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Sample records for active red sea

  1. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  2. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  3. Red sea drillings.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Whitmarsh, R B; Ali, S A; Boudreaux, J E; Coleman, R; Fleisher, R L; Girdler, R; Manheim, F; Matter, A; Nigrini, C; Stoffers, P; Supko, P R

    1973-01-26

    Recent drilling in the Red Sea has shown that much of the basin is underlain by evaporites of a similar age to that of evaporites found in the Mediterranean Sea. These evaporites and their structural positions indicate that other brine areas are present-and, indeed, several others have been discovered. PMID:17843766

  4. Red sea drillings.

    PubMed

    Ross, D A; Whitmarsh, R B; Ali, S A; Boudreaux, J E; Coleman, R; Fleisher, R L; Girdler, R; Manheim, F; Matter, A; Nigrini, C; Stoffers, P; Supko, P R

    1973-01-26

    Recent drilling in the Red Sea has shown that much of the basin is underlain by evaporites of a similar age to that of evaporites found in the Mediterranean Sea. These evaporites and their structural positions indicate that other brine areas are present-and, indeed, several others have been discovered.

  5. Adsorption of basic Red 46 using sea mango (Cerbera odollam) based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Nur Azira Iqlima; Zainudin, Nor Fauziah; Ali, Umi Fazara Md

    2015-05-01

    Sea mango or Cerbera Odollam is another source of carbonaceous material that can be found abundantly in Malaysia. In this research, it is used as a new agricultural source of activated carbon. Sea mango activated carbon was prepared by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH). The sea mango was soaked in KOH at impregnation ratio of 1:1 and followed by carbonization at temperature of 600°C for 1 hour. The sample was then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface morphology, while Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) was used to study the surface area. The result shown that sea mango activated carbon (SMAC) developed new pores on its surface and the BET surface area measured was 451.87 m2/g. The SMAC performance was then tested for the removal of Basic Red 46 in batch process. The removal of Basic Red 46 (50 mg/L, natural pH, 0.1 g SMAC) was more than 99% in 15 minutes where it reached equilibrium in 30 minutes.

  6. Adsorption of basic Red 46 using sea mango (Cerbera odollam) based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Azmi, Nur Azira Iqlima; Zainudin, Nor Fauziah; Ali, Umi Fazara Md

    2015-05-15

    Sea mango or Cerbera Odollam is another source of carbonaceous material that can be found abundantly in Malaysia. In this research, it is used as a new agricultural source of activated carbon. Sea mango activated carbon was prepared by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH). The sea mango was soaked in KOH at impregnation ratio of 1:1 and followed by carbonization at temperature of 600°C for 1 hour. The sample was then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface morphology, while Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) was used to study the surface area. The result shown that sea mango activated carbon (SMAC) developed new pores on its surface and the BET surface area measured was 451.87 m{sup 2}/g. The SMAC performance was then tested for the removal of Basic Red 46 in batch process. The removal of Basic Red 46 (50 mg/L, natural pH, 0.1 g SMAC) was more than 99% in 15 minutes where it reached equilibrium in 30 minutes.

  7. Cytotoxic and HIV-1 enzyme inhibitory activities of Red Sea marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer and HIV/AIDS are two of the greatest public health and humanitarian challenges facing the world today. Infection with HIV not only weakens the immune system leading to AIDS and increasing the risk of opportunistic infections, but also increases the risk of several types of cancer. The enormous biodiversity of marine habitats is mirrored by the molecular diversity of secondary metabolites found in marine animals, plants and microbes which is why this work was designed to assess the anti-HIV and cytotoxic activities of some marine organisms of the Red Sea. Methods The lipophilic fractions of methanolic extracts of thirteen marine organisms collected from the Red Sea (Egypt) were screened for cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines; leukaemia (U937) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. African green monkey kidney cells (Vero) were used as normal non-malignant control cells. The extracts were also tested for their inhibitory activity against HIV-1 enzymes, reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (PR). Results Cytotoxicity results showed strong activity of the Cnidarian Litophyton arboreum against U-937 (IC50; 6.5 μg/ml ±2.3) with a selectivity index (SI) of 6.45, while the Cnidarian Sarcophyton trochliophorum showed strong activity against HeLa cells (IC50; 5.2 μg/ml ±1.2) with an SI of 2.09. Other species showed moderate to weak cytotoxicity against both cell lines. Two extracts showed potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease; these were the Cnidarian jelly fish Cassiopia andromeda (IC50; 0.84 μg/ml ±0.05) and the red algae Galaxura filamentosa (2.6 μg/ml ±1.29). It is interesting to note that the most active extracts against HIV-1 PR, C. andromeda and G. filamentosa showed no cytotoxicity in the three cell lines at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml). Conclusion The strong cytotoxicity of the soft corals L. arboreum and S. trochliophorum as well as the anti-PR activity of the jelly fish C. andromeda and the red

  8. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep. PMID:26284035

  9. Revealing microbial functional activities in the Red Sea sponge Stylissa carteri by metatranscriptomics.

    PubMed

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Seridi, Loqmane; Ryu, Taewoo; Voolstra, Christian R; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-12-01

    Sponges are important components of marine benthic environments and are associated with microbial symbionts that carry out ecologically relevant functions. Stylissa carteri is an abundant, low-microbial abundance species in the Red Sea. We aimed to achieve the functional and taxonomic characterization of the most actively expressed prokaryotic genes in S. carteri. Prokaryotic mRNA was enriched from sponge total RNA, sequenced using Illumina HiSeq technology and annotated using the metagenomics Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) pipeline. We detected high expression of archaeal ammonia oxidation and photosynthetic carbon fixation by members of the genus Synechococcus. Functions related to stress response and membrane transporters were among the most highly expressed by S. carteri symbionts. Unexpectedly, gene functions related to methylotrophy were highly expressed by gammaproteobacterial symbionts. The presence of seawater-derived microbes is indicated by the phylogenetic proximity of organic carbon transporters to orthologues of members from the SAR11 clade. In summary, we revealed the most expressed functions of the S. carteri-associated microbial community and linked them to the dominant taxonomic members of the microbiome. This work demonstrates the applicability of metatranscriptomics to explore poorly characterized symbiotic consortia and expands our knowledge of the ecologically relevant functions carried out by coral reef sponge symbionts.

  10. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartadikaria, Aditya; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ < 26.0. These types of water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  11. Seasonal variations of the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes in the red mullet (Mullus barbatus l.) from the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Sladjan Z; Borković Mitić, Slavica S; Radovanović, Tijana B; Perendija, Branka R; Despotović, Svetlana G; Gavrić, Jelena P; Saicić, Zorica S

    2010-02-26

    This study investigated seasonal variations of antioxidant defense enzyme activities: total, manganese, copper zinc containing superoxide dismutase (Tot SOD, Mn SOD, CuZn SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and biotransformation phase II enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in the liver and white muscle of red mullet (Mullus barbatus). The investigations were performed in winter and spring at two localities: Near Bar (NB) and Estuary of the River Bojana (EB) in the Southern Adriatic Sea. At both sites, Mn SOD, GSH-Px, GR and GST activities decreased in the liver in spring. In the white muscle, activities of Mn SOD, GSH-Px, GR and GST in NB decreased in spring. GR decreased in spring in EB, while CAT activity was higher in spring at both sites. The results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based on correlations indicated a clear separation of various sampling periods for both investigated tissues and a marked difference between two seasons. Our study is the first report on antioxidant defense enzyme activities in the red mullet in the Southern Adriatic Sea. It indicates that seasonal variations of antioxidant defense enzyme activities should be used in further biomonitoring studies in fish species.

  12. Day Pass Down the Red Sea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video over the southeastern Mediterranean Sea and down the coastline of the Red Sea was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was ta...

  13. Biological Activities and Chemical Composition of Methanolic Extracts of Selected Autochthonous Microalgae Strains from the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hugo; Custódio, Luísa; Rodrigues, Maria João; Bruno de Sousa, Carolina; Oliveira, Marta; Barreira, Luísa; Neng, Nuno da Rosa; Nogueira, José Manuel Florêncio; Alrokayan, Salman A.; Mouffouk, Fouzi; Abu-Salah, Khalid M.; Ben-Hamadou, Radhouan; Varela, João

    2015-01-01

    Four lipid-rich microalgal species from the Red Sea belonging to three different genera (Nannochloris, Picochlorum and Desmochloris), previously isolated as novel biodiesel feedstocks, were bioprospected for high-value, bioactive molecules. Methanol extracts were thus prepared from freeze-dried biomass and screened for different biological activities. Nannochloris sp. SBL1 and Desmochloris sp. SBL3 had the highest radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, and the best copper and iron chelating activities. All species had potent butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity (>50%) and mildly inhibited tyrosinase. Picochlorum sp. SBL2 and Nannochloris sp. SBL4 extracts significantly reduced the viability of tumoral (HepG2 and HeLa) cells with lower toxicity against the non-tumoral murine stromal (S17) cells. Nannochloris sp. SBL1 significantly reduced the viability of Leishmania infantum down to 62% (250 µg/mL). Picochlorum sp. SBL2 had the highest total phenolic content, the major phenolic compounds identified being salicylic, coumaric and gallic acids. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-carotene were identified in the extracts of all strains, while canthaxanthin was only identified in Picochlorum sp. SBL2. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the microalgae included in this work could be used as sources of added-value products that could be used to upgrade the final biomass value. PMID:26047482

  14. Biological Activities and Chemical Composition of Methanolic Extracts of Selected Autochthonous Microalgae Strains from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Hugo; Custódio, Luísa; Rodrigues, Maria João; de Sousa, Carolina Bruno; Oliveira, Marta; Barreira, Luísa; Neng, Nuno da Rosa; Nogueira, José Manuel Florêncio; Alrokayan, Salman A; Mouffouk, Fouzi; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Ben-Hamadou, Radhouan; Varela, João

    2015-06-01

    Four lipid-rich microalgal species from the Red Sea belonging to three different genera (Nannochloris, Picochlorum and Desmochloris), previously isolated as novel biodiesel feedstocks, were bioprospected for high-value, bioactive molecules. Methanol extracts were thus prepared from freeze-dried biomass and screened for different biological activities. Nannochloris sp. SBL1 and Desmochloris sp. SBL3 had the highest radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, and the best copper and iron chelating activities. All species had potent butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity (>50%) and mildly inhibited tyrosinase. Picochlorum sp. SBL2 and Nannochloris sp. SBL4 extracts significantly reduced the viability of tumoral (HepG2 and HeLa) cells with lower toxicity against the non-tumoral murine stromal (S17) cells. Nannochloris sp. SBL1 significantly reduced the viability of Leishmania infantum down to 62% (250 µg/mL). Picochlorum sp. SBL2 had the highest total phenolic content, the major phenolic compounds identified being salicylic, coumaric and gallic acids. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-carotene were identified in the extracts of all strains, while canthaxanthin was only identified in Picochlorum sp. SBL2. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the microalgae included in this work could be used as sources of added-value products that could be used to upgrade the final biomass value. PMID:26047482

  15. Dynamics of sea level variations in the coastal Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, James; Abulnaja, Yasser; Nellayaputhenpeedika, Mohammedali; Limeburner, Richard; Lentz, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Sea level variations in the central Red Sea coastal zone span a range of roughly 1.2 m. Though relatively small, these water level changes can significantly impact the environment over the shallow reef tops prevalent in the central Red Sea, altering the water depth by a factor or two or more. While considerable scientific work has been directed at tidal and seasonal variations of Red Sea water level, very little attention has been given to elevation changes in an 'intermediate' frequency band, with periods of 2-30 d, even though motions in this band account for roughly half of the sea level variance in central Red Sea. We examined the sea level signal in this band using AVISO sea level anomaly (SLA) data, COARDAS wind data and measurements from pressure sensors maintained for more than five years at a number of locations in Saudi Arabian coastal waters. Empirical orthogonal function analysis of the SLA data indicates that longer-period (10-30 d) sea level variations in the intermediate band are dominated by coherent motions in a single mode that extends over most of the Red Sea axis. Idealized model results indicate that this large-scale mode of sea level motion is principally due to variations in the large-scale gradient of the along-axis wind. Our analysis indicates that coastal sea level motions at shorter periods (2-10 d) are principally generated by a combination of direct forcing by the local wind stress and forcing associated with large-scale wind stress gradients. However, also contributing to coastal sea level variations in the intermediate frequency band are mesoscale eddies, which are prevalent throughout the Red Sea basin, have a sea level signal of 10's of cm and produce relatively small-scale (order 50 km) changes in coastal sea level.

  16. Decadal stability of Red Sea mangroves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahasheer, Hanan; Aljowair, Abdulaziz; Duarte, Carlos M.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2016-02-01

    Across the Earth, mangroves play an important role in coastal protection, both as nurseries and carbon sinks. However, due to various human and environmental impacts, the coverage of mangroves is declining on a global scale. The Red Sea is in the northern-most area of the distribution range of mangroves. Little is known about the surface covered by mangroves at this northern limit or about the changes experienced by Red Sea mangroves. We sought to study changes in the coverage of Red Sea mangroves by using multi-temporal Landsat data (1972, 2000 and 2013). Interestingly, our results show that there has been no decline in mangrove stands in the Red Sea but rather a slight increase. The area covered by mangroves is about 69 Km2 along the African shore and 51 Km2 along the Arabian Peninsula shore. From 1972 to 2013, the area covered by mangroves increased by about 0.29% y-1. We conclude that the trend exhibited by Red Sea mangroves departs from the general global decline of mangroves. Along the Red Sea, mangroves expanded by 12% over the 41 years from 1972 to 2013. Losses to Red Sea mangroves, mostly due to coastal development, have been compensated by afforestation projects.

  17. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied among marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmoregulation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1-3°C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and

  18. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied among marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmoregulation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1-3°C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and

  19. The Red Sea Modeling and Forecasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoteit, Ibrahim; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Latif, Hatem; Toye, Habib; Zhan, Peng; Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Viswanadhapalli, Yesubabu; Yao, Fengchao; Triantafyllou, George; Langodan, Sabique; Cavaleri, Luigi; Guo, Daquan; Johns, Burt

    2015-04-01

    Despite its importance for a variety of socio-economical and political reasons and the presence of extensive coral reef gardens along its shores, the Red Sea remains one of the most under-studied large marine physical and biological systems in the global ocean. This contribution will present our efforts to build advanced modeling and forecasting capabilities for the Red Sea, which is part of the newly established Saudi ARAMCO Marine Environmental Research Center at KAUST (SAMERCK). Our Red Sea modeling system compromises both regional and nested costal MIT general circulation models (MITgcm) with resolutions varying between 8 km and 250 m to simulate the general circulation and mesoscale dynamics at various spatial scales, a 10-km resolution Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the atmospheric conditions, a 4-km resolution European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM) to simulate the Red Sea ecosystem, and a 1-km resolution WAVEWATCH-III model to simulate the wind driven surface waves conditions. We have also implemented an oil spill model, and a probabilistic dispersion and larval connectivity modeling system (CMS) based on a stochastic Lagrangian framework and incorporating biological attributes. We are using the models outputs together with available observational data to study all aspects of the Red Sea circulations. Advanced monitoring capabilities are being deployed in the Red Sea as part of the SAMERCK, comprising multiple gliders equipped with hydrographical and biological sensors, high frequency (HF) surface current/wave mapping, buoys/ moorings, etc, complementing the available satellite ocean and atmospheric observations and Automatic Weather Stations (AWS). The Red Sea models have also been equipped with advanced data assimilation capabilities. Fully parallel ensemble-based Kalman filtering (EnKF) algorithms have been implemented with the MITgcm and ERSEM for assimilating all available multivariate satellite and in-situ data sets. We

  20. Observations of the summer Red Sea circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofianos, Sarantis S.; Johns, William E.

    2007-06-01

    Aiming at exploring and understanding the summer circulation in the Red Sea, a cruise was conducted in the basin during the summer of 2001 involving hydrographic, meteorological, and direct current observations. The most prominent feature, characteristic of the summer circulation and exchange with the Indian Ocean, is a temperature, salinity, and oxygen minimum located around a depth of 75 m at the southern end of the basin, associated with Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water inflowing from the Gulf of Aden during the summer season as an intruding subsurface layer. Stirring and mixing with ambient waters lead to marked increases in temperature (from 16.5 to almost 33°C) and salinity (from 35.7 to more than 38 psu) in this layer by the time it reaches midbasin. The observed circulation presents a very vigorous pattern with strong variability and intense features that extend the width of the basin. A permanent cyclone, detected in the northern Red Sea, verifies previous observations and modeling studies, while in the central sector of the basin a series of very strong anticyclones were observed with maximum velocities exceeding 1 m/s. The three-layer flow pattern, representative of the summer exchange between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, is observed in the strait of Bab el Mandeb. In the southern part of the basin the layer flow is characterized by strong banking of the inflows and outflows against the coasts. Both surface and intermediate water masses involved in the summer Red Sea circulation present prominent spatial variability in their characteristics, indicating that the eddy field and mixing processes play an important role in the summer Red Sea circulation.

  1. Understanding the Red Sea nutrient cycle - a first look into nitrogen fixation in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Roslinda; Arrieta, Jesus; Alam, Intikhab; Duarte, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Red Sea is an elongated and semi-enclosed system bordered by Africa and Saudi Arabia. Positioned in an arid, tropical zone, the system receives high solar irradiance and heat flux, extensive evaporation, low rainfall and therefore high salinity. These harsh environmental conditions has set the Red Sea to be one of the fastest warming and saltiest ecosystem in the world. Although nutrients are known to be at very low concentrations, the ultimately limiting nutrient in the system is still undefined. Therefore, like most other oligotrophic systems, we regard the Red Sea as being nitrogen-limited and we foresee nitrogen fixation as the most probable bottleneck in the Red Sea nitrogen budget. On the basis of metagenomes from pelagic microbial communities along the Red Sea, we looked into the distribution of nitrogenase, an enzyme involved in nitrogen fixation, in this system and provide a first insight into the microbial community that is involved in the process. The implications of this study will not only help improve our understanding of the Red Sea nutrient regime, but may also hint on future ocean responses to rising climates.

  2. Formation and spreading of Red Sea Outflow Water in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Ping; Bower, Amy S.; Smethie, William M.; Pratt, Larry J.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrographic data, chlorofluorocarbon-12 (CFC-12) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) measurements collected in March 2010 and September-October 2011 in the Red Sea, as well as an idealized numerical experiment are used to study the formation and spreading of Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) in the Red Sea. Analysis of inert tracers, potential vorticity distributions, and model results confirm that RSOW is formed through mixed-layer deepening caused by sea surface buoyancy loss in winter in the northern Red Sea and reveal more details on RSOW spreading rates, pathways, and vertical structure. The southward spreading of RSOW after its formation is identified as a layer with minimum potential vorticity and maximum CFC-12 and SF6. Ventilation ages of seawater within the RSOW layer, calculated from the partial pressure of SF6 (pSF6), range from 2 years in the northern Red Sea to 15 years at 17°N. The distribution of the tracer ages is in agreement with the model circulation field which shows a rapid transport of RSOW from its formation region to the southern Red Sea where there are longer circulation pathways and hence longer residence time due to basin wide eddies. The mean residence time of RSOW within the Red Sea estimated from the pSF6 age is 4.7 years. This time scale is very close to the mean transit time (4.8 years) for particles from the RSOW formation region to reach the exit at the Strait of Bab el Mandeb in the numerical experiment.

  3. Red Sea Kinematics in Relation to the Regional Tectonics Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, T.; Furlong, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Red sSea extensional system started approximately 22+3 Ma. Although, there is evidence that lithospheric weakening and associated incipient extension may have taken place since 30 Ma. There is oceanic crust found in the southern part of the rift, while the northern-most part still involves continental stretching. Meantime magnetic anomalies have been observed for the southern rift, the northern rift is characterized by several deeps where magnetic anomalies have been observed as well as an indication of the transition from continental to oceanic rifting. GPS stations along the Red Sea are consistent with kinematics implied from the magnetic anomalies - an opening rate in the southern part of ~ 15 mm/yr relative to Eurasia fixed while the opening rate in the is ~8 mm/yr. This significant decreasing of the opening rate towards the north implies complexity within the Red Sea extensional system.Our purpose here is to place the Red Sea extensional kinematics within the regional tectonics context by combining constraints on the rate or style of extension within the Red Sea with tectonic activities on the adjacent continental regions. To accomplish this, we will model the extensional kinematics through time by comparing recent kinematics based on the geophysical observations with ones that based on geological observations. In terms of present-day geophysical observations, we have GPS and magnetic anomalies data, and crustal and lithospheric thickness. Geological observations primarily come from stratigraphic and structural data sets.Our overall target is to construct a tectonic model that links the timing of the change in the style and extensional rate with the tectonic activities in Afar, Gulf of Aden, Zagros, Dead Sea fault and Anatolian region.

  4. Shifting environmental baselines in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Price, A R G; Ghazi, S J; Tkaczynski, P J; Venkatachalam, A J; Santillan, A; Pancho, T; Metcalfe, R; Saunders, J

    2014-01-15

    The Red Sea is among the world's top marine biodiversity hotspots. We re-examined coastal ecosystems at sites surveyed during the 1980s using the same methodology. Coral cover increased significantly towards the north, mirroring the reverse pattern for mangroves and other sedimentary ecosystems. Latitudinal patterns are broadly consistent across both surveys and with results from independent studies. Coral cover showed greatest change, declining significantly from a median score of 4 (1000-9999 m(2)) to 2 (10-99m(2)) per quadrat in 2010/11. This may partly reflect impact from coastal construction, which was evident at 40% of sites and has significantly increased in magnitude over 30 years. Beach oil has significantly declined, but shore debris has increased significantly. Although substantial, levels are lower than at some remote ocean atolls. While earlier reports have suggested that the Red Sea is generally healthy, shifting environmental baselines are evident from the current study. PMID:24246651

  5. Shifting environmental baselines in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Price, A R G; Ghazi, S J; Tkaczynski, P J; Venkatachalam, A J; Santillan, A; Pancho, T; Metcalfe, R; Saunders, J

    2014-01-15

    The Red Sea is among the world's top marine biodiversity hotspots. We re-examined coastal ecosystems at sites surveyed during the 1980s using the same methodology. Coral cover increased significantly towards the north, mirroring the reverse pattern for mangroves and other sedimentary ecosystems. Latitudinal patterns are broadly consistent across both surveys and with results from independent studies. Coral cover showed greatest change, declining significantly from a median score of 4 (1000-9999 m(2)) to 2 (10-99m(2)) per quadrat in 2010/11. This may partly reflect impact from coastal construction, which was evident at 40% of sites and has significantly increased in magnitude over 30 years. Beach oil has significantly declined, but shore debris has increased significantly. Although substantial, levels are lower than at some remote ocean atolls. While earlier reports have suggested that the Red Sea is generally healthy, shifting environmental baselines are evident from the current study.

  6. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; Berumen, Michael L; Büttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schätzle, Simone; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-04-30

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters.

  7. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; Berumen, Michael L; Büttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schätzle, Simone; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-04-30

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters. PMID:26776057

  8. Ethiopian Red Sea petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, A. Tadesse, K.; Worku, T.; Tsadik, E.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The primary objectives were to encourage increased hydrocarbon exploration activity within the project area by applying recent exploration techniques basin wide, and to train national geoscientists in exploration techniques. The study of the Ethiopian Red Sea and Gulf of Aden was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. These included reports, sections and wire lines logs from eight wells, samples from seven wells for biostratigraphic analysis, and samples from five wells for geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on 6,600 line-km of seismic data selected from a grid of 29,710 line-km. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis, including the sea floor, top and near base of Middle to Upper Miocene evaporites, and approximate acoustic basement. A bathymetric map, three structure-contour maps, and three interval isopach maps were prepared using digitized picks from the interpreted seismic. The results show that the Ethiopian Red Sea is similar to the better known productive Gulf of Suez in some respects, including the overall tectonic evolution and the Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic sequence. Nevertheless, significant differences result from the location of the Ethiopian Red Sea in the transition zone to the Afar area. An important difference is the development of two major en echelon trends of rifting separated by a block with limited extension in the Danakil Alps. The resulting variations in sedimentary sequence, structural style, and geothermal gradient suggest that a favorable petroleum potential may be present locally in both pre-evaporite and post-evaporite objectives.

  9. Structural evolution history of the Red Sea Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Almeida, G. A. F.

    2010-05-01

    The Red Sea Rift has been an object of comprehensive studies by several generations of geologists and geophysicists. Many publications and open-file reports provide insights into the geological history of this rift. Paleogene and Cretaceous rocks, which are considered to be prerift, are locally exposed at the margins of the Red Sea Rift. At the same time, some evidence indicates that at least some of these rocks are related to the early stage of the evolution of the Red Sea Rift. The available geological data suggest that the Red Sea region started its active evolution in the Cretaceous. As follows from lithostratigraphic data, the Cretaceous-Paleogene trough that predated the Oligocene-Quaternary rift covered this region completely or partially. The pre-Oligocene magmatism and geological evidence show that the Cretaceous-Paleogene trough was of the rift type. The Cretaceous-Eocene and Oligocene-Quaternary phases of rifting were separated by an epoch of uplifting and denudation documented by the erosion surface and unconformity.

  10. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense.

  11. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense. PMID:24288981

  12. Birth of two volcanic islands in the southern Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenbin; Ruch, Joël; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2015-01-01

    Submarine eruptions that lead to the formation of new volcanic islands are rare and far from being fully understood; only a few such eruptions have been witnessed since Surtsey Island emerged to the south of Iceland in the 1960s. Here we report on two new volcanic islands that were formed in the Zubair archipelago of the southern Red Sea in 2011–2013. Using high-resolution optical satellite images, we find that the new islands grew rapidly during their initial eruptive phases and that coastal erosion significantly modified their shapes within months. Satellite radar data indicate that two north–south-oriented dykes, much longer than the small islands might suggest, fed the eruptions. These events occurred contemporaneously with several local earthquake swarms of the type that typically accompany magma intrusions. Earthquake activity has been affecting the southern Red Sea for decades, suggesting the presence of a magmatically active zone that has previously escaped notice. PMID:26010945

  13. Birth of two volcanic islands in the southern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbin; Ruch, Joël; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2015-05-26

    Submarine eruptions that lead to the formation of new volcanic islands are rare and far from being fully understood; only a few such eruptions have been witnessed since Surtsey Island emerged to the south of Iceland in the 1960s. Here we report on two new volcanic islands that were formed in the Zubair archipelago of the southern Red Sea in 2011-2013. Using high-resolution optical satellite images, we find that the new islands grew rapidly during their initial eruptive phases and that coastal erosion significantly modified their shapes within months. Satellite radar data indicate that two north-south-oriented dykes, much longer than the small islands might suggest, fed the eruptions. These events occurred contemporaneously with several local earthquake swarms of the type that typically accompany magma intrusions. Earthquake activity has been affecting the southern Red Sea for decades, suggesting the presence of a magmatically active zone that has previously escaped notice.

  14. Eddies in the Red Sea: A statistical and dynamical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-06-01

    Sea level anomaly (SLA) data spanning 1992-2012 were analyzed to study the statistical properties of eddies in the Red Sea. An algorithm that identifies winding angles was employed to detect 4998 eddies propagating along 938 unique eddy tracks. Statistics suggest that eddies are generated across the entire Red Sea but that they are prevalent in certain regions. A high number of eddies is found in the central basin between 18°N and 24°N. More than 87% of the detected eddies have a radius ranging from 50 to 135 km. Both the intensity and relative vorticity scale of these eddies decrease as the eddy radii increase. The averaged eddy lifespan is approximately 6 weeks. AEs and cyclonic eddies (CEs) have different deformation features, and those with stronger intensities are less deformed and more circular. Analysis of long-lived eddies suggests that they are likely to appear in the central basin with AEs tending to move northward. In addition, their eddy kinetic energy (EKE) increases gradually throughout their lifespans. The annual cycles of CEs and AEs differ, although both exhibit significant seasonal cycles of intensity with the winter and summer peaks appearing in February and August, respectively. The seasonal cycle of EKE is negatively correlated with stratification but positively correlated with vertical shear of horizontal velocity and eddy growth rate, suggesting that the generation of baroclinic instability is responsible for the activities of eddies in the Red Sea.

  15. Red Sea heat flow through time

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, J.D.; Forgotson, J.M.; Girmachev, T. |

    1995-08-01

    Reprocessed multifold seismic lines extending across the Red Sea allow new images of rifting which previously have only been speculated upon. When constrained both by borehole information and sonabuoy refraction, reflection seismic stratigraphy provides a firm foundation for the balancing of extensional features and the determination of crustal stretching factors. These estimates of stretching are useful input parameters for the determination of lithospheric thinning and heat flow through time. The present day thermal state of the Red Sea can be derived by incorporating corrected borehole formation temperatures with oceanographic heat flow measurements into Fourier`s heat flow equation. In order to look at non-steady state effects, heat flows are then extrapolated back through time both from the crustal stretching estimates and empirical relationships between basement depth and thermal crustal cooling. The resulting paleo-heat flow time panels for the Tertiary are instructive in allowing one to observe tectonically produced thermal anomalies through time and space and to constrain kinetic models of hydrocarbon maturation. Ignoring these time transient effects in the heat flow leads to inappropriate maturity approximations and incorrect play concepts for exploration in this region.

  16. Isotopic composition and origin of the red sea and salton sea geothermal brines.

    PubMed

    Craig, H

    1966-12-23

    Abstract. Deuterium and oxygen-18 measurements show that the Red Sea and Salton Sea brines are the results of a single process, the leaching of sediments by surface water circulating downward to a geothermal reservoir. The Salton Sea brine is derived from local precipitation but the Red Sea brine originates 1000 kilometers south of its basin, on the shallow sill which controls the circulation of the Red Sea. On this sill sea water penetrates a thick evaporite sequence to a depth of 2000 meters, and, driven by its increased density relative to sea water, flows northward to emerge in the brine-filled deeps. PMID:17807292

  17. Isotopic composition and origin of the red sea and salton sea geothermal brines.

    PubMed

    Craig, H

    1966-12-23

    Abstract. Deuterium and oxygen-18 measurements show that the Red Sea and Salton Sea brines are the results of a single process, the leaching of sediments by surface water circulating downward to a geothermal reservoir. The Salton Sea brine is derived from local precipitation but the Red Sea brine originates 1000 kilometers south of its basin, on the shallow sill which controls the circulation of the Red Sea. On this sill sea water penetrates a thick evaporite sequence to a depth of 2000 meters, and, driven by its increased density relative to sea water, flows northward to emerge in the brine-filled deeps.

  18. A pyridinium derivative from Red Sea soft corals inhibited voltage-activated potassium conductances and increased excitability of rat cultured sensory neurones

    PubMed Central

    Temraz, Tarek A; Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel; Woolley, David R; Wease, Kerrie N; Davies, Steven N; Scott, Roderick H

    2006-01-01

    Background Whole cell patch clamp recording and intracellular Ca2+ imaging were carried out on rat cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones to characterize the actions of crude extracts and purified samples from Red Sea soft corals. The aim of the project was to identify compounds that would alter the excitability of DRG neurones. Results Crude extracts of Sarcophyton glaucum and Lobophyton crassum attenuated spike frequency adaptation causing DRG neurones to switch from firing single action potentials to multiple firing. The increase in excitability was associated with enhanced KCl-evoked Ca2+ influx. The mechanism of action of the natural products in the samples from the soft corals involved inhibition of voltage-activated K+ currents. An active component of the crude marine samples was identified as 3-carboxy-1-methyl pyridinium (trigonelline). Application of synthetic 3-carboxy-1-methyl pyridinium at high concentration (0.1 mM) also induced multiple firing and reduced voltage-activated K+ current. The changes in excitability of DRG neurones induced by 3-carboxy-1-methyl pyridinium suggest that this compound contributes to the bioactivity produced by the crude extracts from two soft corals. Conclusion Sarcophyton glaucum and Lobophyton crassum contain natural products including 3-carboxy-1-methyl pyridinium that increase the excitability of DRG neurones. We speculate that in addition to developmental control and osmoregulation these compounds may contribute to chemical defenses. PMID:16824204

  19. Factors governing the deep ventilation of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Zhan, Peng; Sofianos, Sarantis S.; Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Qurban, Mohammed; Abualnaja, Yasser; Bower, Amy; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Pavlidou, Alexandra; Asharaf, T. T. Mohamed; Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    A variety of data based on hydrographic measurements, satellite observations, reanalysis databases, and meteorological observations are used to explore the interannual variability and factors governing the deep water formation in the northern Red Sea. Historical and recent hydrographic data consistently indicate that the ventilation of the near-bottom layer in the Red Sea is a robust feature of the thermohaline circulation. Dense water capable to reach the bottom layers of the Red Sea can be regularly produced mostly inside the Gulfs of Aqaba and Suez. Occasionally, during colder than usual winters, deep water formation may also take place over coastal areas in the northernmost end of the open Red Sea just outside the Gulfs of Aqaba and Suez. However, the origin as well as the amount of deep waters exhibit considerable interannual variability depending not only on atmospheric forcing but also on the water circulation over the northern Red Sea. Analysis of several recent winters shows that the strength of the cyclonic gyre prevailing in the northernmost part of the basin can effectively influence the sea surface temperature (SST) and intensify or moderate the winter surface cooling. Upwelling associated with periods of persistent gyre circulation lowers the SST over the northernmost part of the Red Sea and can produce colder than normal winter SST even without extreme heat loss by the sea surface. In addition, the occasional persistence of the cyclonic gyre feeds the surface layers of the northern Red Sea with nutrients, considerably increasing the phytoplankton biomass.

  20. Training Course on the Marine Ecology of the Red Sea. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents a training course on the marine ecology of the Red Sea designed by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) in collaboration with the Marine Science Department of UNESCO for the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA). It was hosted by the Marine Science Station,…

  1. Red Sea circulation during marine isotope stage 5e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccha, Michael; Biton, Eli; Gildor, Hezi

    2015-04-01

    We have employed a regional Massachusetts Institute of Technology oceanic general circulation model of the Red Sea to investigate its circulation during marine isotope stage (MIS) 5e, the peak of the last interglacial, approximately 125 ka before present. Compared to present-day conditions, MIS 5e was characterized by higher Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, accompanied by increases in air temperature of more than 2°C and global sea level approximately 8 m higher than today. As a consequence of the increased seasonality, intensified monsoonal conditions with increased winds, rainfall, and humidity in the Red Sea region are evident in speleothem records and supported by model simulations. To assess the dominant factors responsible for the observed changes, we conducted several sensitivity experiments in which the MIS 5 boundary conditions or forcing parameters were used individually. Overall, our model simulation for the last interglacial maximum reconstructs a Red Sea that is colder, less ventilated and probably more oligotrophic than at present day. The largest alteration in Red Sea circulation and properties was found for the simulation of the northward displacement and intensification of the African tropical rain belt during MIS 5e, leading to a notable increase in the fresh water flux into the Red Sea. Such an increase significantly reduced the Red Sea salinity and exchange volume of the Red Sea with the Gulf of Aden. The Red Sea reacted to the MIS 5e insolation forcing by the expected increase in seasonal sea surface temperature amplitude and overall cooling caused by lower temperatures during deep water formation in winter.

  2. Remote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, Robert J. W.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The Red Sea holds one of the most diverse marine ecosystems, primarily due to coral reefs. However, knowledge on large-scale phytoplankton dynamics is limited. Analysis of a 10-year high resolution Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) dataset, along with remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and wind, provided a detailed description of the spatiotemporal seasonal succession of phytoplankton biomass in the Red Sea. Based on MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data, four distinct Red Sea provinces and seasons are suggested, covering the major patterns of surface phytoplankton production. The Red Sea Chl-a depicts a distinct seasonality with maximum concentrations seen during the winter time (attributed to vertical mixing in the north and wind-induced horizontal intrusion of nutrient-rich water in the south), and minimum concentrations during the summer (associated with strong seasonal stratification). The initiation of the seasonal succession occurs in autumn and lasts until early spring. However, weekly Chl-a seasonal succession data revealed that during the month of June, consistent anti-cyclonic eddies transfer nutrients and/or Chl-a to the open waters of the central Red Sea. This phenomenon occurs during the stratified nutrient depleted season, and thus could provide an important source of nutrients to the open waters. Remotely-sensed synoptic observations highlight that Chl-a does not increase regularly from north to south as previously thought. The Northern part of the Central Red Sea province appears to be the most oligotrophic area (opposed to southern and northern domains). This is likely due to the absence of strong mixing, which is apparent at the northern end of the Red Sea, and low nutrient intrusion in comparison with the southern end. Although the Red Sea is considered an oligotrophic sea, sporadic blooms occur that reach mesotrophic levels. The water temperature and the prevailing winds control the nutrient concentrations within the euphotic zone

  3. A coral reef refuge in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Fine, Maoz; Gildor, Hezi; Genin, Amatzia

    2013-12-01

    The stability and persistence of coral reefs in the decades to come is uncertain due to global warming and repeated bleaching events that will lead to reduced resilience of these ecological and socio-economically important ecosystems. Identifying key refugia is potentially important for future conservation actions. We suggest that the Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) (Red Sea) may serve as a reef refugium due to a unique suite of environmental conditions. Our hypothesis is based on experimental detection of an exceptionally high bleaching threshold of northern Red Sea corals and on the potential dispersal of coral planulae larvae through a selective thermal barrier estimated using an ocean model. We propose that millennia of natural selection in the form of a thermal barrier at the southernmost end of the Red Sea have selected coral genotypes that are less susceptible to thermal stress in the northern Red Sea, delaying bleaching events in the GoA by at least a century.

  4. Monsoon oscillations regulate fertility of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Yi, Xing; Platt, Trevor; Racault, Marie-Fanny; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Pradhan, Yaswant; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-02-01

    Tropical ocean ecosystems are predicted to become warmer, more saline, and less fertile in a future Earth. The Red Sea, one of the warmest and most saline environments in the world, may afford insights into the function of the tropical ocean ecosystem in a changing planet. We show that the concentration of chlorophyll and the duration of the phytoplankton growing season in the Red Sea are controlled by the strength of the winter Arabian monsoon (through horizontal advection of fertile waters from the Indian Ocean). Furthermore, and contrary to expectation, in the last decade (1998-2010) the winter Red Sea phytoplankton biomass has increased by 75% during prolonged positive phases of the Multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index. A new mechanism is reported, revealing the synergy of monsoon and climate in regulating Red Sea greenness.

  5. The Red Sea/Gulf of Aden hydrocarbon potential reassessment

    SciTech Connect

    Beydoun, Z.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Samples from most of the 85 exploration wells drilled in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, made available to the UNDP/World Bank Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project by the participating states were examined for biostratigraphy and source rock geochemistry. Major tectonic elements segment both basins, but in the Gulf of Aden this is less evident as the drift stage is more advanced; additionally, the Red Sea exhibits asymmetry in crustal composition. All this has influenced the location and development of major sediment depocenters and delta fans. Major Neogeon syn-rift and post-rift (Miocene-Pliocene) lithostratigraphic units are correlatable from the petroliferous Gulf of Suez over the Red Sea: pre-rift (Paleogene and older) and syn-rift/post-rift (Oligocene-Miocene/Pliocene) units correlate well across the Gulf of Aden (middle Oligocene) to the southern Red Sea (upper Oligocene) to the northern Red Sea/Gulf of Suez (lower Miocene). Source-rich intervals are present in the mega-sequence of the pre-rift and syn/post-rift packages. Three undeveloped gas and condensate discoveries and a gas blowout plus numerous oil seepages in the Red Sea, and a black oil discovery in the Gulf of Aden are testimony to hydrocarbon generation and entrapment. Although a higher geothermal gradient is present in the southern Red Sea, modeling of the entire basin (rather than in segments) indicates that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the region is neither too hot nor all gas prone, but it possesses the geological parameters conducive to the generation, expulsion, and trapping of significant amount of oil and gas.

  6. Neotectonic Stress Analysis Of The Red Sea Rift By Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, S. K.; Hayashi, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Red Sea is a tectonic rift that was formed in the late Oligocene-early Miocene when the originally connected African and Arabian land masses broke apart. At first it was a continental rift, then, as Arabia drifted away, developed into an intercontinental system that today separates the independent Arabian plate from the African plate. The Red Sea rift is part of an extensive global system of faults running approximately north to south. In the present study, numerical modeling on the Saudi Arabian seismic reflection profile is carried out to examine the neotectonic stress field in the south western Red Sea-Arabian plate margin to reveal kinetics of active fault system using two-dimensional elastic finite element method under plane strain condition. The Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion has been adopted to analyze the relationship between stress distribution and fault formation. A Saudi Arabian reflection profile is adopted for the modeling and extensional displacement boundary condition is imposed along NE-SW direction. Our result shows the extensional displacement and physical properties of rock layer control the distribution, orientation, magnitude and intensity of the stress and fault development. According to the calculated stress patterns of failure elements, normal faults develop in the Red Sea and Arabian Plate margin. The results from our simulation are in good agreement with those of the seismicity, focal mechanism solution of earthquakes and active faulting in the Red Sea. Key words: Red Sea rift, numerical modeling, extension, neotectonics

  7. Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Tao, Weichun; Yapici, Tahir; Warsama, Bashir; Engelbrecht, Johann P.

    2016-09-01

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effects on the Red Sea, land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of windblown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used in climate

  8. Egyptian Red Sea petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Y.H.; Shalaan, A.A.; Zaki, H.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The primary objectives were to encourage increased hydrocarbon exploration techniques basin wide, and to train national geoscientists in exploration techniques. The study was carried out be task forces for each participating country, working in Cairo under the supervision of World Bank technical personnel. In addition, biostratigraphic, paleoenvironmental, and lithostratigraphic analyses by Robertson Group and geochemical studies and BEICIP were carried out on well cuttings and core samples. The study of the Egyptian Red Sea was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. This included reports, sections, and wireline logs from 13 well, samples from ten wells for biostratigraphic analysis, and samples from eight wells for geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on 4,350 line-km of seismic data selected from a grid of 19,000 line-km of data. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis, including the sea floor, top, and near base of middle to upper Miocene evaporites, and approximate acoustic basement. The results show that the Egyptian Red Sea is similar to the better known, productive Gulf of Suez in many respects, including overall tectonic evolution and structural style, present geothermal gradients, and Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic sequence. Based in part on this similarity, the Egyptian Red Sea appears to contain the necessary elements for an attractive petroleum potential.

  9. Modelling the Seasonal Overturning Circulation in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Pratt, Larry; Bower, Amy; Koehl, Armin; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2015-04-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using 50-year, high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is successfully simulated, and the structures of the intruding subsurface Gulf of Aden intermediate water are in good agreement with summer observations in 2011. The model results suggest that the summer overturning circulation is driven by the combined effect of the shoaling of the thermocline in the Gulf of Aden resulting from remote winds in the Arabian Sea and an upward surface slope from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden set up by local surface winds in the Red Sea. For the winter overturning circulation, the climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24°N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model's winter overturning circulation.

  10. Identified Natural Hazards May Cause Adverse Impact on Sustainability of Desalination Plants in Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburizaiza, O. S.; Zaigham, N. A.; Nayyar, Z. A.; Mahar, G. A.; Siddique, A.; Eusufi, S. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Red Sea and its surrounding countries have harsh arid climatic conditions where fast growth of the socio-economic activities and rapid change of lifestyle have caused tremendous stress on water to the level of acute crisis. To meet the water demands, the Red Sea countries have adopted seawater desalination giving priority against their land-based resources. Saudi Arabia is the largest desalinated-water producers in the Red Sea and has practically no adequate backup plan in case of sudden unforeseen emergency. Out of about 3.64 million m3/day, Saudi Arabia is alone being desalinated about 3.29 m3/day seawater from Red Sea and more projects are in progress. Present integrated research study has identified some of natural and anthropogenic hazards, which may be major threats to the quality of the seawater as well as to the desalination plants themselves. Results of present study reveal that the submarine complex morphologic features may cause the isolation of Red Sea from any of the open sea, the increase in the seismicity trends, the active volcanism causing unique longitudinal as well as transverse deformations of the axial trough particularly in the southern part of the Red Sea, the consistently generating enormous hot-brine tectonic-factory all along the deeper parts of the Red Sea rifting trough and other related issues. Considering the identified odd conditions, the total dependence on seawater desalination may not be worthwhile for sustainable water management strategy and consequent socio-economic developments in future. It is recommended that the priority should also be given mainly in three main disciplines to meet the future water challenges - one, developing reliable backup water management; second, alternate options for the supplementary resources of water; and third, the development and immediate implementation of the water-use conservation strategy plan.

  11. Incipient seafloor spreading segments: Insights from the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalki, K. A.; Betts, P. G.; Ailleres, L.

    2016-03-01

    Crustal-scale forward models of marine satellite potential field data suggest that the Red Sea comprises a single segment of ocean crust, which extends along ~60% of the Red Sea. The segment "tips" are bounded by continental crust, and there is no evidence for transforms at the segment terminations at the south. These observations indicate that ocean crust formation does not necessarily occur in response to wholesale tearing or "unzipping" of continental lithosphere nor is it necessarily controlled by preexisting transform faults. Ocean crust initiation occurs as a series of isolated segments that coalesce as the basin evolves. The recognition of this process in an orthogonal extension setting is comparable to spreading segmentation in modern ocean systems generated at a highly oblique convergent margin, suggesting that oceanic crust segmentation is not controlled by kinematic boundary conditions. The Red Sea may represent a combination of incipient type I and type II passive margins development.

