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Sample records for active recombinant enzyme

  1. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD.

  2. Characterisation of the influence of genetic variations on the enzyme activity of a recombinant human glycine N-acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Rencia; Badenhorst, Christoffel P S; van der Westhuizen, Francois H; van Dijk, Alberdina A

    2013-02-25

    Human glycine N-acyltransferase (human GLYAT) detoxifies a wide range of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolites, including benzoate and salicylate. Significant inter-individual variation exists in glycine conjugation capacity. The molecular basis for this variability is not known. To investigate the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GLYAT coding sequence on enzyme activity, we expressed and characterised a recombinant human GLYAT. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate six non-synonymous SNP variants of the enzyme (K16N; S17T; R131H; N156S; F168L; R199C). The variants were expressed, purified, and enzymatically characterised. The enzyme activities of the K16N, S17T and R131H variants were similar to that of the wild-type, whereas the N156S variant was more active, the F168L variant less active, and the R199C variant was inactive. We also generated an E227Q mutant, which lacks the catalytic residue proposed by Badenhorst et al. (2012). This mutant was inactive compared to the wild-type recombinant human GLYAT. A molecular model of human GLYAT containing coenzyme A (CoA) was generated which revealed that the inactivity of the R199C variant could be due to the substitution of the highly conserved Arg(199) and destabilisation of an α-loop-α motif which is important for substrate binding in the GNAT superfamily. The finding that SNP variations in the human GLYAT gene influence the kinetic properties of the enzyme may explain some of the inter-individual variation in glycine conjugation capacity, which is relevant to the metabolism of xenobiotics such as aspirin and the industrial solvent xylene, and to the treatment of some metabolic disorders. PMID:23237781

  3. Identifying Effective Enzyme Activity Targets for Recombinant Class I and Class II Collagenase for Successful Human Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Green, Michael L.; Breite, Andrew G.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Wilhelm, Joshua J.; Tweed, Benjamin; Vargova, Lenka; Lockridge, Amber; Kuriti, Manikya; Hughes, Michael G.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Dwulet, Francis E.; McCarthy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Isolation following a good manufacturing practice-compliant, human islet product requires development of a robust islet isolation procedure where effective limits of key reagents are known. The enzymes used for islet isolation are critical but little is known about the doses of class I and class II collagenase required for successful islet isolation. Methods We used a factorial approach to evaluate the effect of high and low target activities of recombinant class I (rC1) and class II (rC2) collagenase on human islet yield. Consequently, 4 different enzyme formulations with divergent C1:C2 collagenase mass ratios were assessed, each supplemented with the same dose of neutral protease. Both split pancreas and whole pancreas models were used to test enzyme targets (n = 20). Islet yield/g pancreas was compared with historical enzymes (n = 42). Results Varying the Wunsch (rC2) and collagen degradation activity (CDA, rC1) target dose, and consequently the C1:C2 mass ratio, had no significant effect on tissue digestion. Digestions using higher doses of Wunsch and CDA resulted in comparable islet yields to those obtained with 60% and 50% of those activities, respectively. Factorial analysis revealed no significant main effect of Wunsch activity or CDA for any parameter measured. Aggregate results from 4 different collagenase formulations gave 44% higher islet yield (>5000 islet equivalents/g) in the body/tail of the pancreas (n = 12) when compared with those from the same segment using a standard natural collagenase/protease mixture (n = 6). Additionally, islet yields greater than 5000 islet equivalents/g pancreas were also obtained in whole human pancreas. Conclusions A broader C1:C2 ratio can be used for human islet isolation than has been used in the past. Recombinant collagenase is an effective replacement for the natural enzyme and we have determined that high islet yield can be obtained even with low doses of rC1:rC2, which is beneficial for the survival

  4. A novel cold-active lipase from Candida albicans: cloning, expression and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lan, Dong-Ming; Yang, Ning; Wang, Wen-Kai; Shen, Yan-Fei; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yong-Hua

    2011-01-01

    A novel lipase gene lip5 from the yeast Candida albicans was cloned and sequenced. Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed that 86-34% identity exists with lipases from other Candida species. The lipase and its mutants were expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris, where alternative codon usage caused the mistranslation of 154-Ser and 293-Ser as leucine. 154-Ser to leucine resulted in loss of expression of Lip5, and 293-Ser to leucine caused a marked reduction in the lipase activity. Lip5-DM, which has double mutations that revert 154 and 293 to serine residues, showed good lipase activity, and was overexpressed and purified by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography. The pure Lip5-DM was stable at low temperatures ranging from 15-35 °C and pH 5-9, with the optimal conditions being 15-25 °C and pH 5-6. The activation energy of recombinant lipase was 8.5 Kcal/mol between 5 and 25 °C, suggesting that Lip5-DM was a cold-active lipase. Its activity was found to increase in the presence of Zn(2+), but it was strongly inhibited by Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Hg(2+) and some surfactants. In addition, the Lip5-DM could not tolerate water-miscible organic solvents. Lip5-DM exhibited a preference for the short-and medium-chain length p-nitrophenyl (C4 and C8 acyl group) esters rather than the long chain length p-nitrophenyl esters (C12, C16 and C18 acyl group) with highest activity observed with the C8 derivatives. The recombinant enzyme displayed activity toward triacylglycerols, such as olive oil and safflower oil.

  5. Recombinant Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase I (Cel7B) is a highly acidic and promiscuous carbohydrate-active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Serpa, Viviane Isabel; Godoy, Andre S; Camilo, Cesar M; Bernardes, Amanda; Rezende, Camila A; Junior, Nei Pereira; Franco Cairo, João Paulo L; Squina, Fabio M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Trichoderma filamentous fungi have been investigated due to their ability to secrete cellulases which find various biotechnological applications such as biomass hydrolysis and cellulosic ethanol production. Previous studies demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 has a high degree of cellulolytic activity and potential for biomass hydrolysis. However, enzymatic, biochemical, and structural studies of cellulases from T. harzianum are scarce. This work reports biochemical characterization of the recombinant endoglucanase I from T. harzianum, ThCel7B, and its catalytic core domain. The constructs display optimum activity at 55 °C and a surprisingly acidic pH optimum of 3.0. The full-length enzyme is able to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, with high specific activity: 75 U/mg for β-glucan, 46 U/mg toward xyloglucan, 39 U/mg for lichenan, 26 U/mg for carboxymethyl cellulose, 18 U/mg for 4-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside, 16 U/mg for rye arabinoxylan, and 12 U/mg toward xylan. The enzyme also hydrolyzed filter paper, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Sigmacell 20, Avicel PH-101, and cellulose, albeit with lower efficiency. The ThCel7B catalytic domain displays similar substrate diversity. Fluorescence-based thermal shift assays showed that thermal stability is highest at pH 5.0. We determined kinetic parameters and analyzed a pattern of oligosaccharide substrates hydrolysis, revealing cellobiose as a final product of C6 degradation. Finally, we visualized effects of ThCel7B on oat spelt using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating the morphological changes of the substrate during the hydrolysis. The acidic behavior of ThCel7B and its considerable thermostability hold a promise of its industrial applications and other biotechnological uses under extremely acidic conditions. PMID:26156238

  6. Recombinant Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase I (Cel7B) is a highly acidic and promiscuous carbohydrate-active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Serpa, Viviane Isabel; Godoy, Andre S; Camilo, Cesar M; Bernardes, Amanda; Rezende, Camila A; Junior, Nei Pereira; Franco Cairo, João Paulo L; Squina, Fabio M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Trichoderma filamentous fungi have been investigated due to their ability to secrete cellulases which find various biotechnological applications such as biomass hydrolysis and cellulosic ethanol production. Previous studies demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 has a high degree of cellulolytic activity and potential for biomass hydrolysis. However, enzymatic, biochemical, and structural studies of cellulases from T. harzianum are scarce. This work reports biochemical characterization of the recombinant endoglucanase I from T. harzianum, ThCel7B, and its catalytic core domain. The constructs display optimum activity at 55 °C and a surprisingly acidic pH optimum of 3.0. The full-length enzyme is able to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, with high specific activity: 75 U/mg for β-glucan, 46 U/mg toward xyloglucan, 39 U/mg for lichenan, 26 U/mg for carboxymethyl cellulose, 18 U/mg for 4-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside, 16 U/mg for rye arabinoxylan, and 12 U/mg toward xylan. The enzyme also hydrolyzed filter paper, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Sigmacell 20, Avicel PH-101, and cellulose, albeit with lower efficiency. The ThCel7B catalytic domain displays similar substrate diversity. Fluorescence-based thermal shift assays showed that thermal stability is highest at pH 5.0. We determined kinetic parameters and analyzed a pattern of oligosaccharide substrates hydrolysis, revealing cellobiose as a final product of C6 degradation. Finally, we visualized effects of ThCel7B on oat spelt using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating the morphological changes of the substrate during the hydrolysis. The acidic behavior of ThCel7B and its considerable thermostability hold a promise of its industrial applications and other biotechnological uses under extremely acidic conditions.

  7. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  8. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  9. Expression, subcellular localization, and enzyme activity of a recombinant human extra-cellular superoxide dismutase in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana L.).

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Youl; Kim, Eun Yu; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-03-01

    Human extracellular superoxide dismutase (hEC-SOD) is an enzyme that scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because of its antioxidant activity, hEC-SOD has been used as a therapeutic protein to treat skin disease and arthritis in mammalian systems. In this study, codon-optimized hEC-SOD was expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana L.) via a plant-based transient protein expression system. Plant expression binary vectors containing full-length hEC-SOD (f-hEC-SOD) and modified hEC-SOD (m-hEC-SOD), in which the signal peptide and heparin-binding domain were deleted, were constructed for the cytosolic-, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-, and chloroplast-localizations in tobacco leaf mesophyll cells. The results demonstrated that f-hEC-SOD was more efficiently expressed in the cytosolic fractions than in the ER or chloroplasts of tobacco cells. Our data further indicated that differently localized f-hEC-SOD and m-hEC-SOD displayed SOD enzyme activities, suggesting that the hEC-SODs expressed by plants may be functionally active. The f-hEC-SOD was expressed up to 3.8% of the total leaf soluble protein and the expression yield was calculated to be 313.7 μg f-hEC-SOD per g fresh weight of leaf. Overall, our results reveal that it was possible to express catalytically active hEC-SODs by means of a transient plant expression system in tobacco leaf cells. PMID:26611610

  10. Recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing Old Yellow Enzymes from non-conventional yeasts: an easy system for selective reduction of activated alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Old Yellow Enzymes (OYEs) are flavin-dependent enoate reductases (EC 1.6.99.1) that catalyze the stereoselective hydrogenation of electron-poor alkenes. Their ability to generate up to two stereocenters by the trans-hydrogenation of the C = C double bond is highly demanded in asymmetric synthesis. Isolated redox enzymes utilization require the addition of cofactors and systems for their regeneration. Microbial whole-cells may represent a valid alternative combining desired enzymatic activity and efficient cofactor regeneration. Considerable efforts were addressed at developing novel whole-cell OYE biocatalysts, based on recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing OYE genes. Results Recombinant S. cerevisiae BY4741∆Oye2 strains, lacking endogenous OYE and expressing nine separate OYE genes from non-conventional yeasts, were used as whole-cell biocatalysts to reduce substrates with an electron-poor double bond activated by different electron-withdrawing groups. Ketoisophorone, α-methyl-trans-cinnamaldehyde, and trans-β-methyl-β-nitrostyrene were successfully reduced with high rates and selectivity. A series of four alkyl-substituted cyclohex-2-enones was tested to check the versatility and efficiency of the biocatalysts. Reduction of double bond occurred with high rates and enantioselectivity, except for 3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclohexenone. DFT (density functional theory) computational studies were performed to investigate whether the steric hindrance and/or the electronic properties of the substrates were crucial for reactivity. The three-dimensional structure of enoate reductases from Kluyveromyces lodderae and Candida castellii, predicted through comparative modeling, resulted similar to that of S. cerevisiae OYE2 and revealed the key role of Trp116 both in substrate specificity and stereocontrol. All the modeling studies indicate that steric hindrance was a major determinant in the enzyme reactivity. Conclusions The OYE biocatalysts, based on

  11. Sequence and expression of a xylanase gene from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga sp. strain FjSS3-B.1 and characterization of the recombinant enzyme and its activity on kraft pulp.

    PubMed Central

    Saul, D J; Williams, L C; Reeves, R A; Gibbs, M D; Bergquist, P L

    1995-01-01

    A gene expressing xylanase activity was isolated from a genomic library of Thermotoga sp. strain FjSS3-B.1. The sequence of the gene shows that it encodes a single domain, family 10 xylanase. The recombinant enzyme has extremely high thermal stability, activity over a relatively broad pH range, and activity on Pinus radiata kraft pulp. PMID:8526526

  12. High-yield production of biologically active recombinant protein in shake flask culture by combination of enzyme-based glucose delivery and increased oxygen transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the combined use of an enzyme-based glucose release system (EnBase®) and high-aeration shake flask (Ultra Yield Flask™). The benefit of this combination is demonstrated by over 100-fold improvement in the active yield of recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in E. coli. Compared to Terrific Broth and ZYM-5052 autoinduction medium, the EnBase system improved yield mainly through increased productivity per cell. Four-fold increase in oxygen transfer by the Ultra Yield Flask contributed to higher cell density with EnBase but not with the other tested media, and consequently the product yield per ml of EnBase culture was further improved. PMID:22152005

  13. Iron-dependent hydrogenases of Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia: activity of the recombinant entamoebic enzyme and evidence for lateral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Julie E J; Field, Jessica; McArthur, Andrew G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Yarlett, Nigel; Loftus, Brendan J; Samuelson, John

    2003-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica and Spironucleus barkhanus have genes that encode short iron-dependent hydrogenases (Fe-hydrogenases), even though these protists lack hydrogenosomes. To understand better the biochemistry of the protist Fe-hydrogenases, we prepared a recombinant E. histolytica short Fe-hydrogenase and measured its activity in vitro. A Giardia lamblia gene encoding a short Fe-hydrogenase was identified from shotgun genomic sequences, and RT-PCR showed that cultured entamoebas and giardias transcribe short Fe-hydrogenase mRNAs. A second E. histolytica gene, which encoded a long Fe-hydrogenase, was identified from shotgun genomic sequences. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the short Fe-hydrogenase genes of entamoeba and diplomonads share a common ancestor, while the long Fe-hydrogenase gene of entamoeba appears to have been laterally transferred from a bacterium. These results are discussed in the context of competing ideas for the origins of genes encoding fermentation enzymes of these protists.

  14. Recombinant Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christine; Jakob, Franz; Seefried, Lothar; Mentrup, Birgit; Graser, Stephanie; Plotkin, Horacio; Girschick, Hermann J; Liese, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare monogenetic and multisystemic disease with involvement of different organs, including bone, muscle, kidney, lung, gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system. The exact metabolic mechanisms of the effects of TNAP deficiency in different tissues are not understood in detail. There is no approved specific treatment for HPP; therefore symptomatic treatment in order to improve the clinical features is of major interest. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a relatively new type of treatment based on the principle of administering a medical treatment replacing a defective or absent enzyme. Recently ERT with a bone targeted recombinant human TNAP molecule has been reported to be efficient in ten severely affected patients and improved survival of life threatening forms. These results are very promising especially with regard to the skeletal phenotype but it is unclear whether ERT also has beneficial effects for craniosynostosis and in other affected tissues in HPP such as brain and kidney. Long-term data are not yet available and further systematic clinical trials are needed. It is also necessary to establish therapeutic approaches to help patients who are affected by less severe forms of HPP but also suffer from a significant reduction in quality of life. Further basic research on TNAP function and role in different tissues and on its physiological substrates is critical to gain a better insight in the pathogenesis in HPP. This and further experiences in new therapeutic strategies may improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with all forms of HPP.

  15. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant, Tetrameric and Enzymatically Active Influenza Neuraminidase for the Setup of an Enzyme-Linked Lectin-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Prevato, Marua; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bonci, Alessandra; Uematsu, Yasushi; Anselmi, Giulia; Giusti, Fabiola; Bertholet, Sylvie; Legay, Francois; Telford, John Laird; Settembre, Ethan C.; Maione, Domenico; Cozzi, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Developing a universal influenza vaccine that induces broad spectrum and longer-term immunity has become an important potentially achievable target in influenza vaccine research and development. Hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are the two major influenza virus antigens. Although antibody responses against influenza virus are mainly directed toward HA, NA is reported to be more genetically stable; hence NA-based vaccines have the potential to be effective for longer time periods. NA-specific immunity has been shown to limit the spread of influenza virus, thus reducing disease symptoms and providing cross-protection against heterosubtypic viruses in mouse challenge experiments. The production of large quantities of highly pure and stable NA could be beneficial for the development of new antivirals, subunit-based vaccines, and novel diagnostic tools. In this study, recombinant NA (rNA) was produced in mammalian cells at high levels from both swine A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and avian A/turkey/Turkey/01/2005 (H5N1) influenza viruses. Biochemical, structural, and immunological characterizations revealed that the soluble rNAs produced are tetrameric, enzymatically active and immunogenic, and finally they represent good alternatives to conventionally used sources of NA in the Enzyme-Linked Lectin Assay (ELLA). PMID:26280677

  16. Subunit interaction enhances enzyme activity and stability of sweet potato cytosolic Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase purified by a His-tagged recombinant protein method.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Lin, M T; Chen, Y T; Shaw, J F

    1995-05-01

    The coding region of copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) cDNA from sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. cv. Tainong 57, was introduced into an expression vector, pET-20b(+). The Cu/Zn-SOD purified by His-tagged technique showed two active forms (dimer and monomer). The amount of proteins of dimer and monomer appeared to be equal, but the activity of dimeric form was seven times higher than that of monomeric form. The enzyme was dissociated into monomer by imidazole buffer above 1.0 M, acidic pH (below 3.0), or SDS (above 1%). The enzyme is quite stable. The enzyme activity is not affected at 85 degrees C for 20 min, in alkali pH 11.2, or in 0.1 M EDTA and also quite resistant to proteolytic attack. Dimer is more stable than monomer. The thermal inactivation rate constant kd calculated for the monomer at 85 degrees C was 0.029 min-1 and the half-life for inactivation was about 28 min. In contrast, there is no significant change of dimer activity after 40 min at 85 degrees C. The enzyme dimer and monomer retained 83% and 58% of original activity, respectively, after 3 h incubation with trypsin at 37 degrees C, while those retained 100% and 31% of original activity with chymotrypsin under the same condition. These results suggest subunit interaction might change the enzyme conformation and greatly improve the catalytic activity and stability of the enzyme. It is also possible that the intersubunit contacts stabilize a particular optimal conformation of the protein or the dimeric structure enhances catalytic activity by increasing the electrostatic steering of substrate into the active site.

  17. Expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans and some properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Benjamin; Lowe, David J; Smith, Andrew T; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Demais, Stephane; Bray, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    Recent crystal structures of xanthine dehydrogenase, xanthine oxidase and related enzymes have paved the way for a detailed structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. One problem encountered when working with these proteins, especially with recombinant protein, is that the preparations tend to be heterogeneous, with only a fraction of the enzyme molecules being active. This is due to the incompleteness of post-translational modification, which for this protein is a complex, and incompletely understood, process involving incorporation of the Mo and Fe/S centres. The enzyme has been expressed previously in both Drosophila and insect cells using baculovirus. The insect cell system has been exploited by Iwasaki et al. [Iwasaki, Okamoto, Nishino, Mizushima and Hori (2000) J. Biochem (Tokyo) 127, 771-778], but, for the rat enzyme, yields a complex mixture of enzyme forms, containing around 10% of functional enzyme. The expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans is described. The purified protein has been analysed both functionally and spectroscopically. Its specific activity is indistinguishable from that of the enzyme purified from fruit flies [Doyle, Burke, Chovnick, Dutton, Whittle and Bray (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 239, 782-795], and it appears to be more active than recombinant xanthine dehydrogenase produced with the baculovirus system. EPR spectra of the recombinant Drosophila enzyme are reported, including parameters for the Fe/S centres. Only a very weak "Fe/SIII" signal (g(1,2,3), 2.057, 1.930, 1.858) was observed, in contrast to the strong analogous signal reported for the enzyme from baculovirus. Since this signal appears to be associated with incomplete post-translational modification, this is consistent with relatively more complete cofactor incorporation in the Aspergillus-produced enzyme. Thus we have developed a recombinant expression system for D. melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase, which can be used

  18. Rat thimet oligopeptidase: large-scale expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, N; Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1995-01-01

    The coding sequence for rat testis thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) (EC 3.4.24.15) was placed under the control of the T7 polymerase/promoter system. Cultures of Escherichia coli transfected with the resulting plasmid expressed the enzyme as a soluble cytoplasmic protein. Medium-scale cultures allowed isolation of the enzyme in quantities of tens of milligrams. The availability of the recombinant enzyme permitted the determination of such chemical properties as epsilon 280 (48,960), zinc content (2 atom/molecule) and available thiol content (8-10/molecule) for TOP. The recombinant enzyme showed the catalytic activities previously reported for the naturally occurring enzyme, so that we can now conclude with confidence that these are all due to TOP and there is no need to postulate the existence of separate 'Pz-peptidase' or 'endo-oligopeptidase A' enzymes. Images Figure 2 PMID:7619057

  19. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  20. 'Super-perfect' enzymes: Structural stabilities and activities of recombinant triose phosphate isomerases from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermococcus onnurineus produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prerna; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2015-05-01

    Triose phosphate isomerases (TIMs) are considered to be 'kinetically perfect' enzymes, limited in their activity only by the rates of diffusion of substrate and product molecules. Most studies conducted thus far have been on mesophile-derived TIMs. Here, we report studies of two extremophile-derived TIMs produced in Escherichia coli: (i) TonTIM, sourced from the genome of the thermophile archaeon, Thermococcus onnurineus, and (ii) PfuTIM, sourced from the genome of the hyperthermophile archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (PfuTIM). Although these enzymes are presumed to have evolved to function optimally at temperatures close to the boiling point of water, we find that TonTIM and PfuTIM display second-order rate-constants of activity (k(cat)/K(m) values) comparable to mesophile-derived TIMs, at 25 °C. At 90 °C, TonTIM and PfuTIM reach maximum velocities of reaction of ∼ 10(6)-10(7) μmol/s/mg, and display k(cat)/K(m) values in the range of ∼ 10(10)-10(11) M(-1) s(-1), which are three orders of magnitude higher than those reported for mesophile TIMs. Further, the two enzymes display no signs of having undergone any structural unfolding at 90 °C. Such enzymes could thus probably be called 'super-perfect' enzymes. PMID:25824038

  1. Capillary electrophoresis-based nanoscale assays for monitoring ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity and inhibition in preparations of recombinant enzyme and melanoma cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jamshed; Jirovsky, David; Lee, Sang-Yong; Zimmermann, Herbert; Müller, Christa E

    2008-02-01

    Powerful capillary electrophoresis (CE) methods were developed for monitoring the reaction of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT, CD73), a (patho)biochemically important enzyme that hydrolyzes nucleoside-5'-monophosphates to the corresponding nucleosides. The enzymatic reaction was performed either before injection into the capillary (method A) or directly within the capillary (method B). In method A, separation of substrates and products was achieved within 8 min using an eCAP fused-silica capillary (20 cm effective length, 75 microM i.d., UV detection at 260 nm), 40 mM sodium borate buffer (pH 9.1), normal polarity, and a constant voltage of 15 kV. In method B, the sandwich technique was applied; substrate dissolved in reaction buffer (10mM Hepes [pH 7.4], 2mM MgCl2, and 1mM CaCl2) was hydrodynamically injected into a fused-silica capillary (30 cm, 75 microM i.d.), followed by enzyme (recombinant rat ecto-5'-NT) and subsequent injection of substrate solution. The reaction was initiated by the application of 1 kV voltage for 1 min. The voltage was turned off for 1 min and again turned on at a constant voltage of 15 kV to elute products (nucleosides) within 4 min using borate buffer (40 mM, pH 9.1). Thus, assays could be performed within 6 min, including enzymatic reaction, separation, and quantification of the formed nucleoside. The CE methods were used for measuring enzyme kinetics and for assaying inhibitors and substrates. In addition, the online assay was successfully applied to melanoma cell membrane preparations natively expressing the human ecto-5'-NT.

  2. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  3. Fermentation of a yeast producing A. niger glucose oxidase: scale-up, purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    De Baetselier, A; Vasavada, A; Dohet, P; Ha-Thi, V; De Beukelaer, M; Erpicum, T; De Clerck, L; Hanotier, J; Rosenberg, S

    1991-06-01

    We have developed a fermentation process to produce up to 3 grams per liter of active, secreted glucose oxidase from a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Real-time size-exclusion HPLC analysis is used to monitor enzyme production during fermentation, and purification to more than 95 percent is obtained using only filtration methods. The recombinant enzyme is stable to higher temperatures and a wider pH range than the native Aspergillus niger enzyme, and is free of contaminating amylase, cellulase and catalase.

  4. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  5. Cloning and expression of pig kidney dopa decarboxylase: comparison of the naturally occurring and recombinant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P S; Dominici, P; Borri Voltattorni, C

    1996-01-01

    L-Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase; DDC) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homodimeric enzyme that catalyses the decarboxylation of L-dopa and other L-aromatic amino acids. To advance structure-function studies with the enzyme, a cDNA that codes for the protein from pig kidney has been cloned by joining a partial cDNA obtained by library screening with a synthetic portion constructed by the annealing and extension of long oligonucleotides. The hybrid cDNA was then expressed in Escherichia coli to produce recombinant protein. During characterization of the recombinant enzyme it was unexpectedly observed that it possesses certain differences from the enzyme purified from pig kidney. Whereas the later protein binds 1 molecule of PLP per dimer, the recombinant enzyme was found to bind two molecules of coenzyme per dimer. Moreover, the Vmax was twice that of the protein purified from tissue. On addition of substrate, the absorbance changes accompanying transaldimination were likewise 2-fold greater in the recombinant enzyme. Examination of the respective apoenzymes by absorbance, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed distinct differences. The recombinant apoprotein has no significant absorbance at 335 nm, unlike the pig kidney apoenzyme; in the latter case this residual absorbance is associated with a positive dichroic signal. When excited at 335 nm the pig kidney apoenzyme has a pronounced emission maximum at 385 nm, in contrast with its recombinant counterpart, which shows a weak broad emission at about 400 nm. However, the holoenzyme-apoenzyme transition did not markedly alter the respective fluorescence properties of either recombinant or pig kidney DDC when excited at 335 nm. Taken together, these findings indicate that recombinant pig kidney DDC has two active-site PLP molecules and therefore displays structural characteristics typical of PLP-dependent homodimeric enzymes. The natural enzyme contains one active-site PLP molecule

  6. Overexpression of recombinant human antiquitin in E. coli: partial enzyme activity in selected ALDH7A1 missense mutations associated with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coulter-Mackie, Marion B; Tiebout, Sylvia; van Karnebeek, Clara; Stockler, Sylvia

    2014-04-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset seizures responsive to pyridoxine and caused by a defect in the α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (antiquitin) gene (ALDH7A1). We selected four PDE-associated missense ALDH7A1 mutations, p.V367F, p.F410L, p.Q425R, and p.C450S, generated them in a recombinant human antiquitin cDNA with expression in E. coli at either 30°C or 37°C. One mutation, p.C450S, demonstrated substantial activity after expression at both temperatures, potentially contributing to milder biochemical and clinical phenotypes. The p.Q425R mutation yielded no activity at either temperature. The other two mutations yielded significant enzymatic activity at 30°C and markedly reduced activity at 37°C. For these latter three mutations, the markedly reduced or absent enzymatic activity resulting from expression at 37°C may be consistent with pathogenicity.

  7. N-linked glycosylation of recombinant cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Penicillium verruculosum and its effect on the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Dotsenko, Anna S; Gusakov, Alexander V; Volkov, Pavel V; Rozhkova, Aleksandra M; Sinitsyn, Arkady P

    2016-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase I from Penicillium verruculosum (PvCel7A) has four potential N-glycosylation sites at its catalytic module: Asn45, Asn194, Asn388, and Asn430. In order to investigate how the N-glycosylation influences the activity and other properties of the enzyme, the wild type (wt) PvCel7A and its mutant forms, carrying Asn to Ala substitutions, were cloned into Penicillium canescens PCA10 (niaD-) strain, a fungal host for production of heterologous proteins. The rPvCel7A-wt and N45A, N194A, N388A mutants were successfully expressed and purified for characterization, whereas the expression of N430A mutant was not achieved. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry fingerprinting of peptides, obtained as a result of digestion of rPvCel7A forms with specific proteases, showed that the N-linked glycans represent variable high-mannose oligosaccharides and the products of their sequential enzymatic trimming, according to the formula (Man)0-13 (GlcNAc)2 , or a single GlcNAc residue. Mutations had no notable effect on pH-optimum of PvCel7A activity and enzyme thermostability. However, the mutations influenced both the enzyme adsorption ability on Avicel and its activity against natural and synthetic substrates. In particular, the N45A mutation led to a significant increase in the rate of Avicel and milled aspen wood hydrolysis, while the substrate digestion rates in the case of N194A and N388A mutants were notably lower relative to rPvCel7A-wt. These data, together with data of 3D structural modeling of the PvCel7A catalytic module, indicate that the N-linked glycans are an important part of the processive catalytic machinery of PvCel7A. PMID:26301455

  8. N-linked glycosylation of recombinant cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Penicillium verruculosum and its effect on the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Dotsenko, Anna S; Gusakov, Alexander V; Volkov, Pavel V; Rozhkova, Aleksandra M; Sinitsyn, Arkady P

    2016-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase I from Penicillium verruculosum (PvCel7A) has four potential N-glycosylation sites at its catalytic module: Asn45, Asn194, Asn388, and Asn430. In order to investigate how the N-glycosylation influences the activity and other properties of the enzyme, the wild type (wt) PvCel7A and its mutant forms, carrying Asn to Ala substitutions, were cloned into Penicillium canescens PCA10 (niaD-) strain, a fungal host for production of heterologous proteins. The rPvCel7A-wt and N45A, N194A, N388A mutants were successfully expressed and purified for characterization, whereas the expression of N430A mutant was not achieved. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry fingerprinting of peptides, obtained as a result of digestion of rPvCel7A forms with specific proteases, showed that the N-linked glycans represent variable high-mannose oligosaccharides and the products of their sequential enzymatic trimming, according to the formula (Man)0-13 (GlcNAc)2 , or a single GlcNAc residue. Mutations had no notable effect on pH-optimum of PvCel7A activity and enzyme thermostability. However, the mutations influenced both the enzyme adsorption ability on Avicel and its activity against natural and synthetic substrates. In particular, the N45A mutation led to a significant increase in the rate of Avicel and milled aspen wood hydrolysis, while the substrate digestion rates in the case of N194A and N388A mutants were notably lower relative to rPvCel7A-wt. These data, together with data of 3D structural modeling of the PvCel7A catalytic module, indicate that the N-linked glycans are an important part of the processive catalytic machinery of PvCel7A.

  9. Functional characterization of recombinant batroxobin, a snake venom thrombin-like enzyme, expressed from Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    You, Weon-Kyoo; Choi, Won-Seok; Koh, You-Seok; Shin, Hang-Cheol; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2004-07-30

    A thrombin-like enzyme of Bothrops atrox moojeni venom, batroxobin, specifically cleaves fibrinogen alpha chain, resulting in the formation of non-crosslinked fibrin clots. The cDNA encoding batroxobin was cloned, expressed in Pichia pastoris and the molecular function of purified recombinant protein was also characterized. The recombinant batroxobin had an apparent molecular weight of 33 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis and biochemical activities similar to those of native batroxobin. The purified recombinant protein strongly converted fibrinogen into fibrin clot in vitro, and shortened bleeding time and whole blood coagulation time in vivo. However, it did not make any considerable alterations on other blood coagulation factors. Several lines of experimental evidence in this study suggest that the recombinant batroxobin is a potent pro-coagulant agent. PMID:15280019

  10. Metabolism of chamaechromone in vitro with human liver microsomes and recombinant human drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yan; Hu, Haihong; Qiu, Yunqing; Zheng, Jinqi; Wang, Linrun; Zhang, Xingguo; Zeng, Su

    2014-04-01

    Chamaechromone is a major component in the dried roots of Stellera chamaejasme with antihepatitis B virus and insecticidal activity. In this study, metabolic profiles of chamaechromone were investigated in human liver microsomes. One monohydroxide and two monoglucuronides of chamaechromone were identified. The enzyme kinetics for both hydroxylation and glucuronidation were fitted to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The hydroxylation of chamaechromone was inhibited by α-naphthoflavone, and predominantly catalyzed by recombinant human cytochrome P450 1A2, whereas the glucuronidation was inhibited by quercetin, 1-naphthol, and fluconazole, and mainly catalyzed by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3, 1A7, 1A9, and 2B7.

  11. High-yield recombinant expression of the extremophile enzyme, bee hyaluronidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Reitinger, Stephan; Boroviak, Thorsten; Laschober, Gerhard Thomas; Fehrer, Christine; Müllegger, Johannes; Lindner, Herbert; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2008-02-01

    Hyaluronidase from honey bee was recombinantly expressed as a secreted glycoprotein in Pichia pastoris. The active enzyme was produced in milligram quantities per liter of primary culture. When changing the codons of the original transcript to triplet sequences preferred by P. pastoris, no further increase of protein product could be achieved. After expression of a fusion protein by linking hyaluronidase and human serum albumin together with the recognition sequence for the protease, factorXa, fragmented protein products were obtained in the culture supernatant. Only after replacement of the hinge region with a serine-glycine-rich linker, stable full-length fusion protein could be generated. The protein products were purified by cation exchange chromatography at pH 5.0 and pure enzyme fractions were further characterized in detail. The biochemical properties of the product matched those of crude hyaluronidase within bee venom: the native and the recombinant enzyme exhibited activity over a pH range from 3 to 8 (maximum: 3.8), at temperatures as low as 4 degrees C and up to 90 degrees C (maximum 62 degrees C), and at ionic strength as high as 2 M salt. Recombinant bee hyaluronidase efficiently degrades 6-S-chondroitin sulfate (chondroitin sulfate C) as well as 4-S-chondroitin sulfate (chondroitin sulfate A), the latter to a lesser extent. Only very little hydrolase activity towards chondroitin sulfate B (dermatan sulfate) was detectable. PMID:18024155

  12. Genetic and biochemical evidence that recombinant Enterococcus spp. strains expressing gelatinase (GelE) produce bovine milk-derived hydrolysates with high angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA).

    PubMed

    Gútiez, Loreto; Borrero, Juan; Jiménez, Juan J; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2014-06-18

    In this work, genes encoding gelatinase (gelE) and serine proteinase (sprE), two extracellular proteases produced by Enterococcus faecalis DBH18, were cloned in the protein expression vector pMG36c, containing the constitutive P32 promoter, generating the recombinant plasmids pCG, pCSP, and pCGSP encoding gelE, sprE, and gelE-sprE, respectively. Transformation of noncaseinolytic E. faecalis P36, E. faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium AR24, and E. hirae AR14 strains with these plasmids permitted detection of caseinolytic activity only in the strains transformed with pCG or pCGSP. Complementation of a deletion (knockout) mutant of E. faecalis V583 for production of gelatinase (GelE) with pCG unequivocally supported that gelE is responsible for the caseinolytic activity of the transformed strain grown in bovine skim milk (BSM). RP-HPLC-MS/MS analysis of hydrolysates of transformed Enterococcus spp. strains grown in BSM permitted the identification of 38 major peptide fragments including peptides with previously reported angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA), antihypertensive activity, and antioxidant activity.

  13. A biochemical and physicochemical comparison of two recombinant enzymes used for enzyme replacement therapies of hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yo Kyung; Sohn, Young Bae; Sohn, Jong Mun; Lee, Jieun; Chang, Mi Sun; Kwun, Younghee; Kim, Chi Hwa; Lee, Jin Young; Yook, Yeon Joo; Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome; OMIM 309900) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). For enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of Hunter syndrome, two recombinant enzymes, idursulfase (Elaprase(®), Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Lexington, MA) and idursulfase beta (Hunterase(®), Green Cross Corporation, Yongin, Korea), are currently available in Korea. To compare the biochemical and physicochemical differences between idursulfase and idursulfase beta, we examined the formylglycine (FGly) content, specific enzyme activity, mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) content, sialic acid content, and in vitro cell uptake activity of normal human fibroblasts of these two enzymes.The FGly content, which determines the enzyme activity, of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (79.4 ± 0.9 vs. 68.1 ± 2.2 %, P < 0.001). In accordance with the FGly content, the specific enzyme activity of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (42.6 ± 1.1 vs. 27.8 ± 0.9 nmol/min/μg protein, P < 0.001). The levels of M6P and sialic acid were not significantly different (2.4 ± 0.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for M6P and 12.3 ± 0.7 vs. 12.4 ± 0.4 mol/mol protein for sialic acid). However, the cellular uptake activity of the normal human fibroblasts in vitro showed a significant difference (Kuptake, 5.09 ± 0.96 vs. 6.50 ± 1.28 nM protein, P = 0.017).In conclusion, idursulfase beta exhibited significantly higher specific enzyme activity than idursulfase, resulting from higher FGly content. These biochemical differences may be partly attributed to clinical efficacy. However, long-term clinical evaluations of Hunter syndrome patients treated with these two enzymes will be needed to demonstrate the clinical implications of significant difference of the enzyme activity and the FGly content.

  14. Determination of lipolytic enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kovacic, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile human opportunistic pathogen that produces and secretes an arsenal of enzymes, proteins and small molecules many of which serve as virulence factors. Notably, about 40 % of P. aeruginosa genes code for proteins of unknown function, among them more than 80 encoding putative, but still unknown lipolytic enzymes. This group of hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) is known already for decades, but only recently, several of these enzymes have attracted attention as potential virulence factors. Reliable and reproducible enzymatic activity assays are crucial to determine their physiological function and particularly assess their contribution to pathogenicity. As a consequence of the unique biochemical properties of lipids resulting in the formation of micellar structures in water, the reproducible preparation of substrate emulsions is strongly dependent on the method used. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of the respective substrate emulsion may drastically affect the activities of the tested lipolytic enzymes. Here, we describe common methods for the activity determination of lipase, esterase, phospholipase, and lysophospholipase. These methods cover lipolytic activity assays carried out in vitro, with cell extracts or separated subcellular compartments and with purified enzymes. We have attempted to describe standardized protocols, allowing the determination and comparison of enzymatic activities of lipolytic enzymes from different sources. These methods should also encourage the Pseudomonas community to address the wealth of still unexplored lipolytic enzymes encoded and produced by P. aeruginosa.

  15. Recombinant protein production facility for fungal biomass-degrading enzymes using the yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Haon, Mireille; Grisel, Sacha; Navarro, David; Gruet, Antoine; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Bignon, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are the predominant source of lignocellulolytic enzymes used in industry for the transformation of plant biomass into high-value molecules and biofuels. The rapidity with which new fungal genomic and post-genomic data are being produced is vastly outpacing functional studies. This underscores the critical need for developing platforms dedicated to the recombinant expression of enzymes lacking confident functional annotation, a prerequisite to their functional and structural study. In the last decade, the yeast Pichia pastoris has become increasingly popular as a host for the production of fungal biomass-degrading enzymes, and particularly carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). This study aimed at setting-up a platform to easily and quickly screen the extracellular expression of biomass-degrading enzymes in P. pastoris. We first used three fungal glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that we previously expressed using the protocol devised by Invitrogen to try different modifications of the original protocol. Considering the gain in time and convenience provided by the new protocol, we used it as basis to set-up the facility and produce a suite of fungal CAZymes (GHs, carbohydrate esterases and auxiliary activity enzyme families) out of which more than 70% were successfully expressed. The platform tasks range from gene cloning to automated protein purifications and activity tests, and is open to the CAZyme users’ community. PMID:26441929

  16. Recombinant protein production facility for fungal biomass-degrading enzymes using the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Haon, Mireille; Grisel, Sacha; Navarro, David; Gruet, Antoine; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Bignon, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are the predominant source of lignocellulolytic enzymes used in industry for the transformation of plant biomass into high-value molecules and biofuels. The rapidity with which new fungal genomic and post-genomic data are being produced is vastly outpacing functional studies. This underscores the critical need for developing platforms dedicated to the recombinant expression of enzymes lacking confident functional annotation, a prerequisite to their functional and structural study. In the last decade, the yeast Pichia pastoris has become increasingly popular as a host for the production of fungal biomass-degrading enzymes, and particularly carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). This study aimed at setting-up a platform to easily and quickly screen the extracellular expression of biomass-degrading enzymes in P. pastoris. We first used three fungal glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that we previously expressed using the protocol devised by Invitrogen to try different modifications of the original protocol. Considering the gain in time and convenience provided by the new protocol, we used it as basis to set-up the facility and produce a suite of fungal CAZymes (GHs, carbohydrate esterases and auxiliary activity enzyme families) out of which more than 70% were successfully expressed. The platform tasks range from gene cloning to automated protein purifications and activity tests, and is open to the CAZyme users' community.

  17. A recombinant human enzyme for enhanced interstitial transport of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bookbinder, L H; Hofer, A; Haller, M F; Zepeda, M L; Keller, G-A; Lim, J E; Edgington, T S; Shepard, H M; Patton, J S; Frost, G I

    2006-08-28

    Subcutaneously injected therapeutics must pass through the interstitial matrix of the skin in order to reach their intended targets. This complex, three-dimensional structure limits the type and quantity of drugs that can be administered by local injection. Here we found that depolymerization of the viscoelastic component of the interstitial matrix in animal models with a highly purified recombinant human hyaluronidase enzyme (rHuPH20) increased the dispersion of locally injected drugs, across a broad range of molecular weights without tissue distortion. rHuPH20 increased infusion rates and the pattern and extent of appearance of locally injected drugs in systemic blood. In particular, rHuPH20 changed the pharmacokinetic profiles and significantly augmented the absolute bioavailability of locally injected large protein therapeutics. Importantly, within 24 h of injection, the interstitial viscoelastic barriers were restored without histologic alterations or signs of inflammation. rHuPH20 may function as an interstitial delivery enhancing agent capable of increasing the dispersion and bioavailability of coinjected drugs that may enable subcutaneous administration of therapeutics and replace intravenous delivery.

  18. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  19. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  20. Enzyme therapy for pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk.

    PubMed

    Van den Hout, J M; Reuser, A J; de Klerk, J B; Arts, W F; Smeitink, J A; Van der Ploeg, A T

    2001-04-01

    Pompe disease is a metabolic myopathy caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase. In this report we review the first 36 weeks of a clinical study on the safety and efficacy of enzyme therapy aimed at correcting the deficiency. Four patients with infantile Pompe disease were enrolled. They received recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from transgenic rabbit milk. The product is generally well tolerated and reaches the primary target tissues. Normalization of alpha-glucosidase activity in skeletal muscle was obtained and degradation of PAS-positive material was seen in tissue sections. The clinical condition of all patients improved. The effect on heart was most significant, with an impressive reduction of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Motor function improved. The positive preliminary results stimulate continuation and extension of efforts towards the realization of enzyme therapy for Pompe disease.

  1. Enzyme activities in activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Hui; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2007-12-01

    This study quantified the activities of enzymes in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and in pellets. Seven commonly adopted extraction schemes were utilized to extract from aerobic flocs the contained EPS, which were further categorized into loosely bound (LB) and tightly bound (TB) fractions. Ultrasonication effectively extracted the EPS from sludge flocs. Enzyme assay tests showed that the protease activity was localized mainly on the pellets, alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase activities were largely bound with LB-EPS, and few protease, alpha-amylase, or alpha-glucosidase activities were associated with the TB-EPS fraction. There exists no correlation between the biochemical compositions of EPS and the distribution of enzyme activities in the sludge matrix. The 44-65% of alpha-amylase and 59-100% of alpha-glucosidase activities noted with the LB-EPS indicate heterogeneous hydrolysis patterns in the sludge flocs with proteins and carbohydrates.

  2. PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays a role in enhancement of eNOS activity by recombinant human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Han, Zhen-Hua; Li, Yong-Qin; Xue, Jia-Hong; Gao, Deng-Feng; Wu, Xiao-San; Wang, Cong-Xia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the activity of recombinant human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2) promoted the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured in vitro. Then treated with Ang II (1×10-6 mol/L) for 24 h. The rhACE2 (100 μmol/L) was added and incubated for 5, 10, 15, 30, 60 min respectively which was based on Ang II intervention. The effect of rhACE2 on phosphorylation eNOS level was also observed in the presence of LY294002 (10 μmol/L) (PI3K/AKT inhibitors). Griess reagent method was applied to measure NO contents in cell culture supernatant, RT-PCR to detect the expression of eNOSmRNA in HUVEC, and Western blot to detect the expression of eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS. In Ang II intervention group, NO contents were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05). Through rhACE2 treatment, the NO contents in cell culture medium and the expression level of phosphorylated eNOS were significantly higher than in Ang II intervention group (P < 0.05), but eNOSmRNA and non-phosphorylated eNOS protein expression level showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). After HUVEC was intervened by PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002, the expression level of phosphorylated eNOS was significantly lower than that in the rhACE2 30 min treatment group (P < 0.05). rhACE2 may reduce the activity of Ang II inhibited endothelial cell eNOS, which can be blocked by PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002, suggesting PI3K/AKT signaling pathway plays an important role in rhACE2’s promotion of the activity of endothelial cell eNOS. PMID:25550859

  3. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  4. Serum enzyme activities after cardioversion

    PubMed Central

    Mandecki, Tadeusz; Giec, Leszek; Kargul, Włodzimierz

    1970-01-01

    Serum aspartate aminotransferase (SGOT), alanine aminotransferase (SGPT), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and butyric acid dehydrogenase (BDH) were determined in 94 patients before, 1½ hours, and 24 hours after cardioversion. An increase in SGOT and CPK activity was observed 24 hours after cardioversion in the group of patients treated with two or more DC shocks. The importance of this enzyme activity increase is discussed. It originates in the skeletal muscles and probably has no clinical significance, as no other signs of myocardial damage were observed simultaneously in a large group of patients. PMID:5470040

  5. Transketolase A of Escherichia coli K12. Purification and properties of the enzyme from recombinant strains.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, G A; Schörken, U; Sprenger, G; Sahm, H

    1995-06-01

    Transketolase A was purified to apparent homogeneity from recombinant Escherichia coli K12 cells carrying the homologous cloned tktA gene on a pUC19-derived plasmid. These recombinant cells exhibited a transketolase activity in crude extracts of up to 9.7 U/mg compared to < or = 0.1 U/mg in wild-type cells. Transketolase A was purified from crude extracts of a recombinant strain by successive ammonium sulfate precipitations and two anion-exchange chromatography steps (Q-Sepharose FF, Fractogel EMD-DEAE column) and afforded an apparently homogeneous protein band on SDS/PAGE. The enzyme, both in its active and apoform, had a molecular mass of 145,000 Da (+/- 10,000 Da), judged by gel-filtration chromatography. Subunits of 73,000 Da (+/- 2000 Da) were determined on SDS/PAGE, thus, transketolase A most likely forms a homodimer. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protein verified the identity with the cloned gene tktA. The specific activity of the purified enzyme, determined at 30 degrees C with the substrates xylulose 5-phosphate (donor of C2 compound) and ribose 5-phosphate (acceptor) at an optimal pH (50 mM glycylglycine, pH 8.5), was 50.4 U/mg. Km values for the substrates xylulose 5-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate were 160 microM and 1.4 mM, respectively. Km values for the other physiological substrates of transketolase A were 90 microM for erythrose 4-phosphate (best acceptor substrate), 2.1 mM for D,L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, 1.1 mM for fructose 6-phosphate, and 4 mM for sedoheptulose 7-phosphate. Hydroxypyruvate served as alternative donor (Km = 18 mM). Unphosphorylated acceptor compounds were formaldehyde (Km = 31 mM), glycolaldehyde (14 mM), D,L-glyceraldehyde (10 mM) and D-erythrose (150 mM). The enzyme was competitively inhibited by D-arabinose 5-phosphate (K = 6 mM at a concentration of 2.5 mM D-arabinose 5-phosphate) or by the chelating agent EDTA. The inactive apoform of transketolase A was yielded by dialysis against buffer containing 10 mM EDTA

  6. Effect of C-terminal truncation on enzyme properties of recombinant amylopullulanase from Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Pang; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Hsu-Yang; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2012-05-01

    The smallest and enzymatically active molecule, TetApuQ818, was localized within the C-terminal Q818 amino acid residue after serial C-terminal truncation analysis of the recombinant amylopullulanase molecule (TetApuM955) from Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus. Kinetic analyses indicated that the overall catalytic efficiency, k (cat)/K (m), of TetApuQ818 was 8-32% decreased for the pullulan and the soluble starch substrate, respectively. Changes to the substrate affinity, K (m), and the turnover rate, k (cat), were decreased significantly in both enzymatic activities of TetApuQ818. TetApuQ818 exhibited less thermostability than TetApuM955 when the temperature was raised above 85°C, but it had similar substrate-binding ability and hydrolysis products toward various substrates as TetApuM955 did. Both enzymes showed similar spectroscopies of fluorescence and circular dichroism, suggesting the active folding conformation was maintained after this C-terminal Q818 deletion. This study suggested that the binding ability of insoluble starch by TetApuM955 did not rely on the putative C-terminal carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) and two FnIII regions of TetApu, though the integrity of the AamyC module of TetApuQ818 was required for the enzyme activity. PMID:22392283

  7. Metabolism of anabolic steroids by recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rendic, S; Nolteernsting, E; Schänzer, W

    1999-11-26

    Metabolism of steroid hormones with anabolic properties was studied in vitro using human recombinant CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and 2B6 enzymes. The enzyme formats used for CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 were insect cell microsomes expressing human CYP enzymes and purified recombinant human CYP enzymes in a reconstituted system. CYP3A4 enzyme formats incubated with anabolic steroids, testosterone, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, metandienone, boldenone and 4-chloro-1,2-dehydro-17alpha-methyltestosterone, produced 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites identified as trimethylsilyl (TMS)-ethers by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. When the same formats of CYP2C9 were incubated with the anabolic steroids, no 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites were formed. Human lymphoblast cell microsomes expressing human CYP2B6 incubated with the steroids investigated produced traces of 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites with testosterone and 17alpha-methyltestosterone only. We suggest that the electronic effects of the 3-keto-4-ene structural moiety contribute to the selectivity within the active site of CYP3A4 enzyme resulting in selective 6beta-hydroxylation. PMID:10630892

  8. Comparative study on mannose 6-phosphate residue contents of recombinant lysosomal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Tadayasu; Takada, Masaru; Aizawa, Yoshiaki; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Chiba, Yasunori; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    As most recombinant lysosomal enzymes are incorporated into cells via mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptors, the M6P content is important for effective enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for lysosomal diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive reports of the M6P contents of lysosomal enzymes. We developed an M6P assay method comprising three steps, i.e., acid hydrolysis of glycoproteins, derivatization of M6P, and high-performance liquid chromatography, and determined the M6P contents of six recombinant lysosomal enzymes now available for ERT and one in the process of development. The assay is easy, specific, and reproducible. The results of the comparative study revealed that the M6P contents of agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, modified α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, alglucosidase alfa, laronidase, idursulfase, and imiglucerase are 2.1, 2.9, 5.9, 0.7, 2.5, 3.2, and <0.3 mol/mol enzyme, respectively. The results were correlated with those of the biochemical analyses previously performed and that of the binding assay of exposed M6P of the enzymes with the domain 9 of the cation-independent M6P receptor. This assay method is useful for comparison of the M6P contents of recombinant lysosomal enzymes for ERT. PMID:24439675

  9. RecBCD Enzyme "Chi Recognition" Mutants Recognize Chi Recombination Hotspots in the Right DNA Context.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Sharp, Jake W; Smith, Gerald R

    2016-09-01

    RecBCD enzyme is a complex, three-subunit protein machine essential for the major pathway of DNA double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli Upon encountering a Chi recombination-hotspot during DNA unwinding, RecBCD nicks DNA to produce a single-stranded DNA end onto which it loads RecA protein. Conformational changes that regulate RecBCD's helicase and nuclease activities are induced upon its interaction with Chi, defined historically as 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Chi is thought to be recognized as single-stranded DNA passing through a tunnel in RecC. To define the Chi recognition-domain in RecC and thus the mechanism of the RecBCD-Chi interaction, we altered by random mutagenesis eight RecC amino acids lining the tunnel. We screened for loss of Chi activity with Chi at one site in bacteriophage λ. The 25 recC mutants analyzed thoroughly had undetectable or strongly reduced Chi-hotspot activity with previously reported Chi sites. Remarkably, most of these mutants had readily detectable, and some nearly wild-type, activity with Chi at newly generated Chi sites. Like wild-type RecBCD, these mutants had Chi activity that responded dramatically (up to fivefold, equivalent to Chi's hotspot activity) to nucleotide changes flanking 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Thus, these and previously published RecC mutants thought to be Chi-recognition mutants are actually Chi context-dependence mutants. Our results fundamentally alter the view that Chi is a simple 8-bp sequence recognized by the RecC tunnel. We propose that Chi hotspots have dual nucleotide sequence interactions, with both the RecC tunnel and the RecB nuclease domain.

  10. Efficient screening of fungal cellobiohydrolase class I enzymes for thermostabilizing sequence blocks by SCHEMA structure-guided recombination.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Komor, Russell; Kanaan, Arvind; Romero, Philip; Yu, Xinlin; Mohler, Shannon; Snow, Christopher; Arnold, Frances

    2010-11-01

    We describe an efficient SCHEMA recombination-based approach for screening homologous enzymes to identify stabilizing amino acid sequence blocks. This approach has been used to generate active, thermostable cellobiohydrolase class I (CBH I) enzymes from the 390 625 possible chimeras that can be made by swapping eight blocks from five fungal homologs. Constructing and characterizing the parent enzymes and just 32 'monomeras' containing a single block from a homologous enzyme allowed stability contributions to be assigned to 36 of the 40 blocks from which the CBH I chimeras can be assembled. Sixteen of 16 predicted thermostable chimeras, with an average of 37 mutations relative to the closest parent, are more thermostable than the most stable parent CBH I, from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii. Whereas none of the parent CBH Is were active >65°C, stable CBH I chimeras hydrolyzed solid cellulose at 70°C. In addition to providing a collection of diverse, thermostable CBH Is that can complement previously described stable CBH II chimeras (Heinzelman et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 2009;106:5610-5615) in formulating application-specific cellulase mixtures, the results show the utility of SCHEMA recombination for screening large swaths of natural enzyme sequence space for desirable amino acid blocks.

