biological functions of proteins and for designing compounds targeting them. In particular, providing an accurate description of microsecond-millisecond motions opens the opportunity for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by modulating the dynamics of one interacting partner. Here we analyzed the conformational dynamics of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) and the effects of active-site-directed inhibitors on the dynamics. We used an integrated structural biology approach based on NMR spectroscopy and SAXS experiments complemented by MD simulations. We found that POP is in a slow equilibrium in solution between open and closed conformations, and that inhibitors effectively abolished this equilibrium by stabilizing the enzyme in the closed conformation. PMID:26918396

  20. Evaluation of the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Michel, Kathryn E.; Love, Molly; Dow, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs. Animals 104 companion dogs. Procedures While wearing an activity monitor, each dog was led through a series of standard activities: lying down, walking laps, trotting laps, and trotting up and down stairs. Linear regression analysis was used to determine which signalment and body conformation factors were associated with activity counts. Results There was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts when dogs were lying down, walking laps, and trotting laps. However, when dogs were trotting up and down stairs, there was a significant effect of age and body weight such that, for every 1-kg increase in body weight, there was a 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 2.4%) decrease in activity counts and for every 1-year increase in age, there was a 4.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.4% to 6.9%) decrease in activity counts. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance When activity was well controlled, there was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts recorded by the activity monitor. However, when activity was less controlled, older dogs and larger dogs had lower activity counts than younger and smaller dogs. The wide range in body conformation (eg, limb or body length) among dogs did not appear to significantly impact the activity counts recorded by the monitor, but age and body weight did and must be considered in analysis of data collected from the monitors. PMID:20187834

  1. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  2. Nectin-Like Interactions between Poliovirus and Its Receptor Trigger Conformational Changes Associated with Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Belnap, David M.; Cheng, Naiqian; Noel, Roane T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliovirus infection is initiated by attachment to a receptor on the cell surface called Pvr or CD155. At physiological temperatures, the receptor catalyzes an irreversible expansion of the virus to form an expanded form of the capsid called the 135S particle. This expansion results in the externalization of the myristoylated capsid protein VP4 and the N-terminal extension of the capsid protein VP1, both of which become inserted into the cell membrane. Structures of the expanded forms of poliovirus and of several related viruses have recently been reported. However, until now, it has been unclear how receptor binding triggers viral expansion at physiological temperature. Here, we report poliovirus in complex with an enzymatically partially deglycosylated form of the 3-domain ectodomain of Pvr at a 4-Å resolution, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The interaction of the receptor with the virus in this structure is reminiscent of the interactions of Pvr with its natural ligands. At a low temperature, the receptor induces very few changes in the structure of the virus, with the largest changes occurring within the footprint of the receptor, and in a loop of the internal protein VP4. Changes in the vicinity of the receptor include the displacement of a natural lipid ligand (called “pocket factor”), demonstrating that the loss of this ligand, alone, is not sufficient to induce particle expansion. Finally, analogies with naturally occurring ligand binding in the nectin family suggest which specific structural rearrangements in the virus-receptor complex could help to trigger the irreversible expansion of the capsid. IMPORTANCE The cell-surface receptor (Pvr) catalyzes a large structural change in the virus that exposes membrane-binding protein chains. We fitted known atomic models of the virus and Pvr into three-dimensional experimental maps of the receptor-virus complex. The molecular interactions we see between poliovirus and its receptor are

  3. Structural requirements of bitter taste receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Niv, Masha Y.; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    An important question in taste research is how 25 receptors of the human TAS2R family detect thousands of structurally diverse compounds. An answer to this question may arise from the observation that TAS2Rs in general are broadly tuned to interact with numerous substances. Ultimately, interaction with chemically diverse agonists requires architectures of binding pockets tailored to combine flexibility with selectivity. The present study determines the structure of hTAS2R binding pockets. We focused on a subfamily of closely related hTAS2Rs exhibiting pronounced amino acid sequence identities but unique agonist activation spectra. The generation of chimeric and mutant receptors followed by calcium imaging analyses identified receptor regions and amino acid residues critical for activation of hTAS2R46, -R43, and -R31. We found that the carboxyl-terminal regions of the investigated receptors are crucial for agonist selectivity. Intriguingly, exchanging two residues located in transmembrane domain seven between hTAS2R46, activated by strychnine, and hTAS2R31, activated by aristolochic acid, was sufficient to invert agonist selectivity. Further mutagenesis revealed additional positions involved in agonist interaction. The transfer of functionally relevant amino acids identified in hTAS2R46 to the corresponding positions of hTAS2R43 and -R31 resulted in pharmacological properties indistinguishable from the parental hTAS2R46. In silico modeling of hTAS2R46 allowed us to visualize the putative mode of interaction between agonists and hTAS2Rs. Detailed structure-function analyses of hTAS2Rs may ultimately pave the way for the development of specific antagonists urgently needed for more sophisticated analyses of human bitter taste perception. PMID:20534469

  4. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  5. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  6. Buried ionizable networks are an ancient hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Daniel G.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2015-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) have evolved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes over hundreds of millions of years. Comparative structural analysis suggests that these receptors may share a remote evolutionary origin, despite their lack of sequence similarity. Here we used structure-based computations to compare 221 7TMRs from all domains of life. Unexpectedly, we discovered that these receptors contain spatially conserved networks of buried ionizable groups. In microbial 7TMRs these networks are used to pump ions across the cell membrane in response to light. In animal 7TMRs, which include light- and ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), homologous networks were found to be characteristic of activated receptor conformations. These networks are likely relevant to receptor function because they connect the ligand-binding pocket of the receptor to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein. We propose that agonist and G protein binding facilitate the formation of these electrostatic networks and promote important structural rearrangements such as the displacement of transmembrane helix-6. We anticipate that robust classification of activated GPCR structures will aid the identification of ligands that target activated GPCR structural states. PMID:25902551

  7. Phenolic Lipids Affect the Activity and Conformation of Acetylcholinesterase from Electrophorus electricus (Electric eel)

    PubMed Central

    Stasiuk, Maria; Janiszewska, Alicja; Kozubek, Arkadiusz

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic lipids were isolated from rye grains, cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL) from Anacardium occidentale, and fruit bodies of Merrulius tremellosus, and their effects on the electric eel acetylcholinesterase activity and conformation were studied. The observed effect distinctly depended on the chemical structure of the phenolic lipids that were available for interaction with the enzyme. All of the tested compounds reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase. The degree of inhibition varied, showing a correlation with changes in the conformation of the enzyme tested by the intrinsic fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. PMID:24787269

  8. Conformations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) orchestrate neuronal survival by a crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, T; Lesept, F; Chevilley, A; Lenoir, S; Aimable, M; Briens, A; Hommet, Y; Bardou, I; Parcq, J; Vivien, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a pleiotropic serine protease of the central nervous system (CNS) with reported neurotrophic and neurotoxic functions. Produced and released under its single chain form (sc), the sc-tPA can be cleaved by plasmin or kallikrein in a two chain form, tc-tPA. Although both sc-tPA and tc-tPA display a similar fibrinolytic activity, we postulated here that these two conformations of tPA (sc-tPA and tc-tPA) could differentially control the effects of tPA on neuronal survival. Using primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons, our present study reveals that sc-tPA is the only one capable to promote N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced calcium influx and subsequent excitotoxicity. In contrast, both sc-tPA and tc-tPA are capable to activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), a mechanism mediating the antiapoptotic effects of tPA. Interestingly, we revealed a tPA dependent crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR in which a tPA-dependent activation of EGFRs leads to downregulation of NMDAR signaling and to subsequent neurotrophic effects. PMID:26469972

  9. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  10. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein–coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. PMID:20974772

  11. Fatty acid activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR).

    PubMed

    Bocos, C; Göttlicher, M; Gearing, K; Banner, C; Enmark, E; Teboul, M; Crickmore, A; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferators such as clofibric acid, nafenopin, and WY-14,643 have been shown to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. We have cloned the cDNA from rat that is homologous to that from mouse, which encodes a 97% similar protein. To search for physiologically occurring activators, we established a transcriptional transactivation assay by stably expressing in CHO cells a chimera of rat PPAR and the human glucocorticoid receptor that activates expression of the placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. 150 microM concentrations of arachidonic or linoleic acid but not of dehydroepiandrosterone, cholesterol, or 25-hydroxy-cholesterol, activated the receptor chimera. In addition, saturated fatty acids induced the reporter gene. Shortening the chain length to n = 6 or introduction of an omega-terminal carboxylic group abolished the activation potential of the fatty acid. To test whether a common PPAR binding metabolite might be formed from free fatty acids we tested the effects of differentially beta-oxidizable fatty acids and inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. The peroxisomal proliferation-inducing, non-beta-oxidizable, tetradecylthioacetic acid activated PPAR to the same extent as the strong peroxisomal proliferator WY-14,643, whereas the homologous beta-oxidizable tetradecylthiopropionic acid was only as potent as a non-substituted fatty acid. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors, radical scavengers or cytochrome P450 inhibitors did not affect activation of PPAR. In conclusion, beta-oxidation is apparently not required for the formation of the PPAR-activating molecule and this moiety might be a fatty acid, its ester with CoA, or a further derivative of the activated fatty acid prior to beta-oxidation of the acyl-CoA ester. PMID:7626496

  12. Constitutive Activation of the N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor via Cleft-spanning Disulfide Bonds*

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Marie L.; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Although the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays a critical role in the central nervous system, many questions remain regarding the relationship between its structure and functional properties. In particular, the involvement of ligand-binding domain closure in determining agonist efficacy, which has been reported in other glutamate receptor subtypes, remains unresolved. To address this question, we designed dual cysteine point mutations spanning the NR1 and NR2 ligand-binding clefts, aiming to stabilize these domains in closed cleft conformations. Two mutants, E522C/I691C in NR1 (EI) and K487C/N687C in NR2 (KN) were found to exhibit significant glycine- and glutamate-independent activation, respectively, and co-expression of the two subunits produced a constitutively active channel. However, both individual mutants could be activated above constitutive levels in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that cleft closure does not completely prevent agonist association. Interestingly, whereas the NR2 KN disulfide was found to potentiate channel gating and M3 accessibility, NR1 EI exhibited the opposite phenotype, suggesting that the EI disulfide may trap the NR1 ligand-binding domain in a lower efficacy conformation. Furthermore, both mutants affected agonist sensitivity at the opposing subunit, suggesting that closed cleft stabilization may contribute to coupling between the subunits. These results support a correlation between cleft stability and receptor activation, providing compelling evidence for the Venus flytrap mechanism of glutamate receptor domain closure. PMID:18450751

  13. Substituent effect on the stereochemistry of H2-receptor antagonists of the phenylformamidine series. A conformation-dependent mode of interaction with the H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Donetti, A; Bastiaans, H M; Kramer, K; Bietti, G; Cereda, E; Dubini, E; Mondoni, M; Bast, A; Timmerman, H

    1991-06-01

    The influence of alkyl substitution on the stereoisomerism of the formamidine cation (E,E vs E,Z) of several N-substituted (imidazolylphenyl)formamidines (1-10) was investigated. As (imidazolylphenyl)formamidines having alkyl substituents of more than three carbon atoms bind to H2-receptor preparations in a pseudoirreversible mode causing unsurmountable antagonism, the four isomeric butylformamidines (5-7 and 9) having comparable lipophilic character but different E,E/E,Z composition were investigated in H2-receptor assays to determine quantitatively any difference in their pseudoirreversible inhibitory pattern. It was found that the geometry of the formamidine cation is affected by the steric bulk of the substituent on the formamidine nitrogen. A relationship between the percentage of the E,E conformation of the formamidine cation and degree of pseudoirreversible antagonism was also found. The present studies support the hypothesis that bidentate hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of (imidazolylphenyl)formamidines with the H2 receptor. PMID:1676425

  14. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  16. Puckering Energetics and Optical Activities of [7]Circulene Conformers.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Masashi

    2016-02-25

    The structural preference of [7]circulene is analyzed by taking into account vibronic interactions. DFT calculations reveal that pseudo-Jahn-Teller effects cause the D7h-symmetry structure to relax to C2- and Cs-symmetry structures, which are both ca. 9 kcal/mol lower in energy than the D7h structure. In energy terms, the C2-symmetry structure is 0.05 kcal/mol lower than that of the Cs-symmetry. The active vibrations are attributed to low-frequency puckering modes that are coupled with π-σ excitation states. The optical activities of the C2-symmetry structure were simulated by configuration interaction calculations, and the simulated CD/ORD spectra were reasonable and consistent with the experimental data. The optical rotatory strengths obeyed the helix rule; that is, the left-handed helix shows negative Cotton effects through the antisymmetric excited states. The calculated spectra will serve as a foundation for further investigation of optical activities of negatively curved structures. PMID:26829071

  17. Analysis of the conformation and thermal stability of the high-affinity IgE Fc receptor β chain polymorphic proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tomoyoshi; Takahashi, Teppei; Arikawa, Hajime; Era, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    The high-affinity IgE Fc receptor (FcεRI) β chain acts as a signal amplifier through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in its C-terminal intracellular region. Polymorphisms in FcεRI β have been linked to atopy, asthma, and allergies. We investigated the secondary structure, conformation, and thermal stability of FcεRI β polymorphic (β-L172I, β-L174V, and β-E228G) proteins. Polymorphisms did not affect the secondary structure and conformation of FcεRI β. However, we calculated Gibbs free energy of unfolding (ΔGunf) and significant differences were observed in ΔGunf values between the wild-type FcεRI β (β-WT) and β-E228G. These results suggested that β-E228G affected the thermal stability of FcεRI β. The role of β-E228G in biological functions and its involvement in allergic reactions have not yet been elucidated in detail; therefore, differences in the thermal stability of β-E228G may affect the function of FcεRI β. PMID:26940508

  18. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  19. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  20. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity.

    PubMed

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  1. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  2. A new autoinhibited kinase conformation reveals a salt-bridge switch in kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Yang, Shaoyuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of autoinhibited EphA2 tyrosine kinase reported herein, we have captured the entire activation segment, revealing a previously unknown role of the conserved Arg762 in kinase autoinhibition by interacting with the essential Mg2+-chelating Asp757. While it is well known that this Arg residue is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the phospho-residue of the activation loop to stabilize the active conformation, our structure determination revealed a new role for the Arg, acting as a switch between the autoinhibited and activated conformations. Mutation of Arg762 to Ala in EphA2 sensitized Mg2+ response, resulting in enhanced kinase catalytic activity and Mg2+ cooperativity. Furthermore, mutation of the corresponding Arg/Lys to Ala in PKA and p38MAPK also exhibited similar behavior. This new salt bridge-mediated switch may thus be an important mechanism of activation on a broader scope for kinases which utilize autophosphorylation. PMID:27324091

  3. Differential Requirement of the Extracellular Domain in Activation of Class B G Protein-coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Hua; Yin, Yanting; Yang, Dehua; Liu, Bo; Hou, Li; Wang, Xiaoxi; Pal, Kuntal; Jiang, Yi; Feng, Yang; Cai, Xiaoqing; Dai, Antao; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the secretin-like (class B) family are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are important drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disorders and neuronal diseases. They consist of a large N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD) with the GPCR signature of seven transmembrane helices. Class B GPCRs are activated by peptide hormones with their C termini bound to the receptor ECD and their N termini bound to the TMD. It is thought that the ECD functions as an affinity trap to bind and localize the hormone to the receptor. This in turn would allow the hormone N terminus to insert into the TMD and induce conformational changes of the TMD to activate downstream signaling. In contrast to this prevailing model, we demonstrate that human class B GPCRs vary widely in their requirement of the ECD for activation. In one group, represented by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type 1 receptor (PAC1R), the ECD requirement for high affinity hormone binding can be bypassed by induced proximity and mass action effects, whereas in the other group, represented by glucagon receptor (GCGR) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), the ECD is required for signaling even when the hormone is covalently linked to the TMD. Furthermore, the activation of GLP-1R by small molecules that interact with the intracellular side of the receptor is dependent on the presence of its ECD, suggesting a direct role of the ECD in GLP-1R activation. PMID:27226600

  4. Methyl-substituted conformationally constrained rexinoid agonists for the retinoid X receptors demonstrate improved efficacy for cancer therapy and prevention.

    PubMed

    Desphande, Anil; Xia, Gang; Boerma, LeeAnn J; Vines, Kimberly K; Atigadda, Venkatram R; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J; Moeinpour, Fariba L; Smith, Craig D; Christov, Konstantin; Brouillette, Wayne J; Muccio, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8Z)-8-(3',4'-Dihydro-1'(2H)-naphthalen-1'-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,3,6-octatrienoinic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid for the retinoid X nuclear receptors (RXR). 9cUAB30 displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity and is being translated to the clinic as a novel cancer prevention agent. To improve on the potency of 9cUAB30, we synthesized 4-methyl analogs of 9cUAB30, which introduced chirality at the 4-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of the racemic homolog and enantiomers are reported. We demonstrate that the S-enantiomer is the most potent and least toxic even though these enantiomers bind in a similar conformation in the ligand binding domain of RXR. PMID:24359708

  5. Methyl-Substituted Conformationally Constrained Rexinoid Agonists for the Retinoid X Receptors Demonstrate Improved Efficacy for Cancer Therapy and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Desphande, Anil; Xia, Gang; Boerma, LeeAnn J.; Vines, Kimberly K; Atigadda, Venkatram R.; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Moeinpour, Fariba L; Smith, Craig D.; Christov, Konstantin; Brouillette, Wayne J.; Muccio, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8Z)-8-(3’,4’-Dihydro-1’(2H)-naphthalen-1’-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,3,6-octatrienoinic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid for the retinoid X nuclear receptors (RXR). 9cUAB30 displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity and is being translated to the clinic as a novel cancer prevention agent. To improve on the potency of 9cUAB30, we synthesized 4-methyl analogs of 9cUAB30, which introduced chirality at the 4-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of the racemic homolog and enantiomers are reported. We demonstrate that the S-enantiomer is the most potent and least toxic even though these enantiomers bind in a similar conformation in the ligand binding domain of RXR. PMID:24359708

  6. Physical factors affecting the storage stability of freeze-dried interleukin-1 receptor antagonist: glass transition and protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Chang, B S; Beauvais, R M; Dong, A; Carpenter, J F

    1996-07-15

    The effects of glass transition of, and protein conformation in, the dried solid on the storage stability of freeze-dried recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) were examined. Glass transition is a temperature-dependent phenomenon. Amorphous materials become hard and brittle at temperatures below their characteristic glass transition temperatures (Tg) such that diffusion of molecules along the matrix is not sufficient to cause large-scale structural changes. To ascertain the importance of the glass transition in protein storage stability, we compared 10 different lyophilized rhIL-1ra formulations, with Tgs ranging from 20 to 56 degrees C, during several weeks of storage at temperatures above and below the samples' Tgs. Protein degradation, both deamidation and aggregation, was greatly accelerated at temperatures above Tg, but for some formulations also arose below Tg. Thus, storage of dried proteins below the Tg is necessary but not sufficient to ensure long-term stability. To examine the effects of protein structure in the dried solid, we prepared formulations with various sucrose concentrations, all of which had a Tg = 66 +/- 2.5 degrees C. With infrared spectroscopy, we determined that the protein lyophilized with /=5% sucrose, conformational change was inhibited during lyophilization. When stored at 50 degrees C, degradation of the freeze-dried protein varied inversely with sucrose concentration. These results indicate that structural changes arising during the lyophilization process led to damage during subsequent storage, even if the storage temperature was less than the Tg. Together the results of these studies document that to obtain optimum stability of dried rhIL-1ra it was necessary to inhibit conformational change during lyophilization and to store at temperatures below the Tg of the dried formulation. PMID:8660705

  7. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Tropsha, Alexander; Varnek, Alexandre; Zakharov, Alexey; Worth, Andrew; Richard, Ann M.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Fourches, Denis; Horvath, Dragos; Benfenati, Emilio; Muratov, Eugene; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Grisoni, Francesca; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Incisivo, Giuseppina M.; Hong, Huixiao; Ng, Hui W.; Tetko, Igor V.; Balabin, Ilya; Kancherla, Jayaram; Shen, Jie; Burton, Julien; Nicklaus, Marc; Cassotti, Matteo; Nikolov, Nikolai G.; Nicolotti, Orazio; Andersson, Patrik L.; Zang, Qingda; Politi, Regina; Beger, Richard D.; Todeschini, Roberto; Huang, Ruili; Farag, Sherif; Rosenberg, Sine A.; Slavov, Svetoslav; Hu, Xin; Judson, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Objectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure–activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were evaluated on a set of 7,522 chemicals curated from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built by weighting models on scores based on their evaluated accuracies. Results: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. Conclusion: This project demonstrated the possibility to screen large libraries of chemicals using a consensus of different in silico approaches. This concept will be applied in future projects related to other

  8. Exploring the Role of Conformational Heterogeneity in cis-Autoproteolytic Activation of ThnT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been major achievements in understanding the relationship between enzyme catalysis and protein structural plasticity. In autoprocessing systems, however, there is a sparsity of direct evidence of the role of conformational dynamics, which are complicated by their intrinsic chemical reactivity. ThnT is an autoproteolytically activated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic thienamycin. Conservative mutation of ThnT results in multiple conformational states that can be observed via X-ray crystallography, establishing ThnT as a representative and revealing system for studing how conformational dynamics control autoactivation at a molecular level. Removal of the nucleophile by mutation to Ala disrupts the population of a reactive state and causes widespread structural changes from a conformation that promotes autoproteolysis to one associated with substrate catalysis. Finer probing of the active site polysterism was achieved by EtHg derivatization of the nucleophile, which indicates the active site and a neighboring loop have coupled dynamics. Disruption of these interactions by mutagenesis precludes the ability to observe a reactive state through X-ray crystallography, and application of this insight to other autoproteolytically activated enzymes offers an explanation for the widespread crystallization of inactive states. We suggest that the N → O(S) acyl shift in cis-autoproteolysis might occur through a si-face attack, thereby unifying the fundamental chemistry of these enzymes through a common mechanism. PMID:24933323

  9. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  10. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity. PMID:26335395

  11. Enhanced efficacy (intrinsic activity) of cyclic opioid peptide analogs at the. mu. -receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, P.W.; Lemieux, C.; Nguyen, T.M.D.; Maziak, L.A.

    1986-05-01

    Side-chain to end group cyclized enkephalin analogs (e.g. H-Tyr-cyclo(-D-Lys-Gly-Phe-Leu-) and cyclic opioid peptide analogs obtained through covalent linkage of two side-chains (e.g. H-Tyr-D-Cys-Gly-Phe-Cys-NH/sub 2/ or H-Tyr-D-Lys-Gly-Phe-Glu-NH/sub 3/) were tested in the ..mu..-receptor-representative guinea pig ileum (GPI) bioassay and in a binding assay based on displacement of the ..mu..-ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO from rat brain membranes. The cyclic analogs were 5 to 70 times more potent in the GPI assay than in the binding assay, whereas linear analogs showed equal potency in the two assays. These results suggest that the efficacy (intrinsic activity) of cyclic opioid peptide analogs at the ..mu..-receptor is increased as a consequence of the conformation constraint imposed through ring closure. This effect was most pronounced in analogs containing a long hydrophobic sidechain as part of the ring structure in the 2-position of the peptide sequence. Further experimental evidence ruled out the possibilities that these potency discrepancies may be due to differences in enzymatic degradation, dissimilar exposure of the receptors in their lipid environment or interaction with different receptor types in the two assay systems. It can be hypothesized that the semi-rigid cyclic analogs may induce a more productive conformational change in the receptor protein than the linear peptides.