  12. Rare parasitic copepods (Siphonostomatoida: Lernanthropidae) from Egyptian Red Sea fishes.

    PubMed

    El-Rashidy, Hoda Hassan; Boxshall, Geoffrey Allan

    2016-10-01

    Two rare species of parasitic copepods belonging to the genus Lernanthropus de Blainville, 1822 (Siphonostomatoida: Lernanthropidae) are redescribed in detail, based on material collected from Red Sea fishes, caught at El-Tor, near Sharm El-Sheikh on the Red Sea coast of Egypt. Adult females of Lernanthropus sanguineus Song & Chen, 1976 were found on the gills of snapper Lutjanus fulviflamma (Forsskål). This species was known only from its original description based on material from Chinese waters. Adult females of Lernanthropus triangularis Pillai, 1963 were obtained from the gills of mojarra Gerres oyena (Forsskål). Both parasite species are new records for Egyptian Red Sea waters and both host records are new. PMID:27638733

  13. Risk Assessment of Organochlorines in Mollusk from the Mediterranean and Red Sea Coasts of Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; El-Said, Ghada F; Khaled, Azza

    2016-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) residues were studied in different mollusk species from the Egyptian Mediterranean and Red Sea coasts. The average levels of OCPs in mollusks comprised chlordanes, dieldrins, total endrin, endosulfan compounds, and methoxychlor (DECEM), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs). The averages of HCHs, DDTs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in mollusks from the Mediterranean Sea were 1.13±1.21, 1.30±1.27, and 1.40±0.93 ng/g, respectively; from the Red Sea, they were 0.62±0.90, 1.77±1.82, and 6.44±5.05 ng/g, respectively. The analysis of HCHs, DDTs, and PCBs in mollusks indicates a new usage of lindane, PCB congeners, and the input of technical HCH and aged DDT. The data showed that the Red Sea Coast was more affected by PCBs congeners than the Mediterranean Sea Coast, which may be attributed to the different activities along the two coastal areas. Mollusks in the Mediterranean Sea had higher dieldrins, total endrin, endosulfan compounds, and methoxychlor contents than those in the Red Sea. Interestingly, HCHs, DDTs, and PCBs levels were lower than those recommended for Swedish Food Regulation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which means that mollusks from these two coastal areas are safe as food.

  14. Risk Assessment of Organochlorines in Mollusk from the Mediterranean and Red Sea Coasts of Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; El-Said, Ghada F; Khaled, Azza

    2016-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) residues were studied in different mollusk species from the Egyptian Mediterranean and Red Sea coasts. The average levels of OCPs in mollusks comprised chlordanes, dieldrins, total endrin, endosulfan compounds, and methoxychlor (DECEM), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs). The averages of HCHs, DDTs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in mollusks from the Mediterranean Sea were 1.13±1.21, 1.30±1.27, and 1.40±0.93 ng/g, respectively; from the Red Sea, they were 0.62±0.90, 1.77±1.82, and 6.44±5.05 ng/g, respectively. The analysis of HCHs, DDTs, and PCBs in mollusks indicates a new usage of lindane, PCB congeners, and the input of technical HCH and aged DDT. The data showed that the Red Sea Coast was more affected by PCBs congeners than the Mediterranean Sea Coast, which may be attributed to the different activities along the two coastal areas. Mollusks in the Mediterranean Sea had higher dieldrins, total endrin, endosulfan compounds, and methoxychlor contents than those in the Red Sea. Interestingly, HCHs, DDTs, and PCBs levels were lower than those recommended for Swedish Food Regulation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which means that mollusks from these two coastal areas are safe as food. PMID:27131056

  15. Red List of macrofaunal benthic invertebrates of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G. H.; Madsen, P. B.; Jensen, K. T.; van Bernem, K. H.; Harms, J.; Heiber, W.; Kröncke, I.; Michaelis, H.; Rachor, E.; Reise, K.; Dekker, R.; Visser, G. J. M.; Wolff, W. J.

    1996-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea, in total, 93 species of macrofaunal benthic invertebrates are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 72 species are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trilateral Red List. 7 species are (probably) extinct in the entire Wadden Sea area. The status of 9 species of macrofaunal invertebrates is critical, 13 species are (probably) endangered, the status of 25 species is (probably) vulnerable and of 17 species (probably) susceptible.

  16. Red List of spiders (araneae) of the Wadden Sea Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangsgård, C.; Reinke, H.-D.; Schultz, W.; van Helsdingen, P. J.

    1996-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea, in total, 55 species of spiders are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 50 species are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trilateral Red List. According to the present knowledge, no species of the listed spiders are extinct in the entire Wadden Sea area. The status of 3 species of spiders is (probably) critical; 12 species are endangered; the status of 30 species is (probably) vulnerable and of 6 species susceptible.

  17. The impact of dust storms on the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.; Kalenderski, S.; Osipov, S.; Bangalath, H.

    2014-07-01

    Located in the dust belt, the Arabian Peninsula is a major source of atmospheric dust. Frequent dust outbreaks and some 15 to 20 dust storms per year have profound effects on all aspects of human activity and natural processes in this region. To quantify the effect of severe dust events on radiation fluxes and regional climate characteristics, we simulated the storm that occurred on 18-20 March 2012 using a regional weather research forecast model fully coupled with the chemistry/aerosol module (WRF-Chem). This storm swept over a remarkably large area affecting the entire Middle East, North-Eastern Africa, Afghanistan and Pakistan. It was caused by a southward propagating cold front and associated winds activated the dust production in river valleys of the lower Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq, the coastal areas in Kuwait, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates, Rub al Khali, An Nafud and Ad Dahna deserts, and along the Red Sea coast on the west side of the Arabian Peninsula. Our simulation results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations. The total amount of dust generated by the storm reached 93.76 Mt. About 80% of this amount deposited within the calculation domain. The Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf received 5.3 Mt, and the Red Sea 1.2 Mt. Dust particles bring nutrients to marine ecosystems, which is especially important for the oligothrophic Northern Red Sea. However, their contribution to the nutrient balance in the Red Sea remains largely unknown. By scaling the effect of one storm to the number of dust storms observed annually over the Red Sea, we roughly estimate the annual dust deposition to the Red Sea to be 6 Mt.

  18. The impact of dust storms on the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.; Kalenderski, S.; Osipov, S.; Bangalath, H.

    2015-01-01

    Located in the dust belt, the Arabian Peninsula is a major source of atmospheric dust. Frequent dust outbreaks and some 15 to 20 dust storms per year have profound effects on all aspects of human activity and natural processes in this region. To quantify the effect of severe dust events on radiation fluxes and regional climate characteristics, we simulated the storm that occurred from 18 to 20 March 2012 using a regional weather research forecast model fully coupled with the chemistry/aerosol module (WRF-Chem). This storm swept over a remarkably large area affecting the entire Middle East, northeastern Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. It was caused by a southward propagating cold front, and the associated winds activated the dust production in river valleys of the lower Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq; the coastal areas in Kuwait, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates; the Rub al Khali, An Nafud, and Ad Dahna deserts; and along the Red Sea coast on the west side of the Arabian Peninsula. Our simulation results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations. We estimate the total amount of dust generated by the storm to have reached 94 Mt. Approximately 78% of this dust was deposited within the calculation domain. The Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf received 5.3 Mt and the Red Sea 1.2 Mt of dust. Dust particles bring nutrients to marine ecosystems, which is especially important for the oligotrophic Northern Red Sea. However, their contribution to the nutrient balance in the Red Sea remains largely unknown. By scaling the effect of one storm to the number of dust storms observed annually over the Red Sea, we estimate the annual dust deposition to the Red Sea, associated with major dust storms, to be 6 Mt.

  19. Red List of beetles of the Wadden Sea Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, V.; Suikat, R.; Aßmann, Th.

    1996-10-01

    As no data on beetles in the Wadden Sea area are available from The Netherlands, the trilateral status of threat only refers to the Danish and German part of the Wadden Sea. In this area, in total, 238 species of beetles are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 189 species are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trilateral Red List. 4 species are (probably) extinct in the entire Wadden Sea area. The status of 24 species of beetles is (probably) critical, 46 species are (probably) endangered, the status of 86 species is (probably) vulnerable and of 29 species (probably) susceptible.

  20. Red List of grasshoppers of the Wadden Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, K.; Grein, G.; Dierking, U.; van Wingerden, W. K. R. E.

    1996-10-01

    In typical coastal habitats of the Wadden Sea, 15 species of grasshoppers are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 14 species are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trilateral Red List. The situation in the Danish part of the Wadden Sea could only be taken into consideration in a limited way due to the latest available data in Denmark from 1969. The status of 2 species of grasshoppers in the entire Wadden Sea area is critical, 4 species are endangered, the status of 3 species is vulnerable and of 5 species susceptible.

  1. Plate tectonics of the Red Sea and East Africa.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D P; Davies, D; Molnar, P

    1970-04-18

    The relative motion between the plates on each side of the East African Rift Valley can be obtained from the opening of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. The calculated direction of relative motion agrees well with fault plane solutions for earthquakes north of the equator. PMID:16057189

  2. Plate tectonics of the Red Sea and East Africa.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D P; Davies, D; Molnar, P

    1970-04-18

    The relative motion between the plates on each side of the East African Rift Valley can be obtained from the opening of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. The calculated direction of relative motion agrees well with fault plane solutions for earthquakes north of the equator.

  3. New fatty acids from the Red Sea sponge Mycale euplectellioides.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gamal A; Abd-Elrazek, Ali E E; Hassanean, Hashim A; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Almohammadi, Ameen; Youssef, Diaa T A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the Red Sea sponge Mycale euplectellioides afforded two new compounds; hexacosa-(6Z,10Z)-dienoic acid methyl ester (1) and hexacosa-(6Z,10Z)-dienoic acid (2), along with two known compounds: icosa-(8Z,11Z)-dienoic acid methyl ester (3) and β-sitosterol (4). The structures were elucidated by the interpretation of their spectral data. The total methanol extract (TME) of the sponge exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against the different strains at a concentration of 100 mg/mL. All tested fractions did not exhibit any activity against Serratia marcescens and tested fungal strains. The TME and different fractions displayed anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg compared with indomethacin (8 mg). The TME exhibited a remarkable hepato-protective effect in CCl4-induced liver damage compared with silymarin. Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against A549 non-small cell lung cancer, the U373 glioblastoma and the PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines.

  4. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:25309996

  5. Nature of crust in the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Park, Yongcheol

    2014-07-01

    A transition between continental crust in the northern Red Sea and oceanic crust in the southern Red Sea coincides broadly with a southward increase in plate tectonic separation rate and with a decrease in upper mantle seismic velocity. We re-evaluate here the nature of crust in the intervening central Red Sea with the results of legacy seismic refraction experiments and recently released marine gravity anomalies derived from satellite altimeter measurements. In the refraction data, collected east of Thetis Deep, velocities of 6.6-6.9 km s- 1 of a deep refracting layer, which are similar to measured velocities of unaltered gabbro samples, extend outside the deep to 65 km from the axis. The new version of the marine gravity field reveals trends crossing the central Red Sea. Whereas some of them connect with major lineaments in the surrounding African-Arabian shield, those around Thetis Deep die out towards the coastlines. They can be paired across the ridge and lie slightly oblique to plate motions, as is typical of oceanic fracture zones or non-transform discontinuities migrating away from hotspots. Taken together these observations support the view that an oceanic rather than extended continental crust underlies this part of the central Red Sea. The crestal mountains around the median valleys of slow-spreading ridges are typically 500-1000 m lower at spreading discontinuities. Around Thetis Deep, the similar pattern in the gravity field to those of slow-spreading ridges suggests that the crestal mountains may variably block or impede flowage of evaporites towards the spreading centre, whereas the discontinuities may mark areas where flowage is unobstructed. Limited multibeam data collected in transits outside Thetis Deep show oblique fabrics as expected from these predicted movements.

  6. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  7. Red List of vascular plants of the Wadden Sea Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind, P.; van der Ende, M.; Garve, E.; Schacherer, A.; Thissen, J. B. M.

    1996-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea area, a total of 248 (sub)species of vascular plants are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 216 (sub)species are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trialteral Red List. 17 (sub)species of the listed vascular plants are (probably) extinct in the entire Wadden Sea area. The status of 47 (sub)species of vascular plants is (probably) critical; 61 (sub)species are (probably) endangered; the status of 65 (sub)species is (probably) vulnerable and that of 26 (sub)species susceptible.

  8. The tectonic evolution of Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.B. ); Sikander, A.H. ); Abouzakhm, A.G.

    1991-08-01

    The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, formed by rifting of the Arabian plate away from Africa, have been the subjects of numerous studies since the 1960s. Geophysical and geological data gathered during hydrocarbon exploration by several companies are being synthesized as part of the World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project. This synthesis provides an opportunity to study the regional variation in tectonic history and structural style within the two basins, particularly toward the basin margins, where data coverage is most complete and a thinner sedimentary cover allows more reliable interpretation of deeper horizons. Based on this data, most of the Red Sea shows a similar tectonic history to that of the Gulf of Suez. Widespread normal faulting developed contemporaneous with deposition of a dominantly clastic sequence of Oligocene( ) to middle Miocene age. The faulting often dies out within or below thick middle to upper Miocene evaporite deposits with only few faults affecting the younger units. The Gulf of Aden, on the other hand, shows a strong contrast between largely west-northwest-east-southeast oriented extensional structures on land, and generally more east-west oriented extensional structures on the continental shelves and slopes. The onshore extensional structures oriented oblique to the coast, and approximately perpendicular to transform fault trends in the oceanic crust of the central Gulf of Aden. This contrast is extensional structure orientations has important implications for the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Aden.

  9. The Tidal Dynamics and Energy Balance of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, David T.; Abualnaja, Yasser O.; NP, Mohammedali; Eltaib, Elfatih B.

    2014-05-01

    The semidiurnal tides of the Red Sea have been mapped as a classic half-wavelength standing wave. Because of the earth's rotation, the pattern is actually composed of an ingoing Kelvin wave, with maximum amplitude found in the northern eastern side along the Saudi Arabia coastline, and a reflected south-going Kelvin wave along the southern African coastline. The result is tidal rotation around a central amphidrome; this amphidrome, because of energy losses in the reflected wave, is nearer to the African side close to Port Sudan. The movements of this amphidrome can be mapped through a spring-neap tidal cycle to show how the tidal energy is dissipated through the Red Sea. There are suggestions that that Red Sea tides are entirely due to direct internal tidal gravitational astronomical forcing; this is an alternative to the model of energy flux from the Gulf of Aden tides in the Indian Ocean, through the entrance at Bab el Mandeb. These alternative energy sources will be investigated in the project.

  10. Timing of uplift peripheral to the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Zimmermann, R.A.; Bohannon, R.G.; Schmidt, D.L.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A Prominent escarpment is found along the western margin of the Arabian Shield. Elevations along this escarpment are up to 3200 m above the Red Sea. Between the Red Sea and the crest of the escarpment is a relatively featureless coastal plane that is ??? 50 km across. The coastal plane abruptly gives way to the steep mountainous terrain, the elevation of which increases abruptly towards the high crest. The elevation slowly decreases to the east of the high crest. Forty-four apatite fission-track ages have been determined on rocks from the Proterozoic Arabian Shield in southwestern Saudi Arabia. These ages range from 13.8 to 568 Ma. In general, the youngest ages are found at low elevations along the base of the escarpment near the eastern edge of the coastal plane. The oldest ages are from along and to the east of the crest. The fission-track data from Saudi Arabia show that there was a period of minor uplift and cooling during the Cretaceous. This was followed by a relatively stable period which lasted until the Mid to Upper Miocene. The latest uplift and erosion began slightly younger than 13.8 Ma. This latest episode resulted in a minimum uplift of 3 km and is related to the Red Sea Rift. Samples totally annealed prior to this latest episode of uplift and cooling have not yet reached the surface.

  11. Red Sea and Gulf of Aden petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sikander, A.H. ); Allen, R.B. ); Abouzakhm, A.G.

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The primary objectives were to encourage increased hydrocarbon exploration activity within the project area by applying recent exploration techniques basin wide, and to train national geoscientists in exploration techniques. The study was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. This included reports, sections, and wireline logs from most of the offshore wells, and samples for biostratigraphic and geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on seismic data selected from basinwide grids. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis in the Red Sea, including the sea floor, top, and near base of middle to upper Miocene evaporite, and approximate acoustic basement, and an equivalent of horizons were identified in the Gulf of Aden. The results of the syntheses show that the hydrocarbon potential of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden is variable. The Red Sea shows an attractive potential in much of the basin in Miocene to Holocene synrift to post-rift units. This may locally include either lower to middle Miocene sub-evaporite syn-rift units or Pliocene to Holocene superrift units, depending on variations in structural development and sedimentation and thermal history. In addition, sub-rift units of Mesozoic to Paleogene age show an attractive potential in some areas. The primary potential in the Gulf of Aden, on the other hand, may be in Mesozoic to Eocene sub-rift units, with only limited potential in Oligocene and younger units.

  12. Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, Austin.

    This packet provides information on the balance between the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker and modern forestry in Texas. A set of classroom activities about the Red-cockaded Woodpecker and its habitat for grades 3-6, and a booklet, a pamphlet, and a poster are featured. Sections of the booklet include: (1) "The Red-cockaded Woodpecker"; (2)…

  13. Impacts of Atmospheric Modes of Variability on Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Yasser O.; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Josey, Simon A.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Raitsos, Dionissios E.

    2014-05-01

    The potential impacts on Red Sea surface heat exchange of various major modes of atmospheric variability are investigated using the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis and the Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Flux dataset (OAFlux) merged satellite+reanalysis dataset. The mode impacts on surface net heat flux are quantified by calculating the heat flux anomaly that corresponds to a unit positive value of each index for each grid point. The seasonal effects of the atmospheric forcing are investigated considering two and four typical seasons of a calendar year. Considering two seasons, the impacts are strongest during the winter-centered part of the year (October to March) mainly over the northern sub-basin. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic - West Russia Pattern (EAWR), and the Indian Monsoon Index (IMI) have the greatest effects. They generate negative anomalies (by definition additional ocean heat loss) of 7-12 W/m2 in the northern Red Sea basin mean net heat flux for a unit positive value of the mode index. During the summer (April to September), the signal is smaller and the East Atlantic (EA) and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) modes have the strongest impact which is now located in the southern Red Sea (sub-basin anomalies of 4 W/m2 for unit positive mode index, negative for EA and positive for MEI). Results obtained by analysis carried out on the traditional four-season basis reveal that indices impact peaks during the typical boreal winter (DJF) with average anomalies of 12-18 W/m2 to be found in the northern part. It is noteworthy that during the winter, the EAWR generates negative anomalies around 30 W/m2 over the most of the central Red Sea. During the spring (MAM), summer (JJA) and autumn (SON) the anomalies are considerably lower, especially during the spring when the mode impacts are negligible. Atmospheric modes have a stronger effect on air-sea heat flux over the northern

  14. Saurida lessepsianus a new species of lizardfish (Pisces: Synodontidae) from the Red Sea and Mediterranean Sea, with a key to Saurida species in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Russell, Barry C; Golani, Daniel; Tikochinski, Yaron

    2015-05-12

    Saurida lessepsianus n. sp., a lizardfish (Aulopiformes: Synodontidae) from the Red Sea and Mediterranean Sea, previously misidentified as S. undosquamis (Richardson) and more recently as S. macrolepis Tanaka, is described as a new species. It is characterised by the following combination of characters: dorsal fin with 11-12 rays; pectoral fins with 13-15 rays; lateral-line scales 47-51; transverse scale rows above lateral line 4½, below lateral line 5½; pectoral fins moderately long (extending to between just before or just beyond a line from origin of pelvic fins to origin of dorsal fin); 2 rows of teeth on outer palatines; 0-2 teeth on vomer; tongue with 3-6 rows of teeth posteriorly; caudal peduncle slightly compressed (depth a little more than width); upper margin of caudal fin with row of 3-8 (usually 6 or 7) small black spots; stomach pale grey to blackish anteriorly; intestine whitish. The species is common in the Red Sea and as a result of Lessepsian migration through the Suez Canal, it is now widely distributed in the eastern Mediterranean. The taxonomic status of two other Red Sea nominal species, Saurus badimottah Rüppell [= Saurida tumbil (Bloch)] and Saurida sinaitica Dollfus in Gruvel (a nomen nudum), is clarified. A key is provided for the species of Saurida in the Red Sea.

  15. Revisiting Seafloor-Spreading in the Red Sea: Basement Nature, Transforms and Ocean-Continent Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapponnier, P.; Dyment, J.; Zinger, M. A.; Franken, D.; Afifi, A. M.; Wyllie, A.; Ali, H. G.; Hanbal, I.

    2013-12-01

    A new marine geophysical survey on the Saudi Arabian side of the Red Sea confirms early inferences that ~ 2/3 of the eastern Red Sea is floored by oceanic crust. Most seismic profiles south of 24°N show a strongly reflective, landward-deepening volcanic basement up to ~ 100 km east of the axial ridge, beneath thick evaporitic deposits. This position of the Ocean-Continent Boundary (OCB) is consistent with gravity measurements. The low amplitudes and long wavelengths of magnetic anomalies older than Chrons 1-3 can be accounted for by low-pass filtering due to thick sediments. Seafloor-spreading throughout the Red Sea started around 15 Ma, as in the western Gulf of Aden. Its onset was coeval with the activation of the Aqaba/Levant transform and short-cutting of the Gulf of Suez. The main difference between the southern and northern Red Sea lies not in the nature of the crust but in the direction and modulus of the plate motion rate. The ~ 30° counterclockwise strike change and halving of the spreading rate (~ 16 to ~ 8 mm/yr) between the Hermil (17°N) and Suez triple junctions results in a shift from slow (≈ North Atlantic) to highly oblique, ultra-slow (≈ Southwest Indian) ridge type. The obliquity of spreading in the central and northern basins is taken up by transform discontinuities that stop ~ 40 km short of the coastline, at the OCB. Three large transform fault systems (Jeddah, Zabargad, El Akhawein) nucleated as continental transfer faults reactivating NNE-trending Proterozoic shear zones. The former two systems divide the Red Sea into three main basins. Between ~15 and ~5 Ma, for about 10 million years, thick evaporites were deposited directly on top of oceanic crust in deep water, as the depositional environment, modulated by climate, became restricted by the Suez and Afar/Bab-el-Mandeb volcano-tectonic 'flood-gates.' The presence of these thick deposits (up to ~ 8 km) suffices to account for the difference between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden

  16. Sea Breezes over the Red Sea: Affect of topography and interaction with Desert Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Basit A.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2014-05-01

    Thermodynamic structure of sea-breeze, its interaction with coastal mountains, desert plateau and desert convective boundary layer have been investigated in the middle region of the Red Sea around 25°N, at the Western coast of Saudi Arabia. Sea and land breeze is a common meteorological phenomenon in most of the coastal regions around the world. Sea-Breeze effects the local meteorology and cause changes in wind speed, direction, cloud cover and sometimes precipitation. The occurrence of sea-breeze, its intensity and landward propagation are important for wind energy resource assessment, load forecasting for existing wind farms, air pollution, marine and aviation applications. The thermally induced mesoscale circulation of sea breeze modifies the desert Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) by forming Convective Internal Boundary Layer (CIBL), and propagates inland as a density current. The leading edge of the denser marine air rapidly moves inland undercutting the hot and dry desert air mass. The warm air lifts up along the frontal boundary and if contains enough moisture a band of clouds is formed along the sea breeze front (SBF). This study focuses on the thermodynamic structure of sea-breeze as it propagates over coastal rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, east of the Red Sea coast, and the desert plateau across the mountain range. Additional effects of topographical gaps such as Tokar gap on the dynamics of sea-land breezes have also been discussed. Interaction of SBF with the desert convective boundary layer provide extra lifting that could further enhance the convective instability along the frontal boundary. This study provides a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics of interaction of the SBF and convective internal boundary layer over the desert. Observational data from a buoy and meteorological stations have been utilized while The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) modeling system has been employed in real and 2D idealized configuration.

  17. The status of coral reef ecology research in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, M. L.; Hoey, A. S.; Bass, W. H.; Bouwmeester, J.; Catania, D.; Cochran, J. E. M.; Khalil, M. T.; Miyake, S.; Mughal, M. R.; Spaet, J. L. Y.; Saenz-Agudelo, P.

    2013-09-01

    The Red Sea has long been recognized as a region of high biodiversity and endemism. Despite this diversity and early history of scientific work, our understanding of the ecology of coral reefs in the Red Sea has lagged behind that of other large coral reef systems. We carried out a quantitative assessment of ISI-listed research published from the Red Sea in eight specific topics (apex predators, connectivity, coral bleaching, coral reproductive biology, herbivory, marine protected areas, non-coral invertebrates and reef-associated bacteria) and compared the amount of research conducted in the Red Sea to that from Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and the Caribbean. On average, for these eight topics, the Red Sea had 1/6th the amount of research compared to the GBR and about 1/8th the amount of the Caribbean. Further, more than 50 % of the published research from the Red Sea originated from the Gulf of Aqaba, a small area (<2 % of the area of the Red Sea) in the far northern Red Sea. We summarize the general state of knowledge in these eight topics and highlight the areas of future research priorities for the Red Sea region. Notably, data that could inform science-based management approaches are badly lacking in most Red Sea countries. The Red Sea, as a geologically "young" sea located in one of the warmest regions of the world, has the potential to provide insight into pressing topics such as speciation processes as well as the capacity of reef systems and organisms to adapt to global climate change. As one of the world's most biodiverse coral reef regions, the Red Sea may yet have a significant role to play in our understanding of coral reef ecology at a global scale.

  18. Birth of an ocean in the Red Sea: Initial pangs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, Marco; Bonatti, Enrico; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Cipriani, Anna; Cocchi, Luca; Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Carminati, Eugenio; Ottolini, Luisa; Schettino, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    We obtained areal variations of crustal thickness, magnetic intensity, and degree of melting of the sub-axial upwelling mantle at Thetis and Nereus Deeps, the two northernmost axial segments of initial oceanic crustal accretion in the Red Sea, where Arabia is separating from Africa. The initial emplacement of oceanic crust occurred at South Thetis and Central Nereus roughly ˜2.2 and ˜2 Ma, respectively, and is taking place today in the northern Thetis and southern Nereus tips. Basaltic glasses major and trace element composition suggests a rift-to-drift transition marked by magmatic activity with typical MORB signature, with no contamination by continental lithosphere, but with slight differences in mantle source composition and/or potential temperature between Thetis and Nereus. Eruption rate, spreading rate, magnetic intensity, crustal thickness and degree of mantle melting were highest at both Thetis and Nereus in the very initial phases of oceanic crust accretion, immediately after continental breakup, probably due to fast mantle upwelling enhanced by an initially strong horizontal thermal gradient. This is consistent with a rift model where the lower continental lithosphere has been replaced by upwelling asthenosphere before continental rupturing, implying depth-dependent extension due to decoupling between the upper and lower lithosphere with mantle-lithosphere-necking breakup before crustal-necking breakup. Independent along-axis centers of upwelling form at the rifting stage just before oceanic crust accretion, with buoyancy-driven convection within a hot, low viscosity asthenosphere. Each initial axial cell taps a different asthenospheric source and serves as nucleus for axial propagation of oceanic accretion, resulting in linear segments of spreading.

  19. Red Sea/Gulf of Aden source rock geochemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ducreux, C.; Mathurin, G.; Latreille, M. )

    1991-08-01

    The potential of hydrogen generation in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden was studied by geochemical analyses of 2,271 samples from 23 wells drilled in 6 countries within the area. Selection of candidate source beds was primarily a function of the sedimentary column penetrated by drilling (i.e., whereas sub-Tertiary sediments are accessible in Somalia and Yemen in the Gulf of Aden, sampling below the thick Neogene evaporitic sequence in the Red Sea could not be achieved due to a general lack of penetration to such levels). Organic matter content and type, maturity levels, petroleum potential of the rock analyzed, and its capacity to have generated liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons are the basic results provided by the analyses. Geochemical well correlations within and between subbasins are presented using the two most representative parameters: total organic carbon (TOC) and Petroleum Potential (PP = S{sub 1} + S{sub 2}), expressed in kilograms of hydrocarbons per ton of rock. In general, results obtained in the two rift basins, with sampling mostly in Neogene sediments in the Red Sea and in sub-Tertiary and Tertiary sediments in the Gulf of Aden, indicate the presence of favorable sources preferentially in this sub-Tertiary succession. It is stressed that geochemical analysis results are from wells whose locations are generally on structural highs and, therefore, are not representative (especially in terms of maturation) of conditions in adjacent depressions, particularly where the difference in structural level is great. Sound simulation modeling makes possible the reconstruction regional thermal and burial history and, thus, identification of maturation kitchens.

  20. Red sea corals as biomonitors of trace metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Hanna, R G; Muir, G L

    1990-05-01

    Red Sea corals have been found to be biomonitors of trace metal pollution. A comparative study was undertaken on three species from a polluted area near a desalination plant at Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) and from an unpolluted area. The results show that corals take-up trace elements from their aquatic environment and thereby act to record changes in the composition of that environment. Variations in the composition of skeletons and soft tissues of corals have been correlated with changes in sea water composition. Three coral species, Porites lutea, Goniastrea retiformis and Pocillopora verrucosa have been analysed for Hg, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cd, V, Al, Cr, Mg, B, Ca, and Sr in both skeletal and soft tissues. Results show that corals in the polluted areas have significantly higher concentrations of trace elements compared to that of corals from unpolluted areas.

  1. Cytotoxic polyacetylenes from the Red Sea sponge Siphonochalina siphonella.

    PubMed

    Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N; Angawy, Rihab; Alarif, Waliled M; Saqer, Esraa A; Badria, Farid A

    2014-01-01

    Two new polyacetylenes, callyspongenol-D (1) and callyspongendiol (2), the known polyacetylene dehydrosiphonochalynol (3), and the known triterpenoid sipholenol-A (4) were isolated from the Red Sea sponge Siphonochalina siphonella. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. The cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds towards the human mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7 was determined by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, and compounds 4 and 1 were found to be the most toxic of the four, with IC50 values of 8.8 and 11.7 microM, respectively. PMID:24873032

  2. Simple shear detachment fault system and marginal grabens in the southernmost Red Sea rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfaye, Samson; Ghebreab, Woldai

    2013-11-01

    The NNW-SSE oriented Red Sea rift, which separates the African and Arabian plates, bifurcates southwards into two parallel branches, southeastern and southern, collectively referred to as the southernmost Red Sea rift. The southern branch forms the magmatically and seismo-tectonically active Afar rift, while the less active southeastern branch connects the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden through the strait of Bab el Mandeb. The Afar rift is characterized by lateral heterogeneities in crustal thickness, and along-strike variation in extension. The Danakil horst, a counterclockwise rotating, narrow sliver of coherent continental relic, stands between the two rift branches. The western margin of the Afar rift is marked by a series of N-S aligned right-lateral-stepping and seismo-tectonically active marginal grabens. The tectonic configuration of the parallel rift branches, the alignment of the marginal grabens, and the Danakil horst are linked to the initial mode of stretching of the continental crust and its progressive deformation that led to the breakup of the once contiguous African-Arabian plates. We attribute the initial stretching of the continental crust to a simple shear ramp-flat detachment fault geometry where the marginal grabens mark the breakaway zone. The rift basins represent the ramps and the Danakil horst corresponds to the flat in the detachment fault system. As extension progressed, pure shear deformation dominated and overprinted the initial low-angle detachment fault system. Magmatic activity continues to play an integral part in extensional deformation in the southernmost Red Sea rift.

  3. Cytotoxic Compounds from the Saudi Red Sea Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamal, Ali A.; Al-Massarani, Shaza M.; Shaala, Lamiaa A.; Alahdald, Abdulrahman M.; Al-Said, Mansour S.; Ashour, Abdelkader E.; Kumar, Ashok; Abdel-Kader, Maged S.; Abdel-Mageed, Wael M.; Youssef, Diaa T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the Red Sea sponge Xestospongia testudinaria led to the isolation of 13 compounds including two new sterol esters, xestosterol palmitate (2) and xestosterol ester of l6′-bromo-(7′E,11′E,l5′E)-hexadeca-7′,11′,l5′-triene-5′,13′-diynoic acid (4), together with eleven known compounds: xestosterol (1), xestosterol ester of 18′-bromooctadeca-7′E,9′E-diene-7′,15′-diynoic acid (3), and the brominated acetylenic fatty acid derivatives, (5E,11E,15E,19E)-20-bromoeicosa-5,11,15,19-tetraene-9,17-diynoic acid (5), 18,18-dibromo-(9E)-octadeca-9,17-diene-5,7-diynoic acid (6), 18-bromooctadeca-(9E,17E)-diene-7,15-diynoic acid (7), 18-bromooctadeca-(9E,13E,17E)-triene-7,15-diynoic acid (8), l6-bromo (7E,11E,l5E)hexadeca-7,11,l5-triene-5,13-diynoic acid (9), 2-methylmaleimide-5-oxime (10), maleimide-5-oxime (11), tetillapyrone (12), and nortetillapyrone (13). The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were accomplished using one- and two-dimensional NMR, infrared and high-resolution electron impact mass spectroscopy (1D, 2D NMR, IR and HREIMS), and by comparison with the data of the known compounds. The total alcoholic and n-hexane extracts showed remarkable cytotoxic activity against human cervical cancer (HeLa), human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2), and human medulloblastoma (Daoy) cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the dibrominated C18-acetylenic fatty acid (6) exhibited the most potent growth inhibitory activity against these cancer cell lines followed by Compounds 7 and 9. Apparently, the dibromination of the terminal olefinic moiety has an enhanced effect on the cytotoxic activity. PMID:27128926

  4. Bomb radiocarbon in the Red Sea: A medium-scale gas exchange experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cember, R.

    1989-02-15

    The history of bomb-produced radiocarbon in the surface waters of the Red Sea and the western Gulf of Aden was reconstructed from annual growth bands of corals. Gulf of Aden surface water entering the Red Sea and flowing to the north at the surface of the Red Sea becomes progressively enriched in bomb /sup 14/C by air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide. With physical oceanographic observations and analysis as the basis of a simple model, this progressive northward enrichment can be used to calculate a mean invasionn flux for CO/sub 2/ across the Red Sea surface. The CO/sub 2/ invasion flux so calculated is 8 mol/m/sup 2//yr with an uncertainty of approximately 2 mol/m/sup 2//yr. When combined with the extensive historical observations of wind speeds in the Red Sea, the calculated CO/sub 2/ invasion flux supports the empirical relationship between CO/sub 2/ invasion and wind speed proposed by other workers. Sea surface pCO/sub 2/ was measured at seven stations along the length of the Red Sea in January 1985. These pCO/sub 2/ data show that in midwinter the net flux of CO/sub 2/ across the Red Sea surface (i.e. the difference between the invasion and evasion fluxes) is approximately zero for the Red Sea as a whole. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  5. Oil contamination of raptors migrating along the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Clark, W S; Gorney, E

    1987-01-01

    There are few accounts of oil contamination of raptors, and it has not been considered a threat for them. However, we and our colleagues found oil-based asphalt on 55 individuals of 9 species out of 1052 raptors (5.2%) captured and examined in the spring of 1985 and 1986 during our raptor migration study at Elat, Israel. Some were extensively contaminated and probably succumbed to the effects of ingested asphalt. The birds most likely picked up the contamination while drinking water from pools with surface oil. Examples of the contamination will be described. Over 1.2 million raptors were counted passing Elat during the spring of 1985. If 5% of these were contaminated, that would be over 60,000 birds, and this does not consider the raptors that migrate along the Red Sea and do not pass near Elat, nor those that pass Elat unseen by the counters. Thus asphalt contamination could be a major problem for raptors migrating along the Red Sea.

  6. The Influence of Wind and Basin Eddies in Controlling Sea Level Variations in the Coastal Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Yasser O.; Churchill, James H.; Nellayaputhenpeedika, Mohammedali; Limeburner, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Sea level variations in the central Red Sea coastal zone span a range of roughly 1.2 m. Though relatively small, these water level changes can significantly impact the environment over the shallow reef tops prevalent in the central Red Sea, altering the water depth by a factor or two or more. Roughly half of the coastal sea level variance in central Red Sea is due to elevation changes in an 'intermediate' frequency band, with periods between 2 days and 1 month. We examined the sea level signal in this band using the data from pressure sensors maintained for more than five years at a number of locations in Saudi Arabian coastal waters between 20.1 and 23.5 oN. We find that the intermediate-band sea level variations are strongly correlated with the local wind stress measured at a meteorological buoy. The maximum pressure-wind correlation occurs at wind direction closely aligned with the alongshore orientation and at a lag (wind leading) of 45 hr, which is consistent with the expected response of the coastal sea level to local wind forcing. However, less than half of the sea level variance in the intermediate band is related, through linear correlation, with local wind forcing. Our analysis indicates that the residual coastal sea level signal, not associated with wind forcing, is largely driven remotely by the passage of mesoscale eddies, revealed by satellite altimeter-derived sea level anomaly fields of the central Red Sea. These eddy-driven coastal sea level changes occur on time scales of 10-30 days. They span a range of 0.5 m, and thus constitute an import component of the sea level signal in the coastal Red Sea.

  7. Seasonal variability of the Red Sea, from GRACE time-variable gravity and altimeter sea surface height measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John; Smeed, David; Leuliette, Eric; Swenson, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal variability of sea surface height and mass within the Red Sea, occurs mostly through the exchange of heat with the atmosphere and wind-driven inflow and outflow of water through the strait of Bab el Mandab that opens into the Gulf of Aden to the south. The seasonal effects of precipitation and evaporation, of water exchange through the Suez Canal to the north, and of runoff from the adjacent land, are all small. The flow through the Bab el Mandab involves a net mass transfer into the Red Sea during the winter and a net transfer out during the summer. But that flow has a multi-layer pattern, so that in the summer there is actually an influx of cool water at intermediate (~100 m) depths. Thus, summer water in the southern Red Sea is warmer near the surface due to higher air temperatures, but cooler at intermediate depths (especially in the far south). Summer water in the northern Red Sea experiences warming by air-sea exchange only. The temperature profile affects the water density, which impacts the sea surface height but has no effect on vertically integrated mass. Here, we study this seasonal cycle by combining GRACE time-variable mass estimates, altimeter (Jason-1, Jason-2, and Envisat) measurements of sea surface height, and steric sea surface height contributions derived from depth-dependent, climatological values of temperature and salinity obtained from the World Ocean Atlas. We find good consistency, particularly in the northern Red Sea, between these three data types. Among the general characteristics of our results are: (1) the mass contributions to seasonal SSHT variations are much larger than the steric contributions; (2) the mass signal is largest in winter, consistent with winds pushing water into the Red Sea through the Strait of Bab el Mandab in winter, and out during the summer; and (3) the steric signal is largest in summer, consistent with summer sea surface warming.

  8. Nitrogen fixation in the mucus of Red Sea corals.

    PubMed

    Grover, Renaud; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Maguer, Jean-François; Ezzat, Leila; Fine, Maoz

    2014-11-15

    Scleractinian corals are essential constituents of tropical reef ecological diversity. They live in close association with diazotrophs [dinitrogen (N2)-fixing microbes], which can fix high rates of N2. Whether corals benefit from this extrinsic nitrogen source is still under debate. Until now, N2 fixation rates have been indirectly estimated using the acetylene reduction assay, which does not permit assessment of the amount of nitrogen incorporated into the different compartments of the coral holobiont. In the present study, the (15)N2 technique was applied for the first time on three Red Sea coral species. Significant (15)N enrichment was measured in particles released by corals to the surrounding seawater. N2 fixation rates were species specific and as high as 1.6-2 ng N day(-1) l(-1). However, no significant enrichment was measured in the symbiotic dinoflagellates or the coral host tissues, suggesting that corals do not benefit from diazotrophic N2 fixation.

  9. Ogaden Basin subsidence history: Another key to the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden tectonic puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, J.D.; Neese, D.; Carsten, G.

    1995-08-01

    Previous work has attempted to understand the tectonic evolution of the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden region through a focus upon plate kinematics and reconstruction of plate interactions in a two dimensional sense. A significant complement to the three dimensional puzzle can be derived from a critical examination of the vertical component, tectonic subsidence analysis. By removing the isostatic contributions of sediment loading and unloading, and fluctuations in sea level, the remaining thermal-mechanical contribution to a basin`s subsidence can be determined. Such an analysis of several Ogaden Basin wells reveals multiple pulses of tectonic subsidence and uplift which correspond to far-field tectonic activities in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. One of the more dramatic is a Jurassic tectonic pulse circa 145-130 m.a., and a later extensional event which correlates to a major subsidence event ubiquitous through-out the Gulf of Aden, related to Gondwana Land breakup activities. Tectonic uplift during the Tertiary coincides with early Red Sea rifting episodes. Such activities suggest the Ogaden Basin has been a relatively stable East African cratonic basin, but with heating-extension events related to nearby plate interactions. In terms of hydrocarbon generation, the use of steady state present day geothermal gradients, coupled with subsidence analysis shows that potential Paleozoic and Mesozoic source rocks initiated generation as early as the Jurassic. The generating potential of Paleozoic source rocks would only be exacerbated by later heating events. Furthermore, cooling and tectonic uplift during the Tertiary would tend to arrest on-going hydrocarbon generation for Jurassic source rocks in the Ogaden area.

  10. Molecular Architecture and Biomedical Leads of Terpenes from Red Sea Marine Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Mohamed Elamir F.; Mohamed, Tarik A.; Alhammady, Montaser A.; Shaheen, Alaa M.; Reda, Eman H.; Elshamy, Abdelsamed I.; Aziz, Mina; Paré, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Marine invertebrates including sponges, soft coral, tunicates, mollusks and bryozoan have proved to be a prolific source of bioactive natural products. Among marine-derived metabolites, terpenoids have provided a vast array of molecular architectures. These isoprenoid-derived metabolites also exhibit highly specialized biological activities ranging from nerve regeneration to blood-sugar regulation. As a result, intense research activity has been devoted to characterizing invertebrate terpenes from both a chemical and biological standpoint. This review focuses on the chemistry and biology of terpene metabolites isolated from the Red Sea ecosystem, a unique marine biome with one of the highest levels of biodiversity and specifically rich in invertebrate species. PMID:26006713

  11. Molecular architecture and biomedical leads of terpenes from red sea marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Mohamed Elamir F; Mohamed, Tarik A; Alhammady, Montaser A; Shaheen, Alaa M; Reda, Eman H; Elshamy, Abdelsamed I; Aziz, Mina; Paré, Paul W

    2015-05-20

    Marine invertebrates including sponges, soft coral, tunicates, mollusks and bryozoan have proved to be a prolific source of bioactive natural products. Among marine-derived metabolites, terpenoids have provided a vast array of molecular architectures. These isoprenoid-derived metabolites also exhibit highly specialized biological activities ranging from nerve regeneration to blood-sugar regulation. As a result, intense research activity has been devoted to characterizing invertebrate terpenes from both a chemical and biological standpoint. This review focuses on the chemistry and biology of terpene metabolites isolated from the Red Sea ecosystem, a unique marine biome with one of the highest levels of biodiversity and specifically rich in invertebrate species.

  12. Middle Tertiary continental rift and evolution of the Red Sea in southwestern Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Dwight Lyman; Hadley, Donald G.; Brown, Glen F.

    1983-01-01

    Throughout early Tertiary time, the Arabian Shield erosion surface remained near sea level. First-stage uplift of the Red Sea Escarpment began during middle Miocene time, as evidenced by the coarse polymictic boulder conglomerate of the Bathan formation. Second-stage scarp uplift and second-stage sea-floor spreading followed during Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene time.

  13. The geology and geochemistry of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia, and its relation to the Pacific region

    SciTech Connect

    Sindi, H.O.

    1990-06-01

    Geological, geochemical, and comparative studies were carried out on the Red Sea, part of the multirift Circum-Pacific region and other oceanic crust areas represented by MORB-type basalts. The Red Sea geochemical data indicate four magma groups related to the volcanic ridges and the rift floor. This area has different ages and assorted rock compositions ranging from calc-alkaline to sub-alkaline affinities. The Red Sea is formed by the fastest spreading rate and the rotation of Arabia away from Africa in four phases affecting the Indian plate and the Bitils/Zagros sutures. This recent developed ocean consists of shallow continental shelves, a wide main trough (600-1,000 m depth), and a narrow (4-5 km wide) axial trough (2,000 m depth) that is formed by seafloor spreading currently active for plate separation. This axial trough is related to some of the erupted low temperature lava flows on the Afro-Arabian shields. The Red Sea inner floor is occupied by hot points, upwelling areas, and pillowed volcanoes forming elongated hills. The 15 km crustal thickness of the Red Sea shelf with a metamorphic and thick sedimentary basin that is salt-filled suffers major and minor structures of tilted, faulted, foliated, and sheared zones with general NW-SE strikes. Eight m.y. ago, 75 % of this sea was opened, the Gulf of Suez graben remained essentially stagnant, and the Gulf of Agaba-Levant became active and extended to the Dead Sea Arava Rift.