  11. Molecular expression of l-asparaginase gene from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 in Escherichia coli: A prospective recombinant enzyme for leukaemia chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Anburajan, Lawrance; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Shridhar, Divya; Raghavan, Rangamaran Vijaya; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2016-09-30

    l-Asparaginase is an antineoplastic agent that selectively reduces the level of l-asparagine in blood and diminishes the proliferation of cancerous cells. Studies were carried out on the cloning and heterologous expression of l-asparaginase biosynthesis gene (ansA) from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 to achieve the stable inducible system that overproduces the glutaminase-free recombinant l-asparaginase. Overexpression of recombinant l-asparaginase was achieved with an optimized final concentration of 1.5mM of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the enzyme was expressed as a soluble protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) chromatography and the purified enzyme disclosed an elevated level of asparaginase activity (158.1IU/mL). Optimum pH and temperature of the purified l-asparaginase for the hydrolysis of l-asparagine were 8.0 and 37°C and it was very specific for its natural substrate, l-asparagine. Detailed studies were carried out on the kinetics of enzyme reaction, catalytic activity, temperature and ionic strength and the thermostability of the l-asparaginase enzyme. The functional characterisation of the recombinant l-asparaginase was studied through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in silico sequence analysis and protein structural modelling. Glutaminase activity was not detected in the recombinant l-asparaginase, which could reduce the probable side effects during leukaemia therapy.

  12. Ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes induce microhomology-mediated illegitimate recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cecilia Y; Kiechle, Markus; Manivasakam, Palaniyandi; Schiestl, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks can be repaired by illegitimate recombination without extended sequence homology. A distinct mechanism namely microhomology-mediated recombination occurs between a few basepairs of homology that is associated with deletions. Ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes have been shown to increase the frequency of nonhomologous integration in yeast. However, the mechanism of such enhanced recombination events is not known. Here, we report that both ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes increase the frequency of microhomology-mediated integration. Irradiated yeast cells displayed 77% microhomology-mediated integration, compared to 27% in unirradiated cells. Radiation-induced integration exhibited lack of deletions at genomic insertion sites, implying that such events are likely to occur at undamaged sites. Restriction enzymes also enhanced integration events at random non-restriction sites via microhomology-mediated recombination. Furthermore, generation of a site-specific I-SceI-mediated double-strand break induces microhomology-mediated integration randomly throughout the genome. Taken together, these results suggest that double-strand breaks induce a genome-wide microhomology-mediated illegitimate recombination pathway that facilitates integration probably in trans at non-targeted sites and might be involved in generation of large deletions and other genomic rearrangements.

  13. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  14. PhAP protease from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125: Gene cloning, recombinant production in E. coli and enzyme characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pascale, D.; Giuliani, M.; De Santi, C.; Bergamasco, N.; Amoresano, A.; Carpentieri, A.; Parrilli, E.; Tutino, M. L.

    2010-08-01

    Cold-adapted proteases have been found to be the dominant activity throughout the cold marine environment, indicating their importance in bacterial acquisition of nitrogen-rich complex organic compounds. However, few extracellular proteases from marine organisms have been characterized so far, and the mechanisms that enable their activity in situ are still largely unknown. Aside from their ecological importance and use as model enzyme for structure/function investigations, cold-active proteolytic enzymes offer great potential for biotechnological applications. Our studies on cold adapted proteases were performed on exo-enzyme produced by the Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. By applying a proteomic approach, we identified several proteolytic activities from its culture supernatant. PhAP protease was selected for further investigations. The encoding gene was cloned and the protein was recombinantly produced in E. coli cells. The homogeneous product was biochemically characterised and it turned out that the enzyme is a Zn-dependent aminopeptidase, with an activity dependence from assay temperature typical of psychrophilic enzymes.

  15. In vitro evaluation of Bacopa monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant monoamine oxidase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajbir; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2014-09-01

    Bacopa monniera is a traditional Ayurvedic medicinal plant that has been used worldwide for its nootropic action. Chemically standardized extract of B. monniera is now available as over the counter herbal remedy to enhance memory in children and adults. Considering the nootropic action of B. monniera, we evaluated the effect of clinically available B. monniera extract and six of B. monniera constituents (bacoside A3, bacopaside I, bacopaside II, bacosaponin C, bacosine, and bacoside A mixture) on recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The effect of B. monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes was evaluated using MAO-Glo(TM) assay kit (Promega Corporation, USA), following the instruction manual. IC50 and mode of inhibition were measured for MAO enzymes. Bacopaside I and bacoside A mixture inhibited the MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes. Bacopaside I exhibited mixed mode of inhibition with IC50 and Ki values of 17.08 ± 1.64 and 42.5 ± 3.53 µg/mL, respectively, for MAO-A enzyme. Bacopaside I is the major constituent of B. monniera, which inhibited the MAO-A enzyme selectively.

  16. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  17. Population genetic analysis of Helicobacter pylori by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis: extensive allelic diversity and recombinational population structure.

    PubMed Central

    Go, M F; Kapur, V; Graham, D Y; Musser, J M

    1996-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships in 74 Helicobacter pylori isolates recovered from patients assigned to distinct clinical categories were estimated by examination of allelic variation in six genes encoding metabolic housekeeping enzymes by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Seventy-three distinct allele profiles, representing multilocus chromosomal genotypes, were identified. All six loci were highly polymorphic, with an average of 11.2 alleles per locus. The mean genetic diversity in the sample was 0.735, a value that exceeds the level of diversity recorded in virtually all bacterial species studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A high frequency of occurrence of null alleles (lack of enzyme activity) was identified and warrants further investigation at the molecular level. Lack of linkage disequilibrium (nonrandom association (of alleles over loci) indicates that horizontal transfer and recombination of metabolic enzyme genes have contributed to the generation of chromosomal diversity in H. pylori. In this sample of isolates, there was no statistically significant association of multilocus enzyme electrophoretic types or cluster of related chromosomal types and disease category. PMID:8682800

  18. Enzyme activity down to -100 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Bragger, J M; Dunn, R V; Daniel, R M

    2000-07-14

    The activities of two enzymes, beef liver catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) and calf intestine alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), have been measured down to -97 degrees C and -100 degrees C, respectively. Enzyme activity has not previously been measured at such low temperatures. For catalase, the cryosolvents used were methanol:ethylene glycol:water (70:10:20) and DMSO:ethylene glycol:water (60:20:20). For alkaline phosphatase, methanol:ethylene glycol:water (70:10:20) was used. All of the Arrhenius plots were linear over the whole of the temperature range examined. Since the lowest temperatures at which activity was measured are well below the dynamic transition observed for proteins, the results indicate that the motions which cease below the dynamic transition are not essential for enzyme activity. In all cases the use of cryosolvent led to substantial increases in Arrhenius activation energies, and this imposed practical limitations on the measurement of enzyme activity below -100 degrees C. At even lower temperatures, enzyme activity may be limited by the effect of solvent fluidity on substrate/product diffusion, but overall there is no evidence that any intrinsic enzyme property imposes a lower temperature limit for enzyme activity. PMID:10899628

  19. D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase: Cloning and heterologous expression of the spinach gene, and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Hartman, F.C.; Lu, T.Y.S.; Larimer, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The authors have achieved, to their knowledge, the first high-level heterologous expression of the gene encoding D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase from any source, thereby permitting isolation and characterization of the epimerase as found in photosynthetic organisms. The extremely labile recombinant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) enzyme was stabilized by DL-{alpha}-glycerophosphate or ethanol and destabilized by D-ribulose-5-phosphate or 2-mercaptoethanol. Despite this lability, the unprecedentedly high specific activity of the purified material indicates that the structural integrity of the enzyme is maintained throughout isolation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and divalent metal cations did not affect epimerase activity, thereby excluding a requirement for the latter in catalysis. As deduced from the sequence of the cloned spinach gene and the electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions of the purified recombinant enzyme, its 25-kD subunit size was about the same as that of the corresponding epimerases of yeast and mammals. However, in contrast to these other species, the recombinant spinach enzyme was octameric rather than dimeric, as assessed by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Western-blot analyses with antibodies to the purified recombinant enzyme confirmed that the epimerase extracted from spinach leaves is also octameric.

  20. Heparin and related polysaccharides: Synthesis using recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Suflita, Matthew; Fu, Li; He, Wenqin; Koffas, Mattheos; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are linear anionic polysaccharides that exhibit a number of important biological and pharmacological activities. The two most prominent members of this class of polysaccharides are heparin/heparan sulfate and the chondroitin sulfates (including dermatan sulfate). These polysaccharides, having complex structures and polydispersity, are biosynthesized in the Golgi of most animal cells. The chemical synthesis of these glycosaminoglycans is precluded by their structural complexity. Today, we depend on food animal tissues for their isolation and commercial production. Ton quantities of these glycosaminoglycans are used annually as pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. The variability of animal-sourced glycosaminoglycans, their inherent impurities, the limited availability of source tissues, the poor control of these source materials, and their manufacturing processes, suggest a need for new approaches for their production. Over the past decade there have been major efforts in the biotechnological production of these glycosaminoglycans. This mini-review focuses on the use of recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering for the production of heparin and chondroitin sulfates. PMID:26219501

  1. Biotransformation of Natural and Synthetic Isoflavonoids by Two Recombinant Microbial Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Michael; González, Myriam; Cámara, Beatriz; Muñoz, Liliana; Ponce, Emilio; Mejías, Lorenzo; Mascayano, Carolina; Vásquez, Yesseny; Sepúlveda-Boza, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Isolation and synthesis of isoflavonoids has become a frequent endeavor, due to their interesting biological activities. The introduction of hydroxyl groups into isoflavonoids by the use of enzymes represents an attractive alternative to conventional chemical synthesis. In this study, the capabilities of biphenyl-2,3-dioxygenase (BphA) and biphenyl-2,3-dihydrodiol 2,3-dehydrogenase (BphB) of Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 to biotransform 14 isoflavonoids synthesized in the laboratory were investigated by using recombinant Escherichia coli strains containing plasmid vectors expressing the bphA1A2A3A4 or bphA1A2A3A4B genes of strain LB400. The use of BphA and BphB allowed us to biotransform 7-hydroxy-8-methylisoflavone and 7-hydroxyisoflavone into 7,2′,3′-trihydroxy-8-methylisoflavone and 7,3′,4′-trihydroxyisoflavone, respectively. The compound 2′-fluoro-7-hydroxy-8-methylisoflavone was dihydroxylated by BphA at ortho-fluorinated and meta positions of ring B, with concomitant dehalogenation leading to 7,2′,3′,-trihydroxy-8-methylisoflavone. Daidzein (7,4′-dihydroxyisoflavone) was biotransformed by BphA, generating 7,2′,4′-trihydroxyisoflavone after dehydration. Biotransformation products were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. PMID:12957885

  2. Identification of enzymes and quantification of metabolic fluxes in the wild type and in a recombinant aspergillus oryzae strain

    PubMed

    Pedersen; Carlsen; Nielsen

    1999-01-01

    Two alpha-amylase-producing strains of Aspergillus oryzae, a wild-type strain and a recombinant containing additional copies of the alpha-amylase gene, were characterized with respect to enzyme activities, localization of enzymes to the mitochondria or cytosol, macromolecular composition, and metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism during glucose-limited chemostat cultivations. Citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found only in the mitochondria, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP) activities were found only in the cytosol, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, malate dehydrogenase, and glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. The measured biomass components and ash could account for 95% (wt/wt) of the biomass. The protein and RNA contents increased linearly with increasing specific growth rate, but the carbohydrate and chitin contents decreased. A metabolic model consisting of 69 fluxes and 59 intracellular metabolites was used to calculate the metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism at several specific growth rates, with ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway increased with increasing specific growth rate. The fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway were 15 to 26% higher for the recombinant strain than for the wild-type strain.

  3. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  4. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding amylopullulanase from Pyrococcus furiosus and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dong, G; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-09-01

    The gene encoding the Pyrococcus furiosus hyperthermophilic amylopullulanase (APU) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a single 827-residue polypeptide with a 26-residue signal peptide. The protein sequence had very low homology (17 to 21% identity) with other APUs and enzymes of the alpha-amylase family. In particular, none of the consensus regions present in the alpha-amylase family could be identified. P. furiosus APU showed similarity to three proteins, including the P. furiosus intracellular alpha-amylase and Dictyoglomus thermophilum alpha-amylase A. The mature protein had a molecular weight of 89,000. The recombinant P. furiosus APU remained folded after denaturation at temperatures of < or = 70 degrees C and showed an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Denaturating temperatures of above 100 degrees C were required for complete unfolding. The enzyme was extremely thermostable, with an optimal activity at 105 degrees C and pH 5.5. Ca2+ increased the enzyme activity, thermostability, and substrate affinity. The enzyme was highly resistant to chemical denaturing reagents, and its activity increased up to twofold in the presence of surfactants.

  5. Lysostaphin: use of a recombinant bactericidal enzyme as a mastitis therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Oldham, E R; Daley, M J

    1991-12-01

    A recombinant mucolytic protein, lysostaphin, was evaluated as a potential intramammary therapeutic for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle. Lysostaphin, a product of Staphylococcus simulans, enzymatically degrades the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus and is bactericidal. Thirty Holstein-Freisian dairy cattle in their first lactation were infected with Staphylococcus aureus (Newbould 305, ATCC 29740) in all quarters. Infections were established and monitored for somatic cell counts and Staphylococcus aureus colony-forming units 3 wk prior to subsequent treatment. Infected animals were injected through the teat canal with a single dose of recombinant lysostaphin (dose response 1 to 500 mg) or after three successive p.m. milkings with 100 mg of recombinant lysostaphin in 60 ml of sterile phosphate-buffered saline. Animals were considered cured if the milk remained free of Staphylococcus aureus for a total of 28 milkings after last treatment. Kinetic analysis of immunologically active recombinant lysostaphin demonstrated that a minimum bactericidal concentration was maintained in the milk for up to 36 to 48 h after a single infusion of 100 mg of recombinant lysostaphin. The cure rate of quarters receiving recombinant lysostaphin (100 mg in sterile phosphate-buffered saline, administered over three consecutive p.m. milkings) was 20% compared with 29% for sodium cephapirin in saline and 57% for a commercial antibiotic formulation, respectively. An improved formulation of recombinant lysostaphin may prove to be an effective alternative to antibiotic therapy for bovine mastitis.

  6. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

    PubMed

    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  7. Water modulation of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme activity and desquamation.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, A; Harding, C; Moore, A; Coan, P

    2001-09-01

    Exposure to a dry environment leads to depletion of water from the peripheral stratum corneum layers in a process dependent on the relative humidity (RH) and the intrinsic properties of the tissue. We hypothesized that by modulating the water content of the stratum corneum in the surface layers, RH effects the rate of desquamation by modulating the activity of the desquamatory enzymes, and specifically stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme (SCCE). Using a novel air interface in vitro desquamatory model, we demonstrated RH-dependent corneocyte release with desquamatory rates decreasing below 80% RH. Application of 10% glycerol or a glycerol-containing moisturizing lotion further increased desquamation, even in humid conditions, demonstrating that water was the rate-limiting factor in the final stages of desquamation. Furthermore, even in humid conditions desquamation was sub-maximal. In situ stratum corneum SCCE activity showed a dependence on RH: activity was significantly higher at 100% than at 44% RH. Further increases in SCCE activity were induced by applying a 10% glycerol solution. Since SCCE, a water-requiring enzyme, must function in the water-depleted outer stratum corneum, we sought to determine whether this enzyme has a tolerance to lowered water activity. Using concentrated sucrose solutions to lower water activity, we analysed the activity of recombinant SCCE and compared it to that of trypsin and chymotrypsin. SCCE activity demonstrated a tolerance to water restriction, and this may be an adaptation to maintain enzyme activity even within the water-depleted stratum corneum intercellular space. Overall these findings support the concept that in the upper stratum corneum, RH modulates desquamation by its effect upon SCCE activity, and possibly other desquamatory hydrolases. In addition, SCCE may be adapted to function in the water-restricted stratum corneum intercellular space.

  8. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  9. Comparison of the single molecule activity distributions of recombinant and non-recombinant bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Craig, Douglas B; Hanlon-Dearman, Fiona; Beaudry, Shailah; Shek, Kevin; King, Steffany D

    2015-10-01

    Single molecule assays were performed on bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the recombinant enzyme expressed in Pichia pastoris using a capillary electrophoresis-based method. The catalytic rates for the bovine and recombinant enzymes were found to be 11,000±7000min(-1) (N=161) and 12,000±7000min(-1) (N=173), respectively. Mean catalytic rates and variances did not differ significantly between the enzyme from both sources. Furthermore, the distribution of catalytic rates were indistinguishable.

  10. In vitro glucuronidation kinetics of deoxynivalenol by human and animal microsomes and recombinant human UGT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Ronald; Warth, Benedikt; Schebb, Nils Helge; Krska, Rudolf; Koch, Matthias; Sulyok, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), formed by Fusarium species, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins contaminating food and feed worldwide. Upon ingestion, the majority of the toxin is excreted by humans and animal species as glucuronide conjugate. First in vitro data indicated that DON phase II metabolism is strongly species dependent. However, kinetic data on the in vitro metabolism as well as investigations on the specific enzymes responsible for DON glucuronidation in human are lacking. In the present study, the DON metabolism was investigated using human microsomal fractions and uridine-diphosphoglucuronyltransferases (UGTs) as well as liver microsomes from five animal species. Only two of the twelve tested human recombinant UGTs led to the formation of DON glucuronides with a different regiospecificity. UGT2B4 predominantly catalyzed the formation of DON-15-O-glucuronide (DON-15GlcA), while for UGT2B7 the DON-3-O-glucuronide (DON-3GlcA) metabolite prevailed. For human UGTs, liver, and intestinal microsomes, the glucuronidation activities were low. The estimated apparent intrinsic clearance (Clapp,int) for all human UGT as well as tissue homogenates was <1 mL/min mg protein. For the animal liver microsomes, moderate Clapp,int between 1.5 and 10 mL/min mg protein were calculated for carp, trout, and porcine liver. An elevated glucuronidation activity was detected for rat and bovine liver microsomes leading to Clapp,int between 20 and 80 mL/min mg protein. The obtained in vitro data points out that none of the animal models is suitable for estimating the human DON metabolism with respect to the metabolite pattern and formation rate.

  11. The Balance between Recombination Enzymes and Accessory Replicative Helicases in Facilitating Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Aisha H; Atkinson, John; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-07-29

    Accessory replicative helicases aid the primary replicative helicase in duplicating protein-bound DNA, especially transcribed DNA. Recombination enzymes also aid genome duplication by facilitating the repair of DNA lesions via strand exchange and also processing of blocked fork DNA to generate structures onto which the replisome can be reloaded. There is significant interplay between accessory helicases and recombination enzymes in both bacteria and lower eukaryotes but how these replication repair systems interact to ensure efficient genome duplication remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the DNA content defects of Escherichia coli cells lacking the strand exchange protein RecA are driven primarily by conflicts between replication and transcription, as is the case in cells lacking the accessory helicase Rep. However, in contrast to Rep, neither RecA nor RecBCD, the helicase/exonuclease that loads RecA onto dsDNA ends, is important for maintaining rapid chromosome duplication. Furthermore, RecA and RecBCD together can sustain viability in the absence of accessory replicative helicases but only when transcriptional barriers to replication are suppressed by an RNA polymerase mutation. Our data indicate that the minimisation of replisome pausing by accessory helicases has a more significant impact on successful completion of chromosome duplication than recombination-directed fork repair.

  12. The Balance between Recombination Enzymes and Accessory Replicative Helicases in Facilitating Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Atkinson, John; Lloyd, Robert G.; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Accessory replicative helicases aid the primary replicative helicase in duplicating protein-bound DNA, especially transcribed DNA. Recombination enzymes also aid genome duplication by facilitating the repair of DNA lesions via strand exchange and also processing of blocked fork DNA to generate structures onto which the replisome can be reloaded. There is significant interplay between accessory helicases and recombination enzymes in both bacteria and lower eukaryotes but how these replication repair systems interact to ensure efficient genome duplication remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the DNA content defects of Escherichia coli cells lacking the strand exchange protein RecA are driven primarily by conflicts between replication and transcription, as is the case in cells lacking the accessory helicase Rep. However, in contrast to Rep, neither RecA nor RecBCD, the helicase/exonuclease that loads RecA onto dsDNA ends, is important for maintaining rapid chromosome duplication. Furthermore, RecA and RecBCD together can sustain viability in the absence of accessory replicative helicases but only when transcriptional barriers to replication are suppressed by an RNA polymerase mutation. Our data indicate that the minimisation of replisome pausing by accessory helicases has a more significant impact on successful completion of chromosome duplication than recombination-directed fork repair. PMID:27483323

  13. Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA recombination and repair enzymes protect against oxidative damage caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Stohl, Elizabeth A; Seifert, H Steven

    2006-11-01

    The strict human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is exposed to oxidative damage during infection. N. gonorrhoeae has many defenses that have been demonstrated to counteract oxidative damage. However, recN is the only DNA repair and recombination gene upregulated in response to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by microarray analysis and subsequently shown to be important for oxidative damage protection. We therefore tested the importance of RecA and DNA recombination and repair enzymes in conferring resistance to H(2)O(2) damage. recA mutants, as well as RecBCD (recB, recC, and recD) and RecF-like pathway mutants (recJ, recO, and recQ), all showed decreased resistance to H(2)O(2). Holliday junction processing mutants (ruvA, ruvC, and recG) showed decreased resistance to H(2)O(2) resistance as well. Finally, we show that RecA protein levels did not increase as a result of H(2)O(2) treatment. We propose that RecA, recombinational DNA repair, and branch migration are all important for H(2)O(2) resistance in N. gonorrhoeae but that constitutive levels of these enzymes are sufficient for providing protection against oxidative damage by H(2)O(2). PMID:16936020

  14. The specific, submicromolar-Km ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase purified from human placenta is enzymically indistinguishable from recombinant NUDT9 protein, including a selectivity for Mn2+ as activating cation and increase in Km for ADP-ribose, both elicited by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Carloto, António; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos; McLennan, Alexander G; Ribeiro, João Meireles

    2006-10-01

    Free ADP-ribose is a putative second messenger and also a potentially toxic compound due to its non-enzymic reactivity towards protein side chains. ADP-ribose hydrolysis is catalysed by NDP-sugar/alcohol pyrophosphatases of differing specificity, including a highly specific, low-K(m) ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase. In humans, a submicromolar-K(m) ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase has been purified from placenta, while recombinant NUDT9 has been described as a similarly specific enzyme with a nudix motif, but with a 10(2)-10(3) higher K(m). Here, a comparative study of both proteins is presented showing that they are in fact enzymically indistinguishable; crucially, they both have submicromolar K(m) for ADP-ribose. This study firmly supports the view that the ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase present in human tissues is a product of the NUDT9 gene. In addition, this study reveals previously unknown properties of both enzyme forms. They display the same, differential properties in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) as activating cations with respect to substrate specificity, ADP-ribose saturation kinetics, and inhibition by fluoride. Treatment with H(2)O(2) alters the Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) responses and increases the K(m) values for ADP-ribose, changes that are reversed by DTT. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed roles for ADP-ribose in oxidative/nitrosative stress and for ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase as a protective enzyme whose function is to limit the intracellular accumulation of ADP-ribose.

  15. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous In Vivo Grouping (MORPHING) for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Garcia-Ruiz, Eva; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i) the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268); and ii) the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence. PMID:24614282

  16. Antimutagenic activity of oxidase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Agabeili, R.A.

    1986-11-01

    By means of a cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in plant cells (Welsh onion, wheat) it was found that the cofactors nicotinamide adenine phosphate (NAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), and riboflavin possess antimutagenic activity.

  17. Enzyme activity in dialkyl phosphate ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.F.; Dunn, J.; Li, L.-L.; Handley-Pendleton, J. M.; van der lelie, D.; Wishart, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The activity of four metagenomic enzymes and an enzyme cloned from the straw mushroom, Volvariellavolvacea were studied in the following ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [mmim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [emim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate, [emim][dep] and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [emim][OAc]. Activity was determined by analyzing the hydrolysis of para-nitrobenzene carbohydrate derivatives. In general, the enzymes were most active in the dimethyl phosphate ionic liquids, followed by acetate. Generally speaking, activity decreased sharply for concentrations of [emim][dep] above 10% v/v, while the other ionic liquids showed less impact on activity up to 20% v/v.

  18. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  19. Specific starch digestion of maize alpha-limit dextrins by recombinant mucosal glucosidase enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch digestion requires two luminal enzymes, salivary and pancreatic alpha-amylase (AMY), and four small intestinal mucosal enzyme activities from the N- and C-terminals of maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrose-isomaltase (SI) complexes. AMY is not a requirement for starch digestion to glucose b...

  20. Molecular and enzymic properties of recombinant 1, 2-alpha-mannosidase from Aspergillus saitoi overexpressed in Aspergillus oryzae cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ichishima, E; Taya, N; Ikeguchi, M; Chiba, Y; Nakamura, M; Kawabata, C; Inoue, T; Takahashi, K; Minetoki, T; Ozeki, K; Kumagai, C; Gomi, K; Yoshida, T; Nakajima, T

    1999-01-01

    For the construction of an overexpression system of the intracellular 1,2-alpha-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.113) gene (msdS) from Aspergillus saitoi (now designated Aspergillus phoenicis), the N-terminal signal sequence of the gene was replaced with that of the aspergillopepsin I (EC 3.4.23.18) gene (apnS) signal, one of the same strains as described previously. Then the fused 1, 2-alpha-mannosidase gene (f-msdS) was inserted into the NotI site between P-No8142 and T-agdA in the plasmid pNAN 8142 (9.5 kbp) and thus the Aspergillus oryzae expression plasmid pNAN-AM1 (11.2 kbp) was constructed. The fused f-msdS gene has been overexpressed in a transformant A. oryzae niaD AM1 cell. The recombinant enzyme expressed in A. oryzae cells was purified to homogeneity in two steps. The system is capable of making as much as about 320 mg of the enzyme/litre of culture. The recombinant enzyme has activity with methyl-2-O-alpha-d-mannopyranosyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside at pH 5.0, while no activity was determined with methyl-3-O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside or methyl-6-O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was analysed by using pyridylaminated (PA)-oligomannose-type sugar chains, Man9-6(GlcNAc)2-PA (Man is mannose; GlcNAc is N-acetylglucosamine). The enzyme hydrolysed Man8GlcNAc2-PA (type 'M8A') fastest, and 'M6C' ¿Manalpha1-3[Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-3(Manalpha1-6) Manalpha1-6]Manbeta1- 4GlcNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc-PA¿ slowest, among the PA-sugar chains. Molecular-mass values of the enzyme were determined to be 63 kDa by SDS/PAGE and 65 kDa by gel filtration on Superose 12 respectively. The pI value of the enzyme was 4.6. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme was GSTQSRADAIKAAFSHAWDGYLQY, and sequence analysis indicated that the signal peptide from apnS gene was removed. The molar absorption coefficient, epsilon, at 280 nm was determined as 91539 M-1.cm-1. Contents of the secondary structure (alpha-helix, beta

  1. Recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes in metabolic anticancer therapy and bioanalytics.

    PubMed

    Stasyk, Oleh V; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Gonchar, Mykhailo V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2015-03-01

    Tumor cells often exhibit specific metabolic defects due to the aberrations in oncogene-dependent regulatory and/or signaling pathways that distinguish them from normal cells. Among others, many malignant cells are deficient in biosynthesis of certain amino acids and concomitantly exhibit elevated sensitivity to deprivation of these amino acids. Although the underlying causes of such metabolic changes are still not fully understood, this feature of malignant cells is exploited in metabolic enzymotherapies based on single amino acid, e.g., arginine, deprivation. To achieve efficient arginine depletion in vivo, two recombinant enzymes, bacterial arginine deiminase and human arginase I have been evaluated and are undergoing further development. This review is aimed to summarize the current knowledge on the application of arginine-degrading enzymes as anticancer agents and as bioanalytical tools for arginine assays. The problems that have to be solved to optimize this therapy for clinical application are discussed. PMID:25231409

  2. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  3. Evaluation of the Conformational Stability of Recombinant Desulfurizing Enzymes from a Newly Isolated Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Federica; Brocca, Stefania; Lotti, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways of aerobic bacteria able to assimilate sulfur can provide biocatalysts for biodesulfurization of petroleum and of other sulfur-containing pollutants. Of major interest is the so-called "4S pathway," in that C-S bonds are specifically cleaved leaving the carbon skeleton of substrates intact. This pathway is carried out by four enzymes, named Dsz A, B, C, and D. In view of a possible application of recombinant Dsz enzymes in biodesulfurization treatments, we have investigated the structural features of enzymes cloned from a Rhodococcus strain isolated from polluted environmental samples and their resistance to temperature (20-95 °C) and to organic solvents (5, 10, and 20 % v/v methanol, acetonitrile, hexane, and toluene). Changes in protein structures were assessed by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that all Dsz proteins are unfolded by temperatures in the range 45-60 °C and by all solvents tested, with the most dramatic effect being produced by toluene. These results suggest that stabilization of the biocatalysts by protein engineering will be necessary for developing biodesulfurization technologies based on Dsz enzymes.

  4. A High-Throughput (HTS) Assay for Enzyme Reaction Phenotyping in Human Recombinant P450 Enzymes Using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofeng; Suhar, Tom; Glass, Lateca; Rajaraman, Ganesh

    2014-03-03

    Enzyme reaction phenotyping is employed extensively during the early stages of drug discovery to identify the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of new chemical entities (NCEs). Early identification of metabolic pathways facilitates prediction of potential drug-drug interactions associated with enzyme polymorphism, induction, or inhibition, and aids in the design of clinical trials. Incubation of NCEs with human recombinant enzymes is a popular method for such work because of the specificity, simplicity, and high-throughput nature of this approach for phenotyping studies. The availability of a relative abundance factor and calculated intersystem extrapolation factor for the expressed recombinant enzymes facilitates easy scaling of in vitro data, enabling in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Described in this unit is a high-throughput screen for identifying enzymes involved in the metabolism of NCEs. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the human recombinant enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4, including the calculation of the intrinsic clearance for each.

  5. Expression of human recombinant granzyme A zymogen and its activation by the cysteine proteinase cathepsin C.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Kamp, A M; Citarella, F; Horrevoets, A J; Hack, C E

    1996-04-19

    Human granzyme A is one of the serine proteinases present in the granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Granzymes are synthesized as inactive proenzymes with an amino-terminal prodipeptide, which is processed during transport of granzymes to the cytotoxic granules, where they are stored as active proteinases. In this study, we explored the possibility of producing recombinant granzymes. Recombinant human granzyme A zymogen was expressed in several eukaryotic cell lines (HepG2, Jurkat, and COS-1) after infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus containing full-length granzyme A cDNA. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates showed that all infected cells produced a disulfide-linked homodimer of identical molecular weight as natural granzyme A. Infected HepG2 cells produced the largest amount of this protease (approximately 160 times more than lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells). The recombinant protein only had high mannose type oligosaccharides as did the natural protein. Although infected HepG2 and COS cells contained high granzyme A antigen levels, lysates from these cells did not show any granzyme A proteolytic activity. However, the inactive proenzyme could be converted into active granzyme A by incubation with the thiol proteinase cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I). This study is the first to demonstrate expression of an active recombinant human cytotoxic lymphocyte proteinase and conversion of inactive progranzyme A into an active enzyme by cathepsin C. We suggest that a similar approach can be used for the production of other granzymes and related proteinases.

  6. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  7. An Acidic Thermostable Recombinant Aspergillus nidulans Endoglucanase Is Active towards Distinct Agriculture Residues

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Eveline Queiroz de Pinho; Rubini, Marciano Regis; Mello-de-Sousa, Thiago Machado; Duarte, Gilvan Caetano; de Faria, Fabrícia Paula; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio Jose

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is poorly exploited as a source of enzymes for lignocellulosic residues degradation for biotechnological purposes. This work describes the A. nidulans Endoglucanase A heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, the purification and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme. Active recombinant endoglucanase A (rEG A) was efficiently secreted as a 35 kDa protein which was purified through a two-step chromatography procedure. The highest enzyme activity was detected at 50°C/pH 4. rEG A retained 100% of activity when incubated at 45 and 55°C for 72 h. Purified rEG A kinetic parameters towards CMC were determined as Km = 27.5 ± 4.33 mg/mL, Vmax = 1.185 ± 0.11 mmol/min, and 55.8 IU (international units)/mg specific activity. Recombinant P. pastoris supernatant presented hydrolytic activity towards lignocellulosic residues such as banana stalk, sugarcane bagasse, soybean residues, and corn straw. These data indicate that rEG A is suitable for plant biomass conversion into products of commercial importance, such as second-generation fuel ethanol. PMID:23936633

  8. Functional expression of a fragment of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by means of the baculovirus expression vector system, and kinetic investigation of the purified recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knecht, W; Bergjohann, U; Gonski, S; Kirschbaum, B; Löffler, M

    1996-08-15

    Human mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis) has been overproduced by means of a recombinant baculovirus that contained the human cDNA fragment for this protein. After virus infection and protein expression in Trichoplusia ni cells (BTI-Tn-5B1-4), the subcellular distribution of the recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was determined by two distinct enzyme-activity assays and by Western blot analysis with anti-(dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) Ig. The targeting of the recombinant protein to the mitochondria of the insect cells was verified. The activity of the recombinant enzyme in the mitochondria of infected cells was about 740-fold above the level of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in human liver mitochondria. In a three-step procedure, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was purified to a specific activity of greater than 50 U/mg. Size-exclusion chromatography showed a molecular mass of 42 kDa and confirmed the existence of the fully active enzyme as a monomeric species. Fluorimetric cofactor analysis revealed the presence of FMN in recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. By kinetics analysis, Km values for dihydroorotate and ubiquinone-50 were found to be 4 microM and 9.9 microM, respectively, while Km values for dihydroorotate and decylubiquinone were 9.4 microM and 13.7 microM, respectively. The applied expression system will allow preparation of large quantities of the enzyme for structure and function studies. Purified recombinant human dihytdroorotate dehydrogenase was tested for its sensitivity to a reported inhibitor A77 1726 (2-hydroxyethyliden-cyanoacetic acid 4-trifluoromethyl anilide), which is the active metabolite of the isoxazole derivative leflunomide [5-methyl-N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide]. An IC50 value of 1 microM was determined for A77 1726. Detailed kinetics experiments revealed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to dihydroorotate (Kiu = 0.94 microM) and non

  9. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Knoch, Eva; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/) involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development. PMID:24966860

  10. Concentration profiles near an activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyung; Agmon, Noam

    2008-09-25

    When a resting enzyme is activated, substrate concentration profile evolves in its vicinity, ultimately tending to steady state. We use modern theories for many-body effects on diffusion-influenced reactions to derive approximate analytical expressions for the steady-state profile and the Laplace transform of the transient concentration profiles. These show excellent agreement with accurate many-particle Brownian-dynamics simulations for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The steady-state profile has a hyperbolic dependence on the distance of the substrate from the enzyme, albeit with a prefactor containing the complexity of the many-body effects. These are most conspicuous for the substrate concentration at the surface of the enzyme. It shows an interesting transition as a function of the enzyme turnover rate. When it is high, the contact concentration decays monotonically to steady state. However, for slow turnover it is nonmonotonic, showing a minimum due to reversible substrate binding, then a maximum due to diffusion of new substrate toward the enzyme, and finally decay to steady state. Under certain conditions one can obtain a good estimate for the critical value of the turnover rate constant at the transition.

  11. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  12. Local encoding of computationally designed enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Allert, Malin; Dwyer, Mary A.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2007-01-01

    One aim of computational protein design is to introduce novel enzyme activity into proteins of known structure by predicting mutations that stabilize transition states. Previously we have shown that it is possible to introduce triose phosphate isomerase activity into the ribose-binding protein of Escherichia coli by constructing 17 mutations in the first two layers of residues that surround the wild-type ligand-binding site. Here we report that these mutations can be “transplanted” into a homologous ribose-binding protein, isolated from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, with retention of catalytic activity, substrate affinity, and reaction pH dependence. The observed 105–106-fold rate enhancement corresponds to 70% of the maximally known transition-state binding energy. The wild-type sequences in these two homologues are almost perfectly conserved in the vicinity of their ribose-binding sites, but diverge significantly at increasing distance from these sites. The results demonstrate that the computationally designed mutations are sufficient to encode the observed enzyme activity, that all the observed activity is locally encoded within the layer of residues directly in contact with the substrate, and that in this case at least 70% of transition state stabilization energy can be achieved using straightforward considerations of stereochemical complementarity between enzyme and reactants. PMID:17196220

  13. Enhanced expression of an endoglucanase in Bacillus subtilis by using the sucrose-inducible sacB promoter and improved properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen-Lin; Du, Kun

    2012-06-01

    An endoglucanase from Bacillus akibai I-1 was successfully overexpressed in Bacillus subtilis 168 and the expression level of the recombinant enzyme was greatly enhanced by using the sucrose-inducible sacB promoter. The endoglucanase activity in the culture supernatant of recombinant B. subtilis by using itself promoter (HpaII) in plasmid pMA5 was 3U/ml. Interestingly, with the addition of sacB promoter at downstream from the HpaII promoter or the replacement of HpaII promoter by the sacB promoter, the endoglucanase activities reached 62 and 60U/ml, respectively, under the optimal culture conditions. These results demonstrated that the sacB promoter might be more efficient for the expression of the endoglucanase than the HpaII promoter. More interestingly, the purified native enzyme had broad pH stability, good thermostability and resistibility to various metal ions and chelating agents examined, while the recombinant enzyme had improved resistibility to SDS, which was stable in 0.2% (w/v) laundry detergent and thus showed great potential in detergents industry.

  14. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility.

    PubMed

    Smith, Madison A; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N; Johnston, Kathryn A; Lopez, Karlo M

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM(-1 )cm(-1). No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture. PMID:26942005

  15. Sequence Analysis of the Gene Encoding Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea and Characterization of the Recombinant Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Potocki De Montalk, G.; Remaud-Simeon, M.; Willemot, R. M.; Planchot, V.; Monsan, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Neisseria polysaccharea gene encoding amylosucrase was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequencing revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence differs significantly from that previously published. Comparison of the sequence with that of enzymes of the α-amylase family predicted a (β/α)8-barrel domain. Six of the eight highly conserved regions in amylolytic enzymes are present in amylosucrase. Among them, four constitute the active site in α-amylases. These sites were also conserved in the sequence of glucosyltransferases and dextransucrases. Nevertheless, the evolutionary tree does not show strong homology between them. The amylosucrase was purified by affinity chromatography between fusion protein glutathione S-transferase–amylosucrase and glutathione-Sepharose 4B. The pure enzyme linearly elongated some branched chains of glycogen, to an average degree of polymerization of 75. PMID:9882648

  16. Cloning and functional analysis of a high DP fructan:fructan 1-fructosyl transferase from Echinops ritro (Asteraceae): comparison of the native and recombinant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Van den Ende, Wim; Clerens, Stefan; Vergauwen, Rudy; Boogaerts, David; Le Roy, Katrien; Arckens, Lutgarde; Van Laere, André

    2006-01-01

    Inulin-type fructans are the simplest and most studied fructans and have become increasingly popular as prebiotic health-improving compounds. A natural variation in the degree of polymerization (DP) of inulins is observed within the family of the Asteraceae. Globe thistle (Echinops ritro), artichoke (Cynara scolymus), and Viguiera discolor biosynthesize fructans with a considerably higher DP than Cichorium intybus (chicory), Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke), and Dahlia variabilis. The higher DP in some species can be explained by the presence of special fructan:fructan 1-fructosyl transferases (high DP 1-FFTs), different from the classical low DP 1-FFTs. Here, the RT-PCR-based cloning of a high DP 1-FFT cDNA from Echinops ritro is described, starting from peptide sequence information derived from the purified native high DP 1-FFT enzyme. The cDNA was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. A comparison is made between the mass fingerprints of the native, heterodimeric enzyme and its recombinant, monomeric counterpart (mass fingerprints and kinetical analysis) showing that they have very similar properties. The recombinant enzyme is a functional 1-FFT lacking invertase and 1-SST activities, but shows a small intrinsic 1-FEH activity. The enzyme is capable of producing a high DP inulin pattern in vitro, similar to the one observed in vivo. Depending on conditions, the enzyme is able to produce fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) as well. Therefore, the enzyme might be suitable for both FOS and high DP inulin production in bioreactors. Alternatively, introduction of the high DP 1-FFT gene in chicory, a crop widely used for inulin extraction, could lead to an increase in DP which is useful for a number of specific industrial applications. 1-FFT expression analysis correlates well with high DP fructan accumulation in vivo, suggesting that the enzyme is responsible for high DP fructan formation in planta.

  17. Cloning and functional analysis of a high DP fructan:fructan 1-fructosyl transferase from Echinops ritro (Asteraceae): comparison of the native and recombinant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Van den Ende, Wim; Clerens, Stefan; Vergauwen, Rudy; Boogaerts, David; Le Roy, Katrien; Arckens, Lutgarde; Van Laere, André

    2006-01-01

    Inulin-type fructans are the simplest and most studied fructans and have become increasingly popular as prebiotic health-improving compounds. A natural variation in the degree of polymerization (DP) of inulins is observed within the family of the Asteraceae. Globe thistle (Echinops ritro), artichoke (Cynara scolymus), and Viguiera discolor biosynthesize fructans with a considerably higher DP than Cichorium intybus (chicory), Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke), and Dahlia variabilis. The higher DP in some species can be explained by the presence of special fructan:fructan 1-fructosyl transferases (high DP 1-FFTs), different from the classical low DP 1-FFTs. Here, the RT-PCR-based cloning of a high DP 1-FFT cDNA from Echinops ritro is described, starting from peptide sequence information derived from the purified native high DP 1-FFT enzyme. The cDNA was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. A comparison is made between the mass fingerprints of the native, heterodimeric enzyme and its recombinant, monomeric counterpart (mass fingerprints and kinetical analysis) showing that they have very similar properties. The recombinant enzyme is a functional 1-FFT lacking invertase and 1-SST activities, but shows a small intrinsic 1-FEH activity. The enzyme is capable of producing a high DP inulin pattern in vitro, similar to the one observed in vivo. Depending on conditions, the enzyme is able to produce fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) as well. Therefore, the enzyme might be suitable for both FOS and high DP inulin production in bioreactors. Alternatively, introduction of the high DP 1-FFT gene in chicory, a crop widely used for inulin extraction, could lead to an increase in DP which is useful for a number of specific industrial applications. 1-FFT expression analysis correlates well with high DP fructan accumulation in vivo, suggesting that the enzyme is responsible for high DP fructan formation in planta. PMID:16449376

  18. Secretion of active recombinant phytase from soybean cell-suspension cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Hegeman, C E; Hanlon, R W; Lacy, G H; Denbow, M D; Grabau, E A

    1997-01-01

    Phytase, an enzyme that degrades the phosphorus storage compound phytate, has the potential to enhance phosphorus availability in animal diets when engineered into soybean (Glycine max) seeds. The phytase gene from Aspergillus niger was inserted into soybean transformation plasmids under control of constitutive and seed-specific promoters, with and without a plant signal sequence. Suspension cultures were used to confirm phytase expression in soybean cells. Phytase mRNA was observed in cultures containing constitutively expressed constructs. Phytase activity was detected in the culture medium from transformants that received constructs containing the plant signal sequence, confirming expectations that the protein would follow the default secretory pathway. Secretion also facilitated characterization of the biochemical properties of recombinant phytase. Soybean-synthesized phytase had a lower molecular mass than did the fungal enzyme. However, deglycosylation of the recombinant and fungal phytase yielded polypeptides of identical molecular mass (49 kD). Temperature and pH optima of the recombinant phytase were indistinguishable from the commercially available fungal phytase. Thermal inactivation studies of the recombinant phytase suggested that the additional protein stability would be required to withstand the elevated temperatures involved in soybean processing. PMID:9232886

  19. Detection of contaminating enzymatic activity in plant-derived recombinant biotechnology products.

    PubMed

    Brinson, Robert G; Giulian, Gary G; Kelman, Zvi; Marino, John P

    2014-12-01

    Residual impurities in recombinantly produced protein biologics, such as host cell proteins (HCP), can potentially cause unwanted toxic or immunogenic responses in patients. Additionally, undetected impurities found in recombinant proteins used in cell culture may adversely impact basic research and biotechnology applications. Currently, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the standard for detection of residual HCP contamination in recombinantly produced biologics. Alternatively, two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is being developed as a tool for assessing this critical quality attribute. Both of these methods rely on the direct detection of HCPs and some previous knowledge of the contaminant. For contaminating enzymes, the mass level of the impurity may fall below the threshold of detection of these methods and underestimate the true impact. To address this point, here we demonstrate facile detection and characterization of contaminating phytase activity in rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) using a sensitive, label-free nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assay. We observed varying degrees of phytase contamination in biotechnology-grade rHSA from various manufacturers by monitoring the degradation of adenosine-5'-triphosphate and myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate by (31)P NMR. The observed lot-to-lot variability may result in irreproducible cell culture results and should be evaluated as a possible critical quality attribute in plant-derived biotherapeutics.

  20. Saccharification of Lignocelluloses by Carbohydrate Active Enzymes of the White Rot Fungus Dichomitus squalens.

    PubMed

    Rytioja, Johanna; Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkinen, Susanna; Vehmaanperä, Jari; Hatakka, Annele; Mäkelä, Miia R

    2015-01-01

    White rot fungus Dichomitus squalens is an efficient lignocellulose degrading basidiomycete and a promising source for new plant cell wall polysaccharides depolymerizing enzymes. In this work, we focused on cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of D. squalens. The native CBHI fraction of the fungus, consisting three isoenzymes, was purified and it maintained the activity for 60 min at 50°C, and was stable in acidic pH. Due to the lack of enzyme activity assay for detecting only CBHII activity, CBHII of D. squalens was produced recombinantly in an industrially important ascomycete host, Trichoderma reesei. CBH enzymes of D. squalens showed potential in hydrolysis of complex lignocellulose substrates sugar beet pulp and wheat bran, and microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel. Recombinant CBHII (rCel6A) of D. squalens hydrolysed all the studied plant biomasses. Compared to individual activities, synergistic effect between rCel6A and native CBHI fraction of D. squalens was significant in the hydrolysis of Avicel. Furthermore, the addition of laccase to the mixture of CBHI fraction and rCel6A significantly enhanced the amount of released reducing sugars from sugar beet pulp. Especially, synergy between individual enzymes is a crucial factor in the tailor-made enzyme mixtures needed for hydrolysis of different plant biomass feedstocks. Our data supports the importance of oxidoreductases in improved enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose saccharification. PMID:26660105

  1. Saccharification of Lignocelluloses by Carbohydrate Active Enzymes of the White Rot Fungus Dichomitus squalens

    PubMed Central

    Rytioja, Johanna; Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkinen, Susanna; Vehmaanperä, Jari; Hatakka, Annele; Mäkelä, Miia R.

    2015-01-01

    White rot fungus Dichomitus squalens is an efficient lignocellulose degrading basidiomycete and a promising source for new plant cell wall polysaccharides depolymerizing enzymes. In this work, we focused on cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of D. squalens. The native CBHI fraction of the fungus, consisting three isoenzymes, was purified and it maintained the activity for 60 min at 50°C, and was stable in acidic pH. Due to the lack of enzyme activity assay for detecting only CBHII activity, CBHII of D. squalens was produced recombinantly in an industrially important ascomycete host, Trichoderma reesei. CBH enzymes of D. squalens showed potential in hydrolysis of complex lignocellulose substrates sugar beet pulp and wheat bran, and microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel. Recombinant CBHII (rCel6A) of D. squalens hydrolysed all the studied plant biomasses. Compared to individual activities, synergistic effect between rCel6A and native CBHI fraction of D. squalens was significant in the hydrolysis of Avicel. Furthermore, the addition of laccase to the mixture of CBHI fraction and rCel6A significantly enhanced the amount of released reducing sugars from sugar beet pulp. Especially, synergy between individual enzymes is a crucial factor in the tailor-made enzyme mixtures needed for hydrolysis of different plant biomass feedstocks. Our data supports the importance of oxidoreductases in improved enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose saccharification. PMID:26660105

  2. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  3. Staphylococcus simulans Recombinant Lysostaphin: Production, Purification, and Determination of Antistaphylococcal Activity.

    PubMed

    Boksha, I S; Lavrova, N V; Grishin, A V; Demidenko, A V; Lyashchuk, A M; Galushkina, Z M; Ovchinnikov, R S; Umyarov, A M; Avetisian, L R; Chernukha, M Iu; Shaginian, I A; Lunin, V G; Karyagina, A S

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus simulans lysostaphin is an endopeptidase lysing staphylococcus cell walls by cleaving pentaglycine cross-bridges in their peptidoglycan. A synthetic gene encoding S. simulans lysostaphin was cloned in Escherichia coli cells, and producer strains were designed. The level of produced biologically active lysostaphin comprised 6-30% of total E. coli cell protein (depending on E. coli M15 or BL21 producer) under batch cultivation conditions. New methods were developed for purification of lysostaphin without affinity domains and for testing its enzymatic activity. As judged by PAGE, the purified recombinant lysostaphin is of >97% purity. The produced lysostaphin lysed cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus haemolyticus clinical isolates. In vitro activity and general biochemical properties of purified recombinant lysostaphin produced by M15 or BL21 E. coli strains were identical to those of recombinant lysostaphin supplied by Sigma-Aldrich (USA) and used as reference in other known studies. The prepared recombinant lysostaphin represents a potential product for development of enzymatic preparation for medicine and veterinary due to the simple purification scheme enabling production of the enzyme of high purity and antistaphylococcal activity. PMID:27297900

  4. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  5. Identification of activating enzymes of a novel FBPase inhibitor prodrug, CS-917

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kazuishi; Inaba, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Rika; Watanabe, Mihoko; Sakurai, Hidetaka; Fukushima, Yumiko; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Takahashi, Tohru; Izumi, Takashi; Shinagawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    CS-917 (MB06322) is a selective small compound inhibitor of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), which is expected to be a novel drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes by inhibiting gluconeogenesis. CS-917 is a bisamidate prodrug and activation of CS-917 requires a two-step enzyme catalyzed reaction. The first-step enzyme, esterase, catalyzes the conversion of CS-917 into the intermediate form (R-134450) and the second-step enzyme, phosphoramidase, catalyzes the conversion of R-134450 into the active form (R-125338). In this study, we biochemically purified the CS-917 esterase activity in monkey small intestine and liver. We identified cathepsin A (CTSA) and elastase 3B (ELA3B) as CS-917 esterases in the small intestine by mass spectrometry, whereas we found CTSA and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) in monkey liver. We also purified R-134450 phosphoramidase activity in monkey liver and identified sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, acid-like 3A (SMPADL3A), as an R-134450 phosphoramidase, which has not been reported to have any enzyme activity. Recombinant human CTSA, ELA3B, and CES1 showed CS-917 esterase activity and recombinant human SMPDL3A showed R-134450 phosphoramidase activity, which confirmed the identification of those enzymes. Identification of metabolic enzymes responsible for the activation process is the requisite first step to understanding the activation process, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of CS-917 at the molecular level. This is the first identification of a phosphoramidase other than histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein (HINT) family enzymes and SMPDL3A might generally contribute to activation of the other bisamidate prodrugs. PMID:26171222

  6. Recombination activity of interfaces in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peshcherova, S. M.; Yakimov, E. B.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. I.; Pavlova, L. A.; Feklisova, O. V.

    2015-06-15

    The electrical activity of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon grown from metallurgical silicon by the Bridgman method is investigated by the method of electron-beam induced current. The main tendencies of atypical manifestation of the local electrical activity of Σ3(111) and Σ9(110) special boundaries are revealed. The structural features of the grain boundaries after selective etching and the impurity-distribution characteristics in multicrystalline silicon are determined by the methods of electron backscattering diffraction and electron-probe microanalysis.

  7. Recombinant expression, molecular characterization and crystal structure of antitumor enzyme, L-lysine α-oxidase from Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Amano, Marie; Mizuguchi, Haruka; Sano, Tadahisa; Kondo, Hiroki; Shinyashiki, Kengo; Inagaki, Junko; Tamura, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kusakabe, Hitoshi; Imada, Katsumi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    L-Lysine α-oxidase (LysOX) from Trichoderma viride is a homodimeric 112 kDa flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-lysine to form α-keto-ε-aminocaproate. LysOX severely inhibited growth of cancer cells but showed relatively low cytotoxicity for normal cells. We have determined the cDNA nucleotide sequence encoding LysOX from T. viride. The full-length cDNA consists of 2,119 bp and encodes a possible signal peptide (Met1-Arg77) and the mature protein (Ala78-Ile617). The LysOX gene have been cloned and heterologously expressed in Streptomyces lividans TK24 with the enzyme activity up to 9.8 U/ml. The enzymatic properties of the purified recombinant LysOX, such as substrate specificity and thermal stability, are same as those of native LysOX. The crystal structure of LysOX at 1.9 Å resolution revealed that the overall structure is similar to that of snake venom L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), and the residues involved in the interaction with the amino or carboxy group of the substrate are structurally conserved. However, the entrance and the inner surface structures of the funnel to the active site, as well as the residues involved in the substrate side-chain recognition, are distinct from LAAOs. These structural differences well explain the unique substrate specificity of LysOX. PMID:25648943

  8. Activation of the IFN-inducible enzyme RNase L causes apoptosis of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Guerra, M; Rivas, C; Esteban, M

    1997-09-29

    The interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme RNase L produced by a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) causes death of mammalian cells with morphological and biochemical characteristics of apoptosis. Coexpression of 2-5A-synthetase enhances apoptosis induced by RNase L Activation of endogenous RNase L by infection with a VV ts mutant (ts22) or with wild-type virus in the presence of the antipoxvirus drug isatin-beta-thiosemicarbazone, a treatment known to significantly increase the amount of double-stranded RNA late during infection, also causes pronounced apoptosis of infected cells. The effects observed with recombinant virus-derived RNase L or with the endogenous enzyme are specific, since apoptosis also occurs in cells derived from mice lacking the IFN-induced protein kinase (PKR). The apoptosis antagonist Bcl-2 prevents induction of cell death by RNase L activation. Apoptosis of mammalian cells by RNase L activation could be a mechanism mediating anticellular actions of IFN.