  12. Coupling of Conformational Transitions in the N-terminal Domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding Protein (FKBP51) Near Its Site of Interaction with the Steroid Receptor Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Héroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β4-β5 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β4-β5 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centered near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. The contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state. PMID:25953903

  13. The principle of conformational signaling.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter

    2016-07-25

    Signal transduction is the primary process by which cells respond to changes in their physical and chemical environments. Cellular response is initiated through a signaling protein (a receptor), which interacts with the "signal", most often a novel molecule outside or inside the cell. The mechanism of activation of the receptor is a conformational change and/or covalent modification, which then sets in motion a signaling pathway, i.e. a cascade of modification and binding events that relay and amplify the message to eventually alter the state of the cell. In reflection of this general perception, concepts such as the "second messenger" and the "phosphorylation cascade" dominate our views of signal transduction. The idea I advocate here is that the non-covalent change in protein conformation itself might serve as the initial or intermittent "signal" in the cascade, and it is often the primary event being recognized and interpreted by downstream receptor(s). This signaling principle is intertwined with many other cellular regulatory concepts, such as (pathway) allostery, conformational spread, induced folding/unfolding, conformational memory, the hierarchical assembly of complexes, and the action of regulatory chaperones and prions. By elaborating on many examples and also recent advances in experimental methodology, I show that conformational signaling, although thus far underappreciated, is a general and robust signaling principle that most of the time operates in close interplay with covalent signals in the cell. PMID:27242242

  14. S-SAD phasing study of death receptor 6 and its solution conformation revealed by SAXS

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, Heng; Zhao, Lixia; Ding, Wei; Jiao, Lianying; Shaw, Neil; Liang, Wenguang; Zhang, Liguo; Hung, Li-Wei; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-05-01

    A comparative analysis of sulfur phasing of death receptor 6 (DR6) using data collected at wavelengths of 2.0 and 2.7 Å is presented. SAXS analysis of unliganded DR6 defines a dimer as the minimum physical unit in solution. A subset of tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members contain death domains in their cytoplasmic tails. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is one such member and can trigger apoptosis upon the binding of a ligand by its cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). The crystal structure of the ectodomain (amino acids 1–348) of human death receptor 6 (DR6) encompassing the CRD region was phased using the anomalous signal from S atoms. In order to explore the feasibility of S-SAD phasing at longer wavelengths (beyond 2.5 Å), a comparative study was performed on data collected at wavelengths of 2.0 and 2.7 Å. In spite of sub-optimal experimental conditions, the 2.7 Å wavelength used for data collection showed potential for S-SAD phasing. The results showed that the R{sub ano}/R{sub p.i.m.} ratio is a good indicator for monitoring the anomalous data quality when the anomalous signal is relatively strong, while d′′/sig(d′′) calculated by SHELXC is a more sensitive and stable indicator applicable for grading a wider range of anomalous data qualities. The use of the ‘parameter-space screening method’ for S-SAD phasing resulted in solutions for data sets that failed during manual attempts. SAXS measurements on the ectodomain suggested that a dimer defines the minimal physical unit of an unliganded DR6 molecule in solution.

  15. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its prokaryotic homologues: Structure, conformational transitions & allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marco; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger - a neurotransmitter - into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism boosted by X-ray crystallography of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologues of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in conjunction with time-resolved analyses based on single-channel electrophysiology and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The available data consistently point to a global mechanism of gating that involves a large reorganization of the receptor mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions: a global twisting and a radial expansion/contraction of the extracellular domain. These transitions profoundly modify the organization of the interface between subunits, which host several sites for orthosteric and allosteric modulatory ligands. The same mechanism may thus mediate both positive and negative allosteric modulations of pLGICs ligand binding at topographically distinct sites. The emerging picture of signal transduction is expected to pave the way to new pharmacological strategies for the development of allosteric modulators of nAChR and pLGICs in general. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25529272

  16. Conformational Disorganization within the Active Site of a Recently Evolved Organophosphate Hydrolase Limits Its Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mabbitt, Peter D; Correy, Galen J; Meirelles, Tamara; Fraser, Nicholas J; Coote, Michelle L; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of new enzymatic activity is rarely observed outside of the laboratory. In the agricultural pest Lucilia cuprina, a naturally occurring mutation (Gly137Asp) in α-esterase 7 (LcαE7) results in acquisition of organophosphate hydrolase activity and confers resistance to organophosphate insecticides. Here, we present an X-ray crystal structure of LcαE7:Gly137Asp that, along with kinetic data, suggests that Asp137 acts as a general base in the new catalytic mechanism. Unexpectedly, the conformation of Asp137 observed in the crystal structure obstructs the active site and is not catalytically productive. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that alternative, catalytically competent conformers of Asp137 are sampled on the nanosecond time scale, although these states are less populated. Thus, although the mutation introduces the new reactive group responsible for organophosphate detoxification, the catalytic efficiency appears to be limited by conformational disorganization: the frequent sampling of low-energy nonproductive states. This result is consistent with a model of molecular evolution in which initial function-changing mutations can result in enzymes that display only a fraction of their catalytic potential due to conformational disorganization. PMID:26881849

  17. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  18. Structure of the Dcp2-Dcp1 mRNA-decapping complex in the activated conformation.

    PubMed

    Valkov, Eugene; Muthukumar, Sowndarya; Chang, Chung-Te; Jonas, Stefanie; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The removal of the mRNA 5' cap (decapping) by Dcp2 shuts down translation and commits mRNA to full degradation. Dcp2 activity is enhanced by activator proteins such as Dcp1 and Edc1. However, owing to conformational flexibility, the active conformation of Dcp2 and the mechanism of decapping activation have remained unknown. Here, we report a 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dcp2-Dcp1 heterodimer in an unprecedented conformation that is tied together by an intrinsically disordered peptide from Edc1. In this ternary complex, an unforeseen rotation of the Dcp2 catalytic domain allows residues from both Dcp2 and Dcp1 to cooperate in RNA binding, thus explaining decapping activation by increased substrate affinity. The architecture of the Dcp2-Dcp1-Edc1 complex provides a rationale for the conservation of a sequence motif in Edc1 that is also present in unrelated decapping activators, thus indicating that the presently described mechanism of decapping activation is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:27183195

  19. Rearrangement of the Extracellular Domain/Extracellular Loop 1 Interface Is Critical for Thyrotropin Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Joerg; Nagel, Marcus B M; Huth, Sandra; Jaeschke, Holger; Moretti, Rocco; Hintze, Vera; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Meiler, Jens; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with a characteristic large extracellular domain (ECD). TSHR activation is initiated by binding of the hormone ligand TSH to the ECD. How the extracellular binding event triggers the conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) necessary for intracellular G protein activation is poorly understood. To gain insight in this process, the knowledge on the relative positioning of ECD and TMD and the conformation of the linker region at the interface of ECD and TMD are of particular importance. To generate a structural model for the TSHR we applied an integrated structural biology approach combining computational techniques with experimental data. Chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry yielded 17 unique distance restraints within the ECD of the TSHR, its ligand TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex. These structural restraints generally confirm the expected binding mode of TSH to the ECD as well as the general fold of the domains and were used to guide homology modeling of the ECD. Functional characterization of TSHR mutants confirms the previously suggested close proximity of Ser-281 and Ile-486 within the TSHR. Rigidifying this contact permanently with a disulfide bridge disrupts ligand-induced receptor activation and indicates that rearrangement of the ECD/extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) interface is a critical step in receptor activation. The experimentally verified contact of Ser-281 (ECD) and Ile-486 (TMD) was subsequently utilized in docking homology models of the ECD and the TMD to create a full-length model of a glycoprotein hormone receptor. PMID:27129207

  20. Exploiting conformational dynamics in drug discovery: design of C-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 with improved activities

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Elisabetta; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction that occurs between molecules is a dynamic process that impacts both structural and conformational properties of the ligand and the ligand binding site. Herein, we investigate the dynamic cross-talk between a protein and the ligand as a source for new opportunities in ligand design. Analysis of the formation/disappearance of protein pockets produced in response to a first-generation inhibitor assisted in the identification of functional groups that could be introduced onto scaffolds to facilitate optimal binding, which allowed for increased binding with previously uncharacterized regions. MD simulations were used to elucidate primary changes that occur in the Hsp90 C-terminal binding pocket in the presence of first-generation ligands. This data was then used to design ligands that adapt to these receptor conformations, which provides access to an energy landscape that is not visible in a static model. The newly synthesized compounds demonstrated anti-proliferative activity at ~150 nanomolar concentration. The method identified herein may be used to design chemical probes that provide additional information on structural variations of Hsp90 C-terminal binding site. PMID:24397468

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina M; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M Teresa; Eck, Michael J; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  3. Assessing the Conformational Changes of pb5, the Receptor-binding Protein of Phage T5, upon Binding to Its Escherichia coli Receptor FhuA*

    PubMed Central

    Breyton, Cécile; Flayhan, Ali; Gabel, Frank; Lethier, Mathilde; Durand, Grégory; Boulanger, Pascale; Chami, Mohamed; Ebel, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Within tailed bacteriophages, interaction of the receptor-binding protein (RBP) with the target cell triggers viral DNA ejection into the host cytoplasm. In the case of phage T5, the RBP pb5 and the receptor FhuA, an outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, have been identified. Here, we use small angle neutron scattering and electron microscopy to investigate the FhuA-pb5 complex. Specific deuteration of one of the partners allows the complete masking in small angle neutron scattering of the surfactant and unlabeled proteins when the complex is solubilized in the fluorinated surfactant F6-DigluM. Thus, individual structures within a membrane protein complex can be described. The solution structure of FhuA agrees with its crystal structure; that of pb5 shows an elongated shape. Neither displays significant conformational changes upon interaction. The mechanism of signal transduction within phage T5 thus appears different from that of phages binding cell wall saccharides, for which structural information is available. PMID:24014030

  4. Single-Channel Kinetic Analysis for Activation and Desensitization of Homomeric 5-HT3A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Jeremías; Gumilar, Fernanda; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The 5-HT3A receptor is a member of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels. To perform kinetic analysis, we mutated the 5-HT3A subunit to obtain a high-conductance form so that single-channel currents can be detected. At all 5-HT concentrations (>0.1 μM), channel activity appears as openings in quick succession that form bursts, which coalesce into clusters. By combining single-channel and macroscopic data, we generated a kinetic model that perfectly describes activation, deactivation, and desensitization. The model shows that full activation arises from receptors with three molecules of agonist bound. It reveals an earlier conformational change of the fully liganded receptor that occurs while the channel is still closed. From this pre-open closed state, the receptor enters into an open-closed cycle involving three open states, which form the cluster whose duration parallels the time constant of desensitization. A similar model lacking the pre-open closed state can describe the data only if the opening rates are fixed to account for the slow activation rate. The application of the model to M4 mutant receptors shows that position 10′ contributes to channel opening and closing rates. Thus, our kinetic model provides a foundation for understanding structural bases of activation and drug action. PMID:19720021

  5. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  6. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  7. Evidence for a receptor protein of activated carcinogen

    PubMed Central

    Mainigi, Kumar D.; Sorof, Sam

    1977-01-01

    nuclei may be directed by the conformationally altered protein of an activated carcinogen-protein complex, i.e., a specific receptor protein containing activated azocarcinogen. PMID:407575

  8. Activation of neurotensin receptor type 1 attenuates locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Vadnie, Chelsea A; Hinton, David J; Choi, Sun; Choi, YuBin; Ruby, Christina L; Oliveros, Alfredo; Prieto, Miguel L; Park, Jun Hyun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-10-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neurotensin (NT) suppresses locomotor activity. However, the brain regions that mediate the locomotor depressant effect of NT and receptor subtype-specific mechanisms involved are unclear. Using a brain-penetrating, selective NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) agonist PD149163, we investigated the effect of systemic and brain region-specific NTS1 activation on locomotor activity. Systemic administration of PD149163 attenuated the locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice both in a novel environment and in their homecage. However, mice developed tolerance to the hypolocomotor effect of PD149163 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Since NTS1 is known to modulate dopaminergic signaling, we examined whether PD149163 blocks dopamine receptor-mediated hyperactivity. Pretreatment with PD149163 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited D2R agonist bromocriptine (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-mediated hyperactivity. D1R agonist SKF-81297 (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hyperlocomotion was only inhibited by 0.1 mg/kg of PD149163. Since the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in the behavioral effects of NT, we examined whether microinjection of PD149163 into these regions reduces locomotion. Microinjection of PD149163 (2 pmol) into the NAc, but not the mPFC suppressed locomotor activity. In summary, our results indicate that systemic and intra-NAc activation of NTS1 is sufficient to reduce locomotion and NTS1 activation inhibits D2R-mediated hyperactivity. Our study will be helpful to identify pharmacological factors and a possible therapeutic window for NTS1-targeted therapies for movement disorders. PMID:24929110

  9. Conformationally restricted elongation factor G retains GTPase activity but is inactive in translocation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Peske, F; Matassova, N B; Savelsbergh, A; Rodnina, M V; Wintermeyer, W

    2000-08-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) from Escherichia coli is a large, five-domain GTPase that promotes tRNA translocation on the ribosome. Full activity requires GTP hydrolysis, suggesting that a conformational change of the factor is important for function. To restrict the intramolecular mobility, two cysteine residues were engineered into domains 1 and 5 of EF-G that spontaneously formed a disulfide cross-link. Cross-linked EF-G retained GTPase activity on the ribosome, whereas it was inactive in translocation as well as in turnover. Both activities were restored when the cross-link was reversed by reduction. These results strongly argue against a GTPase switch-type model of EF-G function and demonstrate that conformational mobility is an absolute requirement for EF-G function on the ribosome. PMID:10983996

  10. Block of NMDA receptor channels by endogenous neurosteroids: implications for the agonist induced conformational states of the channel vestibule.

    PubMed

    Vyklicky, Vojtech; Krausova, Barbora; Cerny, Jiri; Balik, Ales; Zapotocky, Martin; Novotny, Marian; Lichnerova, Katarina; Smejkalova, Tereza; Kaniakova, Martina; Korinek, Miloslav; Petrovic, Milos; Kacer, Petr; Horak, Martin; Chodounska, Hana; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction is implicated in multiple brain disorders. NMDARs can be allosterically modulated by numerous compounds, including endogenous neurosteroid pregnanolone sulfate. Here, we identify the molecular basis of the use-dependent and voltage-independent inhibitory effect of neurosteroids on NMDAR responses. The site of action is located at the extracellular vestibule of the receptor's ion channel pore and is accessible after receptor activation. Mutations in the extracellular vestibule in the SYTANLAAF motif disrupt the inhibitory effect of negatively charged steroids. In contrast, positively charged steroids inhibit mutated NMDAR responses in a voltage-dependent manner. These results, in combination with molecular modeling, characterize structure details of the open configuration of the NMDAR channel. Our results provide a unique opportunity for the development of new therapeutic neurosteroid-based ligands to treat diseases associated with dysfunction of the glutamate system. PMID:26086919

  11. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  12. Structural Basis of Interaction Between Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator and its Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka,C.; Parry, G.; Callahan, J.; Shaw, D.; Kuo, A.; Cines, B.; Mazar, A.; Lubkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its high-affinity receptor (uPAR) orchestrates uPAR interactions with other cellular components that play a pivotal role in diverse (patho-)physiological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. However, notwithstanding the wealth of biochemical data available describing the activities of uPAR, little is known about the exact mode of uPAR/uPA interactions or the presumed conformational changes that accompany uPA/uPAR engagement. Here, we report the crystal structure of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which contains the three domains of the wild-type receptor but lacks the cell-surface anchoring sequence, in complex with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (ATF), at the resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of free ATF. Our results provide a structural basis, represented by conformational changes induced in uPAR, for several published biochemical observations describing the nature of uPAR/uPA interactions and provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for the cellular responses induced by uPA binding.

  13. Crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region reveals an autoinhibited conformation through active site sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Huawei; Yang, Taehong; Terman, Jonathan R.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2010-01-20

    Plexin cell surface receptors bind to semaphorin ligands and transduce signals for regulating neuronal axon guidance. The intracellular region of plexins is essential for signaling and contains a R-Ras/M-Ras GTPase activating protein (GAP) domain that is divided into two segments by a Rho GTPase-binding domain (RBD). The regulation mechanisms for plexin remain elusive, although it is known that activation requires both binding of semaphorin to the extracellular region and a Rho-family GTPase (Rac1 or Rnd1) to the RBD. Here we report the crystal structure of the plexin A3 intracellular region. The structure shows that the N- and C-terminal portions of the GAP homologous regions together form a GAP domain with an overall fold similar to other Ras GAPs. However, the plexin GAP domain adopts a closed conformation and cannot accommodate R-Ras/M-Ras in its substrate-binding site, providing a structural basis for the autoinhibited state of plexins. A comparison with the plexin B1 RBD/Rnd1 complex structure suggests that Rnd1 binding alone does not induce a conformational change in plexin, explaining the requirement of both semaphorin and a Rho GTPase for activation. The structure also identifies an N-terminal segment that is important for regulation. Both the N-terminal segment and the RBD make extensive interactions with the GAP domain, suggesting the presence of an allosteric network connecting these three domains that integrates semaphorin and Rho GTPase signals to activate the GAP. The importance of these interactions in plexin signaling is shown by both cell-based and in vivo axon guidance assays.

  14. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  15. Conformational analysis of 2-substituted piperazines.

    PubMed

    Kallel, E Adam; Vangel, Colin; Elbaum, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The unusual activity differences of carbon linked versus oxygen linked 2-substituted piperazines as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists led to a conformational study of several examples. The conformational preferences of which are absent from the literature. We report the first study and explanation of the conformational preference of 2-substiturted piperazines and show an example of how this preference controls binding in a pharmaceutically relevant case. In all cases the axial conformation for these 1-acyl and 1 aryl 2-substituted piperazines was found to be preferred. For the ether linked compounds, the axial conformation was found to be further stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The axial orientation also places the basic and pyridyl nitrogens into a special orientation that closely mimics nicotine. Molecular modeling studies confirm that the R enantiomers of the compounds can bind to the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the basic and pyridyl nitrogens colocalized with their counterparts in Epibatidine. PMID:27212066

  16. Structure-Activity Relationships of Constrained Phenylethylamine Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Isberg, Vignir; Paine, James; Leth-Petersen, Sebastian; Kristensen, Jesper L.; Gloriam, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic ligands have proven effective drugs in the treatment of migraine, pain, obesity, and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. There is a clinical need for more highly 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands and the most attention has been given to the phenethylamine class. Conformationally constrained phenethylamine analogs have demonstrated that for optimal activity the free lone pair electrons of the 2-oxygen must be oriented syn and the 5-oxygen lone pairs anti relative to the ethylamine moiety. Also the ethyl linker has been constrained providing information about the bioactive conformation of the amine functionality. However, combined 1,2-constriction by cyclization has only been tested with one compound. Here, we present three new 1,2-cyclized phenylethylamines, 9–11, and describe their synthetic routes. Ligand docking in the 5-HT2B crystal structure showed that the 1,2-heterocyclized compounds can be accommodated in the binding site. Conformational analysis showed that 11 can only bind in a higher-energy conformation, which would explain its absent or low affinity. The amine and 2-oxygen interactions with D3.32 and S3.36, respectively, can form but shift the placement of the core scaffold. The constraints in 9–11 resulted in docking poses with the 4-bromine in closer vicinity to 5.46, which is polar only in the human 5-HT2A subtype, for which 9–11 have the lowest affinity. The new ligands, conformational analysis and docking expand the structure-activity relationships of constrained phenethylamines and contributes towards the development of 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands. PMID:24244317

  17. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  18. Molecular Crowding Affects the Conformational Fluctuations, Peroxidase Activity, and Folding Landscape of Yeast Cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Chakraborty, Ritobrita; Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-04-26

    To understand how a protein folds and behaves inside living cells, the effects of synthetic crowding media on protein folding, function, stability, and association have been studied in detail. Because the effect of excluded volume is more prominent in an extended state than in the native protein, a majority of these studies have been conducted in the unfolded state of different model proteins. Here, we have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other biophysical methods to investigate the effect of crowding agents Ficoll70 and Dextran70 on the nativelike state of cytochrome c from yeast. Yeast cytochrome c (y-cytc) contains a substantial expanded state in its native folded condition, which is present in equilibrium with a compact conformer in aqueous buffer. We have found that the crowding medium affects the native state equilibrium between compact and expanded states, shifting its population toward the compact conformer. As a result, the peroxidase activity of y-cytc decreases. Urea-induced protein stability measurements show that the compaction destabilizes the protein due to charge repulsions between similar charged clusters. Interestingly, the time constant of conformational fluctuations between the compact and expanded conformers has been found to increase in the crowded milieu, suggesting a crucial role of the solution microviscosity. PMID:27050502

  19. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  20. Composition, assembly and activation of the avian progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Toft, D O

    1992-03-01

    When isolated from chick oviduct cytosol by antibody adsorption, the inactive progesterone receptor is associated with the two heat shock proteins, hsp90 and hsp70, plus three additional proteins termed p54, p50, and p23 according to their molecular weights. While their functions remain unknown, all of these receptor associated proteins are dissociated upon receptor activation in intact cells. To better understand the assembly and activation mechanisms of progesterone receptor complexes, we have developed a cell-free system for studying receptor interactions with hsp90 and hsp70 and have used this system to examine requirements for hsp90 binding to the receptor. Purified receptor, free of hsp90 and immobilized on an antibody affinity resin, will rebind hsp90 in rabbit reticulocyte lysate when several conditions are met. These include: (1) absence of progesterone, (2) elevated temperature (30 degrees C), (3) presence of ATP, and (4) presence of Mg2+. We have obtained maximal hsp90 binding to receptor when lysate is supplemented with 3 mM MgCl2 and an ATP regenerating system. ATP depletion of lysate by dialysis or ATPase addition blocks hsp90 binding to the receptor. When progesterone is added to pre-formed receptor complexes in reticulocyte lysate it promotes activation and the dissociation of hsp90. This process is also dependent upon ATP. Thus, both the assembly, and activation of the progesterone receptor can be accomplished in the reticulocyte lysate system. PMID:1562503

  1. Activation-induced structural change in the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; Takahashi, Hirohide; Srivats, Shyam; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We studied the response of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor to activation. • GluN1 and GluN3A subunits interacted within transfected cells. • The GluN1/GluN3A receptor was functionally active. • Glycine or D-serine caused a ∼1 nm height reduction in bilayer-integrated receptors. • This height reduction was abolished by the glycine antagonist DCKA. - Abstract: Unlike GluN2-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which require both glycine and glutamate for activation, receptors composed of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits are activated by glycine alone. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging to examine the response to activation of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor. GluN1 and GluN3A subunits were shown to interact intimately within transfected tsA 201 cells. Isolated GluN1/GluN3A receptors integrated into lipid bilayers responded to addition of either glycine or D-serine, but not glutamate, with a ∼1 nm reduction in height of the extracellular domain. The height reduction in response to glycine was abolished by the glycine antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid. Our results represent the first demonstration of the effect of activation on the conformation of this receptor.