  14. Characterizing Mineral Dust from the Arabian Coast of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthan Purakkal, J.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Engelbrecht, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Peninsula is one of the Earth's major sources of atmospheric dust. Along with profound negative effects on human activity and natural processes in this region, dust is an important nutrient source for the oligothrophic northern Red Sea. From preliminary observations it is estimated that some 18-20 major dust storms per year deposit about 6 Mt of mineral dust into the Red Sea. To better understand the optical properties, health, and ecological impacts of dust, we study the mineralogical, chemical and morphological properties of surface soil samples collected at prevbiously identified potential dust sources along the Arabian coast of the Red Sea. Many of these dust sources lie within a narrow coastal region and because of their proximity to the Red Sea, are important contributors to the dust/nutrient balance, during both dusty and fair weather conditions. Bulk samples were collected from the top 10 mm of soils from three sites along the Arabian coast of the Red Sea. The soil samples were sieved to separate the < 38μm particle fractions for chemical and mineralogical analysis. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was applied to measure the mineral content of the dust. The chemical composition of individual particles was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). From the XRD analysis of the sieved samples from An Masayat (23.3322 N, 38.9481 E), Buthna (23.2960 N, 38.9384 E) and Rabugh pipeline Road (23.292 N, 38.91 E), it was found that the dust was composed largely of hematite, goethite, calcite, dolomite, quartz, chlorite, muscovite, amphibole, epidote and plagioclase. Our results are being compared to, and show similarities to those of Engelbrecht et al. , collected at 15 Middle East sites. Both the mineralogical content and chemical composition of samples bear the signatures of the regional geology. Engelbrecht, J. P., McDonald, E. V., Gillies, J. A., Jayanty, R. K. M., Casuccio, G., and Gertler, A. W., 2009

  15. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of pelagic zooplankton elucidate ecohydrographic features in the oligotrophic Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Benjamin; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; Kürten, Saskia; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M.; Devassy, Reny P.; Struck, Ulrich; Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Jones, Burton H.; Hansen, Thomas; Bruss, Gerd; Sommer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Although zooplankton occupy key roles in aquatic biogeochemical cycles, little is known about the pelagic food web and trophodynamics of zooplankton in the Red Sea. Natural abundance stable isotope analysis (SIA) of carbon (δ13C) and N (δ15N) is one approach to elucidating pelagic food web structures and diet assimilation. Integrating the combined effects of ecological processes and hydrography, ecohydrographic features often translate into geographic patterns in δ13C and δ15N values at the base of food webs. This is due, for example, to divergent 15N abundances in source end-members (deep water sources: high δ15N, diazotrophs: low δ15N). Such patterns in the spatial distributions of stable isotope values were coined isoscapes. Empirical data of atmospheric, oceanographic, and biological processes, which drive the ecohydrographic gradients of the oligotrophic Red Sea, are under-explored and some rather anticipated than proven. Specifically, five processes underpin Red Sea gradients: (a) monsoon-related intrusions of nutrient-rich Indian Ocean water; (b) basin scale thermohaline circulation; (c) mesoscale eddy activity that causes up-welling of deep water nutrients into the upper layer; (d) the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen (N2) by diazotrophs; and (e) the deposition of dust and aerosol-derived N. This study assessed relationships between environmental samples (nutrients, chlorophyll a), oceanographic data (temperature, salinity, current velocity [ADCP]), particulate organic matter (POM), and net-phytoplankton, with the δ13C and δ15N values of zooplankton collected in spring 2012 from 16°28‧ to 26°57‧N along the central axis of the Red Sea. The δ15N of bulk POM and most zooplankton taxa increased from North (Duba) to South (Farasan). The potential contribution of deep water nutrient-fueled phytoplankton, POM, and diazotrophs varied among sites. Estimates suggested higher diazotroph contributions in the North, a greater contribution of

  16. New Observations of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water Intrusion into the Red Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, A.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The three-layer exchange flow between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean during summer is characterized by a thick, northward intrusion of relatively cold, low-salinity and low in dissolved oxygen (< 0.5 ml/l); Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), sandwiched between two thin layers of outflow water. The flux of GAIW into the Red Sea is important in the heat, freshwater and nutrient budgets of the Red Sea, but the structure and pathways of the intrusion are not well-known due to a paucity of hydrographic and direct velocity observations. A research cruise was executed at the eastern side of the Red Sea during September-October 2011 to conduct the first large-scale survey of the intrusion. This mission is part of a series of expeditions in the Red Sea designed to investigate the seasonal Red Sea circulation. Surprisingly, the GAIW intrusion was observed to stretch nearly the entire length of the Red Sea (~1500 km) as a narrow eastern boundary current with subsurface velocity maximum of 0.1-0.3 m/s in the depth range 50-100 m. The intruding layer is weakly stratified compared to the background, possibly an indication of strong vertical mixing as it flows through the strait. Some GAIW was observed to enter deep channels in a coral reef bank (Farasan Banks) located in the southeastern Red Sea, and to enter the Red Sea interior, the latter possibly due to interactions between the boundary current and mesoscale eddies. The pathways and erosion of the GAIW intrusion will likely have major implications for the spatial distribution of biological productivity.

  17. Characteristics of the Bab al Mandab-Northern Afar area of the southern Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.B. ); Sikander, A.H. ); Abouzakhm, A.G.

    1991-08-01

    The southern Red Sea and adjacent Afar area represent an enigmatic portion of the Red Sea/Gulf of Aden basin system. Although the topographic rift shoulders of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden can be traced through this elbow, and appear to suggest that a similar width for the zone of extension is maintained across the region, the character of the floor of the rift zone changes. The distinctive character of the southern Red Sea-Afar area results in part from a topographically elevated region, possibly associated with the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden-East African rift triple junction. In addition, however, seismic data from offshore Ethiopia suggests that the distinctive character is due a complex pattern of rifting. The central axial trough of the Red Sea decreases in depth to the south toward the strait of Bab al Mandab, suggesting that rifting is dying out southward. Farther to the west at the same latitude, a major but narrow half-graben can be seen on seismic in the Gulf of Zula, bounded to the east by a large west-dipping normal fault. This structure continues south into the Danakil Depression of the Afar area. Between these two en echelon rift trends, the Danakil Alps form a long-lived high. Seismic data from the southern Red Sea of Ethiopia show southward thinning and pinch-out of the Miocene syn-rift evaporite sequence onto the northern Danakil block. Thus, it appears that the Danakil block has largely escaped Red Sea extension and subsidence. Instead, it forms a large unextended terrain located between overlapping en echelon rift trends, and may represent an accommodation zone structure associated with offset in the rift axis of the southern Red Sea.

  18. A-type granite and the Red Sea opening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; DeBari, S.; Peterman, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Miocene-Oligocene A-type granite intrudes the eastern side of the Red Sea margin within the zone of extension from Jiddah, Saudi Arabia south to Yemen. The intrusions developed in the early stages of continental extension as Arabia began to move slowly away from Africa (around 30-20 Ma). Within the narrow zone of extension silicic magmas formed dikes, sills, small plutons and extrusive equivalents. In the Jabal Tirf area of Saudi Arabia these rocks occur in an elongate zone consisting of late Precambrian basement to the east, which is gradually invaded by mafic dikes. The number of dikes increases westward until an igneous complex is produced parallel to the present Red Sea axis. The Jabal Tirf igneous complex consists of diabase and rhyolite-granophyre sills (20-24 Ma). Although these are intrusine intrusive rocks their textures indicate shallow depths of intrusion (< 1 km). To the south, in the Yemen, contemporaneous with alkali basaltic eruptions (26-30 Ma) and later silicic eruptions, small plutons, dikes, and stocks of alkali granite invaded thick (1500 m) volcanic series, at various levels and times. Erosion within the uplifted margin of Yemen suggests that the maximum depth of intrusion was less than 1-2 km. Granophyric intrusions (20-30 Ma) within mafic dike swarms similar to the Jabal Tirf complex are present along the western edge of the Yemen volcanic plateau, marking a north-south zone of continental extension. The alkali granites of Yemen consist primarily of perthitic feldspar and quartz with some minor alkali amphiboles and acmite. These granites represent water-poor, hypersolvus magmas generated from parent alkali basalt magmas. The granophyric, two-feldspar granites associated with the mafic dike swarms and layered gabbros formed by fractional crystallization from tholeiitic basalt parent developed in the early stages of extension. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of these rocks and their bulk chemistry indicate that production of peralkaline and

  19. A New Bioactive Metabolite Isolated from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hyrtios erectus.

    PubMed

    Elhady, Sameh S; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Hassanean, Hashim A; Ahmed, Safwat A

    2016-01-15

    Chemical investigation of the lipophilic fraction of Hyrtios erectus, a Red Sea sponge, yielded a new pentacyclic nitrogen-containing scalarane; 24-methoxypetrosaspongia C (1), together with the previously reported scalaranes sesterstatin 3 (2), 12-deacetyl-12-epi-scalaradial (3) and 12-deacetyl-12,18-di-epi-scalaradial (4). The compounds were identified using HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The isolated compounds showed growth inhibitory activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), colorectal carcinoma (HCT-116) and breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7).

  20. Studies on the Red Sea Sponge Haliclona sp. for its Chemical and Cytotoxic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Al-Massarani, Shaza Mohamed; El-Gamal, Ali Ali; Al-Said, Mansour Sulaiman; Abdel-Kader, Maged S.; Ashour, Abdelkader E.; Kumar, Ashok; Abdel-Mageed, Wael M.; Al-Rehaily, Adnan Jathlan; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background: A great number of novel compounds with rich chemical diversity and significant bioactivity have been reported from Red Sea sponges. Objective: To isolate, identify, and evaluate the cytotoxic activity of the chemical constituents of a sponge belonging to genus Haliclona collected from the Eastern coast of the Red Sea. Materials and Methods: The total ethanolic extract of the titled sponge was subjected to intensive chromatographic fractionation and purification guided by cytotoxic bioassay toward various cancer cell lines. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic techniques including one-dimension and two-dimension nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, ultraviolet, and infrared data, as well as comparison with the reported spectral data for the known compounds. X-ray single-crystal structure determination was performed to determine the absolute configuration of compound 4. The screening of antiproliferative activity of the compounds was carried on three tumor cell lines, namely the human cervical cancer (HeLa), human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), and human medulloblastoma (Daoy) cells using MTT assay. Results: This investigation resulted in the isolation of a new indole alkaloid, 1-(1H-indol-3-yloxy) propan-2-ol (1), with the previously synthesized pyrrolidine alkaloid, (2R, 3S, 4R, 5R) pyrrolidine-(1-hydroxyethyl)-3,4-diol hydrochloride (4), isolated here from a natural source for the first time. In addition, six known compounds tetillapyrone (2), nortetillapyrone (3), 2-methyl maleimide-5-oxime (5), maleimide-5-oxime (6), 5-(hydroxymethyl) dihydrofuran-2 (3H)-one (7), and ergosta-5,24 (28)-dien-3-ol (8) were also identified. Most of the isolated compounds exhibited weak cytotoxic activity against HepG-2, Daoy, and HeLa cancer cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first report of the occurrence of the indole and pyrrolidine alkaloids, 1-(1H-indol-2-yloxy) propan-2-ol (1), and the - (1-hydroxyethyl)-3

  1. Exploring the Red Sea seasonal ecosystem functioning using a three-dimensional biophysical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, G.; Yao, F.; Petihakis, G.; Tsiaras, K. P.; Raitsos, D. E.; Hoteit, I.

    2014-03-01

    The Red Sea exhibits complex hydrodynamic and biogeochemical dynamics, which vary both in time and space. These dynamics have been explored through the development and application of a 3-D ecosystem model. The simulation system comprises two off-line coupled submodels: the MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm) and the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM), both adapted for the Red Sea. The results from an annual simulation under climatological forcing are presented. Simulation results are in good agreement with satellite and in situ data illustrating the role of the physical processes in determining the evolution and variability of the Red Sea ecosystem. The model was able to reproduce the main features of the Red Sea ecosystem functioning, including the exchange with the Gulf of Aden, which is a major driving mechanism for the whole Red Sea ecosystem and the winter overturning taking place in the north. Some model limitations, mainly related to the dynamics of the extended reef system located in the southern part of the Red Sea, which is not currently represented in the model, still need to be addressed.

  2. New insights into volcanism and tectonics in the Red Sea Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwan, Froukje M.; Augustin, Nico; Devey, Colin W.; Bantan, Rashad; Kwasnitschka, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The Red Sea is one of the few places on Earth where rifting and splitting of a continent by the formation of an ocean basin is presently occurring. Continental rifting takes place in the northernmost Red Sea and ocean floor is continuously created from at least 23°N to the vicinity of the strait of Bab al-Mandab in the south. Here we present a unique collection of recent continuous multibeam bathymetric datasets with a spatial acoustic resolution of 15-30 m from the Thetis Deep at 23°N to the RSR at 16.5°N together with new volcanic sampling over the Red Sea Rift (RSR). This enables us to study in detail the bathymetry of volcanic structures formed during the creation of this young ocean and the relationship between extension and volcanism allows us to make an extensive interpretation of the structural, tectonic, magmatic and sedimentary evolution of the RSR. Even though the central graben of the RSR is widely covered by sediments and Miocene evaporites north of 20°N (Augustin et al. 2012), the open parts of the rift valley show a wide range of volcanic activity and tectonic features over 700 km of mapped ridge axis. Numerous volcanoes (flat top volcanoes, submarine equivalents of Venusian pancake domes and lava shields) and ridges of hummocky volcanics are scattered all along the RSR. In addition the Red Sea Rift displays typical features of a slow spreading ridge where the slowest spreading, northern section of the Red Sea is strongly tectonically dominated with distinct basins and a strong horst and graben structure with locally very large volcanic edifices. The largest submarine volcano yet observed in the RSR is the Hatiba Mons volcano, previously not recognized as a volcanic edifice. In the south, where the spreading rates are greatest, large basins are not present and instead axial highs are observed as the result of higher recent volcanic activity. The geochemistry of basalts from sampled volcanoes display MORB signatures with no sign of continental

  3. Environmental impacts of tourism in the Gulf and the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, William; Curley, Belinda; Shokri, Mohammad Reza

    2013-07-30

    The Gulf and Red Sea possess diverse coastal and marine environments that support rapidly expanding mass tourism. Despite the associated environmental risks, there is no analysis of the tourism-related literature or recent analysis of impacts. Environmental issues reported in 101 publications (25 from the Gulf, 76 from the Red Sea) include 61 purported impacts (27 from the Gulf, 45 from the Red Sea). Gulf literature includes quantitative studies (68% publications) and reviews (32%), and addresses mostly land reclamation and artificial habitats. Most Gulf studies come from Iran and UAE (64%). Red Sea literature includes quantitative studies (81%) and reviews (11%), with most studies occurring in Egypt (70%). The most published topics relate to coral breakage and its management. A full account of tourism's environmental impacts is constrained by limited tourism data, confounding of impacts with other coastal developments, lack of baseline information, shifting baselines, and fragmentation of research across disciplines.

  4. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Red Sea Basin Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 5 billion barrels of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and 112 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas in the Red Sea Basin Province using a geology-based assessment methodology.

  5. Do genes lie? Mitochondrial capture masks the Red Sea collector urchin's true identity (Echinodermata: Echinoidea: Tripneustes).

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Omri; Kroh, Andreas; Haring, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Novel COI and bindin sequences of the Red Sea collector echinoid Tripneustes gratilla elatensis are used to show that (1) discordance between mitochondrial and nuclear loci exists in this echinoid genus, (2) Tripneustes gratilla as currently defined possibly comprises a complex of cryptic species, and (3) Red Sea Tripneustes form a genetically distinct clade in the bindin tree, which diverged from other Tripneustes clades at least 2-4million years ago. Morphological reassessment of T. gratilla elatensis shows perfect congruence between identification based on skeletal features and genetic data based on a nuclear marker sequence. Hence the Red Sea Tripneustes subspecies established by Dafni in 1983 is a distinct biological unit. All T. g. elatensis samples analyzed are highly similar to or share mtDNA haplotypes with Philippine T. g. gratilla, as do representatives from other edge-of-range occurrences. This lack of genetic structure in Indo-Pacific Tripneustes is interpreted as a result of wide-spread mitochondrial introgression. New fossil specimens from the Red Sea area confirm the sympatric occurrence of T. g. elatensis and T. g. gratilla in the northern Red Sea during Late Pleistocene, identifying a possible timing for the introgression. In addition, present-day distribution shows a contact zone in the Southern Red Sea (in the Dahlak Archipelago). T. g. elatensis, is yet another example of a Red Sea taxon historically identified as conspecific with its Indo-Pacific relatives, but which turned out to be a morphologically and genetically distinct endemic taxon, suggesting that the level of endemism in the Red Sea may still be underestimated. PMID:27475495

  6. Do genes lie? Mitochondrial capture masks the Red Sea collector urchin's true identity (Echinodermata: Echinoidea: Tripneustes).

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Omri; Kroh, Andreas; Haring, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Novel COI and bindin sequences of the Red Sea collector echinoid Tripneustes gratilla elatensis are used to show that (1) discordance between mitochondrial and nuclear loci exists in this echinoid genus, (2) Tripneustes gratilla as currently defined possibly comprises a complex of cryptic species, and (3) Red Sea Tripneustes form a genetically distinct clade in the bindin tree, which diverged from other Tripneustes clades at least 2-4million years ago. Morphological reassessment of T. gratilla elatensis shows perfect congruence between identification based on skeletal features and genetic data based on a nuclear marker sequence. Hence the Red Sea Tripneustes subspecies established by Dafni in 1983 is a distinct biological unit. All T. g. elatensis samples analyzed are highly similar to or share mtDNA haplotypes with Philippine T. g. gratilla, as do representatives from other edge-of-range occurrences. This lack of genetic structure in Indo-Pacific Tripneustes is interpreted as a result of wide-spread mitochondrial introgression. New fossil specimens from the Red Sea area confirm the sympatric occurrence of T. g. elatensis and T. g. gratilla in the northern Red Sea during Late Pleistocene, identifying a possible timing for the introgression. In addition, present-day distribution shows a contact zone in the Southern Red Sea (in the Dahlak Archipelago). T. g. elatensis, is yet another example of a Red Sea taxon historically identified as conspecific with its Indo-Pacific relatives, but which turned out to be a morphologically and genetically distinct endemic taxon, suggesting that the level of endemism in the Red Sea may still be underestimated.

  7. Detecting the red tide based on remote sensing data in optically complex East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Pan, Delu; Mao, Zhihua; Tao, Bangyi; Liu, Qiong

    2012-09-01

    Red tide not only destroys marine fishery production, deteriorates the marine environment, affects coastal tourist industry, but also causes human poison, even death by eating toxic seafood contaminated by red tide organisms. Remote sensing technology has the characteristics of large-scale, synchronized, rapid monitoring, so it is one of the most important and most effective means of red tide monitoring. This paper selects the high frequency red tides areas of the East China Sea as study area, MODIS/Aqua L2 data as the data source, analysis and compares the spectral differences in the red tide water bodies and non-red tide water bodies of many historical events. Based on the spectral differences, this paper develops the algorithm of Rrs555/Rrs488> 1.5 to extract the red tide information. Apply the algorithm on red tide event happened in the East China Sea on May 28, 2009 to extract the information of red tide, and found that the method can determine effectively the location of the occurrence of red tide; there is a good corresponding relationship between red tide extraction result and chlorophyll a concentration extracted by remote sensing, shows that these algorithm can determine effectively the location and extract the red tide information.

  8. Conrad Deep, Northern Red Sea: Development of an early stage ocean deep within the axial depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, A.; Hübscher, C.; Gajewski, D.

    2005-12-01

    The northern Red Sea represents a continental rift in its final stage and close to the following stage of seafloor spreading. Ocean deeps within the evaporites of the northern Red Sea seem to accompany this process and are thought to be surface expressions of first seafloor spreading cells. In 1999 during R/V Meteor cruise M44/3 a dense multichannel seismic and hydroacoustic survey was conducted in order to investigate the initial formation process of the Conrad Deep, a young northern Red Sea deep. Three seismic units were differentiated in the uppermost part of the Miocene evaporites and the Plio-Quaternary sediments. A weakness zone within the evaporites, oblique to the main extension direction of the Red Sea, led to a transtension process within the evaporites that opened the deep. Its formation is directly related to the emplacement of magmatic bodies in its vicinity and the focusing of the Red Sea extension to the axial depression. The Conrad Deep is an intra-evaporite basin that cannot be regarded as surficial expression of a basement structure as the low shear strength of the evaporites decouple the sediments from the basement. However, its position and shape in combination with the accompanying geophysical anomalies point to a strong correlation with the Red Sea rifting process.

  9. Movement patterns of juvenile whale sharks tagged at an aggregation site in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Berumen, Michael L; Braun, Camrin D; Cochran, Jesse E M; Skomal, Gregory B; Thorrold, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    Conservation efforts aimed at the whale shark, Rhincodon typus, remain limited by a lack of basic information on most aspects of its ecology, including global population structure, population sizes and movement patterns. Here we report on the movements of 47 Red Sea whale sharks fitted with three types of satellite transmitting tags from 2009-2011. Most of these sharks were tagged at a single aggregation site near Al-Lith, on the central coast of the Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Individuals encountered at this site were all juveniles based on size estimates ranging from 2.5-7 m total length with a sex ratio of approximately 1∶1. All other known aggregation sites for juvenile whale sharks are dominated by males. Results from tagging efforts showed that most individuals remained in the southern Red Sea and that some sharks returned to the same location in subsequent years. Diving data were recorded by 37 tags, revealing frequent deep dives to at least 500 m and as deep as 1360 m. The unique temperature-depth profiles of the Red Sea confirmed that several whale sharks moved out of the Red Sea while tagged. The wide-ranging horizontal movements of these individuals highlight the need for multinational, cooperative efforts to conserve R. typus populations in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean.

  10. The Egyptian Red Sea coastal microbiome: A study revealing differential microbial responses to diverse anthropogenic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ghada A; Abd-Elgawad, Amr; Ouf, Amged; Siam, Rania

    2016-07-01

    The Red Sea is considered one of the youngest oceanic systems, with unique physical, geochemical and biological characteristics. Tourism, industrialization, extensive fishing, oil processing and shipping are extensive sources of pollution in the Red Sea. We analyzed the geochemical characteristics and microbial community of sediments along the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea. Our sites mainly included 1) four ports used for shipping aluminum, ilmenite and phosphate; 2) a site previously reported to have suffered extensive oil spills; and 3) a site impacted by tourism. Two major datasets for the sediment of ten Red Sea coastal sites were generated; i) a chemical dataset included measurements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur, metals and selected semi-volatile oil; and ii) a 16S rRNA Pyrotags bacterial metagenomic dataset. Based on the taxonomic assignments of the 16S rRNA Pyrotags to major bacterial groups, we report 30 taxa constituting an Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Microbiome. Bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons were predominant in the majority of the sites, particularly in two ports where they reached up to 76% of the total identified genera. In contrast, sulfate-reducing and sulfate-oxidizing bacteria dominated two lakes at the expense of other hydrocarbon metabolizers. Despite the reported "Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Microbiome," sites with similar anthropogenic pollutants showed unique microbial community abundances. This suggests that the abundance of a specific bacterial community is an evolutionary mechanism induced in response to selected anthropogenic pollutants.

  11. Movement Patterns of Juvenile Whale Sharks Tagged at an Aggregation Site in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Berumen, Michael L.; Braun, Camrin D.; Cochran, Jesse E. M.; Skomal, Gregory B.; Thorrold, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation efforts aimed at the whale shark, Rhincodon typus, remain limited by a lack of basic information on most aspects of its ecology, including global population structure, population sizes and movement patterns. Here we report on the movements of 47 Red Sea whale sharks fitted with three types of satellite transmitting tags from 2009–2011. Most of these sharks were tagged at a single aggregation site near Al-Lith, on the central coast of the Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Individuals encountered at this site were all juveniles based on size estimates ranging from 2.5–7 m total length with a sex ratio of approximately 1∶1. All other known aggregation sites for juvenile whale sharks are dominated by males. Results from tagging efforts showed that most individuals remained in the southern Red Sea and that some sharks returned to the same location in subsequent years. Diving data were recorded by 37 tags, revealing frequent deep dives to at least 500 m and as deep as 1360 m. The unique temperature-depth profiles of the Red Sea confirmed that several whale sharks moved out of the Red Sea while tagged. The wide-ranging horizontal movements of these individuals highlight the need for multinational, cooperative efforts to conserve R. typus populations in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. PMID:25076407

  12. The Egyptian Red Sea coastal microbiome: A study revealing differential microbial responses to diverse anthropogenic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ghada A; Abd-Elgawad, Amr; Ouf, Amged; Siam, Rania

    2016-07-01

    The Red Sea is considered one of the youngest oceanic systems, with unique physical, geochemical and biological characteristics. Tourism, industrialization, extensive fishing, oil processing and shipping are extensive sources of pollution in the Red Sea. We analyzed the geochemical characteristics and microbial community of sediments along the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea. Our sites mainly included 1) four ports used for shipping aluminum, ilmenite and phosphate; 2) a site previously reported to have suffered extensive oil spills; and 3) a site impacted by tourism. Two major datasets for the sediment of ten Red Sea coastal sites were generated; i) a chemical dataset included measurements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur, metals and selected semi-volatile oil; and ii) a 16S rRNA Pyrotags bacterial metagenomic dataset. Based on the taxonomic assignments of the 16S rRNA Pyrotags to major bacterial groups, we report 30 taxa constituting an Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Microbiome. Bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons were predominant in the majority of the sites, particularly in two ports where they reached up to 76% of the total identified genera. In contrast, sulfate-reducing and sulfate-oxidizing bacteria dominated two lakes at the expense of other hydrocarbon metabolizers. Despite the reported "Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Microbiome," sites with similar anthropogenic pollutants showed unique microbial community abundances. This suggests that the abundance of a specific bacterial community is an evolutionary mechanism induced in response to selected anthropogenic pollutants. PMID:27179234

  13. Oceanization starts from below during continental rupturing in the northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Ligi, M.; Bonatti, E.; Bosworth, W.; Cipriani, A.; Palmiotto, C.; Rasul, N. M.; Ronca, S.; Sanfilippo, A.; Seyler, M.; Nomani, S.; AlQutub, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The role of magmatism in continental rupturing and in the birth of a new ocean is not well understood. Continental rupture can take place with intense and voluminous volcanism, as in the Southern Red Sea or in a relatively amagmatic mode, as in the Northern Red Sea. Mantle upwelling and melting may be affected by the south to north decreasing opening rate of the Red Sea and by the influence of the Afar plume, also decreasing from south to north. The tholeiitic basalts of the Red Sea spreading system contrast with the extensive Cenozoic basaltic lava fields of the western part of the Arabian peninsula that form one of the largest alkali basalt provinces in the world. In order to establish possible relationship between the Red Sea rift evolution and the western Saudi Arabia intraplate alkali volcanism, field work was carried out on Lunayyir, Ishara, al Kura and Khaybar volcanic fields. Collected samples cover a wide range of chemical diversity (from olivine basalt to trachyte) and span over a 20 Ma interval. We attempt a comparison of the geochemistry of igneous rocks from western Arabia dykes and volcanic fields with those from the Red Sea axis and from the islands of Zabargad and Brothers in the northern Red Sea, that represent basaltic melts injected into the thinned continental crust before continental rupturing and initiation of seafloor spreading. Gabbros drilled in the western Red Sea and exposed on the Brothers islands suggest that continental break up in the northern Red Sea, a relatively non-volcanic rift, is preceded by intrusion of oceanic-type basaltic melts that crystallize at progressively shallower crustal depths as rifting progresses towards continental break-up. A seismic reflection profile running across the central part of the southern Thetis basin shows a ~5 km wide reflector that marks the roof of a magma chamber located ~3.5 km below seafloor. The presence of a few kilometers deep subrift magma chamber soon after the initiation of oceanic

  14. Cytotoxic and apoptotic evaluations of marine bacteria isolated from brine-seawater interface of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High salinity and temperature combined with presence of heavy metals and low oxygen renders deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea as one of the most extreme environments on Earth. The ability to adapt and survive in these extreme environments makes inhabiting bacteria interesting candidates for the search of novel bioactive molecules. Methods Total 20 i.e. lipophilic (chloroform) and hydrophilic (70% ethanol) extracts of marine bacteria isolated from brine-seawater interface of the Red Sea were tested for cytotoxic and apoptotic activity against three human cancer cell lines, i.e. HeLa (cervical carcinoma), MCF-7 (Breast Adenocarcinoma) and DU145 (Prostate carcinoma). Results Among these, twelve extracts were found to be very active after 24 hours of treatment, which were further evaluated for their cytotoxic and apoptotic effects at 48 hr. The extracts from the isolates P1-37B and P3-37A (Halomonas) and P1-17B (Sulfitobacter) have been found to be the most potent against tested cancer cell lines. Conclusion Overall, bacterial isolates from the Red Sea displayed promising results and can be explored further to find novel drug-like molecules. The cell line specific activity of the extracts may be attributed to the presence of different polarity compounds or the cancer type i.e. biological differences in cell lines and different mechanisms of action of programmed cell death prevalent in different cancer cell lines. PMID:23388148

  15. Yemeni Red Sea and Gulf of Aden petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sanabani, M.; Said, F.M. )

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The study of Yemeni Red Sea and Gulf of Aden was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. These included reports, sections, and wireline logs from 15 well, samples from 15 wells for biostratigraphic analysis, and samples from 11 wells for geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on 7,419 line-km of seismic data selected from a grid of 21,623 line-km of data. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis in the Red Sea area, including the sea floor, top, and near base of middle to upper Miocene evaporites, and approximate acoustic basement, as well as equivalent series in the Gulf of Aden. Bathymetric, structure-contour, and interval isopach maps were prepared using digitized picks from the interpreted seismic. Examples of each of these interpreted results will be on display. The results show that the Yemeni Red Sea is similar to the better known, productive Gulf of Suez in its tectonic evolution, and in its Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic sequence. Surface shows on the east side of the southern Red Sea in the Yemeni part of the basin suggest that this area contain the necessary elements for several attractive petroleum plays. The Yemeni Red Sea appears to contain the necessary elements for an attractive petroleum potential. The Yemeni Gulf of Aden, on the other hand, shows an attractive potential chiefly in pre-rift Mesozoic to Eocene units, with more limited potential in Oligocene to younger units.

  16. The use of fish metabolic, pathological and parasitological indices in pollution monitoring . II. The Red Sea and Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamant, A.; Banet, A.; Paperna, I.; Westernhagen, H. v.; Broeg, K.; Kruener, G.; Koerting, W.; Zander, S.

    1999-12-01

    were completely absent. We may therefore regard the Mediterranean as a simulation model for a severely environmentally deteriorated, impoverished habitat, in which all or part of the intermediate host species have been depleted, enabling survival of the monoxenous parasite species only. Parasitological investigations were supplemented by testing the activity of cytochrome P 450- dependent mono-oxygenase EROD as a measure of exposure, and lysosomal stability as a measure of toxic effect in the liver of rabbitfish. The results underline the parasitological findings, showing that fish caught at the impacted sandy beach location in the Red Sea have significantly higher EROD activity and a decreased membrane stability compared with animals from the coral reef. In comparison, EROD activity values in rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were double, while lysosomal membrane stability was half that measured at the most impacted Red Sea location.

  17. 76 FR 36511 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... Fishery Management Council (Council) has submitted Amendment 3 to the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery... envelope, ``Comments on Red Crab Amendment 3.'' Instructions: All comments received are part of the...

  18. Antibacterial substances from marine algae isolated from Jeddah coast of Red sea, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Sarah Saleh Abdu-Llah; Abdel-Raouf, Nevein; El-Wazanani, Hend A; Aref, Ibrahim A

    2014-01-01

    Marine algae are known to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites and several compounds have been derived from them for prospective development of novel drugs by the pharmaceutical industries. However algae of the Red sea have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. In this context Ulva reticulata, Caulerpa occidentalis, Cladophora socialis, Dictyota ciliolata, and Gracilaria dendroides isolated from Red sea coastal waters of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were evaluated for their potential for bioactivity. Extracts of the algae selected for the study were prepared using ethanol, chloroform, petroleum ether and water, and assayed for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25322, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Stapylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. It was found that chloroform was most effective followed by ethanol, petroleum ether and water for the preparation of algal extract with significant antibacterial activities, respectively. Results also indicated that the extracts of red alga G. dendroides were more efficient against the tested bacterial strains followed by green alga U. reticulata, and brown algae D. ciliolata. Chemical analyses showed that G. dendroides recorded the highest percentages of the total fats and total proteins, followed by U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Among the bioflavonoids determined Rutin, Quercetin and Kaempherol were present in high percentages in G. dendroides, U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Estimation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids revealed that palmitic acid was present in highest percentage in all the algal species analyzed. Amino acid analyses indicated the presence of free amino acids in moderate contents in all the species of algae. The results indicated scope for utilizing these algae as a source of antibacterial substances.

  19. Antibacterial substances from marine algae isolated from Jeddah coast of Red sea, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saif, Sarah Saleh Abdu-llah; Abdel-Raouf, Nevein; El-Wazanani, Hend A.; Aref, Ibrahim A.

    2013-01-01

    Marine algae are known to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites and several compounds have been derived from them for prospective development of novel drugs by the pharmaceutical industries. However algae of the Red sea have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. In this context Ulva reticulata, Caulerpa occidentalis, Cladophora socialis, Dictyota ciliolata, and Gracilaria dendroides isolated from Red sea coastal waters of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were evaluated for their potential for bioactivity. Extracts of the algae selected for the study were prepared using ethanol, chloroform, petroleum ether and water, and assayed for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25322, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Stapylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. It was found that chloroform was most effective followed by ethanol, petroleum ether and water for the preparation of algal extract with significant antibacterial activities, respectively. Results also indicated that the extracts of red alga G. dendroides were more efficient against the tested bacterial strains followed by green alga U. reticulata, and brown algae D. ciliolata. Chemical analyses showed that G. dendroides recorded the highest percentages of the total fats and total proteins, followed by U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Among the bioflavonoids determined Rutin, Quercetin and Kaempherol were present in high percentages in G. dendroides, U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Estimation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids revealed that palmitic acid was present in highest percentage in all the algal species analyzed. Amino acid analyses indicated the presence of free amino acids in moderate contents in all the species of algae. The results indicated scope for utilizing these algae as a source of antibacterial substances. PMID:24596500

  20. Recent Rifting Events in the Southern Red Sea and Regional Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Xu, W.; Jonsson, S.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, several rifting events on land have been observed along divergent plate boundaries, separating plates up to several meters in a few weeks. These events are typically accompanied by short-term seismic swarms (<15 days) and normal faulting, and are in some cases followed by eruptions as well. These on land rifting events represent, however, a very limited portion (< 2%) of global intrusions that take place in most cases along mid-ocean ridge systems. Here we focus on the southern Red Sea area, which is a part of the triple junction separating the Nubian, Somalian and Arabian plates where several earthquake swarms were recorded from 2000 to 2014. In three cases, these swarms were followed by eruptions within a year, at Jebel at Tair (2007) and in the Zubair Archipelago (40 km south) were two new volcanic islands developed in 2011 and 2013. Without the surface eruptions, these intrusive events may have remained unnoticed. Together the surface evidence of volcanic activity and recorded seismic swarms during the past two decades allow for a better definition of the overall magmatic activity in the southern Red Sea. We further discuss the possibility that Zubair, which is an emerged portion of a shallow 20 km-long by 5 km-wide NNW-SSE oriented platform, may be the surface expression of an active spreading center, comparable in size with other on land spreading centers. The recent concentration of activity at Zubair developed in a context of high regional magmatic and tectonic activity, including the rifting episode at Dabbahu (2005-2011), the rifting event in the Gulf of Aden (2010-2011) and the 2011 Nabro volcano eruption. Preliminary analysis of regional structural features and volcano lineaments suggest distinct intrusion paths and faulting running parallel to the three main active rift zone axes, and also along a dominant NE-SW oriented preexisting regional fault zones affecting the entire triple junction area.

  1. Bioprospecting Red Sea Coastal Ecosystems for Culturable Microorganisms and Their Antimicrobial Potential

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amoudi, Soha; Essack, Magbubah; Simões, Marta F.; Bougouffa, Salim; Soloviev, Irina; Archer, John A. C.; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms that inhabit unchartered unique soil such as in the highly saline and hot Red Sea lagoons on the Saudi Arabian coastline, represent untapped sources of potentially new bioactive compounds. In this study, a culture-dependent approach was applied to three types of sediments: mangrove mud (MN), microbial mat (MM), and barren soil (BS), collected from Rabigh harbor lagoon (RHL) and Al-Kharrar lagoon (AKL). The isolated bacteria were evaluated for their potential to produce bioactive compounds. The phylogenetic characterization of 251 bacterial isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequencing, supported their assignment to five different phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. Fifteen putative novel species were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to other strain sequences in the NCBI database, being ≤98%. We demonstrate that 49 of the 251 isolates exhibit the potential to produce antimicrobial compounds. Additionally, at least one type of biosynthetic gene sequence, responsible for the synthesis of secondary metabolites, was recovered from 25 of the 49 isolates. Moreover, 10 of the isolates had a growth inhibition effect towards Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas syringae. We report the previously unknown antimicrobial activity of B. borstelensis, P. dendritiformis and M. salipaludis against all three indicator pathogens. Our study demonstrates the evidence of diverse cultured microbes associated with the Red Sea harbor/lagoon environments and their potential to produce antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27626430

  2. Bioprospecting Red Sea Coastal Ecosystems for Culturable Microorganisms and Their Antimicrobial Potential.

    PubMed

    Al-Amoudi, Soha; Essack, Magbubah; Simões, Marta F; Bougouffa, Salim; Soloviev, Irina; Archer, John A C; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms that inhabit unchartered unique soil such as in the highly saline and hot Red Sea lagoons on the Saudi Arabian coastline, represent untapped sources of potentially new bioactive compounds. In this study, a culture-dependent approach was applied to three types of sediments: mangrove mud (MN), microbial mat (MM), and barren soil (BS), collected from Rabigh harbor lagoon (RHL) and Al-Kharrar lagoon (AKL). The isolated bacteria were evaluated for their potential to produce bioactive compounds. The phylogenetic characterization of 251 bacterial isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequencing, supported their assignment to five different phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. Fifteen putative novel species were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to other strain sequences in the NCBI database, being ≤98%. We demonstrate that 49 of the 251 isolates exhibit the potential to produce antimicrobial compounds. Additionally, at least one type of biosynthetic gene sequence, responsible for the synthesis of secondary metabolites, was recovered from 25 of the 49 isolates. Moreover, 10 of the isolates had a growth inhibition effect towards Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas syringae. We report the previously unknown antimicrobial activity of B. borstelensis, P. dendritiformis and M. salipaludis against all three indicator pathogens. Our study demonstrates the evidence of diverse cultured microbes associated with the Red Sea harbor/lagoon environments and their potential to produce antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27626430

  3. Bioprospecting Red Sea Coastal Ecosystems for Culturable Microorganisms and Their Antimicrobial Potential.

    PubMed

    Al-Amoudi, Soha; Essack, Magbubah; Simões, Marta F; Bougouffa, Salim; Soloviev, Irina; Archer, John A C; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2016-09-10

    Microorganisms that inhabit unchartered unique soil such as in the highly saline and hot Red Sea lagoons on the Saudi Arabian coastline, represent untapped sources of potentially new bioactive compounds. In this study, a culture-dependent approach was applied to three types of sediments: mangrove mud (MN), microbial mat (MM), and barren soil (BS), collected from Rabigh harbor lagoon (RHL) and Al-Kharrar lagoon (AKL). The isolated bacteria were evaluated for their potential to produce bioactive compounds. The phylogenetic characterization of 251 bacterial isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequencing, supported their assignment to five different phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. Fifteen putative novel species were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to other strain sequences in the NCBI database, being ≤98%. We demonstrate that 49 of the 251 isolates exhibit the potential to produce antimicrobial compounds. Additionally, at least one type of biosynthetic gene sequence, responsible for the synthesis of secondary metabolites, was recovered from 25 of the 49 isolates. Moreover, 10 of the isolates had a growth inhibition effect towards Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas syringae. We report the previously unknown antimicrobial activity of B. borstelensis, P. dendritiformis and M. salipaludis against all three indicator pathogens. Our study demonstrates the evidence of diverse cultured microbes associated with the Red Sea harbor/lagoon environments and their potential to produce antimicrobial compounds.

  4. Prevalence of red sea bream iridovirus among organs of Japanese amberjack (Seriola quinqueradiata) exposed to cultured red sea bream iridovirus.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takafumi; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Kamaishi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazunori; Nakajima, Kazuhiro

    2013-09-01

    Red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV) is a representative of the genus Megalocytivirus which causes severe disease to aquaculture fish, mainly in Japan and South-east Asia. However, information to assess the viral kinetics of RSIV in fish is limited since reports on experimental infection by the immersion route, which is the natural infection route, are scarce. In this study, a method to evaluate the titre of RSIV was first developed. Experimental infections were continuously performed using RSIV cell culture as the inoculum to juvenile Japanese amberjack (Seriola quinqueradiata) (initial body weight 12.2 g) by immersion at three different concentrations. In addition, to investigate the prevalence of the virus among the organs of experimentally infected fish, viral DNA was measured at selected times by the real-time PCR method following viral inoculation by immersion. The developed titration method showed a 10(2) increase in sensitivity compared with the conventional method. We demonstrated that grunt fin cells can be used for continuous passage of RSIV. In the experimental infection, fish which were intraperitoneally injected with the RSIV cell culture or immersed with RSIV cell culture at 10(-2) and 10(-3) dilutions showed cumulative mortalities of 100 %. The results of measurements of the viral DNA of several organs from infected fish strongly suggest that the spleen is the target organ of RSIV in Japanese amberjack. Since the viral genome was detected from all the tested organs of two of five surviving fish which appeared to completely recover from the disease, it is suggested that these fish may become carriers.

  5. Prevalence of red sea bream iridovirus among organs of Japanese amberjack (Seriola quinqueradiata) exposed to cultured red sea bream iridovirus.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takafumi; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Kamaishi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazunori; Nakajima, Kazuhiro

    2013-09-01

    Red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV) is a representative of the genus Megalocytivirus which causes severe disease to aquaculture fish, mainly in Japan and South-east Asia. However, information to assess the viral kinetics of RSIV in fish is limited since reports on experimental infection by the immersion route, which is the natural infection route, are scarce. In this study, a method to evaluate the titre of RSIV was first developed. Experimental infections were continuously performed using RSIV cell culture as the inoculum to juvenile Japanese amberjack (Seriola quinqueradiata) (initial body weight 12.2 g) by immersion at three different concentrations. In addition, to investigate the prevalence of the virus among the organs of experimentally infected fish, viral DNA was measured at selected times by the real-time PCR method following viral inoculation by immersion. The developed titration method showed a 10(2) increase in sensitivity compared with the conventional method. We demonstrated that grunt fin cells can be used for continuous passage of RSIV. In the experimental infection, fish which were intraperitoneally injected with the RSIV cell culture or immersed with RSIV cell culture at 10(-2) and 10(-3) dilutions showed cumulative mortalities of 100 %. The results of measurements of the viral DNA of several organs from infected fish strongly suggest that the spleen is the target organ of RSIV in Japanese amberjack. Since the viral genome was detected from all the tested organs of two of five surviving fish which appeared to completely recover from the disease, it is suggested that these fish may become carriers. PMID:23784444

  6. 250 years of SW Indian Monsoon Variability from Red Sea Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, S.; Hughen, K. A.; Karnauskas, K. B.; Farrar, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    During the northern hemisphere summer, strong dust storms develop in the Tokar Delta region of Sudan. These massive dust storms are funneled through a gap in the coastal mountains and blow out across the Red Sea. The generation and transport of these dust storms is driven by the large-scale atmospheric pressure gradient across the Red Sea, which is a component of the Southwest Indian Monsoon. Dust deposited on the Red Sea is recorded in skeletal geochemistry of corals that live on the Saudi Arabian coast, and provides an opportunity to reconstruct variability in the monsoon system prior to instrumental records. We have generated annually-resolved records of coral Ba/Ca, which display strong correlations to the zonal pressure gradient across the Red Sea during the instrumental period. Our coral-based monsoon records show an increasing trend in the strength of SW Indian Monsoon circulation since the Little Ice Age, in agreement with lower-resolution Arabian Sea upwelling based records. Our records also show strong decadal-scale variability, which was strongest during the late 19th century and has declined during the past century. In this presentation, we will discuss the decadal-scale variability in the SW Indian Monsoon circulation over the past 250 years as revealed by Red Sea Corals and the implications of the relationships and trends observed in this study for projections of future monsoon variability.

  7. Magmatic history of Red Sea rifting: perspective from the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    An early stage of magmatism related to Red Sea rifting is recorded by a Tertiary dyke complex and comagmatic volcanic rocks exposed on the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain. Field relations and new K/Ar dates indicate episodic magmatism from approx 30 m.y. to the present day and rift-related magmatism as early as 50 m.y. Localized volcanism and sheeted dyke injection ceased at approx 20 m.y. and were replaced by the intrusion of thick gabbro dykes, marking the onset of sea-floor spreading in the central Red Sea. Differences in the depths and dynamics of mantle-melt extraction and transport may account for the transition from mixed alkaline-subalkaline bimodal magmatism of the pre-20 m.y. rift basin to exclusively subalkaline (tholeiitic) magmatism of the Red Sea spreading axis and the alkali basalt volcanism inland.-L.C.H.