  9. Expression and purification of biologically active recombinant human paraoxonase 1 from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Tripathy, Rajan K; Aggarwal, Geetika; Pande, Abhay H

    2015-11-01

    Human PON1 (h-PON1) is a Ca(2+)-dependent serum enzyme and can hydrolyze (and inactivate) a wide range of substrates. It is a multifaceted enzyme and exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-atherogenic, anti-diabetic, anti-microbial, and organophosphate (OP)-detoxifying properties. Thus, h-PON1 is a strong candidate for the development of therapeutic intervention against these conditions in humans. Insufficient hydrolyzing activity of native h-PON1 against desirable substrate affirms the urgent need to develop improved variant(s) of h-PON1 having enhanced activity. Production of recombinant h-PON1 (rh-PON1) using an Escherichia coli expression system is a key to develop such variant(s). However, generation of rh-PON1 using E. coli expression system has been elusive until now because of the aggregation of over-expressed rh-PON1 protein in inactive form as inclusion bodies (IBs) in the bacterial cells. In this study, we have over-expressed rh-PON1(wt) and rh-PON1(H115W;R192K) proteins as IBs in E. coli, and refolded the inactive enzymes present in the IBs to their active form using in vitro refolding. The active enzymes were isolated from the refolding mixture by ion-exchange chromatography. The catalytic properties of the refolded enzymes were similar to their soluble counterparts. Our results show that the pure and the active variant of rh-PON1 enzyme having enhanced hydrolyzing activity can be produced in large quantities using E. coli expression system. This method can be used for the industrial scale production of rh-PON1 enzymes and will aid in developing h-PON1 as a therapeutic candidate.

  10. [Detection of enzyme activity in decontaminated spices in industrial use].

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Theobald, R

    1995-03-01

    A range of decontaminated species of industrial use have been examined for their enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, amylase, lipase activity). The genuine enzymes remain fully active in irradiated spices, whereas the microbial load is clearly reduced. In contrast steam treated spices no longer demonstrate enzyme activities. Steam treatment offers e.g. black pepper without lipase activity, which can no longer cause fat deterioration. Low microbial load in combination with clearly detectable enzyme activity in spices is an indication for irradiation, whereas, reduced microbial contamination combined with enzyme inactivation indicate steam treatment of raw material.

  11. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  12. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Marritt, Sophie J; Kemp, Gemma L; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2013-11-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes.

  13. Puromycin-Sensitive Aminopeptidase: An Antiviral Prodrug Activating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Tehler, Ulrika; Nelson, Cara H.; Peterson, Larryn W.; Provoda, Chester J.; Hilfinger, John M.; Lee, Kyung-Dall; McKenna, Charles E.; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Cidofovir (HPMPC) is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, currently used to treat AIDS-related human cytomegalovirus retinitis. Cidofovir has recognized therapeutic potential for orthopox virus infections, although its use is hampered by its inherent low oral bioavailability. Val-Ser-cyclic HPMPC (Val-Ser-cHPMPC) is a promising peptide prodrug which has previously been shown by us to improve the permeability and bioavailability of the parent compound in rodent models (Eriksson et al. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 2008 vol 5 598-609). Puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was partially purified from Caco-2 cell homogenates and identified as a prodrug activating enzyme for Val-Ser-cHPMPC. The prodrug activation process initially involves an enzymatic step where the l-Valine residue is removed by puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, a step that is bestatin-sensitive. Subsequent chemical hydrolysis results in the generation of cHPMPC. A recombinant puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was generated and its substrate specificity investigated. The kcat for Val-pNA was significantly lower than that for Ala-pNA, suggesting that some amino acids are preferred over others. Furthermore, the three-fold higher kcat for Val-Ser-cHPMPC as compared to Val-pNA suggests that the leaving group may play an important role in determining hydrolytic activity. In addition to its ability to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, these observations strongly suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase is an important enzyme for activating Val-Ser-cHPMPC in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase makes an attractive target for future prodrug design. PMID:19969024

  14. Exploration of the spontaneous fluctuating activity of single enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Anne; Maarleveld, Timo R; Bruggeman, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Single enzyme molecules display inevitable, stochastic fluctuations in their catalytic activity. In metabolism, for instance, the stochastic activity of individual enzymes is averaged out due to their high copy numbers per single cell. However, many processes inside cells rely on single enzyme activity, such as transcription, replication, translation, and histone modifications. Here we introduce the main theoretical concepts of stochastic single-enzyme activity starting from the Michaelis-Menten enzyme mechanism. Next, we discuss stochasticity of multi-substrate enzymes, of enzymes and receptors with multiple conformational states and finally, how fluctuations in receptor activity arise from fluctuations in signal concentration. This paper aims to introduce the exciting field of single-molecule enzyme kinetics and stochasticity to a wider audience of biochemists and systems biologists.

  15. Glutaraldehyde-Modified Recombinant Fel d 1: A Hypoallergen With Negligible Biological Activity But Retained Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Versteeg, Serge A.; Bulder, Ingrid; Himly, Martin; van Capel, Toni M.; van den Hout, R.; Koppelman, Stef J.; de Jong, Esther C.; Ferreira, Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant allergens are under investigation for replacing allergen extracts in immunotherapy. Site-directed mutagenesis has been suggested as a strategy to develop hypoallergenic molecules that will reduce the risk of side effects. For decades, chemically modified allergen extracts have been used for the same reason. Aim To evaluate whether glutaraldehyde modification is a good strategy to produce hypoallergenic recombinant allergens with retained immunogenicity. Methods Fel d 1 was cloned as a single construct linking both chains of the molecule and expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. After physicochemical purification, recombinant Fel d 1 (rFel d 1) was chemically modified using glutaraldehyde. The effect of modification on immune reactivity was evaluated using radioallergosorbent test, CAP-inhibition, competitive radioimmunoassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, basophil histamine release, and T-cell proliferation assays. Both natural Fel d 1 and recombinant unmodified Fel d 1 were used as controls. Results rFel d 1 demonstrated similar IgE binding and biological activity as its natural counterpart. Upon modification, IgE-binding potency decreased to >1000-fold, which was translated into a >106-fold reduction in the biological activity assessed by basophil histamine release. In contrast, the modified recombinant did not show a decreased but even a moderately increased capacity (1.5-fold) to stimulate proliferation of T cells (P < 0.01). Finally, it induced specific IgG antibodies in rabbits that recognized the unmodified allergen. Conclusions Chemical modification is a practical and highly effective approach for achieving hypoallergenicity of recombinant allergens with retained immunogenicity. PMID:23268458

  16. Cloning, heterologous expression and properties of a recombinant active turnip peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cabrera, Norma A; Regalado, C; Garcia-Almendarez, Blanca E

    2011-07-13

    Turnip (Brassica napus) roots peroxidase isoforms have been used in diagnostic kits and can also efficiently polymerize phenolic compounds from wastewaters. Heterologous expression of a turnip acidic peroxidase (BnPA) was investigated to increase availability of this widely used enzyme. The mature BnPA was ligated into the pET28a(+) vector and used to transform Escherichia coli Rosetta 2. Recombinant BnPA peroxidase was overexpressed and accumulated in inclusion bodies from which it was purified to homogeneity by immobilized metal affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. Peroxidase activity was observed after a refolding process under oxidative conditions. The yield of pure recombinant BnPA was 29 mg L(-1) of culture with a specific activity of 981 ± 20 ABTS units mg(-1) at optimal conditions (pH 6, 45 °C). Recombinant BnPA showed similar kinetic properties compared to native turnip peroxidase, and its secondary structure evaluated by circular dichroism comprised 20% α-helix, 32% β-sheet and 48% random structure. Recombinant BnPA showed high yield and good kinetic properties which are key steps for future structure-function studies and biotechnological applications. PMID:21591783

  17. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  18. A protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition assay using a recombinant enzyme for rapid detection of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Imamura, Shihoko; Oshiro, Naomasa; Ikehara, Satsuki; Shinjo, Fukiko; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2008-06-15

    Worldwide blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) commonly occur in freshwater, often in drinking water sources, necessitating routine monitoring of water quality. Microcystin-LR and related cyanobacterial toxins strongly inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and are therefore assayable by measuring the extent of PP2A inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of the catalytic subunit of recombinant PP2A (rPP2Ac) expressed with a baculovirus system for use in a microplate microcystin assay. Five microcystin analogs, microcystin-LR, -RR, -YR, -LF, and -LW, and nodularin strongly inhibited rPP2Ac activity with IC(50) values of 0.048, 0.072, 0.147, 0.096, 0.114, and 0.54 nM, respectively. Microcystin-LR in a water sample could be assayed from 0.005 to 5 ng/ml. The assay could detect the toxin at a far lower level than required by the World Health Organization for regulation of microcystin-LR or its equivalent (1 microg/L). Pretreatment or concentration of water samples with low toxin concentrations was not necessary. The microplate assay using rPP2Ac was more sensitive than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and a cytotoxicity assay. The genetically engineered rPP2Ac was more stable than a commercially available dimeric enzyme, producing accurate and reproducible results. Our results confirm that the rPP2Ac we prepared is an excellent tool for detecting and quantifying microcystins in water.

  19. A protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition assay using a recombinant enzyme for rapid detection of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Imamura, Shihoko; Oshiro, Naomasa; Ikehara, Satsuki; Shinjo, Fukiko; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2008-06-15

    Worldwide blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) commonly occur in freshwater, often in drinking water sources, necessitating routine monitoring of water quality. Microcystin-LR and related cyanobacterial toxins strongly inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and are therefore assayable by measuring the extent of PP2A inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of the catalytic subunit of recombinant PP2A (rPP2Ac) expressed with a baculovirus system for use in a microplate microcystin assay. Five microcystin analogs, microcystin-LR, -RR, -YR, -LF, and -LW, and nodularin strongly inhibited rPP2Ac activity with IC(50) values of 0.048, 0.072, 0.147, 0.096, 0.114, and 0.54 nM, respectively. Microcystin-LR in a water sample could be assayed from 0.005 to 5 ng/ml. The assay could detect the toxin at a far lower level than required by the World Health Organization for regulation of microcystin-LR or its equivalent (1 microg/L). Pretreatment or concentration of water samples with low toxin concentrations was not necessary. The microplate assay using rPP2Ac was more sensitive than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and a cytotoxicity assay. The genetically engineered rPP2Ac was more stable than a commercially available dimeric enzyme, producing accurate and reproducible results. Our results confirm that the rPP2Ac we prepared is an excellent tool for detecting and quantifying microcystins in water. PMID:18430448

  20. Chemical modification of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase; definition of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Britten, C J; Bird, M I

    1997-02-11

    The biosynthesis of the carbohydrate antigen sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)) is dependent on the activity of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.152, GDP-fucose:Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc-R alpha (1-3)fucosyltransferase). This enzyme catalyses the transfer of fucose from GDP-beta-fucose to the 3-OH of N-acetylglucosamine present in lactosamine acceptors. In this report, we have investigated the amino acids essential for the activity of a recombinant alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (FucT-VI) through chemical modification of the enzyme with group-selective reagents. FucT-VI activity was found to be particularly sensitive to the histidine-selective reagent diethylpyrocarbonate and the cysteine reagent N-ethylmaleimide, with IC50 values of less than 200 microM. Reagents selective for arginine and lysine had no effect on enzyme activity. The inclusion of GDP-beta-fucose during preincubation with NEM reduces the rate of inactivation whereas inclusion of an acceptor saccharide for the enzyme, Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc, had no effect. No protective effect with either GDP-beta-fucose or Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc was observed on treatment of the enzyme with diethylpyrocarbonate. These data suggest that in addition to an NEM-reactive cysteine in, or adjacent to, the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, FucT-VI possesses histidine residue(s) that are essential for enzyme activity.

  1. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-15

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE-AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE-AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE-AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE-AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes.

  2. Development of an enzyme immunoassay using recombinant expressed antigen to detect hepatitis delta virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Fields, H A

    1989-10-01

    Two generic enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed for detection of anti-hepatitis delta virus antibodies (anti-HD) and compared with a commercially available radioimmunoassay. Both generic assays were configured as blocking assays and used hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) derived from infected chimpanzee liver (EIA-1) or from Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing an insert from within an open reading frame encoding HDAg (EIA-2). Absolute sensitivity was ascertained by endpoint titration, which demonstrated essentially identical endpoints for EIA-1 and EIA-2. The absolute sensitivities of the EIAs were approximately four times greater than that of the radioimmunoassay. Specificity and sensitivity were ascertained by testing a panel of 176 serum specimens by each assay. The specimens were selected to represent a panel composed of sera from individuals with or without markers of viral hepatitis as follows: (i) serologically confirmed by exclusion as posttransfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis; (ii) acute or chronic hepatitis B virus infection, positive for hepatitis B surface antigen; (iii) resolved hepatitis B virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis B surface antigen; (iv) acute hepatitis A virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin M; and (v) normal human sera. All three assays for anti-HD gave similar specificity and sensitivity values. In conclusion, the recombinant expressed HDAg can replace antigen derived from infected liver tissue as a diagnostic reagent used to configure an EIA for detection of anti-HD. Furthermore, the results suggest that the expressed antigen contains the important immunodominant epitope(s).

  3. Antioxidant enzymes activities in obese Tunisian children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The oxidant stress, expected to increase in obese adults, has an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. It results when free radical formation is greatly increased or protective antioxidant mechanisms are compromised. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant response to obesity-related stress in healthy children. Methods A hundred and six healthy children (54 obese and 52 controls), aged 6–12 years old, participated in this study. The collected data included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and enzymatic antioxidants (Superoxide dismutase: SOD, Catalase: CAT and Glutathione peroxidase: GPx). Results The first step antioxidant response, estimated by the SOD activity, was significantly higher in obese children compared with normal-weight controls (p < 0.05). Mean activities of anti-radical GPx and CAT enzymes were not affected by the BMI increase. Although, total cholesterol levels were statistically higher in the obese group, there was no significant association with the SOD activity. Conclusions The obesity-related increase of the oxidant stress can be observed even in the childhood period. In addition to the complications of an increased BMI, obesity itself can be considered as an independent risk factor of free radical production resulting in an increased antioxidant response. PMID:23360568

  4. Development of a Recombinant Protein-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Mycoplasma bovis Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wawegama, Nadeeka K.; Kanci, Anna; Marenda, Marc S.; Markham, Philip F.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis causes a range of diseases in cattle, including mastitis, arthritis, and pneumonia. However, accurate serological diagnosis of infection remains problematic. The studies described here aimed to identify an antigen that might be used to develop a more specific and sensitive diagnostic assay. A 226-kDa immunogenic protein was consistently detected in Western blots by antibodies in sera from calves experimentally infected with M. bovis. This protein was shown to be a membrane protein with lipase activity and was named mycoplasma immunogenic lipase A (MilA). Different regions of MilA were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins and recombinant products from the amino-terminal end shown to have strong immunoreactivity with M. bovis-specific bovine sera. The most immunoreactive fusion protein, GST-MilA-ab, was used to develop indirect IgM and IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The IgM ELISA detected M. bovis-specific IgM antibody 2 weeks after infection with 97.1% sensitivity and had a specificity of 63.3%, while the IgG ELISA detected M. bovis-specific IgG 3 weeks after infection with 92.86% sensitivity and had a specificity of 98.7%, demonstrating that the IgG ELISA has potential for use as a sensitive and specific assay for detecting infection in cattle. PMID:24334686

  5. Detection of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in domesticated ruminants by recombinant truncated SAG2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkirat; Tewari, Anup Kumar; Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Maharana, Biswaranjan; Sudan, Vikrant; Raina, Opinder Krishan; Rao, Jammi Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    An antibody detection recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for Toxoplasma gondii was laboratory standardized using recombinant truncated surface antigen 2 (SAG2) protein of T. gondii. A 483-bp sequence coding for truncated tachyzoite stage-specific SAG2 protein was amplified and ligated in pPROExHT-b expression vector to transform Escherichia coli DH5α cells. A high-level expression of the histidine-tagged fusion protein was obtained after 8 h of incubation. The recombinant protein was affinity purified using Ni-NTA agarose column and characterized by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Subsequently, the diagnostic potential of the recombinant protein was assessed with 168 field sera samples from sheep, goats and cattle. Among the small ruminants, 50% (n = 60) sheep sera samples and 41.26% (n = 63) goat samples were detected positive for T. gondii-specific antibodies. As far as seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in cattle is concerned, 64.44% (n = 45) of sera samples assayed were found to be positive. When compared to indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), the sensitivity of the recombinant truncated SAG2 antigen-based ELISA (rec-SAG2-ELISA) ranged from 81.25 to 87.10% while the specificity was 85.71 to 91.43% with substantial agreement between the tests.

  6. Serologic diagnosis of canine and equine borreliosis: use of recombinant antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, L A; Flavell, R A; Padula, S J; Anderson, J F; Fikrig, E

    1997-01-01

    Serum samples from dogs and equids suspected of having canine or equine borreliosis, respectively, were analyzed in polyvalent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Purified preparations of recombinant antigens included outer surface protein A (OspA), OspB, OspC, OspE, OspF, and p41-G (a fragment of flagellin). Of the 36 dog sera that reacted positively to whole-cell antigen, 32 (88.9%) contained antibodies to one or more recombinant antigens. Reactivities to OspF (88.9% positive) and p41-G (75% positive) were most prevalent. In analyses of 30 equid sera positive in an ELISA with whole cells, 24 (80%) contained antibodies to one or more recombinant antigens. Seropositivities in ELISAs with p41-G (50% positive) and OspF (46.7% positive) were more than twofold greater than in ELISAs with OspA, OspB, or OspC (10 to 20% positive). In parallel tests of eight canine and three equine sera, there was good agreement in results of Western blot (immunoblot) analyses and ELISAs. Although dog and equid sera with antibodies to whole-cell B. burgdorferi frequently reacted positively to one or more recombinant antigens, the inclusion of OspF and p41-G antigens in ELISAs was most useful in the serologic diagnosis of canine and equine borreliosis. PMID:8968901

  7. Expression of recombinant human phenylalanine hydroxylase as fusion protein in Escherichia coli circumvents proteolytic degradation by host cell proteases. Isolation and characterization of the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A; Knappskog, P M; Olafsdottir, S; Døskeland, A P; Eiken, H G; Svebak, R M; Bozzini, M; Apold, J; Flatmark, T

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH) was produced in high yields in Escherichia coli using the pET and pMAL expression vectors. In the pMAL system, hPAH was fused through the target sequences of the restriction protease factor Xa (IEGR) or enterokinase (D4K) to the C-terminal end of the highly expressed E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP). The recombinant hPAH, recovered in soluble forms, revealed a high specific activity even in crude extracts and was detected as a homogeneous band by Western-blot analysis using affinity-purified polyclonal rabbit anti-(rat PAH) antibodies. The enzyme expressed in the pET system was subject to limited proteolysis by host cell proteases and was difficult to purify with a satisfactory yield. By contrast, when expressed as a fusion protein in the pMAL system, hPAH was resistant to cleavage by host cell proteases and was conveniently purified by affinity chromatography on an amylose resin. Catalytically active tetramer-dimer (in equilibrium) forms of the fusion protein were separated from inactive, aggregated forms by size-exclusion h.p.l.c. After cleavage by restriction protease, factor Xa or enterokinase, hPAH was separated from uncleaved fusion protein, MBP and restriction proteases by hydroxylapatite or ion-exchange (DEAE) chromatography. The yield of highly purified hPAH was approx. 10 mg/l of culture. The specific activity of the isolated recombinant enzyme was high (i.e. 1440 nmol of tyrosine.min-1.mg-1 with tetrahydrobiopterin as the cofactor) and its catalytic and physicochemical properties are essentially the same as those reported for the enzyme isolated from human liver. The recombinant enzyme, both as a fusion protein and as purified full-length hPAH, was phosphorylated in vitro by the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylated from of hPAH electrophoretically displayed an apparently higher molecular mass (approximately 51 kDa) than the non-phosphorylated (approximately 50

  8. Expression and Purification of Chaperone-Active Recombinant Clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, Rebecca A.; Wilson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Clusterin was the first described secreted mammalian chaperone and is implicated as being a key player in both intra- and extracellular proteostasis. Its unique combination of structural features and biological chaperone activity has, however, previously made it very challenging to express and purify the protein in a correctly processed and chaperone-active form. While there are multiple reports in the literature describing the use of recombinant clusterin, all of these reports suffer from one or more of the following shortcomings: details of the methods used to produce the protein are poorly described, the product is incompletely (if at all) characterised, and purity (if shown) is in many cases inadequate. The current report provides the first well validated method to economically produce pure chaperone-active recombinant clusterin. The method was developed after trialling expression in cultured bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian cells, and involves the expression of recombinant clusterin from stably transfected HEK293 cells in protein-free medium. The product is expressed at between 7.5 and 10 µg/ml of culture, and is readily purified by a combination of immunoaffinity, cation exchange and size exclusion chromatography. The purified product was shown to be glycosylated, correctly proteolytically cleaved into α- and β-subunits, and have chaperone activity similar to that of human plasma clusterin. This new method creates the opportunity to use mutagenesis and metabolic labelling approaches in future studies to delineate functionally important sites within clusterin, and also provides a theoretically unlimited supply of recombinant clusterin which may in the future find applications in the development of therapeutics. PMID:24466307

  9. The hydroxymethyldihydropterin pyrophosphokinase domain of the multifunctional folic acid synthesis Fas protein of Pneumocystis carinii expressed as an independent enzyme in Escherichia coli: refolding and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ballantine, S P; Volpe, F; Delves, C J

    1994-08-01

    The folic acid synthesis (Fas) protein of Pneumocystis carinii is a multifunctional enzyme containing dihydroneopterin aldolase, 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (PPPK), and dihydropteroate synthase activities. Isolation of the stretch of fas cDNA shown by amino acid similarity to the bacterial counterparts to code for PPPK activity (fasC domain) is described. FasC was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli inclusion bodies using an inducible tac promoter expression system. Solubilization of the inclusion bodies in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and refolding of the recombinant protein yielded enzymatically active PPPK which was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Sequence analysis showed that the first 13 amino acids of the purified protein were in agreement with those predicted from the DNA sequence and, furthermore, that the amino-terminal methionine had been removed. The enzyme is active in the monomeric form, exhibiting maximum activity at around pH 8.0. Isoelectric focusing gave a pI of 9.1. The Km value for 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin was 3.6 microM in 50 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.2. The production of independently folded, active P. carinii PPPK will allow detailed biochemical and structural studies, increasing our understanding of this enzyme domain.

  10. Observing single enzyme molecules interconvert between activity states upon heating.

    PubMed

    Rojek, Marcin J; Walt, David R

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that single enzyme molecules of β-galactosidase interconvert between different activity states upon exposure to short pulses of heat. We show that these changes in activity are the result of different enzyme conformations. Hundreds of single β-galactosidase molecules are trapped in femtoliter reaction chambers and the individual enzymes are subjected to short heating pulses. When heating pulses are introduced into the system, the enzyme molecules switch between different activity states. Furthermore, we observe that the changes in activity are random and do not correlate with the enzyme's original activity. This study demonstrates that different stable conformations play an important role in the static heterogeneity reported previously, resulting in distinct long-lived activity states of enzyme molecules in a population.

  11. Optimisation of halogenase enzyme activity by application of a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Muffler, Kai; Retzlaff, Marco; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Ulber, Roland

    2007-01-10

    A genetic algorithm (GA) was applied for the optimisation of an enzyme assay composition respectively the enzyme activity of a recombinantly produced FADH(2)-dependent halogenating enzyme. The examined enzyme belongs to the class of halogenases and is capable to halogenate tryptophan regioselective in position 5. Therefore, the expressed trp-5-halogenase can be an interesting tool in the manufacturing of serotonin precursors. The application of stochastic search strategies (e.g. GAs) is well suited for fast determination of the global optimum in multidimensional search spaces, where statistical approaches or even the popular classical one-factor-at-a-time method often failures by misleading to local optima. The concentrations of six different medium components were optimised and the maximum yield of the halogenated tryptophan could be increased from 3.5 up to 65%.

  12. A thermostable recombinant transaldolase with high activity over a broad pH range.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Yan; Zhang, Y-H Percival; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Thermophilic enzymes are in high demand for various applications due to their prolonged lifetimes and high reaction rates at elevated temperatures. In this work, an open reading frame TM0295, which encodes a putative transaldolase (TAL) from a hyper-thermophilic microorganism, Thermotoga maritima, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme activity of transaldolase at high temperatures (e.g., at 80 °C) was reported here for the first time. The recombinant T. maritima transaldolase was extremely thermostable, with a half-life time of 198 and 13.0 h at 60 °C and 80 °C, respectively. The estimated total turn-over number was 1.5 × 10(6) mol of product per mol of enzyme at 80 °C. This enzyme also exhibited high activities within a broad pH range of 6.0-9.0. This ultra-thermostable TAL with high activity shows great potential for use in such applications as the production of enzymatic biofuels production and the synthesis of high-value carbohydrates by cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation.

  13. Evaluation of Recombinant Leptospira Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for the Serodiagnosis of Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Brendan; Costa, Dirceu; Carvalho, Fernanda Pinheiro; Guerreiro, Hygia; Matsunaga, James; Da Silva, Emilson Domingos; Ferreira, Antonio Gomes Pinto; Riley, Lee W.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Haake, David A.; Ko, Albert I.

    2001-01-01

    There is an urgent need for development of new serodiagnostic strategies for leptospirosis, an emerging zoonosis with worldwide distribution. We have evaluated the diagnostic utility of five recombinant antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for serodiagnosis of leptospirosis. Sera from 50 healthy residents of a high-incidence region were used to determine cutoff values for 96% specificity. In paired sera from 50 cases of leptospirosis confirmed by the microscopic agglutination test, immunoglobulin G (IgG) but not IgM reacted with the recombinant leptospiral proteins. The recombinant LipL32 IgG ELISA had the highest sensitivities in the acute (56%) and convalescent (94%) phases of leptospirosis. ELISAs based on recombinant OmpL1, LipL41, and Hsp58 had sensitivities of 16, 24, and 18% during the acute phase and 72, 44, and 32% during convalescence, respectively. Compared to sera from healthy individuals, patient sera did not react significantly with recombinant LipL36 (P > 0.05). Recombinant LipL32 IgG ELISA demonstrated 95% specificity among 100 healthy individuals, and specificities ranging from 90 to 97% among 30 dengue patients, 30 hepatitis patients, and 16 patients with diseases initially thought to be leptospirosis. Among 39 Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test-positive individuals and 30 Lyme disease patients, 13 and 23% of sera, respectively, reacted positively with the rLipL32 antigen. These findings indicate that rLipL32 may be an useful antigen for the serodiagnosis of leptospirosis. PMID:11526167

  14. High Inorganic Triphosphatase Activities in Bacteria and Mammalian Cells: Identification of the Enzymes Involved

    PubMed Central

    Lakaye, Bernard; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Scholer, Georges; Fillet, Marianne; Elias, Benjamin; Derochette, Jean-Michel; Crommen, Jacques; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. Methodology/Principal Findings Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPPi) is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPPi but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. Conclusions and General Significance We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPPi in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPPi, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca2+, thereby interfering with Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22984449

  15. Why do crown ethers activate enzymes in organic solvents?

    PubMed

    van Unen, Dirk-Jan; Engbersen, Johan F J; Reinhoudt, David N

    2002-02-01

    One of the major drawbacks of enzymes in nonaqueous solvents is that their activity is often dramatically low compared to that in water. This limitation can be largely overcome by crown ether treatment of enzymes. In this paper, we describe a number of carefully designed new experiments that have improved the insights into the mechanisms that are operative in the crown ether activation of enzymes in organic solvents. The enhancement of enzyme activity upon addition of 18-crown-6 to the organic solvent can be reconciled with a mechanism in which macrocyclic interactions of 18-crown-6 with the enzyme play an important role. Macrocyclic interactions (e.g., complexation with lysine ammonium groups of the enzyme) can lead to a reduced formation of inter- and intramolecular salt bridges and, consequently, to lowering of the kinetic conformational barriers, enabling the enzyme to refold into thermodynamically stable, catalytically (more) active conformations. This assumption is supported by the observation that the crown-ether-enhanced enzyme activity is retained after removal of the crown by washing with a dry organic solvent. A much stronger crown ether activation is observed when 18-crown-6 is added prior to lyophilization, and this can be explained by a combination of two effects: the before-mentioned macrocyclic complexation effect, and a less specific, nonmacrocyclic, lyoprotecting effect. The magnitude of the total crown ether effect depends on the polarity and thermodynamic water activity of the solvent, the activation being highest in dry and apolar media, where kinetic conformational barriers are highest. By determination of the specific activity of crown-ether-lyophilized enzyme as a function of the enzyme concentration, the macrocyclic crown ether (linearly dependent on the enzyme concentration) and the nonmacrocyclic lyoprotection effect (not dependent on the enzyme concentration) could be separated. These measurements reveal that the contribution of the

  16. Spatial distribution of enzyme activities in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere, the tiny zone of soil surrounding roots, certainly represents one of the most dynamic habitat and interfaces on Earth. Activities of enzymes produced by both plant roots and microbes are the primary biological drivers of organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. That is why there is an urgent need in spatially explicit methods for the determination of the rhizosphere extension and enzyme distribution. Recently, zymography as a new technique based on diffusion of enzymes through the 1 mm gel plate for analysis has been introduced (Spohn & Kuzyakov, 2013). We developed the zymography technique to visualize the enzyme activities with a higher spatial resolution. For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root tip and the root surface in the soil. We visualized the two dimensional distribution of the activity of three enzymes: β-glucosidase, phosphatase and leucine amino peptidase in the rhizosphere of maize using fluorogenically labelled substrates. Spatial-resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil-root system. The newly-developed direct zymography visualized heterogeneity of enzyme activities along the roots. The activity of all enzymes was the highest at the apical parts of individual roots. Across the roots, the enzyme activities were higher at immediate vicinity of the roots (1.5 mm) and gradually decreased towards the bulk soil. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root surface were enzyme specific, with highest extension for phosphatase. We conclude that improved zymography is promising in situ technique to analyze, visualize and quantify spatial distribution of enzyme activities in the rhizosphere hotspots. References Spohn, M., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Phosphorus mineralization can be driven by microbial need for carbon. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 61: 69-75

  17. Tropine Forming Tropinone Reductase Gene from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha): Biochemical Characteristics of the Recombinant Enzyme and Novel Physiological Overtones of Tissue-Wide Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Amit Kumar; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Negi, Arvind Singh; Misra, Laxminarain; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera is one of the most reputed medicinal plants of Indian systems of medicine synthesizing diverse types of secondary metabolites such as withanolides, alkaloids, withanamides etc. Present study comprises cloning and E. coli over-expression of a tropinone reductase gene (WsTR-I) from W. somnifera, and elucidation of biochemical characteristics and physiological role of tropinone reductase enzyme in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in aerial tissues of the plant. The recombinant enzyme was demonstrated to catalyze NADPH-dependent tropinone to tropine conversion step in tropane metabolism, through TLC, GC and GC-MS-MS analyses of the reaction product. The functionally active homodimeric ∼60 kDa enzyme catalyzed the reaction in reversible manner at optimum pH 6.7. Catalytic kinetics of the enzyme favoured its forward reaction (tropine formation). Comparative 3-D models of landscape of the enzyme active site contours and tropinone binding site were also developed. Tissue-wide and ontogenic stage-wise assessment of WsTR-I transcript levels revealed constitutive expression of the gene with relatively lower abundance in berries and young leaves. The tissue profiles of WsTR-I expression matched those of tropine levels. The data suggest that, in W. somnifera, aerial tissues as well possess tropane alkaloid biosynthetic competence. In vivo feeding of U-[14C]-sucrose to orphan shoot (twigs) and [14C]-chasing revealed substantial radiolabel incorporation in tropinone and tropine, confirming the de novo synthesizing ability of the aerial tissues. This inherent independent ability heralds a conceptual novelty in the backdrop of classical view that these tissues acquire the alkaloids through transportation from roots rather than synthesis. The TR-I gene expression was found to be up-regulated on exposure to signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid) and on mechanical injury. The enzyme's catalytic and structural properties as well as gene expression

  18. Self-Assembly of Amyloid Fibrils That Display Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Entwistle, Aiman; Zhang, Hong; Jackson, Antony P; Mason, Thomas O; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Smith, Andrew T; Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Perrett, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization is an important strategy to enhance the stability and recoverability of enzymes and to facilitate the separation of enzymes from reaction products. However, enzyme purification followed by separate chemical steps to allow immobilization on a solid support reduces the efficiency and yield of the active enzyme. Here we describe polypeptide constructs that self-assemble spontaneously into nanofibrils with fused active enzyme subunits displayed on the amyloid fibril surface. We measured the steady-state kinetic parameters for the appended enzymes in situ within fibrils and compare these with the identical protein constructs in solution. Finally, we demonstrated that the fibrils can be recycled and reused in functional assays both in conventional batch processes and in a continuous-flow microreactor. PMID:25937845

  19. Intracellular localization of mevalonate-activating enzymes in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, L. J.; Shah, S. P. J.; Goodwin, T. W.

    1966-01-01

    Mevalonate-activating enzymes are shown to be present in the chloroplasts of French-bean leaves. The chloroplast membrane is impermeable to mevalonic acid. Mevalonate-activating enzymes also appear to be found outside the chloroplast. These results support the view that terpenoid biosynthesis in the plant cell is controlled by a combination of enzyme segregation and specific membrane permeability. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:5947149

  20. Staphylokinase as a Plasminogen Activator Component in Recombinant Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, S. J.; Sihota, E. G.; Habibi, H. R.; Wong, S.-L.

    1999-01-01

    The plasminogen activator staphylokinase (SAK) is a promising thrombolytic agent for treatment of myocardial infarction. It can specifically stimulate the thrombolysis of both erythrocyte-rich and platelet-rich clots. However, SAK lacks fibrin-binding and thrombin inhibitor activities, two functions which would supplement and potentially improve its thrombolytic potency. Creating a recombinant fusion protein is one approach for combining protein domains with complementary functions. To evaluate SAK for use in a translational fusion protein, both N- and C-terminal fusions to SAK were constructed by using hirudin as a fusion partner. Recombinant fusion proteins were secreted from Bacillus subtilis and purified from culture supernatants. The rate of plasminogen activation by SAK was not altered by the presence of an additional N- or C-terminal protein sequence. However, cleavage at N-terminal lysines within SAK rendered the N-terminal fusion unstable in the presence of plasmin. The results of site-directed mutagenesis of lysine 10 and lysine 11 in SAK suggested that a plasmin-resistant variant cannot be created without interfering with the plasmin processing necessary for activation of SAK. Although putative plasmin cleavage sites are located at the C-terminal end of SAK at lysine 135 and lysine 136, these sites were resistant to plasmin cleavage in vitro. Therefore, C-terminal fusions represent stable configurations for developing improved thrombolytic agents based on SAK as the plasminogen activator component. PMID:9925575

  1. Multiple biological activities of human recombinant interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Dinarello, C A; Cannon, J G; Mier, J W; Bernheim, H A; LoPreste, G; Lynn, D L; Love, R N; Webb, A C; Auron, P E; Reuben, R C

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA coding for human monocyte interleukin 1 (IL-1), pI 7 form, was expressed in Escherichia coli. During purification, IL-1 activity on murine T cells was associated with the recombinant protein. Homogeneous human recombinant IL-1 (hrIL-1) was tested in several assays to demonstrate the immunological and inflammatory properties attributed to this molecule. hrIL-1 induced proliferative responses in a cloned murine T cell in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of mitogen, whereas no effect was observed with hrIL-1 alone. At concentrations of 0.05 ng/ml, hrIL-1 doubled the response to mitogen (5 X 10(6) half maximal units/mg). Human peripheral blood T cells depleted of adherent cells underwent a blastogenic response and released interleukin 2 in the presence of hrIL-1 and mitogen. hrIL-1 was a potent inflammatory agent by its ability to induce human dermal fibroblast prostaglandin E2 production in vitro and to produce monophasic (endogenous pyrogen) fever when injected into rabbits or endotoxin-resistant mice. These studies establish that the dominant pI 7 form of recombinant human IL-1 possesses immunological and inflammatory properties and acts on the central nervous system to produce fever. Images PMID:3519678

  2. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  3. The de-ubiquitylating enzymes USP26 and USP37 regulate homologous recombination by counteracting RAP80.

    PubMed

    Typas, Dimitris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Wiegant, Wouter W; Diakatou, Michaela; Helfricht, Angela; Thijssen, Peter E; van den Broek, Bram; van de Broek, Bram; Mullenders, Leon H; van Attikum, Haico

    2015-08-18

    The faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential to safeguard genome stability. DSBs elicit a signaling cascade involving the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8/RNF168 and the ubiquitin-dependent assembly of the BRCA1-Abraxas-RAP80-MERIT40 complex. The association of BRCA1 with ubiquitin conjugates through RAP80 is known to be inhibitory to DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). However, the precise regulation of this mechanism remains poorly understood. Through genetic screens we identified USP26 and USP37 as key de-ubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that limit the repressive impact of RNF8/RNF168 on HR. Both DUBs are recruited to DSBs where they actively remove RNF168-induced ubiquitin conjugates. Depletion of USP26 or USP37 disrupts the execution of HR and this effect is alleviated by the simultaneous depletion of RAP80. We demonstrate that USP26 and USP37 prevent excessive spreading of RAP80-BRCA1 from DSBs. On the other hand, we also found that USP26 and USP37 promote the efficient association of BRCA1 with PALB2. This suggests that these DUBs limit the ubiquitin-dependent sequestration of BRCA1 via the BRCA1-Abraxas-RAP80-MERIT40 complex, while promoting complex formation and cooperation of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2-RAD51 during HR. These findings reveal a novel ubiquitin-dependent mechanism that regulates distinct BRCA1-containing complexes for efficient repair of DSBs by HR. PMID:26101254

  4. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing an 11-kilodalton beta-galactosidase fusion protein incorporate active beta-galactosidase in virus particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Samsonoff, W A; Grzelecki, A

    1988-10-01

    Recombinant plasmids in which vaccinia virus transcriptional regulatory sequences were fused to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene were constructed for insertion of the lacZ gene into the vaccinia virus genome. beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) was found in some purified recombinant vaccinia virions. By enzyme activity, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and microscopic techniques, the evidence suggested that beta-gal accounted for 5% of the total protein in the virion. These recombinant viruses were constructed so that a portion of the coding sequences of a late vaccinia virus structural polypeptide was fused to the amino terminus of beta-gal to produce the fusion protein. Removal of the coding sequences resulted in the complete loss of beta-gal activity. This demonstrated that a vaccinia virus DNA segment from a late structural gene is responsible for the incorporation of beta-gal into the virion.

  5. A Chaperone Enhances Blood α-Glucosidase Activity in Pompe Disease Patients Treated With Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Fecarotta, Simona; la Marca, Giancarlo; Rossi, Barbara; Ascione, Serena; Donati, Maria Alice; Morandi, Lucia Ovidia; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Pichiecchio, Anna; Ombrone, Daniela; Sacchini, Michele; Pasanisi, Maria Barbara; De Filippi, Paola; Danesino, Cesare; Della Casa, Roberto; Romano, Alfonso; Mollica, Carmine; Rosa, Margherita; Agovino, Teresa; Nusco, Edoardo; Porto, Caterina; Andria, Generoso

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is currently the only approved treatment for Pompe disease, due to acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Clinical efficacy of this approach is variable, and more effective therapies are needed. We showed in preclinical studies that chaperones stabilize the recombinant enzyme used for enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we evaluated the effects of a combination of enzyme therapy and a chaperone on α-glucosidase activity in Pompe disease patients. α-Glucosidase activity was analyzed by tandem-mass spectrometry in dried blood spots from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy, either alone or in combination with the chaperone N-butyldeoxynojirimycin given at the time of the enzyme infusion. Thirteen patients with different presentations (3 infantile-onset, 10 late-onset) were enrolled. In 11 patients, the combination treatment resulted in α-glucosidase activities greater than 1.85-fold the activities with enzyme replacement therapy alone. In the whole patient population, α-glucosidase activity was significantly increased at 12 hours (2.19-fold, P = 0.002), 24 hours (6.07-fold, P = 0.001), and 36 hours (3.95-fold, P = 0.003). The areas under the curve were also significantly increased (6.78-fold, P = 0.002). These results suggest improved stability of recombinant α-glucosidase in blood in the presence of the chaperone. PMID:25052852

  6. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  7. Ultrasound in Enzyme Activation and Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawson, Raymond; Gamage, Mala; Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Knoerzer, Kai

    As discussed in previous chapters, most effects due to ultrasound arise from cavitation events, in particular, collapsing cavitation bubbles. These collapsing bubbles generate very high localized temperatures and pressure shockwaves along with micro-streaming that is associated with high shear forces. These effects can be used to accelerate the transport of substrates and reaction products to and from enzymes, and to enhance mass transfer in enzyme reactor systems, and thus improve efficiency. However, the high velocity streaming, together with the formation of hydroxy radicals and heat generation during collapsing of bubbles, may also potentially affect the biocatalyst stability, and this can be a limiting factor in combined ultrasound/enzymatic applications. Typically, enzymes can be readily denatured by slight changes in environmental conditions, including temperature, pressure, shear stress, pH and ionic strength.

  8. Manganese enzymes with binuclear active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to review the recent literature dealing with the mechanisms of catalysis by binuclear manganese enzymes. Second, to summarize and illustrate the general principles of catalysis which distinguish binuclear metalloenzymes from monometallic centers. This review covers primarily the published literature from 1991 up to May 1996. A summary of the major structurally characterized dimanganese enzymes is given. These perform various reaction types including several redox reactions, (de)hydrations, isomerizations, (de)phosphorylation, and phosphoryl transfer. 114 refs.

  9. Determination of concentration and activity of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Morris, Holly; Tivanski, Alexei V; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-09-01

    Methods that directly measure the concentration of surface-immobilized biomolecules are scarce. More commonly, the concentration of the soluble molecule is measured before and after immobilization, and the bound concentration is assessed by elimination, assuming that all bound molecules are active. An assay was developed for measuring the active site concentration, activity, and thereby the catalytic turnover rate (kcat) of an immobilized dihydrofolate reductase as a model system. The new method yielded a similar first-order rate constant, kcat, to that of the same enzyme in solution. The findings indicate that the activity of the immobilized enzyme, when separated from the surface by the DNA spacers, has not been altered. In addition, a new immobilization method that leads to solution-like activity of the enzyme on the surface is described. The approaches developed here for immobilization and for determining the concentration of an immobilized enzyme are general and can be extended to other enzymes, receptors, and antibodies.

  10. Nonproteolytic neuroprotection by human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Park, J H; Hong, S H; Koh, J Y

    1999-04-23

    Human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may benefit ischemic stroke patients by dissolving clots. However, independent of thrombolysis, tPA may also have deleterious effects on neurons by promoting excitotoxicity. Zinc neurotoxicity has been shown to be an additional key mechanism in brain injuries. Hence, if tPA affects zinc neurotoxicity, this may provide additional insights into its effect on neuronal death. Independent of its proteolytic action, tPA markedly attenuated zinc-induced cell death in cortical culture, and, when injected into cerebrospinal fluid, also reduced kainate seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death in adult rats.

  11. Enzyme catalysis in an aqueous/organic segment flow microreactor: ways to stabilize enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Karande, Rohan; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2010-06-01

    Multiphase flow microreactors benefit from rapid mixing and high mass transfer rates, yet their application in enzymatic catalysis is limited due to the fast inactivation of enzymes used as biocatalysts. Enzyme inactivation during segment flow is due to the large interfacial area between aqueous and organic phases. The Peclet number of the system points to strong convective forces within the segments, and this results in rapid deactivation of the enzyme depending on segment length and flow rate. Addition of surfactant to the aqueous phase or enzyme immobilization prevents the biocatalyst from direct contact with the interface and thus stabilizes the enzyme activity. Almost 100% enzyme activity can be recovered compared to 45% without any enzyme or medium modification. Drop tensiometry measurements point to a mixed enzyme-surfactant interfacial adsorption, and above a certain concentration, the surfactant forms a protective layer between the interface and the biocatalyst in the aqueous compartments. Theoretical models were used to compare adsorption kinetics of the protein to the interface in the segment flow microreactor and in the drop tensiometry measurements. This study is the basis for the development of segment flow microreactors as a tool to perform productive enzymatic catalysis. PMID:20201570

  12. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  13. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs.

  14. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  15. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  16. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde by recombinant Escherichia coli co-expressing Lactobacillus reuteri propanediol utilization enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sabet-Azad, Ramin; Sardari, Roya R R; Linares-Pastén, Javier A; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical for the biobased chemical industry. Lactobacillus reuteri produces 3-HP from glycerol via 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) through a CoA-dependent propanediol utilization (Pdu) pathway. This study was performed to verify and evaluate the pathway comprising propionaldehyde dehydrogenase (PduP), phosphotransacylase (PduL), and propionate kinase (PduW) for formation of 3-HP from 3-HPA. The pathway was confirmed using recombinant Escherichia coli co-expressing PduP, PduL and PduW of L. reuteri DSM 20016 and mutants lacking expression of either enzyme. Growing and resting cells of the recombinant strain produced 3-HP with a yield of 0.3mol/mol and 1mol/mol, respectively, from 3-HPA. 3-HP was the sole product with resting cells, while growing cells produced 1,3-propanediol as co-product. 3-HP production from glycerol was achieved with a yield of 0.68mol/mol by feeding recombinant E. coli with 3-HPA produced by L. reuteri and recovered using bisulfite-functionalized resin. PMID:25614245

  17. Enzyme activities along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Takriti, Mounir; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thus carbon and nutrient cycling in soils is mediated by the activity of extracellular enzymes. The specific activities of these enzymes and their ratios to each other represent the link between the composition of soil organic matter and the nutrient demand of the microbial community. Depending on the difference between microbial nutrient demand and substrate availability, extracellular enzymes can enhance or slow down different nutrient cycles in the soil. We investigated activities of six extracellular enzymes (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, chitotriosidase, phosphatase and phenoloxidase) in the topsoil organic horizon, topsoil mineral horizon and subsoil horizon in seven ecosystems along a 1,500 km-long North-South transect in Western Siberia. The transect included sites in the southern tundra, northern taiga, middle taiga, southern taiga, forest-steppe (in forested patches as well as in adjacent meadows) and Steppe. We found that enzyme patterns varied stronger with soil depth than between ecosystems. Differences between horizons were mainly based on the increasing ratio of oxidative enzymes to hydrolytic enzymes. Differences between sites were more pronounced in topsoil than in subsoil mineral horizons, but did not reflect the north-south transect and the related gradients in temperature and precipitation. The observed differences between sites in topsoil horizons might therefore result from differences in vegetation rather than climatic factors. The decreasing variability in the enzyme pattern with depth might also indicate that the composition of soil organic matter becomes more similar with soil depth, most likely by an increasing proportion of microbial remains compared to plant derived constituents of SOM. This also indicates, that SOM becomes less divers the more it is processed by soil microorganisms. Our findings highlight the importance of soil depth on enzyme

  18. Activation and stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2010-06-28

    As environmentally benign "green" solvents, room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been used as solvents or (co)solvents in biocatalytic reactions and processes for a decade. The technological utility of enzymes can be enhanced greatly by their use in ionic liquids (ILs) rather than in conventional organic solvents or in their natural aqueous reaction media. In fact, the combination of green properties and unique tailor-made physicochemical properties make ILs excellent non-aqueous solvents for enzymatic catalysis with numerous advantages over other solvents, including high conversion rates, high selectivity, better enzyme stability, as well as better recoverability and recyclability. However, in many cases, particularly in hydrophilic ILs, enzymes show relative instability and/or lower activity compared with conventional solvents. To improve the enzyme activity as well as stability in ILs, various attempts have been made by modifying the form of the enzymes. Examples are enzyme immobilization onto support materials via adsorption or multipoint attachment, lyophilization in the presence of stabilizing agents, chemical modification with stabilizing agents, formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates, pretreatment with polar organic solvents or enzymes combined with suitable surfactants to form microemulsions. The use of these enzyme preparations in ILs can dramatically increase the solvent tolerance, enhance activity as well as stability, and improve enantioselectivity. This perspective highlights a number of pronounced strategies being used successfully for activation and stabilization of enzymes in non-aqueous ILs media. This review is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to present a general overview of the potential approaches to activate enzymes for diverse enzymatic processes and biotransformations in ILs. PMID:20445940

  19. How should enzyme activities be used in fish growth studies?

    PubMed

    Pelletier; Blier; Dutil; Guderley

    1995-01-01

    The activity of glycolytic and oxidative enzymes was monitored in the white muscle of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua experiencing different growth rates. A strong positive relationship between the activity of two glycolytic enzymes and individual growth rate was observed regardless of whether the enzyme activity was expressed as units per gram wet mass, units per gram dry mass or with respect to muscle protein and DNA content. The most sensitive response to growth rate was observed when pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were expressed as units per microgram DNA, and this may be useful as an indicator of growth rate in wild fish. In contrast, no relationship between the activities of oxidative enzymes and growth rate was observed when cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase activities were expressed as units per gram protein. Apparently, the aerobic capacity of white muscle in cod is not specifically increased to match growth rate. PMID:9319392

  20. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and specifically approved by the NIH Director as...

  1. 78 FR 27977 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... the trial with the NIH OBA or the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) review and reporting... Nucleic Acid Molecules, or DNA or RNA Derived from Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules,...

  2. TREATABILITY STUDY BULLETIN: ENZYME-ACTIVATED CELLULOSE TECHNOLOGY - THORNECO, INC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Enzyme-Activated Cellulose Technology developed by Thorneco, Inc. uses cellulose placed into one or more cylindrical towers to remove metals and organic compounds from an aqueous solution. The cellulose is coated with a proprietary enzyme. Operating parameters that can affe...

  3. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  4. Photoreactivating enzyme activity in the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhead, A.D.; Achey, P.M.

    1981-06-01

    There has been considerable speculation about the occurrence of photoreactivating enzyme in different organisms and about its biological purpose. We have developed a simple, sensitive assay for estimating pyrimidine dimers in DNA which is useful in making a rapid survey for the presence of the enzyme. Using this method, we have found photoreactivating enzyme activity in the tissues of the rat tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta. This parasite spends the majority of its life span in the bodies of its definitive or intermediate hosts, but a period is spent externally. We suggest that photoreactivating enzyme may be important in preserving the integrity of embryonic DNA during this free-living stage.

  5. Photoreactivating enzyme activity in the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhead, A.D.; Achey, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    There has been considerable speculation about the occurrence of photoreactivating enzyme in different organisms and about its biologic purpose. We have developed a simple, sensitive assay for estimating pyrimidine dimers in DNA which is useful in making a rapid survey for the presence of the enzyme. Using this method, we have found photoreactivating enzyme activity in the tissues of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta. This parasite spends the majority of its life span in the bodies of its definitive or intermediate hosts, but a period is spent externally. We suggest that photoreactivating enzyme may be important in perserving the integrity of embryonic DNA during this free-living stage.

  6. TISSUE ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN KEMP'S RIDLEY TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPII).

    PubMed

    Petrosky, Keiko Y; Knoll, Joyce S; Innis, Charles

    2015-09-01

    This study determined the tissue distribution and activities of eight enzymes in 13 juvenile Kemp's ridley turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) that died after stranding. Samples from the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, pancreas, lung, small intestine, and spleen were evaluated for activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amylase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and lipase. AST, CK, and LDH activities were highest in cardiac and skeletal muscle but were also found in all other tissues. Amylase and lipase activities were highest in the pancreas and low in all other tissues. ALP activity was highest in the lung. ALT activity was highest in liver, kidney, and cardiac muscle, and GGT activity was highest in the kidney, but activities of these enzymes were low in all tissues. These data may assist clinicians in interpretation of plasma enzyme activities of Kemp's ridley turtles.

  7. ENZYME ACTIVITIES DURING THE ASEXUAL CYCLE OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA

    PubMed Central

    Stine, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Three enzymes, (a) nicotinamide adenine diphosphate-dependent glutamic dehydrogenase (NAD enzyme), (b) nictoinamide adenine triphosphate-dependent glutamic dehydrogenase (NADP enzyme), and (c) nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotidase (NADase), were measured in separate extracts of Neurospora crassa grown in Vogel's medium N and medium N + glutamate. Specific activities and total units per culture of each enzyme were determined at nine separate intervals phased throughout the asexual cycle. The separate dehydrogenases were lowest in the conidia, increased slowly during germination, and increased rapidly during logarithmic mycelial growth. The amounts of these enzymes present during germination were small when compared with those found later during the production of the conidiophores. The NAD enzyme may be necessary for pregermination synthesis. The NADP-enzyme synthesis was associated with the appearance of the germ tube. Although higher levels of the dehydrogenases in the conidiophores resulted in more enzyme being found in the differentiated conidia, the rate of germination was uneffected. The greatest activity for the NADase enzyme was associated with the conidia, early phases of germination, and later production of new conidia. NADase decreased significantly with the onset of logarithmic growth, remained low during the differentiation of conidiophores, and increased considerably as the conidiophores aged. PMID:4384627

  8. A New Thermoactive Pullulanase from Desulfurococcus mucosus: Cloning, Sequencing, Purification, and Characterization of the Recombinant Enzyme after Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Duffner, Fiona; Bertoldo, Costanzo; Andersen, Jens T.; Wagner, Karen; Antranikian, Garabed

    2000-01-01

    The gene encoding a thermoactive pullulanase from the hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon Desulfurococcus mucosus (apuA) was cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. apuA from D. mucosus showed 45.4% pairwise amino acid identity with the pullulanase from Thermococcus aggregans and contained the four regions conserved among all amylolytic enzymes. apuA encodes a protein of 686 amino acids with a 28-residue signal peptide and has a predicted mass of 74 kDa after signal cleavage. The apuA gene was then expressed in Bacillus subtilis and secreted into the culture fluid. This is one of the first reports on the successful expression and purification of an archaeal amylopullulanase in a Bacillus strain. The purified recombinant enzyme (rapuDm) is composed of two subunits, each having an estimated molecular mass of 66 kDa. Optimal activity was measured at 85°C within a broad pH range from 3.5 to 8.5, with an optimum at pH 5.0. Divalent cations have no influence on the stability or activity of the enzyme. RapuDm was stable at 80°C for 4 h and exhibited a half-life of 50 min at 85°C. By high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis it was observed that rapuDm hydrolyzed α-1,6 glycosidic linkages of pullulan, producing maltotriose, and also α-1,4 glycosidic linkages in starch, amylose, amylopectin, and cyclodextrins, with maltotriose and maltose as the main products. Since the thermoactive pullulanases known so far from Archaea are not active on cyclodextrins and are in fact inhibited by these cyclic oligosaccharides, the enzyme from D. mucosus should be considered an archaeal pullulanase type II with a wider substrate specificity. PMID:11053376

  9. Characterization of Biosensors Based on Recombinant Glutamate Oxidase: Comparison of Crosslinking Agents in Terms of Enzyme Loading and Efficiency Parameters.