  2. Activation of alpha6-containing GABAA receptors by pentobarbital occurs through a different mechanism than activation by GABA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew T; Fisher, Janet L

    2010-03-01

    The GABA(A) receptors are ligand-gated chloride channels which are the targets for many clinically used sedatives, including the barbiturates. The barbiturate pentobarbital acts through multiple sites on the GABA(A) receptor. At low concentrations (muM), it acts as a positive allosteric modulator while at higher concentrations it can directly activate the receptor. This agonist action is influenced by the subunit composition of the receptor, and pentobarbital is a more effective agonist than GABA only at receptors containing an alpha6 subunit. The conformational change that translates GABA binding into channel opening is known to involve a lysine residue located in an extracellular domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane domains. Mutations of this residue disrupt activation of the channel by GABA and have been linked to inherited epilepsy. Pentobarbital binds to the receptor at a different agonist site than GABA, but could use a common signal transduction mechanism to gate the channel. To address this question, we compared the effect of a mutating the homologous lysine residue in the alpha1 or alpha6 subunits (K278 or K277, respectively) to methionine on direct activation of recombinant GABA(A) receptors by GABA or pentobarbital. We found that this mutation reduced GABA sensitivity for both alpha1 and alpha6 subunits, but affected pentobarbital sensitivity only for the alpha1 subunit. This suggests that pentobarbital acts through a distinct signal transduction pathway at the alpha6 subunit, which may account for its greater efficacy compared to GABA at receptors containing this subunit. PMID:20109529

  3. Novel human D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors stabilize an active-site lid-open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T.; Chun, Lawrence E.; Brown, Scott P.; Heffernan, Michele L. R.; Fang, Q. Kevin; Orsini, Michael A.; Pollegioni, Loredano; Hardy, Larry W.; Spear, Kerry L.; Large, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) is a central regulator of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. hDAAO (human D-amino acid oxidase) indirectly reduces NMDAR activity by degrading the NMDAR co-agonist D-serine. Since NMDAR hypofunction is thought to be a foundational defect in schizophrenia, hDAAO inhibitors have potential as treatments for schizophrenia and other nervous system disorders. Here, we sought to identify novel chemicals that inhibit hDAAO activity. We used computational tools to design a focused, purchasable library of compounds. After screening this library for hDAAO inhibition, we identified the structurally novel compound, ‘compound 2’ [3-(7-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)propanoic acid], which displayed low nM hDAAO inhibitory potency (Ki=7 nM). Although the library was expected to enrich for compounds that were competitive for both D-serine and FAD, compound 2 actually was FAD uncompetitive, much like canonical hDAAO inhibitors such as benzoic acid. Compound 2 and an analog were independently co-crystalized with hDAAO. These compounds stabilized a novel conformation of hDAAO in which the active-site lid was in an open position. These results confirm previous hypotheses regarding active-site lid flexibility of mammalian D-amino acid oxidases and could assist in the design of the next generation of hDAAO inhibitors. PMID:25001371

  4. D-Glucose-Derived 1,2,4-Trioxepanes: Synthesis, Conformational Study, and Antimalarial Activity.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, D P; Corbett, Y; Dhavale, D D; Taramelli, D; Trombini, C; Quintavalla, A; Lombardo, M

    2015-08-21

    New enantiomerically pure 1,2,4-trioxepanes 10a,b/11a,b were synthesized from D-glucose. Their conformational behavior was studied by low-temperature NMR and substantiated by DFT calculations. On evaluation of in vitro antimalarial activity, the adamantyl derivative 11b showed IC50 values in the low micromolar range, particularly against the W2 chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strain (IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.12 μM). PMID:26237035

  5. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally restricted acetanilides as potent and selective β3 adrenergic receptor agonists for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Christopher R; Berger, Richard; Goble, Stephen D; Harper, Bart; Shen, Dong-Ming; Wang, Liping; Bansal, Alka; Brown, Patricia N; Chen, Airu S; Dingley, Karen H; Di Salvo, Jerry; Fitzmaurice, Aileen; Gichuru, Loise N; Hurley, Amanda L; Jochnowitz, Nina; Miller, Randall R; Mistry, Shruty; Nagabukuro, Hiroshi; Salituro, Gino M; Sanfiz, Anthony; Stevenson, Andra S; Villa, Katherine; Zamlynny, Beata; Struthers, Mary; Weber, Ann E; Edmondson, Scott D

    2014-02-27

    A series of conformationally restricted acetanilides were synthesized and evaluated as β3-adrenergic receptor agonists (β3-AR) for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Optimization studies identified a five-membered ring as the preferred conformational lock of the acetanilide. Further optimization of both the aromatic and thiazole regions led to compounds such as 19 and 29, which have a good balance of potency and selectivity. These compounds have significantly reduced intrinsic clearance compared to our initial series of pyridylethanolamine β3-AR agonists and thus have improved unbound drug exposures. Both analogues demonstrated dose dependent β3-AR mediated responses in a rat bladder hyperactivity model. PMID:24437735

  6. Interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different conformational states.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Rosenberg, Avraham; Feuerbach, Dominik; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Moaddel, Ruin; Glick, Stanley D; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-06-01

    The interaction of 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) was compared with that for ibogaine and phencyclidine (PCP). The results established that 18-MC: (a) is more potent than ibogaine and PCP inhibiting (+/-)-epibatidine-induced AChR Ca(2+) influx. The potency of 18-MC is increased after longer pre-incubation periods, which is in agreement with the enhancement of [(3)H]cytisine binding to resting but activatable Torpedo AChRs, (b) binds to a single site in the Torpedo AChR with high affinity and inhibits [(3)H]TCP binding to desensitized AChRs in a steric fashion, suggesting the existence of overlapping sites. This is supported by our docking results indicating that 18-MC interacts with a domain located between the serine (position 6') and valine (position 13') rings, and (c) inhibits [(3)H]TCP, [(3)H]ibogaine, and [(3)H]18-MC binding to desensitized AChRs with higher affinity compared to resting AChRs. This can be partially attributed to a slower dissociation rate from the desensitized AChR compared to that from the resting AChR. The enthalpic contribution is more important than the entropic contribution when 18-MC binds to the desensitized AChR compared to that for the resting AChR, and vice versa. Ibogaine analogs inhibit the AChR by interacting with a luminal domain that is shared with PCP, and by inducing desensitization. PMID:20303928

  7. Synthesis, biological activity, and conformational study of N-methylated allatostatin analogues inhibiting juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chuanliang; Wu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Xile; Yang, Xinling; Tobe, Stephen S

    2015-03-25

    An allatostatin (AST) neuropeptide mimic (H17) is a potential insect growth regulator, which inhibits the production of juvenile hormone (JH) by the corpora allata. To determine the effect of conformation of novel AST analogues and their ability to inhibit JH biosynthesis, eight insect AST analogues were synthesized using H17 as the lead compound by N-methylation scanning, which is a common strategy for improving the biological properties of peptides. A bioassay using JH production by corpora allata of the cockroach Diploptera punctata indicated that single N-methylation mimics (analogues 1-4) showed more activity than double N-methylation mimics (analogues 5-8). Especially, analogues 1 and 4 showed roughly equivalent activity to that of H17, with IC50 values of 5.17 × 10(-8) and 6.44 × 10(-8) M, respectively. Molecular modeling based on nuclear magnetic resonance data showed that the conformation of analogues 1 and 4 seems to be flexible, whereas analogues 2 and 3 showed a type IV β-turn. This flexible linear conformation was hypothesized to be a new important and indispensable structural element beneficial to the activity of AST mimics. PMID:25751662

  8. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 by Triton X-100--identification of two consecutive conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Declerck, P J

    1998-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily because of its conformational and functional flexibility. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the functional stability and conformational transitions of PAI-1. At 37 degrees C, TX-100 induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the functional half-life of PAI-1 resulting in half-lives of 177 +/- 54 min (mean +/- SD, n = 3), 19 +/- 2 min, 1.7 +/- 0.3 min and 0.53 +/- 0.03 min in the presence of 0.005, 0.010, 0.020 and 0.2% TX-100, respectively, compared to a half-life of 270 +/- 146 min in the absence of TX-100. Conformational analysis at various time points and at different temperatures (0 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C) revealed that this inactivation proceeds through the formation of a substrate-like intermediate followed by the formation of the latent form. Kinetic evaluation demonstrated that this conversion fits to two consecutive first-order transitions, i.e. active k1--> substrate k2--> latent. The k1 value was strongly dependent on the concentration of TX-100 (e.g. 0.002 +/- 0.0006 s(-1) and 0.029 +/- 0.003 s(-1) for 0.01% and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C) whereas the conversion of substrate to latent (k2) was virtually independent of the TX-100 concentration (i.e. 0.012 +/- 0.002 s(-1) and 0.011 +/- 0.001 s(-1) for 0.01 and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C). Experiments with a variety of other non-ionic amphiphilic compounds revealed that the amphiphilic character of the compound is, at least in part, responsible for the observed effects and strongly indicate that the currently reported mechanism of inactivation is of general importance for the conformational transitions in PAI-1. In conclusion, TX- 100 changes the initial conformation of PAI-1 resulting in altered functional properties. This observation allows us to develop a new model for the mechanism involved in the conformational flexibility of

  9. 1,4-Disubstituted-[1,2,3]triazolyl-Containing Analogues of MT-II: Design, Synthesis, Conformational Analysis, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Side chain-to-side chain cyclizations represent a strategy to select a family of bioactive conformations by reducing the entropy and enhancing the stabilization of functional ligand-induced receptor conformations. This structural manipulation contributes to increased target specificity, enhanced biological potency, improved pharmacokinetic properties, increased functional potency, and lowered metabolic susceptibility. The CuI-catalyzed azide–alkyne 1,3-dipolar Huisgen’s cycloaddition, the prototypic click reaction, presents a promising opportunity to develop a new paradigm for an orthogonal bioorganic and intramolecular side chain-to-side chain cyclization. In fact, the proteolytic stable 1,4- or 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazolyl moiety is isosteric with the peptide bond and can function as a surrogate of the classical side chain-to-side chain lactam forming bridge. Herein we report the design, synthesis, conformational analysis, and functional biological activity of a series of i-to-i+5 1,4- and 4,1-disubstituted [1,2,3]triazole-bridged cyclopeptides derived from MT-II, the homodetic Asp5 to Lys10 side chain-to-side chain bridged heptapeptide, an extensively studied agonist of melanocortin receptors. PMID:25347033

  10. pH dependence of ligand-induced human epidermal growth factor receptor activation investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    The activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (hEGFR) involves a large conformational change in its soluble extracellular domains (sECD, residues 1-620), from a tethered to an extended conformation upon binding of ligands, such as EGF. It has been reported that this dynamic process is pH-dependent, that is, hEGFR can be activated by EGF at high pH to form an extended dimer but remains as an inactive monomer at low pH. In this paper, we perform all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations starting from the tethered conformation of sECD:EGF complex, at pH 5.0 and 8.5, respectively. Simulation results indicate that sECD:EGF shows different dynamic properties between the two pHs, and the complex may have a higher tendency of activation at pH 8.5. Twenty residues, including 13 histidines, in sECD:EGF have different protonation states between the two pHs (calculated by the H++ server). The charge distribution at pH 8.5 is more favorable for forming an extended conformation toward the active state of sECD than that at pH 5.0. Our study may shed light on the mechanism of pH dependence of hEGFR activation. Graphical abstract pH dependence of ligand-induced human epidermal growth factor receptor activation. PMID:27179806

  11. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  12. Simultaneous measurement of DNA motor protein conformation and activity with combined optical trap and single-molecule fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Yann

    2013-03-01

    We present single-molecule measurements of Superfamily 1 UvrD helicase DNA unwinding that reveal directly how helicase stoichiometry and conformation regulate motor activity. Using a new instrument that combines high resolution optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we record DNA unwinding activity with base pair-scale resolution (via optical tweezers) simultaneously with helicase stoichiometry and conformation (via fluorescence). Quantifying the fluorescence signal from labeled UvrD, we observe that pairs of UvrD molecules are required for long distance unwinding but that individual molecules exhibit limited, non-processive unwinding activity. UvrD is also known to exhibit two different conformations, `closed' and `open', based on the orientation of its 2B regulatory domain. The function of these conformations has remained elusive. Measuring the fluorescence of FRET labeled proteins, we detect directly the conformation of the 2B domain of individual UvrD molecules during unwinding activity. We observe that UvrD is in the `closed' conformation during DNA unwinding but surprisingly switches to the `open' conformation upon reversal of helicase direction, i.e. when UvrD switches strands and translocates on the opposing strand with the DNA junction rezipping behind it. We hypothesize that the 2B domain acts as a conformational switch that controls DNA unwinding vs. re-annealing. Work supported by NSF (PHY-082261, Center for the Physics of Living Cells) and NIH (R21 RR025341A)

  13. The Chemokine Receptor CCR1 Is Constitutively Active, Which Leads to G Protein-independent, β-Arrestin-mediated Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, C. Taylor; Salanga, Catherina L.; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Trejo, JoAnn; Handel, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by their associated ligands has been extensively studied, and increasing structural information about the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand-dependent receptor activation is beginning to emerge with the recent expansion in GPCR crystal structures. However, some GPCRs are also able to adopt active conformations in the absence of agonist binding that result in the initiation of signal transduction and receptor down-modulation. In this report, we show that the CC-type chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) exhibits significant constitutive activity leading to a variety of cellular responses. CCR1 expression is sufficient to induce inhibition of cAMP formation, increased F-actin content, and basal migration of human and murine leukocytes. The constitutive activity leads to basal phosphorylation of the receptor, recruitment of β-arrestin-2, and subsequent receptor internalization. CCR1 concurrently engages Gαi and β-arrestin-2 in a multiprotein complex, which may be accommodated by homo-oligomerization or receptor clustering. The data suggest the presence of two functional states for CCR1; whereas receptor coupled to Gαi functions as a canonical GPCR, albeit with high constitutive activity, the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex is required for G protein-independent constitutive receptor internalization. The pertussis toxin-insensitive uptake of chemokine by the receptor suggests that the CCR1·β-arrestin-2 complex may be related to a potential scavenging function of the receptor, which may be important for maintenance of chemokine gradients and receptor responsiveness in complex fields of chemokines during inflammation. PMID:24056371

  14. Constitutive Activity of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu Chiu; Dehm, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States. The androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis is central to all stages of PCa pathophysiology and serves as the main target for endocrine-based therapy. The most advanced stage of the disease, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is presently incurable and accounts for most PCa mortality. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which the AR signaling axis can bypass endocrine-targeted therapies and drive progression of CRPC. These mechanisms include alterations in growth factor, cytokine, and inflammatory signaling pathways, altered expression or activity of transcriptional co-regulators, AR point mutations, and AR gene amplification leading to AR protein overexpression. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the synthesis of constitutively active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) lacking the COOH-terminal ligand binding domain, as well as the role and regulation of AR-Vs in supporting therapeutic resistance in CRPC. Finally, we summarize the ongoing development of inhibitors targeting discrete AR functional domains as well as the status of new biomarkers for monitoring the AR signaling axis in patients. PMID:24931201

  15. Effect of size and conformation of the ligand on asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated ligand internalization and degradation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Chang, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/-I-labeled desialylated cyanogen bromide fragment I of orosomucoid (AS-CNBr-I) and its reduced and carboxymethylated derivative (AS-RC-CNBr-I) were compared with those of /sup 125/I-labeled asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in rat hepatocytes. At 30 nM the rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-AS-CNBr-I were greater than those of /sup 125/I-ASOR. /sup 125/I-AS-RC-CNBr-I also had a lower rate of internalization and degradation. In contrast to /sup 125/I-ASOR, when degradation was inhibited by 5 ..mu..M colchicine there was a significant intracellular accumulation of the smaller ligands. At 4/sup 0/C the hepatocytes were found to bind the fragmented ligands more than /sup 125/I-ASOR. Incubation of the cells with bound ligand at 37/sup 0/ indicated that diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR was greater than the smaller ligands. Colchincine markedly enhanced diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR. On the other hand, there were marked accumulation of the smaller ligands by colchicine. These results suggest that the rates of internalization, degradation and diacytosis of the ligand are affected by the size and conformation of the ligand through different rates of receptor binding and intracellular transport.

  16. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  17. Dynamics of the Ligand Binding Domain Layer during AMPA Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Baranovic, Jelena; Chebli, Miriam; Salazar, Hector; Carbone, Anna L; Faelber, Katja; Lau, Albert Y; Daumke, Oliver; Plested, Andrew J R

    2016-02-23

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are postsynaptic tetrameric ligand-gated channels whose activity mediates fast excitatory transmission. Glutamate binding to clamshell-shaped ligand binding domains (LBDs) triggers opening of the integral ion channel, but how the four LBDs orchestrate receptor activation is unknown. Here, we present a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure displaying two tetrameric LBD arrangements fully bound to glutamate. Using a series of engineered metal ion trapping mutants, we showed that the more compact of the two assemblies corresponds to an arrangement populated during activation of full-length receptors. State-dependent cross-linking of the mutants identified zinc bridges between the canonical active LBD dimers that formed when the tetramer was either fully or partially bound by glutamate. These bridges also stabilized the resting state, consistent with the recently published full-length apo structure. Our results provide insight into the activation mechanism of glutamate receptors and the complex conformational space that the LBD layer can sample. PMID:26910426

  18. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist withmore » residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.« less

  19. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.

  20. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1. PMID:26205105

  1. Mechanisms of xenobiotic receptor activation: Direct vs. indirect.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Bryan; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-09-01

    The so-called xenobiotic receptors (XRs) have functionally evolved into cellular sensors for both endogenous and exogenous stimuli by regulating the transcription of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as those involving energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, and/or immune responses. Unlike prototypical steroid hormone receptors, XRs are activated through both direct ligand-binding and ligand-independent (indirect) mechanisms by a plethora of structurally unrelated chemicals. This review covers research literature that discusses direct vs. indirect activation of XRs. A particular focus is centered on the signaling control of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor (PXR), and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We expect that this review will shed light on both the common and distinct mechanisms associated with activation of these three XRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26877237

  2. Surface energy modified chips for detection of conformational states and enzymatic activity in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Asberg, Peter; Nilsson, K Peter R; Inganäs, Olle

    2006-02-28

    A novel patterning method for anchoring biomolecules and noncovalent assembled conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/biomolecule complexes to a chip surface is presented. The surface energy of a hydrophilic substrate is modified using an elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp, containing a relief pattern. Modification takes place on the parts where the PDMS stamp is in conformal contact with the substrate and leaves low molecular weight PDMS residues on the surface resulting in a hydrophobic modification, and then biomolecules and CPE/biomolecule complexes are then adsorbed in a specific pattern. The method constitutes a discrimination system for different conformations in biomolecules using CPEs as reporters and the PDMS modified substrates as the discriminator. Detection of different conformations in two biomacromolecules, a synthetic peptide (JR2E) and a protein (calmodulin), reported by the CPE and resolved by fluorescence was demonstrated. Also, excellent enzyme activity in patterned CPE/horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme was shown, demonstrating that this method can be used to pattern biomolecules with their activity retained. The method presented could be useful in various biochip applications, such as analyzing proteins and peptides in large-scale production, in making metabolic chips, and for making multi-microarrays. PMID:16489808

  3. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  4. The Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted 4-Substituted-2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Multi-targeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Microtubule Inhibitors as Potential Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Ihnat, Michael; Hamel, Ernest; Zammiello, Cynthia; Bastian, Anja; Mooberry, Susan L.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-01-01

    A series of eleven conformationally restricted, 4-substituted 2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines was designed to explore the bioactive conformation required for dual inhibition of microtubule assembly and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and their biological activities are reported. All three rotatable single bonds in the lead compound 1 were sequentially restricted to address the role of each in SAR for microtubule and RTK inhibitory effects. Compounds 2, 3, 7 and 10 showed microtubule depolymerizing activity comparable to or better than the lead 1, some with nanomolar EC50 values. While compound 8 had no effect on microtubules, 8 and 10 both showed potent RTK inhibition with nanomolar IC50s. These compounds confirm that the bioactive conformation for RTK inhibition is different from that for tubulin inhibition. The tetrahydroquinoline analog 10 showed the most potent dual tubulin and RTK inhibitory activities (low nanomolar inhibition of EGFR, VEGFR2 and PDGFR-β). Compound 10 is highly potent activity against many NCI cancer cell lines, including several chemo-resistant cell lines, and could serve as a lead for further preclinical studies. PMID:25882519

  5. The design, synthesis and biological evaluation of conformationally restricted 4-substituted-2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines as multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase and microtubule inhibitors as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Ihnat, Michael; Hamel, Ernest; Zammiello, Cynthia; Bastian, Anja; Mooberry, Susan L; Gangjee, Aleem

    2015-05-15

    A series of eleven conformationally restricted, 4-substituted 2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines was designed to explore the bioactive conformation required for dual inhibition of microtubule assembly and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and their biological activities are reported. All three rotatable single bonds in the lead compound 1 were sequentially restricted to address the role of each in SAR for microtubule and RTK inhibitory effects. Compounds 2, 3, 7 and 10 showed microtubule depolymerizing activity comparable to or better than the lead 1, some with nanomolar EC50 values. While compound 8 had no effect on microtubules, 8 and 10 both showed potent RTK inhibition with nanomolar IC50s. These compounds confirm that the bioactive conformation for RTK inhibition is different from that for tubulin inhibition. The tetrahydroquinoline analog 10 showed the most potent dual tubulin and RTK inhibitory activities (low nanomolar inhibition of EGFR, VEGFR2 and PDGFR-β). Compound 10 has highly potent activity against many NCI cancer cell lines, including several chemo-resistant cell lines, and could serve as a lead for further preclinical studies. PMID:25882519

  6. Conformational coupling, bridge helix dynamics and active site dehydration in catalysis by RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Steve A.; Singh, Badri Nath; Zhang, Chunfen; Kireeva, Maria; Domecq, Céline; Bouchard, Annie; Nazione, Anthony M.; Feig, Michael; Cukier, Robert I.; Coulombe, Benoit; Kashlev, Mikhail; Hampsey, Michael; Burton, Zachary F.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of Thermus thermophilus (Tt) RNA polymerase (RNAP) in a catalytic conformation demonstrates that the active site dNMP-NTP base pair must be substantially dehydrated to support full active site closing and optimum conditions for phosphodiester bond synthesis. In silico mutant β R428A RNAP, which was designed based on substitutions at the homologous position (Rpb2 R512) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) RNAP II, was used as a reference structure to compare to Tt RNAP in simulations. Long range conformational coupling linking a dynamic segment of the bridge α-helix, the extended fork loop, the active site, and the trigger loop-trigger helix is apparent and adversely affected in β R428A RNAP. Furthermore, bridge helix bending is detected in the catalytic structure, indicating that bridge helix dynamics may regulate phosphodiester bond synthesis as well as translocation. An active site “latch” assembly that includes a key trigger helix residue Tt β’ H1242 and highly conserved active site residues β E445 and R557 appears to help regulate active site hydration/dehydration. The potential relevance of these observations in understanding RNAP and DNAP induced fit and fidelity is discussed. PMID:20478425

  7. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Activity kinetics, conformation, and energetics.