  8. Unusual Red Sea-Type GDGT Distributions during the Early Paleogene: A Proxy for Enhanced Salinity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancost, R. D.; Inglis, G.; Farnsworth, A.; Lunt, D. J.; Foster, G. L.; Hollis, C. J.; Jardine, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    TEX86, an organic palaeothermometer based upon the distribution of isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in marine Thaumarchaeota, is regularly used to reconstruct spatial and temporal sea surface temperature patterns, especially in older (Mesozoic and Palaeogene) settings. The TEX86 proxy assumes that Thaumarchaeota in modern oceans are representative of those living in ancient settings, but even in today's oceans Thaumarchaeotal phylogeny is diverse. In the Red Sea, phylogenetically distinct archaeal communities occur both above and below the thermocline and correspond to core-top sediments in which TEX86 values consistently overestimate satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) by 6-8°C [1]. These elevated SSTs are associated with an unusual GDGT distribution characterised by low GDGT-0 (<10%) and high GDGT-4' (>10%). Here we propose the %GDGTRS index (= ([GDGT-4']/[GDGT-4']+[GDGT-0])*100) as a way to identify Red Sea-type GDGT distributions in ancient sediments. In a Paleogene (65-34Ma) compilation, Red Sea-type GDGT distributions are common and geographically widespread, and could lead to SST overestimates. The underlying ecological controls that govern the occurrence of these distributions remain unclear, but they are especially common during times of elevated warmth (i.e. EECO, PETM). During the EECO and the PETM, the occurrence of Red Sea-type GDGT distributions coincides with the presence of hypersaline and/or lagoonal dinocysts in at least four global localities. We suggest that the high %GDGTRS values during these very hot intervals reflect the presence of unique Thaumarchaeotal or Euryarchaeotal clusters responding to the development of more saline conditions, similar to or perhaps exceeding those observed in the Red Sea today. 1. Trommer, G. et al., 2009. Distribution of Crenarchaeota tetraether membrane lipids in surface sediments from the Red Sea. Organic Geochemistry, v. 40, p. 724-731

  9. Biodegradation of diesel fuel hydrocarbons by mangrove fungi from Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Fuad; Moslem, Mohamed; Hadi, Sarfaraz; Al-Sabri, Ahmed E

    2016-03-01

    Mangrove sediments were collected from major mangrove stands on the Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia. Forty five isolates belonging to 12 genera were purified and five isolates as well as their consortium were found to be able to grow in association with petroleum oil as sole carbon source under in vitro conditions. The isolated strains were identified based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequence analysis. The fungal strains with the greatest potentiality to degrade diesel oil, without developing antagonistic activity, were identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus terreus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Eupenicillium hirayamae and Paecilomyces variotii. As compared to the controls, these fungi accumulated significantly higher biomass, produced extracellular enzymes and liberated larger volumes of CO2. These observations with GC-MS data confirm that these isolates displayed rapid diesel oil bioremoval and when used together as a consortium, there was no antagonistic activity. PMID:26981002

  10. Biodegradation of diesel fuel hydrocarbons by mangrove fungi from Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Fuad; Moslem, Mohamed; Hadi, Sarfaraz; Al-Sabri, Ahmed E

    2016-03-01

    Mangrove sediments were collected from major mangrove stands on the Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia. Forty five isolates belonging to 12 genera were purified and five isolates as well as their consortium were found to be able to grow in association with petroleum oil as sole carbon source under in vitro conditions. The isolated strains were identified based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequence analysis. The fungal strains with the greatest potentiality to degrade diesel oil, without developing antagonistic activity, were identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus terreus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Eupenicillium hirayamae and Paecilomyces variotii. As compared to the controls, these fungi accumulated significantly higher biomass, produced extracellular enzymes and liberated larger volumes of CO2. These observations with GC-MS data confirm that these isolates displayed rapid diesel oil bioremoval and when used together as a consortium, there was no antagonistic activity.

  11. Biodegradation of diesel fuel hydrocarbons by mangrove fungi from Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, Fuad; Moslem, Mohamed; Hadi, Sarfaraz; Al-Sabri, Ahmed E.

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove sediments were collected from major mangrove stands on the Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia. Forty five isolates belonging to 12 genera were purified and five isolates as well as their consortium were found to be able to grow in association with petroleum oil as sole carbon source under in vitro conditions. The isolated strains were identified based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequence analysis. The fungal strains with the greatest potentiality to degrade diesel oil, without developing antagonistic activity, were identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus terreus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Eupenicillium hirayamae and Paecilomyces variotii. As compared to the controls, these fungi accumulated significantly higher biomass, produced extracellular enzymes and liberated larger volumes of CO2. These observations with GC–MS data confirm that these isolates displayed rapid diesel oil bioremoval and when used together as a consortium, there was no antagonistic activity. PMID:26981002

  12. The Environmental Settings of Homo-Sapience Dispersal and the Neolithic Revolution in the Dead Sea - Red Sea Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea-Red Sea Rift accommodated climatic and historic events that have fundamentally influenced the evolution of hominids. Among these developments, the Homo-Sapience (HS) dispersal "out of Africa" and the "Neolithic Revolution (NR)" represent major benchmarks. These developments occurred during the last interglacial and the post-glacial periods when the Red Sea - Levant region was overall arid. Nevertheless, wetter intervals prevailed within these arid periods, allowed the human culture development. The information on these wetter periods is stored in the sedimentary archives that were formed in the Rift. Lake Lisan that expanded all over the Dead Sea- Jordan- Kinnarot basin during the last glacial period retreated and contracted when the ice receded at the northern latitudes. At ~ 14-13 ka BP the lake dropped abruptly and deposited thick sequences of halite. Subsequently, terra rossa soil was re-mobilized from the Judea Mountains and accumulated along the Jordan Valley comprising the Fazael Fm. This soil and the availability of water in the Jordan Valley allow the establishment of the early agriculture settlements of Jericho, Gilgal and Fazael (at ~10-9 ka BP, the "peak" of sapropel S1, when enhance flow of Nile waters arrived to the Mediterranean). During the last interglacial HS dispersal occurs along the Red Sea- Jordan Valley corridor. Evidence for periods of wetness in this rather hyperarid region comes from fringing coral reefs along the Red Sea- Gulf of Aqaba shores, speleothems and travertines in the southern Negev desert -Arava valley and from lake sediments that were recently drilled at the deepest floor of the Dead Sea. All inventories indicate interval of enhanced wetness at ~ 128-122 ka BP, when sapropel S5 occurred. Thus, it appears that the periods of sapropels S1 and S5 were favorite for human culture development along the Red Sea - Jordan rift valley. Nevertheless, these human-development periods terminated abruptly at ~118-116 ka BP and

  13. Raising the Dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea Canal? A hydro-economic-institutional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Presently, just 100 million cubic meters per year (MCM/year) of the 1,000+ MCM/year that historically flowed in the lower Jordan River reach the Dead Sea. Israeli, Jordanian, and Syrian dam and extraction projects built over seven decades have principally caused the reduced flow, associated falling Dead Sea level, shrinking surface area, sink holes, salinity, and other catastrophic problems. These problems will be magnified in the face of up to 20% reductions in precipitation expected with climate change. The fix proposed by Jordan, Israel, and Palestine—and now under study by the World Bank—envisions building a $US 5 billion multipurpose canal from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinated water. Yet alternatives to raise the Dead Sea level that could take advantage of hydrologic variability remain unstudied. Here we show system-wide hydrologic and economic impacts of and discusses institutional management for alternatives to raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the inter-tied Israel-Jordan-Palestinian water systems show the desalination component of the Red Sea-Dead Sea project is economically unviable. Further, many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country together increase economic benefits and can reliably deliver up to 900 MCM/year to the Dead Sea. In all cases, results show that net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as the flow volume delivered to the Dead Sea increases. These findings suggest that (i) each country has little individual incentive to allow water to flow to the Dead Sea, and (ii) outside institutions—such as the World Bank—that seek to raise the Dead should instead offer the countries direct incentives to deliver water rather than build them new infrastructure. The work expands the set of viable options to raise the Dead Sea level and can help the World Bank and others recommend whether

  14. Red Sea isolation history suggested by Plio-Pleistocene seismic reflection sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Ligi, Marco; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2015-11-01

    High evaporation rates in the desert climate of the Red Sea ensure that, during glacial sea level lowstands when water exchange with the Indian Ocean was more restricted, water salinity and δ18 O became unusually extreme. Modeling of the effect on Red Sea sedimentary δ18 O has been used previously to reconstruct relative sea level to 500 ka and now poses the question of whether that sea-level model could be extended if continuous core material of older sediment became available. We attempt to address this question here by examining seismic reflection data. The upper Pleistocene hemipelagic sediments in the Red Sea contain intervals of inorganic aragonite precipitated during supersaturated conditions of sea-level lowstands. Seismic impedance changes associated with boundaries to those aragonite-rich layers appear to explain seismic reflection sequences. A segment of Chirp sediment profiler data from the central Red Sea reveals prominent reflections at ∼1, ∼5, ∼23, ∼26 and ∼36 ms two-way travel time (TWT) from the seabed. Based on depths to the glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) in cores, we relate the upper three reflections to the tops of aragonite-rich layers and hence the sea level rises immediately following MIS 2, 6 and 12. The reflection at 26 ms is related to an unusually rapid fall into MIS 12 predicted by one sea level reconstruction, which may have created an abrupt lower boundary to the MIS 12 aragonite-rich layer. With the aid of seismogram modeling, we tentatively associate the ∼36 ms reflection with the top of an aragonite-rich layer formed during MIS 16. Furthermore, some segments of lower frequency (airgun and sparker) seismic data from the central and southern Red Sea show a lower (earlier) Plio-Pleistocene (PP) interval that is less reflective than the upper (late) PP interval. This implies less variability in sediment impedance and that extreme variability in water salinity did not develop; water exchange with the Indian Ocean

  15. Portunoid crabs as indicators of the Red Sea fauna history and endemism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Vassily; Türkay, Michael; Brösing, Andreas; Al-Aidaroos, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Peculiar environmental conditions and "turbulent" geological history make the Red Sea a laboratory of evolution and a significant area for understanding adaptation processes. To interpret the results of this basin-scale evolutionary experiment revised inventories of taxonomic diversity of particular groups of marine biota are essential. As one of the first results of the Red Sea Biodiversity Survey (RSBS) in the years 2011 - 2012 along the coast of Saudi Arabia (http://www.redseabiodiversity.org/) and examination of earlier collections and literature a revised species list is provided for the portunoid (swimming) crabs (Crustacea Decapoda Portunoidea). This superfamily is one of the most species rich and has one of the broadest habitat scopes among Brachyura in the global scale. The present assessment results in 54 shallow water species (including 2 recorded for the first time in the Red Sea during RSBS), 2 deep water species and 1 semipelagic species Charybdis smithii. Doubtful literature records of another 7 shallow water species remain unconfirmed. Among reliably recorded shallow water species 58 % belong to widespread Indo-West-Pacific (IWP) species, 13% are the species restricted to the western Indian Ocean, 11 % are endemics of the Arabian region (occurring also either in the western Gulf of Aden or along the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, or in both areas) which are usually vicariant to the widespread IWP species, 11% are taxa that are similar to the species occurring elsewhere in the IWP but have morphological peculiarities and probably deserve a specific or subspecific status. Finally 4% of species (Thalamita murinae and Liocarcinus subcorrugatus) appear to be endemic for the Red Sea and show remarkable disjunctions from most closely related species. Carcinus sp. (probably C. aestuarii) is an introduced (but not established) species in the northern Red Sea. The deep water fauna of the Red Sea is unique because it lives in the warm (20.5-21.5 ° C

  16. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Mohamed F.; Thompson, Luke R.; Parks, Donovan H.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea. PMID:27377622

  17. Patterns of distribution of inorganic nutrients in Red Sea and their implications to primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wafar, Mohideen; Qurban, Mohammad Ali; Ashraf, Mohamed; Manikandan, K. P.; Flandez, Ace Vincent; Balala, Arvin C.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents data on inorganic nutrients obtained in several transects within Saudi Arabian waters of the Red Sea in 2012-2015. Increase in their concentrations from north to south is not monotonously linear but is punctuated by regions of high concentrations alternating with those of low concentrations, regardless of the type of nutrient (N, P or Si), season and location. Such a type of distribution could be only explained in terms of eddy circulations within the Red Sea basin. The enrichment with nutrients of the boundary currents of the eddies could be explained partly by entrainment of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water in the eddies and the mixing of the latter with the underlying Red Sea Deep Water, and partly by a higher biological productivity in the peripheries of the eddies. These results have two major implications for our understanding of biogeochemical cycles in the Red Sea. The first is that the eddy-associated injection of nutrients into the euphotic zone could cause higher levels of production over a substantial spread of the Red Sea. The second is that the anticyclonic eddies may function as traps of nutrients and in that event, their peripheries and centers may function as independent mesocosms.

  18. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Mohamed F; Thompson, Luke R; Parks, Donovan H; Hugenholtz, Philip; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea. PMID:27377622

  19. Bio-optical characterization in an ultra-oligotrophic region: the North central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheireddine, Malika; Jones, Burton

    2015-04-01

    Until recently, satellite-derived ocean color observations have been the only means of evaluating optical variability of the Red Sea. During a cruise in autumn 2014, we investigated the variability of Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) in the North Central Red Sea (NCRS) with a particular focus on the particulate backscattering coefficient, bbp, and colored dissolved organic matter, CDOM, absorption. To our knowledge, these are some of the measurements of these properties in the Red Sea. The IOPs are derived from the concentration and physical properties of suspended particles in the ocean. They provide a simple description of the influence of these particles on the light within the water column. Bio-optical relationships found for ultra-oligotrophic waters of the six stations sampled significantly depart from the mean standard relationships provided for the global ocean, showing the peculiar character of the Red Sea. These optical anomalies relate to the specific biological and environmental conditions occurring in the Red Sea ecosystem. Specifically, the surface specific phytoplankton absorption coefficients are lower than the values predicted from the global relationships due to a high proportion of relatively large sized phytoplankton. Conversely, bbp values are much higher than the mean standard values for a given chlorophyll-a concentration, Chl a. This presumably results from the influence of highly refractive submicrometer particles of Saharan origin in the surface layer of the water column.

  20. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Mohamed F; Thompson, Luke R; Parks, Donovan H; Hugenholtz, Philip; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea.

  1. Towards the best approach for wind wave modelling in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langodan, Sabique; Cavaleri, Luigi; Viswanadhapalli, Yesubabu; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    While wind and wave modelling is nowadays quite satisfactory in the open oceans, problems are still present in the enclosed seas. In general, the smaller the basin, the poorer the models perform, especially if the basin is surrounded by a complex orography. The Red Sea is an extreme example in this respect, especially because of its long and narrow shape. This deceivingly simple domain offers very interesting challenges for wind and wave modeling, not easily, if ever, found elsewhere. Depending on the season, opposite wind regimes, one directed to southeast, the other one to northwest, are present and may coexist in the most northerly and southerly parts of the Red Sea. Where the two regimes meet, the wave spectra can be rather complicated and, crucially dependent on small details of the driving wind fields. We explored how well we could reproduce the general and unusual wind and wave patterns of the Red Sea using different meteorological products. Best results were obtained using two rather opposite approaches: the high-resolution Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) regional model and the slightly enhanced surface winds from the global European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. We discuss the reasons why these two approaches produce the best results and the implications on wave modeling in the Red Sea. The unusual wind and wave patterns in the Red Sea suggest that the currently available wave model source functions may not properly represent the evolution of local fields. However, within limits, the WAVEWATCH III wave model, based on Janssen's and also Ardhuin's wave model physics, provides in many cases very reasonable results. Because surface winds lead to important uncertainties in wave simulation, we also discuss the impact of data assimilation for simulating the most accurate winds, and consequently waves, over the Red Sea.

  2. Seasonal Mass Changes in the Red Sea Observed By GPS and Grace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, A. O.; Fing, W.; Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bos, M. S.; Elsaka, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Red Sea is a semi-enclosed basin and exchanges water with the Gulf of Aden through the strait of Bab-el-Mandeb at the southern part of the sea. Its circulation is affected by the Indian Monsoon through its connection via the Gulf of Aden. Two distinctive (in summer and in winter) seasonal signals represent the water exchange. To understand the seasonal mass changes in the Red Sea, estimates of the mass changes based on two geodetic techniques are presented: from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The GRACE solutions were truncated up to spherical harmonic degree and order degree 60 to estimate the average monthly mass change in the atmosphere and ocean from models (several hours). GNSS solution is based on observations from four stations along the Red Sea that have been acquired in continuous mode starting in 2007 (having at least 5 years' data-span). The time series analysis of the observed GNSS vertical deformation of these sites has been analyzed. The results revealed that the GNSS observed vertical loading agrees with the atmospheric loading (ATML) assuming that the hydrological signal along the costs of the Red sea is negligible. Computed values of daily vertical atmospheric loading using the NCEP surface pressure data (Inverted Barometer IB) for the 4 stations for 2003 until 2013 are provided. Comparison of the GRACE and GNSS solutions has shown significant annual mass variations in the Red Sea (about 15 cm annual amplitude). After removing the atmospheric effect (ATML), the ocean loading can be observed by GNSS and GRACE estimates in the Red Sea.

  3. Seasonal variability of the Red Sea, from satellite gravity, radar altimetry, and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John; Smeed, David A.; Leuliette, Eric; Swenson, Sean

    2014-08-01

    Seasonal variations of sea surface height (SSH) and mass within the Red Sea are caused mostly by exchange of heat with the atmosphere and by flow through the strait opening into the Gulf of Aden to the south. That flow involves a net mass transfer into the Red Sea during fall and out during spring, though in summer there is an influx of cool water at intermediate depths. Thus, summer water in the south is warmer near the surface due to higher air temperatures, but cooler at intermediate depths. Summer water in the north experiences warming by air-sea exchange only. The temperature affects water density, which impacts SSH but has no effect on mass. We study this seasonal cycle by combining GRACE mass estimates, altimeter SSH measurements, and steric contributions derived from the World Ocean Atlas temperature climatology. Among our conclusions are: mass contributions are much larger than steric contributions; the mass is largest in winter, consistent with winds pushing water into the Red Sea in fall and out during spring; the steric signal is largest in summer, consistent with surface warming; and the cool, intermediate-depth water flowing into the Red Sea in spring has little impact on the steric signal, because contributions from the lowered temperature are offset by effects of decreased salinity. The results suggest that the combined use of altimeter and GRACE measurements can provide a useful alternative to in situ data for monitoring the steric signal.

  4. Red List of birds of the Wadden Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, L. M.; Norden Andersen, O. G.; Frikke, J.; Laursen, K.; Salvig, J.; Fleet, D. M.; Hälterlein, B.; Heckenroth, H.; Merck, T.; Rösner, H.-U.; Südbeck, P.; Wolff, W. J.; Thissen, J. B. M.

    1996-10-01

    350000 400000 pairs of breeding birds as well as 10 12 millions of migratory waterbirds use the Danish-German-Dutch Wadden Sea as a feeding, roosting and moulting area. The exact number of migrating birds using the Wadden Sea is unknown. 4 Wadden Sea breeding bird species are (probably) extinct in the area, e.g. Caspian Tern ( Sterna caspia) and Roseate Tern ( Sterna dougallii); the status of 5 species is critical, 4 species are endangered, the status of 6 species is vulnerable and of 4 species susceptible. Internaional responsibility can be stated for at least 15 breeding bird species or subspecies, because considerable parts of the north-west-european population (at least 5%) breed in the Wadden Sea (e.g. Eurasian Spoonbill ( Platalea leucorodia), Common Shelduck ( Tadorna tadorna), Hen Harrier ( Circus cyaneus), Avocet ( Recurvirostra avosetta), Kentish Plover ( Charadrius alexandrinus), Common Redshank ( Tringa totanus totanus), Gull-billed Tern ( Gelochelidon nilotica), Sandwich Tern ( Sterna sandvicensis), Common Tern ( Sterna hirundo), Little Tern ( Sterna albifrons). International responsibility can be determined for at least 54 migratory bird species or subspecies, because considerable parts of the biogeographical population (at least 1%) occur in the Wadden Sea during migration. Some species are present in the Wadden Sea with about 50% or nearly 90% of all individuals of the concerned populations, which means a very special international responsibility of the Wadden Sea has to be stated for these species.

  5. North Sea development activity surges

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-10

    This paper reports that operators in the North Sea have reported a burst of upstream activity. Off the U.K.: Amoco (U.K.) Exploration Co. installed three jackets in its North Everest and Lomond fields. It also completed laying the Central Area Transmission System (CATS) pipeline, which will carry the fields' gas to shore. BP Exploration Operating Co. Ltd. installed the jacket for it Unity riser platform 5 {1/2} km from its Forties Charlie platform. Conoco (U.K.) Ltd. tested a successful appraisal well in Britannia field in Block 15/30, about 130 miles northeast of Aberdeen. In the Norwegian North Sea, Saga Petroleum AS placed Snorre oil and gas field on production 6 weeks ahead of schedule and 1.5 billion kroner under budget at a cost of 16.6 billion kroner; and downstream off the U.K., Phillips Petroleum Co. (U.K.) Ltd. awarded Allseas Marine Contractors SA, Essen, Belgium, a pipelay and trenching contract for its Ann field development project in Block 49/6a.

  6. Antiproliferative Scalarane-Based Metabolites from the Red Sea Sponge Hyrtios erectus.

    PubMed

    Elhady, Sameh S; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Hassanean, Hashim A; Ahmed, Safwat A

    2016-01-01

    Two new sesterterpenes analogs, namely, 12-acetoxy,16-epi-hyrtiolide (1) and 12β-acetoxy,16β-methoxy,20α-hydroxy-17-scalaren-19,20-olide (2), containing a scalarane-based framework along with seven previously reported scalarane-type sesterterpenes (3-9) have been isolated from the sponge Hyrtios erectus (order Dictyoceratida) collected from the Red Sea, Egypt. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic data and comparison with reported NMR data. Compounds 1-9 exhibited considerable antiproliferative activity against breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), colorectal carcinoma (HCT-116) and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2). Compounds 3, 5 and 9 were selected for subsequent investigations regarding their mechanism of cell death induction (differential apoptosis/necrosis assessment) and their influence on cell cycle distribution. PMID:27399730

  7. Wewakazole B, a Cytotoxic Cyanobactin from the Cyanobacterium Moorea producens Collected in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Julius Adam V; Al-Lihaibi, Sultan S; Alarif, Walied M; Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; Nogata, Yasuyuki; Washio, Kenji; Morikawa, Masaaki; Okino, Tatsufumi

    2016-04-22

    A mass spectrometry (MS)-guided isolation has led to the purification of a new cyanobactin, wewakazole B (1), along with the known compound curacin D from a Red Sea Moorea producens. The planar structure of 1 was elucidated using a combination of NMR and MS techniques. After ozonolysis and acid hydrolysis, the absolute configurations of the amino acid components of 1 were determined by chiral-phase LC-MS and HPLC analyses. Notably, compound 1 exhibited cytotoxic activity toward human MCF7 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 0.58 μM) and human H460 lung cancer cells (IC50 = 1.0 μM) and was also found to be inactive in a siderophore assay. PMID:26980238

  8. Antiproliferative Scalarane-Based Metabolites from the Red Sea Sponge Hyrtios erectus

    PubMed Central

    Elhady, Sameh S.; Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; El-Halawany, Ali M.; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M.; Hassanean, Hashim A.; Ahmed, Safwat A.

    2016-01-01

    Two new sesterterpenes analogs, namely, 12-acetoxy,16-epi-hyrtiolide (1) and 12β-acetoxy,16β-methoxy,20α-hydroxy-17-scalaren-19,20-olide (2), containing a scalarane-based framework along with seven previously reported scalarane-type sesterterpenes (3–9) have been isolated from the sponge Hyrtios erectus (order Dictyoceratida) collected from the Red Sea, Egypt. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic data and comparison with reported NMR data. Compounds 1–9 exhibited considerable antiproliferative activity against breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), colorectal carcinoma (HCT-116) and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2). Compounds 3, 5 and 9 were selected for subsequent investigations regarding their mechanism of cell death induction (differential apoptosis/necrosis assessment) and their influence on cell cycle distribution. PMID:27399730

  9. The Red Sea analog for the early Gulf of Mexico: Salt basins on oceanic crust

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    New geophysical data from the Red Sea and the Gulf of Mexico support the concept that the early Gulf closely resembled the modern Red Sea. Oceanic crust like that now forming along the axis of the Red Sea basin may underlie much of the continental slope offshore Louisiana and Texas. Original depositional thicknesses greater than 4 km characterize both salt depocenters. The thickest salt overlies oceanic crust, probably for isostatic reasons. Deep crustal detachment faulting in a simple shear model with ductile flow below 15 km and narrow zones (up to 50 km) of severely extended crust on the hanging wall characterizes the early tectonic development. The landward edge of thick (> 2--4 km) salt generally follows the edge of oceanic crust, but the seaward edge is localized by depositional factors, modified by subsequent gravity spreading.

  10. Survey of demersal fishes from southern Saudi Arabia, with five new records for the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Alpermann, Tilman J; Mal, Ahmad O; Gabr, Mohamed H

    2014-08-18

    During a survey of demersal fishes of the southern Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia off Jizan, 98 species were collected by trawling. Five of these represent new records for the Red Sea: Saurida longimanus, Dactyloptena gilberti, Jaydia novaeguineae, Pomadasys maculatus and Parapercis maculata. Additionally a specimen of the rare moray Gymnothorax reticularis, previously known from only three specimens, was collected. Records of two species, Parastromateus niger and Pseudorhombus arsius, that formerly were considered questionable, are confirmed by collection of new voucher specimens. Validity of Laeops sinusarabici is confirmed. This study documents parts of the diversity of the demersal fish communities on sandy areas of the southern Red Sea, but also emphasizes that a large proportion of this area has not been explored. 

  11. Status of breeding seabirds on the Northern Islands of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y.; Aloufi, Abdulhadi A.

    2013-01-01

    We undertook breeding surveys between 2010 and 2011 to assess the status of breeding birds on 16 islands in the northern Saudi Arabia. Sixteen bird species were found breeding at three different seasons; i.e. winter (Osprey), spring (Caspian and Saunder’s Terns), and summer (Lesser Crested, White-cheeked, Bridled Terns). It is postulated that food availability is an important factor influencing the breeding of seabirds in the northern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Several species laid eggs earlier in northern parts of the Red Sea than in southern parts. The predicted increases in temperatures (Ta) could have a negative effect on species survival in the future, especially on those whose nests that are in the open. Finally, disturbance, predation and egg collection were probably the main immediate threats affecting the breeding seabird species in the northern Red Sea. PMID:24955009

  12. Chewing lice (Phthiraptera: Amblycera, Ischnocera) from Red Sea gulls with new host-parasite records.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmed, Azzam; Shobrak, Mohammed; Nasser, Mohamed G E-D

    2014-04-23

    Knowledge about chewing lice from marine birds of the Red Sea is minimal. Five species of gulls were examined for chewing lice in three different localities of the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast. Two gull species were examined for lice for the first time (Larus armenicus Buturlin, 1934 and Larus michahellis Naumann, 1840) and their lice represent new host-louse associations. Four species and two subspecies of lice were identified from 159 specimens collected. Actornithophilus piceus lari (Packard, 1870) and Austromenopon transversum (Denny, 1842) (suborder: Amblycera), and Quadraceps punctatus (Burmeister, 1838) and Saemundssonia lari (O. Fabricius, 1780) (suborder: Ischnocera) were recorded for the first time from Saudi Arabia and Red Sea birds. Taxonomic and ecological notes, type hosts, data on specimens examined, collecting localities, an identification key, and photographs of each species and subspecies are given. 

  13. Status of breeding seabirds on the Northern Islands of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y; Aloufi, Abdulhadi A

    2014-07-01

    We undertook breeding surveys between 2010 and 2011 to assess the status of breeding birds on 16 islands in the northern Saudi Arabia. Sixteen bird species were found breeding at three different seasons; i.e. winter (Osprey), spring (Caspian and Saunder's Terns), and summer (Lesser Crested, White-cheeked, Bridled Terns). It is postulated that food availability is an important factor influencing the breeding of seabirds in the northern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Several species laid eggs earlier in northern parts of the Red Sea than in southern parts. The predicted increases in temperatures (Ta ) could have a negative effect on species survival in the future, especially on those whose nests that are in the open. Finally, disturbance, predation and egg collection were probably the main immediate threats affecting the breeding seabird species in the northern Red Sea.

  14. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Luke R; Field, Chris; Romanuk, Tamara; Ngugi, David; Siam, Rania; El Dorry, Hamza; Stingl, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability.

  15. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Luke R; Field, Chris; Romanuk, Tamara; Ngugi, David; Siam, Rania; El Dorry, Hamza; Stingl, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability. PMID

  16. Red-Sea rift magmatism near Al Lith, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    A model of poly-baric mantle-melt derivation, producing several alkalinesubalkaline cycles, best explains magmatism in the Red Sea region. Differences in the depths and dynamics of mantle-melt extraction and transport brought about through changes in crust and mantle structure as the rift and paar developed may account for the transition from mixed alkaline-subalkaline bimodal magmatism of the pre-20 Ma rift basin to exclusively subalkaline (tholeiitic) magmatism at the Red Sea spreading axis and to predominantly alkali basalt volcanism within the Arabian Shield.

  17. Coral Community Reproductive Patterns: Red Sea Versus the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlesinger, Y.; Loya, Y.

    1985-06-01

    In contrast to many corals of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, which are synchronous multispecific spawners, the abundant coral species in the northern Red Sea, Israel, exhibit temporal reproductive isolation. Spawning dates of 12 of the 13 Red Sea species followed lunar periodicity and were consistent throughout 3 years of study. Spawning periods of all species occurred in different seasons, different months, or different lunar phases within the same month. The high abundance of the corals studied at Eilat may be due in part to the advantages gained through not having overlapping spawning periods and settlement times.

  18. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cell lines by the Red Sea brine pool bacterial extracts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine microorganisms are considered to be an important source of bioactive molecules against various diseases and have great potential to increase the number of lead molecules in clinical trials. Progress in novel microbial culturing techniques as well as greater accessibility to unique oceanic habitats has placed the marine environment as a new frontier in the field of natural product drug discovery. Methods A total of 24 microbial extracts from deep-sea brine pools in the Red Sea have been evaluated for their anticancer potential against three human cancer cell lines. Downstream analysis of these six most potent extracts was done using various biological assays, such as Caspase-3/7 activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), PARP-1 cleavage and expression of γH2Ax, Caspase-8 and -9 using western blotting. Results In general, most of the microbial extracts were found to be cytotoxic against one or more cancer cell lines with cell line specific activities. Out of the 13 most active microbial extracts, six extracts were able to induce significantly higher apoptosis (>70%) in cancer cells. Mechanism level studies revealed that extracts from Chromohalobacter salexigens (P3-86A and P3-86B(2)) followed the sequence of events of apoptotic pathway involving MMP disruption, caspase-3/7 activity, caspase-8 cleavage, PARP-1 cleavage and Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, whereas another Chromohalobacter salexigens extract (K30) induced caspase-9 mediated apoptosis. The extracts from Halomonas meridiana (P3-37B), Chromohalobacter israelensis (K18) and Idiomarina loihiensis (P3-37C) were unable to induce any change in MMP in HeLa cancer cells, and thus suggested mitochondria-independent apoptosis induction. However, further detection of a PARP-1 cleavage product, and the observed changes in caspase-8 and -9 suggested the involvement of caspase-mediated apoptotic pathways. Conclusion Altogether, the study offers novel findings regarding the anticancer

  19. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 1. Model validation and summer circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Pratt, Larry J.; Bower, Amy S.; Zhai, Ping; Köhl, Armin; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2014-04-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. In the first part of this study, the vertical and horizontal structure of the summer overturning circulation and its dynamical mechanisms are presented from the model results. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is successfully simulated, and the structures of the intruding subsurface Gulf of Aden intermediate water are in good agreement with summer observations in 2011. The model results suggest that the summer overturning circulation is driven by the combined effect of the shoaling of the thermocline in the Gulf of Aden resulting from remote winds in the Arabian Sea and an upward surface slope from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden set up by local surface winds in the Red Sea. In addition, during late summer two processes associated, respectively, with latitudinally differential heating and increased salinity in the southern Red Sea act together to cause the reversal of the contrast of the vertical density structure and the cessation of the summer overturning circulation. Dynamically, the subsurface northward pressure gradient force is mainly balanced by vertical viscosity resulting from the vertical shear and boundary friction in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb. Unlike some previous studies, the three-layer summer exchange flows in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb do not appear to be hydraulically controlled.

  20. Phenotypic differentiation of the Red Sea gastropods in response to the environmental deterioration: Geometric morphometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhady, Ahmed Awad

    2016-03-01

    The negative impacts of degradation in the coastal zone of the Red Sea are becoming well known in upper portions of the trophic web (e.g., humans and fish), but are less well known among the benthic primary consumers. In addition, the degree to which heavy metals are entering the trophic web can be better-quantified using macrobenthos. Two-gastropod genera encompassing Echinolittorina subnodosa and Planaxis sulcatus from three different localities on the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea were examined in order to deduce the impact of environmental deterioration on the morphology of shells. The examined sites include clean pristine, slightly polluted, and markedly polluted rocky shores. Phosphate/lead industry is the main source of pollution in this zone. Because landmarks on the rugose Echinolittorina are difficult to define and to ensure finer resolution of the analyses, a newly 'grid-based' landmarks was implemented. Both Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) were particularly capable to capture and terrace the minor morphological variations accurately. Two phenotypes portioned among the environmentally different populations were recognized and interpreted as ecotypes with many intermediate forms. The first ecotype has a higher spire and smaller aperture and dominating the pristine site North of Marsa Alam, whereas the second ecotype has a globular shell shape with big aperture and dominating the markedly polluted site. The intermediate forms dominating the slightly polluted site. The shape differences are interpreted as an adaptive differentiation to different metal concentrations. As the morphological variation between the two-ecotypes of both taxa is still minors, and both ecotypes occur together with many intermediate forms, the phenotypic divergence stage has not yet accomplished. The gradational shape change among the investigated populations was positively correlated with index of Pollution (IP). As the human activities were the main

  1. Numerical modelling of wind and wave conditions in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langodan, S.; Cavaleri, L.; Viswanadhapalli, Y.; Hoteit, I.

    2014-12-01

    While wind and wave modelling is nowadys quite satisfactory in the open oceans, problems are still present in the enclosed seas, the more so the smaller the basin and the more complicated the surrounding orography. The Red Sea is an extreme example in this respect, especially because of its long and narrow shape. This deceivingly simple domain offers very interesting challenges for wind and wave modelling, not easily, if ever, found elsewhere. Depending on the season, opposite wind regimes, one direct to southeast, the other one to northwest, are present may coexist in the most northerly and southerly parts of the Red Sea. Where the two regimes meet, the wavespectra can be rather complicated and, crucially dependent on small details of the driving wind fields. Using different meteorological products and wave models, we explored how well we could reproduce the general and unusual wind and wave patterns of the Red Sea. We obtained the best results using two rather opposite approaches; the high resolution Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) regional model and slightly enhanced surface winds from the global European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. We discuss the reasons why this two approaches produce the best results and the implications on wave modelling in the Red Sea. The unusual wind and wave patterns in the Red Sea suggests that the currently available wave models source functions may not properly represent the evolution of local fields. However, within limits, the WAVEWATCH III wave model, based on Janssen's and also Ardhuin's wave model physics, provides in many cases very reasonable results.

  2. Rhodolith formation induced by reef erosion in the Red Sea, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Rasser, M.

    1996-09-01

    Along the northwestern margin of Safaga Island (Northern Bay of Safaga, Red Sea, Egypt) a small fringing reef (several hundred meters long, up to 2 m high) and small patch reefs are developed due to the local current regime which is favorable for coral growth. Corals and reef rock are encrusted by coralline algae, predominantly by branched Lithophyllum kotschyanum. Owing to destructional processes dominated by sea urchin activities, fragmentation of (1) corals, (2) reef rock, and (3) coralline algae takes place resulting in the formation of almost mono-specific, branched Lithophyllum kotschyanum rhodoliths. Rhodolith formation takes place in various reef environments: (1) in depressions on the reef flat where ellipsoidal rhodoliths develop, with interlocking and fusing branches leading to a coralline algal framework; (2) in discharge channels where smaller elongated rhodoliths occur; (3) in leeward positions between reef flat and seagrass meadows, where a dense belt of spheroidal to ellipsoidal rhodoliths is formed; scattered rhodoliths occur in adjacent seagrass beds. The formation and preservation of rhodoliths requires a complex interplay of destruction, growth, transportation, movement, and stabilization.

  3. Egypt's Red Sea coast: phylogenetic analysis of cultured microbial consortia in industrialized sites

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ghada A.; Abd-Elgawad, Amr; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The Red Sea possesses a unique geography, and its shores are rich in mangrove, macro-algal and coral reef ecosystems. Various sources of pollution affect Red Sea biota, including microbial life. We assessed the effects of industrialization on microbes along the Egyptian Red Sea coast at eight coastal sites and two lakes. The bacterial communities of sediment samples were analyzed using bacterial 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of V6-V4 hypervariable regions. The taxonomic assignment of 131,402 significant reads to major bacterial taxa revealed five main bacterial phyla dominating the sampled sites: Proteobacteria (68%), Firmicutes (13%), Fusobacteria (12%), Bacteriodetes (6%), and Spirochetes (0.03%). Further analysis revealed distinct bacterial consortia that primarily included (1) marine Vibrio spp.—suggesting a “marine Vibrio phenomenon”; (2) potential human pathogens; and (3) oil-degrading bacteria. We discuss two divergent microbial consortia that were sampled from Solar Lake West near Taba/Eilat and Saline Lake in Ras Muhammad; these consortia contained the highest abundance of human pathogens and no pathogens, respectively. Our results draw attention to the effects of industrialization on the Red Sea and suggest the need for further analysis to overcome the hazardous effects observed at the impacted sites. PMID:25157243

  4. Tectonic configuration of the western Arabian continental margin, southern Red Sea, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    A tectonic reconstruction of pre-Red Sea Afro/Arabia suggests that the early rift was narrow with intense extension confined to an axial belt 20 to 40 km wide. Steep Moho slopes probably developed during rift formation as indicated by published gravity data, two published seismic interpretations and the surface geology.

  5. Population fluctuation and vertical distribution of meiofauna in the Red Sea interstitial environment

    PubMed Central

    El-Serehy, Hamed A.; Al-Misned, Fahad A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the benthic meiofauna assemblages of the Egyptian coasts along the Red Sea are described in relation to abiotic variables. Sediment samples were collected seasonally from three stations chosen along the Red Sea to observe the meiofaunal community structure, its temporal distribution and vertical fluctuation in relation to environmental conditions of the Red Sea marine ecosystem. The temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and redox potential were measured at the time of collection. The water content of the sediments, total organic matters and chlorophyll a values were determined, and sediment samples were subjected to granulometric analysis. A total of 10 meiofauna taxa were identified, with the meiofauna being primarily represented by nematodes (on annual average from 42% to 84%), harpacticoids, polycheates and ostracodes; and the meiofauna abundances ranging from 41 to 167 ind./10 cm2. The meiofaunal population density fluctuated seasonally with a peak of 192.52 ind./10 cm2 during summer at station II. The vertical zonation in the distribution of meiofaunal community was significantly correlated with interstitial water, chlorophyll a and total organic matter values. The present study indicates the existence of the well diversified meiofaunal group which can serve as food for higher trophic levels in the Red Sea interstitial environment. PMID:26150753

  6. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furby, K. A.; Bouwmeester, J.; Berumen, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (<20 % on average). We resurveyed the reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e.g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea.

  7. Scientific Diving Training Course. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents the scientific diving training course organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) for the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA). This course of six weeks duration aims to produce a person who is capable of carrying out scientific diving tasks in the…

  8. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse and species-specific microbial communities in sponges from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Lee, On On; Wang, Yong; Yang, Jiangke; Lafi, Feras F; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-04-01

    Marine sponges are associated with a remarkable array of microorganisms. Using a tag pyrosequencing technology, this study was the first to investigate in depth the microbial communities associated with three Red Sea sponges, Hyrtios erectus, Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria. We revealed highly diverse sponge-associated bacterial communities with up to 1000 microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and richness estimates of up to 2000 species. Altogether, 26 bacterial phyla were detected from the Red Sea sponges, 11 of which were absent from the surrounding sea water and 4 were recorded in sponges for the first time. Up to 100 OTUs with richness estimates of up to 300 archaeal species were revealed from a single sponge species. This is by far the highest archaeal diversity ever recorded for sponges. A non-negligible proportion of unclassified reads was observed in sponges. Our results demonstrated that the sponge-associated microbial communities remained highly consistent in the same sponge species from different locations, although they varied at different degrees among different sponge species. A significant proportion of the tag sequences from the sponges could be assigned to one of the sponge-specific clusters previously defined. In addition, the sponge-associated microbial communities were consistently divergent from those present in the surrounding sea water. Our results suggest that the Red Sea sponges possess highly sponge-specific or even sponge-species-specific microbial communities that are resistant to environmental disturbance, and much of their microbial diversity remains to be explored. PMID:21085196

  9. 76 FR 39369 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery; Amendment 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery; Amendment 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... Crab Fishery Management Plan (Red Crab FMP). The New England Fishery Management Council (Council) developed Amendment 3 to bring the Red Crab FMP into compliance with the annual catch limit (ACL)...

  10. mdRNA-Seq analysis of marine microbial communities from the northern Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shengwei; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Miller, Dan; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Metatranscriptomic differential RNA-Seq (mdRNA-Seq) identifies the suite of active transcriptional start sites at single-nucleotide resolution through enrichment of primary transcript 5′ ends. Here we analyzed the microbial community at 45 m depth at Station A in the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, during 500 m deep mixing in February 2012 using mdRNA-Seq and a parallel classical RNA-Seq approach. We identified promoters active in situ for five different pico-planktonic genera (the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria, Synechococcus of Cyanobacteria, Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Micromonas as an example for picoeukaryotic algae), showing the applicability of this approach to highly diverse microbial communities. 16S rDNA quantification revealed that 24% of the analyzed community were group II marine Euryarchaeota in which we identified a highly abundant non-coding RNA, Tan1, and detected very high expression of genes encoding intrinsically disordered proteins, as well as enzymes for the synthesis of specific B vitamins, extracellular peptidases, carbohydrate-active enzymes, and transport systems. These results highlight previously unknown functions of Euryarchaeota with community-wide relevance. The complementation of metatranscriptomic studies with mdRNA-Seq provides substantial additional information regarding transcriptional start sites, promoter activities, and the identification of non-coding RNAs. PMID:27759035

  11. New observations of eddies and boundary currents in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Amy S.; Swift, Stephen A.; Churchill, James H.; McCorkle, Daniel C.; Abualnaja, Yasser; Limeburner, Richard; Zhai, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Physical oceanographic studies of the Red Sea have often focused on the large-scale overturning circulation, in which water entering the sea from the Gulf of Aden becomes cooler, saltier and more dense as it flows northward, due mainly to strong evaporation (~2 m/y), and then flows back southward and exits the sea as a dense overflow through Bab al Mandeb. Less attention has been focused on the details of the horizontal circulation, in large part due to the dearth of high-resolution observations of the three-dimensional structure of water properties and currents. Two high-resolution hydrographic and current surveys were recently carried out in the eastern Red Sea, in March 2010 and September-October 2011. Of particular note are the continuous measurements of current velocity, taken along the cruise tracks from the sea surface to 600 m with a hull-mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, which revealed the presence and structure of several basin-scale eddies and eastern boundary currents. In March 2010, a strong, 200-km diameter anticyclonic eddy was found centered near 23oN, with peak azimuthal velocities of nearly 1 m/s, a transport of 6-7 Sv and eddy currents extending to ~400 m depth. The eddy's core was in solid body rotation, with six-day rotation period and a relative vorticity of 0.5f (i.e., 1/2 the local Coriolis parameter). Surface drifters deployed in the eddy core remained trapped for their entire lifetimes (up to 5 months). An eddy was observed several times previously in this location-20 years of satellite-derived altimetric measurements of sea level anomaly indicate that it is a quasi-permanent feature of the Red Sea circulation and that there is an annual cycle in its strength. This may be linked to the annual cycle in buoyancy forcing and the strength of the cyclonic circulation in the northern Red Sea. In September 2011, cross-basin transects in the southern Red Sea (17-19oN) revealed a layer of relatively cold, fresh, low-oxygen, high

  12. Spatial and seasonal reef calcification in corals and calcareous crusts in the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roik, Anna; Roder, Cornelia; Röthig, Till; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-06-01

    The existence of coral reef ecosystems critically relies on the reef carbonate framework produced by scleractinian corals and calcareous crusts (i.e., crustose coralline algae). While the Red Sea harbors one of the longest connected reef systems in the world, detailed calcification data are only available from the northernmost part. To fill this knowledge gap, we measured in situ calcification rates of primary and secondary reef builders in the central Red Sea. We collected data on the major habitat-forming coral genera Porites, Acropora, and Pocillopora and also on calcareous crusts (CC) in a spatio-seasonal framework. The scope of the study comprised sheltered and exposed sites of three reefs along a cross-shelf gradient and over four seasons of the year. Calcification of all coral genera was consistent across the shelf and highest in spring. In addition, Pocillopora showed increased calcification at exposed reef sites. In contrast, CC calcification increased from nearshore, sheltered to offshore, exposed reef sites, but also varied over seasons. Comparing our data to other reef locations, calcification in the Red Sea was in the range of data collected from reefs in the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific; however, Acropora calcification estimates were at the lower end of worldwide rates. Our study shows that the increasing coral cover from nearshore to offshore environments aligned with CC calcification but not coral calcification, highlighting the potentially important role of CC in structuring reef cover and habitats. While coral calcification maxima have been typically observed during summer in many reef locations worldwide, calcification maxima during spring in the central Red Sea indicate that summer temperatures exceed the optima of reef calcifiers in this region. This study provides a foundation for comparative efforts and sets a baseline to quantify impact of future environmental change in the central Red Sea.