    PubMed

    Ford, Rochelle; Quinn, Susan J; O'Neill, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Amperometric l-glutamate (Glu) biosensors, based on both wild-type and a recombinant form of l-glutamate oxidase (GluOx), were designed and characterized in terms of enzyme-kinetic, sensitivity and stability parameters in attempts to fabricate a real-time Glu monitoring device suitable for future long-term detection of this amino acid in biological and other complex media. A comparison of the enzyme from these two sources showed that they were similar in terms of biosensor performance. Optimization of the loading of the polycationic stabilization agent, polyethyleneimine (PEI), was established before investigating a range of crosslinking agents under different conditions: glutaraldehyde (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDE). Whereas PEI-free biosensor designs lost most of their meager Glu sensitivity after one or two days, configurations with a 2:5 ratio of dip-evaporation applications of PEI(1%):GluOx(400 U/mL) displayed a 20-fold increase in their initial sensitivity, and a decay half-life extended to 10 days. All the crosslinkers studied had no effect on initial Glu sensitivity, but enhanced biosensor stability, provided the crosslinking procedure was carried out under well-defined conditions. The resulting biosensor design based on the recombinant enzyme deposited on a permselective layer of poly-(ortho-phenylenediamine), PoPD/PEI₂/GluOx₅/PEGDE, displayed good sensitivity (LOD < 0.2 μM), response time (t90% < 1 s) and stability over a 90-day period, making it an attractive candidate for future long-term monitoring of Glu concentration dynamics in complex media. PMID:27669257

  10. Characterization of Biosensors Based on Recombinant Glutamate Oxidase: Comparison of Crosslinking Agents in Terms of Enzyme Loading and Efficiency Parameters.

    PubMed

    Ford, Rochelle; Quinn, Susan J; O'Neill, Robert D

    2016-09-23

    Amperometric l-glutamate (Glu) biosensors, based on both wild-type and a recombinant form of l-glutamate oxidase (GluOx), were designed and characterized in terms of enzyme-kinetic, sensitivity and stability parameters in attempts to fabricate a real-time Glu monitoring device suitable for future long-term detection of this amino acid in biological and other complex media. A comparison of the enzyme from these two sources showed that they were similar in terms of biosensor performance. Optimization of the loading of the polycationic stabilization agent, polyethyleneimine (PEI), was established before investigating a range of crosslinking agents under different conditions: glutaraldehyde (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDE). Whereas PEI-free biosensor designs lost most of their meager Glu sensitivity after one or two days, configurations with a 2:5 ratio of dip-evaporation applications of PEI(1%):GluOx(400 U/mL) displayed a 20-fold increase in their initial sensitivity, and a decay half-life extended to 10 days. All the crosslinkers studied had no effect on initial Glu sensitivity, but enhanced biosensor stability, provided the crosslinking procedure was carried out under well-defined conditions. The resulting biosensor design based on the recombinant enzyme deposited on a permselective layer of poly-(ortho-phenylenediamine), PoPD/PEI₂/GluOx₅/PEGDE, displayed good sensitivity (LOD < 0.2 μM), response time (t90% < 1 s) and stability over a 90-day period, making it an attractive candidate for future long-term monitoring of Glu concentration dynamics in complex media.

  11. Function and biotechnology of extremophilic enzymes in low water activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes from extremophilic microorganisms usually catalyze chemical reactions in non-standard conditions. Such conditions promote aggregation, precipitation, and denaturation, reducing the activity of most non-extremophilic enzymes, frequently due to the absence of sufficient hydration. Some extremophilic enzymes maintain a tight hydration shell and remain active in solution even when liquid water is limiting, e.g. in the presence of high ionic concentrations, or at cold temperature when water is close to the freezing point. Extremophilic enzymes are able to compete for hydration via alterations especially to their surface through greater surface charges and increased molecular motion. These properties have enabled some extremophilic enzymes to function in the presence of non-aqueous organic solvents, with potential for design of useful catalysts. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of extremophilic enzymes functioning in high salinity and cold temperatures, focusing on their strategy for function at low water activity. We discuss how the understanding of extremophilic enzyme function is leading to the design of a new generation of enzyme catalysts and their applications to biotechnology. PMID:22480329

  12. Function and biotechnology of extremophilic enzymes in low water activity.

    PubMed

    Karan, Ram; Capes, Melinda D; Dassarma, Shiladitya

    2012-02-02

    Enzymes from extremophilic microorganisms usually catalyze chemical reactions in non-standard conditions. Such conditions promote aggregation, precipitation, and denaturation, reducing the activity of most non-extremophilic enzymes, frequently due to the absence of sufficient hydration. Some extremophilic enzymes maintain a tight hydration shell and remain active in solution even when liquid water is limiting, e.g. in the presence of high ionic concentrations, or at cold temperature when water is close to the freezing point. Extremophilic enzymes are able to compete for hydration via alterations especially to their surface through greater surface charges and increased molecular motion. These properties have enabled some extremophilic enzymes to function in the presence of non-aqueous organic solvents, with potential for design of useful catalysts. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of extremophilic enzymes functioning in high salinity and cold temperatures, focusing on their strategy for function at low water activity. We discuss how the understanding of extremophilic enzyme function is leading to the design of a new generation of enzyme catalysts and their applications to biotechnology.

  13. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family. PMID:25591389

  14. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family.

  15. Sustained gastrointestinal activity of dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Gregor; Grotzky, Andrea; Lukić, Ružica; Matoori, Simon; Luciani, Paola; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Baozhong; Walde, Peter; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Gauthier, Marc A.; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Methods to stabilize and retain enzyme activity in the gastrointestinal tract are investigated rarely because of the difficulty of protecting proteins from an environment that has evolved to promote their digestion. Preventing the degradation of enzymes under these conditions, however, is critical for the development of new protein-based oral therapies. Here we show that covalent conjugation to polymers can stabilize orally administered therapeutic enzymes at different locations in the gastrointestinal tract. Architecturally and functionally diverse polymers are used to protect enzymes sterically from inactivation and to promote interactions with mucin on the stomach wall. Using this approach the in vivo activity of enzymes can be sustained for several hours in the stomach and/or in the small intestine. These findings provide new insight and a firm basis for the development of new therapeutic and imaging strategies based on orally administered proteins using a simple and accessible technology.

  16. Activation volumes of enzymes adsorbed on silica particles.

    PubMed

    Schuabb, Vitor; Czeslik, Claus

    2014-12-30

    The immobilization of enzymes on carrier particles is useful in many biotechnological processes. In this way, enzymes can be separated from the reaction solution by filtering and can be reused in several cycles. On the other hand, there is a series of examples of free enzymes in solution that can be activated by the application of pressure. Thus, a potential loss of enzymatic activity upon immobilization on carrier particles might be compensated by pressure. In this study, we have determined the activation volumes of two enzymes, α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), when they are adsorbed on silica particles and free in solution. The experiments have been carried out using fluorescence assays under pressures up to 2000 bar. In all cases, activation volumes were found to depend on the applied pressure, suggesting different compressions of the enzyme-substrate complex and the transition state. The volume profiles of free and adsorbed HRP are similar. For α-CT, larger activation volumes are found in the adsorbed state. However, up to about 500 bar, the enzymatic reaction of α-CT, which is adsorbed on silica particles, is characterized by a negative activation volume. This observation suggests that application of pressure might indeed be useful to enhance the activity of enzymes on carrier particles.

  17. Microbial hydrolytic enzyme activities in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, A.

    1995-03-01

    The potential hydrolysis rates of five different hydrolytic enzymes were determined in deep-sea sediments from the northeast Atlantic (BIOTRANS area) in March 1992. Fluorogenic substrates were used to assay extracellular α- and β-glucosidase, chitobiase, lipase and aminopeptidase. The potential activity of most of the enzymes investigated decreased to a minimum within the upper two centimetre range, whereas aminopeptidase was high over the upper five centimetre range. Exceptions were found when macrofaunal burrows occurred in the cores, always increasing the activities of some hydrolases, and therefore indicating the impact of bioturbation on degradation rates. The most striking feature of the investigated enzyme spectrum was the 50 2000 times higher specific activity of the aminopeptidase, compared with the other hydrolases. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes most likely reflects the availability of their respective substrates and is not a function of bacterial biomass.

  18. Transcription analysis of pyranose dehydrogenase from the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus and characterization of the recombinantly expressed enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gonaus, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a litter degrading basidiomycete commonly found in humic-rich environments. It is used as model organism and cultivated in large scale for food industry. Due to its ecological niche it produces a variety of enzymes for detoxification and degradation of humified plant litter. One of these, pyranose dehydrogenase, is thought to play a role in detoxification and lignocellulose degradation. It is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline family of flavin-dependent enzymes and oxidizes a wide range of sugars with concomitant reduction of electron acceptors like quinones. In this work, transcription of pdh in A. bisporus was investigated with real-time PCR revealing influence of the carbon source on pdh expression levels. The gene was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed a higher affinity towards disaccharides compared to other tested pyranose dehydrogenases from related Agariceae. Homology modeling and sequence alignments indicated that two loops of high sequence variability at substrate access site could play an important role in modulating these substrate specificities.

  19. Silk Microgels Formed by Proteolytic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sangram K.; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L.; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-01-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMG) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. SDS-PAGE and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the nonamorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient potential and that the prepared SMGS have useful features for studies related to biomaterials and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy approach to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  20. Silk microgels formed by proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-09-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMGs) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer-scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the non-amorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient, and that the prepared SMGs have useful features for studies related to biomaterial and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy way to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  1. Diced electrophoresis gel assay for screening enzymes with specified activities.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Toru; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Adibekian, Alexander; Yoshioka, Kentaro; Terai, Takuya; Ueno, Tasuku; Kawaguchi, Mitsuyasu; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2013-04-24

    We have established the diced electrophoresis gel (DEG) assay as a proteome-wide screening tool to identify enzymes with activities of interest using turnover-based fluorescent substrates. The method utilizes the combination of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) with a multiwell-plate-based fluorometric assay to find protein spots with the specified activity. By developing fluorescent substrates that mimic the structure of neutrophil chemoattractants, we could identify enzymes involved in metabolic inactivation of the chemoattractants.

  2. Compounds from Silicones Alter Enzyme Activity in Curing Barnacle Glue and Model Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. Methodology/Principal Findings GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Conclusions/Significance Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management. PMID:21379573

  3. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  4. In Vitro Antibody-Enzyme Conjugates with Specific Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Daniel M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Parker, Charles W.; Williams, Ralph C.

    1973-01-01

    IgG with antibacterial antibody opsonic activity was isolated from rabbit antisera produced by intravenous hyperimmunization with several test strains of pneumococci, Group A β-hemolytic streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Antibody-enzyme conjugates were prepared, using diethylmalonimidate to couple glucose oxidase to IgG antibacterial antibody preparations. Opsonic human IgG obtained from serum of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis was also conjugated to glucose oxidase. Antibody-enzyme conjugates retained combining specificity for test bacteria as demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. In vitro test for bactericidal activity of antibody-enzyme conjugates utilized potassium iodide, lactoperoxidase, and glucose as cofactors. Under these conditions glucose oxidase conjugated to antibody generates hydrogen peroxide, and lactoperoxidase enzyme catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxide with simultaneous oxidation of I- and halogenation and killing of test bacteria. Potent in vitro bactericidal activity of this system was repeatedly demonstrated for antibody-enzyme conjugates against pneumococci, streptococci, S. aureus, P. mirabilis, and E. coli. However, no bactericidal effect was demonstrable with antibody-enzyme conjugates and two test strains of P. aeruginosa. Bactericidal activity of antibody-enzyme conjugates appeared to parallel original opsonic potency of unconjugated IgG preparations. Antibody-enzyme conjugates at concentrations as low as 0.01 mg/ml were capable of intense bactericidal activity producing substantial drops in surviving bacterial counts within 30-60 min after initiation of assay. These in vitro bactericidal systems indicate that the concept of antibacterial antibody-enzyme conjugates may possibly be adaptable as a mechanism for treatment of patients with leukocyte dysfunction or fulminant bacteremia. PMID:4145026

  5. Fluorescent profiling of modular biosynthetic enzymes by complementary metabolic and activity based probes.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jordan L; Mercer, Andrew C; Burkart, Michael D

    2008-04-23

    The study of the enzymes responsible for natural product biosynthesis has proven a valuable source of new enzymatic activities and been applied to a number of biotechnology applications. Protein profiling could prove highly complementary to genetics based approaches by allowing us to understand the activity, transcriptional control, and post-translational modification of these enzymes in their native and dynamic proteomic environments. Here we present a method for the fluorescent profiling of PKS, NRPS, and FAS multidomain modular synthases in their whole proteomes using complementary metabolic and activity based probes. After first examining the reactivity of these activity based probes with a variety of purified recombinant PKS, NRPS, and FAS enzymes in vitro, we apply this duel labeling strategy to the analysis of modular synthases in a human breast cancer cell line and two strains of the natural product producer Bacillus subtilis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that complementary protein profiling approaches can prove highly useful in the identification and assignment of inhibitor specificity and domain structure of these modular biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:18376827

  6. Optimization of recombinant expression enables discovery of novel cytochrome P450 activity in rice diterpenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Naoki; Wu, Yisheng; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J.

    2015-01-01

    The oxygenation reactions catalyzed by cytochromes P450 (CYPs) play critical roles in plant natural products biosynthesis. At the same time, CYPs are one of most challenging enzymes to functionally characterize due to the difficulty of recombinantly expressing these membrane-associated monooxygenases. In the course of investigating rice diterpenoid biosynthesis we have developed a synthetic biology approach for functional expression of relevant CYPs in Escherichia coli. In certain cases activity was observed for only one of two closely related paralogs although it seems clear that related reactions are required for production of the known diterpenoids. Here we report that optimization of the recombinant expression system enabled characterization of not only these previously recalcitrant CYPs, but also discovery of additional activity relevant to rice diterpenoid biosynthesis. Of particular interest, CYP701A8 was found to catalyze 3β-hydroxylation of syn-pimaradiene, which is presumably relevant to momilactone biosynthesis, while CYP71Z6 & 7 were found to catalyze multiple reactions, with CYP71Z6 catalyzing the production of 2α,3α-dihydroxy-ent-isokaurene via 2α-hydroxy- ent-isokaurene, and CYP71Z7 catalyzing the production of 3α-hydroxy-ent-cassadien-2- one via 2α-hydroxy-ent-cassadiene and ent-cassadien-2-one, which may be relevant to oryzadione and phytocassane biosynthesis, respectively. PMID:25758958

  7. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin G reactive with a recombinant protein expressed from the gene encoding the 116-kilodalton protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M F; Whithear, K G; Noormohammadi, A H; Markham, P F; Catton, M; Leydon, J; Browning, G F

    1999-04-01

    Serology remains the method of choice for laboratory diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Currently available serological tests employ complex cellular fractions of M. pneumoniae as antigen. To improve the specificity of M. pneumoniae diagnosis, a recombinant protein was assessed as a serodiagnostic reagent. A panel of recombinant proteins were expressed from a cloned M. pneumoniae gene that encodes a 116-kDa surface protein antigen. The recombinant proteins were assessed for reactivity with patient sera and the most antigenic was further assessed for its serodiagnostic potential by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA based on the recombinant protein was equivalent in sensitivity to the commercial test (Serodia Myco II; Fujirebio Inc.) to which it was compared. Southern and Western blotting data suggested that the recombinant protein derived from the 116-kDa protein of M. pneumoniae could provide a species-specific diagnostic tool, although further assessment is required.

  8. Bacterial expression of catalytically active fragments of the multifunctional enzyme enniatin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Haese, A; Pieper, R; von Ostrowski, T; Zocher, R

    1994-10-14

    Enniatin synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of N-methylated cyclohexadepsipeptides. The 347 kDa enzyme is encoded by the esyn1 gene of Fusarium scirpi and contains two domains (EA and EB) homologous to each other and to regions of other microbial peptide synthetases. Parts of the esyn1 gene were subcloned in frame to a small lacZ gene portion of Escherichia coli expression vectors. Overproduced recombinant proteins showed a high tendency towards inclusion body formation and could be only partially dissolved in 8 M urea or 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. After renaturation, a 121 kDa recombinant protein representing the N-terminal conserved domain EA of enniatin synthetase was shown to activate D-hydroxyisolvaleric acid via adenylation. Similarly, a 158 kDa recombinant protein comprising the C-terminal conserved domain EB catalyzed the activation of the substrate amino acid (e.g. L-valine). Moreover, this protein could be photolabeled with S-[methyl-14C]adenosyl-L-methionine, (AdoMet) indicating the presence of the methyltransferase. Both functions, L-valine activation and AdoMet binding, could be assigned to a 108 kDa recombinant protein encompassing the A and the M segment of domain EB. The fact that a 65 kDa recombinant protein representing the M portion could be photolabeled, indicated the localization of the methyltransferase in this region. Three deletion mutants of the 65 kDa protein were shown to be inactive with respect to UV-induced AdoMet labeling. PMID:7932733

  9. Presence of the propeptide on recombinant lysosomal dipeptidase controls both activation and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Iztok; Pain, Roger; Turk, Vito

    2007-01-01

    Lysosomal dipeptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis of dipeptides with unsubstituted terminals. It is a homodimer and binds zinc. Dimerization is an important issue in understanding the enzyme's function. In this study, we investigated the influence of the propeptide on the folding and dimerization of recombinant lysosomal dipeptidase. For this purpose, we separately cloned and overexpressed the mature protein and the proenzyme. The overexpressed proteins were localized exclusively to insoluble inclusion bodies. Refolding of the urea-solubilized inclusion bodies showed that only dipeptidase lacking the propeptide was dimeric. The soluble renatured proenzyme was a monomer, although circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra of the proenzyme indicated the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. The propeptide thus controls dimerization, as well as activation, of lysosomal dipeptidase.

  10. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  11. Effects of cadium, zinc and lead on soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-xin; Liu, Shu-qing; Zheng, Da-wei; Feng, Sheng-dong

    2006-01-01

    Heavy metal (HM) is a major hazard to the soil-plant system. This study investigated the combined effects of cadium (Cd), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) on activities of four enzymes in soil, including calatase, urease, invertase and alkalin phosphatase. HM content in tops of canola and four enzymes activities in soil were analyzed at two months after the metal additions to the soil. Pb was not significantly inhibitory than the other heavy metals for the four enzyme activities and was shown to have a protective role on calatase activity in the combined presence of Cd, Zn and Pb; whereas Cd significantly inhibited the four enzyme activities, and Zn only inhibited urease and calatase activities. The inhibiting effect of Cd and Zn on urease and calatase activities can be intensified significantly by the additions of Zn and Cd. There was a negative synergistic inhibitory effect of Cd and Zn on the two enzymes in the presence of Cd, Zn and Pb. The urease activity was inhibited more by the HM combinations than by the metals alone and reduced approximately 20%-40% of urease activity. The intertase and alkaline phosphatase activities significantly decreased only with the increase of Cd concentration in the soil. It was shown that urease was much more sensitive to HM than the other enzymes. There was a obvious negative correlation between the ionic impulsion of HM in soil, the ionic impulsion of HM in canola plants tops and urease activity. It is concluded that the soil urease activity may be a sensitive tool for assessing additive toxic combination effect on soil biochemical parameters.

  12. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  13. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of Streptococcus pneumontae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1990-10-02

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252. 9 figs.

  14. Recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to turkey coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohamed; Loa, Chien Chang; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-06-01

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein gene of turkey coronavirus (TCoV) was expressed in a prokaryotic system and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody to TCoV. Anti-TCoV hyperimmune turkey serum and normal turkey serum were used as positive or negative controls for optimization of the ELISA. Goat anti-turkey IgG (H+L) conjugated with horseradish peroxidase was used as detector antibody. Three hundred and twenty two turkey sera from the field were used to evaluate the performance of ELISA and determine the cut-off point of ELISA. The established ELISA was also examined with serum samples obtained from turkeys experimentally infected with TCoV. Those serum samples were collected at various time intervals from 1 to 63 days post-infection. The optimum conditions for differentiation between anti-TCoV hyperimmune serum and normal turkey serum were recombinant TCoV N protein concentration at 20 μg/ml, serum dilution at 1:800, and conjugate dilution at 1:10,000. Of the 322 sera from the field, 101 were positive for TCoV by immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA). The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA relative to IFA test were 86.0% and 96.8%, respectively, using the optimum cut-off point of 0.2 as determined by logistic regression method. Reactivity of anti-rotavirus, anti-reovirus, anti-adenovirus, or anti-enterovirus antibodies with the recombinant N protein coated on the ELISA plates was not detected. These results indicated that the established antibody-capture ELISA in conjunction with recombinant TCoV N protein as the coating protein can be utilized for detection of antibodies to TCoV in turkey flocks.

  15. Development of a flatfish-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Fsh using a recombinant chimeric gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Verdura, Sara; Mazón, María José; Boj, Mónica; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-09-15

    In flatfishes with asynchronous and semicystic spermatogenesis, such as the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), the specific roles of the pituitary gonadotropins during germ cell development, particularly of the follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh), are still largely unknown in part due to the lack of homologous immunoassays for this hormone. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Senegalese sole Fsh was developed by generating a rabbit antiserum against a recombinant chimeric single-chain Fsh molecule (rFsh-C) produced by the yeast Pichia pastoris. The rFsh-C N- and C-termini were formed by the mature sole Fsh β subunit (Fshβ) and the chicken glycoprotein hormone common α subunit (CGA), respectively. Depletion of the antiserum to remove anti-CGA antibodies further enriched the sole Fshβ-specific antibodies, which were used to develop the ELISA using the rFsh-C for the standard curve. The sensitivity of the assay was 10 and 50 pg/ml for Fsh measurement in plasma and pituitary, respectively, and the cross-reactivity with a homologous recombinant single-chain luteinizing hormone was 1%. The standard curve for rFsh-C paralleled those of serially diluted plasma and pituitary extracts of other flatfishes, such as the Atlantic halibut, common sole and turbot. In Senegalese sole males, the highest plasma Fsh levels were found during early spermatogenesis but declined during enhanced spermiation, as found in teleosts with cystic spermatogenesis. In pubertal males, however, the circulating Fsh levels were as high as in adult spermiating fish, but interestingly the Fsh receptor in the developing testis containing only spermatogonia was expressed in Leydig cells but not in the primordial Sertoli cells. These results indicate that a recombinant chimeric Fsh can be used to generate specific antibodies against the Fshβ subunit and to develop a highly sensitive ELISA for Fsh measurements in diverse flatfishes.

  16. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Theileria parva antibodies in cattle using a recombinant polymorphic immunodominant molecule.

    PubMed

    Katende, J; Morzaria, S; Toye, P; Skilton, R; Nene, V; Nkonge, C; Musoke, A

    1998-05-01

    Field and experimental bovine infection sera were used in immunoblots of sporozoite and schizont lysates of Theileria parva to identify candidate diagnostic antigens. Four parasite antigens of Mr 67,000 (p67), 85,000 (the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, PIM), 104,000 (p104), and 150,000 (p150) were selected for a more detailed analysis. The p67 and p104 antigens were present only in the sporozoite lysates, whereas PIM and p150 were found in both sporozoite and schizont lysates. The four antigens were expressed as recombinant fusion proteins and were compared with each other in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in the whole-schizont-based indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) in terms of their ability to detect antibodies in sera of experimentally infected cattle. The PIM-based ELISA provided a higher degree of sensitivity and specificity than did the ELISA using the other three recombinant antigens or the IFAT. Further evaluation of the PIM-ELISA using experimental sera derived from cattle infected with different hemoparasites and field sera from endemic and nonendemic T. parva areas showed that the assay had a sensitivity of > 99% and a specificity of between 94% and 98%. PMID:9610640

  17. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  18. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  19. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  20. Production of cellulosic ethanol and enzyme from waste fiber sludge using SSF, recycling of hydrolytic enzymes and yeast, and recombinant cellulase-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Alriksson, Björn; Rose, Shaunita H; van Zyl, Willem H; Jönsson, Leif J

    2014-08-01

    Bioethanol and enzymes were produced from fiber sludges through sequential microbial cultivations. After a first simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with yeast, the bioethanol concentrations of sulfate and sulfite fiber sludges were 45.6 and 64.7 g/L, respectively. The second SSF, which included fresh fiber sludges and recycled yeast and enzymes from the first SSF, resulted in ethanol concentrations of 38.3 g/L for sulfate fiber sludge and 24.4 g/L for sulfite fiber sludge. Aspergillus niger carrying the endoglucanase-encoding Cel7B gene of Trichoderma reesei was grown in the spent fiber sludge hydrolysates. The cellulase activities obtained with spent hydrolysates of sulfate and sulfite fiber sludges were 2,700 and 2,900 nkat/mL, respectively. The high cellulase activities produced by using stillage and the significant ethanol concentrations produced in the second SSF suggest that onsite enzyme production and recycling of enzyme are realistic concepts that warrant further attention. PMID:24862324

  1. Production of cellulosic ethanol and enzyme from waste fiber sludge using SSF, recycling of hydrolytic enzymes and yeast, and recombinant cellulase-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Alriksson, Björn; Rose, Shaunita H; van Zyl, Willem H; Jönsson, Leif J

    2014-08-01

    Bioethanol and enzymes were produced from fiber sludges through sequential microbial cultivations. After a first simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with yeast, the bioethanol concentrations of sulfate and sulfite fiber sludges were 45.6 and 64.7 g/L, respectively. The second SSF, which included fresh fiber sludges and recycled yeast and enzymes from the first SSF, resulted in ethanol concentrations of 38.3 g/L for sulfate fiber sludge and 24.4 g/L for sulfite fiber sludge. Aspergillus niger carrying the endoglucanase-encoding Cel7B gene of Trichoderma reesei was grown in the spent fiber sludge hydrolysates. The cellulase activities obtained with spent hydrolysates of sulfate and sulfite fiber sludges were 2,700 and 2,900 nkat/mL, respectively. The high cellulase activities produced by using stillage and the significant ethanol concentrations produced in the second SSF suggest that onsite enzyme production and recycling of enzyme are realistic concepts that warrant further attention.

  2. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  3. Cloning and Expression of Phytase appA Gene from Shigella sp. CD2 in Pichia pastoris and Comparison of Properties with Recombinant Enzyme Expressed in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Pal Roy, Moushree; Mazumdar, Deepika; Dutta, Subhabrata; Saha, Shyama Prasad; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    The phytase gene appAS was isolated from Shigella sp. CD2 genomic library. The 3.8 kb DNA fragment contained 1299 bp open reading frame encoding 432 amino acid protein (AppAS) with 22 amino acid signal peptide at N-terminal and three sites of N-glycosylation. AppAS contained the active site RHGXRXP and HDTN sequence motifs, which are conserved among histidine acid phosphatases. It showed maximum identity with phytase AppA of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter braakii. The appAS was expressed in Pichia pastoris and E. coli to produce recombinant phytase rAppAP and rAppAE, respectively. Purified glycosylated rAppAP and nonglycosylated rAppAE had specific activity of 967 and 2982 U mg-1, respectively. Both had pH optima of 5.5 and temperature optima of 60°C. Compared with rAppAE, rAppAP was 13 and 17% less active at pH 3.5 and 7.5 and 11 and 18% less active at temperature 37 and 50°C, respectively; however, it was more active at higher incubation temperatures. Thermotolerance of rAppAP was 33% greater at 60°C and 24% greater at 70°C, when compared with rAppAE. Both the recombinant enzymes showed high specificity to phytate and resistance to trypsin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on cloning and expression of phytase from Shigella sp. PMID:26808559

  4. Catalytically active nanomaterials: a promising candidate for artificial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-04-15

    Natural enzymes, exquisite biocatalysts mediating every biological process in living organisms, are able to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions up to 10(19) times for specific substrates and reactions. However, the practical application of enzymes is often hampered by their intrinsic drawbacks, such as low operational stability, sensitivity of catalytic activity to environmental conditions, and high costs in preparation and purification. Therefore, the discovery and development of artificial enzymes is highly desired. Recently, the merging of nanotechnology with biology has ignited extensive research efforts for designing functional nanomaterials that exhibit various properties intrinsic to enzymes. As a promising candidate for artificial enzymes, catalytically active nanomaterials (nanozymes) show several advantages over natural enzymes, such as controlled synthesis in low cost, tunability in catalytic activities, as well as high stability against stringent conditions. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in exploring and constructing such nanoparticulate artificial enzymes, including graphene oxide, graphene-hemin nanocomposites, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanodots, mesoporous silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles, gold nanoclusters, and nanoceria. According to their structural characteristics, these enzyme mimics are categorized into three classes: carbon-, metal-, and metal-oxide-based nanomaterials. We aim to highlight the important role of catalytic nanomaterials in the fields of biomimetics. First, we provide a practical introduction to the identification of these nanozymes, the source of the enzyme-like activities, and the enhancement of activities via rational design and engineering. Then we briefly describe new or enhanced applications of certain nanozymes in biomedical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and therapeutics. For instance, we have successfully used these biomimetic catalysts as colorimetric probes for the detection of

  5. Functionalized graphene oxide in enzyme engineering: a selective modulator for enzyme activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liling; Yang, Kai; Yao, Kai; Zhang, Shuai; Tao, Huiquan; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang; Peng, Rui

    2012-06-26

    The understanding of interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules is of fundamental importance to the area of nanobiotechnology. Graphene and its derivative, graphene oxide (GO), are two-dimensional (2-D) nanomaterials with interesting physical and chemical properties and have been widely explored in various directions of biomedicine in recent years. However, how functionalized GO interacts with bioactive proteins such as enzymes and its potential in enzyme engineering have been rarely explored. In this study, we carefully investigated the interactions between serine proteases and GO functionalized with different amine-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG). Three well-characterized serine proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and proteinase K) with important biomedical and industrial applications were analyzed. It is found that these PEGylated GOs could selectively improve trypsin activity and thermostability (60-70% retained activity at 80 °C), while exhibiting barely any effect on chymotrypsin or proteinase K. Detailed investigation illustrates that the PEGylated GO-induced acceleration is substrate-dependent, affecting only phosphorylated protein substrates, and that at least up to 43-fold increase could be achieved depending on the substrate concentration. This unique phenomenon, interestingly, is found to be attributed to both the terminal amino groups on polymer coatings and the 2-D structure of GO. Moreover, an enzyme-based bioassay system is further demonstrated utilizing our GO-based enzyme modulator in a proof-of-concept experiment. To our best knowledge, this work is the first success of using functionalized GO as an efficient enzyme positive modulator with great selectivity, exhibiting a novel potential of GO, when appropriately functionalized, in enzyme engineering as well as enzyme-based biosensing and detection.

  6. Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide.

    PubMed

    Bartko, Johann; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Petroczi, Karin; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) -mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.1.3) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. PMID:27401969

  7. Optimization to Low Temperature Activity in Psychrophilic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Struvay, Caroline; Feller, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Psychrophiles, i.e., organisms thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures, synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. Considering the subtle structural adjustments required for low temperature activity, directed evolution appears to be the most suitable methodology to engineer cold activity in biological catalysts. PMID:23109875

  8. Angiotensin I converting enzyme activity in rabbit corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neels, H M; Vanden Berghe, D A; Neetens, A J; Delgadillo, R A; Scharpe, S L

    1983-01-01

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) was studied in Vero cells, rabbit corneal fibroblasts, and rabbit corneal endothelial cells. The enzyme activity was determined by means of an assay employing hippuryl-glycyl-glycine as a substrate. The hippuric acid end product was separated from the substrate by reversed phase liquid chromatography and measured spectrophotometrically at 228 nm. The enzyme was further characterized by a captopril inhibition study. Significant ACE activity was found in rabbit corneal endothelial cells but not in other types of cells tested. This is the first report of the presence of this enzyme in a specific ocular cell type and suggests that angiotensin II may play a role in normal ocular physiology.

  9. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  10. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase is essential and plays a role in promoting virus genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Don B; Evans, David H

    2009-05-01

    Poxviruses are subjected to extraordinarily high levels of genetic recombination during infection, although the enzymes catalyzing these reactions have never been identified. However, it is clear that virus-encoded DNA polymerases play some unknown yet critical role in virus recombination. Using a novel, antiviral-drug-based strategy to dissect recombination and replication reactions, we now show that the 3'-to-5' proofreading exonuclease activity of the viral DNA polymerase plays a key role in promoting recombination reactions. Linear DNA substrates were prepared containing the dCMP analog cidofovir (CDV) incorporated into the 3' ends of the molecules. The drug blocked the formation of concatemeric recombinant molecules in vitro in a process that was catalyzed by the proofreading activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase. Recombinant formation was also blocked when CDV-containing recombination substrates were transfected into cells infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. These inhibitory effects could be overcome if CDV-containing substrates were transfected into cells infected with CDV-resistant (CDV(r)) viruses, but only when resistance was linked to an A314T substitution mutation mapping within the 3'-to-5' exonuclease domain of the viral polymerase. Viruses encoding a CDV(r) mutation in the polymerase domain still exhibited a CDV-induced recombination deficiency. The A314T substitution also enhanced the enzyme's capacity to excise CDV molecules from the 3' ends of duplex DNA and to recombine these DNAs in vitro, as judged from experiments using purified mutant DNA polymerase. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity appears to be an essential virus function, and our results suggest that this might be because poxviruses use it to promote genetic exchange.

  11. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  12. Enzyme kinetic study of a new cardioprotective agent, KR-32570 using human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojin; Seo, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Hyunmi; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Choong-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Gook; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2007-04-01

    KR-32570 (5-(2-Methoxy-5-chlorophenyl)furan-2-ylcarbonyl)guanidine) is a new cardioprotective agent for preventing ischemia-reperfusion injury. Human liver microsomal incubation of KR-32570 in the presence of NADPH resulted in the formation of two metabolites, hydroxy-KR-32570 and O-desmethyl-KR-32570. In this study, a kinetic analysis of the metabolism of two metabolites from KR-32570 was performed in human liver microsomes, and recombinant CYP1A2, and CYP3A4. The metabolism for hydroxy- and O-desmethyl-KR-32570 formation from KR-32570 by human liver microsomes was best described by a Michaelis-Menten equation and a Hill equation, respectively. The Cl(int) values of hydroxy- and O-desmethyl-KR-32570 formation were similar to each other (0.03 vs 0.04 microL/min/pmol CYP, respectively). CYP3A4 mediated the formation of hydroxy-KR-32570 from KR-32570 with Cl(int) = 0.24 microL/min/pmol CYP3A4. The intrinsic clearance for O-desmethyl-KR-32570 formation by CYP1A2 was 0.83 AL/min/pmol CYP1A2. These findings suggest that CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 enzymes are major enzymes contributing to the metabolism of KR-32570.

  13. Highly miniaturized formats for in vitro drug metabolism assays using vivid fluorescent substrates and recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Olga V; Gibson, Jasmin R; Marks, Bryan D

    2005-02-01

    Highly miniaturized P450 screening assays designed to enable facile analysis of P450 drug interactions in a 1536-well plate format with the principal human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2) and Vivid fluorogenic substrates were developed. The detailed characterization of the assays included stability, homogeneity, and reproducibility of the recombinant P450 enzymes and the kinetic parameters of their reactions with Vivid fluorogenic substrates, with a focus on the specific characteristics of each component that enable screening in a low-volume 1536-well plate assay format. The screening assays were applied for the assessment of individual cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles with a panel of selected assay modifiers, including isozyme-specific substrates and inhibitors. IC(50) values obtained for the modifiers in 96- and 1536-well plate formats were similar and comparable with values obtained in assays with conventional substrates. An overall examination of the 1536-well assay statistics, such as signal-to-background ratio and Z' factor, demonstrated that these assays are a robust, successful, and reliable tool to screen for cytochrome P450 metabolism and inhibition in an ultra-high-throughput screening format.

  14. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  15. Improving Activity of Salt-Lyophilized Enzymes in Organic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borole, Abhijeet P.; Davison, Brian H.

    Lyophilization with salts has been identified as an important method of activating enzymes in organic media. Using salt-activated enzymes to transform molecules tethered to solid surfaces in organic phase requires solubilization of enzymes in the solvents. Methods of improving performance of salt-lyophilized enzymes, further, via chemical modification, and use of surfactants and surfactants to create fine emulsions prior to lyophilization are investigated. The reaction system used is transesterification of N-acetyl phenylalanine ethyl ester with methanol or propanol. Initial rate of formation of amino acid esters by subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) was studied and found to increase two to sevenfold by either chemical modification or addition of surfactants in certain solvents, relative to the salt (only)-lyophilized enzyme. The method to prepare highly dispersed enzymes in a salt-surfactant milieu also improved activity by two to threefold. To test the effect of chemical modification on derivatization of drug molecules, acylation of bergenin was investigated using chemically modified SC.

  16. Improving activity of salt-lyophilized enzymes in organic media

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Davison, Brian H

    2008-01-01

    Lyophilization with salts has been identified as an important method of activating enzymes in organic media. Using salt-activated enzymes to transform molecules tethered to solid surfaces in organic phase requires solubilization of enzymes in the solvents. Methods of improving performance of salt-lyophilized enzymes, further, via chemical modification, and use of surfactants and surfactants to create fine emulsions prior to lyophilization are investigated. The reaction system used is transesterification of N-acetyl phenylalanine ethyl ester with methanol or propanol. Initial rate of formation of amino acid esters by subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) was studied and found to increase two to sevenfold by either chemical modification or addition of surfactants in certain solvents, relative to the salt (only)-lyophilized enzyme. The method to prepare highly dispersed enzymes in a salt-surfactant milieu also improved activity by two to threefold. To test the effect of chemical modification on derivatization of drug molecules, acylation of bergenin was investigated using chemically modified SC.

  17. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  18. [Investigation of metabolic kinetics and reaction phenotyping of ligustrazin by using liver microsomes and recombinant human enzymes].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Shen, Guo-Lin; Li, Hua; Gao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic characteristics of ligustrazin (TMPz) in liver microsomes were investigated in the present study. The reaction phenotyping of TMPz metabolism was also identified by in vitro assessment using recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) and UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). TMPz was incubated at 37 degrees C with human (HLM) and rat liver microsomes (RLM) in the presence of different co-factors. The metabolic stability and enzyme kinetics of TMPz were studied by determining its remaining concentrations with a LC-MS/MS method. TMPz was only metabolically eliminated in the microsomes with NADPH or NADPH+UDPGA. In the HLM and RLM with NADPH+UDPGA, t1/2, K(m) and V(max) of TMPz were 94.24 +/- 4.53 and 105.07 +/- 9.44 min, 22.74 +/- 1.89 and 33.09 +/- 2.74 micromol x L(-1), 253.50 +/- 10.06 and 190.40 +/- 8.35 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) (protein), respectively. TMPz showed a slightly higher metabolic rate in HLM than that in RLM. Its primary oxidative metabolites, 2-hydroxymethyl-3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazine (HTMP), could undergo glucuronide conjugation. The CYP reaction phenotyping of TMPz metabolism was identified using a panel of recombinant CYP isoforms (rCYP) and specific CYP inhibitors in HLM. CYP1A2, 2C9 and 3A4 were found to be the major CYP isoforms involved in TMPz metabolism. Their individual contributions were assessed b) using the method of the total normalized rate to be 19.32%, 27.79% and 52.90%, respectively. It was observed that these CYP isoforms mediated the formation of HTMP in rCYP incubation. The UGT reaction phenotyping of HTMP glucuronidation was also investigated preliminarily by using a panel of 6 UGT isoforms (rUGT). UGT1A1, 1A4 and 1A6 were the predominant isoforms mediated the HTMP glucuronidation. The results above indicate that the metabolism of TMPz involves multiple enzymes mediated phase I and phase II reactions.

  19. Bioethanol production from leafy biomass of mango (Mangifera indica) involving naturally isolated and recombinant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Saprativ P; Ravindran, Rajeev; Deka, Deepmoni; Jawed, Mohammad; Das, Debasish; Goyal, Arun

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the usage of dried leafy biomass of mango (Mangifera indica) containing 26.3% (w/w) cellulose, 54.4% (w/w) hemicellulose, and 16.9% (w/w) lignin, as a substrate for bioethanol production from Zymomonas mobilis and Candida shehatae. The substrate was subjected to two different pretreatment strategies, namely, wet oxidation and an organosolv process. An ethanol concentration (1.21 g/L) was obtained with Z. mobilis in a shake-flask simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) trial using 1% (w/v) wet oxidation pretreated mango leaves along with mixed enzymatic consortium of Bacillus subtilis cellulase and recombinant hemicellulase (GH43), whereas C. shehatae gave a slightly higher (8%) ethanol titer of 1.31 g/L. Employing 1% (w/v) organosolv pretreated mango leaves and using Z. mobilis and C. shehatae separately in the SSF, the ethanol titers of 1.33 g/L and 1.52 g/L, respectively, were obtained. The SSF experiments performed with 5% (w/v) organosolv-pretreated substrate along with C. shehatae as fermentative organism gave a significantly enhanced ethanol titer value of 8.11 g/L using the shake flask and 12.33 g/L at the bioreactor level. From the bioreactor, 94.4% (v/v) ethanol was recovered by rotary evaporator with 21% purification efficiency.

  20. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae), wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow) and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i) 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii) four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. Results We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4)-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Conclusion Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily accessible hemicellulose

  1. Cloning of Bacillus licheniformis xylanase gene and characterization of recombinant enzyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemicellulose is a major component of lignocellulose biomass. Complete enzymatic degradation of this substrate requires several different activities, including xylanase. We isolated a strain of Bacillus licheniformis from a hot springs environment that exhibited xylanase activity. A gene encoding...

  2. Enzyme activities of lung lavage in silicosis.

    PubMed

    Larivée, P; Cantin, A; Dufresne, A; Bégin, R

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of quartz on lung cells has been well documented by in vitro and animal studies, but the pertinence of these findings to humans has not yet been documented. We measured lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the lung lavage of 24 long-term workers in the Québec granite industry and 25 control subjects. We found significant increases in LDH activities in the workers' lung lavage, even in the absence of established silicosis (9 subjects). We looked at a similar observation in the sheep model of early silicosis, measured quartz content of lung lavage, and found significant correlation with LDH levels (R = 0.64, p less than 0.001). All of the quartz particles in human and sheep lung lavage were in the alveolar macrophages. To test further the relationship of macrophage damage (cytotoxicity of quartz) we measured the release of LDH by sheep alveolar macrophage in 24 h cell culture under control conditions, exposure to inert dust, titanium, minusil-5 quartz, or aluminum-treated quartz. The LDH release was at control levels during titanium exposure and showed a significantly dose-related increase during quartz exposure. The latter cytotoxic effect was largely attenuated by aluminum treatment of quartz. These in vitro data agreed with previous reports. This study presents evidence of a cytotoxic effect of quartz inhalation in humans. The effect is related to the intensity of quartz retention in the lung macrophages; it is not a nonspecific dust exposure effect and can be attenuated by surface modification of the quartz.

  3. Expression of Different Levels of Ethanologenic Enzymes from Zymomonas mobilis in Recombinant Strains of Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, L. O.; Conway, T.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II in Escherichia coli converted this organism from the production of organic acids to the production of ethanol. Ethanol was produced during both anaerobic and aerobic growth. The extent to which these ethanologenic enzymes were expressed correlated with the extent of ethanol production. The replacement of organic acids with ethanol as a metabolic product during aerobic and anaerobic growth resulted in dramatic increases in final cell density, indicating that these acids (and the associated decline in pH) are more damaging than the production of ethanol. Of the plasmids examined, the best plasmid for growth and ethanol production expressed pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II at levels of 6.5 and 2.5 IU/mg of total cell protein, respectively. PMID:16347553

  4. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera

    PubMed Central

    Hatzios, Stavroula K.; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Davis, Brigid M.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human cholera stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, while genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance and binding of an intestinal lectin—intelectin—to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialogue in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  5. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  6. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  7. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  8. Directed enzyme evolution guided by multidimensional analysis of substrate-activity space.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Anna-Karin; Emrén, Lars O; Bardsley, William G; Mannervik, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    The directed evolution of protein function frequently involves identification of mutants with improved properties from a population of variants obtained by mutagenesis. The selection of clones to parent the subsequent generation is crucial to the continued creation of superior progeny. In the present study, multivariate analysis guided the evolution of human glutathione transferase (GST) T1-1 to 65-fold enhanced alkyltransferase activity. Six alternative substrates monitored the substrate-activity space that characterized a mutant library of enzymes, obtained by recombination of DNA and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. A subset of mutants was identified by their proximity in the targeted region of six-dimensional factor space. DNA from these mutants was recombined to create a new generation of GST variants from which an improved enzyme was isolated. The multidimensional cluster analysis is applicable to quantitative properties in any population of molecules undergoing evolution and can guide the tailoring of proteins, nucleic acids and other chemical structures to novel and improved functions.

  9. Preparation and characterization of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of recombinant poly-3-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase from Streptomyces exfoliatus.

    PubMed

    Hormigo, Daniel; García-Hidalgo, Javier; Acebal, Carmen; de la Mata, Isabel; Arroyo, Miguel

    2012-07-01

    Cross-linked enzyme aggregates of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) depolymerase from Streptomyces exfoliatus (PhaZ(Sex)-CLEAs) have been prepared. Acetone was used as the precipitating agent, while addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) facilitated CLEAs formation. Conditions for enzyme precipitation and cross-linking have been optimized, and confocal scanning microscopy showed a homogeneous enzyme distribution in the biocatalyst. Obtained PhaZ(Sex)-CLEAs presented an average size of 50-300 μm, showing a high PHB depolymerase activity of 255 U/g wet biocatalyst at 40°C and pH 7.0. Temperature-activity profile of PhaZ(Sex)-CLEAs at pH 8.0 showed that the highest activity for pNPB hydrolysis was achieved at 60°C, whereas pH-activity profile at 40°C indicated that highest activity for PHB hydrolysis was achieved at pH 7.0. Additionally, immobilized biocatalyst could be recycled at least for 20 consecutive batch reactions without loss of catalytic activity, and showed higher pH and temperature stability, and better tolerance to several organic solvents than its soluble counterpart.

  10. A DNA enzyme with N-glycosylase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, T. L.; Ordoukhanian, P.; Joyce, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro evolution was used to develop a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the site-specific depurination of DNA with a catalytic rate enhancement of about 10(6)-fold. The reaction involves hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of a particular deoxyguanosine residue, leading to DNA strand scission at the apurinic site. The DNA enzyme contains 93 nucleotides and is structurally complex. It has an absolute requirement for a divalent metal cation and exhibits optimal activity at about pH 5. The mechanism of the reaction was confirmed by analysis of the cleavage products by using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of an N-glycosylase DNA enzyme demonstrates that single-stranded DNA, like RNA and proteins, can form a complex tertiary structure and catalyze a difficult biochemical transformation. This DNA enzyme provides a new approach for the site-specific cleavage of DNA molecules.

  11. Expression of a β-mannosidase from Paenibacillus polymyxa A-8 in Escherichia coli and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xi; Hu, Hong; Chen, Huaping; Wei, Quanbin; Yang, Zeshen; Huang, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa A-8, which secretes β-mannosidase, was isolated from the soil sample under a pine tree located in the "Laoban" mountain region of Sichuan, China. The β-mannosidase gene (MANB) was isolated from P. polymyxa A-8, using primers according to the complete genome. The MANB (2,550 bp) encoding 849 amino acid residues was expressed in Escherichia coli. The specific activities of β-mannosidase produced by P. polymyxa A-8 and E. coli pET30a-MANB were 12 nkat/mg and 635 nkat/mg respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the molecular mass of the recombinant MANB was approximately 96 kDa. The recombinant MANB was active between pH 7.0-8.5 with the maximum activity at pH 7.0. It had good pH stability and adaptability. The MANB had the optimal temperature of 35°C and was relatively stable at 35-40°C. In addition, the MANB activity was enhanced by K+, Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ and inhibited by Zn2+, Cu2+, and Hg2+. PMID:25423086

  12. Bilirubin Glucuronidation Revisited: Proper Assay Conditions to Estimate Enzyme Kinetics with Recombinant UGT1A1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Bilirubin, an end product of heme catabolism, is primarily eliminated via glucuronic acid conjugation by UGT1A1. Impaired bilirubin conjugation, caused by inhibition of UGT1A1, can result in clinical consequences, including jaundice and kernicterus. Thus, evaluation of the ability of new drug candidates to inhibit UGT1A1-catalyzed bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro has become common practice. However, the instability of bilirubin and its glucuronides presents substantial technical challenges to conduct in vitro bilirubin glucuronidation assays. Furthermore, because bilirubin can be diglucuronidated through a sequential reaction, establishment of initial rate conditions can be problematic. To address these issues, a robust high-performance liquid chromatography assay to measure both bilirubin mono- and diglucuronide conjugates was developed, and the incubation conditions for bilirubin glucuronidation by human embryonic kidney 293-expressed UGT1A1 were carefully characterized. Our results indicated that bilirubin glucuronidation should be assessed at very low protein concentrations (0.05 mg/ml protein) and over a short incubation time (5 min) to assure initial rate conditions. Under these conditions, bilirubin total glucuronide formation exhibited a hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetic profile with a Km of ∼0.2 μM. In addition, under these initial rate conditions, the relative proportions between the total monoglucuronide and the diglucuronide product were constant across the range of bilirubin concentration evaluated (0.05–2 μM), with the monoglucuronide being the predominant species (∼70%). In conclusion, establishment of appropriate incubation conditions (i.e., very low protein concentrations and short incubation times) is necessary to properly characterize the kinetics of bilirubin glucuronidation in a recombinant UGT1A1 system. PMID:20668247

  13. Activation Energy of Extracellular Enzymes in Soils from Different Biomes

    PubMed Central

    Steinweg, J. Megan; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Frerichs, Joshua; Mayes, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme dynamics are being incorporated into soil carbon cycling models and accurate representation of enzyme kinetics is an important step in predicting belowground nutrient dynamics. A scarce number of studies have measured activation energy (Ea) in soils and fewer studies have measured Ea in arctic and tropical soils, or in subsurface soils. We determined the Ea for four typical lignocellulose degrading enzymes in the A and B horizons of seven soils covering six different soil orders. We also elucidated which soil properties predicted any measurable differences in Ea. β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase activities were measured at five temperatures, 4, 21, 30, 40, and 60°C. Ea was calculated using the Arrhenius equation. β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase Ea values for both A and B horizons in this study were similar to previously reported values, however we could not make a direct comparison for B horizon soils because of the lack of data. There was no consistent relationship between hydrolase enzyme Ea and the environmental variables we measured. Phenol oxidase was the only enzyme that had a consistent positive relationship between Ea and pH in both horizons. The Ea in the arctic and subarctic zones for peroxidase was lower than the hydrolases and phenol oxidase values, indicating peroxidase may be a rate limited enzyme in environments under warming conditions. By including these six soil types we have increased the number of soil oxidative enzyme Ea values reported in the literature by 50%. This study is a step towards better quantifying enzyme kinetics in different climate zones. PMID:23536898

  14. Recombinant activated factor VII in post partum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Babu, K. M.; Kapur, Krishan; Chopra, Sanjiv; Joneja, Gurdarshan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) is a life-threatening obstetric complication and the leading cause of maternal death. Any bleeding that results in or could result in haemodynamic instability, if untreated, must be considered as PPH. There is no controversy about the need for prevention and treatment of PPH. The keystone of management of PPH entails first, non-invasive and nonsurgical methods and then invasive and surgical methods. However, mortality remains high. Therefore, new advancements in the treatment are most crucial. One such advancement has been the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in PPH. First used 12 years back in PPH, this universal haemostatic agent has been effectively used in controlling PPH. The best available indicator of rFVIIa efficacy is the arrest of haemorrhage, which is judged by visual evidence and haemodynamic stabilization. It also reduces costs of therapy and the use of blood components in massive PPH. In cases of intractable PPH with no other obvious indications for hysterectomy, administration of rFVIIa should be considered before surgery. We share our experience in a series of cases of PPH, successfully managed using rFVIIa. PMID:24403703

  15. Molecular characterization of a cold-active recombinant xylanase from Flavobacterium johnsoniae and its applicability in xylan hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shicheng; Kaufman, Michael G.; Miazgowicz, Kerri L.; Bagdasarian, Michael; Walker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    A novel xylanase gene, xyn10A, was cloned from Flavobacterium johsoniae, overexpressed in a flavobacterial expression system, the recombinant enzyme purified by Ni-affinity chromatography, and enzyme structure and activity analyzed. Xyn10A was found to be a modular xylanase with an Fn3 accessory domain on its N-terminal and a catalytic region on the C-terminal. The optimum pH and temperature for Xyn10A was 8.0 and 30° C, but Xyn10A retained 50% activity at 4°C, indicating that Xyn10A is a cold-active xylanase. A Fn3-deletion xylanase had relative activity ca. 3.6-fold lower than the wild-type, indicating that Fn3 promotes xylanase activity. The Fn3 region also contributed to stability of the enzyme at elevated temperatures. However, Fn3 did not bind this xylanase to insoluble substrates. The enzyme hydrolyzed xylo-oligosaccharides into xylobiose, and xylose with xylobiose as the main product, confirming that Xyn10A is a strict endo-β-1,4-xylanase. Xyn10A also hydrolyzed birchwood and beechwood xylan to yield mainly xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose. PMID:23196234

  16. [Comparison of expression and antibacterial activities of recombinant porcine lactoferrin expressed in four Lactobacillus species].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Jiang, Yanping; Cui, Wen; Wu, Xiao; He, Jia; Qiao, Xinyuan; Li, Yijing; Tang, Lijie

    2014-09-01

    The coding sequence for the mature peptide of porcine lactoferrin (Plf) was synthesized according to the codon usage of lactobacillus, to establish optimized porcine lactoferrin Lactobacillus expression system. The gene was ligated into the Xho I/BamH I site of Lactobacillus expression vector pPG612.1 and the recombinant plasmid pPG612.1-plf was transformed individually into Lactobacillus casei ATCC393, Lactobacillus pentosus KLDS1.0413, Lactobacillus plantarum KLDS1.0344 or Lactobacillus paracasei KLDS1.0652 by electroporation. After induction with xylose, expression of the recombinant proteins was detected by Western blotting and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Secretion of recombinant Plf proteins from four recombinant species was determined quantitatively by ELISA. The antibacterial activities of recombinant proteins were measured by agar diffusion method. The result shows that Plf was correctly expressed in four species of recombinant lactobacillus, with molecular weight of about 73 kDa. The expression levels in recombinant Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei were 9.6 μg/mL, 10.8 μg/mL, 12.5 μg/mL and 9.9 μg/mL, respectively. Antimicrobial activity experiment shows that the recombinant proteins were active against E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria, Pasteurella. The recombinant Plf expressed by recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum showed the best antibacterial activity among all recombinant lactobacillus species. These data represent a basis for the development and application of porcine lactoferrin from recombinant lactobacillus.