    PubMed

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to examine the ability of non-ionic/non-polar Colloidial Liquid Aphrons (CLAs) to preserve enzyme functionality upon immobilization and release. CLAs consisting of micron-sized oil droplets surrounded by a thin aqueous layer stabilized by a mixture of surfactants, were formulated by direct addition (pre-manufacture addition) using 1% Tween 80/mineral oil and 1% Tween 20 and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. The results of activity assays for both lipase and α-chymotrypsin showed that kinetic activity increased upon immobilization by factors of 7 and 5.5, respectively, while aprotinin retained approximately 85% of its native activity. The conformation of the enzymes released through desorption showed no significant alterations compared to their native state. Changes in pH and temperature showed that optimum conditions did not change after immobilization, while analysis of activation energy for the immobilized enzyme showed an increase in activity at higher temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of bound water within the aphron structure allowed for some degree of enzyme hydration, and this hydration was needed for an active conformation with results showing a decrease in ΔH* for the immobilized system compared to its native counterpart. PMID:26497856

  8. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  9. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  10. The closed conformation of the LDL receptor is destabilized by the low Ca(++) concentration but favored by the high Mg(++) concentration in the endosome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Sancho, Javier

    2015-11-30

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) internalizes LDL and VLDL particles. In the endosomes, it adopts a closed conformation important for recycling, by interaction of two modules of the ligand binding domain (LR4-5) and a β-propeller motif. Here, we investigate by SPR the interactions between those two modules and the β-propeller. Our results indicate that the two modules cooperate to bind the β-propeller. The binding is favored by low pH and by high [Ca(++)]. Our data show that Mg(++), at high concentration in the endosome, favors the formation of the closed conformation by replacing the structuring effect of Ca(++) in LR5. We propose a sequential model of LDL release where formation of the close conformation follows LDL release. PMID:26526611

  11. Comparison of the activation kinetics of the M3 acetylcholine receptor and a constitutively active mutant receptor in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Ziegler, Nicole; Winkler, Christiane; Hein, Peter; Berlot, Catherine H; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors is the first step of the signaling cascade triggered by binding of an agonist. Here we compare the activation kinetics of the G(q)-coupled M(3) acetylcholine receptor (M(3)-AChR) with that of a constitutively active mutant receptor (M(3)-AChR-N514Y) using M(3)-AChR constructs that report receptor activation by changes in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal. We observed a leftward shift in the concentration-dependent FRET response for acetylcholine and carbachol with M(3)-AChR-N514Y. Consistent with this result, at submaximal agonist concentrations, the activation kinetics of M(3)-AChR-N514Y were significantly faster, whereas at maximal agonist concentrations the kinetics of receptor activation were identical. Receptor deactivation was significantly faster with carbachol than with acetylcholine and was significantly delayed by the N514Y mutation. Receptor-G-protein interaction was measured by FRET between M(3)-AChR-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gγ(2). Agonist-induced receptor-G-protein coupling was of a time scale similar to that of receptor activation. As observed for receptor deactivation, receptor-G-protein dissociation was slower for acetylcholine than that for carbachol. Acetylcholine-stimulated increases in receptor-G-protein coupling of M(3)-AChR-N514Y reached only 12% of that of M(3)-AChR and thus cannot be kinetically analyzed. G-protein activation was measured using YFP-tagged Gα(q) and CFP-tagged Gγ(2). Activation of G(q) was significantly slower than receptor activation and indistinguishable for the two agonists. However, G(q) deactivation was significantly prolonged for acetylcholine compared with that for carbachol. Consistent with decreased agonist-stimulated coupling to G(q), agonist-stimulated G(q) activation by M(3)-AChR-N514Y was not detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the N514Y mutation produces constitutive activation of M(3

  12. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  13. Salt Bridges Overlapping the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Agonist Binding Site Reveal a Coincidence Detector for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg38-Asp98 and Glu90-Lys121) and two disulfide (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a “coincidence detector” that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu90-Lys121, but not Arg38-Asp98 ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr284 and the hydrogen bonding of Ser217 are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys191 from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  14. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  15. The Optimal Corepressor Function of Nuclear Receptor Corepressor (NCoR) for Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Requires G Protein Pathway Suppressor 2*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chun; Li, Yali; Gow, Chien-Hung; Wong, Madeline; Zha, Jikun; Yan, Chunxia; Liu, Hongqi; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P.; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-dependent transcription by the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) is important for homeostatic expression of PPARγ target genes in vivo. The current model states that NCoR-mediated repression requires its direct interaction with PPARγ in the repressive conformation. Previous studies, however, have shown that DNA-bound PPARγ is incompatible with a direct, high-affinity association with NCoR because of the inherent ability of PPARγ to adopt the active conformation. Here we show that NCoR acquires the ability to repress active PPARγ-mediated transcription via G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2), a component of the NCoR corepressor complex. Unlike NCoR, GPS2 can recognize and bind the active state of PPARγ. In GPS2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, loss of GPS2 markedly reduces the corepressor function of NCoR for PPARγ, leading to constitutive activation of PPARγ target genes and spontaneous adipogenesis of the cells. GPS2, however, is dispensable for repression mediated by unliganded thyroid hormone receptor α or a PPARγ mutant unable to adopt the active conformation. This study shows that GPS2, although dispensable for the intrinsic repression function of NCoR, can mediate a novel corepressor repression pathway that allows NCoR to directly repress active PPARγ-mediated transcription, which is important for the optimal corepressor function of NCoR for PPARγ. Interestingly, GPS2-dependent repression specifically targets PPARγ but not PPARα or PPARδ. Therefore, GPS2 may serve as a unique target to manipulate PPARγ signaling in diseases. PMID:25519902

  16. Role of extracellular domain dimerization in agonist-induced activation of natriuretic peptide receptor A.

    PubMed

    Parat, Marie; McNicoll, Normand; Wilkes, Brian; Fournier, Alain; De Léan, André

    2008-02-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) A is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) with a ligand binding site, a single transmembrane region, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. The natural agonists atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) bind and activate NPRA, leading to cyclic GMP production, which is responsible for their role in cardiovascular homeostasis. Previous studies suggested that stabilization of a dimeric form of NPRA by agonist is essential for receptor activation. However, ligand specificity and sequential steps of this dimerization process have not been investigated. We used radioligand binding, fluorescence resonance energy transfer homoquenching, and molecular modeling to characterize the interaction of human NPRA-ECD with ANP, BNP, the superagonist (Arg(10),Leu(12),Ser(17),Leu(18))-rANP-(1-28), the minimized analog mini-ANP and the antagonist (Arg(6),beta-cyclohexyl-Ala(8),d-Tic(16),Arg(17),Cys(18))-rANP-(6-18)-amide (A71915). ANP binds to preformed ECD dimers and spontaneous dimerization is the rate-limiting step of the ligand binding process. All the studied peptides, including A71915 antagonist, induce a dose-dependent fluorescence homoquenching, specific to dimerization, with potencies highly correlated with their binding affinities. A71915 induced more quenching than other peptides, suggesting stabilization by the antagonist of ECD dimer in a distinct inactive conformation. In summary, these results indicate that the ligand-induced dimerization process of NPRA is different from that for cytokine receptor model. Agonists or antagonists bind to preformed dimeric ECD, leading to dimer stabilization in an active or inactive conformation, respectively. Furthermore, the highly sensitive fluorescence assay designed to assess dimerization could serve as a powerful tool for further detailing the kinetic steps involved in natriuretic peptide receptor binding and activation. PMID:17965196

  17. Phosphorylation-dependent changes in nucleotide binding, conformation, and dynamics of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B).

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Elvin D; Alvarez, Claudia P; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Sooklal, Clarissa R; Stagljar, Marijana; Kanelis, Voula

    2015-09-11

    The sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B) forms the regulatory subunit of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in vascular smooth muscle. Phosphorylation of the SUR2B nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) by protein kinase A results in increased channel open probability. Here, we investigate the effects of phosphorylation on the structure and nucleotide binding properties of NBD1. Phosphorylation sites in SUR2B NBD1 are located in an N-terminal tail that is disordered. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data indicate that phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail affects multiple residues in NBD1, including residues in the NBD2-binding site, and results in altered conformation and dynamics of NBD1. NMR spectra of NBD1 lacking the N-terminal tail, NBD1-ΔN, suggest that phosphorylation disrupts interactions of the N-terminal tail with the core of NBD1, a model supported by dynamic light scattering. Increased nucleotide binding of phosphorylated NBD1 and NBD1-ΔN, compared with non-phosphorylated NBD1, suggests that by disrupting the interaction of the NBD core with the N-terminal tail, phosphorylation also exposes the MgATP-binding site on NBD1. These data provide insights into the molecular basis by which phosphorylation of SUR2B NBD1 activates KATP channels. PMID:26198630

  18. Crowding Modulates the Conformation, Affinity, and Activity of the Components of the Bacterial Disaggregase Machinery.

    PubMed

    Celaya, Garbiñe; Fernández-Higuero, José Angel; Martin, Ianire; Rivas, Germán; Moro, Fernando; Muga, Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Chaperone-mediated protein aggregate reactivation is a complex reaction that depends on the sequential association of molecular chaperones on their interaction with protein aggregates and on substrate refolding. This process could be modulated by the highly crowded intracellular environment, which is known to affect protein conformational change, enzymatic activity, and protein-protein interactions. Here, we report that molecular crowding shapes the chaperone activity of bacterial disaggregase composed of the DnaK system (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) and the molecular motor ClpB. A combination of biophysical and biochemical methods shows that the excluded volume conditions modify the conformation of DnaK and DnaJ without affecting that of GrpE. These crowding-induced conformational rearrangements activate DnaK, enhance the affinity of DnaK for DnaJ, but not for GrpE, and increase the sensitivity of the chaperone activity to cochaperone concentration, explaining the tight control of their relative intracellular amounts. Furthermore, crowding-mediated disordering of the G/F domain of DnaJ facilitates the reversible formation of intermolecular DnaJ conglomerates. These assemblies could drive the formation of Hsp70 clusters at the aggregate surface with the consequent enhancement of the disaggregation efficiency through their coordinated action via entropic pulling. Finally, crowding helps ClpB to outcompete GrpE for DnaK binding, a key aspect of DnaK/ClpB cooperation given the low affinity of the disaggregase for DnaK. Excluded volume conditions promote the formation of the bichaperone complex that disentangles aggregates, enhancing the efficiency of the disaggregation reaction. PMID:27133933

  19. Steroid receptor RNA activator: Biologic function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan; Wu, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Neng; Shi, Ya-Ning; Liu, Zheng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Qin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) is a type of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) which coordinates the functions of various transcription factors, enhances steroid receptor-dependent gene expression, and also serves as a distinct scaffold. The novel, profound and expanded roles of SRA are emerging in critical aspects of coactivation of nuclear receptors (NRs). As a nuclear receptor coactivator, SRA can coactivate androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor and retinoic acid receptor (RAR). Although SRA is one of the least well-understood molecules, increasing studies have revealed that SRA plays a key role in both biological processes, such as myogenesis and steroidogenesis, and pathological changes, including obesity, cardiomyopathy, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the SRA-related signaling pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), Notch and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) pathways, play critical roles in the pathogenesis of estrogen-dependent breast cancers. In addition, the most recent data demonstrates that SRA expression may serve as a new prognostic marker in patients with ER-positive breast cancer. Thus, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying SRA-mediated functions is important to develop proper novel strategies to target SRA in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:27282881

  20. Novel analogs of alloferon: Synthesis, conformational studies, pro-apoptotic and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Majewska, Anna; Różanowska, Maria; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Lisowski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the structure-activity relationships of novel derivatives of the insect peptide alloferon (H-His-Gly-Val-Ser-Gly-His-Gly-Gln-His-Gly-Val-His-Gly-OH). The peptide structure was modified by exchanging His at position 9 or 12 for natural or non-natural amino acids. Biological properties of these peptides were determined in antiviral in vitro test against Human Herpes Virus 1 McIntrie strain (HHV-1MC) using a Vero cell line. The peptides were also evaluated for the pro-apoptotic action in vivo on hemocytes of the Tenebrio molitor beetle. Additionally, the structural properties of alloferon analogs were examined by the circular dichroism in water and methanol. It was found that most of the evaluated peptides can reduce the HHV-1 titer in Vero cells. [Ala(9)]-alloferon exhibits the strongest antiviral activity among the analyzed compounds. However, no cytotoxic activity against Vero cell line was observed for all the studied peptides. In vivo assays with hemocytes of T. molitor showed that [Lys(9)]-, [Phg(9)]-, [Lys(12)]-, and [Phe(12)]-alloferon exhibit a twofold increase in caspases activity in comparison with the native peptide. The CD conformational studies indicate that the investigated peptides seem to prefer the unordered conformation. PMID:26986636

  1. Screening of bisphenol A, triclosan and paraben analogues as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities.

    PubMed

    Kolšek, Katra; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Sollner Dolenc, Marija

    2015-02-01

    A homeostasis of the glucocorticoid and androgen endocrine system is essential to human health. Their disturbance can lead to various diseases, for example cardiovascular, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, infertility, cancer. Fifteen widely used industrial chemicals that disrupt endocrine activity were selected for evaluation of potential (anti)glucocorticoid and (anti)androgenic activities. The human breast carcinoma MDA-kb2 cell line was utilized for reporter gene assays, since it expresses both the androgen and the glucocorticoid-responsive reporter. Two new antiandrogens, 4,4'-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol) (dBPS) and 4,4'-thiodiphenol (THIO), and two new antiglucocorticoids, bisphenol Z and its analog bis[4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl] sulfone (BHEPS) were identified. Moreover, four new glucocorticoid agonists (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben and bisphenol F) were found. To elucidate the structure-activity relationship of bisphenols, we performed molecular docking experiments with androgen and glucocorticoid receptor. These docking experiments had shown that bulky structures such as BHEPS and bisphenol Z act as antiglucocorticoid, because they are positioned toward helix H12 in the antagonist conformation and could therefore be responsible for H12 conformational change and the switch between agonistic and antagonistic conformation of receptor. On the other hand smaller structures cannot interact with H12. The results of in vitro screening of fifteen industrial chemicals as modulators of the glucocorticoid and androgen receptor activities demand additional in vivo testing of these chemicals for formulating any relevant hazard identification to human health. PMID:25192815

  2. Structural Determinants for the Selective Anti-HIV-1 Activity of the All-β Alternative Conformer of XCL1

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo, Christina; Fox, Jamie C.; Miao, Huiyi; Volkman, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 replication is regulated in vivo by a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. XCL1/lymphotactin, a unique metamorphic chemokine, was recently identified as a broad-spectrum endogenous HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entry via direct interaction with the gp120 envelope glycoprotein. HIV-1 inhibition by XCL1 requires access to the alternative all-β conformation, which interacts with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but not with the specific XCL1 receptor, XCR1. To investigate the structural determinants of the HIV-inhibitory function of XCL1, we performed a detailed structure-function analysis of a stabilized all-β variant, XCL1 W55D. Individual alanine substitutions of two basic residues within the 40s' loop, K42 and R43, abrogated the ability of XCL1 to bind to the viral envelope and block HIV-1 infection; moreover, a loss of HIV-inhibitory function, albeit less marked, was seen upon individual mutation of three additional basic residues: R18, R35, and K46. In contrast, mutation of K42 to arginine did not cause any loss of function, suggesting that the interaction with gp120 is primarily electrostatic in nature. Strikingly, four of these five residues cluster to form a large (∼350 Å2) positively charged surface in the all-β XCL1 conformation, whereas they are dissociated in the classic chemokine fold, which is inactive against HIV-1, providing a structural basis for the selective antiviral activity of the alternatively folded XCL1. Furthermore, we observed that changes to the N-terminal domain, which is proximal to the cluster of putative HIV-1 gp120-interacting residues, also affect the antiviral activity of XCL1. Interestingly, the complement of residues involved in HIV-1 blockade is partially overlapping, but distinct from those involved in the GAG-binding function of XCL1. These data identify key structural determinants of anti-HIV activity in XCL1, providing new templates for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. IMPORTANCE The host

  3. The novel platelet activation receptor CLEC-2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu; Ozaki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The c-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was first identified from a bio-informatic screen for c-type lectin-like receptors. However, neither its function nor its ligand(s) had been elucidated for several years. In 2006, we reported that the receptor is expressed on the surface of platelets and serves as a receptor for the snake venom rhodocytin, which potently stimulates platelet aggregation. Since then CLEC-2 has been intensively investigated, and its endogenous/exogenous ligands and several physiological/pathological roles have been clarified. In this article and its accompanying poster, we outline the structure, distribution, signal transduction mechanism and functions of CLEC-2. PMID:21714702

  4. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  5. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  6. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  7. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  8. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  9. Chronic hyperammonemia induces tonic activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    ElMlili, Nisrin; Boix, Jordi; Ahabrach, Hanan; Rodrigo, Regina; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    Reduced function of the glutamate--nitric oxide (NO)--cGMP pathway is responsible for some cognitive alterations in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia impairs the pathway in cerebellum by increasing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation in Ser847 by calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), reducing nNOS activity, and by reducing nNOS amount in synaptic membranes, which reduces its activation following NMDA receptors activation. The reason for increased CaMKII activity in hyperammonemia remains unknown. We hypothesized that it would be as a result of increased tonic activation of NMDA receptors. The aims of this work were to assess: (i) whether tonic NMDA activation receptors is increased in cerebellum in chronic hyperammonemia in vivo; and (ii) whether this tonic activation is responsible for increased CaMKII activity and reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 increases cGMP and NO metabolites in cerebellum in vivo and in slices from hyperammonemic rats. This is because of reduced phosphorylation and activity of CaMKII, leading to normalization of nNOS phosphorylation and activity. MK-801 also increases nNOS in synaptic membranes and reduces it in cytosol. This indicates that hyperammonemia increases tonic activation of NMDA receptors leading to reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. PMID:20002515

  10. Biological activity of a polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, I A; Andreev, Ya A; Logashina, Yu A; Murashev, A N; Grishin, E V

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents data on the activity of a new APHC2 polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptors, which was isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. It has been shown that APHC2 has an analgesic activity, does not impair normal motor activity, and does not change body temperature of experimental animals, which has a great practical value for design of potent analgesics of a new generation. Further study of the characteristics of binding of the polypeptide to the TRPV1 receptor may show approaches to the development of other antagonists of this receptor that do not influence the body temperature. PMID:26725234

  11. Structural Insights into NEDD8 Activation of Cullin-RING Ligases: Conformational Control of Conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Duda,D.; Borg, L.; Scott, D.; Hunt, H.; Hammel, M.; Schulman, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) comprise the largest ubiquitin E3 subclass, in which a central cullin subunit links a substrate-binding adaptor with an E2-binding RING. Covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to a conserved C-terminal domain (ctd) lysine stimulates CRL ubiquitination activity and prevents binding of the inhibitor CAND1. Here we report striking conformational rearrangements in the crystal structure of NEDD8{approx}Cul5ctd-Rbx1 and SAXS analysis of NEDD8{approx}Cul1ctd-Rbx1 relative to their unmodified counterparts. In NEDD8ylated CRL structures, the cullin WHB and Rbx1 RING subdomains are dramatically reoriented, eliminating a CAND1-binding site and imparting multiple potential catalytic geometries to an associated E2. Biochemical analyses indicate that the structural malleability is important for both CRL NEDD8ylation and subsequent ubiquitination activities. Thus, our results point to a conformational control of CRL activity, with ligation of NEDD8 shifting equilibria to disfavor inactive CAND1-bound closed architectures, and favor dynamic, open forms that promote polyubiquitination.

  12. [Synthesis, conformation, and spectroscopy of nucleoside analogues concerning their antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Kuśmierek, Jarosław T; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified analogues of nucleosides and nucleotides, have been thoroughly investigated since the discovery of DNA double helix by Watson and Crick in 1953 (Nature 171: 737). Chemical structures, first of all tautomerism, of the nucleic acid bases, as well as the conformations of the nucleic acids constituents, determine the secondary and tertiary structures of DNA and RNA polymers. Similarly, structural and dynamic parameters of nucleoside derivatives determine their biological activity in mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation, as well as antiviral or anticancer properties. In this review, a multidisciplinary approach of Prof. David Shugar's group is presented in the studies on nucleosides and nucleotides. It consists in chemical syntheses of suitable analogues, measurements of physicochemical and spectral parameters, conformational analysis by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction, as well as characteristics of the nucleoside analogues as inhibitors of some selected, target enzymes, crucial in respect to antiviral activity of the analogues. These long-lasting studies follows upon the line of the main paradigm of molecular biophysics, i. e. structure-activity relationship. PMID:26677575

  13. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  14. Human receptor activation by aroclor 1260, a polychlorinated biphenyl mixture.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K Cameron; Clair, Heather B; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A; States, J Christopher; Coslo, Denise M; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Cave, Matthew C

    2014-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  15. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  16. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-4 Structures Reveal a Metastable Open Conformation Fostering Robust Core-free Basal Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, R. Max; Kato, Masato; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tso, Shih-Chia; Li, Jun; Chuang, David T.

    2008-10-21

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is down-regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoforms 1-4. PDK4 is overexpressed in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes, resulting in impaired glucose utilization. Here we show that human PDK4 has robust core-free basal activity, which is considerably higher than activity levels of other PDK isoforms stimulated by the PDC core. PDK4 binds the L3 lipoyl domain, but its activity is not significantly stimulated by any individual lipoyl domains or the core of PDC. The 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structures of the PDK4 dimer with bound ADP reveal an open conformation with a wider active-site cleft, compared with that in the closed conformation epitomized by the PDK2-ADP structure. The open conformation in PDK4 shows partially ordered C-terminal cross-tails, in which the conserved DW (Asp{sup 394}-Trp{sup 395}) motif from one subunit anchors to the N-terminal domain of the other subunit. The open conformation fosters a reduced binding affinity for ADP, facilitating the efficient removal of product inhibition by this nucleotide. Alteration or deletion of the DW-motif disrupts the C-terminal cross-tail anchor, resulting in the closed conformation and the nearly complete inactivation of PDK4. Fluorescence quenching and enzyme activity data suggest that compounds AZD7545 and dichloroacetate lock PDK4 in the open and the closed conformational states, respectively. We propose that PDK4 with bound ADP exists in equilibrium between the open and the closed conformations. The favored metastable open conformation is responsible for the robust basal activity of PDK4 in the absence of the PDC core.

  17. A lipid-mediated conformational switch modulates the thermosensing activity of DesK.

    PubMed

    Inda, María Eugenia; Vandenbranden, Michel; Fernández, Ariel; de Mendoza, Diego; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía

    2014-03-01

    The thermosensor DesK is a multipass transmembrane histidine-kinase that allows the bacterium Bacillus subtilis to adjust the levels of unsaturated fatty acids required to optimize membrane lipid fluidity. The cytoplasmic catalytic domain of DesK behaves like a kinase at low temperature and like a phosphatase at high temperature. Temperature sensing involves a built-in instability caused by a group of hydrophilic residues located near the N terminus of the first transmembrane (TM) segment. These residues are buried in the lipid phase at low temperature and partially "buoy" to the aqueous phase at higher temperature with the thinning of the membrane, promoting the required conformational change. Nevertheless, the core question remains poorly understood: How is the information sensed by the transmembrane region converted into a rearrangement in the cytoplasmic catalytic domain to control DesK activity? Here, we identify a "linker region" (KSRKERERLEEK) that connects the TM sensor domain with the cytoplasmic catalytic domain involved in signal transmission. The linker adopts two conformational states in response to temperature-dependent membrane thickness changes: (i) random coiled and bound to the phospholipid head groups at the water-membrane interface, promoting the phosphatase state or (ii) unbound and forming a continuous helix spanning a region from the membrane to the cytoplasm, promoting the kinase state. Our results uphold the view that the linker is endowed with a helix/random coil conformational duality that enables it to behave like a transmission switch, with helix disruption decreasing the kinase/phosphatase activity ratio, as required to modulate the DesK output response. PMID:24522108

  18. tBid Undergoes Multiple Conformational Changes at the Membrane Required for Bax Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Bindner, Scott; Zhu, Weijia; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Campbell, Clinton; Gross, Atan; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David W.; Fradin, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Bid is a Bcl-2 family protein that promotes apoptosis by activating Bax and eliciting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Full-length Bid is cleaved in response to apoptotic stimuli into two fragments, p7 and tBid (p15), that are held together by strong hydrophobic interactions until the complex binds to membranes. The detailed mechanism(s) of fragment separation including tBid binding to membranes and release of the p7 fragment to the cytoplasm remain unclear. Using liposomes or isolated mitochondria with fluorescently labeled proteins at physiological concentrations as in vitro models, we report that the two components of the complex quickly separate upon interaction with a membrane. Once tBid binds to the membrane, it undergoes slow structural rearrangements that result in an equilibrium between two major tBid conformations on the membrane. The conformational change of tBid is a prerequisite for interaction with Bax and is, therefore, a novel step that can be modulated to promote or inhibit MOMP. Using automated high-throughput image analysis in cells, we show that down-regulation of Mtch2 causes a significant delay between tBid and Bax relocalization in cells. We propose that by promoting insertion of tBid via a conformational change at the mitochondrial outer membrane, Mtch2 accelerates tBid-mediated Bax activation and MOMP. Thus the interaction of Mtch2 and tBid is a potential target for therapeutic control of Bid initiated cell death. PMID:23744079

  19. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  20. Conformational studies on activation of the E. coli uvrB cryptic ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, E.L.; Grossman, L.