  13. First Insights into the Viral Communities of the Deep-sea Anoxic Brines of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, André; Alam, Intikhab; Simões, Marta Filipa; Daniels, Camille; Ferreira, Ari J.S.; Siam, Rania; El-Dorry, Hamza; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea include some of the most extreme and unique environments on Earth. They combine high salinities with increases in temperature, heavy metals, hydrostatic pressure, and anoxic conditions, creating unique settings for thriving populations of novel extremophiles. Despite a recent increase of studies focusing on these unusual biotopes, their viral communities remain unexplored. The current survey explores four metagenomic datasets obtained from different brine–seawater interface samples, focusing specifically on the diversity of their viral communities. Data analysis confirmed that the particle-attached viral communities present in the brine–seawater interfaces were diverse and generally dominated by Caudovirales, yet appearing distinct from sample to sample. With a level of caution, we report the unexpected finding of Phycodnaviridae, which infects algae and plants, and trace amounts of insect-infecting Iridoviridae. Results from Kebrit Deep revealed stratification in the viral communities present in the interface: the upper-interface was enriched with viruses associated with typical marine bacteria, while the lower-interface was enriched with haloviruses and halophages. These results provide first insights into the unexplored viral communities present in deep-sea brines of the Red Sea, representing one of the first steps for ongoing and future sampling efforts and studies. PMID:26529193

  14. Exposure of eggs to solar UV-B leads to reduced hatching rates in two sparid fishes, red sea bream Pagrus major and black sea bream Acanthopagrus schlegeli.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Y; Masuda, R; Yamashita, Y

    2010-02-01

    Hatching success was examined under exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) using filters to give three different light conditions [C1: UV-B, UV-A and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), C2: UV-A and PAR, C3: PAR] in red Pagrus major and black Acanthopagrus schlegeli sea bream. Hatching rate of both species was reduced by an exposure over a 2 day period to UVR and was not significantly different between two species under the three light conditions. PMID:20666911

  15. Bioactive Hydantoin Alkaloids from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hemimycale arabica.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Diaa T A; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Alshali, Khalid Z

    2015-10-28

    In the course of our continuing efforts to identify bioactive secondary metabolites from Red Sea marine invertebrates, we have investigated the sponge Hemimycale arabica. The antimicrobial fraction of an organic extract of the sponge afforded two new hydantoin alkaloids, hemimycalins A and B (2 and 3), together with the previously reported compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (1). The structures of the compounds were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) studies and high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Hemimycalins A (2) and B (3) represent the first examples of the natural N-alkylated hydantoins from the sponge Hemimycale arabica. Compounds 1-3 displayed variable antimicrobial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. In addition, compound 1 displayed moderate antiproliferative activity against the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line. These findings provide further insight into the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of this class of compounds.

  16. Mirabolides A and B; New Cytotoxic Glycerides from the Red Sea Sponge Theonella mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hussein, Dina R.; Youssef, Diaa T. A.

    2016-01-01

    As a part of our continuing work to find out bioactive lead molecules from marine invertebrates, the CHCl3 fraction of the organic extract of the Red Sea sponge Theonella mirabilis showed cytotoxic activity in our primary screen. Bioassay-guided purification of the active fractions of the sponge’s extract resulted in the isolation of two new glycerides, mirabolides A and B (1 and 2), together with the reported 4-methylene sterols, conicasterol (3) and swinhosterol B (4). The structures of the compounds were assigned by interpretation of their 1D (1H, 13C), 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC, ROESY) NMR spectral data and high-resolution mass determinations. Compounds 1–4 displayed marked cytotoxic activity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7) with IC50 values of 16.4, 5.18, 6.23 and 3.0 μg/mL, respectively, compared to 5.4 μg/mL observed by doxorubicin as reference drug. PMID:27548191

  17. Mirabolides A and B; New Cytotoxic Glycerides from the Red Sea Sponge Theonella mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hussein, Dina R; Youssef, Diaa T A

    2016-01-01

    As a part of our continuing work to find out bioactive lead molecules from marine invertebrates, the CHCl₃ fraction of the organic extract of the Red Sea sponge Theonella mirabilis showed cytotoxic activity in our primary screen. Bioassay-guided purification of the active fractions of the sponge's extract resulted in the isolation of two new glycerides, mirabolides A and B (1 and 2), together with the reported 4-methylene sterols, conicasterol (3) and swinhosterol B (4). The structures of the compounds were assigned by interpretation of their 1D (¹H, (13)C), 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC, ROESY) NMR spectral data and high-resolution mass determinations. Compounds 1-4 displayed marked cytotoxic activity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7) with IC50 values of 16.4, 5.18, 6.23 and 3.0 μg/mL, respectively, compared to 5.4 μg/mL observed by doxorubicin as reference drug. PMID:27548191

  18. Bioactive secondary metabolites from the Red Sea marine Verongid sponge Suberea species.

    PubMed

    Shaala, Lamiaa A; Youssef, Diaa T A; Badr, Jihan M; Sulaiman, Mansour; Khedr, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    In a continuation of our efforts to identify bioactive compounds from Red Sea Verongid sponges, the organic extract of the sponge Suberea species afforded seven compounds including two new dibrominated alkaloids, subereamollines C and D (1 and 2), together with the known compounds aerothionin (3), homoaerothionin (4), aeroplysinin-1 (5), aeroplysinin-2 (6) and a revised subereaphenol C (7) as ethyl 2-(2,4-dibromo-3,6-dihydroxyphenyl)acetate. The structures of the isolated compounds were assigned by different spectral data including optical rotations, 1D (1H and 13C) and 2D (COSY, multiplicity-edited HSQC, and HMBC) NMR and high-resolution mass spectroscopy. Aerothionin (3) and subereaphenol C (7) displayed potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cell line with IC50 values of 29 and 13.3 µM, respectively. In addition, aeroplysinin-2 (6) showed potent antimigratory activity against the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with IC50 of 18 µM. Subereamollines C and D are new congeners of the previously reported compounds subereamollines A and B with methyl ester functionalities on the side chain. These findings provide further insight into the biosynthetic capabilities of members of the genus Suberea and the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of these compounds. PMID:25812033

  19. Assessment of red onion on antioxidant activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Jung, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2012-11-01

    Oxidative stress related to the aging process can increase the risk of degenerative disease. Red onions contain antioxidative compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effect of dietary red onion peel and/or flesh on antioxidative activity in rats. Twenty Sprague-Dawley male rats (18 weeks old) were divided into four groups. Each group was raised for 4 weeks on a red onion free control diet (ND), red onion diet containing 5% red onion peel (RP), 5% red onion flesh (RF), or 5% red onion peel+flesh (RPF). The results demonstrated that serum SOD activity was significantly increased in the RP and RPF groups, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was significantly higher in the RF group than in the ND group. Catalase activity and ORAC activity in liver showed upward tendency in the RP, RF, and RPF groups although the differences were not statistically significant. Liver malondialdehyde levels in the RPF group were significantly lower than those in the ND group were. In conclusion, red onion may enhance antioxidant defense mechanism through the induction of plasma SOD and GPx activities and inhibited liver lipid peroxidation. Therefore, red onion may exert important protective effects against oxidative stress related diseases.

  20. Assessment of red onion on antioxidant activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Jung, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2012-11-01

    Oxidative stress related to the aging process can increase the risk of degenerative disease. Red onions contain antioxidative compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effect of dietary red onion peel and/or flesh on antioxidative activity in rats. Twenty Sprague-Dawley male rats (18 weeks old) were divided into four groups. Each group was raised for 4 weeks on a red onion free control diet (ND), red onion diet containing 5% red onion peel (RP), 5% red onion flesh (RF), or 5% red onion peel+flesh (RPF). The results demonstrated that serum SOD activity was significantly increased in the RP and RPF groups, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was significantly higher in the RF group than in the ND group. Catalase activity and ORAC activity in liver showed upward tendency in the RP, RF, and RPF groups although the differences were not statistically significant. Liver malondialdehyde levels in the RPF group were significantly lower than those in the ND group were. In conclusion, red onion may enhance antioxidant defense mechanism through the induction of plasma SOD and GPx activities and inhibited liver lipid peroxidation. Therefore, red onion may exert important protective effects against oxidative stress related diseases. PMID:22902824

  1. Effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of the red sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Senhao; Dong, Shuanglin; Gao, Qinfeng; Ren, Yichao; Wang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Three color variants of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus are recognized, the red one is highly valued in the market. When the red variant is cultured in ponds in China, its body color changes from red to celadon in 3-6 months. The effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of this animal were investigated. Juveniles of red A. japonicus were cultured in cages suspended at a range of water depths (20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm). The specific growth rate of red sea cucumbers was significantly higher in animals cultured at deeper water layers compared with those grown at shallowers. Body weights were greatest for sea cucumbers cultured at a depth of 150 cm and their survival rates were highest at a depth of 200 cm. A scale to evaluate the color of red sea cucumbers ( R value) was developed using a Pantone standard color card. All stocked animals in the 9-month trial retained a red color, however the red body color was much more intense in sea cucumbers cultured at shallower depths, while animals suspended in deeper layers became pale. In a separate trial, A. japonicus were cultured in suspended cages with seven different colored substrates. Substrate color had a significant effect on the growth and body-color of red A. japonicus. The yield were greatest for A. japonicus cultured on a yellow substrate, followed by green > white > orange > red > black and blue. All sea cucumbers in the 7-month trial retained a red color, although the red was most intense (highest R value) in animals cultured on a blue substrate and pale (lowest R value) for animals cultured on a green substrate.

  2. Glacial and pluvial periods: their relationship revealed by pleistocene sediments of the red sea and gulf of aden.

    PubMed

    Deuser, W G; Ross, E H; Waterman, L S

    1976-03-19

    Oxygen isotope analyses of planktonic foraminifera from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden indicate that during periods of maximum continental and polar glaciation in the late Pleistocene, the Red Sea was subject to strong evaporation. Between glacial maximums the salinity of the Red Sea was equal to or below that of the open ocean. This suggests that high-latitude glacial periods corresponded in time to interpluvial stages in the present-day desert belt of northern Africa, whereas high-latitude interglacial periods coincided with pluvial stages.

  3. Glacial and pluvial periods: their relationship revealed by pleistocene sediments of the red sea and gulf of aden.

    PubMed

    Deuser, W G; Ross, E H; Waterman, L S

    1976-03-19

    Oxygen isotope analyses of planktonic foraminifera from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden indicate that during periods of maximum continental and polar glaciation in the late Pleistocene, the Red Sea was subject to strong evaporation. Between glacial maximums the salinity of the Red Sea was equal to or below that of the open ocean. This suggests that high-latitude glacial periods corresponded in time to interpluvial stages in the present-day desert belt of northern Africa, whereas high-latitude interglacial periods coincided with pluvial stages. PMID:17781646

  4. Cyphastrea kausti sp. n. (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia), a new species of reef coral from the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Jessica; Benzoni, Francesca; Baird, Andrew H.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new scleractinian coral species, Cyphastrea kausti sp. n., is described from 13 specimens from the Red Sea. It is characterised by the presence of eight primary septa, unlike the other species of the genus, which have six, ten or 12 primary septa. The new species has morphological affinities with Cyphastrea microphthalma, from which it can be distinguished by the lower number of septa (on average eight instead of ten), and smaller calices and corallites. This species was observed in the northern and central Red Sea and appears to be absent from the southern Red Sea. PMID:25931952

  5. Red List of amphibians and reptiles of the Wadden Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fog, K.; Podloucky, R.; Dierking, U.; Stumpel, A. H. P.

    1996-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea, in total, 8 species of amphibians and 4 species of reptiles are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 7 species of amphibians and all 4 species of reptiles are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trilateral Red List. 1 species of the listed reptiles is (probably) extinct in the entire Wadden Sea area. The status of 1 species of amphibians is endangered, the status of (probably) 4 species of amphibians and 3 species of reptiles are vulnerable and of 2 species of amphibians susceptible.

  6. Homogeneity of coral reef communities across 8 degrees of latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Roberts, May B; Jones, Geoffrey P; McCormick, Mark I; Munday, Philip L; Neale, Stephen; Thorrold, Simon; Robitzch, Vanessa S N; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    Coral reef communities between 26.8 °N and 18.6 °N latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea were surveyed to provide baseline data and an assessment of fine-scale biogeography of communities in this region. Forty reefs along 1100 km of coastline were surveyed using depth-stratified visual transects of fish and benthic communities. Fish abundance and benthic cover data were analyzed using multivariate approaches to investigate whether coral reef communities differed with latitude. A total of 215 fish species and 90 benthic categories were recorded on the surveys. There were no significant differences among locations in fish abundance, species richness, or among several diversity indices. Despite known environmental gradients within the Red Sea, the communities remained surprisingly similar. The communities do, however, exhibit subtle changes across this span of reefs that likely reflect the constrained distributions of several species of reef fish and benthic fauna.

  7. Homogeneity of coral reef communities across 8 degrees of latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Roberts, May B; Jones, Geoffrey P; McCormick, Mark I; Munday, Philip L; Neale, Stephen; Thorrold, Simon; Robitzch, Vanessa S N; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    Coral reef communities between 26.8 °N and 18.6 °N latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea were surveyed to provide baseline data and an assessment of fine-scale biogeography of communities in this region. Forty reefs along 1100 km of coastline were surveyed using depth-stratified visual transects of fish and benthic communities. Fish abundance and benthic cover data were analyzed using multivariate approaches to investigate whether coral reef communities differed with latitude. A total of 215 fish species and 90 benthic categories were recorded on the surveys. There were no significant differences among locations in fish abundance, species richness, or among several diversity indices. Despite known environmental gradients within the Red Sea, the communities remained surprisingly similar. The communities do, however, exhibit subtle changes across this span of reefs that likely reflect the constrained distributions of several species of reef fish and benthic fauna. PMID:26608504

  8. Rebuttal to Koeda et al. (2014) on the Red Sea fishes of the perciform genus Pempheris.

    PubMed

    Randall, John E; Victor, Benjamin C; Alpermann, Tilman J; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O; Satapoomin, Ukkrit; Bineesh, K K

    2014-01-01

    Koeda et al. (2014) published a review of fishes of the genus Pempheris of the Red Sea. They concluded that there are four species: P. adusta Bleeker, P. mangula Cuvier, P. nesogallica Cuvier, and a new species, P. tominagai. We show that the first three species they cite are not present in the Red Sea, as follows. 1) P. adusta is a western Pacific species (type locality Ambon), described only from the holotype, and without a dark border on the anal fin. Koeda et al. (2014) mistakenly apply that name to P. flavicycla which is a widespread Indian Ocean species characterized by a prominent broad black border along the anal fin. Koeda et al. (2014) also redescribe P. adusta, using Indian Ocean specimens of P. flavicycla, despite the coloration difference and a 2.5% difference in the mtDNA sequence (COI) between Indian Ocean and W. Pacific populations. 2) P. mangula is a species from the east coast of India (type locality Visakhapatnam), clearly distinct in both gill-raker counts and a 1.1% sequence divergence in COI from its Red Sea relative P. rhomboidea. Pempheris mangula is not found west of India, and Koeda et al. (2014) mistakenly use DNA from Oman and Madagascar to represent P. mangula, instead of genetic material available from the type locality. 3) Pempheris nesogallica (type locality Mauritius) is unknown from the Red Sea. Koeda et al. (2014) separate P. nesogallica from P. rhomboidea (their "P. mangula") by eye size; we fail to find any difference (and they use their purported eye-size difference to erroneously rename one of the two syntypes of P. nesogallica as "P. mangula"). 4) Their new species P. tominagai is referred to as the Indian Ocean sister species of "P. schwenkii of the Pacific"; however, the type locality of P. schwenkii is the Batu Islands off the SW coast of Sumatra in the Indian Ocean. They mistakenly include specimens of a distant South African species as paratypes of P. tominagai. We have determined that P. tominagai is a valid species

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Luke R.

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column. PMID:26868398

  10. The first record of the slender sunfish Ranzania laevis from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Abu El-Regal, M A; El-Moselhy, K

    2013-11-01

    A female specimen of the slender sunfish Ranzania laevis of 600 mm total length was recorded for the first time from the Red Sea after being stranded on a shallow sandy bay at Hurghada beach (27° 06' 16″ N; 33° 50' 01″ E) on 13 May 2012. Ranzania laevis is believed to have migrated from the Indian Ocean as the nearest area where it was found is coastal waters of Oman.

  11. Reproduction, abundance and survivorship of two Alveopora spp. in the mesophotic reefs of Eilat, Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Eyal-Shaham, Lee; Eyal, Gal; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Although the study of coral reproduction has advanced tremendously over the last few decades, a particular gap exists in our knowledge of the reproductive modes of corals from ‘mesophotic coral ecosystems’ (MCEs) found at 30–150 m depth. Here, we report for the first time on the reproductive patterns, living cover, and survivorship under different light treatments of two scleractinian species from the MCEs of Eilat, Red-Sea: Alveopora allingi and A. ocellata. Both species are found exclusively within MCEs and are high in both abundance and relative cover. These species display a synchronous gametogenic cycles with consecutive oocyte growth and development. Peak of reproductive activity occurs in late summer (September-October), typified by accelerated oocyte growth, coinciding with the rise in seawater temperature. Estimates of fecundity show mean monthly maxima of 48.5 ± 26.3 and 23.5 ± 11.8 (Mean ± SE) oocytes per cm2 for A. allingi and A. ocellata respectively, prior to spawning. A comparison of light and temperature regimes in the shallow vs. MCE environments is presented, and the response of these species to changes in these parameters is discussed. A call encouraging the much-needed studies on the sexuality and reproductive modes of MCE coral species is expressed. PMID:26860656

  12. Apratoxin H and apratoxin A sulfoxide from the Red Sea cyanobacterium Moorea producens.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Christopher C; Cowley, Elise S; Sikorska, Justyna; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Ishmael, Jane E; Youssef, Diaa T A; McPhail, Kerry L

    2013-09-27

    Cultivation of the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens, collected from the Nabq Mangroves in the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea), led to the isolation of new apratoxin analogues apratoxin H (1) and apratoxin A sulfoxide (2), together with the known apratoxins A-C, lyngbyabellin B, and hectochlorin. The absolute configuration of these new potent cytotoxins was determined by chemical degradation, MS, NMR, and CD spectroscopy. Apratoxin H (1) contains pipecolic acid in place of the proline residue present in apratoxin A, expanding the known suite of naturally occurring analogues that display amino acid substitutions within the final module of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway. The oxidation site of apratoxin A sulfoxide (2) was deduced from MS fragmentation patterns and IR data, and 2 could not be generated experimentally by oxidation of apratoxin A. The cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 to human NCI-H460 lung cancer cells (IC₅₀ = 3.4 and 89.9 nM, respectively) provides further insight into the structure-activity relationships in the apratoxin series. Phylogenetic analysis of the apratoxin-producing cyanobacterial strains belonging to the genus Moorea, coupled with the recently annotated apratoxin biosynthetic pathway, supports the notion that apratoxin production and structural diversity may be specific to their geographical niche.

  13. Apratoxin H and Apratoxin A Sulfoxide from the Red Sea Cyanobacterium Moorea producens

    PubMed Central

    Thornburg, Christopher C.; Cowley, Elise S.; Sikorska, Justyna; Shaala, Lamiaa A.; Ishmael, Jane E.; Youssef, Diaa T.A.; McPhail, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cultivation of the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens, collected from the Nabq Mangroves in the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea), led to the isolation of new apratoxin analogues, apratoxin H (1) and apratoxin A sulfoxide (2), together with the known apratoxins A-C, lyngbyabellin B and hectochlorin. The absolute configuration of these new potent cytotoxins was determined by chemical degradation, MS, NMR, and CD spectroscopy. Apratoxin H (1) contains pipecolic acid in place of the proline residue present in apratoxin A, expanding the known suite of naturally occurring analogues that display amino acid substitutions within the final module of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway. The oxidation site of apratoxin A sulfoxide (2) was deduced from MS fragmentation patterns and IR data, and 2 could not be generated experimentally by oxidation of apratoxin A. The cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 to human NCI-H460 lung cancer cells (IC50 = 3.4 and 89.9 nM, respectively) provides further insight into the structure–activity relationships in the apratoxin series. Phylogenetic analysis of the apratoxin-producing cyanobacterial strains belonging to the genus Moorea, coupled with the recently annotated apratoxin biosynthetic pathway, supports the notion that apratoxin production and structural diversity may be specific to their geographical niche. PMID:24016099

  14. Dynamic photoinhibition exhibited by red coralline algae in the red sea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Red coralline algae are critical components of tropical reef systems, and their success and development is, at least in part, dependent on photosynthesis. However, natural variability in the photosynthetic characteristics of red coralline algae is poorly understood. This study investigated diurnal variability in encrusting Porolithon sp. and free-living Lithophyllum kotschyanum. Measured parameters included: photosynthetic characteristics, pigment composition, thallus reflectance and intracellular concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), an algal antioxidant that is derived from methionine, an indirect product of photosynthesis. L. kotschyanum thalli were characterised by a bleached topside and a pigmented underside. Results Minimum saturation intensity and intracellular DMSP concentrations in Porolithon sp. were characterised by significant diurnal patterns in response to the high-light regime. A smaller diurnal pattern in minimum saturation intensity in the topside of L. kotschyanum was also evident. The overall reflectance of the topside of L. kotschyanum also exhibited a diurnal pattern, becoming increasingly reflective with increasing ambient irradiance. The underside of L. kotschyanum, which is shaded from ambient light exposure, exhibited a much smaller diurnal variability. Conclusions This study highlights a number of dynamic photoinhibition strategies adopted by coralline algae, enabling them to tolerate, rather than be inhibited by, the naturally high irradiance of tropical reef systems; a factor that may become more important in the future under global change projections. In this context, this research has significant implications for tropical reef management planning and conservation monitoring, which, if natural variability is not taken into account, may become flawed. The information provided by this research may be used to inform future investigations into the contribution of coralline algae to reef accretion, ecosystem

  15. Vertical migration and diel feeding periodicity of the skinnycheek lanternfish (Benthosema pterotum) in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dypvik, Eivind; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2013-02-01

    The vertical migration and diel feeding periodicity of the skinnycheek lanternfish (Benthosema pterotum) were studied by use of a hull-mounted 38 kHz echo sounder, ROV-deployments and net-sampling at two locations (∼24°48‧N, ∼36°15‧E and ∼21°27‧N, ∼38°5‧E) in the central Red Sea. The mesopelagic zone of the Red Sea represents an unusual environment with very high temperatures (∼22 °C) and low zooplankton concentrations (<10 individuals m-3 below 600 m). The skinnycheek lanternfish performed normal diel vertical migration from ∼500 to 750 m during daytime to the epipelagic zone (upper ∼200 m) at night. A strict feeding periodicity occurred; with the skinnycheek lanternfish foraging on zooplankton throughout the night, while rapidly digesting the preceding nocturnal meal in the warm mesopelagic region. We hypothesize that the constrained epipelagic distribution of zooplankton and the unusual warm waters of the Red Sea force the whole population to ascend and feed in epipelagic waters every night, as the prey-ration eaten each night is fully digested at mesopelagic depths during daytime.

  16. Rhizosphere microbiome metagenomics of gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Alzubaidy, Hanin; Essack, Magbubah; Malas, Tareq B; Bokhari, Ameerah; Motwalli, Olaa; Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Jamhor, Suhaiza Ahmad; Mokhtar, Noor Azlin; Antunes, André; Simões, Marta Filipa; Alam, Intikhab; Bougouffa, Salim; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2016-02-01

    Mangroves are unique, and endangered, coastal ecosystems that play a vital role in the tropical and subtropical environments. A comprehensive description of the microbial communities in these ecosystems is currently lacking, and additional studies are required to have a complete understanding of the functioning and resilience of mangroves worldwide. In this work, we carried out a metagenomic study by comparing the microbial community of mangrove sediment with the rhizosphere microbiome of Avicennia marina, in northern Red Sea mangroves, along the coast of Saudi Arabia. Our results revealed that rhizosphere samples presented similar profiles at the taxonomic and functional levels and differentiated from the microbiome of bulk soil controls. Overall, samples showed predominance by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, with high abundance of sulfate reducers and methanogens, although specific groups were selectively enriched in the rhizosphere. Functional analysis showed significant enrichment in 'metabolism of aromatic compounds', 'mobile genetic elements', 'potassium metabolism' and 'pathways that utilize osmolytes' in the rhizosphere microbiomes. To our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study on the microbiome of mangroves in the Red Sea, and the first application of unbiased 454-pyrosequencing to study the rhizosphere microbiome associated with A. marina. Our results provide the first insights into the range of functions and microbial diversity in the rhizosphere and soil sediments of gray mangrove (A. marina) in the Red Sea. PMID:26475934

  17. Rhizosphere microbiome metagenomics of gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Alzubaidy, Hanin; Essack, Magbubah; Malas, Tareq B; Bokhari, Ameerah; Motwalli, Olaa; Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Jamhor, Suhaiza Ahmad; Mokhtar, Noor Azlin; Antunes, André; Simões, Marta Filipa; Alam, Intikhab; Bougouffa, Salim; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2016-02-01

    Mangroves are unique, and endangered, coastal ecosystems that play a vital role in the tropical and subtropical environments. A comprehensive description of the microbial communities in these ecosystems is currently lacking, and additional studies are required to have a complete understanding of the functioning and resilience of mangroves worldwide. In this work, we carried out a metagenomic study by comparing the microbial community of mangrove sediment with the rhizosphere microbiome of Avicennia marina, in northern Red Sea mangroves, along the coast of Saudi Arabia. Our results revealed that rhizosphere samples presented similar profiles at the taxonomic and functional levels and differentiated from the microbiome of bulk soil controls. Overall, samples showed predominance by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, with high abundance of sulfate reducers and methanogens, although specific groups were selectively enriched in the rhizosphere. Functional analysis showed significant enrichment in 'metabolism of aromatic compounds', 'mobile genetic elements', 'potassium metabolism' and 'pathways that utilize osmolytes' in the rhizosphere microbiomes. To our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study on the microbiome of mangroves in the Red Sea, and the first application of unbiased 454-pyrosequencing to study the rhizosphere microbiome associated with A. marina. Our results provide the first insights into the range of functions and microbial diversity in the rhizosphere and soil sediments of gray mangrove (A. marina) in the Red Sea.

  18. Heavy metals and POPs in red king crab from the Barents Sea.

    PubMed

    Julshamn, Kaare; Valdersnes, Stig; Duinker, Arne; Nedreaas, Kjell; Sundet, Jan H; Maage, Amund

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the food safety of the red king crab from Norwegian waters and obtain information on possible geographical and gender differences. Samples of claw and leg meat of 185 red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus), collected from 23 positions in the Barents Sea, were analysed for dioxins, furans, non-ortho and mono-ortho PCBs, non dioxin-like PCBs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and perfluorinated alkyl substances and elements, such as arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead. The concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and metals were low compared to maximum levels laid down in European regulations. Hence, red king crab is a safe food. Significant differences in the concentrations of metals among different areas, and between male and female crabs, were found. Positive correlations were found between carapace length and mercury, methylmercury and cadmium concentrations, and between fat and arsenic and inorganic arsenic concentrations.

  19. Age and growth of the red tilefish, Branchiostegus japonicus in the northern East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Joon Taek; Choi, Young Min; Kim, Yeong Hye; Choi, Jung Hwa

    2008-07-01

    Age and growth of the red tilefish, Branchiostegus japonicus in the northern East China Sea were examined from right otoliths of 591 fish. Marginal increment analysis showed that annual ring formation occurs during the early winter months, supporting the hypothesis that one growth ring is deposited each year Growth of red filefish was expressed by von Bertalanffy's equation as TLt = 61.5[1 - exp{-0.150(t-0.312)}] for males and TLt = 50.6[1 - exp{-0.162 (t + 0.337)}] for females, where TLt is the total length in cm and t is age in years. It was found that females during the first 3 years grew larger than males, but after 3 years females were smaller than males. This phenomenon may be closely related to sexual maturity of red filefish.

  20. Investigating dust input to the Red Sea using barium in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, S. P.; Hughen, K. A.; Farrar, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal wind jets frequently develop through gaps in the coastal mountains that line the margins of the Red Sea (Jiang et al., 2009 Geophys. Res. Lett.). The most prominent of these wind jets is an eastward blowing jet that is funneled through the Tokar Gap on the Sudanese coast. This wind jet, which is related to the northward migration of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and nocturnal drainage airflow, develops almost daily from mid-June to mid-September. The Tokar region of Sudan is an arid alluvial delta of the Baraka River, and is one of the primary dust sources in the Middle East. Large dust plumes originating from the Tokar Gap can be observed over the Red Sea using satellite imagery. These dust events can last several days and occur frequently during the summer season. We investigated past variability in the dust input to the Red Sea using Ba/Ca in corals. We have drilled cores through massive Porites corals from the eastern margin of the Red Sea. These corals grow ~1-1.5 cm/yr, and some of the cores contain continuous growth for the past 250-300 years. Coral Ba/Ca has been previously used to examine sediment flux from rivers (e.g., McCulloch et al., 2003 Nature; Fleitmann et al., 2007 Geophys. Res. Lett.; Prouty et al., 2010 Mar. Poll. Bull.). These studies were based on the observation that dissolved barium adsorbed onto river-borne suspended particles is released as they encounter increased salinities in estuaries (e.g. Coffey et al., 1997 Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science). We propose that wind-borne Tokar delta sediments transport barium to the eastern Red Sea, providing Ba to the coral sites either through desorption upon encountering seawater similar to river-borne sediments, or through direct settling of particles onto coral colonies, or both. We test these hypotheses and examine how Red Sea coral Ba/Ca has changed over the past 250 years. Coral Ba/Ca was measured at biweekly resolution at two sites for the past 15 years. Ba/Ca displays

  1. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  2. No Red River capture since the late Oligocene: Geochemical evidence from the Northwestern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng; Shao, Lei; Liang, Jianshe; Li, Qianyu

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) in the sediment samples of six industrial wells from the Yinggehai-Song Hong Basin in the Northwestern South China Sea were analyzed and compared with the detrital zircon U-Pb data from earlier studies to extrapolate sediment provenance. The results reveal that the Red River (Song Hong River), Hainan Island and Central Vietnam have been the main provenances of the Yinggehai-Song Hong Basin since the late Oligocene. The Red River has been supplying sediments with positive Eu anomalies from basic-ultrabasic metamorphic and volcanic parent rocks to most parts of the basin, while Hainan Island has delivered sediments with negative Eu anomalies from granitic and sedimentary parent rocks to the eastern slope area of the basin. The progradational downlap structures in the seismic profiles also support the finding that the sediment supply is mainly from the Red River and from Hainan Island. The metamorphic rocks, which are widespread within the Red River drainage, not only provided high volumes of sediments to the basin but also contributed to the positive Eu anomalies observed. Because their REE and U-Pb signatures are similar to those of the Red River source, the metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Song Ma Suture Zone, Kontum Massif, and Jinghong area were probably parts of a large basic provenance region before being separated by strike-slip movements along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone. Furthermore, our results indicate that the Red River drainage area has been relatively stable since the late Oligocene. Therefore, if a drainage capture from the Red River occurred, it is likely to have taken place before the late Oligocene.

  3. [Microzooplankton herbivory during red tide-frequent-occurrence period in spring in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Liu, Dongyan; Wang, Zonglin; Shi, Xiaoyong; Li, Ruixiang; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2003-07-01

    Five typical stations in the Changjiang River estuary and adjacent waters of the East China Sea, were chosen as the sites to study phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton ingestion by on-deck-incubation dilution experiment from 25th April to 25th May 2002. The results showed that microzooplankton ingestion was a key process for controlling red tide event. Strombidium sulcatum, Noctiluca scintillans and Mesodinium robudium were dominant microzooplankton species. In this study, the ingestion rate of microzooplankton ranged from 0.28 to 1.13 d-1; ingestion pressure on percentage of phytoplankton standing crop ranged from 35.14% to 811.69%; ingestion pressure on percentage of potential production ranged from 74.04% to 203.25%; and ingestion rate of phytoplankton carbon ranged from 9.58 to 97.91 C.L-1.d-1. The microzooplankton grazing rate, ingestion pressure on percentage of phytoplankton standing crop, and ingestion rate of phytoplankton carbon were higher near coastal area, but lower at open sea, and the microzooplankton ingestion pressure on percentage of phytoplankton potential production was no the contrary. Compared with the similar studies around the world, the ingestion pressure of microzooplankton in the East China Sea was at a higher level. The primary deduction was that Strombidium was the key microzooplankton species on controlling Prorocentrum dentatum, the most important red tide species in the East China Sea.

  4. New records of Recent Brachiopoda from the Red Sea with a description of a new species .

    PubMed

    Logan, Alan; Bitner, Maria Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    A revised checklist of 14 Recent brachiopod species from Egypt and the Sudan in the Red Sea has been compiled. New records of Minutella minuta (Cooper), Thecidellina blochmanni Dall and Argyrotheca somaliensis Cooper are described and a new species Argyrotheca cooperi is erected for specimens with few but very strong costae. The new records support earlier suggestions that the affinities of the Red Sea brachiopod fauna are with those of the Mediterranean and Indo-Pacific areas. PMID:25113473

  5. New records of Recent Brachiopoda from the Red Sea with a description of a new species .

    PubMed

    Logan, Alan; Bitner, Maria Aleksandra

    2013-12-10

    A revised checklist of 14 Recent brachiopod species from Egypt and the Sudan in the Red Sea has been compiled. New records of Minutella minuta (Cooper), Thecidellina blochmanni Dall and Argyrotheca somaliensis Cooper are described and a new species Argyrotheca cooperi is erected for specimens with few but very strong costae. The new records support earlier suggestions that the affinities of the Red Sea brachiopod fauna are with those of the Mediterranean and Indo-Pacific areas.

  6. Sea level and shoreline reconstructions for the Red Sea: isostatic and tectonic considerations and implications for hominin migration out of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, Kurt; Purcell, Anthony; Flemming, Nicholas. C.; Vita-Finzi, Claudio; Alsharekh, Abdullah M.; Bailey, Geoffrey N.

    2011-12-01

    The history of sea level within the Red Sea basin impinges on several areas of research. For archaeology and prehistory, past sea levels of the southern sector define possible pathways of human dispersal out of Africa. For tectonics, the interglacial sea levels provide estimates of rates for vertical tectonics. For global sea level studies, the Red Sea sediments contain a significant record of changing water chemistry with implications on the mass exchange between oceans and ice sheets during glacial cycles. And, because of its geometry and location, the Red Sea provides a test laboratory for models of glacio-hydro-isostasy. The Red Sea margins contain incomplete records of sea level for the Late Holocene, for the Last Glacial Maximum, for the Last Interglacial and for earlier interglacials. These are usually interpreted in terms of tectonics and ocean volume changes but it is shown here that the glacio-hydro-isostatic process is an additional important component with characteristic spatial variability. Through an iterative analysis of the Holocene and interglacial evidence a separation of the tectonic, isostatic and eustatic contributions is possible and we present a predictive model for palaeo-shorelines and water depths for a time interval encompassing the period proposed for migrations of modern humans out of Africa. Principal conclusions include the following. (i) Late Holocene sea level signals evolve along the length of the Red Sea, with characteristic mid-Holocene highstands not developing in the central part. (ii) Last Interglacial sea level signals are also location dependent and, in the absence of tectonics, are not predicted to occur more than 1-2 m above present sea level. (iii) For both periods, Red Sea levels at 'expected far-field' elevations are not necessarily indicative of tectonic stability and the evidence points to a long-wavelength tectonic uplift component along both the African and Arabian northern and central sides of the Red Sea. (iv) The

  7. Co-invasion of a Red Sea fish and its ectoparasitic monogenean, Polylabris cf. mamaevi into the Mediterranean: observations on oncomiracidium behavior and infection levels in both seas.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Zohar; Diamant, Ariel; Abelson, Avigdor

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated aspects of the biology of the monogenean gill ectoparasite Polylabris cf. mamaevi (Polyopisthocotylea: Microcotyleae) infecting rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus (Forskal) (Teleostei: Siganidae). Both host and parasite are Lessepsian immigrants that have co-invaded the Mediterranean Sea via the Suez Canal. The infection prevalence and mean intensity of the polyopisthocotylean was examined in both native and immigrant host populations and found to be three times greater in the new biogeographical region. In vitro observations on parasite eggs from both areas indicated that hatching occurred almost exclusively in the dark. The reaction of the larval oncomiracidia to water flow and secreted host chemicals indicated that neither Red Sea nor Mediterranean oncomiracidia exposed to waterborne host metabolites displayed any significant response or change in behavior; however, upon encountering flow, they ceased to swim and drifted passively downstream. Host specificity of P. cf. mamaevi may have co-evolved with temporal synchronization of the parasite with the host's diurnal activity. Hatching of P. cf. mamaevi eggs was rhythmical and the timing coincided with the known nocturnal resting behavior of the hosts, when their schools lie immobile on the sea bottom. After hatching, abrupt cessation of active swimming by the oncomiracidia upon sensing host inhalant gill-ventilating currents is likely to facilitate rapid, passive entry into the gill chamber of a suitable host. The greater abundance of P. cf. mamaevi in the invading (Mediterranean) populations is probably due to the changed, new environment, possibly impacting host resistance to the parasite and encouraging heavier infections.

  8. Activity mixed outside main N. Sea sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-02

    This paper reports on activity levels which are mixed in sectors outside the North Sea's major producing regions. Danish sector production prospects are improving in step with horizontal drilling technology. Dutch activity centers on laying on the Nogat pipeline system and developing gas fields that will feed it. And Ireland is considering ways of boosting exploratory interest.

  9. Multi-species spawning synchrony within scleractinian coral assemblages in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, J.; Baird, A. H.; Chen, C. J.; Guest, J. R.; Vicentuan, K. C.; Berumen, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Early work on coral reproduction in the far northern Red Sea suggested that the spawning times of ecologically abundant species did not overlap, unlike on the Great Barrier Reef where many species spawn with high synchrony. In contrast, recent work in the northern and central Red Sea indicates a high degree of synchrony in the reproductive condition of Acropora species: over 90 % of species sampled in April/May contain mature gametes. However, it has yet to be determined when most Acropora release their gametes. In addition, there is a lack of data for other ecologically important scleractinian species such as merulinids and poritids. Here, we document the date and time of spawning for 51 species in the central Red Sea over three consecutive years, and the month of spawning for an additional 17 species inferred from the presence of mature gametes. Spawning occurs on nights around the full moon, the spawning season lasts at least 4 months from April until July, and observations are consistent with the few other records from the Red Sea. The number of Acropora species spawning was highest in April with 13 species spawning two nights before the full moon in 2011, 13 species spawning on the night of the full moon in 2012, and eight species spawning four nights after the full moon in 2013. The total number of species spawning was high in April, May, and June and involved 15-19 species per month in 2012. Only four species spawned in July 2012. Few regions worldwide have been similarly sampled and include the Philippines, Okinawa in Japan, and Palau, where spawning patterns are very similar to those in the central Red Sea and where corals spawn on nights around the full moon over a period of 3-4 months. In particular, in all four locations, Acropora are among the first species to spawn. Our results add to a growing body of evidence indicating that multi-species spawning synchrony is a feature of all speciose coral assemblages.

  10. Probiotics as an environment-friendly approach to enhance red sea bream, Pagrus major growth, immune response and oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; El-Sabagh, Mabrouk; Esteban, M Angeles; Zaineldin, Amr I

    2016-10-01

    A usual strategy in modern aquaculture to combat production bottlenecks associated with intensification is preventive health care through the use of consumer and environment-friendly alternatives including probiotics. The current study evaluates the influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR), a lyophilized probiotic bacterium, on health status and performance of red sea bream (Pagrus major). Probiotics were incorporated in the diets at four different concentrations: 0 (control diet, LR0), 10(2) (LR1), 10(4) (LR2) and 10(6) (LR3) cells g(-1) and diets were administered to the fish for a period of 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, final body weight, body weight gain, specific growth rate, protease activity, protein digestibility, Lactobacillus sp. intestinal count, and superoxide dismutase were significantly higher in all probiotic-fed groups (P < 0.05). In addition, lipid and dry matter digestibility, reactive oxygen metabolites, biological antioxidant potential, and humoral and mucosal immune parameters including (total serum protein, alternative complement pathway, bactericidal and peroxidase activities) were also significantly elevated in fish fed probiotic supplementations being the effects dose-dependent. All growth, feed utilization, immune and oxidative parameters were significantly improved following probiotic administration. Present results revealed that L. rhamnosus is a promising probiotic candidate employed to help red sea bream protect themselves, thus promoting safe farming that would be less dependent on chemotherapy against infectious diseases. PMID:27542618

  11. Probiotics as an environment-friendly approach to enhance red sea bream, Pagrus major growth, immune response and oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; El-Sabagh, Mabrouk; Esteban, M Angeles; Zaineldin, Amr I

    2016-10-01

    A usual strategy in modern aquaculture to combat production bottlenecks associated with intensification is preventive health care through the use of consumer and environment-friendly alternatives including probiotics. The current study evaluates the influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR), a lyophilized probiotic bacterium, on health status and performance of red sea bream (Pagrus major). Probiotics were incorporated in the diets at four different concentrations: 0 (control diet, LR0), 10(2) (LR1), 10(4) (LR2) and 10(6) (LR3) cells g(-1) and diets were administered to the fish for a period of 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, final body weight, body weight gain, specific growth rate, protease activity, protein digestibility, Lactobacillus sp. intestinal count, and superoxide dismutase were significantly higher in all probiotic-fed groups (P < 0.05). In addition, lipid and dry matter digestibility, reactive oxygen metabolites, biological antioxidant potential, and humoral and mucosal immune parameters including (total serum protein, alternative complement pathway, bactericidal and peroxidase activities) were also significantly elevated in fish fed probiotic supplementations being the effects dose-dependent. All growth, feed utilization, immune and oxidative parameters were significantly improved following probiotic administration. Present results revealed that L. rhamnosus is a promising probiotic candidate employed to help red sea bream protect themselves, thus promoting safe farming that would be less dependent on chemotherapy against infectious diseases.

  12. Imprint of Southern Red Sea Major Tectonic Zone In A New Bouguer Anomaly Map of Southern Yemen Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, V.

    A new Bouguer anomaly map of western part of southern Yemen margin has been compiled. Densities of rock samples from main geological units (Precambrian base- ment, Mesozoic sediments, Tertiary volcanites) have been measured and used for grav- ity modeling. Regional gravity map indicates decrease of thickness of continental crust from volcanites of the Yemen Trap Series towards the coast of the Gulf of Aden. Most remarkable feature in the map of residual anomalies is a positive anomaly over the Dhala graben. The Dhala graben is a prominent geological structure in the area of study trending parallel to the Red Sea axis. Gravity modeling on a profile across the Dhala graben presumes intrusive plutonic rocks beneath the graben. There are two other areas in the southwestern tip of Arabia, which have essentially the same struc- tural position as the Dhala graben: the Jabal Tirf volcanic rift zone in the southern Saudi Arabia and Jabal Hufash extensional zone in northern Yemen. All three areas extend along the line trending parallel to the Red Sea axis with length of about 500 km. The line coincides with the axis of Afar (Danakil) depression after Arabia is shifted and rotated back to Africa. These facts imply conclusion that the Oligocene - Early Miocene magmatic activity on the Jabal Tirf - Dhala lineament is related to the same original deep tectonic zone, forming present-day Afar depression and still active.

  13. Recent kinematics of the tectonic plates surrounding the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Antonio; Macchiavelli, Chiara; Pierantoni, Pietro Paolo; Zanoni, Davide; Rasul, Najeeb

    2016-07-01

    The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden represent two young basins that formed between Africa and Arabia since the early Oligocene, floored by oceanic crust or by transitional and thinned continental crust. While in the easternmost Gulf of Aden the rift-drift transition can be dated chron C6 (˜20.1 Ma), here we show that in the Red Sea the first pulse of sea floor spreading occurred during chron C3n.2n (˜4.6 Ma) around ˜17.1°N (present-day coordinates) and propagated southwards from this location, separating the Danakil microplate from Arabia. It is also shown that sea floor spreading between Arabia and Nubia started later, around chron 2A (˜2.58 Ma), and propagated northwards. At present, there is no magnetic evidence for the existence of a linear spreading center in the northern Red Sea at latitudes higher than ˜24°N and in the southern Red Sea below ˜14.8°N. The present-day plate kinematics of this region can be described with high accuracy by a network of five interacting plates (Nubia, Arabia, Somalia, Sinai, and Danakil) and six triple junctions. For times older than anomaly 2A (˜2.58 Ma) and up to anomaly 3, the absence of marine magnetic anomalies between Arabia and Nubia prevents a rigorous kinematic description of the five-plates system. However, there is strong evidence that the unique changes in plate motions during the last five Myrs were a dramatic slowdown at chron C2 (˜1.77 Ma) in the spreading or extension rates along the ridge and rift axes, thereby a good representation of the real plate motions can be obtained anyway by backward extension of the oldest Arabia - Nubia and Arabia - Danakil stage rotations determined on the basis of marine magnetic anomalies, respectively C2 - C2A and C2A - C3. The proposed kinematic reconstructions are accompanied by a geodynamic explanation for the genesis of large continent-continent fracture zones at the rift-drift transition and by an analysis of the strain associated with plate motions in Afar, northeastern

  14. Bioactive terpenoids from the Red Sea soft coral Sinularia polydactyla.

    PubMed

    Aboutabl, El-Sayed A; Azzam, Shadia M; Michel, Camilia G; Selim, Nabil M; Hegazy, Mohamed F; Ali, Abdel-Hamid A M; Hussein, Ahmed A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical investigation of an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Sinularia polydactyla (Ehrenberg) led to the isolation of three known terpenoides, two of them sterols, 24-methylcholestane-3β,5α,6β,25-tetrol 25-monoacetate (1), 24-methylcholestane-5-en-3β,25-diol (2), in addition to a cembranoid diterpene, durumolide C (3), for the first time. The cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities of the ethyl acetate extract and the isolated compounds 1-3 were evaluated in vitro. Durumolide C (3) showed selective cytotoxicity against HepG2 (IC50 1.0 μg/mL), whereas 24-methylcholestane-3β,5α,6β,25-tetrol 25-monoacetate (1) showed IC50 of 6.1 and 8.2 μg/mL against Hep2 and HCT human cancer cell lines, respectively.