  17. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  18. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  19. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is active against hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chi, SungGi; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Asako; Takaoka, Masato; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital to initiate highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) for documented acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The HIV load was 2.5 million copies/mL and the CD4-positive lymphocyte count was only 52 cells/µL at presentation. The HAART regimen consisted of lamivudine and abacavir as the backbone, plus raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir as the base. The day after initiating HAART, his body temperature rose to 102.4 °F (39.1 °C), accompanied by elevated levels of liver enzymes, neutropenia, coagulopathies, and an extremely high serum ferritin level, prompting us to suspect hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). To correct the coagulation abnormalities, recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM) was initiated at 375 U/kg. Surprisingly, fever resolved almost immediately, in parallel with dramatic decreases in serum levels of ferritin and liver enzymes and prompt normalization of coagulopathy with only two doses of rTM. The patient subsequently developed amebiasis, which was successfully treated using metronidazole. In summary, the use of rTM dramatically improved not only DIC, but also HLH, suggesting potent anti-inflammatory effects of the agent. Although further clinical reports and trials are needed, rTM appears to provide an additional therapeutic option in the management of HLH.

  20. Modulating enzyme activity using ionic liquids or surfactants.

    PubMed

    Goldfeder, Mor; Fishman, Ayelet

    2014-01-01

    One of the important strategies for modulating enzyme activity is the use of additives to affect their microenvironment and subsequently make them suitable for use in different industrial processes. Ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated extensively in recent years as such additives. They are a class of solvents with peculiar properties and a "green" reputation in comparison to classical organic solvents. ILs as co-solvents in aqueous systems have an effect on substrate solubility, enzyme structure and on enzyme-water interactions. These effects can lead to higher reaction yields, improved selectivity, and changes in substrate specificity, and thus there is great potential for IL incorporation in biocatalysis. The use of surfactants, which are usually denaturating agents, as additives in enzymatic reactions is less reviewed in recent years. However, interesting modulations in enzyme activity in their presence have been reported. In the case of surfactants there is a more pronounced effect on the enzyme structure, as can be observed in a number of crystal structures obtained in their presence. For each additive and enzymatic process, a specific optimization process is needed and there is no one-fits-all solution. Combining ILs and surfactants in either mixed micelles or water-in-IL microemulsions for use in enzymatic reaction systems is a promising direction which may further expand the range of enzyme applications in industrial processes. While many reviews exist on the use of ILs in biocatalysis, the present review centers on systems in which ILs or surfactants were able to modulate and improve the natural activity of enzymes in aqueous systems. PMID:24281758

  1. Peptide-Recombinant VP6 Protein Based Enzyme Immunoassay for the Detection of Group A Rotaviruses in Multiple Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Subhankar; Saurabh, Sharad; Gulati, Baldev R.; Singh, Neeraj; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Joshi, Vinay G.; Banyai, Krisztian; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel enzyme immunoassay for the detection of group A rotavirus (RVA) antigen in fecal samples of multiple host species. The assay is based on the detection of conserved VP6 protein using anti-recombinant VP6 antibodies as capture antibodies and anti-multiple antigenic peptide (identified and constructed from highly immunodominant epitopes within VP6 protein) antibodies as detector antibodies. The clinical utility of the assay was evaluated using a panel of 914 diarrhoeic fecal samples from four different host species (bovine, porcine, poultry and human) collected from diverse geographical locations in India. Using VP6- based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as the gold standard, we found that the diagnostic sensitivity (DSn) and specificity (DSp) of the new assay was high [bovine (DSn = 94.2% & DSp = 100%); porcine (DSn = 94.6% & DSp = 93.3%); poultry (DSn = 74.2% & DSp = 97.7%) and human (DSn = 82.1% & DSp = 98.7%)]. The concordance with RT-PCR was also high [weighted kappa (k) = 0.831–0.956 at 95% CI = 0.711–1.0] as compared to RNA-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (RNA-PAGE). The performance characteristics of the new immunoassay were comparable to those of the two commercially available ELISA kits. Our results suggest that this peptide-recombinant protein based assay may serve as a preliminary assay for epidemiological surveillance of RVA antigen and for evaluation of vaccine effectiveness especially in low and middle income settings. PMID:27391106

  2. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in avian semen.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Agnieszka; Lukaszewicz, Ewa; Niżański, Wojciech

    2012-10-01

    The present study compared the antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation in semen of two avian species: chicken and goose. The experiment was conducted on Greenleg Partridge roosters and White Koluda(®) ganders, each represented by 10 mature males. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in sperm cells and seminal plasma. In gander spermatozoa, the amount of MDA was 10 times greater (P<0.01) than in rooster spermatozoa. Each of the investigated antioxidant enzymes had greater (P<0.01) activity in goose than chicken sperm. Catalase activity was detected in seminal plasma and spermatozoa from both studied species for the first time. In seminal plasma, the activity of GPx was two times greater (P<0.01) in the White Koluda(®) than in chickens, whereas SOD activity was less (P<0.01) than in chickens. This is the first study describing the presence of CAT in avian semen and the occurrence of indicator of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in geese. Data from the present study clearly show the species-specific differences in the activity of antioxidant defense and LPO. The greater amount of lipid peroxidation and greater activity of antioxidant enzymes in goose semen might suggest that spermatozoa were under greater oxidative stress and the enzymes were not utilized for the protection of functionally and structurally impaired cells. In turn, in fresh chicken semen a lesser activity of antioxidant enzymes accompanied with a lesser lipid peroxidation amount and good semen quality could indicate that fowl spermatozoa were under oxidative stress, but the enzymes were employed to protect and maintain sperm quality.

  3. Recombinant Drosophila prophenoloxidase 1 is sequentially cleaved by α-chymotrypsin during in vitro activation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anrui; Li, Xuquan; Hillyer, Julián F; Beerntsen, Brenda T; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Ling, Erjun

    2014-07-01

    Insect prophenoloxidase (PPO) is an essential innate immunity protein to induce pathogen into melanization. In Bombyx mori, pro-phenoloxidase-activating enzyme (PPAE) can directly cleave and activate PPO. However, PPO in Manduca sexta cannot be cleaved into active phenoloxidase (PO) by serine proteases unless cofactors are involved, which indicates that PPO activation is complicated. Here we use recombinant Drosophila melanogaster prophenoloxidase 1 (rPPO1) to study the mechanism of PPO activation induced by a typical serine protease, α-chymotrypsin. Small amounts of α-chymotrypsin cleave rPPO1 at the N- and C-terminus to produce a large fragment rPPO1(N1/C1) that needs further cleavage by α-chymotrypsin to produce a smaller fragment rPO1(60-kD) with PO activity. rPO1(60-kD) oxidizes dopamine without being affected by high temperature, or by having salt and Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) in the solution. After incubation with dopamine, rPO1(60-kD) cannot be detected using reducing SDS-PAGE due to formation of a large complex. Trypsin, another typical serine protease, cleaves rPPO1 at the N- and C-terminus to produce a small fragment rPPO1(N'/C') without PO activity. Several rPPO1 mutants were created through over-expressing active fragments that have direct PO activity. They are easily cleaved by low amounts of α-chymotrypsin without increasing PO activity. Therefore, rPPO1 can be sequentially cleaved in at least three places by α-chymotrypsin to produce activated rPO1(60-kD).

  4. [Enzyme activity of an actinomycete producer of carotenes and macrotetrolides].

    PubMed

    Nefelova, M V; Sverdlova, A N

    1982-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase and dehydrogenases of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was assayed in the mycelium of Streptomyces chrysomallus var. Carotenoides growing under different conditions of the medium. The activity of the enzymes increased when acetic, citric and succinic acids were added at different periods of the growth. Moreover, addition of the acids increased the time of intensive functioning of the dehydrogenases whose activity abruptly decreased after 60 h of the growth under the control conditions.

  5. Myelostimulatory activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.E.; Schneider, M.; Keller, J.; Ruscetti, F.; Longo, D.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Tribble, H.

    1989-05-01

    In a series of studies designed to extend our understanding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and to study the effect of biologic response modifiers on bone marrow, we observed that administering recombinant human (rH) IL-2 to normal mice resulted in an increase in the frequency of colony-forming units-culture (CFU-C) in bone marrow. In addition, rH IL-2 was able to accelerate host recovery from cyclophosphamide (CTX)- or radiation-induced bone marrow depression and peripheral blood leukopenia. Not only can rH IL-2 accelerate, in a dose-dependent manner, the return of bone marrow, peripheral blood cellularity, and CFU-C frequency to normal levels following cytoreduction by CTX or irradiation, but it also significantly increases CFU-C frequency to greater than normal levels. Furthermore, rH IL-2 can significantly prolong survival of animals receiving a lethal dose of irradiation or CTX. Thus, multiple mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic therapeutic activity associated with rH IL-2 and CTX. rH IL-2 does not act only as an immunomodulatory agent in the presence or absence of suppressor T cells, but also accelerates host recovery from cytoreductive agents, resulting in decreased leukopenia and perhaps resistances to secondary infection. Thus, rH IL-2 plus chemotherapy may increase therapeutic activity against neoplastic disease, not only by adding immune stimulation to the direct antitumor effect of the drug but also by allowing delivery of higher, more effective doses of chemotherapy.

  6. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  7. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying; Naleway, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  8. Enzyme activities by indicator of quality in organic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigon Jiménez, Mo; Fita, Ana Delores; Rodriguez Burruezo, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The analytical determination of biochemical parameters, as soil enzyme activities and those related to the microbial biomass is growing importance by biological indicator in soil science studies. The metabolic activity in soil is responsible of important processes such as mineralization and humification of organic matter. These biological reactions will affect other key processes involved with elements like carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus , and all transformations related in soil microbial biomass. The determination of biochemical parameters is useful in studies carried out on organic soil where microbial processes that are key to their conservation can be analyzed through parameters of the metabolic activity of these soils. The main objective of this work is to apply analytical methodologies of enzyme activities in soil collections of different physicochemical characteristics. There have been selective sampling of natural soils, organic farming soils, conventional farming soils and urban soils. The soils have been properly identified conserved at 4 ° C until analysis. The enzyme activities determinations have been: catalase, urease, cellulase, dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase, which bring together a representative group of biological transformations that occur in the soil environment. The results indicate that for natural and agronomic soil collections, the values of the enzymatic activities are within the ranges established for forestry and agricultural soils. Organic soils are generally higher level of enzymatic, regardless activity of the enzyme involved. Soil near an urban area, levels of activities have been significantly reduced. The vegetation cover applied to organic soils, results in greater enzymatic activity. So the quality of these soils, defined as the ability to maintain their biological productivity is increased with the use of cover crops, whether or spontaneous species. The practice of cover based on legumes could be used as an ideal choice

  9. Chi hotspots trigger a conformational change in the helicase-like domain of AddAB to activate homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Gilhooly, Neville S.; Carrasco, Carolina; Gollnick, Benjamin; Wilkinson, Martin; Wigley, Dale B.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks is modulated by Chi sequences. These are recognised by helicase-nuclease complexes that process DNA ends for homologous recombination. Chi activates recombination by changing the biochemical properties of the helicase-nuclease, transforming it from a destructive exonuclease into a recombination-promoting repair enzyme. This transition is thought to be controlled by the Chi-dependent opening of a molecular latch, which enables part of the DNA substrate to evade degradation beyond Chi. Here, we show that disruption of the latch improves Chi recognition efficiency and stabilizes the interaction of AddAB with Chi, even in mutants that are impaired for Chi binding. Chi recognition elicits a structural change in AddAB that maps to a region of AddB which resembles a helicase domain, and which harbours both the Chi recognition locus and the latch. Mutation of the latch potentiates the change and moderately reduces the duration of a translocation pause at Chi. However, this mutant displays properties of Chi-modified AddAB even in the complete absence of bona fide hotspot sequences. The results are used to develop a model for AddAB regulation in which allosteric communication between Chi binding and latch opening ensures quality control during recombination hotspot recognition. PMID:26762979

  10. Fatty acid hydration activity of a recombinant Escherichia coli-based biocatalyst is improved through targeting the oleate hydratase into the periplasm.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang-Min; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Hoo; Park, Jin-Byung; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Whole-cell biotransformation of fatty acids can be influenced by the activities of catalytic enzymes and by the efficiency of substrate transport into host cells. Here, we improved fatty acid hydration activity of the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing an oleate hydratase of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by targeting the catalytic enzyme into the periplasm instead of the cytoplasm. Recombinant E. coli producing OhyA in the periplasm under guidance of the PelB signal sequence (E. coli OhyA_PP) exhibited significantly greater hydration activity with oleic acid and linoleic acid compared to a recombinant E. coli producing OhyA in the cytoplasm (E. coli OhyA_CS). For example, the oleate double bond hydration rate of E. coli OhyA_PP was >400 μmol/g dry cells/min (400 U/g dry cells), which is >10-fold higher than that of E. coli OhyA_CS. As the specific activities of the enzymes targeted into the cytoplasm and periplasm were comparable, we assumed that targeting OhyA into the periplasm could accelerate fatty acid transport to the catalytic enzymes by skipping the major mass transport barrier of the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results will contribute to the development of whole-cell biocatalysts for fatty acid biotransformation.

  11. Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas enzymes activate metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivate metronidazole (nitroimidazole reductases).

    PubMed

    Pal, Dibyarupa; Banerjee, Sulagna; Cui, Jike; Schwartz, Aaron; Ghosh, Sudip K; Samuelson, John

    2009-02-01

    Infections with Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Trichomonas vaginalis, which cause diarrhea, dysentery, and vaginitis, respectively, are each treated with metronidazole. Here we show that Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas have oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (ntr) genes which are homologous to those genes that have nonsense mutations in metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates. Entamoeba and Trichomonas also have nim genes which are homologous to those genes expressed in metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates. Recombinant Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas nitroreductases used NADH rather than the NADPH used by Helicobacter, and two recombinant Entamoeba nitroreductases increased the metronidazole sensitivity of transformed Escherichia coli strains. Conversely, the recombinant nitroimidazole reductases (NIMs) of Entamoeba and Trichmonas conferred very strong metronidazole resistance to transformed bacteria. The Ehntr1 gene of the genome project HM-1:IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica had a nonsense mutation, and the same nonsense mutation was present in 3 of 22 clinical isolates of Entamoeba. While ntr and nim mRNAs were variably expressed by cultured Entamoeba and Trichomonas isolates, there was no relationship to metronidazole sensitivity. We conclude that microaerophilic protists have bacterium-like enzymes capable of activating metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivating metronidazole (NIMs). While Entamoeba and Trichomonas displayed some of the changes (nonsense mutations and gene overexpression) associated with metronidazole resistance in bacteria, these changes did not confer metronidazole resistance to the microaerophilic protists examined here.

  12. Chronic administration of recombinant IL-6 upregulates lipogenic enzyme expression and aggravates high-fat-diet-induced steatosis in IL-6-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Vida, Margarita; Gavito, Ana Luisa; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Bautista, Dolores; Serrano, Antonia; Suarez, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Decara, Juan; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Baixeras, Elena

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has emerged as an important mediator of fatty acid metabolism with paradoxical effects in the liver. Administration of IL-6 has been reported to confer protection against steatosis, but plasma and tissue IL-6 concentrations are elevated in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver diseases associated with obesity and alcoholic ingestion. In this study, we further investigated the role of IL-6 on steatosis induced through a high-fat diet (HFD) in wild-type (WT) and IL-6-deficient (IL-6(-/-)) mice. Additionally, HFD-fed IL-6(-/-) mice were also chronically treated with recombinant IL-6 (rIL-6). Obesity in WT mice fed a HFD associated with elevated serum IL-6 levels, fatty liver, upregulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), increased AMP kinase phosphorylation (p-AMPK), and downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic enzymes fatty acid synthase (FAS) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1). The HFD-fed IL-6(-/-) mice showed severe steatosis, no changes in CPT1 levels or AMPK activity, no increase in STAT3 amounts, inactivated STAT3, and marked downregulation of the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCα/β), FAS and SCD1. The IL-6 chronic replacement in HFD-fed IL-6 -/-: mice restored hepatic STAT3 and AMPK activation but also increased the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACCα/β, FAS and SCD1. Furthermore, rIL-6 administration was associated with aggravated steatosis and elevated fat content in the liver. We conclude that, in the context of HFD-induced obesity, the administration of rIL-6 might contribute to the aggravation of fatty liver disease through increasing lipogenesis.

  13. Chronic administration of recombinant IL-6 upregulates lipogenic enzyme expression and aggravates high-fat-diet-induced steatosis in IL-6-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Vida, Margarita; Gavito, Ana Luisa; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Bautista, Dolores; Serrano, Antonia; Suarez, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Decara, Juan; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Baixeras, Elena

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has emerged as an important mediator of fatty acid metabolism with paradoxical effects in the liver. Administration of IL-6 has been reported to confer protection against steatosis, but plasma and tissue IL-6 concentrations are elevated in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver diseases associated with obesity and alcoholic ingestion. In this study, we further investigated the role of IL-6 on steatosis induced through a high-fat diet (HFD) in wild-type (WT) and IL-6-deficient (IL-6−/−) mice. Additionally, HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice were also chronically treated with recombinant IL-6 (rIL-6). Obesity in WT mice fed a HFD associated with elevated serum IL-6 levels, fatty liver, upregulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), increased AMP kinase phosphorylation (p-AMPK), and downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic enzymes fatty acid synthase (FAS) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1). The HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice showed severe steatosis, no changes in CPT1 levels or AMPK activity, no increase in STAT3 amounts, inactivated STAT3, and marked downregulation of the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCα/β), FAS and SCD1. The IL-6 chronic replacement in HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice restored hepatic STAT3 and AMPK activation but also increased the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACCα/β, FAS and SCD1. Furthermore, rIL-6 administration was associated with aggravated steatosis and elevated fat content in the liver. We conclude that, in the context of HFD-induced obesity, the administration of rIL-6 might contribute to the aggravation of fatty liver disease through increasing lipogenesis. PMID:26035386

  14. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  15. Carbohydrate active enzymes revealed in Coptotermes formosanus transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A normalized cDNA library of Coptotermes formosanus was constructed using mixed RNA isolated from workers, soldiers, nymphs and alates of both sexes. Sequencing of this library generated 131,637 EST and 25,939 unigenes were assembled. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) revealed in this library we...

  16. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens. PMID:11265593

  17. 75 FR 31795 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 28811) is withdrawn. The discussion that was to be held at the June 16-17, 2010 meeting of... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... ] under Section III-A-1 of the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules...

  18. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... containing an HA from the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage should become an HHS Select Agent (77 FR 63783... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

  19. 75 FR 28811 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH... DNA Advisory Committee and approved by the NIH Director (Section III-A-1). Such research involves...

  20. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... experts from NIH, CDC, and academia. These proposed changes were published in the Federal Register (76 FR... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

  1. Potential enzyme activities in cryoturbated organic matter of arctic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, J.; Wild, B.; Rusalimova, O.; Mikutta, R.; Guggenberger, G.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    An estimated 581 Gt organic carbon is stored in arctic soils that are affected by cryoturbtion, more than in today's atmosphere (450 Gt). The high amount of organic carbon is, amongst other factors, due to topsoil organic matter (OM) that has been subducted by freeze-thaw processes. This cryoturbated OM is usually hundreds to thousands of years old, while the chemical composition remains largely unaltered. It has therefore been suggested, that the retarded decomposition rates cannot be explained by unfavourable abiotic conditions in deeper soil layers alone. Since decomposition of soil organic material is dependent on extracellular enzymes, we measured potential and actual extracellular enzyme activities in organic topsoil, mineral subsoil and cryoturbated material from three different tundra sites, in Zackenberg (Greenland) and Cherskii (North-East Siberia). In addition we analysed the microbial community structure by PLFAs. Hydrolytic enzyme activities, calculated on a per gram dry mass basis, were higher in organic topsoil horizons than in cryoturbated horizons, which in turn were higher than in mineral horizons. When calculated on per gram carbon basis, the activity of the carbon acquiring enzyme exoglucanase was not significantly different between cryoturbated and topsoil organic horizons in any of the three sites. Oxidative enzymes, i.e. phenoloxidase and peroxidase, responsible for degradation of complex organic substances, showed higher activities in topsoil organic and cryoturbated horizons than in mineral horizons, when calculated per gram dry mass. Specific activities (per g C) however were highest in mineral horizons. We also measured actual cellulase activities (by inhibiting microbial uptake of products and without substrate addition): calculated per g C, the activities were up to ten times as high in organic topsoil compared to cryoturbated and mineral horizons, the latter not being significantly different. The total amount of PLFAs, as a proxy for

  2. Construction of chimeric enzymes out of maize endosperm branching enzymes I and II: activity and properties.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, T; Stewart, D C; Preiss, J

    1997-11-14

    Branching enzyme I and II isoforms from maize endosperm (mBE I and mBE II, respectively) have quite different properties, and to elucidate the domain(s) that determines the differences, chimeric genes consisting of part mBE I and part mBE II were constructed. When expressed under the control of the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli, several of the chimeric enzymes were inactive. The only fully active chimeric enzyme was mBE II-I BspHI, in which the carboxyl-terminal part of mBE II was exchanged for that of mBE I at a BspHI restriction site and was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Another chimeric enzyme, mBE I-II HindIII, in which the amino-terminal end of mBE II was replaced with that of mBE I, had very little activity and was only partially characterized. The purified mBE II-I BspHI exhibited higher activity than wild-type mBE I and mBE II when assayed by the phosphorylase a stimulation assay. mBE II-I BspHI had substrate specificity (preference for amylose rather than amylopectin) and catalytic capacity similar to mBE I, despite the fact that only the carboxyl terminus was from mBE I, suggesting that the carboxyl terminus may be involved in determining substrate specificity and catalytic capacity. In chain transfer experiments, mBE II-I BspHI transferred more short chains (with a degree of polymerization of around 6) in a fashion similar to mBE II. In contrast, mBE I-II HindIII transferred more long chains (with a degree of polymerization of around 11-12), similar to mBE I, suggesting that the amino terminus of mBEs may play a role in the size of oligosaccharide chain transferred. This study challenges the notion that the catalytic centers for branching enzymes are exclusively located in the central portion of the enzyme; it suggests instead that the amino and carboxyl termini may also be involved in determining substrate preference, catalytic capacity, and chain length transfer.

  3. Carotenoid-cleavage activities of crude enzymes from Pandanous amryllifolius.

    PubMed

    Ningrum, Andriati; Schreiner, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Carotenoid degradation products, known as norisoprenoids, are aroma-impact compounds in several plants. Pandan wangi is a common name of the shrub Pandanus amaryllifolius. The genus name 'Pandanus' is derived from the Indonesian name of the tree, pandan. In Indonesia, the leaves from the plant are used for several purposes, e.g., as natural colorants and flavor, and as traditional treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cleavage of β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal by carotenoid-cleavage enzymes isolated from pandan leaves, to investigate dependencies of the enzymatic activities on temperature and pH, to determine the enzymatic reaction products by using Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometry (HS-SPME GC/MS), and to investigate the influence of heat treatment and addition of crude enzyme on formation of norisoprenoids. Crude enzymes from pandan leaves showed higher activity against β-carotene than β-apo-8'-carotenal. The optimum temperature of crude enzymes was 70°, while the optimum pH value was 6. We identified β-ionone as the major volatile reaction product from the incubations of two different carotenoid substrates, β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal. Several treatments, e.g., heat treatment and addition of crude enzymes in pandan leaves contributed to the norisoprenoid content. Our findings revealed that the crude enzymes from pandan leaves with carotenoid-cleavage activity might provide a potential application, especially for biocatalysis, in natural-flavor industry.

  4. Evaluation of a recombinant rhoptry protein 2 enzyme-linked immunoassay for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Capobiango, Jaqueline Dario; Pagliari, Sthefany; Pasquali, Aline Kuhn Sbruzzi; Nino, Beatriz; Ferreira, Fernanda Pinto; Monica, Thaís Cabral; Tschurtschenthaler, Nely Norder; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Garcia, João Luis; Mitsuka-Breganó, Regina; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an enzyme-linked immunoassay with recombinant rhoptry protein 2 (ELISA-rROP2) for its ability to detectToxoplasma gondii ROP2-specific IgG in samples from pregnant women. The study included 236 samples that were divided into groups according to serological screening profiles for toxoplasmosis: unexposed (n = 65), probable acute infection (n = 48), possible acute infection (n = 58) and exposed to the parasite (n = 65). When an indirect immunofluorescence assay forT. gondii-specific IgG was considered as a reference test, the ELISA-rROP2 had a sensitivity of 61.8%, specificity of 62.8%, predictive positive value of 76.6% and predictive negative value of 45.4% (p = 0.0002). The ELISA-rROP2 reacted with 62.5% of the samples from pregnant women with probable acute infection and 40% of the samples from pregnant women with previous exposure (p = 0.0180). Seropositivity was observed in 50/57 (87.7%) pregnant women with possible infection. The results underscored that T. gondii rROP2 is recognised by specific IgG antibodies in both the acute and chronic phases of toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy. However, the sensitivity of the ELISA-rROP2 was higher in the pregnant women with probable and possible acute infections and IgM reactivity. PMID:26517651

  5. Evaluation of a recombinant rhoptry protein 2 enzyme-linked immunoassay for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Capobiango, Jaqueline Dario; Pagliari, Sthefany; Pasquali, Aline Kuhn Sbruzzi; Nino, Beatriz; Ferreira, Fernanda Pinto; Monica, Thaís Cabral; Tschurtschenthaler, Nely Norder; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Garcia, João Luis; Mitsuka-Breganó, Regina; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an enzyme-linked immunoassay with recombinant rhoptry protein 2 (ELISA-rROP2) for its ability to detect Toxoplasma gondii ROP2-specific IgG in samples from pregnant women. The study included 236 samples that were divided into groups according to serological screening profiles for toxoplasmosis: unexposed (n = 65), probable acute infection (n = 48), possible acute infection (n = 58) and exposed to the parasite (n = 65). When an indirect immunofluorescence assay forT. gondii-specific IgG was considered as a reference test, the ELISA-rROP2 had a sensitivity of 61.8%, specificity of 62.8%, predictive positive value of 76.6% and predictive negative value of 45.4% (p = 0.0002). The ELISA-rROP2 reacted with 62.5% of the samples from pregnant women with probable acute infection and 40% of the samples from pregnant women with previous exposure (p = 0.0180). Seropositivity was observed in 50/57 (87.7%) pregnant women with possible infection. The results underscored that T. gondii rROP2 is recognised by specific IgG antibodies in both the acute and chronic phases of toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy. However, the sensitivity of the ELISA-rROP2 was higher in the pregnant women with probable and possible acute infections and IgM reactivity.

  6. A recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Su, Mingjun; Li, Chunqiu; Guo, Donghua; Wei, Shan; Wang, Xinyu; Geng, Yufei; Yao, Shuang; Gao, Jing; Wang, Enyu; Zhao, Xiwen; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Jianfa; Wu, Rui; Feng, Li; Sun, Dongbo

    2016-05-01

    Recently, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) has been proven to be associated with enteric disease in piglets. Diagnostic tools for serological surveys of PDCoV remain in the developmental stage when compared with those for other porcine coronaviruses. In our study, an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (rPDCoV-N-ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies against PDCoV using a histidine-tagged recombinant nucleocapsid (N) protein as an antigen. The rPDCoV-N-ELISA did not cross-react with antisera against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, swine transmissible gastroenteritis virus, porcine group A rotavirus, classical swine fever virus, porcine circovirus-2, porcine pseudorabies virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus; the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed 100% sensitivity and 90.4% specificity of the rPDCoV-N-ELISA based on samples of known status (n=62). Analyses of field samples (n=319) using the rPDCoV-N-ELISA indicated that 11.59% of samples were positive for antibodies against PDCoV. These data demonstrated that the rPDCoV-N-ELISA can be used for epidemiological investigations of PDCoV and that PDCoV had a low serum prevalence in pig population in Heilongjiang province, northeast China. PMID:26668175

  7. Detection of Antibodies to U.S. Isolates of Avian Pneumovirus by a Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Baldev R.; Munir, Shirin; Patnayak, Devi P.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Kapur, Vivek

    2001-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of subgroup C (United States-specific) avian pneumovirus (APV/US) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and antibodies to the recombinant N protein were shown to specifically recognize the ≈47-kDa N protein of APV/US by Western immunoblot analysis. The recombinant APV/US N protein was used in a sandwich-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the resulting assay was found to be more sensitive and specific than the routine indirect ELISA for the detection of APV/US antibodies in turkey sera. PMID:11474024

  8. Effect of codon-optimized E. coli signal peptides on recombinant Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase periplasmic localization, yield and activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Shalaka; Gupta, Gunja; Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Haq, Saiful F; Nair, Ayyappan; Sambasivam, Ganesh; Sukumaran, Sunilkumar

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant proteins can be targeted to the Escherichia coli periplasm by fusing them to signal peptides. The popular pET vectors facilitate fusion of target proteins to the PelB signal. A systematic comparison of the PelB signal with native E. coli signal peptides for recombinant protein expression and periplasmic localization is not reported. We chose the Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase (MA), an industrial enzyme widely used in the baking and brewing industry, as a model protein and analyzed the competence of seven, codon-optimized, E. coli signal sequences to translocate MA to the E. coli periplasm compared to PelB. MA fusions to three of the signals facilitated enhanced periplasmic localization of MA compared to the PelB fusion. Interestingly, these three fusions showed greatly improved MA yields and between 18- and 50-fold improved amylase activities compared to the PelB fusion. Previously, non-optimal codon usage in native E. coli signal peptide sequences has been reported to be important for protein stability and activity. Our results suggest that E. coli signal peptides with optimal codon usage could also be beneficial for heterologous protein secretion to the periplasm. Moreover, such fusions could even enhance activity rather than diminish it. This effect, to our knowledge has not been previously documented. In addition, the seven vector platform reported here could also be used as a screen to identify the best signal peptide partner for other recombinant targets of interest. PMID:25038884

  9. Purified recombinant bluetongue virus VP1 exhibits RNA replicase activity.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Mark; Wehrfritz, Josa; Noad, Rob; Roy, Polly

    2004-04-01

    The polymerase protein of all known double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses is located within a complex subviral core particle that is responsible for transcription of the viral genome. For members of the family Reoviridae, this particle allows messenger sense RNA synthesis while sequestering the viral genome away from cellular dsRNA surveillance systems during infection of eukaryotic cells. The core particle of bluetongue virus (BTV) consists of the major structural proteins VP3 and VP7 and the minor enzymatic proteins VP1 (polymerase), VP4 (capping enzyme), and VP6 (helicase). In this report we have characterized fully processive dsRNA synthesis by VP1 from a viral plus-strand RNA template in the absence of the other proteins of the BTV core. This replicase activity consists of de novo initiation of synthesis, followed by elongation of the minus strand. Purified VP1 exhibits little sequence specificity for BTV plus-strand template, suggesting that the choice of viral over nonviral RNA template comes from its association with other proteins within the viral core.

  10. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  11. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  12. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  13. Ca2+ activates human homologous recombination protein Rad51 by modulating its ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2004-01-01

    Human Rad51 (hRad51) protein plays a key role in homologous recombination and DNA repair. hRad51 protein forms a helical filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which performs the basic steps of homologous recombination: a search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and DNA strand exchange. hRad51 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity; however, the role of this activity has not been understood. Our current results show that Ca2+ greatly stimulates DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. We found that Ca2+ exerts its stimulatory effect by modulating the ATPase activity of hRad51 protein. Our data demonstrate that, in the presence of Mg2+, the hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament is quickly converted to an inactive hRad51-ADP-ssDNA form, due to relatively rapid ATP hydrolysis and slow dissociation of ADP. Ca2+ maintains the active hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament by reducing the ATP hydrolysis rate. These findings demonstrate a crucial role of the ATPase activity in regulation of DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. This mechanism of Rad51 protein regulation by modulating its ATPase activity is evolutionarily recent; we found no such mechanism for yeast Rad51 (yRad51) protein. PMID:15226506

  14. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to the site of injury, internalize necrotic or foreign material. Along with phagocytosis, activated macrophages release proteolytic enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins into the extracellular environment. Pro-inflammatory monocytes and macrophages also induce tissue oxidative damage through the inflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this review we will highlight recent advances in molecular macrophage imaging. Particular stress will be given to macrophage functional and enzymatic activity imaging which targets phagocytosis, proteolysis and myeloperoxidase activity imaging. PMID:24729833

  15. [Activity of hydrogen sulfide production enzymes in kidneys of rats].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, A V; Pentiuk, O O

    2009-01-01

    An experimental research of activity and kinetic descriptions of enzymes participating in formation of hydrogen sulfide in the kidney of rats has been carried out. It was established that cystein, homocystein and thiosulphate are the basic substrates for hydrogen sulfide synthesis. The higest activity for hydrogen sulfide production belongs to thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cysteine aminotransferase, less activity is characteristic of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathio-nine gamma-lyase. The highest affinity to substrate is registered for thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. It is discovered that the substrate inhibition is typical of all hydrogen sulfide formation enzymes, although this characteristic is the most expressed thiosulfat-dithiolsulfurtransferase. PMID:20387629

  16. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased in soils under cotton rotated with sorghum or wheat, and due to conservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  17. Recombinant production and characterization of a highly active alkaline phosphatase from marine bacterium Cobetia marina.

    PubMed

    Golotin, Vasily; Balabanova, Larissa; Likhatskaya, Galina; Rasskazov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The psychrophilic marine bacterium, Cobetia marina, recovered from the mantle tissue of the marine mussel, Crenomytilus grayanus, which contained a gene encoding alkaline phosphatase (AP) with apparent biotechnology advantages. The enzyme was found to be more efficient than its counterparts and showed k cat value 10- to 100-fold higher than those of all known commercial APs. The enzyme did not require the presence of exogenous divalent cations and dimeric state of its molecule for activity. The recombinant enzyme (CmAP) production and purification were optimized with a final recovery of 2 mg of the homogenous protein from 1 L of the transgenic Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)/Pho40 cells culture. CmAP displayed a half-life of 16 min at 45 °C and 27 min at 40 °C in the presence of 2 mM EDTA, thus suggesting its relative thermostability in comparison with the known cold-adapted analogues. A high concentration of EDTA in the incubation mixture did not appreciably inhibit CmAP. The enzyme was stable in a wide range of pH (6.0-11.0). CmAP exhibited its highest activity at the reaction temperature of 40-50 °C and pH 9.5-10.3. The structural features of CmAP could be the reason for the increase in its stability and catalytic turnover. We have modeled the CmAP 3D structure on the base of the high-quality experimental structure of the close homologue Vibrio sp. AP (VAP) and mutated essential residues predicted to break Mg(2+) bonds in CmAP. It seems probable that the intrinsically tight binding of catalytic and structural metal ions together with the flexibility of intermolecular and intramolecular links in CmAP could be attributed to the adapted mutualistic lifestyle in oceanic waters. PMID:25260971

  18. Extracellular enzyme activity and biogeochemical cycling in restored prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, L.; Hernandez, D.; Schade, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Winter microbial activity in mid-latitude prairie ecosystems is thermally sensitive and significantly influenced by snow depth. Snow insulates the soil column facilitating microbial processing of complex organic substrates. Previous studies in forests and tundra ecosystems suggest patterns of substrate utilization and limitation are seasonal; above freezing, soil microbes access fresh litter inputs and sugar exudates from plant roots, while under frozen condition they recycle nutrients incorporated in microbial biomass. In order to liberate nutrients required for carbon degradation, soil microbes invest energy in the production of extracellular enzymes that cleave monomers from polymer bonds. The inverse relationship between relative enzyme abundance and substrate availability makes enzyme assays a useful proxy to assess changes in resources over time. Our objective in this study was to assess patterns in microbial biomass, nutrient availability, and extracellular enzyme activity in four snow exclosure sites over a seven-month period. Over the past three years, we have maintained a snow removal experiment on two restored prairies in central Minnesota. In each prairie, snow was continuously removed annually from two 4 x 4 m plots by shoveling after each snow event. Extractable C, N and P, and microbial C, N and P in soil samples were measured in samples collected from these snow removal plots, as well as in adjacent unmanipulated prairie control plots. Pools of C, N, and P were estimated using standard extraction protocols, and microbial pools were estimated using chloroform fumigation direct extraction (CFDE). We conducted fluorometric extracellular enzyme assays (EEA) to assess how the degradation potential of cellulose (cellobiohydrolase, CBH), protein (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP), and phosphate esters (phosphatase, PHOS) changed seasonally. Microbial C and N declined between October and June, while microbial P declined during the fall and winter, but increased

  19. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Lipowski, Paweł; Zorena, Katarzyna; Skorek, Andrzej; Glasner, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs). Materials and methods The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group) for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes). The observation period was 6 months. Conclusion In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33%) and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%). It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema) had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end of the 6-month period in both groups. In the TPA group, the dissolution of the membrane occurred most often within 3 months from the primary injection. Based on statistics, we can confirm that in the control group there was a decrease in visual acuity during the 6 months of the study period. At the same time, visual acuity in the TPA

  20. Extracellular enzyme activity in a willow sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Brzezinska, Maria Swiontek; Lalke-Porczyk, Elżbieta; Kalwasińska, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the activity of extra-cellular enzymes in soil-willow vegetation filter soil which is used in the post-treatment of household sewage in an onsite wastewater treatment system located in central Poland. Wastewater is discharged from the detached house by gravity into the onsite wastewater treatment system. It flows through a connecting pipe into a single-chamber septic tank and is directed by the connecting pipe to a control well to be further channelled in the soil-willow filter by means of a subsurface leaching system. Soil samples for the studies were collected from two depths of 5 cm and 1 m from three plots: close to the wastewater inflow, at mid-length of the plot and close to its terminal part. Soil samples were collected from May to October 2009. The activity of the extra-cellular enzymes was assayed by the fluorometric method using 4-methylumbelliferyl and 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin substrate. The ranking of potential activity of the assayed enzymes was the same at 5 cm and 1 m soil depths, i.e. esterase > phosphmomoesterase > leucine-aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase. The highest values of enzymatic activity were recorded in the surface layer of the soil at the wastewater inflow and decreased with increasing distance from that point.

  1. Recombination hotspot activity of hypervariable minisatellite DNA requires minisatellite DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Moore, P D

    1998-01-01

    Hypervariable minisatellite DNA repeats are found at tens of thousands of loci in the mammalian genome. These sequences stimulate homologous recombination in mammalian cells [Cell 60:95-103]. To test the hypothesis that protein-DNA interaction is required for hotspot function in vivo, we determined whether a second protein binding nearby could abolish hotspot activity. Intermolecular recombination between pairs of plasmid substrates was measured in the presence or absence of the cis-acting recombination hotspot and in the presence or absence of the second trans-acting DNA binding protein. Minisatellite DNA had hotspot activity in two cell lines, but lacked hotspot activity in two closely related cell lines expressing a site-specific helicase that bound to DNA adjacent to the hotspot. Suppression of hotspot function occurred for both replicating and non-replicating recombination substrates. These results indicate that hotspot activity in vivo requires site occupancy by minisatellite DNA binding proteins. PMID:9776980

  2. 76 FR 44339 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...) AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, PHS, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION:...

  3. Enzyme-like activities of algal polysaccharide - cerium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongfeng; Sun, Jipeng; Du, Dehong; Ye, Shen; Wang, Changhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xue, Changhu

    2005-01-01

    Water-soluble algal polysaccharides (APS) (alginic acid, fucoidan and laminaran) possess many pharmacological activities. The results of this study showed that the APS-Ce4+ complexes have some enzyme-like activities. Fucoidan and its complex with Ce4+ have activities similar to those of SOD. The activities of laminaran, alginic acid and their complexes are not measurable. The APS do not show measurable activities in the digestion of plasmid DNA. In contrast, the APS - Ce4+ complexes show these measurable activities under the comparable condition when APS bind Ce4+ and form homogenous solutions. The laminaran - Ce4+ complex shows the most obvious activity in the digestion of plasmid DNA, pNPP and chloropy-rifos under neutral conditions.

  4. Polyphosphate-degrading enzymes in Acinetobacter spp. and activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    van Groenestijn, J W; Bentvelsen, M M; Deinema, M H; Zehnder, A J

    1989-01-01

    Polyphosphate-degrading enzymes were studied in Acinetobacter spp. and activated sludge. Polyphosphate: AMP phosphotransferase activity in Acinetobacter strain 210A decreased with increasing growth rates. The activity of this enzyme in cell extracts of Acinetobacter strain 210A was maximal at a pH of 8.5 and a temperature of 40 degrees C and was stimulated by (NH4)2SO4. The Km for AMP was 0.6 mM, and the Vmax was 60 nmol/min per mg of protein. Cell extracts of this strain also contained polyphosphatase, which was able to degrade native polyphosphate and synthetic magnesium polyphosphate and was strongly stimulated by 300 to 400 mM NH4Cl. A positive correlation was found between polyphosphate:AMP phosphotransferase activity, adenylate kinase activity, and phosphorus accumulation in six Acinetobacter strains. Significant activities of polyphosphate kinase were detected only in strain P, which contained no polyphosphate:AMP phosphotransferase. In samples of activated sludge from different plants, the activity of adenylate kinase correlated well with the ability of the sludge to remove phosphate biologically from wastewater. PMID:2539774

  5. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-01

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  6. An enzyme activity capable of endotransglycosylation of heteroxylan polysaccharides is present in plant primary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sarah L; Prakash, Roneel; Chen, Nancy J; Kumagai, Monto H; Turano, Helen M; Cooney, Janine M; Atkinson, Ross G; Paull, Robert E; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Brummell, David A; Schröder, Roswitha

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxylans in the plant cell wall have been proposed to have a role analogous to that of xyloglucans or heteromannans, forming growth-restraining networks by interlocking cellulose microfibrils. A xylan endotransglycosylase has been identified that can transglycosylate heteroxylan polysaccharides in the presence of xylan-derived oligosaccharides. High activity was detected in ripe fruit of papaya (Carica papaya), but activity was also found in a range of other fruits, imbibed seeds and rapidly growing seedlings of cereals. Xylan endotransglycosylase from ripe papaya fruit used a range of heteroxylans, such as wheat arabinoxylan, birchwood glucuronoxylan and various heteroxylans from dicotyledonous primary cell walls purified from tomato and papaya fruit, as donor molecules. As acceptor molecules, the enzyme preferentially used xylopentaitol over xylohexaitol or shorter-length acceptors. Xylan endotransglycosylase was active over a broad pH range and could perform transglycosylation reactions up to 55 °C. Xylan endotransglycosylase activity was purified from ripe papaya fruit by ultrafiltration and cation exchange chromatography. Highest endotransglycosylase activity was identified in fractions that also contained high xylan hydrolase activity and correlated with the presence of the endoxylanase CpaEXY1. Recombinant CpaEXY1 protein transiently over-expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed both endoxylanase and xylan endotransglycosylase activities in vitro, suggesting that CpaEXY1 is a single enzyme with dual activity in planta. Purified native CpaEXY1 showed two- to fourfold higher endoxylanase than endotransglycosylase activity, suggesting that CpaEXY1 may act primarily as a hydrolase. We propose that xylan endotransglycosylase activity (like xyloglucan and mannan endotransglycosylase activities) could be involved in remodelling or re-arrangement of heteroxylans of the cellulose-non-cellulosic cell wall framework.

  7. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  8. Imaging β-Galactosidase Activity In Vivo Using Sequential Reporter-Enzyme Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    von Degenfeld, Georges; Wehrman, Tom S.; Blau, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence using the reporter enzyme firefly luciferase (Fluc) and the substrate luciferin enables noninvasive optical imaging of living animals with extremely high sensitivity. This type of analysis enables studies of gene expression, tumor growth, and cell migration over time in live animals that were previously not possible. However, a major limitation of this system is that Fluc activity is restricted to the intracellular environment, which precludes important applications of in vivo imaging such as antibody labeling, or serum protein monitoring. In order to expand the application of bioluminescence imaging to other enzymes, we characterized a sequential reporter-enzyme luminescence (SRL) technology for the in vivo detection of β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity. The substrate is a “caged” D-luciferin conjugate that must first be cleaved by β-gal before it can be catalyzed by Fluc in the final, light-emitting step. Hence, luminescence is dependent on and correlates with β-gal activity. A variety of experiments were performed in order to validate the system and explore potential new applications. We were able to visualize non-invasively over time constitutive β-gal activity in engineered cells, as well as inducible tissue-specific β-gal expression in transgenic mice. Since β-gal, unlike Fluc, retains full activity outside of cells, we were able to show that antibodies conjugated to the recombinant β-gal enzyme could be used to detect and localize endogenous cells and extracellular antigens in vivo. In addition, we developed a low-affinity β-gal complementation system that enables inducible, reversible protein interactions to be monitored in real time in vivo, for example, sequential responses to agonists and antagonists of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus, using SRL, the exquisite luminescent properties of Fluc can be combined with the advantages of another enzyme. Other substrates have been described that extend the scope to endogenous

  9. Lipid-induced NOX2 activation inhibits autophagic flux by impairing lysosomal enzyme activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Jaishy, Bharat; Zhang, Quanjiang; Chung, Heaseung S.; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Jenkins, Stephen; Abel, Patrick; Cowart, L. Ashley; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Abel, E. Dale

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in maintaining energy and organelle homeostasis. The relationship between obesity and the regulation of autophagy is cell type specific. Despite adverse consequences of obesity on cardiac structure and function, the contribution of altered cardiac autophagy in response to fatty acid overload is incompletely understood. Here, we report the suppression of autophagosome clearance and the activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox)2 in both high fat-fed murine hearts and palmitate-treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes (CMs). Defective autophagosome clearance is secondary to superoxide-dependent impairment of lysosomal acidification and enzyme activity in palmitate-treated CMs. Inhibition of Nox2 prevented superoxide overproduction, restored lysosome acidification and enzyme activity, and reduced autophagosome accumulation in palmitate-treated CMs. Palmitate-induced Nox2 activation was dependent on the activation of classical protein kinase Cs (PKCs), specifically PKCβII. These findings reveal a novel mechanism linking lipotoxicity with a PKCβ-Nox2-mediated impairment in pH-dependent lysosomal enzyme activity that diminishes autophagic turnover in CMs. PMID:25529920

  10. Sample storage for soil enzyme activity and bacterial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, K; Rita, H; Simpanen, S; Mikkonen, A; Niemi, R M

    2010-04-01

    Storage of samples is often an unavoidable step in environmental data collection, since available analytical capacity seldom permits immediate processing of large sample sets needed for representative data. In microbiological soil studies, sample pretreatments may have a strong influence on measurement results, and thus careful consideration is required in the selection of storage conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of prolonged (up to 16 weeks) frozen or air-dried storage for divergent soil materials. The samples selected to this study were mineral soil (clay loam) from an agricultural field, humus from a pine forest and compost from a municipal sewage sludge composting field. The measured microbiological parameters included functional profiling with ten different hydrolysing enzyme activities determined by artificial fluorogenic substrates, and structural profiling with bacterial 16S rDNA community fingerprints by amplicon length heterogeneity analysis (LH-PCR). Storage of samples affected the observed fluorescence intensity of the enzyme assay's fluorophor standards dissolved in soil suspension. The impact was highly dependent on the soil matrix and storage method, making it important to use separate standardisation for each combination of matrix type, storage method and time. Freezing proved to be a better storage method than air-drying for all the matrices and enzyme activities studied. The effect of freezing on the enzyme activities was small (<20%) in clay loam and forest humus and moderate (generally 20-30%) in compost. The most dramatic decreases (>50%) in activity were observed in compost after air-drying. The bacterial LH-PCR community fingerprints were unaffected by frozen storage in all matrices. The effect of storage treatments was tested using a new statistical method based on showing similarity rather than difference of results.

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activation improves endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Costa-Fraga, Fabiana P; Murça, Tatiane M; Moraes, Patrícia L; Martins Lima, Augusto; Lautner, Roberto Q; Castro, Carlos H; Soares, Célia Maria A; Borges, Clayton L; Nadu, Ana Paula; Oliveira, Marilene L; Shenoy, Vinayak; Katovich, Michael J; Santos, Robson A S; Raizada, Mohan K; Ferreira, Anderson J

    2013-06-01

    Diminished release and function of endothelium-derived nitric oxide coupled with increases in reactive oxygen species production is critical in endothelial dysfunction. Recent evidences have shown that activation of the protective axis of the renin-angiotensin system composed by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, angiotensin-(1-7), and Mas receptor promotes many beneficial vascular effects. This has led us to postulate that activation of intrinsic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 would improve endothelial function by decreasing the reactive oxygen species production. In the present study, we tested 1-[[2-(dimetilamino)etil]amino]-4-(hidroximetil)-7-[[(4-metilfenil)sulfonil]oxi]-9H-xantona-9 (XNT), a small molecule angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator, on endothelial function to validate this hypothesis. In vivo treatment with XNT (1 mg/kg per day for 4 weeks) improved the endothelial function of spontaneously hypertensive rats and of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats when evaluated through the vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine/sodium nitroprusside. Acute in vitro incubation with XNT caused endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation in aortic rings of rats. This vasorelaxation effect was attenuated by the Mas antagonist D-pro7-Ang-(1-7), and it was reduced in Mas knockout mice. These effects were associated with reduction in reactive oxygen species production. In addition, Ang II-induced reactive oxygen species production in human aortic endothelial cells was attenuated by preincubation with XNT. These results showed that chronic XNT administration improves the endothelial function of hypertensive and diabetic rat vessels by attenuation of the oxidative stress. Moreover, XNT elicits an endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation response, which was mediated by Mas. Thus, this study indicated that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activation promotes beneficial effects on the endothelial function and it is a potential target for treating cardiovascular disease.

  12. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera.

    PubMed

    Hatzios, Stavroula K; Abel, Sören; Martell, Julianne; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T; Davis, Brigid M; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-04-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human choleric stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, and genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance of intelectin, an intestinal lectin, and its binding to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialog in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  13. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharewski, T.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  14. Exploring the sheep rumen microbiome for carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lucas Dantas; de Souza Lima, André Oliveira; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Darias, Phillip; da Silva, Lília Raquel Fé; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Louvandini, Helder; Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Mendes, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    The rumen is a complex ecosystem enriched for microorganisms able to degrade biomass during the animal's digestion process. The recovery of new enzymes from naturally evolved biomass-degrading microbial communities is a promising strategy to overcome the inefficient enzymatic plant destruction in industrial production of biofuels. In this context, this study aimed to describe the bacterial composition and functions in the sheep rumen microbiome, focusing on carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAE). Here, we used phylogenetic profiling analysis (inventory of 16S rRNA genes) combined with metagenomics to access the rumen microbiome of four sheep and explore its potential to identify fibrolytic enzymes. The bacterial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, followed by Proteobacteria. As observed for other ruminants, Prevotella was the dominant genus in the microbiome, comprising more than 30 % of the total bacterial community. Multivariate analysis of the phylogenetic profiling data and chemical parameters showed a positive correlation between the abundance of Prevotellaceae (Bacteroidetes phylum) and organic matter degradability. A negative correlation was observed between Succinivibrionaceae (Proteobacteria phylum) and methane production. An average of 2 % of the shotgun metagenomic reads was assigned to putative CAE when considering nine protein databases. In addition, assembled contigs allowed recognition of 67 putative partial CAE (NCBI-Refseq) representing 12 glycosyl hydrolase families (Pfam database). Overall, we identified a total of 28 lignocellulases, 22 amylases and 9 other putative CAE, showing the sheep rumen microbiome as a promising source of new fibrolytic enzymes.