    1994-12-31

    Expression of a DNA-dependent ATPase activity by the uvrB protein is essential for early steps (preceding incision) in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in E. coli. Yet, in isolation, uvrB lacks any known catalytic ability. Its cryptic ATPase is elicited in NER by association with uvrA, but it can also be turned on by a specific, omp T-mediated proteolytic elimination of the C-terminal 43 amino acids. The truncated protein uvrB{sup *} may serve as a model for the activated structure induced by complex formation with uvrA. To probe the mechanism of activation, which may be expected to require a series of conformational changes, we have introduced the intrinsic fluorophore tryptophan (Trp) into the ATP binding site of uvrB via site-specific mutagenesis.

  1. Evidence from molecular dynamics simulations of conformational preorganization in the ribonuclease H active site

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Palmer III, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease H1 (RNase H) enzymes are well-conserved endonucleases that are present in all domains of life and are particularly important in the life cycle of retroviruses as domains within reverse transcriptase. Despite extensive study, especially of the E. coli homolog, the interaction of the highly negatively charged active site with catalytically required magnesium ions remains poorly understood. In this work, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli homolog in complex with magnesium ions, as well as simulations of other homologs in their apo states. Collectively, these results suggest that the active site is highly rigid in the apo state of all homologs studied and is conformationally preorganized to favor the binding of a magnesium ion. Notably, representatives of bacterial, eukaryotic, and retroviral RNases H all exhibit similar active-site rigidity, suggesting that this dynamic feature is only subtly modulated by amino acid sequence and is primarily imposed by the distinctive RNase H protein fold. PMID:25075292

  2. Amyloid β peptide oligomers directly activate NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Texidó, Laura; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Alberdi, Elena; Solsona, Carles; Matute, Carlos

    2011-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers accumulate in the brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients and are related to disease pathogenesis. The precise mechanisms by which Aβ oligomers cause neurotoxicity remain unknown. We recently reported that Aβ oligomers cause intracellular Ca(2+) overload and neuronal death that can be prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists. This study investigated whether Aβ oligomers directly activated NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using NR1/NR2A and NR1/NR2B receptors that were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Indeed, Aβ oligomers induced inward non-desensitizing currents that were blocked in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonists memantine, APV, and MK-801. Intriguingly, the amplitude of the responses to Aβ oligomers was greater for NR1/NR2A heteromers than for NR1/NR2B heteromers expressed in oocytes. Consistent with these findings, we observed that the increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+) induced by Aβ oligomers in cortical neurons is prevented by AP5, a broad spectrum NMDA receptor antagonist, but slightly attenuated by ifenprodil which blocks receptors with the NR2B subunit. Together, these results indicate that Aβ oligomers directly activate NMDA receptors, particularly those with the NR2A subunit, and further suggest that drugs that attenuate the activity of such receptors may prevent Aβ damage to neurons in Alzheimeŕs disease. PMID:21349580

  3. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  4. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  5. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  6. 3D modeling, ligand binding and activation studies of the cloned mouse delta, mu; and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Filizola, M; Laakkonen, L; Loew, G H

    1999-11-01

    Refined 3D models of the transmembrane domains of the cloned delta, mu and kappa opioid receptors belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) were constructed from a multiple sequence alignment using the alpha carbon template of rhodopsin recently reported. Other key steps in the procedure were relaxation of the 3D helix bundle by unconstrained energy optimization and assessment of the stability of the structure by performing unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations of the energy optimized structure. The results were stable ligand-free models of the TM domains of the three opioid receptors. The ligand-free delta receptor was then used to develop a systematic and reliable procedure to identify and assess putative binding sites that would be suitable for similar investigation of the other two receptors and GPCRs in general. To this end, a non-selective, 'universal' antagonist, naltrexone, and agonist, etorphine, were used as probes. These ligands were first docked in all sites of the model delta opioid receptor which were sterically accessible and to which the protonated amine of the ligands could be anchored to a complementary proton-accepting residue. Using these criteria, nine ligand-receptor complexes with different binding pockets were identified and refined by energy minimization. The properties of all these possible ligand-substrate complexes were then examined for consistency with known experimental results of mutations in both opioid and other GPCRs. Using this procedure, the lowest energy agonist-receptor and antagonist-receptor complexes consistent with these experimental results were identified. These complexes were then used to probe the mechanism of receptor activation by identifying differences in receptor conformation between the agonist and the antagonist complex during unconstrained dynamics simulation. The results lent support to a possible activation mechanism of the mouse delta opioid receptor similar to that recently

  7. Conformational transition in signal transduction: metastable states and transition pathways in the activation of a signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction is of vital importance to the growth and adaptation of living organisms. The key to understand mechanisms of biological signal transduction is elucidation of the conformational dynamics of its signaling proteins, as the activation of a signaling protein is fundamentally a process of conformational transition from an inactive to an active state. A predominant form of signal transduction for bacterial sensing of environmental changes in the wild or inside their hosts is a variety of two-component systems, in which the conformational transition of a response regulator (RR) from an inactive to an active state initiates responses to the environmental changes. Here, RR activation has been investigated using RR468 as a model system by extensive unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent, starting from snapshots along a targeted MD trajectory that covers the conformational transition. Markov state modeling, transition path theory, and geometric analyses of the wealth of the MD data have provided a comprehensive description of the RR activation. It involves a network of metastable states, with one metastable state essentially the same as the inactive state and another very similar to the active state that are connected via a small set of intermediates. Five major pathways account for >75% of the fluxes of the conformational transition from the inactive to the active-like state. The thermodynamic stability of the states and the activation barriers between states are found, to identify rate-limiting steps. The conformal transition is initiated predominantly by movements of the β3α3 loop, followed by movements of the β4α4-loop and neighboring α4 helix region, and capped by additional movements of the β3α3 loop. A number of transient hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions are revealed, and they may be important for the conformational transition. PMID:25945797

  8. Analysis of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 activation at the single-channel level.

    PubMed

    Carignano, Camila; Barila, Esteban Pablo; Spitzmaul, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 forms pentameric proteins with two alternate stoichiometries. The high-sensitivity receptor is related to (α4)2(β2)3 stoichiometry while the low-sensitivity receptor to (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry. Both subtypes share two binding sites at the α4((+))/β2((-)) interface with high affinity for agonists. (α4)3(β2)2 has an additional binding site at the α4((+))/α4((-)) interface with low affinity for agonists. We investigated activation kinetics of both receptor subtypes by patch-clamp recordings of single-channel activity in the presence of several concentrations of acetylcholine (0.5 to 300μM). We used kinetic software to fit these data with kinetic models. We found that the high-sensitivity subtype correlates with the low-conductance channel (g-70=29pS) and does not activate with high efficacy. On the contrary, the low-sensitivity subtype correlated with a high-conductance channel (g-70=44pS) and exhibited higher activation efficacy. Opening events of individual nAChRs at high agonist concentrations occurred in clusters, which allowed us to determine kinetic constants for the activation of the triliganded receptor. Our kinetic modeling identified an intermediate state, between resting and open conformation of the receptor. Binding of the third molecule increases the efficacy of receptor activation by favoring the transition between resting and intermediate state around 18 times. The low rate for this transition in the diliganded receptor explains the action of acetylcholine as partial agonist when it binds to the high-affinity sites. The presence of the third binding site emerges as a potent modulator of nicotinic receptor α4β2 activation which may display different functions depending on agonist concentration. PMID:27233449

  9. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John; Skaja Robinson, Anne

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, ormore » DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  10. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Andrea N; McNeely, Patrick M; Katsaras, John; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2016-08-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. The studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein's purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner. PMID:27241126

  11. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  12. A Potential Substrate Binding Conformation of β-Lactams and Insight into the Broad Spectrum of NDM-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1. PMID:22825119

  13. Lipid activation of the signal recognition particle receptor provides spatial coordination of protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vinh Q.; Akopian, David; Rome, Michael; Henningsen, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor comprise the major cellular machinery that mediates the cotranslational targeting of proteins to cellular membranes. It remains unclear how the delivery of cargos to the target membrane is spatially coordinated. We show here that phospholipid binding drives important conformational rearrangements that activate the bacterial SRP receptor FtsY and the SRP–FtsY complex. This leads to accelerated SRP–FtsY complex assembly, and allows the SRP–FtsY complex to more efficiently unload cargo proteins. Likewise, formation of an active SRP–FtsY GTPase complex exposes FtsY’s lipid-binding helix and enables stable membrane association of the targeting complex. Thus, membrane binding, complex assembly with SRP, and cargo unloading are inextricably linked to each other via conformational changes in FtsY. These allosteric communications allow the membrane delivery of cargo proteins to be efficiently coupled to their subsequent unloading and translocation, thus providing spatial coordination during protein targeting. PMID:20733058

  14. Relationship between Structure and Conformational Change of the Vitamin D Receptor Ligand Binding Domain in 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lin-Yan; Zhang, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Meng-Di; Du, You-Qin; Liu, Chang-Bai; Wu, Jiang-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) belongs to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily. Whereas the structure of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of VDR has been determined in great detail, the role of its amino acid residues in stabilizing the structure and ligand triggering conformational change is still under debate. There are 13 α-helices and one β-sheet in the VDR LBD and they form a three-layer sandwich structure stabilized by 10 residues. Thirty-six amino acid residues line the ligand binding pocket (LBP) and six of these residues have hydrogen-bonds linking with the ligand. In 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ signaling, H3 and H12 play an important role in the course of conformational change resulting in the provision of interfaces for dimerization, coactivator (CoA), corepressor (CoR), and hTAFII 28. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the amino acid residues stabilizing the structure and taking part in conformational change of VDR LBD according to functional domains. PMID:26593892

  15. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models with receptor-dependent descriptors for predicting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lather, Viney; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship study has been carried out, in which the relationship between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonistic activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives and quantitative descriptors, V(site) calculated in a receptor-dependent manner is modeled. These descriptors quantify the volume occupied by the optimized ligands in regions that are either common or specific to the superimposed binding sites of the targets under consideration. The quantitative structure-activity relationship models were built by forward stepwise linear regression modeling for a training set of 27 compounds and validated for a test set of seven compounds, resulting in a squared correlation coefficient value of 0.90 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and of 0.89 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. The leave-one-out cross-validation and test set predictability squared correlation coefficient values for these models were 0.85 and 0.62 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and 0.89 and 0.50 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma respectively. A dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor model has also been developed, and it indicates the structural features required for the design of ligands with dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity. These quantitative structure-activity relationship models show the importance of the descriptors here introduced in the prediction and interpretation of the compounds affinity and selectivity. PMID:19243388

  16. The conformation changes of the finger domain of tissue type plasminogen activator during the activator-inhibitor reaction.

    PubMed

    Wilczyńska, M; Cierniewski, C S

    1990-04-12

    A peptide fragment of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) corresponding to amino acid residues 4-8 (tPA4-8) was synthesized, coupled to thyroglobulin and injected into rabbits. Antibodies specific to the peptide tPA4-8 were purified immunochemically on the pentapeptide coupled to CNBr-Sepha rose 4B. Anti-tPA4-8 antibodies, reacted with iodinated peptide tPA4-8, showing a relatively high binding affinity (KD = 2.3 x 10(-8) M). There was no interaction between anti-tPA4-8 antibodies and native one- or two-chain tPA. However, reduction of disulfide bonds unmasked the epitope on the heavy chain of tPA which became accessible to anti-tPA4-8 antibodies. Similarly, complexing of tPA with alpha 1-antitrypsin inhibitor resulted in unmasking of the epitope formed by amino acid residues in the positions 4-8. Presented data suggest that complexing of tPA with inhibitors results in conformational changes occurring in the "finger" domain of tPA molecule and such conformational transition can be detected by antipeptide antibodies. Therefore, anti-tPA4-8 antibodies may be employed as sequence-specific reporter molecules to monitor local conformational changes in tPA molecule. PMID:2114044

  17. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation. PMID:26747838

  18. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  19. A sandwich ELISA for the conformation-specific quantification of the activated form of human Bax.

    PubMed

    Teijido, Oscar; Ganesan, Yogesh Tengarai; Llanos, Raul; Peton, Ashley; Urtecho, Jean-Baptiste; Soprani, Adauri; Villamayor, Aimee; Antonsson, Bruno; Manon, Stéphen; Dejean, Laurent

    2016-03-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins are critical regulators of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which represents the point of no return of apoptotic cell death. The exposure of the Bax N-terminus at the mitochondria reflects Bax activation; and this activated configuration of the Bax protein is associated with MOMP. N-terminal exposure can be detected using specific monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies, and the onset of activated Bax has extensively been used as an early marker of apoptosis. The protocols of immunoprecipitation and/or immunocytochemistry commonly used to detect activated Bax are long and tedious, and allow semiquantification of the antigen at best. The sandwich ELISA protocol we developed has a 5 ng/mL detection limit and is highly specific for the activated conformation of Bax. This ELISA allows a rapid quantification of activated human Bax in whole cells and isolated mitochondria protein extracts. These properties grant this assay the potential to further clarify the prognostic and diagnostic value of activated Bax in disorders associated with deregulated apoptotic pathways such as degenerative diseases or cancer. PMID:26748144

  20. Functions of the extracellular histidine residues of receptor activity-modifying proteins vary within adrenomedullin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji

    2008-12-05

    Receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-2 and -3 chaperone calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to the plasma membrane, where together they form heterodimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptors. We investigated the contributions made by His residues situated in the RAMP extracellular domain to AM receptor trafficking and receptor signaling by co-expressing hCRLR and V5-tagged-hRAMP2 or -3 mutants in which a His residue was substituted with Ala in HEK-293 cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that hRAMP2-H71A mediated normal hCRLR surface delivery, but the resultant heterodimers showed significantly diminished [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-evoked cAMP production. Expression of hRAMP2-H124A and -H127A impaired surface delivery of hCRLR, which impaired or abolishing AM binding and receptor signaling. Although hRAMP3-H97A mediated full surface delivery of hCRLR, the resultant heterodimers showed impaired AM binding and signaling. Other His residues appeared uninvolved in hCRLR-related functions. Thus, the His residues of hRAMP2 and -3 differentially govern AM receptor function.

  1. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  2. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  3. Structural variants of yeast prions show conformer-specific requirements for chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Kevin C.; True, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular chaperones monitor protein homeostasis and defend against the misfolding and aggregation of proteins that is associated with protein conformational disorders. In these diseases, a variety of different aggregate structures can form. These are called prion strains, or variants, in prion diseases, and cause variation in disease pathogenesis. Here, we use variants of the yeast prions [RNQ+] and [PSI+] to explore the interactions of chaperones with distinct aggregate structures. We found that prion variants show striking variation in their relationship with Hsp40s. Specifically, the yeast Hsp40 Sis1, and its human ortholog Hdj1, had differential capacities to process prion variants, suggesting that Hsp40 selectivity has likely changed through evolution. We further show that such selectivity involves different domains of Sis1, with some prion conformers having a greater dependence on particular Hsp40 domains. Moreover, [PSI+] variants were more sensitive to certain alterations in Hsp70 activity as compared to [RNQ+] variants. Collectively, our data indicate that distinct chaperone machinery is required, or has differential capacity, to process different aggregate structures. Elucidating the intricacies of chaperone-client interactions, and how these are altered by particular client structures, will be crucial to understanding how this system can go awry in disease and contribute to pathological variation. PMID:25060529

  4. Effect of succinylation (3-carboxypropionylation) on the conformation and immunological activity of ovalbumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kidwai, S A; Ansari, A A; Salahuddin, A

    1976-01-01

    The epsilon-amino groups of ovalbumin were modified with succinic anhydride; as many as 16 lysine residues were succinylated (3-carboxypropionylated). The five succinylated derivatives thus prepared were homogeneous with respect to the extent of chemical modification as shown by electrophoretic and immunological data. Succinylation of the amino groups altered electrophoretic mobility and isoionic pH of ovalbumin in the expected direction. U.v.-absorption and fluorescence spectra suggested changes in the microenvironment of the chromophores in the modified proteins. The difference-spectral results showed greater exposure of tyrosine and tryptophan residues in the succinylated ovalbumin. Increase in susceptibility to tryptic digestion, Stokes radius and intrinsic viscosity of native ovalbumin, which was observed on successive increase in the chemical modification, demonstrated a conformational change that was proportional to the extent of modification. The loss of immunological reactivity caused by chemical modification also indicated a conformational change in succinylated ovalbumin. The fact that the intrinsic viscosity of maximally modified ovalbumin was less than one-third of that for the completely denatured protein in 6M-guanidinium chloride suggested that the modified protein contained significant residual native structure. The latter presumably accommodates some antigenic determinants accounting for 37% residual immunological activity observed with maximally succinylated ovalbumin. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:820333

  5. Cloning, constitutive activity and expression profiling of two receptors related to relaxin receptors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Proost, Paul; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors (LGRs) comprise a cluster of transmembrane proteins, characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular domain. This receptor group can be classified into three subtypes. Belonging to the subtype C LGRs are the mammalian relaxin receptors LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8 (RXFP2), which mediate important reproductive and other processes. We identified two related receptors in the genome of the fruit fly and cloned their open reading frames into an expression vector. Interestingly, dLGR3 demonstrated constitutive activity at very low doses of transfected plasmid, whereas dLGR4 did not show any basal activity. Both receptors exhibited a similar expression pattern during development, with relatively high transcript levels during the first larval stage. In addition, both receptors displayed higher expression in male adult flies as compared to female flies. Analysis of the tissue distribution of both receptor transcripts revealed a high expression of dLGR3 in the female fat body, while the expression of dLGR4 peaked in the midgut of both the wandering and adult stage. PMID:25064813

  6. A dual mechanism for impairment of GABAA receptor activity by NMDA receptor activation in rat cerebellum granule cells.

    PubMed

    Robello, M; Amico, C; Cupello, A

    1997-01-01

    The function of the GABAA receptor has been studied using the whole cell voltage clamp recording technique in rat cerebellum granule cells in culture. Activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors causes a reduction in the effect of GABA. Full GABAA receptor activity was recovered after washing out NMDA and NMDA action was prevented in a Mg+2 containing medium. The NMDA effect was also absent when extracellular Ca+2 was replaced by Ba+2 and when 10 mM Bapta was present in the intracellular solution. Charge accumulations via voltage activated Ca+2 channels greater than the ones via NMDA receptors do not cause any reduction in GABAA receptor function, suggesting that Ca+2 influx through NMDA receptor channels is critical for the effect. The NMDA effect was reduced by including adenosine-5'-O-3-thiophosphate (ATP-gamma-S) in the internal solution and there was a reduction in the NMDA effect caused by deltamethrin, a calcineurin inhibitor. Part of the NMDA induced GABAA receptor impairment was prevented by prior treatment with L-arginine. Analogously, part of the NMDA effect was prevented by blockage of NO-synthase activity by N omega-nitro-L-arginine. A combination of NO-synthase and calcineurin inhibitors completely eliminated the NMDA action. An analogous result was obtained by combining the NO-synthase inhibitor with the addition of ATP-gamma-S to the pipette medium. The additivity of the prevention of the NMDA impairment of GABAA receptor by blocking the L-arginine/NO pathway and inhibiting calcineurin activity suggests an independent involvement of these two pathways in the interaction between NMDA and the GABAA receptor. On the one hand Ca+2 influx across NMDA channels activates calcineurin and dephosphorylates the GABAA receptor complex directly or dephosphorylates proteins critical for the function of the receptor. On the other hand, Ca+2 influx activates NO-synthase and induces nitric oxide production, which regulates such receptors via protein kinase G

  7. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Rebecca A.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27379162

  8. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S.; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a “gatekeeper” domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91–379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics. PMID:26618408

  9. Raman optical activity spectra and conformational elucidation of chiral drugs. The case of the antiangiogenic aeroplysinin-1.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Casado, Juan; Blanch, Ewan W; López Navarrete, Juan T; Quesada, Ana R; Ramírez, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    We present the determination of the conformational properties of aeroplysinin-1 in aqueous solution by means of a combined experimental and theoretical Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) study. Aeroplysinin-1 is an antiangiogenic drug extracted from the sponge Aplysina cavernicola which has been proved to be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cancer and other antiangiogenic diseases. Our study shows that this molecule possesses the 1S,6R absolute configuration in aqueous solution, where only two conformers are present to a significant level. We discuss in detail the relationships between the chiro-optical ROA and VCD features, and the structural properties of various energy accessible conformers are described. The present work is one of the first studies in which both ROA and VCD have been used as complementary tools for the determination of absolute configuration and dominant solution-state conformations of an unknown therapeutically significant molecule. PMID:21401047

  10. Thermal activation of a group II intron ribozyme reveals multiple conformational states.

    PubMed

    Franzen, J S; Zhang, M; Chay, T R; Peebles, C L

    1994-09-20

    Conformational changes often accompany biological catalysis. Group II introns promote a variety of reactions in vitro that show an unusually sharp temperature dependence. This suggests that the chemical steps are accompanied by the conversion of a folded-but-inactive form to a differently folded active state. We report here the kinetic analysis of 5'-splice-junction hydrolysis (SJH) by E1:12345, a transcript containing the 5'-exon plus the first five of six intron secondary structure domains. The pseudo-first-order SJH reaction shows (1) activation by added KCl to 1.5 M; (2) cooperative activation by added MgCl2, nHill = 4.1-4.3, and [MgCl2]vmax/2 approximately 0.040 M; and (3) a rather high apparent activation energy, Ea approximately 50 kcal mol-l. In contrast, the 5'-terminal phosphodiester bond of a domain 5 transcript (GGD5) was hydrolyzed with Ea approximately 30 kcal mol-1 under SJH conditions; the 5'-GG leader dinucleotide presumably lacks secondary structure constraints. The effect of adding the chaotropic salt tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was also investigated. TEA reduced the melting temperatures of GGD5 and E1:12345. TEA also shifted the profile of rate versus temperature for SJH by E1:12345 toward lower temperatures without affecting the maximum rate. TEA had little effect on the rate of hydrolysis of the 5'-phosphodiester bond of GGD5. The high apparent activation enthalpy and entropy for SJH along with the effect of TEA on these parameters imply that conversion of an inactive form of E1:12345 to an active conformation accompanies enhanced occupation of the transition state as the temperature is raised to that for maximum SJH. Analytical modeling indicates that either a two-state model (open and disordered, with open being active) or a three-state model (compact, open, and disordered) could account for the temperature dependence of kSJH. However, the three-state model is clearly preferable, since it does not require that the activation parameters