  15. Are There Oceanographic Explanations for the Israelites'Crossing of the Red Sea?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nof, Doron; Paldor, Nathan

    1992-03-01

    Two relatively simple physical oceanographic processes are suggested as plausible explanations for the biblical description of the Israelites' Crossing of the Red Sea during their exodus from Egypt. The first involves strong wind that blows along the Gulf of Suez and pushes the water a considerable distance away from the regular shoreline. This process is examined with the aid of a simple conceptual model consisting of a shallow, narrow, and long channel (corresponding to the Gulf of Suez) connected to a large body of water (corresponding to the main body of the Red Sea). Uniform wind is allowed to blow over the entire gulf for a period of about a day and the resulting phenomena are examined by solving the appropriate governing equations.It is shown that, in a similar fashion to the familiar wind setup in a long and narrow lake, the water at the edge of the gulf slowly recedes away from its original prewind position. The receding distance of the shoreline and the associated sea level drop are computed by solving the nonlinear equation that governs the motion resulting from the wind. It is found that, even for moderate storms with wind speed of about 20 s1 receding distance of more than 1 km and a sea level drop of more than 2.5 m are obtained. These relatively high values are a result of the unique geometry of the gulf (i.e., its rather small width-to-length and depth-to-length ratios) and the nonlinearity of the governing equation. Upon an abrupt relaxation of the wind, the water returns to its prewind position as a fast (nonlinear) gravity wave that floods the entire receding zone within minutes. It is suggested that the crossing occurred while the water receded and that the drowning of the Egyptians was a result of the rapidly returning wave.The second possible mechanism that is considered is a tsunami (i.e., a flood resulting from an earthquake under the sea)m that arrived at the Gulf of Suez from the main body of the Red Sea. In a similar fashion to the wind

  16. Modeling a Typical Winter-time Dust Event over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G.; Zhao, Chun

    2013-02-20

    We used WRF-Chem, a regional meteorological model coupled with an aerosol-chemistry component, to simulate various aspects of the dust phenomena over the Arabian Peninsula and Red Sea during a typical winter-time dust event that occurred in January 2009. The model predicted that the total amount of emitted dust was 18.3 Tg for the entire dust outburst period and that the two maximum daily rates were ~2.4 Tg/day and ~1.5 Tg/day, corresponding to two periods with the highest aerosol optical depth that were well captured by ground- and satellite-based observations. The model predicted that the dust plume was thick, extensive, and mixed in a deep boundary layer at an altitude of 3-4 km. Its spatial distribution was modeled to be consistent with typical spatial patterns of dust emissions. We utilized MODIS-Aqua and Solar Village AERONET measurements of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) to evaluate the radiative impact of aerosols. Our results clearly indicated that the presence of dust particles in the atmosphere caused a significant reduction in the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface during the dust event. We also found that dust aerosols have significant impact on the energy and nutrient balances of the Red Sea. Our results showed that the simulated cooling under the dust plume reached 100 W/m2, which could have profound effects on both the sea surface temperature and circulation. Further analysis of dust generation and its spatial and temporal variability is extremely important for future projections and for better understanding of the climate and ecological history of the Red Sea.

  17. 75 FR 49420 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... establish a target TAC greater than that recommended by the Council, the initial final rule (75 FR 27219... on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35435), requesting public comment on the revised recommended catch level... (TAC) and corresponding fleet days-at-sea (DAS) allocation for the Atlantic deep- sea red crab...

  18. Molecular polymorphism and expression analysis of MHC class II B gene from red sea bream (Chrysophrys major).

    PubMed

    Chen, Song-Lin; Zhang, Yu-Xi; Xu, Mei-Yu; Ji, Xiang-Shan; Yu, Guo-Cai; Dong, Cheng-Fang

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II (major histocompatibility complex class II) plays an important role in the immune response of vertebrates. Its function is to present antigenic peptides to the T-cell receptor. In order to study the function and molecular polymorphism of class II B gene in fish, we have isolated cDNAs encoding class II B from spleen cDNA library of red sea bream (Chrysophrys major) by using EST sequencing, and examined genomic organization, molecular polymorphism and expression of red sea bream class II B gene. As in other vertebrates, five exons and four introns were identified in red sea bream class II B gene. Seven class II B alleles were identified from seven individuals of red sea bream. The deduced amino acid sequence of red sea bream MHC class II B 1(Chma-DAB*0101) had 87.1, 85.1, 87.1, 90.4, 87.1, 90.8% identity with those of red sea bream class II B 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7(Chma-DAB*0201-Chma-DAB*0701), respectively, and had 75.2, 74.5, 55.9, 55.1, 34.3 and 30.4% identity with those of striped sea bass, cichlid, rainbow trout, Atlantic salmon, mouse and human, respectively. Four different class II B alleles were observed in a single individual and two different 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) sequences from this individual may infer the existence of two loci at least. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that high expression was detected in liver, head kidney, kidney, intestine, gill, stomach, hear and spleen, low expression in muscle and blood. Challenge of red sea bream with the pathogenic bacteria, Vibrio anguillarum, resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of MHC class II B mRNA from 5 to 72 h after infection in liver, spleen, head kidney and intestine, followed by a recovery to normal level after 96 h.

  19. Marine molluscs and fish as biomarkers of pollution stress in littoral regions of the Red Sea, Mediterranean Sea and North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Vladimir; Bissinger, Vera; Abelson, Avigdor; Dizer, Halim; Sturm, Armin; Kratke, Renate; Fishelson, Lev; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich

    1999-12-01

    The intensive development of industry and urban structures along the seashores of the world, as well as the immense increase in marine transportation and other activities, has resulted in the deposition of thousands of new chemicals and organic compounds, endangering the existence of organisms and ecosystems. The conventional single biomarker methods used in ecological assessment studies cannot provide an adequate base for environmental health assessment, management and sustainability planning. The present study uses a set of novel biochemical, physiological, cytogenetic and morphological methods to characterize the state of health of selected molluscs and fish along the shores of the German North Sea, as well as the Israeli Mediterranean and Red Sea. The methods include measurement of activity of multixenobiotic resistance-mediated transporter (MXRtr) and the system of active transport of organic anions (SATOA) as indicators of antixenobiotic defence; glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity as an indicator of biotransformation of xenobiotics; DNA unwinding as a marker of genotoxicity; micronucleus test for clastogenicity; levels of phagocytosis for immunotoxicity; cholinesterase (ChE) activity and level of catecholamines as indicators of neurotoxicity; permeability of external epithelia to anionic hydrophilic probe, intralysosomal accumulation of cationic amphiphilic probe and activity of non-specific esterases as indicators of cell/tissue viability. Complete histopathological examination was used for diagnostics of environmental pathology. The obtained data show that the activity of the defensive pumps, MXRtr and SATOA in the studied organisms was significantly higher in the surface epithelia of molluscs from a polluted site than that of the same species from control, unpolluted stations, providing clear evidence of response to stress. Enhanced frequency of DNA lesions (alkaline and acidic DNA unwinding) and micronucleus-containing cells was significantly higher

  20. The Elemental Composition of Demospongiae from the Red Sea, Gulf of Aqaba

    PubMed Central

    Mayzel, Boaz; Aizenberg, Joanna; Ilan, Micha

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements are vital for the growth and development of all organisms. Little is known about the elemental content and trace metal biology of Red Sea demosponges. This study establishes an initial database of sponge elemental content. It provides the necessary foundation for further research of the mechanisms used by sponges to regulate the uptake, accumulation, and storage of metals. The metal content of 16 common sponge species was determined using ICP measurements. A combination of statistical methods was used to determine the correlations between the metals and detect species with significantly high or low concentrations of these metals. Bioaccumulation factors were calculated to compare sponge metal content to local sediment. Theonella swinhoei contained an extremely high concentration of arsenic and barium, much higher (at least 200 times) than all other species and local sediment. Hyrtios erecta had significantly higher concentration of Al, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ti and V than all other species. This is due to sediment accumulation and inclusion in the skeleton fibers of this sponge species. Suberites clavatus was found to contain significantly higher concentration of Cd, Co, Ni and Zn than all other species and local sediment, indicating active accumulation of these metals. It also has the second highest Fe concentration, but without the comparably high concentrations of Al, Mn and Ti that are evident in H. erecta and in local sediment. These differences indicate active uptake and accumulation of Fe in S. clavatus, this was also noted in Niphates rowi. A significantly higher B concentration was found in Crella cyatophora compared to all other species. These results indicate specific roles of trace elements in certain sponge species that deserve further analysis. They also serve as a baseline to monitor the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on Eilat's coral reefs. PMID:24759635

  1. Red List of lampreys and marine fishes of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S.; Krog, C.; Muus, B.; Nielsen, J.; Fricke, R.; Berghahn, R.; Neudecker, Th.; Wolff, W. J.

    1996-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea areas of Denmark, Germany and The Netherlands, a total of 162 fish and lamprey species is known. 72 of these species are migrants entering the area occasionally; the total number of resident species in the Wadden Sea area is 90. In the Wadden Sea, in total, 20 species of fish and lamprey species are threatened in at least one subregion. Of these, 19 species are threatened in the entire area and are therefore placed on the trilateral Red List. 2 species of the listed fish and lamprey species are (probably) extinct in the entire Wadden Sea area. The status of 5 species of fish and lamprey species is critical, 5 species are (probably) endangered, the status of 6 is vulnerable and of 1 species susceptible. For about 16 rare species which may also be threatened, data were not sufficient to estimate past and present population sizes. The contributors to the list would like to encourage researchers to intensify work on the ecology and the present population sizes of these rare Wadden Sea species (see Fricke et al., 1995).

  2. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  3. Trace element levels in fish from clean and polluted coastal marine sites in the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Nurit; Herut, Barak; Shefer, Edna; Hornung, Hava

    1999-12-01

    The bioaccumulation of Hg, Cd, Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe was evaluated in the muscle and liver tissue of four fish species (Siganus rivulatus, Diplodus sargus, Lithognatus mormyrus and Plathychtis flesus) from clean and polluted marine coastal sites in the Red Sea, Mediterranean Sea and North Sea within the framework of the MARS 1 program. Representative liver samples were screened for organic contaminants (DDE, PCBs and PAHs) which exhibited very low concentrations. The levels of Cd, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn found in the muscle tissue in this study were similar among the four species and within the naturally occurring metal ranges. However, differences were found among the sites. In the Red Sea, Cu was higher in the muscle of S. rivulatus at Ardag and Zn at the Observatory (OBS). Cu, Zn and Mn were higher in the Red Sea than in the specimens from the Mediterranean. The differences were attributed to different diets derived from distinctively different natural environments. D. sargus from Haifa Bay (HB) had higher Cd, Cu and Mn values than specimens from Jaffa (JFA), and L. mormyrus higher Cd, Fe and Mn in HB, corresponding to the polluted environmental status of the Bay. No differences in metal levels were found among the North Sea sites, except for Fe that was lower at the Eider station. Hg was low in all the specimens, but the values varied with species and sites. The lowest Hg values were found in S. rivulatus, the herbivorous species, as expected from its trophic level. Hg in P. flesus was higher than in S. rivulatus but still low. Higher Hg values were found in the muscle tissue of L. mormyrus,with the highest values in D. sargus, both carnivorous species from the same family. Hg in D. sargus was higher in HB than in JFA, as expected, but in the larger specimens of L. mormyrus from JFA values were higher, while in the small specimens there were no differences in Hg values. The levels of all metals were higher in the liver than in the muscle, with enrichment factors ranging

  4. Amino acid composition and functional properties of giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) collagen hydrolysates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zunying; Su, Yicheng; Zeng, Mingyong

    2011-03-01

    Giant red sea cucumber ( Parastichopus californicus) is an under-utilized species due to its high tendency to autolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional properties of collagen hydrolysates from this species. The degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE, emulsion activity index (EAI), emulsion stability index (ESI), foam expansion (FE), and foam stability (FS) of hydrolysates were investigated. The effects of pH on the EAI, ESI FE and FS of hydrolysates were also investigated. The results indicated that the β and α 1 chains of the collagen were effectively hydrolyzed by trypsin at 50°c with an Enzyme/Substrate (E/S) ration of 1:20 (w:w). The DH of collagen was up to 17.3% after 3 h hydrolysis with trypsin. The hydrolysates had a molecular weight distribution of 1.1-17 kDa, and were abundant in glycine (Gly), proline (Pro), glutamic acid (Glu), alanine (Ala) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) residues. The hydrolysates were fractionated into three fractions (< 3 kDa, 3-10 kDa, and > 10 kDa), and the fraction of 3-10 kDa exhibited a higher EAI value than the fraction of > 10 kDa ( P<0.05). The fraction of > 10 kDa had higher FE and FS values than other fractions ( P<0.05). The pH had an important effect on the EAI, ESI, FE and FS. All the fractions showed undesirable emulsion and forming properties at pH 4.0. Under pH 7.0 and pH 10.0, the 3-10 kDa fraction showed higher EAI value and the fraction of > 10 kDa showed higher FE value, respectively. They are hoped to be utilized as functional ingredients in food and nutraceutical industries.

  5. [Juvenile production of the red sea urchin Strongylocentrotus franciscanus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) in Baja California, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Salas-Garza, A; Carpizo-Ituarte, E; Parés-Sierra, G; Martínez-López, R; Quintana-Rodríguez, R

    2005-12-01

    The red sea urchin Strongylocentrotusfranciscanus (Agassiz 1863) is harvested commercially in Baja California, Mexico, since 1970; however, in the last ten years the capture per unit effort (CPUE) has decreased from 310 kg/fishing unit/day to 120 kg/fishing unit/day. For this reason, actions were taken to develop a culture technology allowing massive production of juveniles for re-stocking natural populations or for growing them commercially. We summarize some of the basic studies and main achievements in this effort. In Baja California, considerably faster larval development (approximately 21 days) has been attained than in the US northwest coast (62 days). Spawning of red sea urchins was routinely induced with KCI while egg fertilization was performed using a 100,000-sperm/ml solution. Six microalgae species were tested and Rhodomonas sp. produced the best larval development. The mean survival rate at the end of the larval period was 25%, but results varied widely with bactch. From the feed ratios tested, best results were obtained using 7000 cel/ml during the first week of larval development, followed by 10,000 cel/ml during the second and 15,000 cel/ml during the third week. KCl proved the most consistent metamorphic inducer, regularly yielding metamorphosis percentages higher than 90%. Metamorphosis was considered complete when the functional jaw that juveniles use for first benthic feeding appeared (as soon as 20 days after induction). With this method several thousands of red sea urchin juveniles were produced. They reached up to 1.5 mm in size during the first 50 days of culture after metamorphosis, showing the great potential for mass production of this species in the laboratory. PMID:17469265

  6. Probing magnetic bottom and crustal temperature variations along the Red Sea margin of Egypt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravat, D.; Salem, A.; Abdelaziz, A.M.S.; Elawadi, E.; Morgan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 magnetic bottom depths derived from spectra of magnetic anomalies in Eastern Egypt along the Red Sea margin show variable magnetic bottoms ranging from 10 to 34. km. The deep magnetic bottoms correspond more closely to the Moho depth in the region, and not the depth of 580??C, which lies significantly deeper on the steady state geotherms. These results support the idea of Wasilewski and coworkers that the Moho is a magnetic boundary in continental regions. Reduced-to-pole magnetic highs correspond to areas of Younger Granites that were emplaced toward the end of the Precambrian. Other crystalline Precambrian units formed earlier during the closure of ocean basins are not strongly magnetic. In the north, magnetic bottoms are shallow (10-15. km) in regions with a high proportion of these Younger Granites. In the south, the shoaling of the magnetic bottom associated with the Younger Granites appears to be restricted to the Aswan and Ras Banas regions. Complexity in the variation of magnetic bottom depths may arise due to a combination of factors: i) regions of Younger (Precambrian) Granites with high magnetite content in the upper crust, leaving behind low Curie temperature titanomagnetite components in the middle and lower crust, ii) rise in the depth of 580??C isotherm where the crust may have been heated due to initiation of intense magmatism at the time of the Red Sea rifting (~. 20. Ma), and iii) the contrast of the above two factors with respect to the neighboring regions where the Moho and/or Curie temperature truncates lithospheric ferromagnetism. Estimates of fractal and centroid magnetic bottoms in the oceanic regions of the Red Sea are significantly below the Moho in places suggesting that oceanic uppermost mantle may be serpentinized to the depth of 15-30 km in those regions. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Environmental gradients predict the genetic population structure of a coral reef fish in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Nanninga, Gerrit B; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Manica, Andrea; Berumen, Michael L

    2014-02-01

    The relatively recent fields of terrestrial landscape and marine seascape genetics seek to identify the influence of biophysical habitat features on the spatial genetic structure of populations or individuals. Over the last few years, there has been accumulating evidence for the effect of environmental heterogeneity on patterns of gene flow and connectivity in marine systems. Here, we investigate the population genetic patterns of an anemonefish, Amphiprion bicinctus, along the Saudi Arabian coast of the Red Sea. We collected nearly one thousand samples from 19 locations, spanning approximately 1500 km, and genotyped them at 38 microsatellite loci. Patterns of gene flow appeared to follow a stepping-stone model along the northern and central Red Sea, which was disrupted by a distinct genetic break at a latitude of approximately 19°N. The Red Sea is characterized by pronounced environmental gradients along its axis, roughly separating the northern and central from the southern basin. Using mean chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for this gradient, we ran tests of isolation by distance (IBD, R(2) = 0.52) and isolation by environment (IBE, R(2) = 0.64), as well as combined models using partial Mantel tests and multiple matrix regression with randomization (MMRR). We found that genetic structure across our sampling sites may be best explained by a combined model of IBD and IBE (Mantel: R(2) = 0.71, MMRR: R(2) = 0.86). Our results highlight the potential key role of environmental patchiness in shaping patterns of gene flow in species with pelagic larval dispersal. We support growing calls for the integration of biophysical habitat characteristics into future studies of population genetic structure.

  8. Phage therapy of the white plague-like disease of Favia favus in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atad, I.; Zvuloni, A.; Loya, Y.; Rosenberg, E.

    2012-09-01

    Coral disease is a major factor in the global decline of coral reefs. At present, there are no known procedures for preventing or treating infectious diseases of corals. Immunization is not possible because corals have a restricted adaptive immune system and antibiotics are neither ecologically safe nor practical in an open system. Thus, we tested phage therapy as an alternative therapeutic method for treating diseased corals. Phage BA3, specific to the coral pathogen Thalassomonas loyana, inhibited the progression of the white plague-like disease and transmission to healthy corals in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Only one out of 19 (5 %) of the healthy corals became infected when placed near phage-treated diseased corals, whereas 11 out of 18 (61 %) healthy corals were infected in the no-phage control. This is the first successful treatment for a coral disease in the sea. We posit that phage therapy of certain coral diseases is achievable in situ.

  9. Towards an Archaeology of Early Islamic Ports on the Western Red Sea Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Colin

    2013-12-01

    Against a background of developing research on Red Sea ports, a hypothetical model of the morphology of port towns during the early Islamic period is presented here. These places went through constant cycles of change as economic and political frameworks fluctuated. While their physical shape and form was strongly influenced by architectural features of the Islamic world their functionality was more aligned to commercial interaction. These were dynamic spaces where the daily life of their inhabitants was guided by trade, religion, weather and politics. The ports were intrinsically tied to the trade networks that connected Africa with Arabia and the broader Indian Ocean world.

  10. Recent kinematics of the tectonic plates surrounding the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Antonio; Macchiavelli, Chiara; Pierantoni, Pietro Paolo; Zanoni, Davide; Rasul, Najeeb

    2016-10-01

    The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden represent two young basins that formed between Africa and Arabia since the early Oligocene, floored by oceanic crust or by transitional and thinned continental crust. While in the easternmost Gulf of Aden, the rift-drift transition can be dated chron C6 (˜20.1 Ma), here we show that in the Red Sea the first pulse of seafloor spreading occurred during chron C3n.2n (˜4.6 Ma) around ˜17.1°N (present-day coordinates) and propagated southwards from this location, separating the Danakil microplate from Arabia. It is also shown that seafloor spreading between Arabia and Nubia started later, around chron 2A (˜2.58 Ma), and propagated northwards. At present, there is no magnetic evidence for the existence of a linear spreading centre in the northern Red Sea at latitudes higher than ˜24°N and in the southern Red Sea below ˜14.8°N. The present-day plate kinematics of this region can be described with high accuracy by a network of five interacting plates (Nubia, Arabia, Somalia, Sinai and Danakil) and six triple junctions. For times older than anomaly 2A (˜2.58 Ma) and up to anomaly 3, the absence of marine magnetic anomalies between Arabia and Nubia prevents a rigorous kinematic description of the five-plates system. However, there is strong evidence that the unique changes in plate motions during the last 5 Myr were a dramatic slowdown at chron C2 (˜1.77 Ma) in the spreading or extension rates along the ridge and rift axes, thereby a good representation of the real plate motions can be obtained anyway by backward extension of the oldest Arabia-Nubia and Arabia-Danakil stage rotations determined on the basis of marine magnetic anomalies, respectively, C2-C2A and C2A-C3. The proposed kinematic reconstructions are accompanied by a geodynamic explanation for the genesis of large continent-continent fracture zones at the rift-drift transition and by an analysis of the strain associated with plate motions in Afar, northeastern Egypt and

  11. A new species of Hetereleotris (Perciformes: Gobiidae) from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marcelo; Bogorodsky, Sergey V

    2014-02-12

    A new species of the genus Hetereleotris is described from the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, on the basis of two specimens. Hetereleotris psammophila sp. nov. is unique among the species of the genus Hetereleotris, except for H. diademata, in lacking scales and head pores. The new species differs from the morphologically similar H. diademata in having fewer rays in the second dorsal and anal fins, and in coloration. The habitat preference of the new species for open sand area close to coral reefs in 8-21 m and its nocturnal habits are unusual for species of the genus Hetereleotris.

  12. Earthquakes Magnitude Predication Using Artificial Neural Network in Northern Red Sea Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarifi, A. S.; Alarifi, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    Earthquakes are natural hazards that do not happen very often, however they may cause huge losses in life and property. Early preparation for these hazards is a key factor to reduce their damage and consequence. Since early ages, people tried to predicate earthquakes using simple observations such as strange or a typical animal behavior. In this paper, we study data collected from existing earthquake catalogue to give better forecasting for future earthquakes. The 16000 events cover a time span of 1970 to 2009, the magnitude range from greater than 0 to less than 7.2 while the depth range from greater than 0 to less than 100km. We propose a new artificial intelligent predication system based on artificial neural network, which can be used to predicate the magnitude of future earthquakes in northern Red Sea area including the Sinai Peninsula, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the Gulf of Suez. We propose a feed forward new neural network model with multi-hidden layers to predicate earthquakes occurrences and magnitudes in northern Red Sea area. Although there are similar model that have been published before in different areas, to our best knowledge this is the first neural network model to predicate earthquake in northern Red Sea area. Furthermore, we present other forecasting methods such as moving average over different interval, normally distributed random predicator, and uniformly distributed random predicator. In addition, we present different statistical methods and data fitting such as linear, quadratic, and cubic regression. We present a details performance analyses of the proposed methods for different evaluation metrics. The results show that neural network model provides higher forecast accuracy than other proposed methods. The results show that neural network achieves an average absolute error of 2.6% while an average absolute error of 3.8%, 7.3% and 6.17% for moving average, linear regression and cubic regression, respectively. In this work, we show an analysis

  13. Starvation beneficially influences the liver physiology and nutrient metabolism in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sipra; Chakraborty, Tapas; Shimizu, Sonoko; Urasaki, Shintaro; Matsubara, Takahiro; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Ohta, Kohei

    2015-11-01

    Dietary compromises, especially food restrictions, possess species-specific effects on the health status and infection control in several organisms, including fish. To understand the starvation-mediated physiological responses in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream, especially in the liver, we performed a 20-day starvation experiment using 4 treatment (2 fed and 2 starved) groups, namely, fed-placebo, starved-placebo, fed-infected, and starved-infected, wherein bacterial exposure was done on the 11th day. In the present study, the starved groups showed reduced hepatosomatic index and drastic depletion in glycogen storage and vacuole formation. The fed-infected fish showed significant (P<0.05) increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in relation to its starved equivalent. Significant (P<0.05) alteration in glucose and energy metabolism, as evident from hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, was recorded in the starved groups. Interestingly, coinciding with the liver histology, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator activated receptors) α transcription followed a time-dependent activation in starved groups while PPARγ exhibited an opposite pattern. The transcription of hepcidin 1 and transferrin, initially increased in 0dai (days after infection) starved fish but reduced significantly (P<0.05) at later stages. Two-color immunohistochemistry and subsequent cell counting showed significant increase in P63-positive cells at 0dai and 5dai but later reduced slightly at 10dai. Similar results were also obtained in the lysosomal (cathepsin D) and non-lysosomal (ubiquitin) gene transcription level. All together, our data suggest that starvation exerts multidirectional responses, which allows for better physiological adaptations during any infectious period, in red sea bream.

  14. Evolution around the Red Sea: Systematics and biogeography of the agamid genus Pseudotrapelus (Squamata: Agamidae) from North Africa and Arabia.

    PubMed

    Tamar, Karin; Scholz, Sebastian; Crochet, Pierre-André; Geniez, Philippe; Meiri, Shai; Schmitz, Andreas; Wilms, Thomas; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Since the Oligocene, regions adjacent to the Red Sea have experienced major environmental changes, from tectonic movements and continuous geological activity to shifting climatic conditions. The effect of these events on the distribution and diversity of the regional biota is still poorly understood. Agamid members of the genus Pseudotrapelus are diurnal, arid-adapted lizards distributed around the Red Sea from north-eastern Africa, across the mountains and rocky plateaus of the Sinai and Arabian Peninsulas northwards to Syria. Despite recent taxonomic work and the interest in the group as a model for studying biogeographic and diversity patterns of the arid areas of North Africa and Arabia, its taxonomy is poorly understood and a comprehensive phylogeny is still lacking. In this study, we analyzed 92 Pseudotrapelus specimens from across the entire distribution range of the genus. We included all known species and subspecies, and sequenced them for mitochondrial (16S, ND4 and tRNAs) and nuclear (MC1R, c-mos) markers. This enabled us to obtain the first time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of the genus, using gene trees, species trees and coalescent-based methods for species delimitation. Our results revealed Pseudotrapelus as a monophyletic genus comprised of two major clades and six independently evolving lineages. These lineages correspond to the five currently recognized species and a sixth lineage relating to the synonymized P. neumanni. The subspecific validity of P. sinaitus werneri needs further assessment as it does not form a distinct cluster relative to P. s. sinaitus. The onset of Pseudotrapelus diversification is estimated to have occurred in Arabia during the late Miocene. Radiation has likely resulted from vicariance and dispersal events due to the continued geological instability, sea level fluctuations and climatic changes within the region. PMID:26772670

  15. Evolution around the Red Sea: Systematics and biogeography of the agamid genus Pseudotrapelus (Squamata: Agamidae) from North Africa and Arabia.

    PubMed

    Tamar, Karin; Scholz, Sebastian; Crochet, Pierre-André; Geniez, Philippe; Meiri, Shai; Schmitz, Andreas; Wilms, Thomas; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Since the Oligocene, regions adjacent to the Red Sea have experienced major environmental changes, from tectonic movements and continuous geological activity to shifting climatic conditions. The effect of these events on the distribution and diversity of the regional biota is still poorly understood. Agamid members of the genus Pseudotrapelus are diurnal, arid-adapted lizards distributed around the Red Sea from north-eastern Africa, across the mountains and rocky plateaus of the Sinai and Arabian Peninsulas northwards to Syria. Despite recent taxonomic work and the interest in the group as a model for studying biogeographic and diversity patterns of the arid areas of North Africa and Arabia, its taxonomy is poorly understood and a comprehensive phylogeny is still lacking. In this study, we analyzed 92 Pseudotrapelus specimens from across the entire distribution range of the genus. We included all known species and subspecies, and sequenced them for mitochondrial (16S, ND4 and tRNAs) and nuclear (MC1R, c-mos) markers. This enabled us to obtain the first time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of the genus, using gene trees, species trees and coalescent-based methods for species delimitation. Our results revealed Pseudotrapelus as a monophyletic genus comprised of two major clades and six independently evolving lineages. These lineages correspond to the five currently recognized species and a sixth lineage relating to the synonymized P. neumanni. The subspecific validity of P. sinaitus werneri needs further assessment as it does not form a distinct cluster relative to P. s. sinaitus. The onset of Pseudotrapelus diversification is estimated to have occurred in Arabia during the late Miocene. Radiation has likely resulted from vicariance and dispersal events due to the continued geological instability, sea level fluctuations and climatic changes within the region.

  16. The interaction of the sea breezes with the boundary layer along the Red Sea coast and its effect on the dust transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Basit Ali; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2013-04-01

    Sea and land breezes are common meteorological phenomena in most coastal regions of the world. The thermally induced mesoscale circulation of sea breezes modifies the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by forming a convective internal boundary layer (CIBL), which can trap dust and other pollutants in the thin convective layer while the return flow can transport dust and pollutants from the land towards the sea. We used the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) modeling system to study the structure and dynamics of sea breezes in the middle region of the Red Sea (around 25°N) on the western coast of Saudi Arabia. Results showed the existence of two thermal circulations on both the western and eastern coasts of the Red Sea. The modeling results are consistent with observations from buoys and meteorological towers along the Saudi Arabian coast and suggest that the onset of the sea breeze in this area typically occurs at about 0800 Local Standard Time (LST). The sea breeze decays after 1700 LST, although the timing of the onset and decay could be affected by the sea-land thermal gradient, topography, the sea-land orientation and the direction and strength of the wind. The depth of the predicted inflow layer reaches one kilometer while the height of sea breeze head may reach three kilometers. The rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, along the Saudi coast line, restricts the inland propagation of the sea breeze and significantly affects the structure of the flow. We conducted a detailed process analysis of our simulation results to understand the sea breeze and PBL interaction and its effect on local meteorology and dust transport.

  17. Statistics of Wind over the Red Sea with Application to the Exodus Question.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nof, Doron; Paldor, Nathan

    1994-08-01

    This paper supplements an earlier article by Nof and Paldor that offered a possible explanation for the biblical crossing of the Red Sea in terms of natural phenomena. In that article, it was suggested that sustained winds (of 20 m s1) could have caused a receding of the shoreline (of the Gulf of Suez) of more than a kilometer from its original prewind position. Such a wind would also be associated with a sea level drop of more than 2.5 m that would expose a swath of Red Sea bottom and make a crossing possible. The present article puts this nonlinear theory on firmer ground by providing a statistical analysis of the actual wind pattern in the area.The authors used the Weibull distribution, the known duration of typical storms in the area, and direct measurements in the region. On the basis of the Weibull distribution applied to winds in the part of the Indian Ocean adjacent to the Red Sea, it is argued that the likelihood of a storm sustaining winds of 20 m s1 and lasting, as required, for the entire night is roughly once every 2000 years. Direct measurements along the Gulf of Suez suggest, on the other hand, a somewhat lower probability—once every 2400 years or so. When the application of the direct measurement calculation is restricted to a specific time of the year, such as the spring, when the crossing presumably occurred and when the area is usually more stormy than the rest of the year, the likelihood of the event increases to once every 1400 years. However, the relatively high likelihood associated with the last calculation is at least partially a result of the fact that one of the stations was situated in the mountains a few hundred meters above sea level. When this station is excluded from the computation, the likelihood of the storm occurring in April decreases to once every 2400 years.Given the sensitivity of the above predictions to the distribution of the measured values and the fact that both the Weibull distribution method and the direct

  18. Evolution of physical and biological characteristics of mesoscale eddy in north-central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Jones, Burton

    2015-04-01

    Eddies appear to be important to both the physical and biogeochemical dynamics of the Red Sea. Numerical simulations of physical dynamics and remote sensing studies of chlorophyll concentration and sea surface height in the Red Sea indicate their importance to the upper portions of the sea (Raitsos et al., 2013; Yao et al., 2014; Zhan et al., 2014). Despite their apparent importance, process studies of these eddies have been lacking. In March 2013 we began an extended observational study of the north-central Red Sea (NCRS) where anticyclonic eddies have been observed. The study began with a ship-based characterization of the eddy and was followed by a three-month observational time series using an autonomous glider equipped with a CTD, oxygen sensor, and optical sensors for chlorophyll, CDOM and optical backscatter. The ship-based study captured an initial snapshot of an anticyclonic eddy and it's associated biological and bio-optical distributions. Initially, chlorophyll distributions tended to mirror the density distribution, with deeper isopycnals and chlorophyll maximum depth in the anticyclonic eddy center. The anticyclone eddy in March had an along basin diameter of 150 km, penetrated vertically less than 150 m and elevated near surface chlorophyll concentrations appeared along its outer boundary. The shallowing of the pycnocline of the outer boundaries of the anticyclone eddy on March may elevate nutrients into the lower euphotic zone, contributing to phytoplankton productivity and biomass within the eddy. This eddy contains most of the kinetic energy of the region with the maximum velocities up to 30 - 35 cm/s. The eddy appeared to interact with the coastal reefs where exchange particulate and dissolved matter may occur. The autonomous glider provided the spring-to-summer progression of the system with increasing stratification, shallowing of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum, and fluctuations in the position and intensity of the eddy. Our glider effort

  19. Kudoa iwatai (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida) in wild and cultured fish in the Red Sea: redescription and molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Diamant, A; Ucko, M; Paperna, I; Colorni, A; Lipshitz, A

    2005-10-01

    Gilt-head sea bream, Sparus aurata L., the Mediterranean's most important mariculture species, has been cultured for the last 30 yr in Eilat (Israeli Red Sea). Kudoa sp. was the first myxosporean parasite reported from this species. In recent years, an increase in prevalence in both land-based and sea-cage facilities in Eilat has been observed. Infections with the same Kudoa species appeared in cultured European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and grey mullet Mugil cephalus in the same farms, as well as in 10 species of wild Red Sea reef fish, indicating that Kudoa sp. is not fastidious with regard to its host. All affected species displayed 1- to 2-mm (up to 5 mm) whitish, spherical, or oval polysporous plasmodia. The parasite established multiple site infections, most commonly in the muscles and intracranial adipose tissue of the brain and eye periphery. Other sites were subcutaneous adipose tissue, nerve axons, mouth, eye, mesenteries, peritoneum, swim bladder, intestinal musculature, heart, pericardium, kidney, and ovary. On the basis of spore morphology, the parasite was identified as Kudoa iwatai Egusa and Shiomitsu, 1983. Ultrastructural features were comparable to those of previously studied Kudoa species. The 18S rDNA from 7 Red Sea isolates was sequenced and compared with the sequence of the same gene from K. iwatai isolated from cultured red sea bream, Pagrus major, in Japan. The phylogenetic position of K. iwatai within the genus was determined using sequence analysis of all related taxa available in GenBank. The 3 isolates of K. iwatai clustered together on a newly formed, highly supported clade. The Red Sea strain of K. iwatai is apparently native to the region. In the absence of records of this Kudoa sp. from the extensive Mediterranean sea bream and sea bass production industries, introduction with its Mediterranean hosts seems unlikely. Therefore, we conclude that K. iwatai is an Indo-Pacific species that, in the Red Sea, has extended its host

  20. Recent origin and semi-permeable species boundaries in the scleractinian coral genus Stylophora from the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Roberto; Benzoni, Francesca; Terraneo, Tullia I.; Caragnano, Annalisa; Berumen, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Reticulate evolution, introgressive hybridisation, and phenotypic plasticity have been documented in scleractinian corals and have challenged our ability to interpret speciation processes. Stylophora is a key model system in coral biology and physiology, but genetic analyses have revealed that cryptic lineages concealed by morphological stasis exist in the Stylophora pistillata species complex. The Red Sea represents a hotspot for Stylophora biodiversity with six morphospecies described, two of which are regionally endemic. We investigated Stylophora species boundaries from the Red Sea and the associated Symbiodinium by sequencing seven DNA loci. Stylophora morphospecies from the Red Sea were not resolved based on mitochondrial phylogenies and showed nuclear allele sharing. Low genetic differentiation, weak isolation, and strong gene flow were found among morphospecies although no signals of genetic recombination were evident among them. Stylophora mamillata harboured Symbiodinium clade C whereas the other two Stylophora morphospecies hosted either Symbiodinium clade A or C. These evolutionary patterns suggest that either gene exchange occurs through reticulate evolution or that multiple ecomorphs of a phenotypically plastic species occur in the Red Sea. The recent origin of the lineage leading to the Red Sea Stylophora may indicate an ongoing speciation driven by environmental changes and incomplete lineage sorting. PMID:27713475

  1. Propagation of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW) in the Red Sea during autumn and its importance to biological production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wafar, Mohideen; Ashraf, Mohamed; Manikandan, K. P.; Qurban, Mohammad Ali; Kattan, Yasser

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of high-resolution CTD data acquired at closely spaced stations during two cruises in the Saudi Arabian waters of the Red Sea (17 to 27°N), supported by the multiple tracer analysis (Mackas et al., 1987), showed that the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW) is clearly detectable as far as north as 26°N in the Red Sea basin albeit at a fraction less than 10%. Continuity of core salinity minima of the GAIW layer also showed that the northward propagation of GAIW north of 20°N happens mainly along the Saudi Arabian coast. The discontinuity of core minima of GAIW properties in a section along the axis, coincidence of these with alternating directions of zonal currents, the good relationships between concentrations of nutrients and salinity in the GAIW layer, and the cores of high nutrient concentrations in this section led to the conclusions that the GAIW is entrained in eddy circulations across the basin and that it is a significant source of nutrients to the entire Red Sea basin. However, the addition of nutrients with GAIW could account for only a small fraction of the nutrients (as nitrogen) needed for primary production, suggesting that recycling within the Red Sea and input from other sources will have to be significant enough to sustain the current levels of primary production measured in Red Sea waters.

  2. Analyzing the Modeled Tidal Signal in the Bab El Mandeb Strait and Adjacent Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, R. N. B.

    2014-12-01

    The tidal forces that dominate the Bab el Mandeb region are influenced by both the generally semi-diurnal tides in the Red Sea and mixed tides in the Gulf of Aden. Also, the tidal ranges are much greater in the Gulf of Aden (~ 2 m) than in the Red Sea (< 1m), which further complicates the tidal signal in Bab el Mandeb Strait. The Red Sea Regional Navy Coastal Model (NCOM), which includes the entire Red Sea, and the western part of the Gulf of Aden at a 1 km resolution, will be evaluated on how well it replicates the tidal signal described in literature and historical observations. In addition, the model will be compared to available temperature/salinity in situ profiles. NCOM incorporates the Oregon State University Tide Model, which should allow the ocean model to accurately reflect the transitional tides in the Bab el Mandeb Strait. Preliminary estimates indicate that the model replicates the overall circulation pattern seen in literature and the fact that there are higher tidal amplitudes in the Gulf of Aden than in the Red Sea. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited

  3. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS. PMID:26826831

  4. Offshore Evidence for an Undocumented Tsunami Event in the 'Low Risk' Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat, Northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Goodman Tchernov, Beverly; Katz, Timor; Shaked, Yonathan; Qupty, Nairooz; Kanari, Mor; Niemi, Tina; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-01-01

    Although the Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat is located in the tectonically active northern Red Sea, it has been described as low-risk with regard to tsunami activity because there are no modern records of damaging tsunami events and only one tsunami (1068 AD) referred to in historical records. However, this assessment may be poorly informed given that the area was formed by and is located along the seismically active Dead Sea Fault, its population is known to fluctuate in size and literacy in part due to its harsh hyper-arid climate, and there is a dearth of field studies addressing the presence or absence of tsunamigenic deposits. Here we show evidence from two offshore cores for a major paleotsunami that occurred ~2300 years ago with a sedimentological footprint that far exceeds the scarce markers of the historically mentioned 1068 AD event. The interpretation is based on the presence of a laterally continuous and synchronous, anomalous sedimentological deposit that includes allochtonous inclusions and unique structural characteristics. Based on sedimentological parameters, these deposits could not be accounted for by other transport events, or other known background sedimentological processes.

  5. Offshore Evidence for an Undocumented Tsunami Event in the 'Low Risk' Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat, Northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Goodman Tchernov, Beverly; Katz, Timor; Shaked, Yonathan; Qupty, Nairooz; Kanari, Mor; Niemi, Tina; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-01-01

    Although the Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat is located in the tectonically active northern Red Sea, it has been described as low-risk with regard to tsunami activity because there are no modern records of damaging tsunami events and only one tsunami (1068 AD) referred to in historical records. However, this assessment may be poorly informed given that the area was formed by and is located along the seismically active Dead Sea Fault, its population is known to fluctuate in size and literacy in part due to its harsh hyper-arid climate, and there is a dearth of field studies addressing the presence or absence of tsunamigenic deposits. Here we show evidence from two offshore cores for a major paleotsunami that occurred ~2300 years ago with a sedimentological footprint that far exceeds the scarce markers of the historically mentioned 1068 AD event. The interpretation is based on the presence of a laterally continuous and synchronous, anomalous sedimentological deposit that includes allochtonous inclusions and unique structural characteristics. Based on sedimentological parameters, these deposits could not be accounted for by other transport events, or other known background sedimentological processes. PMID:26815553

  6. Diurnal vertical migration of Cochlodinium polykrikoides during the red tide in Korean coastal sea waters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sug; Jeong, Chang Su; Seong, Gi Tak; Han, In Sung; Lee, Young Sik

    2010-09-01

    The diurnal vertical migration of Cochlodinium polykrikoides (C. polykrikoides), which caused a red tide in the Korean coastal waters of the East Sea/Sea of Japan in September 2003, was examined by determining the time-dependent changes in the density of living cells in relation to the depth of the water column. The ascent of this species into the surface layer (depth of water 2 m) occurred during 1400-1500. The descent started at 1600 and a high distribution rate (86%) at 15-20 m was observed at 0300. During the ascent, the cells were widely distributed at each depth level from 0600 hr and at 0800-1100, the cells were primarily distributed in the middle layer (0-6 m). The concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen was generally < or = 2.86 micromol l(-1), but at 1400-1500, the concentration in the surface layer reduced to < or = 0.14 micromol l(-1). Moreover, the concentration gradually increased as the depth increased to > or = 5 m. These results showed that the nutrient-consumption rate associated with the proliferation of C. polykrikoides during a red tide is more influenced by the inorganic-nitrogen resources ratherthan the inorganic-phosphorus compounds.

  7. Assessment of Zooplankton Community Composition along a Depth Profile in the Central Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Pearman, John K.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2015-01-01

    The composition of zooplankton in the water column has received limited attention in the main body of the Red Sea and this study investigates the change in the community both spatially and temporally across 11 stations in the central Red Sea. Using molecular methods to target the v9 region of the 18S rRNA gene a total of approximately 11.5 million reads were sequenced resulting in 2528 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% similarity. The phylum Arthropoda dominated in terms of reads accounting for on average 86.2% and 65.3% for neuston nets and vertical multinets respectively. A reduction in the number of OTUs was noticed with depth for both total metazoa and Maxillopoda whilst there was also a significant change in the composition of the Maxillopoda community. The genus Corycaeus had a higher proportion of reads in the epipelagic zone with Pleuromamma becoming increasingly dominant with depth. No significant difference was observed in the community between night and day sampling however there was a significant difference in the zooplankton community between two sampling periods separated by 10 days. PMID:26186220

  8. Collapse of a new living species of giant clam in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Richter, Claudio; Roa-Quiaoit, Hilly; Jantzen, Carin; Al-Zibdah, Mohammad; Kochzius, Marc

    2008-09-01

    Giant clams are among the most spectacular but also the most endangered marine invertebrates. Their large size and easy accessibility has caused overfishing and collapse of the natural stocks in many places and local extinction in some of the species [1, 2]. The diversity of giant clams is extremely low because of reliction in this Tethyan group [3, 4]. The latest additions of living species date back almost two decades [5-7], fixing the number of extant Tridacna at seven species [3]. Here, we report the discovery of a new species of giant clam: Tridacna costata sp. nov. features characteristic shells with pronounced vertical folds, is genetically distinct, and shows an earlier and abbreviated reproduction than its Red Sea congeners. This species represents less than 1% of the present stocks but up to >80% of the fossil shells. The decline in proportion and shell size (20x) indicates overharvesting [8] dating back to the early human occupation of the Red Sea >125,000 years ago [9]. This earliest depletion reported so far of a shallow-water megafaunal invertebrate has important ramifications for human dispersal out of Africa [10]. Its oversight in one of the best-investigated reef provinces [11-13] illustrates the dearth of knowledge on marine biodiversity.