  15. Exploring the sheep rumen microbiome for carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lucas Dantas; de Souza Lima, André Oliveira; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Darias, Phillip; da Silva, Lília Raquel Fé; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Louvandini, Helder; Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Mendes, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    The rumen is a complex ecosystem enriched for microorganisms able to degrade biomass during the animal's digestion process. The recovery of new enzymes from naturally evolved biomass-degrading microbial communities is a promising strategy to overcome the inefficient enzymatic plant destruction in industrial production of biofuels. In this context, this study aimed to describe the bacterial composition and functions in the sheep rumen microbiome, focusing on carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAE). Here, we used phylogenetic profiling analysis (inventory of 16S rRNA genes) combined with metagenomics to access the rumen microbiome of four sheep and explore its potential to identify fibrolytic enzymes. The bacterial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, followed by Proteobacteria. As observed for other ruminants, Prevotella was the dominant genus in the microbiome, comprising more than 30 % of the total bacterial community. Multivariate analysis of the phylogenetic profiling data and chemical parameters showed a positive correlation between the abundance of Prevotellaceae (Bacteroidetes phylum) and organic matter degradability. A negative correlation was observed between Succinivibrionaceae (Proteobacteria phylum) and methane production. An average of 2 % of the shotgun metagenomic reads was assigned to putative CAE when considering nine protein databases. In addition, assembled contigs allowed recognition of 67 putative partial CAE (NCBI-Refseq) representing 12 glycosyl hydrolase families (Pfam database). Overall, we identified a total of 28 lignocellulases, 22 amylases and 9 other putative CAE, showing the sheep rumen microbiome as a promising source of new fibrolytic enzymes. PMID:25900454

  16. Polymer nanocarriers protecting active enzyme cargo against proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dziubla, Thomas D; Karim, Adnan; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2005-02-01

    Polymeric nanocarriers (PNCs), proposed as an attractive vehicle for vascular drug delivery, remain an orphan technology for enzyme therapies due to poor loading and inactivation of protein cargoes. To unite enzyme delivery by PNC with a clinically relevant goal of containment of vascular oxidative stress, a novel freeze-thaw encapsulation strategy was designed and provides approximately 20% efficiency loading of an active large antioxidant enzyme, catalase, into PNC (200-300 nm) composed of biodegradable block copolymers poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-glycolic acid). Catalase's substrate, H(2)O(2), was freely diffusible in the PNC polymer. Furthermore, PNC-loaded catalase stably retained 25-30% of H(2)O(2)-degrading activity for at least 18 h in a proteolytic environment, while free catalase lost activity within 1 h. Delivery and protection of catalase from lysosomal degradation afforded by PNC nanotechnology may advance effectiveness and duration of treatment of diverse disease conditions associated with vascular oxidative stress. PMID:15653162

  17. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  18. Digestive enzyme activities in larvae of sharpsnout seabream (Diplodus puntazzo).

    PubMed

    Suzer, Cüneyt; Aktülün, Sevim; Coban, Deniz; Okan Kamaci, H; Saka, Sahin; Firat, Kürşat; Alpbaz, Atilla

    2007-10-01

    The ontogenesis and specific activities of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes were investigated in sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo, during larval development until the end of weaning on day 50. The green-water technique was carried out for larval rearing in triplicate. Trypsin was first detected as early as hatching and sharply increased related to age and exogenous feeding until day 25, but a sharp decrease was observed towards the end of the experiment. Amylase was determined 2 days after hatching (DAH) and sharply increased to 10 DAH. Afterwards, slight decreases were found between 10 and 20 DAH and then slow alterations were continued until end of the experiment. Lipase was measured for the first time on day 4, and then slight increase was found to 25 DAH. After this date, slow variations were maintained until end of the experiment. Pepsin was firstly assayed 32 DAH related with stomach formation and sharply increased to 40 DAH. Then it was fluctuated until end of the experiment. Enzymes of brush border membranes, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N, showed similar pattern on specific activities during the first 10 days. Thereafter, while specific activity of alkaline phosphatase slightly decreased to 15 DAH and fluctuated until 20 DAH, aminopeptidase N activity slowly declined to 20 DAH. Afterwards, activity of alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N were sharply increased to 30 DAH, showing maturation of the intestinal digestive process and also these activities continued to slight increase until end of the experiment. The specific activity of cytosolic peptidase, leucine-alanine peptidase sharply increased to on day 8, then suddenly declined to 12 DAH and further decreased until 20 DAH. After this date, in contrast to enzymes of brush border membranes, it sharply decreased to 25 DAH and continued to gradually decline until the end of the experiment. These converse expressions were indicative of a maturation of enterocytes and the transition to

  19. Digestive enzyme activities in larvae of sharpsnout seabream (Diplodus puntazzo).

    PubMed

    Suzer, Cüneyt; Aktülün, Sevim; Coban, Deniz; Okan Kamaci, H; Saka, Sahin; Firat, Kürşat; Alpbaz, Atilla

    2007-10-01

    The ontogenesis and specific activities of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes were investigated in sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo, during larval development until the end of weaning on day 50. The green-water technique was carried out for larval rearing in triplicate. Trypsin was first detected as early as hatching and sharply increased related to age and exogenous feeding until day 25, but a sharp decrease was observed towards the end of the experiment. Amylase was determined 2 days after hatching (DAH) and sharply increased to 10 DAH. Afterwards, slight decreases were found between 10 and 20 DAH and then slow alterations were continued until end of the experiment. Lipase was measured for the first time on day 4, and then slight increase was found to 25 DAH. After this date, slow variations were maintained until end of the experiment. Pepsin was firstly assayed 32 DAH related with stomach formation and sharply increased to 40 DAH. Then it was fluctuated until end of the experiment. Enzymes of brush border membranes, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N, showed similar pattern on specific activities during the first 10 days. Thereafter, while specific activity of alkaline phosphatase slightly decreased to 15 DAH and fluctuated until 20 DAH, aminopeptidase N activity slowly declined to 20 DAH. Afterwards, activity of alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N were sharply increased to 30 DAH, showing maturation of the intestinal digestive process and also these activities continued to slight increase until end of the experiment. The specific activity of cytosolic peptidase, leucine-alanine peptidase sharply increased to on day 8, then suddenly declined to 12 DAH and further decreased until 20 DAH. After this date, in contrast to enzymes of brush border membranes, it sharply decreased to 25 DAH and continued to gradually decline until the end of the experiment. These converse expressions were indicative of a maturation of enterocytes and the transition to

  20. Fabrication of an on-line enzyme micro-reactor coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the digestion of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hsiao Ching; Smith, Norman W; Stanley, Shawn M R

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a fast and efficient on-line method using micro-reactors for the digestion and deglycosylation of recombinant human erythropoietin extracted from equine plasma. The trypsin digestion micro reactors were fabricated using fused silica capillaries with either a dextran-modified coating or a porous monolith that was able to immobilise the enzyme. These were both found to be reasonably robust and durable, with the trypsin immobilised on dextran-modified fused silica capillaries offering better reproducibility than the micro-reactor based upon covalent attachment of this enzyme to the polymer. It is also evident that the enzyme attached micro reactors produced some tryptic peptides in a greater yield than in-solution digestion. A peptide-N-glycosidase F reactor was also fabricated and, when coupled with the trypsin reactor, the deaminated peptides T5 DAM and T9 DAM from recombinant human erythropoietin could also be detected by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These results were better than those achieved using off-line digestion plus deglycosylation reactions and the analysis required far less time and effort to complete. The use of this on-line approach improved the sensitivity, efficiency and speed of our confirmation methodology that is based upon detecting the unique peptide segments of recombinant human erythropoietin that has been affinity extracted from positive equine plasma samples.

  1. A novel type of replicative enzyme harbouring ATPase, primase and DNA polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, Georg; Röther, Susanne; Hart, Christina; Krauss, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Although DNA replication is a process common in all domains of life, primase and replicative DNA polymerase appear to have evolved independently in the bacterial domain versus the archaeal/eukaryal branch of life. Here, we report on a new type of replication protein that constitutes the first member of the DNA polymerase family E. The protein ORF904, encoded by the plasmid pRN1 from the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus, is a highly compact multifunctional enzyme with ATPase, primase and DNA polymerase activity. Recombinant purified ORF904 hydrolyses ATP in a DNA-dependent manner. Deoxynucleotides are preferentially used for the synthesis of primers ∼8 nucleotides long. The DNA polymerase activity of ORF904 synthesizes replication products of up to several thousand nucleotides in length. The primase and DNA polymerase activity are located in the N-terminal half of the protein, which does not show homology to any known DNA polymerase or primase. ORF904 constitutes a new type of replication enzyme, which could have evolved indepen dently from the eubacterial and archaeal/eukaryal proteins of DNA replication. PMID:12743045

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant VP2 Capsids for the Detection of Antibodies to Aleutian Mink Disease Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Knuuttila, Anna; Aronen, Pirjo; Saarinen, Auli; Vapalahti, Olli

    2009-01-01

    Aleutian disease (AD), a common infectious disease in farmed minks worldwide, is caused by Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV). Serodiagnosis of AD in minks has been based on detection of AMDV antibodies by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) since the 1980s. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) for identifying AMDV antibodies from mink sera. AMDV capsid protein (VP2) of a Finnish wild-type strain was expressed by the baculovirus system in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 insect cells and was shown to self-assemble to VLPs (with an ultrastructure similar to that of the actual virion). A direct immunoglobulin G ELISA was established using purified recombinant AMDV VP2 VLPs as an antigen. Sera from farmed minks were collected to evaluate the AMDV VP2 ELISA (n = 316) and CIE (n = 209) based on AMDV VP2 recombinant antigen in parallel with CIE performed using a commercially available traditional antigen. CIE performed with the recombinant antigen had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and ELISA a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 97%, with reference to CIE performed with the commercial antigen. The results show that the recombinant AMDV VP2 VLPs are antigenic and that AMDV VP2 ELISA is sensitive and specific and encourage further development of the method for high-throughput diagnostics, involving hundreds of thousands of samples in Finland annually. PMID:19641102

  3. Development and evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant VP2 capsids for the detection of antibodies to Aleutian mink disease virus.

    PubMed

    Knuuttila, Anna; Aronen, Pirjo; Saarinen, Auli; Vapalahti, Olli

    2009-09-01

    Aleutian disease (AD), a common infectious disease in farmed minks worldwide, is caused by Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV). Serodiagnosis of AD in minks has been based on detection of AMDV antibodies by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) since the 1980s. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) for identifying AMDV antibodies from mink sera. AMDV capsid protein (VP2) of a Finnish wild-type strain was expressed by the baculovirus system in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 insect cells and was shown to self-assemble to VLPs (with an ultrastructure similar to that of the actual virion). A direct immunoglobulin G ELISA was established using purified recombinant AMDV VP2 VLPs as an antigen. Sera from farmed minks were collected to evaluate the AMDV VP2 ELISA (n = 316) and CIE (n = 209) based on AMDV VP2 recombinant antigen in parallel with CIE performed using a commercially available traditional antigen. CIE performed with the recombinant antigen had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and ELISA a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 97%, with reference to CIE performed with the commercial antigen. The results show that the recombinant AMDV VP2 VLPs are antigenic and that AMDV VP2 ELISA is sensitive and specific and encourage further development of the method for high-throughput diagnostics, involving hundreds of thousands of samples in Finland annually. PMID:19641102

  4. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  5. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  6. Hydrostatic Pressure Increases the Catalytic Activity of Amyloid Fibril Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Luong, Trung Quan; Erwin, Nelli; Neumann, Matthias; Schmidt, Andreas; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Volker; Fändrich, Marcus; Winter, Roland

    2016-09-26

    We studied the combined effects of pressure (0.1-200 MPa) and temperature (22, 30, and 38 °C) on the catalytic activity of designed amyloid fibrils using a high-pressure stopped-flow system with rapid UV/Vis absorption detection. Complementary FT-IR spectroscopic data revealed a remarkably high pressure and temperature stability of the fibrillar systems. High pressure enhances the esterase activity as a consequence of a negative activation volume at all temperatures (about -14 cm(3)  mol(-1) ). The enhancement is sustained in the whole temperature range covered, which allows a further acceleration of the enzymatic activity at high temperatures (activation energy 45-60 kJ mol(-1) ). Our data reveal the great potential of using both pressure and temperature modulation to optimize the enzyme efficiency of catalytic amyloid fibrils.

  7. Hydrostatic Pressure Increases the Catalytic Activity of Amyloid Fibril Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Luong, Trung Quan; Erwin, Nelli; Neumann, Matthias; Schmidt, Andreas; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Volker; Fändrich, Marcus; Winter, Roland

    2016-09-26

    We studied the combined effects of pressure (0.1-200 MPa) and temperature (22, 30, and 38 °C) on the catalytic activity of designed amyloid fibrils using a high-pressure stopped-flow system with rapid UV/Vis absorption detection. Complementary FT-IR spectroscopic data revealed a remarkably high pressure and temperature stability of the fibrillar systems. High pressure enhances the esterase activity as a consequence of a negative activation volume at all temperatures (about -14 cm(3)  mol(-1) ). The enhancement is sustained in the whole temperature range covered, which allows a further acceleration of the enzymatic activity at high temperatures (activation energy 45-60 kJ mol(-1) ). Our data reveal the great potential of using both pressure and temperature modulation to optimize the enzyme efficiency of catalytic amyloid fibrils. PMID:27573584

  8. Structure of recombinant Leishmania donovani pteridine reductase reveals a disordered active site

    PubMed Central

    Barrack, Keri L.; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Burke, Lynsey-Ann; Fyfe, Paul K.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Pteridine reductase (PTR1) is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, protozoa that are responsible for a range of serious diseases found in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. As part of a structure-based approach to inhibitor development, specifically targeting Leishmania species, well ordered crystals of L. donovani PTR1 were sought to support the characterization of complexes formed with inhibitors. An efficient system for recombinant protein production was prepared and the enzyme was purified and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. Diffraction data were measured to 2.5 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. However, a sulfate occupies a phosphate-binding site used by NADPH and occludes cofactor binding. The nicotinamide moiety is a critical component of the active site and without it this part of the structure is disordered. The crystal form obtained under these conditions is therefore unsuitable for the characterization of inhibitor complexes. PMID:21206018

  9. [Expression, refolding and biological activity of recombinant type-I metalloproteinase acutolysin a from Agkistrodon acutus].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kai-Jun; Yu, Hong-Xiu; Zou, Chun-Sen; Yuan, Pei-Hua; Liu, Jing

    2002-09-01

    Type-I snake venom metalloproteinase acutolysin A gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pBAD/gIIIA and the resulting recombinant plasmid pDS was obtained. By the induction with 0.02% L-(+)-arabinose, the recombinant metalloproteinase was expressed in insoluble inclusion body in E. coli TOP10 and reached up to 5%--10% of total bacterial proteins. The recombinant metalloproteinase has an additional sequence of N-terminal 22 amino acids and C-terminal 8 amino acids (housing 6 histidines), both of which derived from the vector. The purified inclusion body was solubilized by 8 mol/L urea or 6 mol/L guanidine-HCl and the denatured soluble recombinant metalloproteinase was allowed to refold in vitro. Western blotting and ELISA obviously showed that the renatured recombinant metalloproteinase possessed strong immune reactivity very closely related to natural acutolysin A. Animal experiments showed that the refolded recombinant metalloproteinase had an obvious hemorrhagic activity. Except PMSF, 1 mmol/L EDTA, 1 mmol/L EGTA, and 3 mmol/L imidazole could inhibit the hemorrhagic activity of the recombinant and the natural metalloproteinases to different extent. Based on the investigations of others and our experimental results, the hemorrhagic mechanism of snake metalloproteinases was discussed.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipolytic Enzymes as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Belinda; Lecoufle, Mélanie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Dedieu, Luc; Canaan, Stéphane; Valverde, Viviane; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB) burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452) as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. Methods Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. Results A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. Conclusion These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent biomarkers providing high

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  12. Interaction of carbohydrates with alcohol dehydrogenase: Effect on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Swati B; Bankar, Sandip B; Granström, Tom; Ojamo, Heikki; Singhal, Rekha S; Survase, Shrikant A

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was covalently conjugated with three different oxidized carbohydrates i.e., glucose, starch and pectin. All the carbohydrates inhibited the enzyme. The inhibition was studied with respect to the inhibition rate constant, involvement of thiol groups in the binding, and structural changes in the enzyme. The enzyme activity decreased to half of its original activity at the concentration of 2 mg/mL of pectin, 4 mg/mL of glucose and 10 mg/mL of starch within 10 min at pH 7. This study showed oxidized pectin to be a potent inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase followed by glucose and starch. Along with the aldehyde-amino group interaction, thiol groups were also involved in the binding between alcohol dehydrogenase and carbohydrates. The structural changes occurring on binding of alcohol dehydrogenase with oxidized carbohydrates was also confirmed by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Oxidized carbohydrates could thus be used as potential inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized. PMID:26139824

  14. RecBC enzyme activity is required for far-UV induced respiration shutoff in Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Swenson, P A; Norton, I L

    1986-01-01

    Shutoff of respiration is one of a number of recA+ lexA+ dependent (SOS) responses caused by far ultraviolet (245 nm) radiation (UV) damage of DNA in Escherichia coli cells. Thus far no rec/lex response has been shown to require the recB recC gene product, the RecBC enzyme. We report in this paper that UV-induced respiration shutoff did not occur in either of these radiation-sensitive derivatives of K12 strain AB1157 nor in the recB recC double mutant. The sbcB gene product is exonuclease I and it has been reported that the triple mutant strain recB recC sbcB has near normal recombination efficiency and resistance to UV. The sbcB strain shut off its respiration after UV but the triple mutant did not show UV-induced respiration shutoff; the shutoff and death responses were uncoupled. We concluded that respiration shutoff requires RecBC enzyme activity. The RecBC enzyme has ATP-dependent double-strand exonuclease activity, helicase activity and several other activities. We tested a recBC+ (double dagger) mutant strain (recC 1010) that had normal recombination efficiency and resistance to UV but which possessed no ATP-dependent double-strand exonuclease activity. This strain did not shut off its respiration. The presence or absence of other RecBC enzyme activities in this mutant is not known. These results support the hypothesis that ATP-dependent double-strand exonuclease activity is necessary for UV-induced respiration shutoff.

  15. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Fernando D; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress.

  16. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Fernando D.; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress. PMID:26066044

  17. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  18. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  19. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  20. A cellulose-binding domain-fused recombinant human T cell connective tissue-activating peptide-III manifests heparanase activity.

    PubMed

    Rechter, M; Lider, O; Cahalon, L; Baharav, E; Dekel, M; Seigel, D; Vlodavsky, I; Aingorn, H; Cohen, I R; Shoseyov, O

    1999-02-24

    The chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III, which belongs to the leukocyte-derived growth factor family of mediators, was previously shown to be mitogenic for fibroblasts. However, it has recently been shown that CTAP-III, released from platelets, can act like a heparanase enzyme and degrade heparan sulfate. This suggests that CTAP-III may also function as a proinflammatory mediator. We have successfully cloned CTAP-III from a lambdagt11 cDNA library of PHA-activated human CD4(+) T cells and produced recombinant CTAP-III as a fusion protein with a cellulose-binding domain moiety. This recombinant CTAP-III exhibited heparanase activity and released degradation products from metabolically labeled, naturally produced extracellular matrix. We have also developed polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and these antibodies against the recombinant CTAP-III detected the CTAP-III molecule in human T cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and placental extracts. Thus, our study provides tools to examine further immune cell behavior in inflamed sites rich with extracellular moieties and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10049766

  1. Recombinant proteins in newly developed foods: identification of allergenic activity.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; Reese, G

    1997-01-01

    A number of agricultural crops are being modified for various purposes using recombinant DNA technology. Since transferred genes may code for proteins that are ordinarily not present, there is concern about the potential allergenicity of these new varieties. The safety evaluation of transgenic foods is relatively easy when the allergenicity of the gene source is known. Recombinant allergens in genetically engineered or altered foods can be identified using traditional immunological assays such as RAST or ELISA inhibition or immunoblotting procedures. Our recent studies of two corn proteins (10 kD and HSZ) used to alter grain amino acid composition and of transgenic soybeans with an altered fatty acid profile are examples of this approach. Both 10 kD and HSZ did not bind IgE antibodies from sera of corn-reactive subjects by immunoblotting. Studies of wild-type and transgenic soybeans with high oleic acidic content by RAST inhibition and immunoblotting with pooled sera of soy-allergic individuals demonstrated no difference in the allergen content of both extracts. In contrast to these studies, a recent investigation by Nordlee et al. (1996) of transgenic soybeans which expressed a methionine/cysteine-rich protein from Brazil nuts identified this protein as a major Brazil nut allergen. These studies indicate that, when the gene source is from a known allergen or if the recipient contains allergens, it is possible to determine whether the allergen content of the transgenic line is altered relative to the nontransgenic varieties.

  2. Protoplast fusion enhances lignocellulolytic enzyme activities in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yu-xiao; Liu, Jia-jing; Liu, Yan; Cheng, Qi-yue; Yu, Qun; Chen, Xin; Ren, Xiao-dong

    2014-12-01

    Protoplast fusion was used to obtain a higher production of lignocellulolytic enzymes with protoplast fusion in Trichoderma reesei. The fusant strain T. reesei JL6 was obtained from protoplast fusion from T. reesei strains QM9414, MCG77, and Rut C-30. Filter paper activity of T. reesei JL6 increased by 18% compared with that of Rut C-30. β-Glucosidase, hemicellulase and pectinase activities of T. reesei JL6 were also higher. The former activity was 0.39 Uml(-1), while those of QM9414, MCG77, and Rut C-30 were 0.13, 0.11, and 0.16 Uml(-1), respectively. Pectinase and hemicellulase activities of JL6 were 5.4 and 15.6 Uml(-1), respectively, which were slightly higher than those of the parents. The effects of corn stover and wheat bran carbon sources on the cellulase production and growth curve of T. reesei JL6 were also investigated.

  3. Plasma lysosomal enzyme activity in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Welman, E; Selwyn, A P; Peters, T J; Colbeck, J F; Fox, K M

    1978-02-01

    N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30, recommended name beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase) was found to be a constituent of human cardiac lysosomes. beta-glucuronidase was also found in this tissue, while lysozyme, an enzyme present in leucocyte lysosomes, was not detectable in the heart. The activities of both N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and beta-glucuronidase were elevated in plasma during the first 24 h after the onset of chest pain in patients with acute myocardial infarction and the peak levels of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase correlated well with those of creatine kinase. N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase showed a further rise in plasma activity which gave a peak at 72 h after the onset of chest pain and this was accompanied by a rise in lysozyme activity. It is suggested that lysosome disruption caused by myocardial cell necrosis was responsible for the initial rise in plasma lysosomal enzyme activity and that the subsequent inflammatory reaction gave rise to the second peak. PMID:647716

  4. Charge Shielding of PIP2 by Cations Regulates Enzyme Activity of Phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Huang, Weigang; Zhang, Qisheng; Koh, Duk-Su

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) of the plasma membrane by phospholipase C (PLC) generates two critical second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. For the enzymatic reaction, PIP2 binds to positively charged amino acids in the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC. Here we tested the hypothesis that positively charged divalent and multivalent cations accumulate around the negatively charged PIP2, a process called electrostatic charge shielding, and therefore inhibit electrostatic PIP2-PLC interaction. This charge shielding of PIP2 was measured quantitatively with an in vitro enzyme assay using WH-15, a PIP2 analog, and various recombinant PLC proteins (β1, γ1, and δ1). Reduction of PLC activity by divalent cations, polyamines, and neomycin was well described by a theoretical model considering accumulation of cations around PIP2 via their electrostatic interaction and chemical binding. Finally, the charge shielding of PIP2 was also observed in live cells. Perfusion of the cations into cells via patch clamp pipette reduced PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC as triggered by M1 muscarinic receptors with a potency order of Mg2+ < spermine4+ < neomycin6+. Accumulation of divalent cations into cells through divalent-permeable TRPM7 channel had the same effect. Altogether our results suggest that Mg2+ and polyamines modulate the activity of PLCs by controlling the amount of free PIP2 available for the enzymes and that highly charged biomolecules can be inactivated by counterions electrostatically. PMID:26658739

  5. Charge Shielding of PIP2 by Cations Regulates Enzyme Activity of Phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Huang, Weigang; Zhang, Qisheng; Koh, Duk-Su

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) of the plasma membrane by phospholipase C (PLC) generates two critical second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. For the enzymatic reaction, PIP2 binds to positively charged amino acids in the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC. Here we tested the hypothesis that positively charged divalent and multivalent cations accumulate around the negatively charged PIP2, a process called electrostatic charge shielding, and therefore inhibit electrostatic PIP2-PLC interaction. This charge shielding of PIP2 was measured quantitatively with an in vitro enzyme assay using WH-15, a PIP2 analog, and various recombinant PLC proteins (β1, γ1, and δ1). Reduction of PLC activity by divalent cations, polyamines, and neomycin was well described by a theoretical model considering accumulation of cations around PIP2 via their electrostatic interaction and chemical binding. Finally, the charge shielding of PIP2 was also observed in live cells. Perfusion of the cations into cells via patch clamp pipette reduced PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC as triggered by M1 muscarinic receptors with a potency order of Mg2+ < spermine4+ < neomycin6+. Accumulation of divalent cations into cells through divalent-permeable TRPM7 channel had the same effect. Altogether our results suggest that Mg2+ and polyamines modulate the activity of PLCs by controlling the amount of free PIP2 available for the enzymes and that highly charged biomolecules can be inactivated by counterions electrostatically.

  6. Charge Shielding of PIP2 by Cations Regulates Enzyme Activity of Phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Huang, Weigang; Zhang, Qisheng; Koh, Duk-Su

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) of the plasma membrane by phospholipase C (PLC) generates two critical second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. For the enzymatic reaction, PIP2 binds to positively charged amino acids in the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC. Here we tested the hypothesis that positively charged divalent and multivalent cations accumulate around the negatively charged PIP2, a process called electrostatic charge shielding, and therefore inhibit electrostatic PIP2-PLC interaction. This charge shielding of PIP2 was measured quantitatively with an in vitro enzyme assay using WH-15, a PIP2 analog, and various recombinant PLC proteins (β1, γ1, and δ1). Reduction of PLC activity by divalent cations, polyamines, and neomycin was well described by a theoretical model considering accumulation of cations around PIP2 via their electrostatic interaction and chemical binding. Finally, the charge shielding of PIP2 was also observed in live cells. Perfusion of the cations into cells via patch clamp pipette reduced PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC as triggered by M1 muscarinic receptors with a potency order of Mg2+ < spermine4+ < neomycin6+. Accumulation of divalent cations into cells through divalent-permeable TRPM7 channel had the same effect. Altogether our results suggest that Mg2+ and polyamines modulate the activity of PLCs by controlling the amount of free PIP2 available for the enzymes and that highly charged biomolecules can be inactivated by counterions electrostatically. PMID:26658739

  7. Characterization of cytidylyltransferase enzyme activity through high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brault, James P; Friesen, Jon A

    2016-10-01

    The cytidylyltransferases are a family of enzymes that utilize cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) to synthesize molecules that are typically precursors to membrane phospholipids. The most extensively studied cytidylyltransferase is CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), which catalyzes conversion of phosphocholine and CTP to cytidine diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), a step critical for synthesis of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). The current method used to determine catalytic activity of CCT measures production of radiolabeled CDP-choline from (14)C-labeled phosphocholine. The goal of this research was to develop a CCT enzyme assay that employed separation of non-radioactive CDP-choline from CTP. A C18 reverse phase column with a mobile phase of 0.1 M ammonium bicarbonate (98%) and acetonitrile (2%) (pH 7.4) resulted in separation of solutions of the substrate CTP from the product CDP-choline. A previously characterized truncated version of rat CCTα (denoted CCTα236) was used to test the HPLC enzyme assay by measuring CDP-choline product formation. The Vmax for CCTα236 was 3850 nmol/min/mg and K0.5 values for CTP and phosphocholine were 4.07 mM and 2.49 mM, respectively. The HPLC method was applied to glycerol 3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (GCT) and CTP:2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase synthetase (CMS), members of the cytidylyltransferase family that produce CDP-glycerol and CDP-methylerythritol, respectively. PMID:27443959

  8. Tissue enzyme activities in the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eric T; Socha, Victoria L; Gardner, Jennifer; Byrd, Lynne; Manire, Charles A

    2013-03-01

    The loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta, one of the seven species of threatened or endangered sea turtles worldwide, is one of the most commonly encountered marine turtles off the eastern coast of the United States and Gulf of Mexico. Although biochemical reference ranges have been evaluated for several species of sea turtles, tissue specificity of the commonly used plasma enzymes is lacking. This study evaluated the tissue specificity of eight enzymes, including amylase, lipase, creatine kinase (CK), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), in 30 tissues from five stranded loggerhead sea turtles with no evidence of infectious disease. Amylase and lipase showed the greatest tissue specificity, with activity found only in pancreatic samples. Creatine kinase had high levels present in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and moderate levels in central nervous system and gastrointestinal samples. Gamma-glutamyl transferase was found in kidney samples, but only in very low levels. Creatine kinase, ALP, AST, and LDH were found in all tissues evaluated and ALT was found in most, indicating low tissue specificity for these enzymes in the loggerhead.

  9. Characterization of recombinantly expressed dihydroxy-acid dehydratase from Sulfobus solfataricus-A key enzyme for the conversion of carbohydrates into chemicals.

    PubMed

    Carsten, Jörg M; Schmidt, Anja; Sieber, Volker

    2015-10-10

    Dihydroxyacid dehydratases (DHADs) are excellent biocatalysts for the defunctionalization of biomass. Here, we report on the recombinant production of DHAD from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsDHAD) in E. coli and its characterization with special focus on activity toward non-natural substrates, thermo-stability, thermo-inactivation kinetics and activation capabilities and its application within multi-step cascades for chemicals production. Using a simple heat treatment of cell lysate as major purification step we achieved a specific activity of 4.4 units per gram cell mass toward the substrate d-gluconate. The optimal temperature and pH value for this reaction are 77°C and pH 6.2. The inhibitory concentration (IC50, 50% residual activity) of different alcohols was determined to be 15% (v/v) for ethanol, 4.5% (v/v) for butanol and 4% (v/v) for isobutanol. Besides d-gluconate and the natural substrate 2,3-dihydroxyisovalerate (DHIV) SsDHAD is able to convert the C3-sugar-acid d-glycerate to pyruvate, a reaction, which does not occur in natural metabolic pathways, with a specific activity of 10.7±0.4mU/mg. The specific activity of the enzyme can be increased 3-fold by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol. The activation has no impact on temperature dependence, but modulates the thermo-inactivation tolerance at 50°C. The total turnover numbers for all of the three reactions was found to be 35.5×10(3)±1.0×10(3) for the conversion of d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate (KDG), 28.2×10(3)±0.8×10(3) for DHIV to 2-ketovalerate (KIV) and 943±0.28×10(2) for d-glycerate to pyruvate. With activated SsDHAD these values could be further increased 5- and 4-fold for the d-gluconate and d-glycerate conversion, respectively.

  10. Characterization of recombinantly expressed dihydroxy-acid dehydratase from Sulfobus solfataricus-A key enzyme for the conversion of carbohydrates into chemicals.

    PubMed

    Carsten, Jörg M; Schmidt, Anja; Sieber, Volker

    2015-10-10

    Dihydroxyacid dehydratases (DHADs) are excellent biocatalysts for the defunctionalization of biomass. Here, we report on the recombinant production of DHAD from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsDHAD) in E. coli and its characterization with special focus on activity toward non-natural substrates, thermo-stability, thermo-inactivation kinetics and activation capabilities and its application within multi-step cascades for chemicals production. Using a simple heat treatment of cell lysate as major purification step we achieved a specific activity of 4.4 units per gram cell mass toward the substrate d-gluconate. The optimal temperature and pH value for this reaction are 77°C and pH 6.2. The inhibitory concentration (IC50, 50% residual activity) of different alcohols was determined to be 15% (v/v) for ethanol, 4.5% (v/v) for butanol and 4% (v/v) for isobutanol. Besides d-gluconate and the natural substrate 2,3-dihydroxyisovalerate (DHIV) SsDHAD is able to convert the C3-sugar-acid d-glycerate to pyruvate, a reaction, which does not occur in natural metabolic pathways, with a specific activity of 10.7±0.4mU/mg. The specific activity of the enzyme can be increased 3-fold by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol. The activation has no impact on temperature dependence, but modulates the thermo-inactivation tolerance at 50°C. The total turnover numbers for all of the three reactions was found to be 35.5×10(3)±1.0×10(3) for the conversion of d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate (KDG), 28.2×10(3)±0.8×10(3) for DHIV to 2-ketovalerate (KIV) and 943±0.28×10(2) for d-glycerate to pyruvate. With activated SsDHAD these values could be further increased 5- and 4-fold for the d-gluconate and d-glycerate conversion, respectively. PMID:26102631

  11. Activity of enzyme immobilized on silanized Co-Cr-Mo.

    PubMed

    Puleo, D A

    1995-08-01

    The surface of an orthopedic biomaterial was modified by the covalent immobilization of biomolecules. Derivatization of Co-Cr-Mo samples with organic and aqueous solutions of gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) resulted in a concentration-dependent number of reactive NH2 groups on the surface available for coupling to protein. The enzyme trypsin was used as a model biomolecule to investigate the effect of immobilization on proteolytic activity. Trypsin was coupled to the silanized samples by formation of Schiff's base linkages via glutaraldehyde. The nature of the interaction between trypsin and biomaterial was then probed by treatment with concentrated guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and urea. Residual activity (following treatment with chaotropic agents) of trypsin immobilized on silanized Co-Cr-Mo was dependent both on the nature of the silane solution and on the type of chaotropic agent. Organic silanization with APS required a minimum density of approximately 49 NH2 per nm2 of nominal surface area (> 0.021 M APS) for residual activity of immobilized trypsin. For aqueous silanization, approximately 5.4 NH2/nm2 (0.51 M APS) resulted in maximal residual trypsin activity. Treatment with GuHCl removed more trypsin activity from Co-Cr-Mo samples silanized with organic solutions of APS than did treatment with urea. On the contrary, with aqueous silanization the samples possessed greater residual activity following treatment with GuHCl than following urea. Compared to simple adsorption with protein onto Co-Cr-Mo, both methods of silanization with APS resulted in superior residual immobilized enzyme activity. PMID:7593038

  12. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and... Bacillus subtilis. The food additive alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation, may be safely used in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme...

  13. Application of capillary enzyme micro-reactor in enzyme activity and inhibitors studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we present an on-line measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme micro-reactor (CE-based IMER). The IMER was prepared using a two-step protocol based on electrostatic assembly. The micro-reactor exhibited good stability and reproducibility for on-line assay of G6PDH enzyme. Both the activity as well as the inhibition of the G6PDH enzyme by six inhibitors, including three metals (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)), vancomycin, urea and KMnO4, were investigated using on-line assay of the CE-based IMERs. The enzyme activity and inhibition kinetic constants were measured using the IMERs which were found to be consistent with those using traditional off-line enzyme assays. The kinetic mechanism of each inhibitor was also determined. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CE-based IMERs for rapid and efficient on-line assay of G6PDH, an important enzyme in the pentosephosphate pathway of human metabolism.

  14. Development of an efficient signal amplification strategy for label-free enzyme immunoassay using two site-specific biotinylated recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin-Bao; Tang, Ying; Yang, Hong-Ming

    2015-02-15

    Constructing a recombinant protein between a reporter enzyme and a detector protein to produce a homogeneous immunological reagent is advantageous over random chemical conjugation. However, the approach hardly recombines multiple enzymes in a difunctional fusion protein, which results in insufficient amplification of the enzymatic signal, thereby limiting its application in further enhancement of analytical signal. In this study, two site-specific biotinylated recombinant proteins, namely, divalent biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (AP) and monovalent biotinylated ZZ domain, were produced by employing the Avitag-BirA system. Through the high streptavidin (SA)-biotin interaction, the divalent biotinylated APs were clustered in the SA-biotin complex and then incorporated with the biotinylated ZZ. This incorporation results in the formation of a functional macromolecule that involves numerous APs, thereby enhancing the enzymatic signal, and in the production of several ZZ molecules for the interaction with immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. The advantage of this signal amplification strategy is demonstrated through ELISA, in which the analytical signal was substantially enhanced, with a 32-fold increase in the detection sensitivity compared with the ZZ-AP fusion protein approach. The proposed immunoassay without chemical modification can be an alternative strategy to enhance the analytical signals in various applications involving immunosensors and diagnostic chips, given that the label-free IgG antibody is suitable for the ZZ protein.

  15. The recombinant expression and activity detection of MAF-1 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ping; Wu, Jianwei; Gao, Song; Guo, Guo; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study establishes the recombinant expression system of MAF-1 (Musca domestica antifungal peptide-1) and demonstrates the antifungal activity of the expression product and shows the relationship between biological activity and structure. The gene segments on mature peptide part of MAF-1 were cloned, based on the primers designed according to the cDNA sequence of MAF-1. We constructed the recombinant prokaryotic expression plasmid using prokaryotic expression vector (pET-28a(+)) and converted it to the competent cell of BL21(DE3) to gain recombinant MAF-1 fusion protein with His tag sequence through purifying affinity chromatographic column of Ni-NTA. To conduct the Western Blotting test, recombinant MAF-1 fusion protein was used to produce the polyclonal antibody of rat. The antifungal activity of the expression product was detected using Candida albicans (ATCC10231) as the indicator. The MAF-1 recombinant fusion protein was purified to exhibit obvious antifungal activity, which lays the foundation for the further study of MAF-1 biological activity, the relationship between structure and function, as well as control of gene expression. PMID:26423137

  16. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  17. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  18. Growth characteristics and enzyme activity in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis isolates.

    PubMed

    Symonds, E Pearl; Trott, Darren J; Bird, Philip S; Mills, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a member of the phylum Chytridiomycota and the causative organism chytridiomycosis, a disease of amphibians associated with global population declines and mass mortality events. The organism targets keratin-forming epithelium in adult and larval amphibians, which suggests that keratinolytic activity may be required to infect amphibian hosts. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested 10 isolates of B. dendrobatidis for their ability to grow on a range of keratin-supplemented agars and measured keratolytic enzyme activity using a commercially available kit (bioMerieux API ZYM). The most dense and fastest growth of isolates were recorded on tryptone agar, followed by growth on frog skin agar and the slowest growth recorded on feather meal and boiled snake skin agar. Growth patterns were distinctive for each nutrient source. All 10 isolates were strongly positive for a range of proteolytic enzymes which may be keratinolytic, including trypsin and chymotrypsin. These findings support the predilection of B. dendrobatidis for amphibian skin. PMID:18568420

  19. GTPase activity and biochemical characterization of a recombinant cotton fiber annexin.

    PubMed

    Shin, H; Brown, R M

    1999-03-01

    A cDNA encoding annexin was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant recombinant protein was purified. We then investigated some biochemical properties of the recombinant annexin based on the current understanding of plant annexins. An "add-back experiment" was performed to study the effect of the recombinant annexin on beta-glucan synthase activity, but no effect was found. However, it was found that the recombinant annexin could display ATPase/GTPase activities. The recombinant annexin showed much higher GTPase than ATPase activity. Mg2+ was essential for these activities, whereas a high concentration of Ca2+ was inhibitory. A photolabeling assay showed that this annexin could bind GTP more specifically than ATP. The GTP-binding site on the annexin was mapped into the carboxyl-terminal fourth repeat of annexin from the photolabeling experiment using domain-deletion mutants of this annexin. Northern-blot analysis showed that the annexin gene was highly expressed in the elongation stages of cotton fiber differentiation, suggesting a role of this annexin in cell elongation. PMID:10069831

  20. GTPase activity and biochemical characterization of a recombinant cotton fiber annexin

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.; Brown, R.M. Jr. . Dept. of Botany)

    1999-03-01

    A cDNA encoding annexin was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant recombinant protein was purified. The authors then investigated some biochemical properties of the recombinant annexin based on the current understanding of plant annexins. An add-back experiment was performed to study the effect of the recombinant annexin on [beta]-glucan synthase activity, but no effect was found. However, it was found that the recombinant annexin could display ATPase/GTPase activities. The recombinant annexin showed much higher GTPase than ATPase activity. Mg[sup 2+] was essential for these activities, whereas a high concentration of Ca[sup 2+] was inhibitory. A photolabeling assay showed that this annexin could bind GTP more specifically than ATP. The GTP-binding site on the annexin was mapped into the carboxyl-terminal fourth repeat of annexin from the photolabeling experiment using domain-deletion mutants of this annexin. Northern-blot analysis showed that the annexin gene was highly expressed in the elongation stages of cotton fiber differentiation, suggesting a role of this annexin in cell elongation.

  1. Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

  2. Activity of extracellular enzymes on the marine beach differing in the level of antropopressure.

    PubMed

    Perliński, P; Mudryk, Z J

    2016-03-01

    The level of activity of extracellular enzymes was determined on two transects characterised by different anthropic pressure on a sandy beach in Ustka, the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Generally, the level of activity of the studied enzymes was higher on the transect characterised by high anthropic pressure. The ranking order of the mean enzyme activity rates in the sand was as follows: lipase > phosphatase > aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase > chitinase. Each enzyme had its characteristic horizontal profile of activity. The levels of activity of the studied enzymes were slightly higher in the surface than subsurface sand layer. Extracellular enzymatic activities were strongly influenced by the season. PMID:26911592

  3. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  4. Evolution of an Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Constrained by Stability and Activity Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Pressured by antibiotic use, resistance enzymes have been evolving new activities. Does such evolution have a cost? To investigate this question at the molecular level, clinically isolated mutants of the {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 were studied. When purified, mutant enzymes had increased activity against cephalosporin antibiotics but lost both thermodynamic stability and kinetic activity against their ancestral targets, penicillins. The X-ray crystallographic structures of three mutant enzymes were determined. These structures suggest that activity gain and stability loss is related to an enlarged active site cavity in the mutant enzymes. In several clinically isolated mutant enzymes, a secondary substitution is observed far from the active site (Met182 {yields} Thr). This substitution had little effect on enzyme activity but restored stability lost by substitutions near the active site. This regained stability conferred an advantage in vivo. This pattern of stability loss and restoration may be common in the evolution of new enzyme activity.

  5. Integrative analyses of genetic variation in enzyme activities of primary carbohydrate metabolism reveal distinct modes of regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Keurentjes, Joost JB; Sulpice, Ronan; Gibon, Yves; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Fu, Jingyuan; Koornneef, Maarten; Stitt, Mark; Vreugdenhil, Dick

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant primary carbohydrate metabolism is complex and flexible, and is regulated at many levels. Changes of transcript levels do not always lead to changes in enzyme activities, and these do not always affect metabolite levels and fluxes. To analyze interactions between these three levels of function, we have performed parallel genetic analyses of 15 enzyme activities involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism, transcript levels for their encoding structural genes, and a set of relevant metabolites. Quantitative analyses of each trait were performed in the Arabidopsis thaliana Ler × Cvi recombinant inbred line (RIL) population and subjected to correlation and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Results Traits affecting primary metabolism were often correlated, possibly due to developmental control affecting multiple genes, enzymes, or metabolites. Moreover, the activity QTLs of several enzymes co-localized with the expression QTLs (eQTLs) of their structural genes, or with metabolite accumulation QTLs of their substrates or products. In addition, many trait-specific QTLs were identified, revealing that there is also specific regulation of individual metabolic traits. Regulation of enzyme activities often occurred through multiple loci, involving both cis- and trans-acting transcriptional or post-transcriptional control of structural genes, as well as independently of the structural genes. Conclusion Future studies of the regulatory processes in primary carbohydrate metabolism will benefit from an integrative genetic analysis of gene transcription, enzyme activity, and metabolite content. The multiparallel QTL analyses of the various interconnected transducers of biological information flow, described here for the first time, can assist in determining the causes and consequences of genetic regulation at different levels of complex biological systems. PMID:18710526

  6. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design. PMID:27298067

  7. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  8. Identification of DNA cleavage- and recombination-specific hnRNP cofactors for activation-induced cytidine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjun; Begum, Nasim A; Mondal, Samiran; Stanlie, Andre; Honjo, Tasuku

    2015-05-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). AID originally was postulated to function as an RNA-editing enzyme, based on its strong homology with apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1), the enzyme that edits apolipoprotein B-100 mRNA in the presence of the APOBEC cofactor APOBEC1 complementation factor/APOBEC complementation factor (A1CF/ACF). Because A1CF is structurally similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), we investigated the involvement of several well-known hnRNPs in AID function by using siRNA knockdown and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9-mediated disruption. We found that hnRNP K deficiency inhibited DNA cleavage and thereby induced both CSR and SHM, whereas hnRNP L deficiency inhibited only CSR and somewhat enhanced SHM. Interestingly, both hnRNPs exhibited RNA-dependent interactions with AID, and mutant forms of these proteins containing deletions in the RNA-recognition motif failed to rescue CSR. Thus, our study suggests that hnRNP K and hnRNP L may serve as A1CF-like cofactors in AID-mediated CSR and SHM.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2) and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets. PMID:25049952

  10. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  11. Interleukin-10 induces immunoglobulin G isotype switch recombination in human CD40-activated naive B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Upon activation, B lymphocytes can change the isotype of the antibody they express by immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype switch recombination. In previous studies on the regulation of human IgG expression, we demonstrated that interleukin 10 (IL-10) could stimulate IgG1 and IgG3 secretion by human CD40-activated naive (sIgD+) tonsillar B cells. To assess whether IL-10 actually promotes the DNA recombination underlying switching to these isotypes, we examined the effect of IL-10 on the generation of reciprocal products that form DNA circles as by-products of switch recombination. The content of reciprocal products characteristic of mu-gamma recombination was elevated after culture of CD40-activated tonsillar sIgD+ B cells with either IL-4 or IL-10, although high levels of IgG secretion were observed only with IL-10. Unlike IL-4, IL-10 did not induce reciprocal products of mu-epsilon and gamma-epsilon switch recombination. These results demonstrate that IL- 10 promotes both switching to gamma and IgG secretion. PMID:8642297

  12. County-Scale Spatial Distribution of Soil Enzyme Activities and Enzyme Activity Indices in Agricultural Land: Implications for Soil Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km2) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality. PMID:25610908

  13. County-scale spatial distribution of soil enzyme activities and enzyme activity indices in agricultural land: implications for soil quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiangping; Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km(2)) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality. PMID:25610908

  14. Preparation of an active recombinant peptide of crustacean androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Atsuro; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Nishiyama, Makoto; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Ko, Rinkei; Kurihara, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2002-03-01

    In crustaceans, male sexual characteristics are induced by a hormone referred to as androgenic gland hormone. We have recently cloned a candidate cDNA in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. In order to prove that this cDNA encodes the hormone, recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of B chain, C peptide and A chain were produced using both baculovirus and bacterial expression systems. Neither recombinant precursors showed activity. Digestion of only the precursor carrying a glycan moiety with lysyl endopeptidase gave a heterodimeric peptide with hormonal activity by removing a part of C peptide. These results indicate that the cDNA encodes the hormone. PMID:11836008

  15. Molecular co-evolution of a protease and its substrate elucidated by analysis of the activity of predicted ancestral hatching enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hatching enzyme is a protease that digests the egg envelope, enabling hatching of the embryo. We have comprehensively studied the molecular mechanisms of the enzyme action to its substrate egg envelope, and determined the gene/protein structure and phylogenetic relationships. Because the hatching enzyme must have evolved while maintaining its ability to digest the egg envelope, the hatching enzyme-egg envelope protein pair is a good model for studying molecular co-evolution of a protease and its substrate. Results Hatching enzymes from medaka (Oryzias latipes) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) showed species-specific egg envelope digestion. We found that by introducing four medaka-type residue amino acid substitutions into recombinant killifish hatching enzyme, the mutant killifish hatching enzyme could digest medaka egg envelope. Further, we studied the participation of the cleavage site of the substrate in the species-specificity of hatching enzyme. A P2-site single amino acid substitution was responsible for the species-specificity. Estimation of the activity of the predicted ancestral enzymes towards various types of cleavage sites along with prediction of the evolutionary timing of substitutions allowed prediction of a possible evolutionary pathway, as follows: ancestral hatching enzyme, which had relatively strict substrate specificity, developed broader specificity as a result of four amino acid substitutions in the active site cleft of the enzyme. Subsequently, a single substitution occurred within the cleavage site of the substrate, and the recent feature of species-specificity was established in the hatching enzyme-egg envelope system. Conclusions The present study clearly provides an ideal model for protease-substrate co-evolution. The evolutionary process giving rise to species-specific egg envelope digestion of hatching enzyme was initiated by amino acid substitutions in the enzyme, resulting in altered substrate specificity, which later

  16. Modelling thermal stability and activity of free and immobilized enzymes as a novel tool for enzyme reactor design.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M P; Oliveira, M G; Maugeri, F

    2007-11-01

    In this work, a novel method is proposed to establish the most suitable operational temperature for an enzyme reactor. The method was based on mathematical modelling of the thermal stability and activity of the enzyme and was developed using thermodynamic concepts and experimental data from free and immobilized inulinases (2,1-beta-D fructan frutanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus, which were used as examples. The model was, therefore, designed to predict the enzyme activity with respect to the temperature and time course of the enzymatic process, as well as its half-life, in a broad temperature range. The knowledge and information provided by the model could be used to design the operational temperature conditions, leading to higher enzyme activities, while preserving acceptable stability levels, which represent the link between higher productivity and lower process costs. For the inulinase used in this study, the optimum temperature conditions leading to higher enzyme activities were shown to be 63 degrees C and 57.5 degrees C for the free and immobilized inulinases, respectively. However, according to the novel method of approach used here, the more appropriate operating temperatures would be 52 degrees C for free and 42 degrees C for immobilized inulinases, showing that the working temperature is not necessarily the same as the maximum reaction rate temperature, but preferably a lower temperature where the enzyme is much more stable.

  17. Genetically encoded optical activation of DNA recombination in human cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental protocols. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc03934k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, J.; Arbely, E.; Zhang, J.; Chou, C.; Uprety, R.; Chin, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    We developed two tightly regulated, light-activated Cre recombinase enzymes through site-specific incorporation of two genetically-encoded photocaged amino acids in human cells. Excellent optical off to on switching of DNA recombination was achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrated precise spatial control of Cre recombinase through patterned illumination. PMID:27277957

  18. Phlorotannins from Alaskan seaweed inhibit carbolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Joshua; Grace, Mary H; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-10-22

    Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively). The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS) was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia.

  19. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115...

  20. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  1. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  2. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  3. Novel recombinant human lactoferrin: Differential activation of oxidative stress related gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kruzel, Marian L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; MichałZimecki; Wise, Jasen; Płoszaj, Paulina; Mirza, Shaper; Kruzel, Mark; Hwang, Shen-An; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein found in high concentrations in mammalian exocrine secretions, is an important component of the host defense system. It is also a major protein of the secondary granules of neutrophils from which is released upon activation. Due to its potential clinical utility, recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) has been produced in various eukaryotic expression systems; however, none of these are fully compatible with humans. Most of the biopharmaceuticals approved by the FDA for use in humans are produced in mammalian expression systems. The Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) have become the system of choice for proteins that require post-translational modifications, such as glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to scale-up expression and purification of rhLF in a CHO expression system, verify its glycan primary structure, and assess its biological properties in cell culture models. A stable CHO cell line producing >200 mg/L of rhLF was developed and established. rhLF was purified by a single-step cation-exchange chromatography procedure. The highly homogenous rhLF has a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis revealed N-linked, partially sialylated glycans at two glycosylation sites, typical for human milk LF. This novel rhLF showed a protective effect against oxidative stress in a similar manner to its natural counterpart. In addition, rhLF revealed a modulatory effect on cellular redox via upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. These data imply that the CHO-derived rhLF is fully compatible with the native molecule, thus it has promise for human therapeutic applications. PMID:24070904

  4. Novel recombinant human lactoferrin: differential activation of oxidative stress related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Zimecki, Michał; Wise, Jasen; Płoszaj, Paulina; Mirza, Shaper; Kruzel, Mark; Hwang, Shen-An; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-12-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein found in high concentrations in mammalian exocrine secretions, is an important component of the host defense system. It is also a major protein of the secondary granules of neutrophils from which is released upon activation. Due to its potential clinical utility, recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) has been produced in various eukaryotic expression systems; however, none of these are fully compatible with humans. Most of the biopharmaceuticals approved by the FDA for use in humans are produced in mammalian expression systems. The Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) have become the system of choice for proteins that require post-translational modifications, such as glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to scale-up expression and purification of rhLF in a CHO expression system, verify its glycan primary structure, and assess its biological properties in cell culture models. A stable CHO cell line producing >200mg/L of rhLF was developed and established. rhLF was purified by a single-step cation-exchange chromatography procedure. The highly homogenous rhLF has a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis revealed N-linked, partially sialylated glycans at two glycosylation sites, typical for human milk LF. This novel rhLF showed a protective effect against oxidative stress in a similar manner to its natural counterpart. In addition, rhLF revealed a modulatory effect on cellular redox via upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. These data imply that the CHO-derived rhLF is fully compatible with the native molecule, thus it has promise for human therapeutic applications.

  5. Full activation of RNaseL in animal cells requires binding of 2-5A within ankyrin repeats 6 to 9 of this interferon-inducible enzyme.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Guerra, M; Rivas, C; Esteban, M

    1999-02-01

    To define protein domains important for activation of the interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme 2-5A-dependent RNaseL, we have generated vaccinia virus (VV) recombinants able to express in cultured cells truncated forms of this protein and compared their biologic activities with those producing the wild-type enzyme, with and without coexpression of 2-5A synthetase. Our results show that full activation of RNaseL requires binding of 2-5A oligonucleotides within amino acid positions 212-339, corresponding to ankyrin repeats 6 to 9. The protein kinase and ribonuclease domains of RNaseL, amino acids 340-741, are sufficient for a constitutively active enzyme that is unresponsive to excess 2-5A. These results demonstrate in vivo the importance of the ankyrin domains in the biologic function of RNaseL. We suggest that ankyrin repeats act as key modulators of RNaseL activity.

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity in Mexican Fresco cheese.

    PubMed

    Torres-Llanez, M J; González-Córdova, A F; Hernandez-Mendoza, A; Garcia, H S; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if Mexican Fresco cheese manufactured with specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB) presented angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEI) activity. Water-soluble extracts (3 kDa) obtained from Mexican Fresco cheese prepared with specific LAB (Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, and mixtures: Lactococcus-Lactobacillus and Lactococcus-Enterococcus) were evaluated for ACEI activity. Specific peptide fractions with high ACEI were analyzed using reverse phase-HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry for determination of amino acid sequence. Cheese containing Enterococcus faecium or a Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis-Enterococcus faecium mixture showed the largest number of fractions with ACEI activity and the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50); <10 μg/mL). Various ACEI peptides derived from β-casein [(f(193-205), f(193-207), and f(193-209)] and α(S1)-casein [f(1-15), f(1-22), f(14-23), and f(24-34)] were found. The Mexican Fresco cheese manufactured with specific LAB strains produced peptides with potential antihypertensive activity.