  11. Calcitonin and Amylin Receptor Peptide Interaction Mechanisms: INSIGHTS INTO PEPTIDE-BINDING MODES AND ALLOSTERIC MODULATION OF THE CALCITONIN RECEPTOR BY RECEPTOR ACTIVITY-MODIFYING PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Min; Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) determine the selectivity of the class B G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor (CTR) and the CTR-like receptor (CLR) for calcitonin (CT), amylin (Amy), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and adrenomedullin (AM) peptides. RAMP1/2 alter CLR selectivity for CGRP/AM in part by RAMP1 Trp-84 or RAMP2 Glu-101 contacting the distinct CGRP/AM C-terminal residues. It is unclear whether RAMPs use a similar mechanism to modulate CTR affinity for CT and Amy, analogs of which are therapeutics for bone disorders and diabetes, respectively. Here, we reproduced the peptide selectivity of intact CTR, AMY1 (CTR·RAMP1), and AMY2 (CTR·RAMP2) receptors using purified CTR extracellular domain (ECD) and tethered RAMP1- and RAMP2-CTR ECD fusion proteins and antagonist peptides. All three proteins bound salmon calcitonin (sCT). Tethering RAMPs to CTR enhanced binding of rAmy, CGRP, and the AMY antagonist AC413. Peptide alanine-scanning mutagenesis and modeling of receptor-bound sCT and AC413 supported a shared non-helical CGRP-like conformation for their TN(T/V)G motif prior to the C terminus. After this motif, the peptides diverged; the sCT C-terminal Pro was crucial for receptor binding, whereas the AC413/rAmy C-terminal Tyr had little or no influence on binding. Accordingly, mutant RAMP1 W84A- and RAMP2 E101A-CTR ECD retained AC413/rAmy binding. ECD binding and cell-based signaling assays with antagonist sCT/AC413/rAmy variants with C-terminal residue swaps indicated that the C-terminal sCT/rAmy residue identity affects affinity more than selectivity. rAmy(8-37) Y37P exhibited enhanced antagonism of AMY1 while retaining selectivity. These results reveal unexpected differences in how RAMPs determine CTR and CLR peptide selectivity and support the hypothesis that RAMPs allosterically modulate CTR peptide affinity. PMID:26895962

  12. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  13. AT1 receptors as mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Storch, Ursula; Gudermann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are appreciated as central components of neurohormonal signaling. Recently, it turned out that they may also play a role in mechanotransduction. The angiotensin II AT(1) receptor was the first G-protein-coupled receptor claimed to be a mechanosensor. In the meantime, several other G(q/11)-coupled receptors were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is first evidence to support the concept that G(i/o)-coupled receptors are susceptible to mechanical stimulation as well. Mechanical receptor activation appears to be agonist-independent and is initiated by a conformational change of the receptor protein discernible from agonist-bound conformations. Mechanically induced receptor activation plays a physiological role for myogenic vasoconstriction and is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21147033

  14. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  15. Transcriptional activation of nuclear estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qi-Liang; Qiu, Jing-Tao; Cui, Sheng; Xia, Guo-Liang; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) are two important members of steroid receptors family, an evolutionarily conserved family of transcription factors. Upon binding to their ligands, ER and PR enter cell nucleus to interact with specific DNA element in the context of chromatin to initiate the transcription of diverse target genes, which largely depends on the timely recruitment of a wide range of cofactors. Moreover, the interactions between steroid hormones and their respective receptors also trigger post-translational modifications on these receptors to fine-tune their transcriptional activities. Besides the well-known phosphorylation modifications on tyrosine and serine/threonine residues, recent studies have identified several other covalent modifications, such as ubiquitylation and sumoylation. These post-translational modifications of steroid receptors affect its stability, subcellular localization, and/or cofactor recruitment; eventually influence the duration and extent of transcriptional activation. This review is to focus on the recent research progress on the transcriptional activation of nuclear ER and PR as well as their physiological functions in early pregnancy, which may help us to better understand related female reproductive diseases. PMID:27546504

  16. Analyzing the activation of the melanocortin-2 receptor of tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Dores, Robert M; Liang, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Following the biochemical characterization of the pituitary hormone, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), in the 1950's, a number of structure/function studies were done which identifies two amino acid motifs in ACTH, the HFRW motif and KKRR motif, as critical for the activation of the "ACTH" receptor on adrenal cortex cells. In the 1990's the "ACTH" receptor was identified as a member of the melanocortin receptor gene family, and given the name melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R). Since that time a number of studies on both tetrapod and teleost MC2R orthologs have established that these orthologs can only be activated by ACTH, but not by any of the MSH-sized melanocortin ligands, and these orthologs require interaction with the melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for functional expression. This review summarizes recent structure/function studies on human ACTH, and points out the importance of the GKPVG motif in ACTH for the activation of the receptor. In this regard, a multiple-step model for the activation of tetrapod and teleost MC2R orthologs is presented, and the evolution of gnathostome MC2R ligand selectivity and the requirement for MRAP interaction is discussed in light of a recent study on a cartilaginous fish MC2R ortholog. This review contains excerpts from the Gorbman/Bern Lecture presented at the Second Meeting of the North American Society for Comparative Endocrinology (NASCE). PMID:24713445

  17. DNA binding induces active site conformational change in the human TREX2 3'-exonuclease.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Udesh; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    The TREX enzymes process DNA as the major 3'-->5' exonuclease activity in mammalian cells. TREX2 and TREX1 are members of the DnaQ family of exonucleases and utilize a two metal ion catalytic mechanism of hydrolysis. The structure of the dimeric TREX2 enzyme in complex with single-stranded DNA has revealed binding properties that are distinct from the TREX1 protein. The TREX2 protein undergoes a conformational change in the active site upon DNA binding including ordering of active site residues and a shift of an active site helix. Surprisingly, even when a single monomer binds DNA, both monomers in the dimer undergo the structural rearrangement. From this we have proposed a model for DNA binding and 3' hydrolysis for the TREX2 dimer. The structure also shows how TREX proteins potentially interact with double-stranded DNA and suggest features that might be involved in strand denaturation to provide a single-stranded substrate for the active site. PMID:19321497

  18. c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase Adopts Multiple Active Conformational States in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases of the Abl family have diverse roles in normal cellular regulation and drive several forms of leukemia as oncogenic fusion proteins. In the crystal structure of the inactive c-Abl kinase core, the SH2 and SH3 domains dock onto the back of the kinase domain, resulting in a compact, assembled state. This inactive conformation is stabilized by the interaction of the myristoylated N-cap with a pocket in the C-lobe of the kinase domain. Mutations that perturb these intramolecular interactions result in kinase activation. Here, we present X-ray scattering solution structures of multidomain c-Abl kinase core proteins modeling diverse active states. Surprisingly, the relative positions of the regulatory N-cap, SH3, and SH2 domains in an active myristic acid binding pocket mutant (A356N) were virtually identical to those of the assembled wild-type kinase core, indicating that Abl kinase activation does not require dramatic reorganization of the downregulated core structure. In contrast, the positions of the SH2 and SH3 domains in a clinically relevant imatinib-resistant gatekeeper mutant (T315I) appear to be reconfigured relative to their positions in the wild-type protein. Our results demonstrate that c-Abl kinase activation can occur either with (T315I) or without (A356N) global allosteric changes in the core, revealing the potential for previously unrecognized signaling diversity. PMID:27166638

  19. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold. PMID:18434362

  20. Opportunistic activation of TRP receptors by endogenous lipids: Exploiting lipidomics to understand TRP receptor cellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Heather B.; Raboune, Siham; Hollis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) form a large family of ubiquitous non-selective cation channels that function as cellular sensors and in many cases regulate intracellular calcium. Identification of the endogenous ligands that activate these TRP receptors is still under intense investigation with the majority of these channels still remaining “orphans”. That these channels respond to a variety of external stimuli (e.g. plant-derived lipids, changes in temperature, and changes in pH) provides a framework for their abilities as cellular sensors, however, the mechanism of direct activation is still under much debate and research. In the cases where endogenous ligands (predominately lipids) have shown direct activation of a channel, multiple ligands have been shown to activate the same channel suggesting that these receptors are “promiscuous” in nature. Lipidomics of a growing class of endogenous lipids, N-acyl amides, the most famous of which is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (the endogenous cannabinoid, Anandamide) is providing a novel set of ligands that have been shown to activate some members of the TRP family and have the potential to deorphanize many more. Here it is argued that activation of TRPV receptors, a subset of the larger family of TRPs, by multiple endogenous lipids that are structurally analogous is a model system to drive our understanding that many TRP receptors are not promiscuous, but are more characteristically “opportunistic” in nature; exploiting the structural similarity and biosynthesis of a narrow range of analogous endogenous lipids. In addition, this manuscript will compare the activation properties of TRPC5 to the activity profile of an “orphan” lipid, N-palmitoyl glycine; further demonstrating that lipidomics aimed at expanding our knowledge of the family of N-acyl amides has the potential to provide novel avenues of research for TRP receptors. PMID:23178153

  1. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  2. Ligands for the Nuclear Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors, which represent a primary class of drug targets. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key player in various biological processes. PPARγ is widely known as the target protein of the thiazolidinediones for treating type 2 diabetes. Moreover, PPARγ ligands can induce anti-inflammatory and potentially additional beneficial effects. Recent mechanistic insights of PPARγ modulation give hope the next generation of efficient PPARγ-based drugs with fewer side effects can be developed. Furthermore, chemical approaches that make use of synergistic action of combinatorial ligands are promising alternatives for providing tailored medicine. Lessons learned from fine-tuning the action of PPARγ can provide avenues for efficient molecular intervention via many other nuclear receptors to combat common diseases. PMID:26435213

  3. Prolonged activation of NMDA receptors promotes dephosphorylation and alters postendocytic sorting of GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Terunuma, Miho; Vargas, Karina J.; Wilkins, Megan E.; Ramírez, Omar A.; Jaureguiberry-Bravo, Matías; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Smart, Trevor G.; Moss, Stephen J.; Couve, Andrés

    2010-01-01

    Slow and persistent synaptic inhibition is mediated by metabotropic GABAB receptors (GABABRs). GABABRs are responsible for the modulation of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals and for hyperpolarization at postsynaptic sites. Postsynaptic GABABRs are predominantly found on dendritic spines, adjacent to excitatory synapses, but the control of their plasma membrane availability is still controversial. Here, we explore the role of glutamate receptor activation in regulating the function and surface availability of GABABRs in central neurons. We demonstrate that prolonged activation of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) leads to endocytosis, a diversion from a recycling route, and subsequent lysosomal degradation of GABABRs. These sorting events are paralleled by a reduction in GABABR-dependent activation of inwardly rectifying K+ channel currents. Postendocytic sorting is critically dependent on phosphorylation of serine 783 (S783) within the GABABR2 subunit, an established substrate of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). NMDA-R activation leads to a rapid increase in phosphorylation of S783, followed by a slower dephosphorylation, which results from the activity of AMPK and protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. Agonist activation of GABABRs counters the effects of NMDA. Thus, NMDA-R activation alters the phosphorylation state of S783 and acts as a molecular switch to decrease the abundance of GABABRs at the neuronal plasma membrane. Such a mechanism may be of significance during synaptic plasticity or pathological conditions, such as ischemia or epilepsy, which lead to prolonged activation of glutamate receptors. PMID:20643948

  4. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G protein-coupled receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-10-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homoeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. In addition, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modelling cell membranes.

  5. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G Protein-coupled receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-01-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. Additionally, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modeling cell membranes. PMID:25296113

  6. Total Synthesis and Selective Activity of a NewClass of Conformationally Restrained Epothilones

    PubMed Central

    Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M.; Gupta, Shuchi; Hudson, Richard A.; Perera, Lalith

    2009-01-01

    Stereoselective total syntheses of two novel conformationally restrained epothilone analogues are described. Evans asymmetric alkylation, Brown allylation, and a diastereoselective aldol reaction served as the key steps in the stereoselective synthesis of one of the two key fragments of the convergent synthetic approach.Enzyme resolution was employed to obtain the second fragment as a single enantiomer. The molecules were assembled by esterification, followed by ring-closing metathesis. In preliminary cytotoxicity studies, one of the analogues showed strong and selective growth inhibitory activity against two leukemia cell lines over solid human tumor cell lines. The precise biological mechanism of action and high degree of selectivity of this analogue remain to be examined. PMID:17955508

  7. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding. PMID:25239139

  8. Effect of copper oxide nanoparticles on the conformation and activity of β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Mohd Jahir; Ahmad, Abrar; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to explore the interaction of β-galactosidase with copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs). Steady-state absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to unveil the conformational changes of β-galactosidase induced by the binding of CuO NPs. Temperature dependent fluorescence quenching results indicates a static quenching mechanism in the present case. The binding thermodynamic parameters delineate the predominant role of H-bonding and van der Waals forces between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs binding process. The binding was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the result revealed that the complexation is enthalpy driven, the ΔH°<0, ΔS°<0 indicates the formation of hydrogen bonds between β-galactosidase and CuO NPs occurs. Disruption of the native conformation of the protein upon binding with CuO NPs is reflected through a reduced functionality (in terms of hydrolase activity) of the protein CuO NPs conjugate system in comparison to the native protein and CuO NPs exhibited a competitive mode of inhibition. This also supports the general belief that H-bond formation occurs with NPs is associated with a lesser extent of modification in the native structure. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Additionally the considerable increase in the Rh following the addition of CuO NPs accounts for the unfolding of β-galactosidase. Chemical and thermal unfolding of β-galactosidase, when carried out in the presence of CuO NPs, also indicated a small perturbation in the protein structure. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound β-galactosidase which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25260221

  9. In vitro modification of substituted cysteines as tool to study receptor functionality and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Rathmann, Daniel; Pedragosa-Badia, Xavier; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-08-15

    Mutagenic investigations of expressed membrane proteins are routine, but the variety of modifications is limited by the twenty canonical amino acids. We describe an easy and effective cysteine substitution mutagenesis method to modify and investigate distinct amino acids in vitro. The approach combines the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) with a functional signal transduction readout system using different thiol-specific reagents. We applied this approach to the prolactin-releasing peptide receptor (PrRPR) to facilitate biochemical structure-activity relationship studies of eight crucial positions. Especially for D(6.59)C, the treatment with the positively charged methanethiosulfonate (MTS) ethylammonium led to an induced basal activity, whereas the coupling of the negatively charged MTS ethylsulfonate nearly reconstituted full activity, obviously by mimicking the wild-type charged side chain. At E(5.26)C, W(5.28)C, Y(5.38)C, and Q(7.35)C, accessibility was observed but hindered transfer into the active receptor conformation. Accordingly, the combination of SCAM and signaling assay is feasible and can be adapted to other G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This method circumvents the laborious way of inserting non-proteinogenic amino acids to investigate activity and ligand binding, with rising numbers of MTS reagents allowing selective side chain modification. This method pinpoints to residues being accessible but also presents potential molecular positions to investigate the global conformation. PMID:23624320

  10. Cofactor bypass variants reveal a conformational control mechanism governing cell wall polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Markovski, Monica; Bohrhunter, Jessica L; Lupoli, Tania J; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel E; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-04-26

    To fortify their cytoplasmic membrane and protect it from osmotic rupture, most bacteria surround themselves with a peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton synthesized by the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). As their name implies, these proteins are the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics. We and others have shown that the PG synthases PBP1b and PBP1a of Escherichia coli require the outer membrane lipoproteins LpoA and LpoB, respectively, for their in vivo function. Although it has been demonstrated that LpoB activates the PG polymerization activity of PBP1b in vitro, the mechanism of activation and its physiological relevance have remained unclear. We therefore selected for variants of PBP1b (PBP1b*) that bypass the LpoB requirement for in vivo function, reasoning that they would shed light on LpoB function and its activation mechanism. Several of these PBP1b variants were isolated and displayed elevated polymerization activity in vitro, indicating that the activation of glycan polymer growth is indeed one of the relevant functions of LpoB in vivo. Moreover, the location of amino acid substitutions causing the bypass phenotype on the PBP1b structure support a model in which polymerization activation proceeds via the induction of a conformational change in PBP1b initiated by LpoB binding to its UB2H domain, followed by its transmission to the glycosyl transferase active site. Finally, phenotypic analysis of strains carrying a PBP1b* variant revealed that the PBP1b-LpoB complex is most likely not providing an important physical link between the inner and outer membranes at the division site, as has been previously proposed. PMID:27071112

  11. Superiority of the S,S conformation in diverse pharmacological processes: Intestinal transport and entry inhibition activity of novel anti-HIV drug lead.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Joseph; Swed, Avi; Joubran, Salim; Hurevich, Mattan; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon

    2015-11-30

    Chirality is an important aspect in many pharmacological processes including drug transport and metabolism. The current investigation examined the stereospecific transport and entry inhibitory activity of four diastereomers derived from a small (macrocyclic) molecule that has two chiral centers. These molecules were designed to mimic the interaction between CD4 and gp120 site of HIV-1 and thereby to function as entry inhibitor(s). Intestinal permeability was assessed by ex-vivo model using excised rat intestine mounted in side-by-side diffusion chambers. The entry inhibitory activity was monitored using indicator HeLa-CD4-LTR-beta-gal cells (MAGI assay). The (S/S) diastereomer, named CG-1, exhibited superiority in both unrelated tested biological processes: (I) high transport through the intestine and (II) entry inhibition activity (in the low μM range). The permeability screening revealed a unique transporter-mediated absorption pathway of CG-1, suggesting a significant role of the molecule's conformation on the mechanism of intestinal absorption. Here we highlight that only the S,S enantiomer (CG-1) has both (I) promising anti HIV-1 entry inhibitory properties and (II) high transporter mediated intestinal permeability. Hence we suggest preference in pharmacological processes to the S,S conformation. This report augments the knowledge regarding stereoselectivity in receptor mediated and protein-protein interaction processes. PMID:26392249

  12. Structure of a mitochondrial cytochrome c conformer competent for peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Levi J.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of apoptosis, the peroxidation of cardiolipin at the inner mitochondrial membrane by cytochrome c requires an open coordination site on the heme. We report a 1.45-Å resolution structure of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with the Met80 heme ligand swung out of the heme crevice and replaced by a water molecule. This conformational change requires modest adjustments to the main chain of the heme crevice loop and is facilitated by a trimethyllysine 72-to-alanine mutation. This mutation also enhances the peroxidase activity of iso-1-cytochrome c. The structure shows a buried water channel capable of facilitating peroxide access to the active site and of moving protons produced during peroxidase activity to the protein surface. Alternate positions of the side chain of Arg38 appear to mediate opening and closing of the buried water channel. In addition, two buried water molecules can adopt alternate positions that change the network of hydrogen bonds in the buried water channel. Taken together, these observations suggest that low and high proton conductivity states may mediate peroxidase function. Comparison of yeast and mammalian cytochrome c sequences, in the context of the steric factors that permit opening of the heme crevice, suggests that higher organisms have evolved to inhibit peroxidase activity, providing a more stringent barrier to the onset of apoptosis. PMID:24760830

  13. Desensitization and internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a following activation of heterologous Gq/11-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Pula, Giordano; McIlhinney, R A Jeffrey; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-06-15

    In this study we characterized the heterologous desensitization and internalization of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b following activation of endogenous G(q/11)-coupled receptors in HEK293 cells. Agonist activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine or P2Y1 purinergic receptors triggered the PKC- and CaMKII-dependent internalization of mGluR1a. In co-immunoprecipitation studies, both glutamate and carbachol increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Co-addition of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 blocked the ability of glutamate and carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Glutamate also increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1b, whereas carbachol did not. However, unlike mGluR1a, glutamate-stimulated association of GRK2 with mGluR1b was not reduced by PKC/CaMKII inhibition. Pretreatment of cells expressing mGluR1a or mGluR1b with carbachol rapidly desensitized subsequent glutamate-stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation. The carbachol-induced heterologous desensitization and internalization of mGluR1a was blocked by LY367385, an mGluR1a antagonist with inverse agonist activity. Furthermore, LY367385 blocked the ability of carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. On the other hand, LY367385 had no effect on the carbachol-induced desensitization and internalization of the nonconstitutively active mGluR1b splice variant. These results demonstrate that the internalization of mGluR1a, triggered homologously by glutamate or heterologously by carbachol, is PKC/CaMKII-, GRK2-, arrestin-, and clathrin-dependent and that PKC/CaMKII activation appears to be necessary for GRK2 to associate with mGluR1a. Furthermore, the heterologous desensitization of mGluR1a is dependent upon the splice variant being in an active conformation. PMID:15182196

  14. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  15. An activating mutation of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor autonomously sustains spermatogenesis in a hypophysectomized man

    SciTech Connect

    Gromoll, J.; Simoni, M.; Nieschlag, E.

    1996-04-01

    As both gonadotropins, LH and FSH, are required for normal spermatogenesis, patients with pituitary insufficiency need hCG plus human menopausal gonadotropin therapy to induce spermatogenesis and establish fertility. In a patient hypophysectomized because of a pituitary tumor, who, despite undetectable serum gonadotropin levels, had normal testis volume and semen parameters and fathered three children under testosterone substitution alone, we hypothesized an activating mutation of the FSH receptor. Exon 10 of the FSH receptor gene was amplified from genomic DNA by PCR, screened by single stranded conformation polymorphism gel electrophoresis, and sequenced. We identified a heterozygous A{r_arrow}G base change at nucleotide position 1700, leading to an Asp,Gly transition in codon 567 in the third intracytoplasmatic loop. COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the mutated receptor displayed a 1.5-fold increase in basal cAMP production compared to wild-type receptor, indicating that this mutation leads to ligand-independent constitutive activation of the FSH receptor. We conclude that this activating mutation of the FSH receptor, the first ever described, autonomously sustains spermatogenesis in the absence of gonadotropins. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Activating mutations in the extracellular domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 function by disruption of the disulfide bond in the third immunoglobulin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, S C; Meyer, A N; Hart, K C; Galvin, B D; Webster, M K; Donoghue, D J

    1998-04-14

    Multiple human skeletal and craniosynostosis disorders, including Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Jackson-Weiss, and Apert syndromes, result from numerous point mutations in the extracellular region of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). Many of these mutations create a free cysteine residue that potentially leads to abnormal disulfide bond formation and receptor activation; however, for noncysteine mutations, the mechanism of receptor activation remains unclear. We examined the effect of two of these mutations, W290G and T341P, on receptor dimerization and activation. These mutations resulted in cellular transformation when expressed as FGFR2/Neu chimeric receptors. Additionally, in full-length FGFR2, the mutations induced receptor dimerization and elevated levels of tyrosine kinase activity. Interestingly, transformation by the chimeric receptors, dimerization, and enhanced kinase activity were all abolished if either the W290G or the T341P mutation was expressed in conjunction with mutations that eliminate the disulfide bond in the third immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig-3). These results demonstrate a requirement for the Ig-3 cysteine residues in the activation of FGFR2 by noncysteine mutations. Molecular modeling also reveals that noncysteine mutations may activate FGFR2 by altering the conformation of the Ig-3 domain near the disulfide bond, preventing the formation of an intramolecular bond. This allows the unbonded cysteine residues to participate in intermolecular disulfide bonding, resulting in constitutive activation of the receptor. PMID:9539778

  17. Structural Basis of Activation of Bitter Taste Receptor T2R1 and Comparison with Class A G-protein-coupled Receptors (GPCRs)*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Pydi, Sai Prasad; Upadhyaya, Jasbir; Chelikani, Prashen

    2011-01-01

    The human bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are non-Class A members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, with very limited structural information. Amino acid sequence analysis reveals that most of the important motifs present in the transmembrane helices (TM1–TM7) of the well studied Class A GPCRs are absent in T2Rs, raising fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of activation and how T2Rs recognize bitter ligands with diverse chemical structures. In this study, the bitter receptor T2R1 was used to systematically investigate the role of 15 transmembrane amino acids in T2Rs, including 13 highly conserved residues, by amino acid replacements guided by molecular modeling. Functional analysis of the mutants by calcium imaging analysis revealed that replacement of Asn-662.65 and the highly conserved Asn-241.50 resulted in greater than 90% loss of agonist-induced signaling. Our results show that Asn-241.50 plays a crucial role in receptor activation by mediating an hydrogen bond network connecting TM1-TM2-TM7, whereas Asn-662.65 is essential for binding to the agonist dextromethorphan. The interhelical hydrogen bond between Asn-241.50 and Arg-552.54 restrains T2R receptor activity because loss of this bond in I27A and R55A mutants results in hyperactive receptor. The conserved amino acids Leu-1975.50, Ser-2005.53, and Leu-2015.54 form a putative LXXSL motif which performs predominantly a structural role by stabilizing the helical conformation of TM5 at the cytoplasmic end. This study provides for the first time mechanistic insights into the roles of the conserved transmembrane residues in T2Rs and allows comparison of the activation mechanisms of T2Rs with the Class A GPCRs. PMID:21852241

  18. Identification of a hexapeptide that mimics a conformation-dependent binding site of acetylcholine receptor by use of a phage-epitope library.