  9. Biodiversity patterns of plankton assemblages at the extremes of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Pearman, J K; Kürten, S; Sarma, Y V B; Jones, B H; Carvalho, S

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of microbial plankton has received limited attention in the main basin of the Red Sea. This study investigates changes in the community composition and structure of prokaryotes and eukaryotes at the extremes of the Red Sea along cross-shelf gradients and between the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum. Using molecular methods to target both the 16S and 18S rRNA genes, it was observed that the dominant prokaryotic classes were Acidimicrobiia, Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, regardless of the region and depth. The eukaryotes Syndiniophyceae and Dinophyceae between them dominated in the north, with Bacillariophyceae and Mamiellophyceae more prominent in the southern region. Significant differences were observed for prokaryotes and eukaryotes for region, depth and distance from shore. Similarly, it was noticed that communities became less similar with increasing distance from the shore. Canonical correspondence analysis at the class level showed that Mamiellophyceae and Bacillariophyceae correlated with increased nutrients and chlorophyll a found in the southern region, which is influenced by the input of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water. PMID:26738552

  10. Isotopic constraints on the origin of the Atlantis II, Suakin and Valdivia brines, Red Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1986-01-01

    The origin of three Red Sea submarine brine pools was investigated by analysis of the S and O isotope ratios of dissolved sulfate and Sr isotope ratios of dissolved Sr in the brines. Sulfur and O isotope ratios of sulfate and Sr isotope ratios of evaporitic source rocks for the brines were measured for comparison. The S, O and Sr isotope ratios of evaporites recovered from DSDP site 227 are consistent with an upper Miocene evaporites age. The Valdivia Deep brine formed by karstic dissolution of Miocene evaporites by overlying seawater and shows no signs of hydrothermal input. The Suakin Deep brines are derived from, or have isotopically exchanged with Miocene or older evaporites. There has been only minor dilution of the brine by overlying seawater. Strontium isotope ratios of Suakin brine may indicate addition of a minor (15%) amount of volcanic Sr to the brine, but there is no evidence of high temperature brine-rock interaction. The sulfate in the Atlantis II brine was apparently derived from seawater. The O isotope ratio of sulfate in the present Atlantis II brine could reflect isotopic exchange between seawater sulfate and the brine at approximately 255??C. Approximately 30% of the Sr in the Atlantis II brine is derived from the underlying basalt, probably by hydrothermal leaching. Atlantis II brine is the only known example from the Red Sea which has a significant high-temperature hydrothermal history. ?? 1986.

  11. Aerosol deposition favors red tide phytoplankton in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.; Chien, C.; Chen, Y.; Glover, D. M.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    Chinese marginal seas support vast fisheries and vital economies, but their productivity is threatened by eutrophication from runoff and atmospheric deposition. The East China Sea is inundated with nitrogen from the Yangtze River and anthropogenic emissions, leading to elevated N:P ratios. We show that aerosol additions approximating one week of moderate deposition to offshore waters favor the growth of red tide phytoplankton, such as Skeletonema costatum, by providing nutrients and trace metals (iron and zinc) needed for growth. In contrast toxin-producing Pseudonitzchia does not benefit from aerosols in this region, possibly due to its preference for lower N:P ratios. A dose-dependent toxic response was observed in Synechococcus at high aerosol loads approximating a week of heavy deposition in the region. In contrast, phytoplankton growth at an onshore station was light limited, and aerosol additions did not have an appreciable effect on phytoplankton growth. Aerosol and chlorophyll observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite have the potential to explore the effect of aerosols on phytoplankton blooms over longer time scales and seasons. This study shows the potential for aerosols to control N:P ratios in offshore waters and to shape the phytoplankton community through fertilization and toxicity, contributing to the occurrence of red tides.

  12. Sedimentary-hosted polymetallic massive sulfide deposits of the Kebrit and Shaban Deeps, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, N.; Puchelt, H.

    1991-07-01

    Massive sulfides recovered from the Kebrit Deep carbonaceous sedimentary succession represent black smoker fragments, novel to any Red Sea brine pool deposit. Chimneys, which were also observed in situ near the seawater/brine interface of the Kebrit Deep pool, are primarily comprised of Fe-, Zn- and Pb-bearing phases, and are often tar and asphalt impregnated. Cu-sulfides are virtually absent from parageneses, contrasting rift-related smoker and Red Sea metalliferous sediment deposits. Concentration of nickel in discrete bravoite points to a basalt/seawater leaching process as a source for most metals. The sedimentary package, which probably hosts Cu-mineralization in lower stockworks of the smoker deposit, is considered the major source of lead. Prevention of boiling of hydrothermal fluids, passing through a succession of organic-rich carbonate and clay horizons prior to discharge, is essential for smoker formation. Shaban Deep sedimentary-hosted massive sulfides are less frequent, with pyrite being the dominant ore mineral. Sulfur isotope data indicate both high temperature inorganic as well as biogenic sulfate (seawater and/or evaporite) reduction in sulfide-forming processes. Cogenetic sulfates formed from residual, bacteriogenically reduced seawater sulfate. Rather low sulfide/sulfate precipitation temperatures of 110 130 °C for the Kebrit brine pool and 100 °C for Shaban Deep massive sulfides are evident.

  13. Intrusion of Oceanic-type Basaltic Melts Precedes Continental Break up in the Red Sea Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Enrico; Ligi, Marco; Ronca, Sara; Seyler, Monique; Bosworth, William; Cipriani, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The role of magmatism in continental rifting and break up and in the birth of a new ocean are not well understood. Continental break up can take place with intense and voluminous volcanism, as in the Southern Red Sea/Afar Rift, or in a relatively amagmatic mode, as in the Mesozoic Iberian Atlantic rift. Studies of gabbros from the Brothers and Zabargad islands suggest that continental break up in the northern Red Sea, a relatively non-volcanic rift, is preceded by intrusion of oceanic-type basaltic melts that crystallize at progressively shallower crustal depths as rifting progresses towards continental break-up. A seismic reflection profile running across the central part of the southern Thetis basin, shows a ~5 km wide reflector ~1.25 s below the axial neovolcanic zone. We interpret it as marking the roof of a magma chamber or melt lens, similar to those identified below several mid-ocean ridges. Assuming a 4.5 km/s acoustic velocity for the upper oceanic crust at Thetis, this reflector is ~3.5 km below the seafloor. The presence of a few kilometers deep subrift magma chamber soon after the initiation of oceanic spreading implies the crystallization of lower oceanic crust intrusives as a last step in a sequence of basaltic melt intrusion from pre-oceanic continental rifting to oceanic spreading. Thus, oceanic crust accretion in the Red Sea rift starts at depth before continental break up, emplacement of oceanic basalt at the sea floor, and development of Vine-Matthews magnetic anomalies, pointing to a rift model, where the lower continental lithosphere has been replaced by upwelling asthenosphere before continental rupturing. This model would imply depth-dependent extension due to decoupling between the upper and lower lithosphere with mantle-lithosphere-necking breakup before crustal-necking breakup. This mode of initial oceanic crust accretion may have been common in Mesozoic Atlantic-type rifts, in addition to wider, amagmatic, Iberian-type continent

  14. A note on the flow of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wafar, Mohideen

    2016-11-01

    In this short communication, we compare our results with an earlier study by Churchill et al. (2014) who arrived at similar findings. Recently we published a paper (Wafar et al., 2016) on the spread of Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW) in the Red Sea in Journal of Marine Systems. Churchill et al. (2014) published findings similar to ours earlier than we did but by unfortunate oversight we failed to cite their paper when we wrote ours. We sincerely regret this negligence. The important findings from the study of Churchill et al. (2014) are that the GAIW: flows as a coastal current along Saudi coast, is traceable up to about 24°N, constitutes a source of new N to the coastal reef ecosystems, and is transported across the basin in an anticyclonic eddy circulation. Our findings agree with these. Our results also demonstrate the presence of GAIW still further north, as far as 26°N, by using a multiple tracer analysis, and the entrainment of GAIW in more than one anticyclonic eddy circulation. Regardless of the precedence, the results from the study of Churchill et al. (2014) and subsequently ours together add definite proof of GAIW flowing as an eastern boundary current which was only surmised before. While we have not examined the importance of GAIW as a source of new N to coral reefs, our demonstration that the GAIW is entrained across the basin in several eddy circulations, besides being consistent with the findings of Churchill et al. (2014), strongly supports the possibility that this is a mechanism of determining the extents of basin-wide biological production. Red Sea is a sea area that remains even now less intensively sampled and it is extremely unfortunate that a recent paper like that of Churchill et al. (2014) escaped our attention. However, we are happy that our findings are consistent with theirs and build more on what they deduced on the flow of GAIW and its role on nutrient enrichment of the Red Sea waters.

  15. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  16. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free direct radiative forcing of aerosol over the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, Helen; Osipov, Serega; Bantges, Richard; Smirnov, Alexander; Banks, Jamie; Levy, Robert; Prakash, P.-Jish; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-04-01

    A combination of ground-based and satellite observations are used, in conjunction with column radiative transfer modelling, to assess the climatological aerosol loading and quantify its corresponding cloud-free direct radiative forcing (DRF) over the Red Sea. While there have been campaigns designed to probe aerosol-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to this region. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements which can be used to evaluate retrievals are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based sun-photometer micro-tops observations gathered from a series of cruises which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Initially two aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms developed for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are evaluated via comparison with the co-located cruise observations. These show excellent agreement, with correlations typically better than 0.9 and very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of radiative fluxes and DRF along one of the cruises using the observed aerosol and meteorological conditions also show good agreement with co-located estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large

  17. Colony size-frequency distribution of pocilloporid juvenile corals along a natural environmental gradient in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Cortés, Diego F; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    Coral colony size-frequency distributions can be used to assess population responses to local environmental conditions and disturbances. In this study, we surveyed juvenile pocilloporids, herbivorous fish densities, and algal cover in the central and southern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We sampled nine reefs with different disturbance histories along a north-south natural gradient of physicochemical conditions (higher salinity and wider temperature fluctuations in the north, and higher turbidity and productivity in the south). Since coral populations with negatively skewed size-frequency distributions have been associated with unfavorable environmental conditions, we expected to find more negative distributions in the southern Red Sea, where corals are potentially experiencing suboptimal conditions. Although juvenile coral and parrotfish densities differed significantly between the two regions, mean colony size and size-frequency distributions did not. Results suggest that pocilloporid colony size-frequency distribution may not be an accurate indicator of differences in biological or oceanographic conditions in the Red Sea.

  18. Colony size-frequency distribution of pocilloporid juvenile corals along a natural environmental gradient in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Cortés, Diego F; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    Coral colony size-frequency distributions can be used to assess population responses to local environmental conditions and disturbances. In this study, we surveyed juvenile pocilloporids, herbivorous fish densities, and algal cover in the central and southern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We sampled nine reefs with different disturbance histories along a north-south natural gradient of physicochemical conditions (higher salinity and wider temperature fluctuations in the north, and higher turbidity and productivity in the south). Since coral populations with negatively skewed size-frequency distributions have been associated with unfavorable environmental conditions, we expected to find more negative distributions in the southern Red Sea, where corals are potentially experiencing suboptimal conditions. Although juvenile coral and parrotfish densities differed significantly between the two regions, mean colony size and size-frequency distributions did not. Results suggest that pocilloporid colony size-frequency distribution may not be an accurate indicator of differences in biological or oceanographic conditions in the Red Sea. PMID:26520210

  19. [Fluorescence characterization of dissolved organic matter in the East China Sea after diatom red tide dispersion].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Peng-ji; Zhao, Wei-hong

    2009-05-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission spectroscopy (EEMS) was employed to analyze the 3-dimensional fluorescence of dissolved organic matter in the East China Sea after diatom red tide dispersion. The relationships between fluorescence peak intensity, and salinity and chlorophyll-a were discussed. The centers of protein-like fluorescence peaks dispersed at Exmax/Exmax = 270-280/290-315 nm (Peak B), 220-230/290-305 nm (Peak D), 230-240/335-350 nm (Peak S) and 280/320 nm (Peak T). Two humic-like peaks appeared at 255-270/435-480 nm (Peak A)and 330-350/420-480 nm (Peak C). High tyrosine-like intensity was observed in diatom red tide dispersion area, and tryptophan-like fluorescence was also found which was lower. High FIB/FIS showed that diatom red tide produced much tyrosine-like matter during dispersion. Peaks S, A and C had positive correlation with one another, and their distributions were similar, which decreased with distance increasing away from the shore. Good negative correlations between peaks S, A and C and salinity suggested that Jiangsu-Zhejiang coastal water was the same source of them. Correlations between fluorescence peak intensity and chlorophyll-a were not remarkable enough to clear the relationship between fluorescence and living algal matter. It was supposed that the living algal matter contributed little to the fluorescence intensity of algal dispersion seawater.

  20. Occurrence of Diatom-Cyanobacterial symbiotic relationship in the coastal surface waters of Northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    khomayis, hisham; Sommer, Ulrich; Al-Aidaroos, Ali; Kürten, Benjamin; Devassy, Reny

    2013-04-01

    The phenomenon of Diatom-Cyanobacterial symbiotic association is widely noticed from different marine ecosystems around the world especially in the tropical and subtropical regions. The fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the oligotrophic ocean is an important source of new nitrogen to surface waters, stimulating phytoplankton productivity and fueling the biological pump. The most common cyanobacterium that carry out the so called nitrogen fixation in marine system is Trichodesmium. The other major representative of this diazotrophic group is the heterocystous endosymbiotic cyanobacterium known as Richelia intracellularis which always seen in symbiotic relationship with other phytoplankton and is well-known for its capability to fix the atmospheric nitrogen in oligotrophic waters. Planktonic diatom- cyanobaterial symbioses play a significant role in the ecology and biogeochemistry of the surface oceans. Studies suggest that these particular diazotroph communities contribute annually 4.79 × 1012 gm of nitrogen to the water which comes almost one quarter of the total nitrogen input to the sea. The endosymbiont Richelia normally occupies the periplasmic space between the plasmalemma and the cell wall of the host and it provides a source of nutrient availability to the host where it is associated. They are expected to release the fixed nitrogen as either ammonium or dissolved organic nitrogen, which is then available to the particular host which lives in nutrient-starved condition. It is mainly known to be associated with the centric diatoms like Rhizosolenia, Hemialus, and Guinardia. The present observation of the Rhizosolenia-Richelia and Hemialus-Richelia symbiotic relation from the coastal waters of northern red sea implies much attention to the ecology of the particular area. While considering the oligotrophic nature of the region, the particular association helps the phytoplankton to avoid the limited growth due to the scarcity of nitrogen to a great extent. The

  1. Dike Intrusions and Magma Accumulation in the Red Sea Region: Insights from InSAR and High-Resolution Optical Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Jonsson, S.; Ruch, J.

    2014-12-01

    During the past decade, several magmatic intrusions and eruptions have occurred in the Red Sea region. The activity began in 2007 with an eruption on Jebel at Tair Island and it was the first volcanic event known to occur in the southern Red Sea in over a century. We used co-eruption InSAR data to constrain a tensile dislocation model, which suggests that the island's stress field is both temporarily varying and isolated from the regional Red Sea stress regime. Later in 2009, a dike intrusion in Harrat Lunayyir (western Saudi Arabia) almost made it to the surface to start an eruption. Our InSAR observations document how the intrusion first ascended to shallow depths and then started activating graben-bounding normal faults. The progressive dike opening resulted in over a meter of crustal extension and extensive surface fracturing. During the post-diking period, the ground deformation continued, but was of an order of magnitude smaller than the displacements associated with the main event. More recently, two Surtseyan eruptions occurred in the Zubair archipelago (southern Red Sea) forming two new islands in 2011-12 and 2013. High-resolution optical imagery reveals that significant wind and coastal erosion rapidly changed both the size and the shape of the two new islands during the months following the end of the eruptions. Several TanDEM-X InSAR data sets show the co-eruption deformation that occurred on the neighboring islands, indicating that both eruptions were fed by two ~10 km long dikes with a thickness of ~1 m. All these volcanic events were fed by dike intrusions and were contemporaneously associated with significant seismic swarms. Our observations do not show evidence for shallow magma reservoirs at these locations and that the magma appears to have ascended directly from a significant depth.

  2. Comparative analysis of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminants in Black Sea green and red macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Strezov, A S; Nonova, Tz P

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis about the accumulation of heavy metal, natural and technogenic radionuclides from the Black Sea environment in different Bulgarian coastline regions is made. The possibilities to use Chlorophyta and Rhodophyta algae phylums as bioindicators in marine environment are investigated. Environmental contamination in the Black Sea alga species (green and red) was studied from 1992 to 2003. Sampling sites were selected to cover the whole coastal region. Low level gamma spectrometry was used to determine the natural and technogenic nuclide concentrations. The heavy metal concentrations were measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). The obtained data show that radionuclide and metal concentrations depend on the macrophyte type. Tendencies in the concentration of pollutant variations during the studied period are examined and all data give information about different macrophytic species' ability to accumulate certain elements from one and the same sampling location. All obtained results show that use of macroalgae in marine environmental monitoring reduces the need for complex studies on chemical speciation of aquatic contaminants and makes algae valuable indicators for seawater quality assessment. All data show the lack of serious pollution along the Bulgarian Black Sea coast.

  3. Colonizing the Red Planet: An Interdisciplinary Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomblin, David C.; Bentley, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a simulation activity based on the hypothesis that human habitation on Mars is a realistic future public policy issue and a reasonable consequence of space exploration. Uses cooperative learning. (DDR)

  4. The genus Litophyton Forskål, 1775 (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nephtheidae) in the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    van Ofwegen, Leen P

    2016-01-01

    The Litophyton species of the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean are revised, which includes species previously belonging to the genus Nephthea, which is synonymized with Litophyton. A neotype for both Litophyton arboreum, the type species of Litophyton, and Nephthea chabrolii, the type species of Nephthea, are designated. The new species Litophyton curvum sp. n. is described and depicted, and a key to all Litophyton species is provided. Of the 26 species previously described from the western Indian Ocean and Red Sea, 13 species are considered valid and 13 have been synonymized or placed in other genera.

  5. The genus Litophyton Forskål, 1775 (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nephtheidae) in the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    van Ofwegen, Leen P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Litophyton species of the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean are revised, which includes species previously belonging to the genus Nephthea, which is synonymized with Litophyton. A neotype for both Litophyton arboreum, the type species of Litophyton, and Nephthea chabrolii, the type species of Nephthea, are designated. The new species Litophyton curvum sp. n. is described and depicted, and a key to all Litophyton species is provided. Of the 26 species previously described from the western Indian Ocean and Red Sea, 13 species are considered valid and 13 have been synonymized or placed in other genera. PMID:27103869

  6. The genus Litophyton Forskål, 1775 (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nephtheidae) in the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    van Ofwegen, Leen P

    2016-01-01

    The Litophyton species of the Red Sea and the western Indian Ocean are revised, which includes species previously belonging to the genus Nephthea, which is synonymized with Litophyton. A neotype for both Litophyton arboreum, the type species of Litophyton, and Nephthea chabrolii, the type species of Nephthea, are designated. The new species Litophyton curvum sp. n. is described and depicted, and a key to all Litophyton species is provided. Of the 26 species previously described from the western Indian Ocean and Red Sea, 13 species are considered valid and 13 have been synonymized or placed in other genera. PMID:27103869

  7. Morphology and water permeability of red blood cells from green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Benga, Gheorghe; Chapman, Bogdan E; Romeo, Tony; Cox, Guy C; Kuchel, Philip W

    2015-07-01

    The morphology and diffusional water permeability (P d) of red blood cells (RBCs) from green sea turtle (GST) (Chelonia mydas) are presented for the first time. The RBCs had an ellipsoidal shape with full-axis lengths (diameters): D = 14.4 μm; d = 10.2 μm; h = 2.8 μm. The values of P d (cm s(-1)) were 5.1 × 10(-3) at 15 °C, 5.7 × 10(-3) at 20 °C, 6.3 × 10(-3) at 25 °C, 6.8 × 10(-3) at 30 °C, and 7.9 × 10(-3) at 37 °C (i.e., significantly higher than in human RBCs in which it was measured to be 4.2 × 10(-3) at 25 °C, 5.0 × 10(-3) at 30 °C, and 6.2 × 10(-3) at 37 °C). There was a lack of inhibition of P d of GST RBCs by p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB), a well-known inhibitor of the RBC water channel proteins (WCPs). The activation energy of water diffusion (E a,d) in GST RBCs was 15.0 ± 1.6 kJ mol(-1) which is lower than the E a,d for human RBCs (~25 kJ mol(-1)). These results indicate that in the membrane of GST RBCs, there were no WCPs that were inhibited by the mercurial reagent, while the lipid bilayer of this membrane is unusually permeable to water. This is likely to be a phylogenetically old trait, like that found in amphibians and even the later birds, all of which have nucleated erythrocytes; and it is also likely to be a result of the animal's adaptation to a herbivorous diet (algae and seagrasses).

  8. Morphology and water permeability of red blood cells from green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Benga, Gheorghe; Chapman, Bogdan E; Romeo, Tony; Cox, Guy C; Kuchel, Philip W

    2015-07-01

    The morphology and diffusional water permeability (P d) of red blood cells (RBCs) from green sea turtle (GST) (Chelonia mydas) are presented for the first time. The RBCs had an ellipsoidal shape with full-axis lengths (diameters): D = 14.4 μm; d = 10.2 μm; h = 2.8 μm. The values of P d (cm s(-1)) were 5.1 × 10(-3) at 15 °C, 5.7 × 10(-3) at 20 °C, 6.3 × 10(-3) at 25 °C, 6.8 × 10(-3) at 30 °C, and 7.9 × 10(-3) at 37 °C (i.e., significantly higher than in human RBCs in which it was measured to be 4.2 × 10(-3) at 25 °C, 5.0 × 10(-3) at 30 °C, and 6.2 × 10(-3) at 37 °C). There was a lack of inhibition of P d of GST RBCs by p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB), a well-known inhibitor of the RBC water channel proteins (WCPs). The activation energy of water diffusion (E a,d) in GST RBCs was 15.0 ± 1.6 kJ mol(-1) which is lower than the E a,d for human RBCs (~25 kJ mol(-1)). These results indicate that in the membrane of GST RBCs, there were no WCPs that were inhibited by the mercurial reagent, while the lipid bilayer of this membrane is unusually permeable to water. This is likely to be a phylogenetically old trait, like that found in amphibians and even the later birds, all of which have nucleated erythrocytes; and it is also likely to be a result of the animal's adaptation to a herbivorous diet (algae and seagrasses). PMID:25534259

  9. Estimating Curie Point Depth and Heat Flow Map for Northern Red Sea Rift of Egypt and Its Surroundings, from Aeromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Salah; Salk, Müjgan; Pamukçu, Oya

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we aim to map the Curie point depth surface for the northern Red Sea rift region and its surroundings based on the spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data. Spectral analysis technique was used to estimate the boundaries (top and bottom) of the magnetized crust. The Curie point depth (CPD) estimates of the Red Sea rift from 112 overlapping blocks vary from 5 to 20 km. The depths obtained for the bottom of the magnetized crust are assumed to correspond to Curie point depths where the magnetic layer loses its magnetization. Intermediate to deep Curie point depth anomalies (10-16 km) were observed in southern and central Sinai and the Gulf of Suez (intermediate heat flow) due to the uplifted basement rocks. The shallowest CPD of 5 km (associated with very high heat flow, ~235 mW m-2) is located at/around the axial trough of the Red Sea rift region especially at Brothers Island and Conrad Deep due to its association with both the concentration of rifting to the axial depression and the magmatic activity, whereas, beneath the Gulf of Aqaba, three Curie point depth anomalies belonging to three major basins vary from 10 km in the north to about 14 km in the south (with a mean heat flow of about 85 mW m-2). Moreover, low CPD anomalies (high heat flow) were also observed beneath some localities in the northern part of the Gulf of Suez at Hammam Fraun, at Esna city along River Nile, at west Ras Gharib in the eastern desert and at Safaga along the western shore line of the Red Sea rift. These resulted from deviatoric tensional stresses developing in the lithosphere which contribute to its further extension and may be due to the opening of the Gulf of Suez and/or the Red Sea rift. Furthermore, low CPD (with high heat flow anomaly) was observed in the eastern border of the study area, beneath northern Arabia, due to the quasi-vertical low-velocity anomaly which extends into the lower mantle and may be related to volcanism in northern Arabia. Dense microearthquakes

  10. Microbial–meiofaunal interrelationships in coastal sediments of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    El-Serehy, Hamed A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.; Al-Misned, Fahad A.; Al-Talasat, Abdul Allah R.; Gewik, Mohamed M.

    2016-01-01

    Population density and biomass of bacteria and meiofauna were investigated seasonally in the sediments of the north-western bank of Red Sea. Samples of sediments were collected seasonally from three different stations to determine microphytobenthic biomass (chlorophyll a), protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and total organic matter concentrations. These investigations revealed that microbial components tended to increase their dominancy, whereas sensitive meiofauna were extremely reduced during the entire study period. Thus a very low density of the total meiofauna (with an annual average of 109 ± 26 ind./10 cm2) was recorded whilst the benthic microbial population densities exhibited higher values (ranging from 0.31 ± 0.02 × 108 to 43.67 ± 18.62 × 108/g dry sediment). These changes in the relative importance analysis of benthic microbial components versus meiofaunal ones seem to be based on the impact of organic matter accumulation on the function and structure of these benthic communities. Proteins, lipids and carbohydrates showed very low concentration values, and the organic matter mostly consisted of carbohydrates, reflecting lower nutritional values for benthic fauna in general and meiofauna in particular. The distribution of microbial and meiofaunal communities seems to be dependent on the quality of the organic matter rather than on its quantity. Total organic matter concentrations varied between 5.8 and 7.6 mg/g, with organic carbon accounting for only 32% of the total organic matter. Chlorophyll a attained very low values, fluctuating between 0.11 and 0.56 μg/g, indicating the oligotrophy of the studied area. The very low concentration of chlorophyll a in the Red Sea sediment suggests that the sedimentary organic matter, heterotrophic bacteria and/or protozoa constitute an alternative resource that is consumed by meiofauna when algae are less abundant. Protozoa, therefore, represent the “missing link in bacteria–meiofauna interaction in

  11. Microbial-meiofaunal interrelationships in coastal sediments of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    El-Serehy, Hamed A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Al-Misned, Fahad A; Al-Talasat, Abdul Allah R; Gewik, Mohamed M

    2016-05-01

    Population density and biomass of bacteria and meiofauna were investigated seasonally in the sediments of the north-western bank of Red Sea. Samples of sediments were collected seasonally from three different stations to determine microphytobenthic biomass (chlorophyll a), protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and total organic matter concentrations. These investigations revealed that microbial components tended to increase their dominancy, whereas sensitive meiofauna were extremely reduced during the entire study period. Thus a very low density of the total meiofauna (with an annual average of 109 ± 26 ind./10 cm(2)) was recorded whilst the benthic microbial population densities exhibited higher values (ranging from 0.31 ± 0.02 × 10(8) to 43.67 ± 18.62 × 10(8)/g dry sediment). These changes in the relative importance analysis of benthic microbial components versus meiofaunal ones seem to be based on the impact of organic matter accumulation on the function and structure of these benthic communities. Proteins, lipids and carbohydrates showed very low concentration values, and the organic matter mostly consisted of carbohydrates, reflecting lower nutritional values for benthic fauna in general and meiofauna in particular. The distribution of microbial and meiofaunal communities seems to be dependent on the quality of the organic matter rather than on its quantity. Total organic matter concentrations varied between 5.8 and 7.6 mg/g, with organic carbon accounting for only 32% of the total organic matter. Chlorophyll a attained very low values, fluctuating between 0.11 and 0.56 μg/g, indicating the oligotrophy of the studied area. The very low concentration of chlorophyll a in the Red Sea sediment suggests that the sedimentary organic matter, heterotrophic bacteria and/or protozoa constitute an alternative resource that is consumed by meiofauna when algae are less abundant. Protozoa, therefore, represent the "missing link in bacteria-meiofauna interaction

  12. Climatic, eustatic, and tectonic controls on Quaternary deposits and landforms, Red Sea coast, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Arvidson, R.; Becker, R.; Shanabrook, A.; Luo, W.; Sultan, M.; Sturchio, N.; Lotfy, Z.; Mahmood, A.M.; El Alfy, Z.

    1994-06-10

    The degree to which local climatic variations, eustatic sea level fluctuations, and tectonic uplift have influenced the development of Quaternary marine and fluvial landforms and deposits along the Red Sea coast, Eastern Desert, Egypt was investigated using a combination of remote sensing and field data, age determinations of corals, and numerical simulations. False color composites generated from Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT image data, digital elevation models derived from stereophotogrammetric analysis of SPOT data, and field observations document that a {approximately}10-km-wide swath inland from the coast is covered in many places with coalescing alluvial fans of Quaternary age. Wadis cutting through the fans exhibit several pairs of fluvial terraces, and wadi walls expose alluvium interbedded with coralline limestone deposits. Further, three distinct coral terraces are evident along the coastline. Climatic, eustatic, and tectonic uplift controls on the overall system were simulated using a cellular automata algorithm with the following characteristics: (1) uplift as a function of position and time, as defined by the elevations and ages of corals; (2) climatic variations driven by insolation changes associated with Milankovitch cycles; (3) sea level fluctuations based on U/Th ages of coral terraces and eustatic data; and (4) parameterized fluvial erosion and deposition. Results imply that the fans and coralline limestones were generated in a setting in which the tectonic uplift rate decreased over the Quaternary to negligible values at present. During lowstands, wadis cut into sedimentary deposits; coupled with continuing uplift, fans were dissected, leaving remnant surfaces, and wadi-related terraces were generated by down cutting. Only landforms from the past three to four eustatic sea level cycles (i.e., {approximately} 300 to 400 kyr) are likely to have survived erosion and deposition associated with fluvial processes. 33 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Climatic, eustatic, and tectnoic controls on Quarternary deposits and landforms, Red Sea coast, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond; Becker, Richard; Shanabrook, Amy; Luo, Wei; Sturchio, Neil; Sultan, Mohamed; Lofty, Zakaria; Mahmood, Abdel Moneim; El Alfy, Zeinhom

    1994-01-01

    The degree to which local climatic variations, eustatic sea level fluctuations, and tectonic uplift have influenced the development of Quaternary marine and fluvial landforms and deposits along the Red Sea coast, Eastern Desert, was investigated using a combination of remote sensing and field data, age determinations of corals, and numerical simulations. False color composites generated from Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT image data, digital elevation models derived from sterophotogrammetric analysis of SPOT data, and field observations document that a approximately 10-km wide swath inland from the coast is covered in many places with coalescing alluvial fans of Quaternary age. Wadis cutting through the fans exhibit several pairs of fluvial terraces, and wadi walls expose alluvium interbedded with corraline limestone deposits Further, three distinct coral terraces are evident along the coatline. Climatic, eustatic, and tectonic uplift controls on the overall system were simulated using a cellular automata algorithm with the following characteristics: (1) uplift as a function of position and time, as defined by the elevations and ages of corals; (2) climatic variations driven by insolation changes associated with Milankovitch cycles; (3) sea level fluctuations based on U/Th ages of coral terraces and eustatic data; and (4) parametrized fluvial erosion and deposition. Results imply that the fans and coralline limestones were generated in a setting in which the tectonic uplift rate decreased over the Quarternary to negligible values at present. Coralline limestones formed furing eustatic highstands when alluvium was trapped uspstream and wadis filled with debris. During lowstands, wadis cut into sedimentary deposits; coupled with continuing uplift, fans were dissected, leaving remnant surfaces, and wadi-related terraces were generated by down cutting. Only landforms from the past three to four eustatic sea level cycles (i.e., approximately 300 to 400 kyr) are likely

  14. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12727.001 PMID:27011354

  15. Large scale patterns of antimicrofouling defenses in the hard coral Pocillopora verrucosa in an environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian coast of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Martin; Al Sofyani, Abdulmohsin; Saha, Mahasweta; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Sawall, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Large scale patterns of ecologically relevant traits may help identify drivers of their variability and conditions beneficial or adverse to the expression of these traits. Antimicrofouling defenses in scleractinian corals regulate the establishment of the associated biofilm as well as the risks of infection. The Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast features a pronounced thermal and nutritional gradient including regions and seasons with potentially stressful conditions to corals. Assessing the patterns of antimicrofouling defenses across the Red Sea may hint at the susceptibility of corals to global change. We investigated microfouling pressure as well as the relative strength of 2 alternative antimicrofouling defenses (chemical antisettlement activity, mucus release) along the pronounced environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast in 2 successive years. Microfouling pressure was exceptionally low along most of the coast but sharply increased at the southernmost sites. Mucus release correlated with temperature. Chemical defense tended to anti-correlate with mucus release. As a result, the combined action of mucus release and chemical antimicrofouling defense seemed to warrant sufficient defense against microbes along the entire coast. In the future, however, we expect enhanced energetic strain on corals when warming and/or eutrophication lead to higher bacterial fouling pressure and a shift towards putatively more costly defense by mucus release.

  16. Large scale patterns of antimicrofouling defenses in the hard coral Pocillopora verrucosa in an environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian coast of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Martin; Al Sofyani, Abdulmohsin; Saha, Mahasweta; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Sawall, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Large scale patterns of ecologically relevant traits may help identify drivers of their variability and conditions beneficial or adverse to the expression of these traits. Antimicrofouling defenses in scleractinian corals regulate the establishment of the associated biofilm as well as the risks of infection. The Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast features a pronounced thermal and nutritional gradient including regions and seasons with potentially stressful conditions to corals. Assessing the patterns of antimicrofouling defenses across the Red Sea may hint at the susceptibility of corals to global change. We investigated microfouling pressure as well as the relative strength of 2 alternative antimicrofouling defenses (chemical antisettlement activity, mucus release) along the pronounced environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast in 2 successive years. Microfouling pressure was exceptionally low along most of the coast but sharply increased at the southernmost sites. Mucus release correlated with temperature. Chemical defense tended to anti-correlate with mucus release. As a result, the combined action of mucus release and chemical antimicrofouling defense seemed to warrant sufficient defense against microbes along the entire coast. In the future, however, we expect enhanced energetic strain on corals when warming and/or eutrophication lead to higher bacterial fouling pressure and a shift towards putatively more costly defense by mucus release. PMID:25485603

  17. Large Scale Patterns of Antimicrofouling Defenses in the Hard Coral Pocillopora verrucosa in an Environmental Gradient along the Saudi Arabian Coast of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Martin; Al Sofyani, Abdulmohsin; Saha, Mahasweta; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Sawall, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Large scale patterns of ecologically relevant traits may help identify drivers of their variability and conditions beneficial or adverse to the expression of these traits. Antimicrofouling defenses in scleractinian corals regulate the establishment of the associated biofilm as well as the risks of infection. The Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast features a pronounced thermal and nutritional gradient including regions and seasons with potentially stressful conditions to corals. Assessing the patterns of antimicrofouling defenses across the Red Sea may hint at the susceptibility of corals to global change. We investigated microfouling pressure as well as the relative strength of 2 alternative antimicrofouling defenses (chemical antisettlement activity, mucus release) along the pronounced environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast in 2 successive years. Microfouling pressure was exceptionally low along most of the coast but sharply increased at the southernmost sites. Mucus release correlated with temperature. Chemical defense tended to anti-correlate with mucus release. As a result, the combined action of mucus release and chemical antimicrofouling defense seemed to warrant sufficient defense against microbes along the entire coast. In the future, however, we expect enhanced energetic strain on corals when warming and/or eutrophication lead to higher bacterial fouling pressure and a shift towards putatively more costly defense by mucus release. PMID:25485603

  18. Topographic and volcanic asymmetry around the Red Sea - Constraints on rift models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Ivins, Erik R.; Franklin, Brenda J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a model which explains the topographic and volcanic asymmetry around the Red Sea. The model involves asthenospheric upwelling beneath a lithosphere of laterally variable strength in which a weak zone (e.g., a suture or a region with quartz-bearing lower crust) may have controlled the location of rifting. In this model, Tertiary volcanism in Saudi Arabia marks the location of initial upwelling, and uplift is due to crustal thickening associated with magmatic underplating and crustal intrusion. The model predicts that the incipient crustal rift and the locus of mantle upwelling will tend to align as rifting continues and stable seafloor spreading develops, implying relative migration of the lithosphere and asthenosphere.

  19. Monogenean infestations and mortality in wild and cultured Red Sea fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperna, I.; Diamant, A.; Overstreet, R. M.

    1984-03-01

    Hyperinfection by the gill-infesting monogenean Allobivagina sp. (Microcotylea) caused mass mortalities in juveniles of Siganus luridus cultured in seawater earthen ponds and holding tanks in Eilat (Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea). Other species of Siganus and adults of S. luridus cultured in the same systems acquired a low intensity of infestation. Most hyperinfected fish were emaciated and anaemic with hematocrit values below 10 %. Skin and mouth infestations by the monogenean Benedenia monticelli (Capsaloidea) caused mass mortalities in grey mullets (Mugilidae). These mortalities occurred in large individuals in wild populations of Liza carinata from lagoonal habitats in the Gulf of Suez and in most species of grey mullets cultured in Eilat. The intensity of infestation correlated positively with severity of infestation, and the common sites of infestation corresponded with areas of severe pathological alterations. Spontaneous recovery followed the climax of an epizootic, both for infested S. luridus and infested grey mullets. Decline in infestation coincided with remission of the pathological signs.

  20. Style of extensional tectonism during rifting, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Geologic and geophysical studies from the Arabian continental margin in the southern Red Sea and LANDSAT analysis of the northern Somalia margin in the Gulf of Aden suggest that the early continental rifts were long narrow features that formed by extension on closely spaced normal faults above moderate- to shallow-dipping detachments with break-away zones defining one rift flank and root zones under the opposing rift flank. The rift flanks presently form the opposing continental margins across each ocean basin. The detachment on the Arabian margin dips gently to the west, with a breakaway zone now eroded above the deeply dissected terrain of the Arabian escarpment. A model is proposed in which upper crustal breakup occurs on large detachment faults that have a distinct polarity. -from Author

  1. Preliminary study on chromosomes of induced triploid in the red sea bream, Pagrosomus major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; You, Feng

    2000-06-01

    Triploidy red sea bream were induced by cold-shock techniques (0 3°C) in Qingdao in April 1994, May 1995 and May 1996. Normal diploidy and triploidy chromosome metaphases were produced by chromosome spreads from the gastrula. Counts of 104 chromosome metaphases of normal diploid showed each of them consisted of 2 acrocentric (st) and 46 telocentric (t) chromosomes. Based on the relative lengths and arm ratios, the 48 chromosomes were matched into 24 pairs. Counts of 107 chromosome metaphases of induced triploid showed that each metaphase consisted of 3 acrocentric (st) and 69 telocentric (t) chromosomes. The 72 chromosomes were easily matched into three sets of chromosomes, based on the relative lengths and arm ratios.

  2. A new species of Hetereleotris (Perciformes: Gobiidae) from Farasan Island (Red Sea).

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marcelo; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O

    2014-07-31

    A new species of the genus Hetereleotris is described from Farasan Island, Saudi Arabia, Red Sea, on the basis of a single specimen. Hetereleotris dorsovittata sp. nov is unique among the known sixteen species of Hetereleotris, except for H. diademata and H. psammophila, in the combination of the absence of head canals and lack of squamation. The low count of pectoral-fin rays (14) is only overlap with H. psammophila (14 or 15), whereas all other Hetereleotris species have a higher number of pectoral-fin rays. The new species differs from H. psammophila in having more soft rays in the dorsal and anal fins, by the arrangement of papillae in the preoperculo-mandibular row i and by coloration. The single specimen was collected in the large lagoon at the base of an isolated small coral patch at a depth of 1m. 

  3. Isotopic studies of epigenetic features in metalliferous sediment, Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, Robert A.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1988-01-01

    The unique depositional environment of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea produces a stratiform metalliferous deposit of greater areal extent than deposits formed by buoyant-plume systems typical of the midocean ridges because of much more efficient metal entrapment. Isotopic analyses of strontium, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen from the metalliferous sediments indicate that three major sources contribute dissolved components to the hydrothermal system: seawater, Miocene evaporites, and rift-zone basalt. An areally restricted magnetite-hematite-pyroxene assemblage formed at high temperatures, possibly in response to hydrothermal convection initiated by intrusion of basalt into the metalliferous sediment. A correlation between smectite Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios and oxygen isotope temperatures suggests that smectite is a potentially important chemical geothermometer, and confirms geochemical calculations indicating that Mg-rich smectite is more stable than Fe-rich smectite at elevated temperatures.

  4. ERTS surveys a 500 km squared locust breeding site in Saudi Arabia. [Red Sea coastal plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedgley, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    From September 1972 to January 1973, ERTS-1 precisely located a 500 sq km area on the Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia within which the Desert Locust (Schistocerca gregaria, Forsk.) bred successfully and produced many small swarms. Growth of vegetation shown by satellite imagery was confirmed from ground surveys and raingauge data. The experiment demonstrates the feasibility of detecting potential locust breeding sites by satellite, and shows that an operational satellite would be a powerful tool for routine survey of the 3 x 10 to the 7th power sq km invasion area of the Desert Locust in Africa and Asia, as well as of other locust species in the arid and semi-arid tropics.

  5. Red Sea Suberea mollis Sponge Extract Protects against CCl4-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Rats via an Antioxidant Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Aymn T.; El-Shitany, Nagla A.; Shaala, Lamiaa A.; Ali, Soad S.; Azhar, Esam I.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Youssef, Diaa T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that marine sponges and their active constituents exhibited several potential medical applications. This study aimed to evaluate the possible hepatoprotective role as well as the antioxidant effect of the Red Sea Suberea mollis sponge extract (SMSE) on carbon tetrachloride- (CCl4-) induced acute liver injury in rats. In vitro antioxidant activity of SMSE was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate (DPPH) assay. Rats were orally administered three different concentrations (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) of SMSE and silymarin (100 mg/kg) along with CCl4 (1 mL/kg, i.p., every 72 hr) for 14 days. Plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and total bilirubin were measured. Hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were also measured. Liver specimens were histopathologically examined. SMSE showed strong scavenging activity against free radicals in DPPH assay. SMSE significantly reduced liver enzyme activities. Moreover, SMSE significantly reduced hepatic MDA formation. In addition, SMSE restored GSH, NO, SOD, GPx, and CAT. The histopathological results confirmed these findings. The results of this study suggested a potent protective effect of the SMSE against CCl4-induced hepatic injury. This may be due to its antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. PMID:25214875

  6. Expelled subsalt fluids form a pockmark field in the eastern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldens, P.; Schmidt, M.; Mücke, I.; Augustin, N.; Al-Farawati, R.; Orif, M.; Faber, E.

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to constrain the source area of fluids responsible for the formation of a pockmark field in the eastern Red Sea. The newly discovered field extends over an area of at least 1,000 km2 at a water depth of ~400 m. The pockmarks have modal diameters of 140-150 m and are either randomly distributed on the seafloor or aligned within valleys approximately 25 m deep and several kilometres in length. Seismic data show that chimneys and/or regions of acoustic turbidity prevail beneath the pockmark field down to the top of Miocene evaporites, which are widespread in the Red Sea. Four gravity cores were taken from the pockmark field. For most of the cores, geochemical analyses show that porewater has a higher Cl concentration than the local seawater and increased Cl/Br ratios, which indicate an origin from evaporites. The adsorbed hydrocarbons are of thermal origin, with C1/(C2+C3) ratios between 4 and 23 and stable carbon isotope data for methane varying from δ13C of -34 to -36.4‰ with respect to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite. On the basis of the calculated maturity of the source rock of 1.2-1.4 Ro, local thermal gradients and sedimentation rates, its deeper depth boundary is approximated at 2,000 to 2,200 m. The results indicate that the adsorbed hydrocarbons sampled at the seafloor had to pass through an evaporite sequence of potentially several hundred metres to a few km in thickness. The most likely explanation for the increased permeability of the evaporite sequence is brittle deformation triggered by extensive local tectonic movements and supported by high fluid overpressure within the evaporite sequence.