  7. Effects of Fertilization on Tomato Growth and Soil Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhen; Hu, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Chang; Luo, Zhi-qing

    2015-04-01

    To study the effects of different fertilizer applications on soil enzyme activity, tomato plant growth and tomato yield and quality, a field experiment on tomato cultivation was carried out in the suburb of Shanghai. Three fertilizer treatments, chemical fertilizer (CF) (N, 260 g/kg; P, 25.71g/kg; K, 83.00g/kg), rapeseed cake manure (CM) (N, 37.4 g/kg; P, 9.0 g/kg; K, 8.46 g/kg), crop-leaf fermenting manure (FM) (N, 23.67 g/kg; P, 6.39 g/kg; K 44.32 g/kg), and a control without using any fertilizers (CK), were designed. The total amounts of fertilizer application to each plot for the CF, CM, FM and CK were 0.6 kg, 1.35 kg, 3.75 kg and 0 kg, respectively, 50% of which were applied as base fertilizer, and another 50% were applied after the first fruit picking as top dressing. Each experimental plot was 9 m2 (1 m × 9 m) in area. Each treatment was replicated for three times. No any pesticides and herbicides were applied during the entire period of tomato growth to prevent their disturbance to soil microbial activities. Soil enzyme activities at each plot were constantly tested during the growing period; the tomato fruit quality was also constantly analyzed and the tomato yield was calculated after the final harvesting. The results were as follows: (1) Urease activity in the soils treated with the CF, CM and FM increased quickly after applying base fertilizer. That with the CF reached the highest level. Sucrase activity was inhibited by the CF and CM to some extent, which was 32.4% and 11.2% lower than that with the CK, respectively; while that with the FM was 15.7% higher than that with the CK. Likewise, catalase activity with the CF increased by 12.3% - 28.6%; that with the CM increased by 87.8% - 95.1%; that with the FM increased by 86.4% - 93.0%. Phosphatase activity with the CF increased rapidly and reached a maximum 44 days after base fertilizer application, and then declined quickly. In comparison, that with the CM and FM increased slowly and reached a maximum

  8. Enzyme architecture: deconstruction of the enzyme-activating phosphodianion interactions of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lawrence M; Amyes, Tina L; Goryanova, Bogdana; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2014-07-16

    The mechanism for activation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) by interactions of side chains from Gln215 and Try217 at a gripper loop and R235, adjacent to this loop, with the phosphodianion of OMP was probed by determining the kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic binding energy of the phosphodianion is shown to be equal to the sum of the binding energies of the side chains of R235 (6 kcal/mol), Q215 (2 kcal/mol), Y217 (2 kcal/mol), and hydrogen bonds to the G234 and R235 backbone amides (2 kcal/mol). Analysis of a triple mutant cube shows small (ca. 1 kcal/mol) interactions between phosphodianion gripper side chains, which are consistent with steric crowding of the side chains around the phosphodianion at wild-type OMPDC. These mutations result in the same change in the activation barrier to the OMPDC-catalyzed reactions of the whole substrate OMP and the substrate pieces (1-β-D-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid (EO) and phosphite dianion. This shows that the transition states for these reactions are stabilized by similar interactions with the protein catalyst. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy of OMP is divided between the 8 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to drive a thermodynamically unfavorable conformational change of the free enzyme, resulting in an increase in (k(cat))(obs) for OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, and the 4 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to stabilize the Michaelis complex, resulting in a decrease in (K(m))(obs).

  9. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    PubMed Central

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  10. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-05-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (A549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment.

  11. Rat oocyte tissue plasminogen activator is a catalytically efficient enzyme in the absence of fibrin. Endogenous potentiation of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bicsak, T A; Hsueh, A J

    1989-01-01

    Rat oocytes synthesize tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in response to stimuli which initiate meiotic maturation. Purified tPA exhibits optimal activity only in the presence of fibrin or fibrin substitutes. Because oocytes are not exposed to fibrin in situ, we investigated the possible stimulation of rat oocyte tPA activity by other endogenous factor(s). Oocytes were obtained from immature female rats which were induced to ovulate with gonadotropins. tPA activity was measured by the plasminogen-dependent cleavage of a chromogenic substrate. Measurements of kinetic parameters with Glu- or Lys-plasminogen revealed a Km for the rat oocyte enzyme of 1.3-2.1 microM compared with 23-24 microM for purified human tPA. Inclusion of the soluble fibrin substitute polylysine lowered the Km of human tPA by 30-fold (0.8 microM) but had no effect on the oocyte tPA Km. Polylysine had no significant effect on the Vmax values. The rate of plasminogen activation catalyzed by oocyte tPA was increased only 4.3-fold by fibrin while fibrin stimulated purified human tPA activity by 15.2-fold. After fractionation of oocyte extract by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, polylysine enhanced oocyte tPA activity as seen by casein zymography. tPA activity in the conditioned medium of a rat insulinoma cell line was also not stimulated with polylysine prior to fractionation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These data suggest that extravascular cells which elaborate tPA may produce stimulatory factor(s) which allow for full tPA activity at physiological concentrations of plasminogen in the absence of fibrin. PMID:2491854

  12. Microbial enzyme activities of peatland soils in south central Alaska lowlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial enzyme activities related to carbon and nutrient acquisition were measured on Alaskan peatland soils as indicators of nutrient limitation and biochemical sustainability. Peat decomposition is mediated by microorganisms and enzymes that in turn are limited by various ph...

  13. A Review on the Effects of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide on Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Zdeněk; Zarevúcka, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Different types of enzymes such as lipases, several phosphatases, dehydrogenases, oxidases, amylases and others are well suited for the reactions in SC-CO2. The stability and the activity of enzymes exposed to carbon dioxide under high pressure depend on enzyme species, water content in the solution and on the pressure and temperature of the reaction system. The three-dimensional structure of enzymes may be significantly altered under extreme conditions, causing their denaturation and consequent loss of activity. If the conditions are less adverse, the protein structure may be largely retained. Minor structural changes may induce an alternative active protein state with altered enzyme activity, specificity and stability. PMID:20162013

  14. Impact of cysteine variants on the structure, activity, and stability of recombinant human α-galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huawei; Honey, Denise M; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Park, Anna; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Wei, Ronnie R; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal) is a homodimeric glycoprotein deficient in Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. In this study, each cysteine residue in rhαGal was replaced with serine to understand the role each cysteine plays in the enzyme structure, function, and stability. Conditioned media from transfected HEK293 cells were assayed for rhαGal expression and enzymatic activity. Activity was only detected in the wild type control and in mutants substituting the free cysteine residues (C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S). Cysteine-to-serine substitutions at the other sites lead to the loss of expression and/or activity, consistent with their involvement in the disulfide bonds found in the crystal structure. Purification and further characterization confirmed that the C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S mutants are enzymatically active, structurally intact and thermodynamically stable as measured by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. The purified inactive C142S mutant appeared to have lost part of its alpha-helix secondary structure and had a lower apparent melting temperature. Saturation mutagenesis study on Cys90 and Cys174 resulted in partial loss of activity for Cys174 mutants but multiple mutants at Cys90 with up to 87% higher enzymatic activity (C90T) compared to wild type, suggesting that the two free cysteines play differential roles and that the activity of the enzyme can be modulated by side chain interactions of the free Cys residues. These results enhanced our understanding of rhαGal structure and function, particularly the critical roles that cysteines play in structure, stability, and enzymatic activity.

  15. Development of radiometric assays for quantification of enzyme activities of the key enzymes of thyroid hormones metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, S

    2014-01-01

    We newly elaborated and adapted several radiometric enzyme assays for the determination of activities of the key enzymes engaged in the biosynthesis (thyroid peroxidase, TPO) and metabolic transformations (conjugating enzymes and iodothyronine deiodinases, IDs) of thyroid hormones (THs) in the thyroid gland and in peripheral tissues, especially in white adipose tissue (WAT). We also elaborated novel, reliable radiometric methods for extremely sensitive determination of enzyme activities of IDs of types 1, 2 and 3 in microsomal fractions of different rat and human tissues, as well as in homogenates of cultured mammalian cells. The use of optimized TLC separation of radioactive products from the unconsumed substrates and film-less autoradiography of radiochromatograms, taking advantage of storage phosphor screens, enabled us to determine IDs enzyme activities as low as 10(-18) katals. In studies of the interaction of fluoxetine (Fluox) with the metabolism of THs, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT). Fluox is the most frequently used representative of a new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs--selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. We used the elaborated assays for quantification the effects of Fluox and for the assessment of the degree of potential induction of rat liver ST and/or UDP-GT enzyme activities by Fluox alone or in combination with T(3). Furthermore, we studied possible changes in IDs activities in murine adipose tissue under the conditions that promoted either tissue hypertrophy (obesogenic treatment) or involution (caloric restriction), and in response to leptin, using our newly developed radiometric enzyme assays for IDs. Our results suggest that deiodinase D1 has a functional role in WAT, with D1 possibly being involved in the control of adipose tissue metabolism and/or accumulation of the tissue. Significant positive correlation between

  16. Effect of age and diet composition on activity of pancreatic enzymes in birds.

    PubMed

    Brzęk, Paweł; Ciminari, M Eugenia; Kohl, Kevin D; Lessner, Krista; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    Digestive enzymes produced by the pancreas and intestinal epithelium cooperate closely during food hydrolysis. Therefore, activities of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes processing the same substrate can be hypothesized to change together in unison, as well as to be adjusted to the concentration of their substrate in the diet. However, our knowledge of ontogenetic and diet-related changes in the digestive enzymes of birds is limited mainly to intestinal enzymes; it is largely unknown whether they are accompanied by changes in activities of enzymes produced by the pancreas. Here, we analyzed age- and diet-related changes in activities of pancreatic enzymes in five passerine and galloanserine species, and compared them with simultaneous changes in activities of intestinal enzymes. Mass-specific activity of pancreatic amylase increased with age in young house sparrows but not in zebra finches, in agreement with changes in typical dietary starch content and activity of intestinal maltase. However, we found little evidence for the presence of adaptive, diet-related modulation of pancreatic enzymes in both passerine and galloanserine species, even though in several cases the same birds adaptively modulated activities of their intestinal enzymes. In general, diet-related changes in mass-specific activities of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes were not correlated. We conclude that activity of pancreatic enzymes in birds is under strong genetic control, which enables evolutionary adjustment to typical diet composition but is less adept for short term, diet-related flexibility.

  17. IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity and Desensitisation with Recombinant Enzymes in Pompe Disease and Type I and Type VI Mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Azkur, Dilek; Vezir, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is important for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions with ERT have been reported, and in these cases, desensitisation with the enzyme is necessary. Here we report the cases of 3 patients with lysosomal storage disorders, including Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, who had IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and positive skin tests. Successful desensitisation protocols with the culprit enzyme solution were used for these patients. All 3 patients were able to safely receive ERT with the desensitisation protocol. PMID:27144408

  18. Expression and activity of recombinant proaerolysin derived from Aeromonas hydrophila cultured from diseased channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proaerolysin-coding gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of A. hydrophila and heterologously expressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant proaerolysin was inactive and could be activated by treatment with proteases, furin and trypsin, and extra-cellular proteins (ECPs, the cell-free supernatant of...

  19. Effect of copper on the recombination activity of extended defects in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Feklisova, O. V. Yakimov, E. B.

    2015-06-15

    The effect of copper atoms introduced by high-temperature diffusion on the recombination properties of dislocations and dislocation trails in p-type single-crystal silicon is studied by the electron-beam-induced current technique. It is shown that, in contrast to dislocations, dislocation trails exhibit an increase in recombination activity after the introduction of copper. Bright contrast appearance in the vicinity of dislocation trails is detected after the diffusion of copper and quenching of the samples. The contrast depends on the defect density in these trails.

  20. [Expression, purification of recombinant cationic peptide AIK in Escherichia coli and its antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Fan, Fangfang; Sun, Huiying; Xu, Hui; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Haiyuan; Li, Yilan; Ning, Xuelian; Sun, Yue; Bai, Jing; Fu, Songbin; Zhou, Chunshui

    2015-12-01

    AIK is a novel cationic peptide with potential antitumor activity. In order to construct the AIK expression vector by Gateway technology, and establish an optimal expression and purification method for recombinant AIK, a set of primers containing AttB sites were designed and used to create the AttB-TEV-FLAG-AIR fusion gene by overlapping PCR. The resulting fusion gene was cloned into the donor vector pDONR223 by attB and attP mediated recombination (BP reaction), then, transferred into the destination vector pDESTl 5 by attL and attR mediated recombination (LR reaction). All the cloning was verified by both colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The BL21 F. coli transformed by the GST-AIR expression plasmid was used to express the GST-AIK fusion protein with IPTG induction and the induction conditions were optimized. GST-AIR fusion protein was purified by glutathione magnetic beads, followed by rTEV cleavage to remove GST tag and MTS assay to test the growth inhibition activity of the recombinant AIR on human leukemia HL-60 cells. We found that a high level of soluble expression of GST-AIK protein (more than 30% out of the total bacterial proteins) was achieved upon 0.1 mmol/L ITPG induction for 4 h at 37 °C in the transformed BL21 F. coli with starting OD₆₀₀ at 1.0. Through GST affinity purification and rTEV cleavage, the purity of the resulting recombinant AIK was greater than 95%. And the MTS assays on HL-60 cells confirmed that the recombinant AIK retains an antitumor activity at a level similar to the chemically synthesized AIK. Taken together, we have established a method for expression and purification of recombinant AIK with a potent activity against tumor cells, which will be beneficial for the large-scale production and application of recombinant AIK in the future. PMID:27093838

  1. Evidence for reduced charge recombination in carbon nanotube/perovskite-based active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A.; Jeong, Seung Pyo; Han, Xu; Cutting, Christie L.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy and computation, we show that incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the bulk of the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells reduces charge recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. An ∼87% reduction in recombination was achieved when MWCNTs were introduced in the planar-heterostructure perovskite solar cell containing mixed counterions. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of perovskite/MWCNTs devices was increased by 70 mV, while the short circuit current density (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) remained unchanged.

  2. Engineering of Recombinant Poplar Deoxy-D-Xylulose-5-Phosphate Synthase (PtDXS) by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Improves Its Activity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Preiser, Alyssa L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme, plays a regulatory role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the end products of this pathway, inhibit DXS by competing with ThDP. Feedback inhibition of DXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes a significant metabolic regulation of this pathway. The aim of this work was to experimentally test the effect of key residues of recombinant poplar DXS (PtDXS) in binding both ThDP and IDP. This work also described the engineering of PtDXS to improve the enzymatic activity by reducing its inhibition by IDP and DMADP. We have designed and tested modifications of PtDXS in an attempt to reduce inhibition by IDP. This could possibly be valuable by removing a feedback that limits the usefulness of the MEP pathway in biotechnological applications. Both ThDP and IDP use similar interactions for binding at the active site of the enzyme, however, ThDP being a larger molecule has more anchoring sites at the active site of the enzyme as compared to the inhibitors. A predicted enzyme structure was examined to find ligand-enzyme interactions, which are relatively more important for inhibitor-enzyme binding than ThDP-enzyme binding, followed by their modifications so that the binding of the inhibitors can be selectively affected compared to ThDP. Two alanine residues important for binding ThDP and the inhibitors were mutated to glycine. In two of the cases, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were increased. In another case, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were reduced. This provides proof of concept that it is possible to reduce the feedback from IDP on DXS activity. PMID:27548482

  3. Mechanism of porphobilinogen synthase. Requirement of Zn2+ for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bevan, D R; Bodlaender, P; Shemin, D

    1980-03-10

    The role of metal ions in the mechanism of action of bovine liver porphobilinogen synthase was investigated. Studies with chelating agents were consistent with a requirement of metal ions for enzyme activity, and the use of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid suggested that Zn2+ was present in the enzyme. The low activity detected in metal-free apoporphobilinogen synthase was attributed to adventitious metal ions. Addition of Zn2+ to the apoenzyme completely restored enzyme activity if the essential sulfhydryl groups on the enzyme were first reduced with sulfhydryl reagents. It does not follow necessarily from this observation that Zn2+ forms a bond with a sulfhydryl group in the enzyme. However, we also observed that Zn2+ did not bind to the enzyme unless the essential cysteinyl residues were reduced. We have concluded that the octameric enzyme contains 4 g atoms of Zn2+/mol from our enzyme activity measurements and binding studies. Alkylation of the enzyme resulted in a marked reduction in the binding of Zn2+ to the enzyme. These observations are consistent with the suggestion that the interaction of the Zn2+ ions with the enzyme occurs with sulfhydryl groups at the active site. It appears that Zn2+ does not participate in substrate binding nor in the maintenance of the quaternary structure of the enzyme. Possible mechanistic roles for Zn2+ in porphobilinogen synthase are discussed. It should be noted that Cd2+ was the only other element found which restored activity to the apoenzyme.

  4. Refolding techniques for recovering biologically active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2014-02-20

    Biologically active proteins are useful for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs and biomaterials in a biotechnology industry. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. As inclusion bodies contain relatively pure and intact proteins, protein refolding is an important process to obtain active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, conventional refolding methods, such as dialysis and dilution, are time consuming and, often, recovered yields of active proteins are low, and a trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. Recently, several approaches have been reported to refold these aggregated proteins into an active form. The strategies largely aim at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This review focuses on protein refolding techniques using chemical additives and laminar flow in microfluidic chips for the efficient recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies.

  5. Immobilization of thermoalkalophilic recombinant esterase enzyme by entrapment in silicate coated Ca-alginate beads and its hydrolytic properties.

    PubMed

    Gülay, Seçkin; Şanlı-Mohamed, Gülşah

    2012-04-01

    Thermoalkalophilic esterase enzyme from Balçova (Agamemnon) geothermal site were aimed to be immobilized effectively via a simple and cost-effective protocol in silicate coated Calcium alginate (Ca-alginate) beads by entrapment. The optimal immobilization conditions of enzyme in Ca-alginate beads were investigated and obtained with 2% alginate using 0.5mg/ml enzyme and 0.7 M CaCl(2) solution. In order to prevent enzyme from leaking out of the gel beads, Ca-alginate beads were then coated with silicate. Enzyme loading efficiency and immobilization yield for silicate coated beads was determined as 98.1% and 71.27%, respectively and compared with non-coated ones which were 68.5% and 45.80%, respectively. Surface morphologies, structure and elemental analysis of both silicate coated and non-coated alginate beads were also compared using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Moreover, silicate coated alginate beads enhanced reusability of esterase in continuous processes compared to non-coated beads. The hydrolytic properties of free and immobilized enzyme in terms of storage and thermal stability as well as the effects of the temperature and pH were determined. It was observed that operational, thermal and storage stabilities of the esterase were increased with immobilization. PMID:22309712

  6. Immobilization of thermoalkalophilic recombinant esterase enzyme by entrapment in silicate coated Ca-alginate beads and its hydrolytic properties.

    PubMed

    Gülay, Seçkin; Şanlı-Mohamed, Gülşah

    2012-04-01

    Thermoalkalophilic esterase enzyme from Balçova (Agamemnon) geothermal site were aimed to be immobilized effectively via a simple and cost-effective protocol in silicate coated Calcium alginate (Ca-alginate) beads by entrapment. The optimal immobilization conditions of enzyme in Ca-alginate beads were investigated and obtained with 2% alginate using 0.5mg/ml enzyme and 0.7 M CaCl(2) solution. In order to prevent enzyme from leaking out of the gel beads, Ca-alginate beads were then coated with silicate. Enzyme loading efficiency and immobilization yield for silicate coated beads was determined as 98.1% and 71.27%, respectively and compared with non-coated ones which were 68.5% and 45.80%, respectively. Surface morphologies, structure and elemental analysis of both silicate coated and non-coated alginate beads were also compared using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Moreover, silicate coated alginate beads enhanced reusability of esterase in continuous processes compared to non-coated beads. The hydrolytic properties of free and immobilized enzyme in terms of storage and thermal stability as well as the effects of the temperature and pH were determined. It was observed that operational, thermal and storage stabilities of the esterase were increased with immobilization.

  7. Submillimeter recombination lines in dust-obscured starbursts and active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, N.; Murchikova, L.

    2013-12-10

    We examine the use of submillimeter (submm) recombination lines of H, He, and He{sup +} to probe the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity of starbursts (SBs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that the submm recombination lines of H, He, and He{sup +} are in fact extremely reliable and quantitative probes of the EUV continuum at 13.6 eV to above 54.6 eV. At submm wavelengths, the recombination lines originate from low energy levels (n = 20-50). The maser amplification, which poses significant problems for quantitative interpretation of the higher n, radio frequency recombination lines, is insignificant. Lastly, at submm wavelengths, the dust extinction is minimal. The submm line luminosities are therefore directly proportional to the emission measures (EM{sub ION} = n{sub e} × n {sub ion} × volume) of their ionized regions. We also find that the expected line fluxes are detectable with ALMA and can be imaged at ∼0.''1 resolution in low redshift ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Imaging of the H I lines will provide accurate spatial and kinematic mapping of the star formation distribution in low-z IR-luminous galaxies, and the relative fluxes of the H I and He II recombination lines will strongly constrain the relative contributions of SBs and AGNs to the luminosity. The H I lines should also provide an avenue to constraining the submm dust extinction curve.

  8. High-Level Expression of Recombinant Bovine Lactoferrin in Pichia pastoris with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Figueroa, Blanca; Valdiviezo-Godina, Norberto; Siqueiros-Cendón, Tania; Sinagawa-García, Sugey; Arévalo-Gallegos, Sigifredo; Rascón-Cruz, Quintín

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein considered an important nutraceutical protein because of its several properties, was expressed in Pichia pastoris KM71-H under AOX1 promoter control, using pJ902 as the recombinant plasmid. Dot blotting analysis revealed the expression of recombinant bovine lactoferrin (rbLf) in Pichia pastoris. After Bach fermentation and purification by molecular exclusion, we obtained an expression yield of 3.5 g/L of rbLf. rbLf and predominantly pepsin-digested rbLf (rbLfcin) demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21DE3, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) FRI137, and, in a smaller percentage, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. Aeruginosa) ATCC 27833. The successful expression and characterization of functional rbLf expressed in Pichia pastoris opens a prospect for the development of natural antimicrobial agents produced recombinantly. PMID:27294912

  9. Application of activity-based protein profiling to study enzyme function in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Galmozzi, Andrea; Dominguez, Eduardo; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemical proteomics approach that utilizes small-molecule probes to determine the functional state of enzymes directly in native systems. ABPP probes selectively label active enzymes, but not their inactive forms, facilitating the characterization of changes in enzyme activity that occur without alterations in protein levels. ABPP can be a tool superior to conventional gene expression and proteomic profiling methods to discover new enzymes active in adipocytes and to detect differences in the activity of characterized enzymes that may be associated with disorders of adipose tissue function. ABPP probes have been developed that react selectively with most members of specific enzyme classes. Here, using as an example the serine hydrolase family that includes many enzymes with critical roles in adipocyte physiology, we describe methods to apply ABPP analysis to the study of adipocyte enzymatic pathways.

  10. Microbial extracellular enzyme activities in HUMEX Lake Skjervatjern

    SciTech Connect

    Muenster, U. )

    1992-01-01

    Two microbial extracellular enzyme activities (MEEA) were studied in HUMEX Lake Skjervatjern: acid phosphatase (APHA) and leucine aminopeptidase (LeuAMPA). Both enzyme activities varied in the vertical and horizontal scale in both lake sites. APHA varied in the acidfied Basin A between 945-1706 nmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1] and LeuAMPA between 3.7-25 nmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1]. Both MEEA reached maxima in 0.5 m depth. In the control site (Basin B), APHA was lower by a factor of two, and varied between 156-669 nmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1]. LeuAMPA reached similar values as in Basin A and varied between 7.8-34.8 nmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1]. Maxima of APHA were found in the upper layer (0-2 m), while LeuAMPA had only one distinct maxima at 2-2.5 m depth. The number of bacteria (AFDC) varied between 4.4-8.8 10[sup 6] cells mL[sup [minus]1] and was not significantly different in either side, but both had maxima in the thermocline. Highest specific LeuAMPA activities were found in the thermocline (3.2-4.5 fmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1] cell[sup [minus]1]) in both sides and varied between 0.4-4.5 fmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1] cell[sup [minus]1] in both water columns. The main contributor (60-70%) to LeuAMPA was found in the microplankton fraction, retained on Nuclepore filters with pore sizes between 2.0-0.2 [mu]m. APHA was retained less even on a filter with pore size smaller than 0.2 [mu]m. About 50-70% of APHA passed through 0.2 [mu]m-0.1 [mu]m Nuclepore filters and could be found in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction. APHA and bacteria counts (AFDC) showed a distinct gradient from the littoral zone to the pelagial in the surface water samples (0.2 m depth). APHA and LeuAMPA are regarded as important regulators for nutrient availabilty to microplankton. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Chi Enhances Heteroduplex DNA Levels during Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, S. L.; Smith, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    The major pathway of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, the RecBCD pathway, is stimulated by Chi sites. To determine whether Chi enhances an early or late step in recombination, we measured formation of heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) in extracts of lambda-infected E. coli. Chi elevated hDNA levels in these extracts, supporting a role for Chi early (before hDNA formation) in recombination. RecA protein and RecBCD enzyme were both necessary for detection of hDNA, indicating that they, too, act early. Analysis of a panel of recBCD mutants indicated that Chi-nicking activity was needed for Chi's stimulation of hDNA formation. These results support a previously proposed model of recombination. Further results suggested that RecBCD enzyme has an additional role late in recombination. PMID:1459441

  12. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  13. Correlation Among Soil Enzyme Activities, Root Enzyme Activities, and Contaminant Removal in Two-Stage In Situ Constructed Wetlands Purifying Domestic Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Xu, Jiajun; Chu, Xianglin; Li, Shiyin; Wang, Peifang; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage in situ wetlands (two vertical flow constructed wetlands in parallel and a horizontal flow constructed wetland) were constructed for studying domestic wastewater purification and the correlations between contaminant removal and plant and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated the removal efficiency of NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) were significantly correlated with both urease and protease activity, and the removal of total phosphorus was significantly correlated with phosphatase activity. Chemical oxygen demand removal was not correlated with enzyme activity in constructed wetlands. Plant root enzyme (urease, phosphatase, protease and cellulose) activity correlation was apparent with all contaminant removal in the two vertical flow constructed wetlands. However, the correlation between the plant root enzyme activity and contaminant removal was poor in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. Results indicated that plant roots clearly played a role in the removal of contaminants. PMID:27230025

  14. Correlation Among Soil Enzyme Activities, Root Enzyme Activities, and Contaminant Removal in Two-Stage In Situ Constructed Wetlands Purifying Domestic Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Xu, Jiajun; Chu, Xianglin; Li, Shiyin; Wang, Peifang; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage in situ wetlands (two vertical flow constructed wetlands in parallel and a horizontal flow constructed wetland) were constructed for studying domestic wastewater purification and the correlations between contaminant removal and plant and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated the removal efficiency of NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) were significantly correlated with both urease and protease activity, and the removal of total phosphorus was significantly correlated with phosphatase activity. Chemical oxygen demand removal was not correlated with enzyme activity in constructed wetlands. Plant root enzyme (urease, phosphatase, protease and cellulose) activity correlation was apparent with all contaminant removal in the two vertical flow constructed wetlands. However, the correlation between the plant root enzyme activity and contaminant removal was poor in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. Results indicated that plant roots clearly played a role in the removal of contaminants.

  15. A fluorescent assay amenable to measuring production of beta-D-glucuronides produced from recombinant UDP-glycosyl transferase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, O V; Shaw, P M

    1999-05-01

    Beta-glucuronidase cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucuronide generates the highly fluorescent compound, 4-methylumbelliferone. We show that other beta-D-glucuronide compounds act as competitors in this assay. The 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-glucuronide cleavage assay can easily be adapted to high throughput formats to detect the presence of beta-D glucuronides generated using recombinant glycosyl transferase preparations.

  16. Extracellular enzyme activities during lignocellulose degradation by Streptomyces spp. : a comparative study of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, M.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III

    1987-12-01

    The wild-type ligninolytic actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A and two genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produce a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate, an acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), were grown on lignocellulose in solid-state fermentation cultures. Culture filtrates were periodically collected, analyzed for APPL, and assayed for extracellular lignocellulose-catabolizing enzyme activities. Two APPL-overproducing strains, UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10, had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activities than did the wild-type strain T7A. Results implicated one or more of these enzymes in lignin solubilization. Only mutant T7A-81 had higher xylanase activity than the wild type. The peroxidase was induced by both lignocellulose and APPL. This extracellular enzyme has some similarities to previously described ligninases in fungi. This is the first report of such an enzyme in Streptomyces spp. Four peroxidase isozymes were present, and all catalyzed the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, while one also catalyzed hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of homoprotocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. Three constitutive esterase isozymes were produced which differed in substrate specificity toward ..cap alpha..-naphthyl acetate and ..cap alpha..-naphthyl butyrate. Three endoglucanase bands, which also exhibited a low level of xylanase activity, were identified on polyacrylamide gels as was one xylanase-specific band. There were no major differences in the isoenzymes produced by the different strains. The probable role of each enzyme in lignocellulose degradation is discussed.

  17. Redesign of MST enzymes to target lyase activity instead promotes mutase and dehydratase activities

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate and salicylate synthases are members of the MST family of enzymes. The isochorismate synthases establish an equilibrium for the conversion chorismate to isochorismate and the reverse reaction. The salicylate synthases convert chorismate to salicylate with an isochorismate intermediate; therefore, the salicylate synthases perform isochorismate synthase and isochorismate-pyruvate lyase activities sequentially. While the active site residues are highly conserved, there are two sites that show trends for lyase-activity and lyase-deficiency. Using steady state kinetics and HPLC progress curves, we tested the “interchange” hypothesis that interconversion of the amino acids at these sites would promote lyase activity in the isochorismate synthases and remove lyase activity from the salicylate synthases. An alternative, “permute” hypothesis, that chorismate-utilizing enzymes are designed to permute the substrate into a variety of products and tampering with the active site may lead to identification of adventitious activities, is tested by more sensitive NMR time course experiments. The latter hypothesis held true. The variant enzymes predominantly catalyzed chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase activities, sequentially generating prephenate and phenylpyruvate, augmenting previously debated (mutase) or undocumented (dehydratase) adventitious activities. PMID:24055536

  18. Redesign of MST enzymes to target lyase activity instead promotes mutase and dehydratase activities.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Lamb, Audrey L

    2013-11-01

    The isochorismate and salicylate synthases are members of the MST family of enzymes. The isochorismate synthases establish an equilibrium for the conversion chorismate to isochorismate and the reverse reaction. The salicylate synthases convert chorismate to salicylate with an isochorismate intermediate; therefore, the salicylate synthases perform isochorismate synthase and isochorismate-pyruvate lyase activities sequentially. While the active site residues are highly conserved, there are two sites that show trends for lyase-activity and lyase-deficiency. Using steady state kinetics and HPLC progress curves, we tested the "interchange" hypothesis that interconversion of the amino acids at these sites would promote lyase activity in the isochorismate synthases and remove lyase activity from the salicylate synthases. An alternative, "permute" hypothesis, that chorismate-utilizing enzymes are designed to permute the substrate into a variety of products and tampering with the active site may lead to identification of adventitious activities, is tested by more sensitive NMR time course experiments. The latter hypothesis held true. The variant enzymes predominantly catalyzed chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase activities, sequentially generating prephenate and phenylpyruvate, augmenting previously debated (mutase) or undocumented (dehydratase) adventitious activities.

  19. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Enzyme Catalysis; Enzyme Activity in Formulations for Lactose-Intolerant Infants.

    PubMed

    Altas, Margarida C; Kudryashov, Evgeny; Buckin, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    The paper introduces ultrasonic technology for real-time, nondestructive, precision monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in solutions and in complex opaque media. The capabilities of the technology are examined in a comprehensive analysis of the effects of a variety of diverse factors on the performance of enzyme β-galactosidase in formulations for reduction of levels of lactose in infant milks. These formulations are added to infant's milk bottles prior to feeding to overcome the frequently observed intolerance to lactose (a milk sugar), a serious issue in healthy development of infants. The results highlight important impediments in the development of these formulations and also illustrate the capability of the described ultrasonic tools in the assessment of the performance of enzymes in complex reaction media and in various environmental conditions. PMID:27018312

  20. Activity, life time and effect of hydrolytic enzymes for enhanced biogas production from sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Odnell, Anna; Recktenwald, Michael; Stensén, Katarina; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald; Karlsson, Martin

    2016-10-15

    As an alternative to energy intensive physical methods, enzymatic treatment of sludge produced at wastewater treatment plants for increased hydrolysis and biogas production was investigated. Several hydrolytic enzymes were assessed with a focus on how enzyme activity and life time was influenced by sludge environments. It could be concluded that the activity life time of added enzymes was limited (<24 h) in both waste activated sludge and anaerobic digester sludge environments and that this was, for the majority of enzymes, due to endogenous protease activity. In biogas in situ experiments, subtilisin at a 1% mixture on basis of volatile solids, was the only enzyme providing a significantly increased biomethane production of 37%. However, even at this high concentration, subtilisin could not hydrolyze all available substrate within the life time of the enzyme. Thus, for large scale implementation, enzymes better suited to the sludge environments are needed. PMID:27498254

  1. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-10

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  2. Activity, life time and effect of hydrolytic enzymes for enhanced biogas production from sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Odnell, Anna; Recktenwald, Michael; Stensén, Katarina; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald; Karlsson, Martin

    2016-10-15

    As an alternative to energy intensive physical methods, enzymatic treatment of sludge produced at wastewater treatment plants for increased hydrolysis and biogas production was investigated. Several hydrolytic enzymes were assessed with a focus on how enzyme activity and life time was influenced by sludge environments. It could be concluded that the activity life time of added enzymes was limited (<24 h) in both waste activated sludge and anaerobic digester sludge environments and that this was, for the majority of enzymes, due to endogenous protease activity. In biogas in situ experiments, subtilisin at a 1% mixture on basis of volatile solids, was the only enzyme providing a significantly increased biomethane production of 37%. However, even at this high concentration, subtilisin could not hydrolyze all available substrate within the life time of the enzyme. Thus, for large scale implementation, enzymes better suited to the sludge environments are needed.

  3. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  4. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  5. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  6. TEMPERATURE ACTIVATION OF CERTAIN RESPIRATORY ENZYMES OF STENOTHERMOPHILIC BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Gaughran, Eugene R. L.

    1949-01-01

    The results of this study of the effect of temperature on the respiratory mechanism of five stenothermophilic bacteria may be summarized as follows:— 1. The respiratory mechanism and its various components of the stenothermophilic bacteria were found to function at temperatures below the minimum temperature for growth of these organisms. In every case the rates of the individual reactions involved in the respiratory chain increased exponentially with temperature until the temperature at which inactivation became apparent was reached. 2. The mean activation energies, calculated from the "best" value for the slope of the straight lines resulting from a plot of log rate against the reciprocal of the absolute temperature were: Dehydrogenases: 28,000 to 28,500 calories per gram molecule. Glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, glycine, β-alanine, monosodium glutamate, (asparagine). 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 15,000 calories per gram molecule. Formate. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome b and c (substrate: p-phenylenediamine): 16,800 calories per gram molecule. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome c (substrate: hydroquinone): 20,200 calories per gram molecule. Catalase: 4,100 calories per gram molecule. Complete aerobic respiratory system (plus added glucose): 29,500 calories per gram molecule. 3. The identity of the energies of activation of the respiratory system and its enzymic components at temperatures above and below the minimum temperature for growth of the stenothermophilic bacteria was demonstrated. 4. An attempt has been made to indicate a relationship between the nature of the substrate and the activation energy by grouping substrates on the basis of common µ values obtained for their dehydrogenation by resting cell preparations of

  7. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  8. Activities of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes, Glyoxylate Cycle Enzymes, and Fructose Diphosphatase in Bakers' Yeast During Adaptation to Acetate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, J. P.; Duggan, P. F.

    1971-01-01

    Bakers' yeast oxidizes acetate at a high rate only after an adaptation period during which the capacity of the glyoxylate cycle is found to increase. There was apparently no necessity for the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase, the capacity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, or the concentrations of the cytochromes to increase for this adaptation to occur. Elevation of fructose 1,6 diphosphatase occurred only when acetate oxidation was nearly maximal. Cycloheximide almost completely inhibited adaptation as well as increases in the activities of isocitrate lyase and aconitate hydratase, the only enzymes assayed. p-Fluorophenylalanine was partially effective and chloramphenicol did not inhibit at all. The presence of ammonium, which considerably delayed adaptation of the yeast to acetate oxidation, inhibited the increases in the activities of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes to different degrees, demonstrating noncoordinate control of these enzymes. Under the various conditions, the only enzyme activity increase consistently related to the rising oxygen uptake rate was that of isocitrate lyase which apparently limited the activity of the cycle. PMID:5557595

  9. Enzyme catalysis: C-H activation is a Reiske business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Steven D.

    2011-05-01

    Enzymes that selectively oxidize unactivated C-H bonds are capable of constructing complex molecules with high efficiency. A new member of this enzyme family is RedG, a Reiske-type oxygenase that catalyses chemically challenging cyclizations in the biosynthesis of prodiginine natural products.

  10. Regulation of enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase through its interactions with pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Quanhui; Tong, Wei; Bai, Xue; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Jiyuan; Liu, Siqi

    2012-01-20

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) from thermophilic microorganisms are interesting enzymes that have their potential applications in biotechnology and potentially provide insight into the mechanisms of action of thermo-tolerant proteins. The molecular mechanisms of ADHs under thermal stress in vivo have yet to be explored. Herein, we employed a proteomic strategy to survey the possible interactions of secondary-ADH (2-ADH) with other proteins in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (T. tengcongensis) cultured at 75°C and found that 2-ADH, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and several glycolytic enzymes coexisted in a protein complex. Using anion exchange chromatography, the elution profile indicated that the native 2-ADH was present in two forms, PFOR-bound and PFOR-free. Immuno-precipitation and pull down analysis further validated the interactions between 2-ADH and PFOR. The kinetic behaviours of 2-ADH either in the recombinant or native form were evaluated with different substrates. The enzyme activity of 2-ADH was inhibited in a non-competitive mode by PFOR, implying the interaction of 2-ADH and PFOR negatively regulated alcohol formation. In T. tengcongensis, PFOR is an enzyme complex located at the upstream of 2-ADH in the alcohol generation pathway. These findings, therefore, offered a plausible mechanism for how alcohol metabolism is regulated by hetero-interactions between 2-ADH and PFOR, especially in anaerobic thermophiles. PMID:22222371

  11. Chaperone-like activities of {alpha}-synuclein: {alpha}-Synuclein assists enzyme activities of esterases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Misun; Kim, SeungBum; Kang, Mira; Ryu, Yeonwoo . E-mail: ywryu@ajou.ac.kr; Doohun Kim, T. . E-mail: doohunkim@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-08-11

    {alpha}-Synuclein, a major constituent of Lewy bodies (LBs), has been implicated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), although the physiological function of {alpha}-synuclein has not yet been known. Here we have shown that {alpha}-synuclein, which has no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure, can protect the enzyme activity of microbial esterases against stress conditions such as heat, pH, and organic solvents. In particular, the flexibility of {alpha}-synuclein and its C-terminal region seems to be important for complex formation, but the structural integrity of the C-terminal region may not be required for stabilization of enzyme activity. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in vivo enzyme assays showed highly specific interactions of esterases with {alpha}-synuclein. Our results indicate that {alpha}-synuclein not only protects the enzyme activity of microbial esterases in vitro, but also can stabilize the active conformation of microbial esterases in vivo.

  12. Controlled exogenous enzyme imbibition and activation in whole chickpea seed enzyme reactor (SER).

    PubMed

    Kliger, Eynav; Fischer, Lutz; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Saguy, I Sam

    2011-05-01

    Chickpeas are of excellent quality (protein, vitamins, minerals, unsaturated fatty acids) and very low in phytoestrogen, making them a potentially promising source for vegetarian-based infant formula (VBIF). However, their high starch and fiber concentration could hinder their utilization for infants. To overcome this natural shortcoming, a solid-state "enzymation" (SSE) process was developed in which imbibition of exogenous enzyme facilitates hydrolysis within the intact chickpea seed. The process was termed seed enzyme reactor (SER). Liquid imbibition data of dry chickpeas during soaking were fitted with the Weibull distribution model. The derived Weibull shape parameter, β, value (0.77 ± 0.11) indicated that the imbibition mechanism followed Fickian diffusion. Imbibition occurred through the coat and external layers. The process was tested using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as an exogenous marker, and involved soaking, thermal treatment, peeling, microwave partial drying, rehydration in enzyme solution, and SSE at an adjusted pH, time, and temperature. Amylases, or a combination of amylases and cellulases, resulted in significant carbohydrate hydrolysis (23% and 47% of the available starch, respectively). In addition, chickpea initial raffinose and stachyose concentration was significantly reduced (91% and 92%, respectively). The process could serve as a proof of concept, requiring additional development and optimization to become a full industrial application.

  13. Inhibition and stimulation of activity of purified recombinant CYP11A1 by therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Linger, Marlin; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2013-05-22

    In vertebrates, the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is initiated by cytochrome P450 CYP11A1 which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone. We investigated whether some of the experimental and FDA-approved therapeutic agents alter the activity of CYP11A1 in the reconstituted system in vitro. We found that under the experimental conditions used and when phospholipids are included, ketoconazole, posaconazole, carbenoxolone, and selegiline inhibit CYP11A1-mediated production of pregnenolone by at least 67%. Conversely, pemirolast, clobenpropit, desogestrel, dexmedetomidine, and tizanidine stimulate the enzyme activity by up to 70%. We then evaluated the identified inhibitors and activators for spectral binding to CYP11A1 and their effect on enzyme activity in the absence of phospholipids. The data obtained provide insight into how different drugs interact with CYP11A1 and demonstrate that P450 association with the lipid bilayer determines, in many cases, a drug's effect on enzyme activity.

  14. Inhibition and stimulation of activity of purified recombinant CYP11A1 by therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Linger, Marlin; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is initiated by cytochrome P450 CYP11A1 which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone. We investigated whether some of the experimental and FDA-approved therapeutic agents alter the activity of CYP11A1 in the reconstituted system in vitro. We found that under the experimental conditions used and when phospholipids are included, ketoconazole, posaconazole, carbenoxolone, and selegiline inhibit CYP11A1-mediated production of pregnenolone by at least 67%. Conversely, pemirolast, clobenpropit, desogestrel, dexmedetomidine, and tizanidine stimulate the enzyme activity by up to 70%. We then evaluated the identified inhibitors and activators for spectral binding to CYP11A1 and their effect on enzyme activity in the absence of phospholipids. The data obtained provide insight into how different drugs interact with CYP11A1 and demonstrate that P450 association with the lipid bilayer determines, in many cases, a drug’s effect on enzyme activity. PMID:23089212

  15. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme: role of catalytic cysteine residues in regulation of enzymatic activity through changes in oligomeric state.

    PubMed

    Dotson, P Patrick; Karakashian, Alexander A; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N

    2015-02-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2) is the major sphingomyelinase activated in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and during oxidative stress. It is a membrane-bound 655 amino acid protein containing 22 cysteine residues. In this study, we expressed recombinant mouse nSMase-2 protein in Escherichia coli, and investigated whether nSMase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme. Our results demonstrate that nSMase-2 exists as both monomers and multimers that are associated with high and low enzymatic activity respectively. Mutational analysis of nSMase-2 identified within its C-terminal catalytic domain several oxidant-sensitive cysteine residues that were shown to be involved in enzyme oligomerization. Changing Cys(617) to Ser for example is a gain-of-function mutation associated with a decreased propensity for oligomerization. Alternatively, nSMase-2 expression in a bacterial strain that lacks endogenous thioredoxin, Rosetta-gami2, results in increased oligomer formation and lower enzyme activity. Phenotypic rescue was accomplished by treating nSMase-2 lysates with recombinant human thioredoxin. This indicates that nSMase-2 may be a novel substrate for thioredoxin. FRET analysis confirmed the presence of nSMase-2 multimers in mammalian HEK cells and their localization to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results identify nSMase-2 as a redox-sensitive enzyme, whose basal activity is influenced by thioredoxin-mediated changes in its oligomeric state. PMID:25287744

  16. Recombinant immunocytokines targeting the mouse transferrin receptor: construction and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Dreier, T; Lode, H N; Xiang, R; Dolman, C S; Reisfeld, R A; Kang, A S

    1998-01-01

    Localized cytokine therapies with recombinant monoclonal antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, designated immunocytokines, have become of increasing interest for tumor immunotherapy, since they direct immunomodulatory cytokines into the tumor microenvironment. To investigate their mechanisms of action in a variety of syngeneic tumor models, recombinant mouse cytokines IL2 and GM-CSF were engineered as fusion proteins to the carboxyl terminus of a chimeric rat/mouse antitransferrin receptor antibody, ch17217 and expressed in stable-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The recombinant immunocytokines were readily purified by affinity chromatography and their binding characteristics were identical to those shown for the ch17217 antibody. The IL2 immunocytokine had an activity similar to recombinant mouse IL2, whereas the GM-CSF immunocytokine had enhanced cytokine activity relative to recombinant mouse GM-CSF. The clearance rates of ch17217 and the GM-CSF and IL2 immunocytokines were relatively similar with elimination phases (t1/2alpha) of 1.8 h and distribution phases (t1/2beta) of 83, 88, and 91 h, respectively. Both immunocytokines demonstrated effective antitumor activity by suppressing the growth of hepatic metastases of mouse neuroblastoma and pulmonary metastases of mouse colon carcinoma in syngeneic A/J and BALB/c mice, respectively. These results indicate that biologically effective IL2 and GM-CSF immunocytokines combine the targeting ability of an antitransferrin receptor monoclonal antibody with the immunomodulatory functions of each cytokine. Because of the universal expression of the transferrin receptor on mouse tumor cell lines, these constructs should prove useful to determine their efficacy in a wide variety of syngeneic mouse tumor models and to perform detailed studies of their modes of action.

  17. CYP2J2 and CYP2C19 are the major enzymes responsible for metabolism of albendazole and fenbendazole in human liver microsomes and recombinant P450 assay systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhexue; Lee, Doohyun; Joo, Jeongmin; Shin, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Wonku; Oh, Sangtaek; Lee, Do Yup; Lee, Su-Jun; Yea, Sung Su; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Taeho; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2013-11-01

    Albendazole and fenbendazole are broad-spectrum anthelmintics that undergo extensive metabolism to form hydroxyl and sulfoxide metabolites. Although CYP3A and flavin-containing monooxygenase have been implicated in sulfoxide metabolite formation, the enzymes responsible for hydroxyl metabolite formation have not been identified. In this study, we used human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450s (P450s) to characterize the enzymes involved in the formation of hydroxyalbendazole and hydroxyfenbendazole from albendazole and fenbendazole, respectively. Of the 10 recombinant P450s, CYP2J2 and/or CYP2C19 was the predominant enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of albendazole and fenbendazole. Albendazole hydroxylation to hydroxyalbendazole is primarily mediated by CYP2J2 (0.34 μl/min/pmol P450, which is a rate 3.9- and 8.1-fold higher than the rates for CYP2C19 and CYP2E1, respectively), whereas CYP2C19 and CYP2J2 contributed to the formation of hydroxyfenbendazole from fenbendazole (2.68 and 1.94 μl/min/pmol P450 for CYP2C19 and CYP2J2, respectively, which are rates 11.7- and 8.4-fold higher than the rate for CYP2D6). Correlation analysis between the known P450 enzyme activities and the rate of hydroxyalbendazole and hydroxyfenbendazole formation in samples from 14 human liver microsomes showed that albendazole hydroxylation correlates with CYP2J2 activity and fenbendazole hydroxylation correlates with CYP2C19 and CYP2J2 activities. These findings were supported by a P450 isoform-selective inhibition study in human liver microsomes. In conclusion, our data for the first time suggest that albendazole hydroxylation is primarily catalyzed by CYP2J2, whereas fenbendazole hydroxylation is preferentially catalyzed by CYP2C19 and CYP2J2. The present data will be useful in understanding the pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of albendazole and fenbendazole in vivo.

  18. Carbohydrate-active enzymes exemplify entropic principles in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kartal, Önder; Mahlow, Sebastian; Skupin, Alexander; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Glycans comprise ubiquitous and essential biopolymers, which usually occur as highly diverse mixtures. The myriad different structures are generated by a limited number of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), which are unusual in that they catalyze multiple reactions by being relatively unspecific with respect to substrate size. Existing experimental and theoretical descriptions of CAZyme-mediated reaction systems neither comprehensively explain observed action patterns nor suggest biological functions of polydisperse pools in metabolism. Here, we overcome these limitations with a novel theoretical description of this important class of biological systems in which the mixing entropy of polydisperse pools emerges as an important system variable. In vitro assays of three CAZymes essential for central carbon metabolism confirm the power of our approach to predict equilibrium distributions and non-equilibrium dynamics. A computational study of the turnover of the soluble heteroglycan pool exemplifies how entropy-driven reactions establish a metabolic buffer in vivo that attenuates fluctuations in carbohydrate availability. We argue that this interplay between energy- and entropy-driven processes represents an important regulatory design principle of metabolic systems. PMID:22027553

  19. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity.

  20. Radiative recombination from dark excitons in nanocrystals: Activation mechanisms and polarization properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodina, Anna V.; Efros, Alexander L.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze theoretically physical mechanisms responsible for the radiative recombination of the ground optically passive ("dark") exciton (DE), which dominates in photoluminescence (PL) of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) at low temperatures. The DE becomes optically active due to its mixing with the bright excitons caused by an external magnetic field, dangling-bond spins or by acoustic and optical phonons. These activation mechanisms mix the DE with different bright excitons and, consequently, lead to different PL polarization properties, because they are determined by dipole orientations of the bright excitons, which the DE is coupled with. We show that the PL polarization properties of prolate and oblate shape NCs are different due to different activation mechanisms responsible for the DE recombination.

  1. Toxoplasma gondii: Recombinant GRA5 antigen for detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Holec-Gasior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef

    2010-03-01

    In this study, for the first time, the evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii full-length recombinant GRA5 antigen for the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis is shown. The recombinant GRA5 antigen as a fusion protein containing His-tag at both terminals was obtained using an Escherichia coli expression system. The usefulness of rGRA5 for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in an ELISA was tested on a total of 189 sera from patients with different stages of the infection and 31 sera from sero-negative individuals, obtained during routine diagnostic tests. Anti-GRA5 IgG antibodies were detected in 70.9% of all seropositive serum samples. This result was comparable to ELISA using a Toxoplasma lysate antigen (TLA) and six combinations of recombinant antigens. The sensitivity of IgG ELISA calculated from all positive serum samples was similar for TLA (94.2%), rMAG1+rSAG1+rGRA5 (92.6%), rGRA2+rSAG1+rGRA5 (93.1%) and rROP1+rSAG1+rGRA5 (94.2%) cocktails, whereas the sensitivity of cocktails without rGRA5 antigens was lower giving 82.0%, 86.2% and 87.8%, respectively. Thus, the present study showed that the full-length rGRA5 is suitable for use as a component of an antigen cocktail for the detection of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies.

  2. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of Pencilluim notatum lipase enzyme with improved activity, stability and reusability characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saima; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) are considered as an effective tool for the immobilization of enzyme. In this study, Pencillium notatum lipase (PNL) was immobilized as carrier free cross-linked enzyme aggregates using glutaraldehyde (GLA) and Ethylene glycol-bis [succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide] (EG-NHS) as cross-linking agents. The optimal conditions for the synthesis of an efficient lipase CLEAs such as precipitant type, the nature and amount of cross-linking reagent, and cross-linking time were optimized. The recovered activities of CLEAs were considerably dependent on the concentration of GLA; however, the activity recovery was not severely affected by EG-NHS as a mild cross-linker. The EG-NHS aggregates displayed superior hydrolytic (52.08±2.52%) and esterification (64.42%) activities as compared to GLA aggregates which showed 23.8±1.86 and 34.54% of hydrolytic and esterification activity, respectively. Morphological analysis by fluorescence and scanning electron microscope revealed that EG-NHS aggregates were smaller in size with larger surface area compared to GLA aggregates. The pH optima of both types of CLEAs were displaced to slightly alkaline region and higher temperature as compared to native enzyme. Highest enzyme activity of CLEAs was achieved at the pH of 9.0 and 42°C temperature. Moreover, a significant improvement in the thermal resistance was also recorded after immobilization. After ten reusability cycles in aqueous medium, GLA and EG-NHS cross-linked lipase CLEAs preserved 63.62% and 70.9% of their original activities, respectively. The results suggest that this novel CLEA-lipase is potentially usable in many industrial applications.