    PubMed Central

    Balass, M; Heldman, Y; Cabilly, S; Givol, D; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Fuchs, S

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5.5 is directed against the ligand-binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The epitope for this antibody is conformation-dependent, and the antibody does not react with synthetic peptides derived from the receptor sequence. We have identified a ligand peptide that mimics this conformation-dependent epitope from a phage-epitope library composed of filamentous phage displaying random hexapeptides. Among 38 positive phage clones, individually selected from the library, 34 positive clones carried the sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DLVWLL), 1 positive clone had the sequence Asp-Ile-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DIVWLL), and 3 positive clones expressed the sequence Leu-Ile-Glu-Trp-Leu-Leu (LIEWLL), none of which are significantly homologous with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit sequence. All of these phages bind specifically to mAb 5.5. The synthetic peptide DLVWLL inhibits binding of mAb 5.5 to the related peptide-presenting phage and to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 value is of the order of 10(-4) M. Bioactivity of the peptide "mimotope" DLVWLL was demonstrated in vivo in hatched chickens by inhibition of the mAb 5.5 effect by the peptide. The neuromuscular block and myasthenia gravis-like symptoms that are induced in chicken by passive transfer of mAb 5.5 were specifically abolished by DLVWLL. This study shows the potential of a random peptide phage-epitope library for selecting a mimotope for an antibody that recognizes a folded form of the protein, where peptides from the linear amino acid sequence of the protein are not applicable. Images Fig. 5 PMID:7504273

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model.

    PubMed

    Bernoux, Maud; Burdett, Hayden; Williams, Simon J; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Anderson, Peter A; Dodds, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  20. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  1. Mutated human androgen receptor gene detected in a prostatic cancer patient is also activated by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Elo, J.P.; Kvist, L.; Leinonen, K.; Isomaa, V.

    1995-12-01

    Androgens are necessary for the development of prostatic cancer. The mechanisms by which the originally androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells are relieved of the requirement to use androgen for their growth are largely unknown. The human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP has been shown to contain a point mutation in the human androgen receptor gene (hAR), suggesting that changes in the hAR may contribute to the abnormal hormone response of prostatic cells. To search for point mutations in the hAR, we used single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and a polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing method to screen 23 prostatic cancer specimens from untreated patients, 6 prostatic cancer specimens from treated patients, and 11 benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. One mutation was identified in DNA isolated from prostatic cancer tissue, and the mutation was also detected in the leukocyte DNA of the patient and his offspring. The mutation changed codon 726 in exon E from arginine to leucine and was a germ line mutation. The mutation we found in exon E of the hAR gene does not alter the ligand binding specificity of the AR, but the mutated receptor was activated by estradiol to a significantly greater extent than the wild-type receptor. The AR gene mutation described in this study might be one explanation for the altered biological activity of prostatic cancer. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Structural mechanism of glutamate receptor activation and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joel R; Kumar, Janesh; Chittori, Sagar; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Mayer, Mark L; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-10-16

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate brain. To gain a better understanding of how structural changes gate ion flux across the membrane, we trapped rat AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and kainate receptor subtypes in their major functional states and analysed the resulting structures using cryo-electron microscopy. We show that transition to the active state involves a 'corkscrew' motion of the receptor assembly, driven by closure of the ligand-binding domain. Desensitization is accompanied by disruption of the amino-terminal domain tetramer in AMPA, but not kainate, receptors with a two-fold to four-fold symmetry transition in the ligand-binding domains in both subtypes. The 7.6 Å structure of a desensitized kainate receptor shows how these changes accommodate channel closing. These findings integrate previous physiological, biochemical and structural analyses of glutamate receptors and provide a molecular explanation for key steps in receptor gating. PMID:25119039

  3. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and human Mrgpr family members. This expansion of our understanding by which proteases interact with GPCRs redefines the concept of what constitutes a protease-activated receptor. The findings also implicate proteases as ligands to members of this orphan receptor family while providing new insights into how cysteine proteases contribute to itch. PMID:26216096

  4. Cytokine Activation by Antibody Fragments Targeted to Cytokine-Receptor Signaling Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kuruganti, Srilalitha; Miersch, Shane; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Speir, Jeffrey A; Harris, Bethany D; Schriewer, Jill M; Buller, R Mark L; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Walter, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous cytokine therapy can induce systemic toxicity, which might be prevented by activating endogenously produced cytokines in local cell niches. Here we developed antibody-based activators of cytokine signaling (AcCS), which recognize cytokines only when they are bound to their cell surface receptors. AcCS were developed for type I interferons (IFNs), which induce cellular activities by binding to cell surface receptors IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. As a potential alternative to exogenous IFN therapy, AcCS were shown to potentiate the biological activities of natural IFNs by ∼100-fold. Biochemical and structural characterization demonstrates that the AcCS stabilize the IFN-IFNAR2 binary complex by recognizing an IFN-induced conformational change in IFNAR2. Using IFN mutants that disrupt IFNAR1 binding, AcCS were able to enhance IFN antiviral potency without activating antiproliferative responses. This suggests AcCS can be used to manipulate cytokine signaling for basic science and possibly for therapeutic applications. PMID:26546677

  5. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  6. VARIABLE ACTIVE SITE LOOP CONFORMATIONS ACCOMMODATE THE BINDING OF MACROCYCLIC LARGAZOLE ANALOGUES TO HDAC8

    PubMed Central

    Decroos, Christophe; Clausen, Dane J.; Haines, Brandon E.; Wiest, Olaf; Williams, Robert M.; Christianson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The macrocyclic depsipeptide Largazole is a potent inhibitor of metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs), some of which are drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. Indeed, Largazole partially resembles Romidepsin (FK228), a macrocyclic depsipeptide already approved for clinical use. Each inhibitor contains a pendant side chain thiol that coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion, as observed in the X-ray crystal structure of the HDAC8–Largazole complex [Cole, K. E.; Dowling, D. P.; Boone, M. A.; Phillips, A. J.; Christianson, D. W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 12474]. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of HDAC8 complexed with three synthetic analogues of Largazole in which the depsipeptide ester is replaced with a rigid amide linkage. In two of these analogues, a 6-membered pyridine ring is also substituted (with two different orientations) for the 5-membered thiazole ring in the macrocycle skeleton. The side chain thiol group of each analogue coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion with nearly ideal geometry, thereby preserving the hallmark structural feature of inhibition by Largazole. Surprisingly, in comparison with the binding of Largazole, these analogues trigger alternative conformational changes in the L1 and L2 loops flanking the active site. However, despite these structural differences, inhibitory potency is generally comparable to, or just moderately less than, the inhibitory potency of Largazole. Thus, this study reveals important new structure-affinity relationships for the binding of macrocyclic inhibitors to HDAC8. PMID:25793284

  7. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate on the conformation and activity of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Kang, Yijun; Cao, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is among the most prominent contaminates in human serum and has been reported to possess potential toxicity to the human body. In this study, the effects of PFOS on the conformation and activity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated in vitro. The results indicated that the binding interaction of PFOS with BSA destroyed the tertiary and secondary structures of protein with the loss of α-helix structure and the increasing of hydrophobic microenvironment of the Trp or Tyr residues. During the thermal denaturation protein, PFOS increases the protein stability of BSA. The proportion of α-helix decreased on increasing the PFOS concentration and the microenvironment of the Trp or Tyr residues becomes more hydrophobic. The results from molecular modeling indicated that BSA had not only one possible binding site to bind with PFOS by the polar interaction, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces. In addition, the BSA relative activities were decreased with the increase of PFOS concentration. Such loss of BSA activity in the presence of PFOS indicated that one of the binding sites in BSA is located in subdomain IIIA, which is in good agreement with the fluorescence spectroscopic experiments and molecular modeling results. This study offers a comprehensive picture of the interactions of PFOS with serum albumin and provides insights into the toxicological effect of perfluoroalkylated substances. PMID:27031195

  8. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  10. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  11. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  12. The Reaction of Glucagon with Its Receptor: Evidence for Discrete Regions of Activity and Binding in the Glucagon Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Rodbell, Martin; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Pohl, Stephen L.; Sundby, F.

    1971-01-01

    Des-histidine-glucagon (DH-glucagon, glucagon2-29) does not activate the glucagon-sensitive adenylate cyclase system present in either liver plasma membranes or in fat-cell “ghosts”, but inhibits the response of these systems to submaximal concentrations of glucagon. DH-glucagon also inhibits, competitively, the binding of [125I]glucagon to its receptor in liver plasma membranes. Amino-terminal fragments of glucagon (glucagon1-21, glucagon1-23) and carboxy-terminal fragments (glucagon20-29, glucagon22-29) failed to activate adenylate cyclase, to inhibit the response of the enzyme to glucagon, or to compete with labeled glucagon at its receptor. It is concluded that the amino-terminal histidine residue of glucagon is essential for biological activity and that a hydrophobic near-carboxy-terminal region (residues 22-27) is essential for binding of glucagon to its receptor. Amino-terminal histidine may also contribute to the binding of glucagon, since the apparent affinity of DH-glucagon for the receptor is only about one-sixth that of glucagon. Thus, essentially the entire molecule of glucagon must be considered to be the biologically active species. Because, as shown elsewhere, the binding of glucagon to its receptor shows characteristics of hydrophobic bonding, and because certain detergents induce conformational changes in the carboxy-terminal binding region of glucagon, the binding is probably of a lipophilic type. PMID:5280527

  13. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  14. Small molecule agonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 do not induce global conformational changes and are significantly better than activating antibodies in reducing vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Gomez, Camilo; Duque, Juan Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte adhesion, migration and immune functions. We recently identified novel compounds, leukadherins, that allosterically enhance CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion and reduce inflammation in vivo, suggesting integrin activation to be a novel mechanism of action for the development of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Since a number of well-characterized anti-CD11b/CD18 activating antibodies are currently available, we wondered if such biological agonists could also become therapeutic leads following this mechanism of action. METHODS We compared the two types of agonists using in vitro cell adhesion and wound-healing assays and using animal model systems. We also studied effects of the two types of agonists on outside-in signaling in treated cells. RESULTS Both types of agonists similarly enhanced integrin-mediated cell adhesion and decreased cell migration. However, unlike leukadherins, the activating antibodies produced significant CD11b/CD18 macro clustering and induced phosphorylation of key proteins involved in outside-in signaling. Studies using conformation reporter antibodies showed that leukadherins did not induce global conformational changes in CD11b/CD18 explaining the reason behind their lack of ligand-mimetic outside-in signaling. In vivo, leukadherins reduced vascular injury in a dose-dependent fashion, but, surprisingly, the anti-CD11b activating antibody ED7 was ineffective. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that small molecule allosteric agonists of CD11b/CD18 have clear advantages over the biologic activating antibodies and provide a mechanistic basis for the difference. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE CD11b/CD18 activation represents a novel strategy for reducing inflammatory injury. Our study establishes small molecule leukadherins as preferred agonists over activating antibodies for future development as novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:23454649

  15. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  16. An investigation into the origin of the biased agonism associated with the urotensin II receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, Diego; Merlino, Francesco; Limatola, Antonio; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Campiglia, Pietro; Novellino, Ettore; Grieco, Paolo; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    The urotensin II receptor (UTR) has long been studied mainly for its involvement in the cardiovascular homeostasis both in health and disease state. Two endogenous ligands activate UTR, i.e. urotensin II (U-II) and urotensin II-related peptide (URP). Extensive expression of the two ligands uncovers the diversified pathophysiological effects mediated by the urotensinergic system such as cardiovascular disorders, smooth muscle cell proliferation, renal disease, diabetes, and tumour growth. As newly reported, U-II and URP have distinct effects on transcriptional activity, cell proliferation, and myocardial contractile activities supporting the idea that U-II and URP interact with UTR in a distinct manner (biased agonism). To shed light on the origin of the divergent activities of the two endogenous ligands, we performed a conformational study on URP by solution NMR in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle solution and compared the obtained NMR structure of URP with that of hU-II previously determined. Finally, we undertook docking studies between URP, hU-II, and an UT receptor model. PMID:25694247

  17. Biologic activity of antigen receptors artificially incorporated onto B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Peacock, J S; Londo, T R; Roess, D A; Barisas, B G

    1986-09-15

    We describe a method for incorporating monoclonal antibody molecules onto viable murine lymphocytes and summarize the biologic activity of these artificial receptors on B cells. Mouse spleen cells incubated overnight with palmitate conjugates of a monoclonal anti-DNP IgA (protein 315) in the presence of deoxycholic acid incorporate about 50,000 antibody molecules per cell. When concentrations of deoxycholate and palmitoyl-protein 315 are carefully controlled, this labeling procedure does not affect the viability or the normal functions of the receptor-decorated cells. The incorporated antibody specifically binds DNP-antigens, although it appears to be unable to communicate directly with internal cellular components. Yet when these receptor-decorated, unprimed cells are challenged with any one of several DNP-antigens, up to 42,000 per 10(6) B cells differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. This response is about 23-fold greater than that induced in normal cell cultures and is of the same magnitude as that induced by the polyclonal B cell activator LPS. This, in addition to the observation that only about 3.6% of receptor-decorated B cells responding to DNP-conjugated polymerized flagellin (DNP-POL) produce hapten-specific antibody, demonstrates that these antigens cause polyclonal B cell differentiation. Normal spleen cells in the presence of DNP-POL and irradiated spleen cells bearing the artificial receptors do not exhibit the polyclonal antibody response. Also, the response of receptor-decorated B cell is blocked by high but nontoxic concentrations of the nonimmunogenic hapten DNP-lysine. These observations demonstrate that the polyclonal B cell response in this system requires the binding of antigen to artificial receptors on functionally viable cells. The polyclonal B cell response to a thymus-dependent antigen DNP-conjugated bovine gamma-globulin (DNP-BGG) requires the presence of the carrier-primed T cells. On the other hand, T cell depletion by anti-Thy-1

  18. Atomic insights into distinct hormonal activities of Bisphenol A analogues toward PPARγ and ERα receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-20

    Bisphenol A analogues (BPAs) belong to a wide variety of large volume chemicals with diverse applications yet emerging environmental concerns. Limited experimental data have demonstrated that BPAs with different halogenation patterns distinctly affect the agonistic activities toward proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and estrogen receptors (ER)α. Understanding the modes of action of BPAs toward different receptors is essential, however, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we probed the molecular recognition process of halogenated BPAs including TBBPA, TCBPA, BPAF, BPC, triBBPA, diBBPA, and monoBBPA toward PPARγ and ERα by molecular modeling, especially the impact of different halogen patterns. Increasing bromination at phenolic rings of BPAs was found highly correlated with electrostatic interactions (R(2) = 0.978 and 0.865 toward PPARγ and ERα, respectively) and van der Waals interactions (R(2) = 0.995 and 0.994 toward PPARγ and ERα, respectively). More halogenated phenolic rings at 3,5-positions of BPAs increase the shielding of the hormonally active phenolic OH and markedly decrease electrostatic interactions favorable for agonistic activities toward PPARγ, but unfavorable for agonistic activities toward ERα. The halogenation at the phenolic rings of BPAs exerts more impact on molecular electrostatic potential distribution than halogenation at the bridging alkyl moiety. Different halogenations further alter hydrogen bond interactions of BPAs and induce conformational changes of PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD) and ERα LBD, specifically affecting the stabilization of helix H12 attributable to the different agonistic activities. Our results indicate that structural variations in halogenation patterns result in different interactions of BPAs with PPARγ LBD and ERα LBD, potentially causing distinct agonistic/antagonistic toxic effects. The various halogenation patterns should be fully considered for the design of

  19. Liver X Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonist from Cornus alternifolia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yang-Qing; Ma, Guo-Yi; Peng, Jiang-nan; Ma, Zhan-Ying; Hamann, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptors superfamily and are transcription factors activated by specific ligands. Liver X receptors (LXR) belong to the nuclear hormone receptors and have been shown to play an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. From the previous screening of several medicinal plants for potential partial PPARγ agonists, the extracts of Cornus alternifolia were found to exhibit promising bioactivity. In this paper, we report the isolation and structural elucidation of four new compounds and their potential as ligands for PPAR. Methods The new compounds were extracted from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia and fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and analysis of their hydrolysis products. Results Three new iridoid glycosides including an iridolactone, alternosides A-C (1–3), a new megastigmane glycoside, cornalternoside (4) and 10 known compounds, were obtained from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia. Kaempferol-3-O-β-glucopyranoside (5) exhibited potent agonistic activities for PPARα, PPARγ and LXR with EC50 values of 0.62, 3.0 and 1.8 μ M, respectively. Conclusions We isolated four new and ten known compounds from Cornus alternifolia, and one known compound showed agonistic activities for PPARα, PPARγ and LXR. General significance Compound 1 is the first example of a naturally occurring iridoid glycoside containing a β-glucopyranoside moiety at C-6. PMID:22353334

  20. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by α-subunit motif controlling active site conformation.

    PubMed

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2013-02-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate. PMID:23345443

  1. A Phytochrome Sensory Domain Permits Receptor Activation by Red Light.

    PubMed

    Reichhart, Eva; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Tichy, Alexandra-Madelaine; McKenzie, Catherine; Janovjak, Harald

    2016-05-17

    Optogenetics and photopharmacology enable the spatio-temporal control of cell and animal behavior by light. Although red light offers deep-tissue penetration and minimal phototoxicity, very few red-light-sensitive optogenetic methods are currently available. We have now developed a red-light-induced homodimerization domain. We first showed that an optimized sensory domain of the cyanobacterial phytochrome 1 can be expressed robustly and without cytotoxicity in human cells. We then applied this domain to induce the dimerization of two receptor tyrosine kinases-the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 and the neurotrophin receptor trkB. This new optogenetic method was then used to activate the MAPK/ERK pathway non-invasively in mammalian tissue and in multicolor cell-signaling experiments. The light-controlled dimerizer and red-light-activated receptor tyrosine kinases will prove useful to regulate a variety of cellular processes with light. PMID:27101018

  2. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  3. Novel positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors with anesthetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Maldifassi, Maria C.; Baur, Roland; Pierce, David; Nourmahnad, Anahita; Forman, Stuart A.; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    GABAA receptors are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are targets for numerous clinically important drugs such as benzodiazepines, anxiolytics and anesthetics. We previously identified novel ligands of the classical benzodiazepine binding pocket in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors using an experiment-guided virtual screening (EGVS) method. This screen also identified novel ligands for intramembrane low affinity diazepam site(s). In the current study we have further characterized compounds 31 and 132 identified with EGVS as well as 4-O-methylhonokiol. We investigated the site of action of these compounds in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using voltage-clamp electrophysiology combined with a benzodiazepine site antagonist and transmembrane domain mutations. All three compounds act mainly through the two β+/α− subunit transmembrane interfaces of the GABAA receptors. We then used concatenated receptors to dissect the involvement of individual β+/α− interfaces. We further demonstrated that these compounds have anesthetic activity in a small aquatic animal model, Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The newly identified compounds may serve as scaffolds for the development of novel anesthetics. PMID:27198062

  4. HAMP Domain Conformers That Propagate Opposite Signals in Bacterial Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Airola, Michael V.; Sukomon, Nattakan; Samanta, Dipanjan; Borbat, Peter P.; Freed, Jack H.; Watts, Kylie J.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between “on” and “off” conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses. PMID:23424282

  5. Endocannabinoid tone versus constitutive activity of cannabinoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Allyn C; Reggio, Patricia H; Childers, Steven R; Hampson, Robert E; Ulloa, Nadine M; Deutsch, Dale G

    2011-01-01

    This review evaluates the cellular mechanisms of constitutive activity of the cannabinoid (CB) receptors, its reversal by inverse agonists, and discusses the pitfalls and problems in the interpretation of the research data. The notion is presented that endogenously produced anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) serve as autocrine or paracrine stimulators of the CB receptors, giving the appearance of constitutive activity. It is proposed that one cannot interpret inverse agonist studies without inference to the receptors' environment vis-à-vis the endocannabinoid agonists which themselves are highly lipophilic compounds with a preference for membranes. The endocannabinoid tone is governed by a combination of synthetic pathways and inactivation involving transport and degradation. The synthesis and degradation of 2-AG is well characterized, and 2-AG has been strongly implicated in retrograde signalling in neurons. Data implicating endocannabinoids in paracrine regulation have been described. Endocannabinoid ligands can traverse the cell's interior and potentially be stored on fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Molecular modelling predicts that the endocannabinoids derived from membrane phospholipids can laterally diffuse to enter the CB receptor from the lipid bilayer. Considering that endocannabinoid signalling to CB receptors is a much more likely scenario than is receptor activation in the absence of agonist ligands, researchers are advised to refrain from assuming constitutive activity except for experimental models known to be devoid of endocannabinoid ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21545414

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Bishop-Bailey, David

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)s are a family of three nuclear hormone receptors, PPARα, -δ, and -γ, which are members of the steriod receptor superfamily. The first member of the family (PPARα) was originally discovered as the mediator by which a number of xenobiotic drugs cause peroxisome proliferation in the liver. Defined functions for all these receptors, until recently, mainly concerned their ability to regulate energy balance, with PPARα being involved in β-oxidation pathways, and PPARγ in the differentiation of adipocytes. Little is known about the functions of PPARδ, though it is the most ubiquitously expressed. Since their discovery, PPARs have been shown to be expressed in monocytes/macrophages, the heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and in atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, PPARs can be activated by a vast number of compounds including synthetic drugs, of the clofibrate, and anti-diabetic thiazoldinedione classes, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a number of eicosanoids, including prostaglandins, lipoxygenase products, and oxidized low density lipoprotein. This review will aim to introduce the field of PPAR nuclear hormone receptors, and discuss the discovery and actions of PPARs in the cardiovascular system, as well as the source of potential ligands. PMID:10696077

  7. Conformable actively multiplexed high-density surface electrode array for brain interfacing

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan

    2015-01-13

    Provided are methods and devices for interfacing with brain tissue, specifically for monitoring and/or actuation of spatio-temporal electrical waveforms. The device is conformable having a high electrode density and high spatial and temporal resolution. A conformable substrate supports a conformable electronic circuit and a barrier layer. Electrodes are positioned to provide electrical contact with a brain tissue. A controller monitors or actuates the electrodes, thereby interfacing with the brain tissue. In an aspect, methods are provided to monitor or actuate spatio-temporal electrical waveform over large brain surface areas by any of the devices disclosed herein.

  8. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  9. OX1 orexin/hypocretin receptor activation of phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Jäntti, MH; Putula, J; Somerharju, P; Frohman, MA; Kukkonen, JP

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Orexin receptors potently signal to lipid messenger systems, and our previous studies have suggested that PLD would be one of these. We thus wanted to verify this by direct measurements and clarify the molecular mechanism of the coupling. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Orexin receptor-mediated PLD activation was investigated in CHO cells stably expressing human OX1 orexin receptors using [14C]-oleic acid-prelabelling and the transphosphatidylation assay. KEY RESULTS Orexin stimulation strongly increased PLD activity – even more so than the phorbol ester TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), a highly potent activator of PLD. Both orexin and TPA responses were mediated by PLD1. Orexin-A and -B showed approximately 10-fold difference in potency, and the concentration–response curves were biphasic. Using pharmacological inhibitors and activators, both orexin and TPA were shown to signal to PLD1 via the novel PKC isoform, PKCδ. In contrast, pharmacological or molecular biological inhibitors of Rho family proteins RhoA/B/C, cdc42 and Rac did not inhibit the orexin (or the TPA) response, nor did the molecular biological inhibitors of PKD. In addition, neither cAMP elevation, Gαi/o nor Gβγ seemed to play an important role in the orexin response. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Stimulation of OX1 receptors potently activates PLD (probably PLD1) in CHO cells and this is mediated by PKCδ but not other PKC isoforms, PKDs or Rho family G-proteins. At present, the physiological significance of orexin-induced PLD activation is unknown, but this is not the first time we have identified PKCδ in orexin signalling, and thus some specific signalling cascade may exist between orexin receptors and PKCδ. PMID:21718304

  10. Activation of dimeric ABA receptors elicits guard cell closure, ABA-regulated gene expression, and drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masanori; Peterson, Francis C.; Defries, Andrew; Park, Sang-Youl; Endo, Akira; Nambara, Eiji; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential molecule in plant abiotic stress responses. It binds to soluble pyrabactin resistance1/PYR1-like/regulatory component of ABA receptor receptors and stabilizes them in a conformation that inhibits clade A type II C protein phosphatases; this leads to downstream SnRK2 kinase activation and numerous cellular outputs. We previously described the synthetic naphthalene sulfonamide ABA agonist pyrabactin, which activates seed ABA responses but fails to trigger substantial responses in vegetative tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we describe quinabactin, a sulfonamide ABA agonist that preferentially activates dimeric ABA receptors and possesses ABA-like potency in vivo. In Arabidopsis, the transcriptional responses induced by quinabactin are highly correlated with those induced by ABA treatments. Quinabactin treatments elicit guard cell closure, suppress water loss, and promote drought tolerance in adult Arabidopsis and soybean plants. The effects of quinabactin are sufficiently similar to those of ABA that it is able to rescue multiple phenotypes observed in the ABA-deficient mutant aba2. Genetic analyses show that quinabactin’s effects in vegetative tissues are primarily mediated by dimeric ABA receptors. A PYL2-quinabactin-HAB1 X-ray crystal structure solved at 1.98-Å resolution shows that quinabactin forms a hydrogen bond with the receptor/PP2C “lock” hydrogen bond network, a structural feature absent in pyrabactin-receptor/PP2C complexes. Our results demonstrate that ABA receptors can be chemically controlled to enable plant protection against water stress and define the dimeric receptors as key targets for chemical modulation of vegetative ABA responses. PMID:23818638

  11. A Second Class of Nuclear Receptors for Oxysterols: Regulation of RORα and RORγ activity by 24S-Hydroxycholesterol (Cerebrosterol)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Crumbley, Christine; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γ (RORα [NR1F1] and RORγ [NR1F3]) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. These 2 receptors regulate many physiological processes including development, metabolism and immunity. We recently found that certain oxysterols, namely the 7-substituted oxysterols, bound to the ligand binding domains (LBDs) of RORα and RORγ with high affinity, altered the LBD conformation and reduced coactivator binding resulting in suppression of the constitutive transcriptional activity of these two receptors. Here, we show that another oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC), is also a high affinity ligand for RORα and RORγ (Ki ∼ 25 nM). 24S-OHC is also known as cerebrosterol due to its high level in the brain where it plays an essential role as an intermediate in cholesterol elimination from the CNS. 24S-OHC functions as a RORα/γ inverse agonist suppressing the constitutive transcriptional activity of these receptors in cotransfection assays. Additionally, 24S-OHC suppressed the expression of several RORα target genes including BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in a ROR-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that 24S-OHC decreases the ability of RORα to recruit the coactivator SRC-2 when bound to the BMAL1 promoter. We also noted that 24(S), 25-epoxycholesterol selectively suppressed the activity of RORγ. These data indicate that RORα and RORγ may serve as sensors of oxsterols. Thus, RORα and RORγ display an overlapping ligand preference with another class of oxysterol nuclear receptors, the liver X receptors (LXRα [NR1H3] and LXRβ [NR1H2]). PMID:20211758

  12. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  13. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  14. The Catalytic Activity of Protein-Disulfide Isomerase Requires a Conformationally Flexible Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, G.; Kober, F; Lewandrowski, U; Sickmann, A; Lennarz, W; Schindelin, H

    2008-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation of the correct pattern of disulfide bonds in secretory proteins. A low resolution crystal structure of yeast PDI described here reveals large scale conformational changes compared with the initially reported structure, indicating that PDI is a highly flexible molecule with its catalytic domains, a and a?, representing two mobile arms connected to a more rigid core composed of the b and b? domains. Limited proteolysis revealed that the linker between the a domain and the core is more susceptible to degradation than that connecting the a? domain to the core. By restricting the two arms with inter-domain disulfide bonds, the molecular flexibility of PDI, especially that of its a domain, was demonstrated to be essential for the enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. The crystal structure also featured a PDI dimer, and a propensity to dimerize in solution and in the ER was confirmed by cross-linking experiments and the split green fluorescent protein system. Although sedimentation studies suggested that the self-association of PDI is weak, we hypothesize that PDI exists as an interconvertible mixture of monomers and dimers in the endoplasmic reticulum due to its high abundance in this compartment.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of phosphorylated galactomannan: the effect of DS on solution conformation and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Ting; Tian, Jia; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Xiaofang; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-11-26

    Phosphorylated derivatives of galactomannan from guar gum (GG) with the degree of substitution (DS) of 0.35-0.52 were synthesized using POCl3/pyridine. FT-IR, (13)C NMR and XPS results revealed that phosphorylation had occurred and C-6 substitution was predominant in phosphorylated guar gum (PGG). PGG showed an increase in Mw and more broad molar mass distribution in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. Higher reaction temperature (above 60 °C) resulted in a higher MW value in PGG. It might be due to the cross-linking of polysaccharide chains by POCl3 via di-ester which was also supported by monosaccharide composition result. Results of M(W) - (S(2))(z)(1/2) showed a decrease in fractal dimension (df) values. DS had greater influence on its conformation in aqueous solution. The introduction of -PO3H2 groups improved significantly the stiffness of the chains due to the electrostatic effect. Furthermore, antioxidant experiments revealed that high DS could enhance the scavenging activities of radicals of PGG in vitro. PMID:25256491

  16. Aromatic Residues {epsilon}Trp-55 and {delta}Trp-57 and the Activation of Acetylcholine Receptor Channels.

    PubMed

    Bafna, Pallavi A; Jha, Archana; Auerbach, Anthony

    2009-03-27

    The two transmitter binding sites of the neuromuscular acetylcholine (ACh) receptor channel contain several aromatic residues, including a tryptophan located on the complementary, negative face of each binding pocket. These two residues, Trp-55 in the epsilon subunit and Trp-57 in the delta subunit, were mutated (AEFHILRVY), and for most constructs the rate constants for acetylcholine binding and channel gating were estimated by using single channel kinetic analyses. The rate constants for unliganded channel opening and closing were also estimated for some mutants. From these measurements we calculated all of the equilibrium constants of the "allosteric" cycle as follows: diliganded gating, unliganded gating, dissociation from the C(losed) conformation, and dissociation from the O(pen) conformation. The results indicate the following. (i) These aromatic side chains play a relatively minor role in ACh receptor channel activation. (ii) The main consequence of mutations is to reduce the affinity of the O conformation of the binding site for ACh, with the effect being greater at the epsilon subunit. (iii) In epsilon (but not delta) the aromatic nature of the side chain is important in determining affinity, to a slightly greater degree in the O conformation. Phi value analyses (of both tryptophan residues) show Phi approximately 1 for both the ACh binding and diliganded gating reactions. (iv) This suggests that the structural boundaries of the dynamic elements of the gating conformational change may not be subunit-delimited, and (v) the mutated tryptophan residues experience energy changes that occur relatively early in both the ligand-binding and channel-gating reactions. PMID:19171937

  17. N-terminal horseshoe conformation of DCC is functionally required for axon guidance and might be shared by other neural receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Sun, Xiaqin; Zhou, Xiao-hong; Liu, Jin-huan; Wu, Jane; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jia-huai

    2013-01-01

    Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) is a receptor for the axon guidance cues netrin-1 and draxin. The interactions between these guidance cues and DCC play a key role in the development of the nervous system. In the present study, we reveal the crystal structure of the N-terminal four Ig-like domains of DCC. The molecule folds into a horseshoe-like configuration. We demonstrate that this horseshoe conformation of DCC is required for guidance-cue-mediated axonal attraction. Structure-based mutations that disrupt the DCC horseshoe indeed impair its function. A comparison of the DCC horseshoe with previously described horseshoe structures has revealed striking conserved structural features and important sequence signatures. Using these signatures, a genome-wide search allows us to predict the N-terminal horseshoe arrangement in a number of other cell surface receptors, nearly all of which function in the nervous system. The N-terminal horseshoe appears to be evolutionally selected as a platform for neural receptors. PMID:23038776

  18. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  19. Protease-activated-receptor-2 affects protease-activated-receptor-1-driven breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohammad; Maoz, Miriam; Kancharla, Arun; Agranovich, Daniel; Peretz, Tamar; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian protease-activated-receptor-1 and -2 (PAR1 and PAR2) are activated by proteases found in the flexible microenvironment of a tumor and play a central role in breast cancer. We propose in the present study that PAR1 and PAR2 act together as a functional unit during malignant and physiological invasion processes. This notion is supported by assessing pro-tumor functions in the presence of short hairpin; shRNA knocked-down hPar2 or by the use of a truncated PAR2 devoid of the entire cytoplasmic tail. Silencing of hPar2 by shRNA-attenuated thrombin induced PAR1 signaling as recapitulated by inhibiting the assembly of Etk/Bmx or Akt onto PAR1-C-tail, by thrombin-instigated colony formation and invasion. Strikingly, shRNA-hPar2 also inhibited the TFLLRN selective PAR1 pro-tumor functions. In addition, while evaluating the physiological invasion process of placenta extravillous trophoblast (EVT) organ culture, we observed inhibition of both thrombin or the selective PAR1 ligand; TFLLRNPNDK induced EVT invasion by shRNA-hPar2 but not by scrambled shRNA-hPar2. In parallel, when a truncated PAR2 was utilized in a xenograft mouse model, it inhibited PAR1-PAR2-driven tumor growth in vivo. Similarly, it also attenuated the interaction of Etk/Bmx with the PAR1-C-tail in vitro and decreased markedly selective PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion. Confocal images demonstrated co-localization of PAR1 and PAR2 in HEK293T cells over-expressing YFP-hPar2 and HA-hPar1. Co-immuno-precipitation analyses revealed PAR1-PAR2 complex formation but no PAR1-CXCR4 complex was formed. Taken together, our observations show that PAR1 and PAR2 act as a functional unit in tumor development and placenta-uterus interactions. This conclusion may have significant consequences on future breast cancer therapeutic modalities and improved late pregnancy outcome. PMID:24177339

  20. Lysophosphatidylserine analogues differentially activate three LysoPS receptors.

    PubMed

    Uwamizu, Akiharu; Inoue, Asuka; Suzuki, Kensuke; Okudaira, Michiyo; Shuto, Akira; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Makide, Kumiko; Ikubo, Masaya; Nakamura, Sho; Jung, Sejin; Sayama, Misa; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Aoki, Junken

    2015-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylserine (1-oleoyl-2 R-lysophosphatidylserine, LysoPS) has been shown to have lipid mediator-like actions such as stimulation of mast cell degranulation and suppression of T lymphocyte proliferation, although the mechanisms of LysoPS actions have been elusive. Recently, three G protein-coupled receptors (LPS1/GPR34, LPS2/P2Y10 and LPS3/GPR174) were found to react specifically with LysoPS, raising the possibility that LysoPS serves as a lipid mediator that exerts its role through these receptors. Previously, we chemically synthesized a number of LysoPS analogues and evaluated them as agonists for mast-cell degranulation. Here, we used a transforming growth factor-α (TGFα) shedding assay to see if these LysoPS analogues activated the three LysoPS receptors. Modification of the serine moiety significantly reduced the ability of the analogues to activate the three LysoPS receptors, whereas modification of other parts resulted in loss of activity in receptor-specific manner. We found that introduction of methyl group to serine moiety (1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and removal of sn-2 hydroxyl group (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-LysoPS) resulted in reduction of reactivity with LPS1 and LPS3, respectively. Accordingly, we synthesized a LysoPS analogue with the two modifications (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and found it to be an LPS2-selective agonist. These pharmacological tools will definitely help to identify the biological roles of these LysoPS receptors. PMID:25320102

  1. Receptor antagonism/agonism can be uncoupled from pharmacoperone activity.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Spicer, Timothy P; Smith, Emery; Bannister, Thomas D; Kenakin, Terry; Scampavia, Louis; Conn, P Michael

    2016-10-15

    Pharmacoperones rescue misrouted mutants of the vasopressin receptor type 2 (V2R) and enable them to traffic to the correct biological locus where they function. Previously, a library of nearly 645,000 structures was interrogated with a high throughput screen; pharmacoperones were identified for V2R mutants with a view toward correcting the underlying mutational defects in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In the present study, an orthologous assay was used to evaluate hits from the earlier study. We found no consistent relation between antagonism or agonism and pharmacoperone activity. Active pharmacoperones were identified which had minimal antagonistic activity. This increases the therapeutic reach of these drugs, since virtually all pharmacoperone drugs reported to date were selected from peptidomimetic antagonists. Such mixed-activity drugs have a complex pharmacology limiting their therapeutic utility and requiring their removal prior to stimulation of the receptor with agonist. PMID:27389877

  2. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-12-25

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys(19)-Pro(20)-Trp(21)-Cys(22) motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a "closed" compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an "open" conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily. PMID:26546681

  3. Increased phospholipase A2 activity with phosphorylation of peroxiredoxin 6 requires a conformational change in the protein

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Zhou, Suiping; Dodia, Chandra; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Huang, Shaohui; Speicher, David; Fisher, Aron B.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown previously and confirmed in the present study that the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is markedly increased by phosphorylation. This report evaluated the conformation and thermodynamic stability of Prdx6 protein after phosphorylation to understand the physical basis for increased activity. Phosphorylation resulted in decreased negative far-UV CD, increased ANS binding, and lack of rigid tertiary structure, compatible with a change in conformation to that of a molten globule. The ΔGDo was 3.3 ± 0.3 kcal mol-1 for Prdx6 and 1.7 ± 0.7 kcal mol-1 for pPrdx6 suggesting that phosphorylation destabilizes the protein. Phosphorylation of Prdx6 changed the conformation of the N-terminal domain exposing Trp 33, as determined by tryptophan fluorescence and NaI fluorescence quenching. The kinetics of interaction of proteins with unilamellar liposomes (DPPC/egg PC/cholesterol/PG; 50:25:15:10, mol/mol) was evaluated with tryptophan fluorescence. pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with higher affinity (Kd, 5.6 ± 1.2 μM) in comparison to Prdx6 (Kd, 24.9 ± 4.5 μM). By isothermal titration calorimetry, pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with a large exothermic heat loss (ΔH = -31.49 ± 0.22 kcal mol-1). Correlating our conformation studies with the published crystal structure of oxidized Prdx6 suggests that phosphorylation results in exposure of hydrophobic residues, thereby providing accessibility to the sites for liposome binding. Because binding of the enzyme to the phospholipid substrate interface is a requirement for PLA2 activity, these results indicate that a change in the conformation of Prdx6 upon its phosphorylation is the basis for enhancement of PLA2 enzymatic activity. PMID:22663767

  4. Cytokine Spatzle binds to the Drosophila immunoreceptor Toll with a neurotrophin-like specificity and couples receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Miranda; Arnot, Christopher J; Beeston, Helen; McCoy, Airlie; Ashcroft, Alison E; Gay, Nicholas J; Gangloff, Monique

    2013-12-17

    Drosophila Toll functions in embryonic development and innate immunity and is activated by an endogenous ligand, Spätzle (Spz). The related Toll-like receptors in vertebrates also function in immunity but are activated directly by pathogen-associated molecules such as bacterial endotoxin. Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.35-Å resolution of dimeric Spz bound to a Toll ectodomain encompassing the first 13 leucine-rich repeats. The cystine knot of Spz binds the concave face of the Toll leucine-rich repeat solenoid in an area delineated by N-linked glycans and induces a conformational change. Mutagenesis studies confirm that the interface observed in the crystal structure is relevant for signaling. The asymmetric binding mode of Spz to Toll is similar to that of nerve growth factor (NGF) in complex with the p75 neurotrophin receptor but is distinct from that of microbial ligands bound to the Toll-like receptors. Overall, this study indicates an allosteric signaling mechanism for Toll in which ligand binding to the N terminus induces a conformational change that couples to homodimerization of juxtamembrane structures in the Toll ectodomain C terminus. PMID:24282309

  5. Mechanisms of NOD-like receptor-associated inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haitao; Miao, Edward A; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2013-09-19

    A major function of a subfamily of NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing, or NOD-like receptor) proteins is in inflammasome activation, which has been implicated in a multitude of disease models and human diseases. This work will highlight key progress in understanding the mechanisms that activate the best-studied NLRs (NLRP3, NLRC4, NAIP, and NLRP1) and in uncovering inflammasome NLRs. PMID:24054327

  6. Adenosine kinase inhibitors attenuate opiate withdrawal via adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Coyle, T S

    1998-11-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. This study examines the effects of indirect activation of adenosine receptors, via treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, on the expression of opiate withdrawal in mice. Mice receive chronic morphine treatment via implantation of subcutaneous morphine pellets (75 mg) for 72 h. Mice then receive parenteral treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, either 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (2, 5, 20, 40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal or i.p.) or iodotubericidin (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by naloxone injection and opiate withdrawal signs are measured over 20 min. Both adenosine kinase inhibitors significantly reduce the following opiate withdrawal signs in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle: withdrawal jumps, teeth chattering, forepaw tremors, and forepaw treads. Additionally, 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine significantly reduces withdrawal-induced diarrhea and weight loss. Effects of 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (40 mg/kg) on opiate withdrawal signs appear to be mediated via adenosine receptor activation as they are reversed by pretreatment by adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (20 mg, i.p.) but not by selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Adenosine receptor activation via adenosine kinase inhibitor treatment attenuates opiate withdrawal and these agents may be generally useful in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes. PMID:9865523

  7. Receptor Activity-Modifying Proteins (RAMPs): New Insights and Roles.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2016-01-01

    It is now recognized that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), once considered largely independent functional units, have a far more diverse molecular architecture. Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) provide an important example of proteins that interact with GPCRs to modify their function. RAMPs are able to act as pharmacological switches and chaperones, and they can regulate signaling and/or trafficking in a receptor-dependent manner. This review covers recent discoveries in the RAMP field and summarizes the known GPCR partners and functions of RAMPs. We also discuss the first peptide-bound structures of RAMP-GPCR complexes, which give insight into the molecular mechanisms that enable RAMPs to alter the pharmacology and signaling of GPCRs. PMID:26514202

  8. Conformational selection or induced fit? 50 years of debate resolved

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Exactly 50 years ago, biochemists raised the question of the mechanism of the conformational change that mediates “allosteric” interactions between regulatory sites and biologically active sites in regulatory/receptor proteins. Do the different conformations involved already exist spontaneously in the absence of the regulatory ligands (Monod-Wyman-Changeux), such that the complementary protein conformation would be selected to mediate signal transduction, or do particular ligands induce the receptor to adopt the conformation best suited to them (Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer—induced fit)? This is not just a central question for biophysics, it also has enormous importance for drug design. Recent advances in techniques have allowed detailed experimental and theoretical comparisons with the formal models of both scenarios. Also, it has been shown that mutated receptors can adopt constitutively active confirmations in the absence of ligand. There have also been demonstrations that the atomic resolution structures of the same protein are essentially the same whether ligand is bound or not. These and other advances in past decades have produced a situation where the vast majority of the data using different categories of regulatory proteins (including regulatory enzymes, ligand-gated ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors) support the conformational selection scheme of signal transduction. PMID:21941598

  9. Interaction of receptor-activity-modifying protein1 with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Thomas H; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Schwerdtfeger, Kerstin; Kleinert, Peter; Troxler, Heinz; Kelm, Jens M; Ittner, Lars M; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 is an accessory protein of the G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). The CLR/RAMP1 heterodimer defines a receptor for the potent vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide. A wider tissue distribution of RAMP1, as compared to that of the CLR, is consistent with additional biological functions. Here, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments identified beta-tubulin as a novel RAMP1-interacting protein. GST pull-down experiments indicated interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the interaction between the N-terminal region of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Interestingly, alpha-tubulin was co-extracted with beta-tubulin in pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation of RAMP1 coprecipitated alpha- and beta-tubulin. Confocal microscopy indicated colocalization of RAMP1 and tubulin predominantly in axon-like processes of neuronal differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, the findings point to biological roles of RAMP1 beyond its established interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17493758

  10. Normal Activation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mutants with Disulfide Cross-links, Insertions, or Deletions in the Extracellular Juxtamembrane Region

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Abe, Takemoto; Liu, Justin K. H.; Zalivina, Irina; Hohenester, Erhard; Leitinger, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by collagen. DDR activation does not appear to occur by the common mechanism of ligand-induced receptor dimerization: the DDRs form stable noncovalent dimers in the absence of ligand, and ligand-induced autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosines is unusually slow and sustained. Here we sought to identify functionally important dimer contacts within the extracellular region of DDR1 by using cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. Cysteine substitutions close to the transmembrane domain resulted in receptors that formed covalent dimers with high efficiency, both in the absence and presence of collagen. Enforced covalent dimerization did not result in constitutive activation and did not affect the ability of collagen to induce receptor autophosphorylation. Cysteines farther away from the transmembrane domain were also cross-linked with high efficiency, but some of these mutants could no longer be activated. Furthermore, the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 tolerated large deletions as well as insertions of flexible segments, with no adverse effect on activation. These findings indicate that the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 is exceptionally flexible and does not constrain the basal or ligand-activated state of the receptor. DDR1 transmembrane signaling thus appears to occur without conformational coupling through the juxtamembrane region, but requires specific receptor interactions farther away from the cell membrane. A plausible mechanism to explain these findings is signaling by DDR1 clusters. PMID:24671415

  11. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  12. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  13. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  14. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  15. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  16. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  17. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  18. Conformationally selective RNA aptamers allosterically modulate the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Kahsai, Alem W; Wisler, James W; Lee, Jungmin; Ahn, Seungkirl; Cahill Iii, Thomas J; Dennison, S Moses; Staus, Dean P; Thomsen, Alex R B; Anasti, Kara M; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wingler, Laura M; Desai, Hemant; Bompiani, Kristin M; Strachan, Ryan T; Qin, Xiaoxia; Alam, S Munir; Sullenger, Bruce A; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands function by stabilizing multiple, functionally distinct receptor conformations. This property underlies the ability of 'biased agonists' to activate specific subsets of a given receptor's signaling profile. However, stabilizing distinct active GPCR conformations to enable structural characterization of mechanisms underlying GPCR activation remains difficult. These challenges have accentuated the need for receptor tools that allosterically stabilize and regulate receptor