  3. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of Pencilluim notatum lipase enzyme with improved activity, stability and reusability characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saima; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) are considered as an effective tool for the immobilization of enzyme. In this study, Pencillium notatum lipase (PNL) was immobilized as carrier free cross-linked enzyme aggregates using glutaraldehyde (GLA) and Ethylene glycol-bis [succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide] (EG-NHS) as cross-linking agents. The optimal conditions for the synthesis of an efficient lipase CLEAs such as precipitant type, the nature and amount of cross-linking reagent, and cross-linking time were optimized. The recovered activities of CLEAs were considerably dependent on the concentration of GLA; however, the activity recovery was not severely affected by EG-NHS as a mild cross-linker. The EG-NHS aggregates displayed superior hydrolytic (52.08±2.52%) and esterification (64.42%) activities as compared to GLA aggregates which showed 23.8±1.86 and 34.54% of hydrolytic and esterification activity, respectively. Morphological analysis by fluorescence and scanning electron microscope revealed that EG-NHS aggregates were smaller in size with larger surface area compared to GLA aggregates. The pH optima of both types of CLEAs were displaced to slightly alkaline region and higher temperature as compared to native enzyme. Highest enzyme activity of CLEAs was achieved at the pH of 9.0 and 42°C temperature. Moreover, a significant improvement in the thermal resistance was also recorded after immobilization. After ten reusability cycles in aqueous medium, GLA and EG-NHS cross-linked lipase CLEAs preserved 63.62% and 70.9% of their original activities, respectively. The results suggest that this novel CLEA-lipase is potentially usable in many industrial applications. PMID:27365121

  4. Active and Inactive Transplacement of the M26 Recombination Hotspot in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, J. B.; Metzger, J.; Smith, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    The ade6-M26 mutation of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe creates a meiotic recombination hotspot that elevates ade6 intragenic recombination ~10-15-fold. A heptanucleotide sequence including the M26 point mutation is required but not sufficient for hotspot activity. We studied the effects of plasmid and chromosomal context on M26 hotspot activity. The M26 hotspot was inactive on a multicopy plasmid containing M26 embedded within 3.0 or 5.9 kb of ade6 DNA. Random S. pombe genomic fragments totaling ~7 Mb did not activate the M26 hotspot on a plasmid. M26 hotspot activity was maintained when 3.0-, 4.4-, and 5.9-kb ade6-M26 DNA fragments, with various amounts of non-S. pombe plasmid DNA, were integrated at the ura4 chromosomal locus, but only in certain configurations relative to the ura4 gene and the cointegrated plasmid DNA. Several integrations created new M26-independent recombination hotspots. In all cases the non-ade6 DNA was located >1 kb from the M26 site, and in some cases >2 kb. Because the chromosomal context effect was transmitted over large distances, and did not appear to be mediated by a single discrete DNA sequence element, we infer that the local chromatin structure has a pronounced effect on M26 hotspot activity. PMID:8536980

  5. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald; Gretz, Norbert; Dooley, Steven; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expression of IDE in subjects with T2DM. HepG2 cells were treated with 10 nM insulin for 24 h with or without inhibition of IDE activity using IDE RNAi, and cell transcriptome and proliferation rate were analyzed. Human liver samples (n = 22) were used for the gene expression profiling by microarrays. In HepG2 cells, IDE knockdown changed expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Proliferation rate was lower in IDE knockdown cells than in controls. Microarray analysis revealed the decrease of hepatic IDE expression in subjects with T2DM accompanied by the downregulation of the p53-dependent genes FAS and CCNG2, but not by the upregulation of proliferation markers MKI67, MCM2 and PCNA. Similar results were found in the liver microarray dataset from GEO Profiles database. In conclusion, IDE expression is decreased in liver of subjects with T2DM which is accompanied by the dysregulation of p53 pathway. Prolonged use of IDE inhibitors for T2DM treatment should be carefully tested in animal studies regarding its potential effect on hepatic tumorigenesis.

  6. A microsystem to assay lysosomal enzyme activities in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cabral, L; Unger, W; Boulton, M; Marshall, J

    1988-11-01

    A microsystem to assay the activity of lysosomal enzymes in a small number of cultured RPE cells is described. The activities of acid phosphatase, a-mannosidase, B-glucuronidase and N-acetyl-B-glucosaminidase were estimated in different human RPE cultures of varying passages. Some biochemical characteristics for each of the enzyme assays were studied including the effect of pH, the saturating concentrations of the appropriate substrates and the relationship between the enzyme activity and the number of cells assayed. The method presented is straightforward, avoids complicated tissue fractionation procedures and is able to estimate enzyme activities in as few as 10(4) cells. PMID:3243083

  7. Enzyme activities in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle of five avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Murray, H.C.; Bunck, C.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in plasma, kidney, liver, and muscle from five species of captive birds. Few differences occurred in plasma activities between sexes but considerable differences occurred between species. All five enzymes were detected in each of the tissues sampled. Relative enzyme activities in liver, kidney, and muscle were similar for each species. CPK activity was much higher in muscle than in liver or kidney and, of the five enzymes studied, may be the best indicator of muscle damage. Most of the other enzymes were more evenly distributed among the three tissues, and no organ-specific enzyme could be identified for liver or kidney. Because of interspecific variations in plasma enzyme activities, it is important to establish baseline values for each species to ensure accurate interpretation of results.

  8. In Vivo Activities of Recombinant Divercin V41 and Its Structural Variants against Listeria monocytogenes▿

    PubMed Central

    Rihakova, Jitka; Cappelier, Jean-Michel; Hue, Isabelle; Demnerova, Katerina; Fédérighi, Michel; Prévost, Hervé; Drider, Djamel

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant divercin RV41 (DvnRV41) and its structural variants were used in this study to assess their antilisterial activities in vivo in mice challenged intravenously with Listeria monocytogenes EGDe. Treatment with DvnRV41 before and after infection permitted a conclusion as to the capacities of this peptide to retain activity and reduce growth of L. monocytogenes EGDe. Moreover, the use of structural variants for the first time in vivo and the reductions of their activities confirmed the importance of certain amino acids in antilisterial activity. PMID:19841145

  9. Expression and Purification of Recombinant Cyclins and CDKs for Activity Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gallastegui, Edurne; Bachs, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) belong to a family of key regulators of cell division cycle and transcription. Their activity is mainly regulated by association with regulatory subunits named cyclins but their activities are also regulated by phosphorylation, acetylation, and the association with specific inhibitory proteins (CKIs). The activity of different Cdks is deregulated in many different type of tumors, and thus, Cdks are considered targets for antitumoral therapy. For large screenings of inhibitors the use of purified recombinant Cdks and cyclins is recommended. We report here the current methods to determine their in vitro activity for large screenings of inhibitors.

  10. Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases by recombinant calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, N; Disa, J; Spielman, W S; Brooks, D P; Nambi, P; Aiyar, N

    2000-02-18

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide and a potent vasodilator. Although calcitonin gene-related peptide has been shown to have a number of effects in a variety of systems, the mechanisms of action and the intracellular signaling pathways, especially the regulation of mitogen-activated protien kinase (MAPK) pathway, is not known. In the present study we investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the regulation of MAPKs in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably transfected with a recombinant porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Calcitonin gene-related peptide caused a significant dose-dependent increase in cAMP response and the effect was inhibited by calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist. Calcitonin gene-related peptide also caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK) activities, with apparently no significant change in cjun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase also stimulated ERK and P38 activities in these cells suggesting the invovement of cAMP in this process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-stimulated ERK and P38 MAPK activities were inhibited significantly by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, calcitonin gene-related peptide-(8-37) suggesting the involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Preincubation of the cells with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, H89 [¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, hydrochloride¿] inhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated activation of ERK and p38 kinases. On the other hand, preincubation of the cells with wortmannin ¿[1S-(1alpha,6balpha,9abeta,11alpha, 11bbeta)]-11-(acetyloxy)-1,6b,7,8,9a,10,11, 11b-octahydro-1-(methoxymethyl)-9a,11b-dimethyl-3H-furo[4,3, 2-de]indeno[4,5-h]-2

  11. Iron inhibits activation-induced cytidine deaminase enzymatic activity and modulates immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; Pone, Egest J; Tran, Daniel C; Patel, Pina J; Dao, Lisa; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2012-06-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) are critical for the maturation of the antibody response. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates CSR and SHM by deaminating deoxycytidines (dCs) in switch (S) and V(D)J region DNA, respectively, to generate deoxyuracils (dUs). Processing of dUs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) yields abasic sites, which are excised by apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases, eventually generating double strand DNA breaks, the obligatory intermediates of CSR. Here, we found that the bivalent iron ion (Fe(2+), ferrous) suppressed CSR, leading to decreased number of switched B cells, decreased postrecombination Iμ-C(H) transcripts, and reduced titers of secreted class-switched IgG1, IgG3, and IgA antibodies, without alterations in critical CSR factors, such as AID, 14-3-3γ, or PTIP, or in general germline I(H)-S-C(H) transcription. Fe(2+) did not affect B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Rather, it inhibited AID-mediated dC deamination in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition of intrinsic AID enzymatic activity by Fe(2+) was specific, as shown by lack of inhibition of AID-mediated dC deamination by other bivalent metal ions, such as Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+), or Ni(2+), and the inability of Fe(2+) to inhibit UNG-mediated dU excision. Overall, our findings have outlined a novel role of iron in modulating a B cell differentiation process that is critical to the generation of effective antibody responses to microbial pathogens and tumoral cells. They also suggest a possible role of iron in dampening AID-dependent autoimmunity and neoplastic transformation.

  12. Safety update on the use of recombinant activated factor VII in approved indications.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Ellis J; Négrier, Claude; Arkhammar, Per; Benchikh el Fegoun, Soraya; Simonsen, Mette Duelund; Rosholm, Anders; Seremetis, Stephanie

    2015-06-01

    This updated safety review summarises the large body of safety data available on the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in approved indications: haemophilia with inhibitors, congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency, acquired haemophilia and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. Accumulated data up to 31 December 2013 from clinical trials as well as post-marketing data (registries, literature reports and spontaneous reports) were included. Overall, rFVIIa has shown a consistently favourable safety profile, with no unexpected safety concerns, in all approved indications. No confirmed cases of neutralising antibodies against rFVIIa have been reported in patients with congenital haemophilia, acquired haemophilia or Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. The favourable safety profile of rFVIIa can be attributed to the recombinant nature of rFVIIa and its localised mechanism of action at the site of vascular injury. Recombinant FVIIa activates factor X directly on the surface of activated platelets, which are present only at the site of injury, meaning that systemic activation of coagulation is avoided and the risk of thrombotic events (TEs) thus reduced. Nonetheless, close monitoring for signs and symptoms of TE is warranted in all patients treated with any pro-haemostatic agent, including rFVIIa, especially the elderly and any other patients with concomitant conditions and/or predisposing risk factors to thrombosis.

  13. Structure, origin, and transforming activity of feline leukemia virus-myc recombinant provirus FTT.

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, D L; Drake, A L; Hirsch, V; Rowe, M E; Stallard, V; Mullins, J I

    1989-01-01

    A myc-containing recombinant feline leukemia provirus, designated FTT, was molecularly cloned from the cat T-cell lymphoma line F422. Its transforming activity, as well as the nucleotide sequence of the 3' 2.7 kilobases of FTT, including v-myc, was determined. The predicted v-myc protein differs from feline c-myc by three amino acid changes and is truncated by two amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. Comparison with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline c-myc, and other FeLV proviruses indicates that recombination junctions involved in the generation of FeLV-onc viruses occur at preferred locations within the virus. They usually follow or occur within the sequence ACCCC at 5' junctions and may result from homologous recombination between sequences of marked purine-pyrimidine strand bias, especially at 3' junctions. Some recombination sites also resemble recombinase recognition sequences utilized in immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor variable-region joining. Transfection of primary rat embryo fibroblasts and subsequent in vivo analysis revealed that morphologic and tumorigenic transformation require cotransfection of FTT with human EJ-ras DNA; neither gene alone is sufficient. FTT v-myc is expressed in these transformed rat cells as a 3.0-kilobase subgenomic RNA; however, in contrast to the depressed level of c-myc expression in v-myc-involved feline tumors, steady-state levels of rat c-myc RNA and protein are apparently unaltered. Images PMID:2539507

  14. Integrated lipase production and in situ biodiesel synthesis in a recombinant Pichia pastoris yeast: an efficient dual biocatalytic system composed of cell free enzymes and whole cell catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipase-catalyzed biotransformation of acylglycerides or fatty acids into biodiesel via immobilized enzymes or whole cell catalysts has been considered as one of the most promising methods to produce renewable and environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuels, thus being extensively studied so far. In all previously pursued approaches, however, lipase enzymes are prepared in an independent process separated from enzymatic biodiesel production, which would unavoidably increase the cost and energy consumption during industrial manufacture of this cost-sensitive energy product. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel cost-effective biocatalysts and biocatalytic processes with genuine industrial feasibility. Result Inspired by the consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose to generate bioethanol, an integrated process with coupled lipase production and in situ biodiesel synthesis in a recombinant P. pastoris yeast was developed in this study. The novel and efficient dual biocatalytic system based on Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase took advantage of both cell free enzymes and whole cell catalysts. The extracellular and intracellular lipases of growing yeast cells were simultaneously utilized to produce biodiesel from waste cooking oils in situ and in one pot. This integrated system effectively achieved 58% and 72% biodiesel yield via concurrent esterified-transesterified methanolysis and stepwise hydrolysis-esterification at 3:1 molar ratio between methanol and waste cooking oils, respectively. Further increasing the molar ratio of methanol to waste cooking oils to 6:1 led to an 87% biodiesel yield using the stepwise strategy. Both water tolerance and methanol tolerance of this novel system were found to be significantly improved compared to previous non-integrated biodiesel production processes using separately prepared immobilized enzymes or whole cell catalysts. Conclusion We have proposed a new concept of integrated biodiesel production

  15. Annexation of a high-activity enzyme in a synthetic three-enzyme complex greatly decreases the degree of substrate channeling.

    PubMed

    You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2014-06-20

    The self-assembled three-enzyme complex containing triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), aldolase (ALD), and fructose 1,6-biphosphatase (FBP) was constructed via a mini-scaffoldin containing three different cohesins and the three dockerin-containing enzymes. This enzyme complex exhibited 1 order of magnitude higher initial reaction rates than the mixture of noncomplexed three enzymes. In this enzyme cascade reactions, the reaction mediated by ALD was the rate-limiting step. To understand the in-depth role of the rate-limiting enzyme ALD in influencing the substrate channeling effect of synthetic enzyme complexes, low-activity ALD from Thermotoga maritima was replaced with a similar-size ALD isolated from Thermus thermophilus, where the latter had more than 5 times specific activity of the former. The synthetic three-enzyme complexes annexed with either low-activity or high-activity ALDs exhibited higher initial reaction rates than the mixtures of the two-enzyme complex (TIM-FBP) and the nonbound low-activity or high activity ALD at the same enzyme concentration. It was also found that the annexation of more high-activity ALD in the synthetic enzyme complexes drastically decreased the degree of substrate channeling from 7.5 to 1.5. These results suggested that the degree of substrate channeling in synthetic enzyme complexes depended on the enzyme choice. This study implied that the construction of synthetic enzyme enzymes in synthetic cascade pathways could be a very important tool to accrelerate rate-limiting steps controlled by low-activity enzymes.

  16. Catalytic properties of recombinant dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase from Escherichia coli: a comparative study with angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carlos Eduardo L; Magliarelli, Helena de Fátima; Paschoalin, Thaysa; Nchinda, Aloysius T; Lima, Jackson C; Juliano, Maria A; Paiva, Paulo B; Sturrock, Edward D; Travassos, Luiz R; Carmona, Adriana K

    2009-09-01

    Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase from Escherichia coli (EcDcp) is a zinc metallopeptidase with catalytic properties closely resembling those of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). However, EcDcp and ACE are classified in different enzyme families (M3 and M2, respectively) due to differences in their primary sequences. We cloned and expressed EcDcp and studied in detail the enzyme's S(3) to S(1)' substrate specificity using positional-scanning synthetic combinatorial (PS-SC) libraries of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides. These peptides contain ortho-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) and 2,4-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) as donor/acceptor pair. In addition, using FRET substrates developed for ACE [Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH] as well as natural ACE substrates (angiotensin I, bradykinin, and Ac-SDKP-OH), we show that EcDcp has catalytic properties very similar to human testis ACE. EcDcp inhibition studies were performed with the ACE inhibitors captopril (K(i)=3 nM) and lisinopril (K(i)=4.4 microM) and with two C-domain-selective ACE inhibitors, 5-S-5-benzamido-4-oxo-6-phenylhexanoyl-L-tryptophan (kAW; K(i)=22.0 microM) and lisinopril-Trp (K(i)=0.8 nM). Molecular modeling was used to provide the basis for the differences found in the inhibitors potency. The phylogenetic relationship of EcDcp and related enzymes belonging to the M3 and M2 families was also investigated and the results corroborate the distinct origins of EcDcp and ACE.

  17. The use of recombinant activated factor VII in congenital and acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven), a novel hemostatic agent originally developed for the treatment of bleeding episodes in hemophilia A or B patients with inhibitors, has been recently employed with benefit for the management of hemorrhages in other nonhemophilic congenital and acquired hemostatic abnormalities. This review focuses on the use of this drug in acquired and congenital von Willebrand disease. The analysis of the literature data shows that recombinant activated factor VII is an effective agent for the treatment of refractory bleeding in von Willebrand disease patients and for the treatment or prevention of bleeding in those patients with alloantibodies or autoantibodies against von Willebrand factor. Further studies are needed, however, to assess its safety and to optimize the dosages and regimens of therapy in such patients.

  18. Development of a Highly Sensitive and Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant Matrix Protein for Detection of Avian Pneumovirus Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Baldev R.; Cameron, Kjerstin T.; Seal, Bruce S.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Halvorson, David A.; Njenga, M. Kariuki

    2000-01-01

    The matrix (M) protein of avian pneumovirus (APV) was evaluated for its antigenicity and reliability in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for diagnosis of APV infection, a newly emergent disease of turkeys in United States. Sera from APV-infected turkeys consistently contained antibodies to a 30-kDa protein (M protein). An ELISA based on recombinant M protein generated in Escherichia coli was compared with the routine APV ELISA that utilizes inactivated virus as antigen. Of 34 experimentally infected turkeys, 33 (97.1%) were positive by M protein ELISA whereas only 18 (52.9%) were positive by routine APV ELISA 28 days after infection. None of the serum samples from 41 uninfected experimental turkeys were positive by M protein ELISA. Of 184 field sera from turkey flocks suspected of having APV infection, 133 (72.3%) were positive by M protein ELISA whereas only 99 (53.8%) were positive by routine APV ELISA. Twelve serum samples, which were negative by M protein ELISA but positive by routine APV ELISA, were not reactive with either recombinant M protein or denatured purified APV proteins by Western analysis. This indicates that the samples had given false-positive results by routine APV ELISA. The M protein ELISA was over six times more sensitive than virus isolation (11.5%) in detecting infections from samples obtained from birds showing clinical signs of APV infection. Taken together, these results show that ELISA based on recombinant M protein is a highly sensitive and specific test for detecting antibodies to APV. PMID:11060061

  19. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of West Nile virus infection based on a recombinant envelope protein produced in Trichoplusia ni larvae.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Escribano, José M; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Escribano-Romero, Estela

    2010-06-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a Flavivirus distributed most widely, is presenting lately variable epidemiological and ecological patterns, including an increasing virulence that has already caused over 1000 human deaths in USA. Currently, diagnosis of WNV is achieved mainly by enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) based on the use of inactivated whole WNV (iWNV) as antigen, although results have to be confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNTs). Expression of WNV envelope recombinant E (rE) protein and its usefulness as ELISA antigen are described. Production of rE was achieved upon infection of Trichoplusia ni insect larvae with a recombinant baculovirus. Once optimized, the rE-based ELISA was validated with a battery of mouse and equine sera characterized previously. Concordance with the iWNV-based ELISA used routinely was good (95%), as it was with the reference PRNT (90%), with specificity of 94.4% and sensitivity of 88.1%. Production of rE protein in insect larvae allows for an easy, low cost and quite large-scale yield of partially purified antigen which is suitable for serological diagnosis of WNV, without the need for manipulation of large quantities of infective virus.

  20. Recombination-active defects in silicon ribbon and polycrystalline solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports results from a study of recombination-active structural defects in silicon ribbon and polycrystalline solar cells using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique in a scanning electron microscope. It is demonstrated that low temperature EBIC measurements can reveal a range of defects that are not observable at room temperature, including slip dislocations in silicon dendritic web ribbons as well as decorated twin boundaries and dislocation complexes in cast polycrystalline silicon solar cell materials.

  1. Guanidinylated neomycin mediates heparan sulfate-dependent transport of active enzymes to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Stéphane; Wilson, Beth; Sly, William S; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2010-07-01

    Guanidinylated neomycin (GNeo) can transport bioactive, high molecular weight cargo into the interior of cells in a process that depends on cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In this report, we show that GNeo-modified quantum dots bind to cell surface heparan sulfate, undergo endocytosis and eventually reach the lysosomal compartment. An N-hydroxysuccinimide activated ester of GNeo (GNeo-NHS) was prepared and conjugated to two lysosomal enzymes, beta-D-glucuronidase (GUS) and alpha-L-iduronidase. Conjugation did not interfere with enzyme activity and enabled binding of the enzymes to heparin-Sepharose and heparan sulfate on primary human fibroblasts. Cells lacking the corresponding lysosomal enzyme took up sufficient amounts of the conjugated enzymes to restore normal turnover of glycosaminoglycans. The high capacity of proteoglycan-mediated uptake suggests that this method of delivery might be used for enzyme replacement or introduction of foreign enzymes into cells.

  2. Activity-based proteomics probes for carbohydrate-processing enzymes: current trends and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Keith A

    2014-05-22

    Carbohydrate-processing enzymes are gaining more attention due to their roles in health and disease as these enzymes are involved in the construction and deconstruction of vast arrays of glycan structures. As a result, the development of methods to identify these enzymes in complex biological systems is of increasing interest. Activity-based proteomics probes (ABPPs) are increasingly being used in glycobiology to detect and identify functionally related proteins (and homologues) within a biological system. This review will describe the design of activity-based proteomics probes, provide examples of compounds that have been used to profile activity in the area of carbohydrate-processing enzymes, and give some future perspectives.

  3. Preparation of biocatalytic nanofibers with high activity and stability via enzyme aggregate coating on polymer nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Nair, Sujith; Kim, Jungbae; Kwak, Ja Hun; Grate, Jay W.; Kim, Seong H.; Gu, Man Bock

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a unique approach for the fabrication of enzyme coating on the surface of electrospun polymer nanofibers. This approach employs covalent attachment of seed enzymes onto nanofibers, followed by the glutaraldehyde treatment that crosslinks additional enzymes onto the seed enzyme molecules. These crosslinked enzyme aggregates, covalently attached to the nanofibers via seed enzyme linker, would improve not only the enzyme activity due to increased enzyme loading, but also the enzyme stability. To demonstrate the principle of concept, we fabricated the coating of alpha-chymotrypsin (CT) on the nanofibers electrospun from a mixture of polystyrene and poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride). The addition of poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) makes it much easier to attach the seed enzyme molecules onto electrospun nanofibers without any rigorous functionalization of nanofibers for the attachment of enzymes. The initial activity of final CT coating was 17 and 9 times higher than those of simply-adsorbed CT and covalently-attached CT, respectively. While adsorbed and covalently-attached CT resulted in a serious enzyme leaching during initial incubation in a shaking condition, the CT coating did not show any leaching from the beginning of incubation in the same condition. As a result, the enzyme stability of CT coating was impressively improved with a half-life of 686 days under rigorous shaking while the half-life of covalently-attached CT was only 21 hours. This new approach of enzyme coating with high stability and activity will make a great impact in various applications of enzymes such as bioconversion, bioremediation, and biosensors.

  4. Kinetic Parameters and Cytotoxic Activity of Recombinant Methionine γ-Lyase from Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Yashin, D V; Anufrieva, N V; Anisimova, N Y; Revtovich, S V; Kotlov, M I; Belyi, Y F; Pokrovsky, V S; Demidkina, T V

    2013-07-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent recombinant methionine γ -lyase from three pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium sporogenes, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined in β- and γ-elimination reactions. The enzyme from C. sporogenes is characterized by the highest catalytic efficiency in the γ-elimination reaction of L-methionine. It was demonstrated that the enzyme from these three sources exists as a tetramer. The N-terminal poly-histidine fragment of three recombinant enzymes influences their catalytic activity and facilitates the aggregation of monomers to yield dimeric forms under denaturing conditions. The cytotoxicity of methionine γ-lyase from C. sporogenes and C. tetani in comparison with Citrobacter freundii was evaluated using K562, PC-3, LnCap, MCF7, SKOV-3, and L5178y tumor cell lines. K562 (IC50=0.4-1.3 U/ml), PC-3 (IC50=0.1-0.4 U/ml), and MCF7 (IC50=0.04-3.2 U/ml) turned out to be the most sensitive cell lines.

  5. Active gamma-carboxylated human factor IX expressed using recombinant DNA techniques.

    PubMed

    de la Salle, H; Altenburger, W; Elkaim, R; Dott, K; Dieterlé, A; Drillien, R; Cazenave, J P; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    Factor IX (Christmas factor), a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein made in the liver, functions in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. A functional deficiency of factor IX underlies haemophilia B, a chromosome X-linked recessive disease for which the major therapeutic approach is replacement treatment using factor IX concentrates. The cloning and characterization of the gene for human factor IX would mean that human factor IX could be produced in greater yield and purity through using recombinant DNA techniques. We have now used a human factor IX cDNA clone, inserted into a vaccinia virus-derived vector, to infect human hepatoma cells which normally produce no factor IX, and mouse fibroblasts. Fully active factor IX was produced by the hepatoma cells, whereas the fibroblasts produced a protein less active than natural factor IX, even in the presence of high levels of vitamin K. Human factor IX is extensively post-translationally modified, and thus represents probably the most complex protein produced in active form by recombinant DNA techniques to date. Our study also illustrates the potential of vaccinia virus-based vectors for expressing significant amounts of complex, clinically useful proteins in eukaryotic cells, in addition to its already demonstrated usefulness for producing live recombinant vaccines.

  6. BacMam production of active recombinant lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase: Expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Romanow, William G; Piper, Derek E; Fordstrom, Preston; Thibault, Stephen; Zhou, Mingyue; Walker, Nigel P C

    2016-09-01

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a key enzyme in the esterification of cholesterol and its subsequent incorporation into the core of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. It is also involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the mechanism by which cholesterol is removed from peripheral cells and transported to the liver for excretion. These processes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD) and may have therapeutic implications. This work describes the use of baculovirus as a transducing vector to express LCAT in mammalian cells, expression of the recombinant protein as a high-mannose glycoform suitable for deglycosylation by Endo H and its purification to homogeneity and characterization. The importance of producing underglycosylated forms of secreted glycoproteins to obtain high-resolution crystal structures is discussed. PMID:26363122

  7. Molecular architectures and functions of radical enzymes and their (re)activating proteins.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naoki; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2015-10-01

    Certain proteins utilize the high reactivity of radicals for catalysing chemically challenging reactions. These proteins contain or form a radical and therefore named 'radical enzymes'. Radicals are introduced by enzymes themselves or by (re)activating proteins called (re)activases. The X-ray structures of radical enzymes and their (re)activases revealed some structural features of these molecular apparatuses which solved common enigmas of radical enzymes—i.e. how the enzymes form or introduce radicals at the active sites, how they use the high reactivity of radicals for catalysis, how they suppress undesired side reactions of highly reactive radicals and how they are (re)activated when inactivated by extinction of radicals. This review highlights molecular architectures of radical B12 enzymes, radical SAM enzymes, tyrosyl radical enzymes, glycyl radical enzymes and their (re)activating proteins that support their functions. For generalization, comparisons of the recently reported structures of radical enzymes with those of canonical radical enzymes are summarized here.

  8. Endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) activity in human vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Janet J; Johnson, Christopher M; Mockridge, James W; Davenport, Anthony P

    1997-01-01

    of a phosphoramidon-sensitive ECE on the smooth muscle layer of the human umbilical vein which can convert big ET-1, big ET-2(1-37), big ET-2(1-38) and big ET-3 to their mature biologically active forms. The precise subcellular localization of this enzyme and its physiological relevance remains to be determined. PMID:9422810

  9. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-03-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme

  10. Enhanced diffusion, chemotaxis, and pumping by active enzymes: progress toward an organizing principle of molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Astumian, R Dean

    2014-12-23

    Active enzymes diffuse more rapidly than inactive enzymes. This phenomenon may be due to catalysis-driven conformational changes that result in "swimming" through the aqueous solution. Recent additional work has demonstrated that active enzymes can undergo chemotaxis toward regions of high substrate concentration, whereas inactive enzymes do not, and, further, that active enzymes immobilized at surfaces can directionally pump liquids. In this Perspective, I will discuss these phenomena in light of Purcell's work on directed motion at low Reynold's number and in the context of microscopic reversibility. The conclusions suggest that a deep understanding of catalytically driven enhanced diffusion of enzymes and related phenomena can lead toward a general organizing principle for the design, characterization, and operation of molecular machines.

  11. Antibacterial, Antifungal, Cytotoxic, Phytotoxic, Insecticidal, and Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Geranium wallichianum

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Muhammad; Hussain, Javid; Khan, Arif-ullah; Khan, Abdul Latif; Ali, Liaqat; Khan, Farman-ullah; Khan, Amir Zada; Niaz, Uzma; Lee, In-Jung

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the phytochemical investigations of the crude extracts of rhizomes and leaves of Geranium wallichianum. The crude extracts were fractionated to obtain n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol fractions, which were subjected to different biological activities and enzyme inhibition assays to explore the therapeutic potential of this medicinally important herb. The results indicated that the crude extracts and different fractions of rhizomes and leaves showed varied degree of antimicrobial activities and enzyme inhibitions in different assays. Overall, the rhizome extract and its different fractions showed comparatively better activities in various assays. Furthermore, the purified constituents from the repeated chromatographic separations were also subjected to enzyme inhibition studies against three different enzymes. The results of these studies showed that lipoxygenase enzyme was significantly inhibited as compared to urease. In case of chemical constituents, the sterols (2–4) showed no inhibition, while ursolic acid (1) and benzoic ester (6) showed significant inhibition of urease enzymes. PMID:23049606

  12. Purified and Recombinant Hemopexin: Protease Activity and Effect on Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tian; Liu, Jialin; Huang, Feng; van Engelen, Tjitske SR; Thundivalappil, Sujatha R; Riley, Frank E; Super, Michael; Watters, Alexander L; Smith, Ann; Brinkman, Nathan; Ingber, Donald E; Warren, H Shaw

    2016-01-01

    Infusion of the heme-binding protein hemopexin has been proposed as a novel approach to decrease heme-induced inflammation in settings of red blood cell breakdown, but questions have been raised as to possible side effects related to protease activity and inhibition of chemotaxis. We evaluated protease activity and effects on chemotaxis of purified plasma hemopexin obtained from multiple sources as well as a novel recombinant fusion protein Fc-hemopexin. Amidolytic assay was performed to measure the protease activity of several plasma-derived hemopexin and recombinant Fc-hemopexin. Hemopexin was added to the human monocyte culture in the presence of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and also injected into mice intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before inducing neutrophil migration via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of thioglycolate. Control groups received the same amount of albumin. Protease activity varied widely between hemopexins. Recombinant Fc-hemopexin bound heme, inhibited the synergy of heme with LPS on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production from monocytes, and had minor but detectable protease activity. There was no effect of any hemopexin preparation on chemotaxis, and purified hemopexin did not alter the migration of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity of mice. Heme and LPS synergistically induced the release of LTB4 from human monocytes, and hemopexin blocked this release, as well as chemotaxis of neutrophils in response to activated monocyte supernatants. These results suggest that hemopexin does not directly affect chemotaxis through protease activity, but may decrease heme-driven chemotaxis and secondary inflammation by attenuating the induction of chemoattractants from monocytes. This property could be beneficial in some settings to control potentially damaging inflammation induced by heme. PMID:26772775

  13. Deubiquitinating Enzyme Specificity for Ubiquitin Chain Topology Profiled by Di-Ubiquitin Activity Probes

    PubMed Central

    McGouran, Joanna F.; Gaertner, Selina R.; Altun, Mikael; Kramer, Holger B.; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Posttranslational modification with ubiquitin (Ub) controls many cellular processes, and aberrant ubiquitination can contribute to cancer, immunopathology, and neurodegeneration. The versatility arises from the ability of Ub to form polymer chains with eight distinct linkages via lysine side chains and the N terminus. In this study, we engineered Di-Ub probes mimicking all eight different poly-Ub linkages and profiled the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) selectivity for recognizing Di-Ub moieties in cellular extracts. Mass spectrometric profiling revealed that most DUBs examined have broad selectivity, whereas a subset displays a clear preference for recognizing noncanonical over K48/K63 Ub linkages. Our results expand knowledge of Ub processing enzyme functions in cellular contexts that currently depends largely on using recombinant enzymes and substrates. PMID:24290882

  14. Highly sensitive fluorescence assay of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and inhibition via enzyme-assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mangjuan; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoxin

    2014-11-01

    DNA phosphorylation catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) is an indispensable process in the repair, replication, and recombination of nucleic acids. Here, an enzyme-assisted amplification strategy was developed for the ultrasensitive monitoring activity and inhibition of T4 PNK. A hairpin oligonucleotide (hpDNA) was designed as a probe whose stem can be degraded from the 5' to 3' direction by lambda exonuclease (λ exo) when its 5' end is phosphorylated by PNK. So, the 3' stem and loop part of hpDNA was released as an initiator strand to open a molecular beacon (MB) that was designed as a fluorescence reporter, leading to a fluorescence restoration. Then, the initiator strand was released again by the nicking endonuclease (Nt.BbvCI) to hybridize with another MB, resulting in a cyclic reaction and accumulation of fluorescence signal. Based on enzyme-assisted amplification, PNK activity can be sensitively and rapidly detected with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-4)U/ml, which is superior to those of most existing approaches. Furthermore, the application of the proposed strategy for screening PNK inhibitors also demonstrated satisfactory results. Therefore, it provided a promising platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of PNK as well as for studying the activity of other nucleases.

  15. Expression and purification of recombinant active prostate-specific antigen from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sujin; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2007-05-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a 33 kDa serine protease with comprehensive homology to glandular kallikrein, is secreted from prostatic tissue into the seminal fluid and enters into the circulation. The level of PSA increases in the serum of patients with prostatic cancer and hence is widely employed as a marker of the disease status. In particular, an enzymatically active PSA that is a form cleaved at the N-terminal seven-amino-acids prosequence, APLILSR, of proPSA may play an important roll in the progression of prostate cancer. Thus, the presence of the active form would selectively discriminate the cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study, we developed a convenient purification method for the acquisition of active PSA and proPSA. Recombinant proPSA and active PSA were expressed directly in Escherichia coli, easily and efficiently isolated from inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified. Moreover, the enzymatic activity of the recombinant active PSA was confirmed as serine protease using chromogenic chymotrypsin substrate. This purified active PSA could be further applied to scrutinize the biological or conformational characteristics of the protein and to develop specific diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents against prostate cancer.

  16. [Glycolytic activity of enzyme preparation from the red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) hepatopancreas].

    PubMed

    Rysakova, K S; Novikov, V Iu; Mukhin, V A; Serafimchik, E M

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme preparation exhibiting glycolytic activity yielding chitooligosaccharides along with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was obtained from the red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) hepatopancreas. The results of the analysis confirmed the presence of endo- and exochitinase activities in the preparation. HPLC showed that the hydrolysis products of chitin and chitosan did not contain D(+)-glucosamine, which is indicative of the absence of deacetylase and, apparently, exochitosanase activities. A comparison of the dependence of the enzyme preparation activity on temperature and pH of the incubation medium suggests that chitinase and protease activities are exhibited by different enzymes.

  17. Identification and characterization of an unusual glycosyltransferase-like enzyme with β-galactosidase activity from a soil metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-di; Guo, Geng-shan; Li, Liang; Cao, Li-chuang; Tong, Ling; Ren, Guang-hui; Liu, Yu-huan

    2014-04-10

    Glycosyltransferases and glycoside hydrolases are two diversified groups of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in existence, they serve to build and break down the glycosidic bonds, respectively, and both categories have formed many sequence-based families. In this study, a novel gene (glyt110) conferring β-galactosidase activity was obtained from a metagenomic library of Turpan Basin soil. Sequence analysis revealed that glyt110 encoded a protein of 369 amino acids that, rather than belonging to a family typically known for β-galactosidase activity, belonged to glycosyltransferase family 4. Because of this unusual sequence information, the novel gene glyt110 was subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and the recombinant enzyme (Glyt110) was purified and characterized. Biochemical characterization revealed that the β-galactosidase activity of Glyt110 toward o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) and lactose were identified to be 314±18.3 and 32±2.7 U/mg, correspondingly. In addition, Glyt110 can synthesize galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) using lactose as substrate. A GOS yield of 47.2% (w/w) was achieved from 30% lactose solution at 50 °С, pH 8.0 after 10 h reaction. However, Glyt110 was unable to glycosylate either N-acetylated saccharides or lactose and galactose using UDP-gal as sugar donor, and its glycosyltransferase activity needs further investigation. These results indicated that Glyt110 is an unusual enzyme with β-galactosidase activity but phylogenetically related to glycosyltransferase. Our findings may provide opportunities to improve the insight into the relationship between glycosyltransferases and glycoside hydrolases and the sequence-based classification.

  18. Production and purification of biologically active recombinant tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) prolactins.

    PubMed

    Swennen, D; Rentier-Delrue, F; Auperin, B; Prunet, P; Flik, G; Wendelaar Bonga, S E; Lion, M; Martial, J A

    1991-11-01

    Recombinant expression vectors carrying tilapia prolactin-I or -II (tiPRL-I or tiPRL-II) cDNA were constructed and the tiPRL-I and II proteins were produced in E. coli as inclusion bodies. These inclusion bodies were dissolved in 6 mol urea/l. Refolding of the proteins was followed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions so as to visualize the oxidized state of the molecules. Proteins tiPRL-I and tiPRL-II were purified by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The N-terminal sequence and bioactivities of both purified proteins were then analysed. Recombinant tiPRL-I and tiPRL-II induced a significant rise in plasma calcium levels as well as in mucocyte density in the abdominal skin epithelium. When tested on kidney membrane, both proteins exhibited potency in competing with 125I-labelled tiPRL-I for binding sites, but tiPRL-I seemed to be more potent than tiPRL-II in competing for these sites. The results obtained for the biological activities tested suggest that both recombinant prolactins were correctly refolded and had retained the full biological activity previously observed with the natural hormone preparations extracted from the animals. PMID:1744569

  19. Evolution of class switch recombination function in fish activation-induced cytidine deaminase, AID.

    PubMed

    Wakae, Koshou; Magor, Brad G; Saunders, Holly; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Kawamura, Akemi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi

    2006-01-01

    Following activation of mammalian B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of the Ig heavy chain (IgH) gene can improve the functions of the expressed antibodies. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the only known B cell-specific protein required for inducing CSR and SHM in mammals. Lower vertebrates have an AID homologue, and there is some evidence of SHM in vivo. However there is no evidence of CSR in the cartilaginous or bony fishes, and this may be due in part to a lack of cis-elements in the IgH gene that are the normal targets of AID-mediated recombination. We have tested whether bony fish (zebrafish and catfish) AID can mediate CSR and SHM in mammalian cells. As expected, ectopic expression of fish AID in mouse fibroblasts resulted in mutations in an introduced SHM reporter gene, indicating that fish AID can mediate SHM. Unexpectedly, expression of fish AID in mouse AID-/- B cells induced surface IgG expression as well as switched transcripts from Ig gene loci, clearly indicating that the fish AID protein can mediate CSR, at least in mouse cells. These results suggest that the AID protein acquired the ability to mediate CSR before the IgH locus evolved the additional exon clusters and switch regions that are the targets of recombination. We discuss how pleiotropic functions of specific domains within the AID protein may have facilitated the early evolution of CSR in lower vertebrates.

  20. Inhibitory effect of mitragynine on human cytochrome P450 enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Hanapi, N. A.; Ismail, S.; Mansor, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: To date, many findings reveal that most of the modern drugs have the ability to interact with herbal drugs. Aims: This study was conducted to determine the inhibitory effects of mitragynine on cytochrome P450 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4 activities. Methods and Material: The in vitro study was conducted using a high-throughput luminescence assay. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was conducted using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test with P < 0.05 vs. control. The IC50 values were calculated using the GraphPad Prism® 5 (Version 5.01, GraphPad Software, Inc., USA). Results: Assessment using recombinant enzymes showed that mitragynine gave the strongest inhibitory effect on CYP2D6 with an IC50 value of 0.45±0.33 mM, followed by CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 with IC50 values of 9.70±4.80 and 41.32±6.74 μM respectively. Positive inhibitors appropriate for CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 which are sulfaphenazole, quinidine and ketoconazole were used respectively. Vmax values of CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 were 0.0005, 0.01155 and 0.0137 μM luciferin formed/pmol/min respectively. Km values of CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 were 32.65, 56.01, and 103.30 μM respectively. Mitragynine noncompetitively inhibits CYP2C9 and CYP2D6 activities with the Ki values of 61.48 and 12.86 μM respectively. On the other hand, mitragynine inhibits CYP3A4 competitively with a Ki value of 379.18 μM. Conclusions: The findings of this study reveal that mitragynine might inhibit cytochrome P450 enzyme activities, specifically CYP2D6. Therefore, administration of mitragynine together with herbal or modern drugs which follow the same metabolic pathway may contribute to herb-drug interactions. PMID:24174816

  1. Enzyme Activity Profiles during Fruit Development in Tomato Cultivars and Solanum pennellii1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Steinhauser, Dirk; Koehl, Karin; Carrari, Fernando; Gibon, Yves; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes interact to generate metabolic networks. The activities of more than 22 enzymes from central metabolism were profiled during the development of fruit of the modern tomato cultivar Solanum lycopersicum ‘M82’ and its wild relative Solanum pennellii (LA0716). In S. pennellii, the mature fruit remains green and contains lower sugar and higher organic acid levels. These genotypes are the parents of a widely used near introgression line population. Enzymes were also profiled in a second cultivar, S. lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’, for which data sets for the developmental changes of metabolites and transcripts are available. Whereas most enzyme activities declined during fruit development in the modern S. lycopersicum cultivars, they remained high or even increased in S. pennellii, especially enzymes required for organic acid synthesis. The enzyme profiles were sufficiently characteristic to allow stages of development and cultivars and the wild species to be distinguished by principal component analysis and clustering. Many enzymes showed coordinated changes during fruit development of a given genotype. Comparison of the correlation matrices revealed a large overlap between the two modern cultivars and considerable overlap with S. pennellii, indicating that despite the very different development responses, some basic modules are retained. Comparison of enzyme activity, metabolite profiles, and transcript profiles in S. lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’ revealed remarkably little connectivity between the developmental changes of transcripts and enzymes and even less between enzymes and metabolites. We discuss the concept that the metabolite profile is an emergent property that is generated by complex network interactions. PMID:20335402

  2. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate) by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing leucine metabolism-related enzymes derived from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Saika, Azusa; Watanabe, Yoriko; Sudesh, Kumar; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2014-06-01

    An obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile has a unique metabolic pathway to convert leucine to 4-methylvalerate, in which 4-methyl-2-pentenoyl-CoA (4M2PE-CoA) is an intermediate of this pathway. 4M2PE-CoA is also able to be converted to 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV), a branched side chain monomer unit, for synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymer. In this study, to synthesize 3H4MV-containing PHA copolymer from leucine, the leucine metabolism-related enzymes (LdhA and HadAIBC) derived from C. difficile and PHA biosynthesis enzymes (PhaPCJAc and PhaABRe) derived from Aeromonas caviae and Ralstonia eutropha were co-expressed in the codon usage-improved Escherichia coli. Under microaerobic culture conditions, this E. coli was able to synthesize P(3HB-co-12.2 mol% 3H4MV) from glucose with the supplementation of 1 g/L leucine. This strain also produced P(3HB-co-12.6 mol% 3H4MV) using the culture supernatant of leucine overproducer E. coli strain NS1391 as the medium for PHA production, achieving 3H4MV copolymer synthesis only from glucose. Furthermore, we tested the feasibility of the 3H4MV copolymer synthesis in E. coli strain NS1391 from glucose. The recombinant E. coli NS1391 was able to synthesize P(3HB-co-3.0 mol% 3H4MV) from glucose without any leucine supplementation. This study demonstrates the potential of the new metabolic pathway for 3H4MV synthesis using leucine metabolism-related enzymes from C. difficile.

  3. Effects of single N-glycosylation site knockout on folding and defibrinogenating activities of acutobin recombinants from HEK293T.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Inn-Ho; Wang, Ying-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa

    2015-02-01

    Acutobin, the α-fibrinogenase from Deinagkistrodon acutus venom, contains four N-glycosylation sites with disialylated complex-typed glycans. Here, we explore the functional roles of each of the N-glycan by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type (ATB-wt) and single glycan-knockout mutants of recombinant acutobin were prepared from HEK293T, demonstrating that mutations at Asn(77), Asn(81) and Asn(100) impaired the folding while the S79A mutant and various Asn(229)-deglycosylated mutants were correctly folded. Based on homology modeling of acutobin and multiple sequence alignment with various venom thrombin-like enzymes, the importance of a hydrophilic environment at each glycosylation site to the enzyme folding could be rationalized. Remarkably, all the mutants showed similar catalytic activities for the chromogenic substrate and similar thermal stabilities as ATB-wt, suggesting that the glycan knockout did not affect the gross conformation and stability of the active sites. Although SDS-PAGE analyses revealed that ATB-wt and the D229-mutant degraded all human fibrinogen subunits faster but less specifically in vitro as compared with other mutants that cleaved only the α-subunit, ATB-wt and D229-mutant were not able to release fibrinogen-peptide A and thus coagulated human plasma slower than the other mutants did. In the mice model, the defibrinogenating effect of ATB-wt was stronger and lasting-longer than those of all the mutants. Taken together, all the glycans contribute to the pharmacokinetics of acutobin and ATB-wt in vivo, and the microenvironment around the Asn(229)-glycan appears to regulate the fibrinogen-chain specificity of acutobin while the N-glycans at positions 77, 81 and 100 are crucial for its folding. PMID:25533529

  4. Spatial distribution of enzyme activities along the root and in the rhizosphere of different plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular enzymes are important for decomposition of many biological macromolecules abundant in soil such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and proteins. Activities of enzymes produced by both plant roots and microbes are the primary biological drivers of organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. So far acquisition of in situ data about local activity of different enzymes in soil has been challenged. That is why there is an urgent need in spatially explicit methods such as 2-D zymography to determine the variation of enzymes along the roots in different plants. Here, we developed further the zymography technique in order to quantitatively visualize the enzyme activities (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013), with a better spatial resolution We grew Maize (Zea mays L.) and Lentil (Lens culinaris) in rhizoboxes under optimum conditions for 21 days to study spatial distribution of enzyme activity in soil and along roots. We visualized the 2D distribution of the activity of three enzymes:β-glucosidase, leucine amino peptidase and phosphatase, using fluorogenically labelled substrates. Spatial resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil-root system. The newly-developed direct zymography shows different pattern of spatial distribution of enzyme activity along roots and soil of different plants. We observed a uniform distribution of enzyme activities along the root system of Lentil. However, root system of Maize demonstrated inhomogeneity of enzyme activities. The apical part of an individual root (root tip) in maize showed the highest activity. The activity of all enzymes was the highest at vicinity of the roots and it decreased towards the bulk soil. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root surface were enzyme specific, with highest extension for phosphatase. We conclude that improved zymography is promising in situ technique to analyze, visualize and quantify

  5. A New Versatile Microarray-based Method for High Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-active Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L.; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B.; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  6. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths.

  7. Expression of biologically active recombinant rat IgE-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, L G; Robertson, M W; Liu, F T

    1990-12-01

    IgE-binding protein (epsilon BP) is a protein which has affinity for IgE and was originally identified in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells. Subsequently, it was found to be the rat homolog of CBP35, a murine beta-galactoside-specific lectin. This protein is also designated as L-34 and RL-29 and studied independently by several laboratories. More recently, CBP35 (epsilon BP) was found to be equivalent to Mac-2, a surface marker on activated macrophages. Using rat epsilon BP cDNA, we have succeeded in expressing recombinant epsilon BP in Escherichia coli. Milligram quantities of homogeneous epsilon BP could be obtained from bacterial lysate in a one-step affinity purification procedure utilizing lactosyl-Sepharose 4B and elution with a lactose gradient. The recombinant epsilon BP (r epsilon BP) binds mouse IgE and retains reactivity to anti-peptide antibodies specific for a sequence within rat epsilon BP. The purified r epsilon BP exhibits binding activity to various saccharides, with affinity for N-acetyllactosamine greater than thiodigalactoside greater than lactose much greater than D-galactose greater than L-arabinose, an order identical to that exhibited by native epsilon BP isolated from RBL cells. The recombinant lectin displayed hemagglutination activity when tested with rabbit erythrocytes. Although epsilon BP shares sequence homology to other lectins containing S-type (thiol-dependent) carbohydrate-recognition domains, r epsilon BP is resistant to air oxidation and does not require reducing agents for maintaining its activity. Furthermore, the single cysteine residue appears to be unexposed and can be alkylated only when the protein is denatured in 5.6 M guanidinium hydrochloride. The availability of a source for a large quantity of epsilon BP should facilitate the analysis of biological function(s) and structure-activity relationships of this lectin.

  8. Bypass of a primase requirement for bacteriophage T4 DNA replication in vivo by a recombination enzyme, endonuclease VII.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Luder, A; Ernst, A; Canan, N

    1991-12-01

    A primase, the product of phage T4 gene 61, is required to initiate synthesis of Okazaki pieces and to allow bidirectional replication from several T4 origins. However, primase-defective T4 gene 61 mutants are viable. In these mutants, leading-strand DNA synthesis starts at the same time as in wild type infections, but, in contrast to wild type, initiation is unidirectional and the first replicative intermediates are large displacement loops. Rapid double-strand DNA replication occurs later after infection, generating multiple branched concatemers, which are cut and packaged into viable progeny particles, as in wild-type T4. Evidence is presented that this late double-strand DNA replication requires functional endonuclease VII (endo VII), the product of the T4 gene 49. We propose that endo VII can provide a backup mechanism when primase is defective, because it cuts recombinational junctions, generating 3' ends. These ends can prime DNA synthesis to copy the DNA strands that had been displaced during the initial origin-dependent replication. We explain the DNA-delay phenotype and the commonly observed temperature dependence of DNA replication in primase-deficient gene 61 mutants as a consequence of temperature-dependent translational control of gene 49 expression. In the presence or absence of functional primase endo VII is essential for correct packaging of DNA. The powerful selection that keeps the function of endo VII and expression of its gene at levels that are optimal for T4 development determines both the efficiency and the limitations of the bypass mechanism.

  9. Development of recombinant BgP12 based enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for serodiagnosis of Babesia gibsoni infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mrityunjay; Banerjee, Partha S; Kumar, Saroj; Garg, Rajat; Ram, Hira; Raina, Opinder K

    2016-01-01

    Indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA using recombinant BgP12 (rBgP12) were developed for the diagnosis of Babesia gibsoni infected dogs. The complete open reading frame of BgP12 gene (378bp) was cloned in pET-32a(+) expression vector and expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble thioredoxin (Trx) fusion protein. The purified rBgP12 was used for production of anti-rBgP12 rabbit serum, which recognized a native 12-kDa protein in B. gibsoni infected erythrocyte by Western blot analysis. To evaluate the potential of rBgP12 for the serodiagnosis of B. gibsoni, a panel of serum/plasma samples from dogs infected with B. gibsoni (n=13), uninfected sera (n=13) and sera from dogs infected with other haemoparasites viz., Babesia canis vogeli (n=3), Ehrlichia canis (n=3), Hepatozoon canis (n=1) and Dirofilaria immitis (n=1) were used in ELISA formats. In addition, the performance of rBgP12 based indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA were evaluated using 75 serum/plasma samples collected from suspected dogs, in respect to the nested PCR as reference test. The diagnostic sensitivities of indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA were 94.59% and 89.18%, respectively, while their specificities were 84.21% and 81.57%, respectively. Moreover, both the assays using rBgP12 showed no cross reaction with sera from dogs infected with other common haemoparasites indicating their high specificity. High kappa values of indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA indicated the potentials of these assays with substantial agreement at 95% confidence level. It is concluded that indirect ELISA and dot ELISA using rBgP12 might be used in large scale epidemiological surveys and clinical diagnosis of B. gibsoni infection in dogs. PMID:26827835

  10. Development of recombinant BgP12 based enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for serodiagnosis of Babesia gibsoni infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mrityunjay; Banerjee, Partha S; Kumar, Saroj; Garg, Rajat; Ram, Hira; Raina, Opinder K

    2016-01-01

    Indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA using recombinant BgP12 (rBgP12) were developed for the diagnosis of Babesia gibsoni infected dogs. The complete open reading frame of BgP12 gene (378bp) was cloned in pET-32a(+) expression vector and expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble thioredoxin (Trx) fusion protein. The purified rBgP12 was used for production of anti-rBgP12 rabbit serum, which recognized a native 12-kDa protein in B. gibsoni infected erythrocyte by Western blot analysis. To evaluate the potential of rBgP12 for the serodiagnosis of B. gibsoni, a panel of serum/plasma samples from dogs infected with B. gibsoni (n=13), uninfected sera (n=13) and sera from dogs infected with other haemoparasites viz., Babesia canis vogeli (n=3), Ehrlichia canis (n=3), Hepatozoon canis (n=1) and Dirofilaria immitis (n=1) were used in ELISA formats. In addition, the performance of rBgP12 based indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA were evaluated using 75 serum/plasma samples collected from suspected dogs, in respect to the nested PCR as reference test. The diagnostic sensitivities of indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA were 94.59% and 89.18%, respectively, while their specificities were 84.21% and 81.57%, respectively. Moreover, both the assays using rBgP12 showed no cross reaction with sera from dogs infected with other common haemoparasites indicating their high specificity. High kappa values of indirect ELISA and dot-ELISA indicated the potentials of these assays with substantial agreement at 95% confidence level. It is concluded that indirect ELISA and dot ELISA using rBgP12 might be used in large scale epidemiological surveys and clinical diagnosis of B. gibsoni infection in dogs.

  11. Temperature adaptation of enzymes: roles of the free energy, the enthalpy, and the entropy of activation.

    PubMed

    Low, P S; Bada, J L; Somero, G N

    1973-02-01

    The enzymic reactions of ectothermic (cold-blooded) species differ from those of avian and mammalian species in terms of the magnitudes of the three thermodynamic activation parameters, the free energy of activation (DeltaG()), the enthalpy of activation (DeltaH()), and the entropy of activation (DeltaS()). Ectothermic enzymes are more efficient than the homologous enzymes of birds and mammals in reducing the DeltaG() "energy barrier" to a chemical reaction. Moreover, the relative importance of the enthalpic and entropic contributions to DeltaG() differs between these two broad classes of organisms.

  12. [Relationship between soil enzyme activities and trace element contents in Eucalyptus plantation soil].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuelin; Peng, Shaolin; Li, Zhihui; Ren, Hai; Li, Zhi'an

    2003-03-01

    Canonical correlation analysis on soil enzyme activities and trace element contents in Eucalyptus plantation soil showed that among the test elements, only Zn and Mn affected enzyme activ