  7. Exploring seascape genetics and kinship in the reef sponge Stylissa carteri in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Emily C; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Hussey, Nigel E; Ravasi, Timothy; Berumen, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    A main goal of population geneticists is to study patterns of gene flow to gain a better understanding of the population structure in a given organism. To date most efforts have been focused on studying gene flow at either broad scales to identify barriers to gene flow and isolation by distance or at fine spatial scales in order to gain inferences regarding reproduction and local dispersal. Few studies have measured connectivity at multiple spatial scales and have utilized novel tools to test the influence of both environment and geography on shaping gene flow in an organism. Here a seascape genetics approach was used to gain insight regarding geographic and ecological barriers to gene flow of a common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri in the Red Sea. Furthermore, a small-scale (<1 km) analysis was also conducted to infer reproductive potential in this organism. At the broad scale, we found that sponge connectivity is not structured by geography alone, but rather, genetic isolation in the southern Red Sea correlates strongly with environmental heterogeneity. At the scale of a 50-m transect, spatial autocorrelation analyses and estimates of full-siblings revealed that there is no deviation from random mating. However, at slightly larger scales (100–200 m) encompassing multiple transects at a given site, a greater proportion of full-siblings was found within sites versus among sites in a given location suggesting that mating and/or dispersal are constrained to some extent at this spatial scale. This study adds to the growing body of literature suggesting that environmental and ecological variables play a major role in the genetic structure of marine invertebrate populations. PMID:26257865

  8. Limits to physiological plasticity of the coral Pocillopora verrucosa from the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Maren; Roder, Cornelia M.; Büchel, Claudia; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2014-12-01

    Many coral species display changing distribution patterns across coral reef depths. While changes in the underwater light field and the ability to associate with different photosynthetic symbionts of the genus Symbiodinium explain some of the variation, the limits to physiological plasticity are unknown for most corals. In the central Red Sea, colonies of the branching coral Pocillopora verrucosa are most abundant in shallow high light environments and become less abundant in water depths below 10 m. To further understand what determines this narrow distribution, we conducted a cross-depths transplant experiment looking at physiological plasticity and acclimation in regard to depth. Colonies from 5, 10, and 20 m were collected, transplanted to all depths, and re-investigated after 30 and 210 d. All coral colonies transplanted downward from shallow to deep water displayed an increase in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigments, which resulted in higher photosynthetic efficiency. Shallow-water specimens transplanted to deeper water showed a significant decrease in total protein content after 30 and 210 d under low light conditions compared to specimens transplanted to shallow and medium depths. Stable isotope data suggest that heterotrophic input of carbon was not increased under low light, and consequently, decreasing protein levels were symptomatic of decreasing photosynthetic rates that could not be compensated for through higher light-harvesting efficiency. Our results provide insights into the physiological plasticity of P. verrucosa in changing light regimes and explain the observed depth distribution pattern. Despite its high abundance in shallow reef waters, P. verrucosa possesses limited heterotrophic acclimation potential, i.e., the ability to support its mainly photoautotrophic diet through heterotrophic feeding. We conclude that P. verrucosa might be a species vulnerable to sudden changes in underwater light fields resulting from processes such as

  9. Exploring seascape genetics and kinship in the reef sponge Stylissa carteri in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Giles, Emily C; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Hussey, Nigel E; Ravasi, Timothy; Berumen, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    A main goal of population geneticists is to study patterns of gene flow to gain a better understanding of the population structure in a given organism. To date most efforts have been focused on studying gene flow at either broad scales to identify barriers to gene flow and isolation by distance or at fine spatial scales in order to gain inferences regarding reproduction and local dispersal. Few studies have measured connectivity at multiple spatial scales and have utilized novel tools to test the influence of both environment and geography on shaping gene flow in an organism. Here a seascape genetics approach was used to gain insight regarding geographic and ecological barriers to gene flow of a common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri in the Red Sea. Furthermore, a small-scale (<1 km) analysis was also conducted to infer reproductive potential in this organism. At the broad scale, we found that sponge connectivity is not structured by geography alone, but rather, genetic isolation in the southern Red Sea correlates strongly with environmental heterogeneity. At the scale of a 50-m transect, spatial autocorrelation analyses and estimates of full-siblings revealed that there is no deviation from random mating. However, at slightly larger scales (100-200 m) encompassing multiple transects at a given site, a greater proportion of full-siblings was found within sites versus among sites in a given location suggesting that mating and/or dispersal are constrained to some extent at this spatial scale. This study adds to the growing body of literature suggesting that environmental and ecological variables play a major role in the genetic structure of marine invertebrate populations.

  10. Expelled subsalt fluids form a pockmark field in the eastern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldens, P.; Schmidt, M.; Mücke, I.; Augustin, N.; Al-Farawati, R.; Orif, M.; Faber, E.

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to constrain the source area of fluids responsible for the formation of a pockmark field in the eastern Red Sea. The newly discovered field extends over an area of at least 1,000 km2 at a water depth of ~400 m. The pockmarks have modal diameters of 140-150 m and are either randomly distributed on the seafloor or aligned within valleys approximately 25 m deep and several kilometres in length. Seismic data show that chimneys and/or regions of acoustic turbidity prevail beneath the pockmark field down to the top of Miocene evaporites, which are widespread in the Red Sea. Four gravity cores were taken from the pockmark field. For most of the cores, geochemical analyses show that porewater has a higher Cl concentration than the local seawater and increased Cl/Br ratios, which indicate an origin from evaporites. The adsorbed hydrocarbons are of thermal origin, with C1/(C2+C3) ratios between 4 and 23 and stable carbon isotope data for methane varying from δ13C of -34 to -36.4‰ with respect to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite. On the basis of the calculated maturity of the source rock of 1.2-1.4 Ro, local thermal gradients and sedimentation rates, its deeper depth boundary is approximated at 2,000 to 2,200 m. The results indicate that the adsorbed hydrocarbons sampled at the seafloor had to pass through an evaporite sequence of potentially several hundred metres to a few km in thickness. The most likely explanation for the increased permeability of the evaporite sequence is brittle deformation triggered by extensive local tectonic movements and supported by high fluid overpressure within the evaporite sequence.

  11. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  12. 76 FR 60379 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... measures in Amendment 3 published in the Federal Register on July 6, 2011 (76 FR 39369), with public... Amendment 3 was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2011 (76 FR 36511), with public comments... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...

  13. Programme for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, Jeddah II Conference, 12-18 January 1976. Provisional Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This publication presents the report of Jeddah II Conference of the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA) hosted by King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah in January 1976. The Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) initiated the conference to study the issues of scientific research on,…

  14. 75 FR 35435 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... crab emergency action implemented by NMFS (74 FR 9770, March 6, 2009), i.e., a target TAC of 3.56..., 2010 final rule implementing the FY 2010 red crab specifications (75 FR 27219), that rule set the... catch (TAC) and a fleet-wide days-at-sea (DAS) allocation. However, the implementing regulations for...

  15. Zonation of Microbial Communities by a Hydrothermal Mound in the Atlantis II Deep (the Red Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Li, Jiang Tao; He, Li Sheng; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhao Ming; Cao, Hui Luo; Batang, Zenon; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea geothermal rift zones, the dispersal of hydrothermal fluids of moderately-high temperatures typically forms subseafloor mounds. Major mineral components of the crust covering the mound are barite and metal sulfides. As a result of the continental rifting along the Red Sea, metalliferous sediments accumulate on the seafloor of the Atlantis II Deep. In the present study, a barite crust was identified in a sediment core from the Atlantis II Deep, indicating the formation of a hydrothermal mound at the sampling site. Here, we examined how such a dense barite crust could affect the local environment and the distribution of microbial inhabitants. Our results demonstrate distinctive features of mineral components and microbial communities in the sediment layers separated by the barite crust. Within the mound, archaea accounted for 65% of the community. In contrast, the sediments above the barite boundary were overwhelmed by bacteria. The composition of microbial communities under the mound was similar to that in the sediments of the nearby Discovery Deep and marine cold seeps. This work reveals the zonation of microbial communities after the formation of the hydrothermal mound in the subsurface sediments of the rift basin. PMID:26485717

  16. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwirichia, Romano; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Vinu, Manikandan; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Anthony Kamau, Allan; Kamanda Ngugi, David; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bajic, Vladimir; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available.

  17. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Mwirichia, Romano; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Vinu, Manikandan; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Anthony Kamau, Allan; Kamanda Ngugi, David; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bajic, Vladimir; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available. PMID:26758088

  18. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwirichia, Romano; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Vinu, Manikandan; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Anthony Kamau, Allan; Kamanda Ngugi, David; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bajic, Vladimir; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available.

  19. Zonation of Microbial Communities by a Hydrothermal Mound in the Atlantis II Deep (the Red Sea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Li, Jiang Tao; He, Li Sheng; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhao Ming; Cao, Hui Luo; Batang, Zenon; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea geothermal rift zones, the dispersal of hydrothermal fluids of moderately-high temperatures typically forms subseafloor mounds. Major mineral components of the crust covering the mound are barite and metal sulfides. As a result of the continental rifting along the Red Sea, metalliferous sediments accumulate on the seafloor of the Atlantis II Deep. In the present study, a barite crust was identified in a sediment core from the Atlantis II Deep, indicating the formation of a hydrothermal mound at the sampling site. Here, we examined how such a dense barite crust could affect the local environment and the distribution of microbial inhabitants. Our results demonstrate distinctive features of mineral components and microbial communities in the sediment layers separated by the barite crust. Within the mound, archaea accounted for 65% of the community. In contrast, the sediments above the barite boundary were overwhelmed by bacteria. The composition of microbial communities under the mound was similar to that in the sediments of the nearby Discovery Deep and marine cold seeps. This work reveals the zonation of microbial communities after the formation of the hydrothermal mound in the subsurface sediments of the rift basin. PMID:26485717

  20. Basin-scale estimates of pelagic and coral reef calcification in the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Zvi; Erez, Jonathan; Shemesh, Aldo; Yam, Ruth; Katz, Amitai; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    Basin-scale calcification rates are highly important in assessments of the global oceanic carbon cycle. Traditionally, such estimates were based on rates of sedimentation measured with sediment traps or in deep sea cores. Here we estimated CaCO3 precipitation rates in the surface water of the Red Sea from total alkalinity depletion along their axial flow using the water flux in the straits of Bab el Mandeb. The relative contribution of coral reefs and open sea plankton were calculated by fitting a Rayleigh distillation model to the increase in the strontium to calcium ratio. We estimate the net amount of CaCO3 precipitated in the Red Sea to be 7.3 ± 0.4·1010 kg·y−1 of which 80 ± 5% is by pelagic calcareous plankton and 20 ± 5% is by the flourishing coastal coral reefs. This estimate for pelagic calcification rate is up to 40% higher than published sedimentary CaCO3 accumulation rates for the region. The calcification rate of the Gulf of Aden was estimated by the Rayleigh model to be ∼1/2 of the Red Sea, and in the northwestern Indian Ocean, it was smaller than our detection limit. The results of this study suggest that variations of major ions on a basin scale may potentially help in assessing long-term effects of ocean acidification on carbonate deposition by marine organisms. PMID:25368148

  1. Basin-scale estimates of pelagic and coral reef calcification in the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Zvi; Erez, Jonathan; Shemesh, Aldo; Yam, Ruth; Katz, Amitai; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-11-18

    Basin-scale calcification rates are highly important in assessments of the global oceanic carbon cycle. Traditionally, such estimates were based on rates of sedimentation measured with sediment traps or in deep sea cores. Here we estimated CaCO3 precipitation rates in the surface water of the Red Sea from total alkalinity depletion along their axial flow using the water flux in the straits of Bab el Mandeb. The relative contribution of coral reefs and open sea plankton were calculated by fitting a Rayleigh distillation model to the increase in the strontium to calcium ratio. We estimate the net amount of CaCO3 precipitated in the Red Sea to be 7.3 ± 0.4·10(10) kg·y(-1) of which 80 ± 5% is by pelagic calcareous plankton and 20 ± 5% is by the flourishing coastal coral reefs. This estimate for pelagic calcification rate is up to 40% higher than published sedimentary CaCO3 accumulation rates for the region. The calcification rate of the Gulf of Aden was estimated by the Rayleigh model to be ∼1/2 of the Red Sea, and in the northwestern Indian Ocean, it was smaller than our detection limit. The results of this study suggest that variations of major ions on a basin scale may potentially help in assessing long-term effects of ocean acidification on carbonate deposition by marine organisms.

  2. Basin-scale estimates of pelagic and coral reef calcification in the Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Zvi; Erez, Jonathan; Shemesh, Aldo; Yam, Ruth; Katz, Amitai; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-11-18

    Basin-scale calcification rates are highly important in assessments of the global oceanic carbon cycle. Traditionally, such estimates were based on rates of sedimentation measured with sediment traps or in deep sea cores. Here we estimated CaCO3 precipitation rates in the surface water of the Red Sea from total alkalinity depletion along their axial flow using the water flux in the straits of Bab el Mandeb. The relative contribution of coral reefs and open sea plankton were calculated by fitting a Rayleigh distillation model to the increase in the strontium to calcium ratio. We estimate the net amount of CaCO3 precipitated in the Red Sea to be 7.3 ± 0.4·10(10) kg·y(-1) of which 80 ± 5% is by pelagic calcareous plankton and 20 ± 5% is by the flourishing coastal coral reefs. This estimate for pelagic calcification rate is up to 40% higher than published sedimentary CaCO3 accumulation rates for the region. The calcification rate of the Gulf of Aden was estimated by the Rayleigh model to be ∼1/2 of the Red Sea, and in the northwestern Indian Ocean, it was smaller than our detection limit. The results of this study suggest that variations of major ions on a basin scale may potentially help in assessing long-term effects of ocean acidification on carbonate deposition by marine organisms. PMID:25368148

  3. The impact of the hydrodynamic conditions in aquatic areas on the red king crab fouling communities of the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoretsky, A. G.; Dvoretsky, V. G.

    2014-03-01

    A comparative analysis of the species composition and indices of associated organisms for the red king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus has been carried out at two aquatic areas of the Barents Sea that differ based on the intensity of their water exchange with the open sea areas. In Dolgaya Bay, a typical fjord of the Barents Sea with low water circulation, such common fouling organisms as the barnacles Balanus crenatus dominated on the crabs, while, in Dalnezelenetskaya Bay, a semiopen coastal area, the most common mobile symbionts on the red king crab were the amphipods Ischyrocerus commensalis and I. anguipes. In Dolgaya Bay, the hydrodynamic conditions promote the settlement of larval foulers, whose colonization leads to a decrease of the crab infestation with the mobile symbionts and changes in their distribution along the host body if compared to the more open coastal areas of Eastern Murman.

  4. Receiver function constraints on crustal seismic velocities and partial melting in the Red Sea Rift, Central Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Almadani, S.; Gao, S. S.; Elsheikh, A. A.; Cherie, S.; Thurmond, A. K.; Liu, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Afar Depression is currently a unique locale for the investigation of crustal and mantle processes involved in the transition from continental to oceanic rifting. To provide high-quality images of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Red Sea Rift in Central Afar, we deployed an array of 18 broadband seismic stations in 2010 and 2011. Here we report receiver function stacking results to investigate crustal properties of this presumably incipient oceanic rift. Stacking of approximately 2200 radial receiver functions along the ~200 km long array reveals an average crustal thickness of 22 km, ranging from nearly 18 km within the Red Sea Rift axis to approximately 30 km within the overlap zone between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rift axes. The resulting anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios systematically decrease toward the northeast, ranging from 2.40 southwest of the Tendaho Graben to 1.85 within the overlap zone. We utilize theoretical Vp and melt fraction relationships to constrain a highly reduced average crustal P-velocity of 5.0 km/s within the rift axis, which is characterized by a melt percentage of ~11% confined primarily to the lower crust while the overlap zone contains relatively minor quantities of partial melt. An observed asymmetric distribution of high Vp/Vs values within the Tendaho Graben, as well as regionally maximum values on the southwestern rift flank, suggest crustal magmas either delivered from off-axis subcrustal magma chambers or as material present as residuum from the Red Sea Rift axis migration. Comparisons of these crustal properties beneath the Red Sea Rift and those found beneath mature mid-ocean ridges suggest the locus of extensional strain within the Central Afar is currently diffuse and in the process of localizing toward the Tendaho Graben accompanying the northeastward migration of the Afar Triple Junction.

  5. Anticancer Activity of Sea Cucumber Triterpene Glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Aminin, Dmitry L.; Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S.; Pisliagin, Evgeny A.; Silchenko, Alexandra S.; Avilov, Sergey A.; Kalinin, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Triterpene glycosides are characteristic secondary metabolites of sea cucumbers (Holothurioidea, Echinodermata). They have hemolytic, cytotoxic, antifungal, and other biological activities caused by membranotropic action. These natural products suppress the proliferation of various human tumor cell lines in vitro and, more importantly, intraperitoneal administration in rodents of solutions of some sea cucumber triterpene glycosides significantly reduces both tumor burden and metastasis. The anticancer molecular mechanisms include the induction of tumor cell apoptosis through the activation of intracellular caspase cell death pathways, arrest of the cell cycle at S or G2/M phases, influence on nuclear factors, NF-κB, and up-down regulation of certain cellular receptors and enzymes participating in cancerogenesis, such as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), Akt (protein kinase B), ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases), FAK (focal adhesion kinase), MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) and others. Administration of some glycosides leads to a reduction of cancer cell adhesion, suppression of cell migration and tube formation in those cells, suppression of angiogenesis, inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation and tumor invasion. As a result, marked growth inhibition of tumors occurs in vitro and in vivo. Some holothurian triterpene glycosides have the potential to be used as P-gp mediated MDR reversal agents in combined therapy with standard cytostatics. PMID:25756523

  6. Regal phylogeography: Range-wide survey of the marine angelfish Pygoplites diacanthus reveals evolutionary partitions between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Richard R; Eble, Jeffrey A; DiBattista, Joseph D; Rocha, Luiz A; Randall, John E; Berumen, Michael L; Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The regal angelfish (Pygoplites diacanthus; family Pomacanthidae) occurs on reefs from the Red Sea to the central Pacific, with an Indian Ocean/Rea Sea color morph distinct from a Pacific Ocean morph. To assess population differentiation and evaluate the possibility of cryptic evolutionary partitions in this monotypic genus, we surveyed mtDNA cytochrome b and two nuclear introns (S7 and RAG2) in 547 individuals from 15 locations. Phylogeographic analyses revealed four mtDNA lineages (d=0.006-0.015) corresponding to the Pacific Ocean, the Red Sea, and two admixed lineages in the Indian Ocean, a pattern consistent with known biogeographic barriers. Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean had both Indian and Pacific lineages. Both S7 and RAG2 showed strong population-level differentiation between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean (ΦST=0.066-0.512). The only consistent population sub-structure within these three regions was at the Society Islands (French Polynesia), where surrounding oceanographic conditions may reinforce isolation. Coalescence analyses indicate the Pacific (1.7Ma) as the oldest extant lineage followed by the Red Sea lineage (1.4Ma). Results from a median-joining network suggest radiations of two lineages from the Red Sea that currently occupy the Indian Ocean (0.7-0.9Ma). Persistence of a Red Sea lineage through Pleistocene glacial cycles suggests a long-term refuge in this region. The affiliation of Pacific and Red Sea populations, apparent in cytochrome b and S7 (but equivocal in RAG2) raises the hypothesis that the Indian Ocean was recolonized from the Red Sea, possibly more than once. Assessing the genetic architecture of this widespread monotypic genus reveals cryptic evolutionary diversity that merits subspecific recognition. We recommend P.d. diacanthus and P.d. flavescens for the Pacific and Indian Ocean/Red Sea forms. PMID:27068838

  7. Regal phylogeography: Range-wide survey of the marine angelfish Pygoplites diacanthus reveals evolutionary partitions between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Richard R; Eble, Jeffrey A; DiBattista, Joseph D; Rocha, Luiz A; Randall, John E; Berumen, Michael L; Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The regal angelfish (Pygoplites diacanthus; family Pomacanthidae) occurs on reefs from the Red Sea to the central Pacific, with an Indian Ocean/Rea Sea color morph distinct from a Pacific Ocean morph. To assess population differentiation and evaluate the possibility of cryptic evolutionary partitions in this monotypic genus, we surveyed mtDNA cytochrome b and two nuclear introns (S7 and RAG2) in 547 individuals from 15 locations. Phylogeographic analyses revealed four mtDNA lineages (d=0.006-0.015) corresponding to the Pacific Ocean, the Red Sea, and two admixed lineages in the Indian Ocean, a pattern consistent with known biogeographic barriers. Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean had both Indian and Pacific lineages. Both S7 and RAG2 showed strong population-level differentiation between the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean (ΦST=0.066-0.512). The only consistent population sub-structure within these three regions was at the Society Islands (French Polynesia), where surrounding oceanographic conditions may reinforce isolation. Coalescence analyses indicate the Pacific (1.7Ma) as the oldest extant lineage followed by the Red Sea lineage (1.4Ma). Results from a median-joining network suggest radiations of two lineages from the Red Sea that currently occupy the Indian Ocean (0.7-0.9Ma). Persistence of a Red Sea lineage through Pleistocene glacial cycles suggests a long-term refuge in this region. The affiliation of Pacific and Red Sea populations, apparent in cytochrome b and S7 (but equivocal in RAG2) raises the hypothesis that the Indian Ocean was recolonized from the Red Sea, possibly more than once. Assessing the genetic architecture of this widespread monotypic genus reveals cryptic evolutionary diversity that merits subspecific recognition. We recommend P.d. diacanthus and P.d. flavescens for the Pacific and Indian Ocean/Red Sea forms.

  8. Spatial distribution of fifty ornamental fish species on coral reefs in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Maroof A.; Abdallah, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The spatial distribution of 50 ornamental fish species from shallow water habitats on coral reefs were investigated using visual census techniques, between latitudes 11−29°N in the Red Sea, in Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen, and in the adjacent Gulf of Aden in Djibouti. One hundred eighteen transects (each 100×5 m) were examined in 29 sites (3−8 sites per country). A total of 522,523 fish individuals were counted during this survey, with mean abundance of 4428.2 ± 87.26 individual per 500 m² transect. In terms of relative abundance (RA), the most abundant species were Blue green damselfish, Chromis viridis (RA=54.4%),followed bySea goldie, Pseudanthias squamipinnis (RA= 34.7), Whitetail dascyllus, Dascyllus aruanus (RA= 2.6%), Marginate dascyllus, Dascyllus marginatus (RA= 2.0),Red Sea eightline flasher Paracheilinus octotaenia (RA=1.0),andKlunzinger’s wrasse, Thalassoma rueppellii (0.7%). The highest number of species (S) per 500 m² transect was found on reefs at the latitude 20° in Saudi Arabia (S=21.8), and the lowest number of species was found at the latitude 15° in Djibouti (S=11.11). The highest mean abundance (8565.8) was found on reefs at latitude 20° in Saudi Arabia and the lowest mean abundance (230) was found on reefs at latitude 22°, also in Saudi Arabia. Whereas, the highest Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index was found in reefs at the latitude 22° (H`=2.4) and the lowest was found in reefs at the latitude 20° (H`=0.6). This study revealed marked differences in the structure of ornamental fish assemblages with latitudinal distribution. The data support the presence of two major biogeographic groups of fishes in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden: the southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden group and the group in the northern and central Red Sea. Strong correlations were found between live coral cover and the number of fish species, abundance and Shannon-Wiener Diversity indices, and the strength of these correlations varied among the

  9. Spatial distribution of fifty ornamental fish species on coral reefs in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Maroof A; Abdallah, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of 50 ornamental fish species from shallow water habitats on coral reefs were investigated using visual census techniques, between latitudes 11-29°N in the Red Sea, in Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen, and in the adjacent Gulf of Aden in Djibouti. One hundred eighteen transects (each 100×5 m) were examined in 29 sites (3-8 sites per country). A total of 522,523 fish individuals were counted during this survey, with mean abundance of 4428.2 ± 87.26 individual per 500 m² transect. In terms of relative abundance (RA), the most abundant species were Blue green damselfish, Chromis viridis (RA=54.4%),followed bySea goldie, Pseudanthias squamipinnis (RA= 34.7), Whitetail dascyllus, Dascyllus aruanus (RA= 2.6%), Marginate dascyllus, Dascyllus marginatus (RA= 2.0),Red Sea eightline flasher Paracheilinus octotaenia (RA=1.0),andKlunzinger's wrasse, Thalassoma rueppellii (0.7%). The highest number of species (S) per 500 m² transect was found on reefs at the latitude 20° in Saudi Arabia (S=21.8), and the lowest number of species was found at the latitude 15° in Djibouti (S=11.11). The highest mean abundance (8565.8) was found on reefs at latitude 20° in Saudi Arabia and the lowest mean abundance (230) was found on reefs at latitude 22°, also in Saudi Arabia. Whereas, the highest Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index was found in reefs at the latitude 22° (H`=2.4) and the lowest was found in reefs at the latitude 20° (H`=0.6). This study revealed marked differences in the structure of ornamental fish assemblages with latitudinal distribution. The data support the presence of two major biogeographic groups of fishes in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden: the southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden group and the group in the northern and central Red Sea. Strong correlations were found between live coral cover and the number of fish species, abundance and Shannon-Wiener Diversity indices, and the strength of these correlations varied among the reefs. A

  10. Antioxidant activity of isolated ellagitannins from red raspberries and cloudberries.

    PubMed

    Kähkönen, Marja; Kylli, Petri; Ollilainen, Velimatti; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Heinonen, Marina

    2012-02-01

    Ellagitannins from red raspberries (Rubus idaeus) and cloudberries (Rubus chamaemorus) were isolated by using column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The berry phenolic isolates consisted of 80% (cloudberry) and of 60% (raspberry) of ellagitannins, with raspberries also containing anthocyanins. The main ellagitannins of both raspberries and cloudberries were identified by ESI-MS to consist of the dimeric sanguiin H-6 and the trimeric lambertianin C. Monomeric ellagitannins such as casuarictin in raspberries and pedunculagin in cloudberries were also found. The antioxidant activity of the berry phenolic isolate, ellagitannin isolate (mixture), ellagitannin main fraction (dimer and trimer), and ellagic acid was studied in bulk and emulsified methyl linoleate, in human low-density lipoprotein in vitro, and the radical scavenging activity was studied in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test. Cloudberry and red raspberry ellagitannins were highly effective as radical scavengers. Berry ellagitannins also showed significant antioxidant activity toward oxidation of both human LDL and methyl linoleate emulsions. However, only weak or moderate antioxidant activity was exhibited by ellagitannins toward oxidation of bulk oil. Thus, ellagitannins contribute significantly to the antioxidant capacity of cloudberries and red raspberries in lipoprotein and lipid emulsion environments, the latter being more relevant for food applications.

  11. Evolution of Chromospheric Activity: M67 Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Whitney, B. A.; Pasquini, L.

    1999-08-01

    Echelle spectra of the Ca II H- and K-line region (λ3950) of 15 red giant stars in the open cluster M67 reveal atmospheric dynamics and determine chromospheric radiative losses in order to assess chromospheric heating requirements and to follow the evolution of chromospheric activity. M67 red giants in conjunction with giants in younger clusters create a continuous group of red giants in the color-magnitude diagram, with 0.1<=(B-V)<=1.65 along the red giant branch. M67 contains the more evolved clump giants as well. Asymmetric line emission cores, indicative of outflowing material, are found in a majority of the M67 giants on the red giant branch and occur over the complete sample, from MV=-0.8 to MV=1.9, suggesting that outward mass motions are well established at these luminosities. Radiative losses, as measured by emission strengths from Ca II, decrease smoothly with decreasing stellar effective temperature in M67 and connect well to a combined sample of warmer cluster giants (NGC 2477, IC 4756, and the Hyades) with M<=3 Msolar studied by Beasley & Cram. Stellar effective temperature predominantly determines the level of chromospheric Ca II losses for giants with M<=3 Msolar. No evidence is found for a sharp decline in the flux of Ca II predicted by the Rutten & Pylyser magnetic model for chromospheric heating. However, emission in field giants (which tend to be younger) suggests that sharp declines in surface flux with decreasing effective temperature characteristic of pure magnetic activity occur for ion species more highly excited than Ca II. Although acoustic models for chromospheric heating apparently agree with the measured Ca II flux levels for the coolest giants, additional heating processes must be present in warmer giants and clump stars. Clump giants exhibit Ca II fluxes consistent with stars of similar colors on the red giant branch, suggesting a renaissance in chromospheric heating occurs after evolution beyond the red giant branch. Chromospheric

  12. Caprellidae (Crustacea: Peracarida: Amphipoda) from the Red Sea and Suez Canal, with the redescription of Metaprotella africana and Paradeutella multispinosa.

    PubMed

    Zeina, Amr F; Guerra-García, José M

    2016-01-01

    The Caprellidae from the Red Sea are reviewed based on the literature data and new collections from the Hurghada coasts. So far, only six valid species has been reported from the Red Sea and Suez Canal: Caprella equilibra Say, 1818, Hemiaegina minuta Mayer, 1890, Metaprotella africana Mayer, 1903, Paracaprella pusilla Mayer, 1890 and Paradeutella multispinosa Schellenberg, 1928 and Pseudocaprellina pambanensis Sundara Raj, 1927. The type material of M. africana (deposited in the Muséum nacional d'Histoire naturelle, Paris) and Paradeutella multispinosa (deposited in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin) are redescribed and illustrated in detail. P. pambanensis and H. minuta were the most abundant species in the collections along the northern coast. Most of the sampling effort has been focused on algae from shallow waters; additional substrates such as sediments, hydroids and coral rubble, especially from areas deeper than 15 meters should be explored. The number of caprellid species in the Red Sea is low compared to adjacent waters, as the Mediterranean Sea. However, further research and more extensive caprellid collections should be conducted along the coasts of Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Sudan and Eritrea, which are still unexplored. PMID:27394584

  13. Geophysical investigation of an upper tertiary subbasin in the southern Egyptian Red Sea shelf and its bearing on oil exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattab, M. M.

    Several narrow, elongate and Red Sea-trending gravity lows, suggested recently as due to depositional troughs, are shown on the Egyptian Red Sea shelf Bouguer map. Few drilling data and poor reflectivity below the Pliocene-Miocene uncorformity hinder subsurface evaluation. A 1 mgal anomaly (25 km north of Ras Benas Peninsula) was analysed along a crossing sessmic reflection line. The interpretation was aided by: lithology at an off-shore well, seismic data above the unconformity and aeromagnetic data in the southerly-located Foul Bay. The best fit of computed to observed gravity was for a three-layers model (water, post-evaporites and evaporites) where maximum sediment thickness was 3.8 km of which layers 2 and 3 constittted 1.6 and 2.2 km. The subbasin configuration was found to be controlled by Quaternary (similar to that mapped at Egyptian and Saudi Arabian coastal provinces) and pre-middle Miocence (affecting only middle Miocene evaprites beneath a reflection line at the western margin of the main trough near latitude 24°N) faulting which supports the conceot of Red Sea arching and subsequent faulting at marginal shelves. This subbasin is found associated, in part, with a sea--floor trough and with part of Foul Bay magnetic lineations (interpreted recently as caused by oceanic crust) which, in turn, are shown to constitute continuation of mapped onshore tholeiitic dikes.

  14. Hydrographic changes during 20 years in the brine-filled basins of the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Blanc, Gérard; Chatin, Fabienne; Geiller, Magali; Pierret, Marie-Claire

    1999-10-01

    Many of the deep basins filled by hot brines in the Red Sea have not been investigated since their discovery in the early 1970s. Twenty years later, in September 1992, six of these deeps were revisited. The temperature and salinity of the Suakin, Port Sudan, Chain B, and Nereus deeps ranged from 23.25 to 44.60°C and from 144 to 270‰. These values were approximately the same in 1972, indicating that the budget of heat and salt was quite balanced. We measured strong gradients of properties in the transition zone between brines and overlying seawater. The contribution of salinity to the density gradient was more than one order of magnitude higher than the opposite contribution of temperature across the seawater-brine interface. Therefore the interface was extemely stable, and the transfer of properties across it was considered to be controlled mostly by molecular diffusion. We calculate that the diffusional transport of salt from the brines to seawater cannot affect significantly the salinity of the brines over a 20 year period, which agrees with the observations. The brine pools can persist for centuries with no salt input. Therefore, the persisence of brines does not correspond to a steady balance between diffusional loss and continuous input of hydrothermal solutions. Deeps that experience only episodical hydrothermal brine supplies may persist for a long time with salt inherited from past inputs. The theoretical loss of heat by diffusion from the brine to seawater was higher than the observed decrease in temperature of the brine pool during the 20 year period of observation. We calculated that the heat flux out of the pools into the overlying seawater was compensated by a heat flux into the pools of about 250-600 mW/m 2. This range of values corresponds to bottom heat flow values that have been reported earlier for the axial zone of the Red Sea. In contrast to the other brine pools, the temperature and salinity of the Valdivia Deep brine increased by 4.1°C and

  15. Stratigraphy and evolution of emerged Pleistocene reefs at the Red Sea coast of Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Basher; Bussert, Robert; Dominik, Wilhelm

    2016-02-01

    Emerged Pleistocene coral reefs constitute a prominent landform along the Red Sea coast of Sudan. They are well exposed with a thickness of up to 12 m and extend over a width of about 3 km parallel to the coastline. Four major reef units that represent different reef zones are distinguished. Unit 1 is located directly at the coastline and is assigned to the rock-reef rim, while unit 2 represents the reef-front zone. Unit 3 is attributed to the reef-flat zone and unit 4 to the back-reef zone. The stratigraphic position and age of the four units respectively the facies zones are based on field relationships and δ18O analysis. Results of δ18O analysis of coral, gastropod and bivalve samples were correlated to previous age dating of correlative reefs in Sudan and other parts of the Red Sea region. Estimation of reef ages was mainly based on δ18O values of the reef-front zone (unit 2) and the observed sedimentary succession of the reefs. δ18O values of two Porites coral samples from the reef-front zone strongly suggest equivalent ages of 120 and 122 ka that correspond to marine isotope stage MIS 5.5. Based on δ18O values and the field relationship to the reef-front zone, ages of reef-flat zone (unit 3) and back-reef zone (unit 4) could be assigned to MIS 9 and MIS 7 respectively. MIS 5.1 is suggested for the reef-rock rim (unit 1). The relationship of the reef zones to individual MIS might be explained by the predominance of a specific zone during a certain stage, while other facies were less well developed and/or later eroded by wave action. The reef unit most distal from the recent coastline formed during interglacial stage MIS 7, while former studies assign this unit to interglacial stage MIS 9. Unique flourishing, high diversity and excellent preservation of corals in the back-reef unit of MIS 7 reflect growth in troughs landward of the oldest reef-flat formed during previous interglacial stage MIS 9.

  16. The use of biotic and abiotic components of Red Sea coastal areas as indicators of ecosystem health.

    PubMed

    Omar, Wael A; Saleh, Yousef S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S

    2016-03-01

    A biomonitoring study was conducted using some biotic (Pomadasys hasta and Lutjanus russellii fish) and abiotic (water and sediment) components of the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, Yemen Republic along two polluted sites (Al-Dawar beach and Urj village) in comparison to a reference site (Al-Nukhailah beach). The studied fish biomarkers included hepatosomatic index (HSI), condition factor (K), scaled mass index (SMI), catalase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), malondialdehyde (MDA), total protein and albumin. In addition, metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) concentrations in water and sediment were measured and sediment pollution assessment was carried out using contamination factor (CF), geoaccumulation index (Igeo), pollution load index (PLI) and enrichment factor (EF). The studied metals concentration in water and sediment samples showed significant increase among the polluted sites in comparison to the reference site. Sediment pollution assessment generally confirmed that Urj village was the most contaminated site followed by Al-Dawar beach. Catalase, GST and MDA proved to be the most responsive biomarkers with increased values of GST and MDA at sites influenced by agricultural, urban and industrial activities while catalase, HSI, K, SMI, total protein and albumin showed the opposite trend. This study recommends monitoring of sediment Igeo and EF values as well as SMI, catalase, GST and MDA as sensitive indicators of different anthropogenic activities and their effects on aquatic ecosystems under complex and different gradients of metal pollution. In addition, P. hasta proved to be more sensitive towards the detected pollution condition.

  17. Phosphorus Availability, Phytoplankton Community Dynamics, and Taxon-Specific Phosphorus Status in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.; Labiosa, R. G.; Calhoun, M.; Street, J. H.; Post, A. F.; Paytan, A.

    2006-12-01

    The relationships among phytoplankton taxon-specific phosphorus-status, phytoplankton community composition, and nutrient levels were assessed over three seasons in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. During summer and fall, stratified surface waters were depleted of nutrients and picophytoplankton populations comprised the majority of cells (80% and 88% respectively). In winter, surface nutrient concentrations were higher and larger phytoplankton were more abundant (63%). Cell specific alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) derived from enzyme labeled fluorescence was consistently low (less than 5%) in the picophytoplankton throughout the year, whereas larger cells expressed elevated APA during the summer and fall but less in the winter. A nutrient addition bioassay during the fall showed that, relative to control, APA was reduced by half in larger cells following addition of orthophosphate, whereas the APA of picophytoplankton remained low (less than 1%) across all treatments and the control. These results indicate that the most abundant phytoplankton are not limited by orthophosphate and only some subpopulations (particularly of larger cells) exhibit orthophosphate-limitation throughout the year. Our results indicate that orthophosphate availability influences phytoplankton ecology, correlating with shifts in phytoplankton community structure and the nutrient status of individual cells. The role of dissolved organic phosphorus as an important phosphorus source for marine phytoplankton in oligotrophic settings and the need for evaluating nutrient limitation at the taxa and/or single cell level (rather than inferring it from nutrient concentrations and ratios or bulk enzyme activity measurements) are highlighted.

  18. Survival of high latitude fringing corals in extreme temperatures: Red Sea oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, M. Z.; Moustafa, M. S.; Moustafa, Z. D.; Moustafa, S. E.

    2014-04-01

    This multi-year study set out to establish a comprehensive knowledgebase for a fringing coral reef in the Gulf of Suez, while also investigating the link between coral reef survivability and the extreme environmental conditions present in the region. The Gulf of Suez is a narrow branch of the northern Red Sea for which all forms of environmental and scientific data are severely lacking. Monitoring oceanographic and meteorological data provides evidence of both seasonal variability and interannual variability in this region, and may reveal correlations between reef health and prevailing climate conditions. Specifically, this research sought to document the environmental conditions under which Zaki's Reef, a small fringing coral reef (29.5°N and 32.4°E) that lies at the northernmost limit of tropical reefs worldwide, is able to survive, in order to determine how extreme the conditions are. Results of observed seawater temperature revealed that coral species at Zaki's Reef regularly experience 2-4 °C and 10-15 °C daily and seasonal temperature variations, respectively. Seawater temperature monthly means reached a minimum of 14 °C in February and a maximum of 33 °C in August. Monthly mean sea surface temperature climatology obtained from satellite measurements was comparable to observed seawater temperatures, while annual air and seawater temperature means were identical at 22 °C. Observed seawater temperatures exceeded established coral bleaching thresholds for extended periods of time, suggesting that coral species at this location may have developed a mechanism to cope with such extreme temperatures. Further scrutiny of these species and the mechanisms by which they are able to thrive is recommended.

  19. Chemical composition of the giant red sea cucumber, Parastichopus californicus, commercially harvested in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Peter J; Oliveira, Alexandra CM; Demir, Necla; Smiley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Giant red sea cucumbers, Parastichopus californicus, are commercially harvested in the U.S. Pacific Northwest; however, the nutritional and chemical properties of its edible muscle bands and body wall have not been fully elucidated. In particular are the fatty acid profiles of P. californicus tissues, which have not been documented. Sea cucumbers were delivered live and muscle bands and body wall freeze dried, vacuum packed, and stored at –30°C until analyzed. Proximate composition of freeze-dried tissues varied greatly with muscle bands being composed of 68% protein, 12% ash, 9% carbohydrate, and 5% lipids, while the body wall was composed of 47% protein, 26% ash, 15% carbohydrate, and 8% lipids. The hydroxyproline, proline, and glycine contents of the body wall were much higher than those in muscle bands, consistent with the larger amount of connective tissue. Calcium, magnesium, sodium, and iron contents were higher in the body wall than those in muscle bands, whereas the opposite was observed for zinc content. Total long-chain n-3 fatty acid contents were 19% and 32% of total fatty acids in body wall and muscle bands, respectively. Muscle bands had higher content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) than body wall at 22.6% and 12.3%, respectively. High content of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was recorded in both body wall (7.1%) and muscle bands (9.9%). Overall, the fatty acid profiles of body wall and muscle bands of P. californicus resemble those described for other species; however, the distribution and occurrence of certain fatty acids is unique to P. californicus, being representative of the fatty acid composition of temperate-polar marine organisms. The chemical characterization of freeze-dried edible tissues from P. californicus demonstrated that these products have valuable nutritional properties. The body wall, a food product of lower market value than muscle bands, could be better utilized for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID

  20. Chemical and isotopic ( 87Sr/ 86Sr, δ 18O, δD) constraints to the formation processes of Red-Sea brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, M. C.; Clauer, N.; Bosch, D.; Blanc, G.; France-Lanord, C.

    2001-04-01

    About twenty deeps filled with hot brines and/or metalliferous sediments, are located along the Red-Sea axis. These brines present a well-suited framework to study the hydrothermal activity in such a young ocean. The present study outlines the results of a geochemical approach combining major-, trace-element and isotopic (oxygen, hydrogen, strontium) analyses of brines in six of the deeps, to evaluate different processes of brine formation and to compare the evolution of each deep. Important heterogeneities in temperature, salinity, hydrographic structure and chemistry are recorded, each brine having its own characteristics. The intensity of hydrothermal circulation varies among the deeps and ranges from being strong (Atlantis II and Nereus) to weak (Port-Soudan) and even to negligible (Valdivia and Suakin) and it varies along the entire Red-Sea axis. These observations do not favour a unique formational model for all of the brines. For example, the brines of the Suakin deep appear to have been formed by an old sea water which dissolved evaporite beds, without significant fluid circulation and hydrothermal input, while others such as Atlantis II or Nereus Deeps appear to be dominated by hydrothermal influences. A striking feature is the absence of a relationship between the position of the deeps along the axis and their evolutionary maturity.

  1. Mass evolution of Mediterranean, Black, Red, and Caspian Seas from GRACE and altimetry: accuracy assessment and solution calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, B. D.; Luthcke, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present new measurements of mass evolution for the Mediterranean, Black, Red, and Caspian Seas as determined by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) GRACE time-variable global gravity mascon solutions. These new solutions are compared to sea surface altimetry measurements of sea level anomalies with steric corrections applied. To assess their accuracy, the GRACE- and altimetry-derived solutions are applied to the set of forward models used by GSFC for processing the GRACE Level-1B datasets, with the resulting inter-satellite range-acceleration residuals providing a useful metric for analyzing solution quality. We also present a differential correction strategy to calibrate the time series of mass change for each of the seas by establishing the strong linear relationship between differences in the forward modeled mass and the corresponding range-acceleration residuals between the two solutions. These calibrated time series of mass change are directly determined from the range-acceleration residuals, effectively providing regionally-tuned GRACE solutions without the need to form and invert normal equations. Finally, the calibrated GRACE time series are discussed and combined with the steric-corrected sea level anomalies to provide new measurements of the unmodeled steric variability for each of the seas over the span of the GRACE observation record. We apply ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to adaptively sort the mass and steric components of sea level anomalies into seasonal, non-seasonal, and long-term temporal scales.

  2. Heavy metals in fish from the Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean: effect of origin, fish species and size and correlation among the metals.

    PubMed

    Obaidat, Mohammad M; Massadeh, Adnan M; Al-Athamneh, Ahmad M; Jaradat, Qasem M

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the levels of As, Cu, Pb, and Cd in fish from Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Metal levels were compared with international standards. The levels among fish types and origin, the relationship among metals, and the correlation between the levels and fish size were statistically tested. Fish type and origin significantly affected the levels. None of the fish contained As, Cu, and Pb above the FAO and EU codes. However, Cd exceeded the Jordanian, FAO, and EC codes from the three origins. As and Cd positively correlated with each other in Arabian Sea fish. As and Pb correlated negatively, but Cu and Cd did not correlate with fish size. This study indicates that Cd is common in fish from the three origins regardless the fish size. This warrants continuous monitoring for heavy metals, especially Cd, in internationally traded fish.

  3. Heavy metals in fish from the Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean: effect of origin, fish species and size and correlation among the metals.

    PubMed

    Obaidat, Mohammad M; Massadeh, Adnan M; Al-Athamneh, Ahmad M; Jaradat, Qasem M

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the levels of As, Cu, Pb, and Cd in fish from Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Metal levels were compared with international standards. The levels among fish types and origin, the relationship among metals, and the correlation between the levels and fish size were statistically tested. Fish type and origin significantly affected the levels. None of the fish contained As, Cu, and Pb above the FAO and EU codes. However, Cd exceeded the Jordanian, FAO, and EC codes from the three origins. As and Cd positively correlated with each other in Arabian Sea fish. As and Pb correlated negatively, but Cu and Cd did not correlate with fish size. This study indicates that Cd is common in fish from the three origins regardless the fish size. This warrants continuous monitoring for heavy metals, especially Cd, in internationally traded fish. PMID:25822330

  4. Immune responses and stress resistance in red sea bream, Pagrus major, after oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum and vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro

    2016-07-01

    The present study evaluated the interactive benefits of dietary administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) and vitamin C (VC) on the growth, oxidative status and immune response of red sea bream (Pagrus major). A diet without LP and VC supplements was employed as a control diet. Four other test diets with 0 or 1 g LP kg(-1) combined with 0.5 or 1 g VC kg(-1) (2 × 2 factorial design) were fed to red sea bream (2 ± 0.01 g) for 56 days. A significant interaction was found between LP and VC on final body weight (FNW), weight gain (WG), hematocrit (HCT), serum bactericidal (BA) and lysozyme (LZY) activities, mucus LZY and peroxidase (PA) activities, nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), catalase, mucus secretion and tolerance against low salinity stress test (LT50) (P < 0.05). In addition, FNW, WG, specific growth rate, feed and protein efficiency ratio, serum (BA, LZY, PA and NBT), mucus (LZY and PA), superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and mucus secretion were significantly affected by either LP or VC (P < 0.05). Furthermore, only LP was a significant factor on survival, plasma total cholesterol, mucus BA and alternative complement pathway (P < 0.05). However, VC supplementation affected on HCT and LT50. Interestingly, fish fed with both LP at 1 g kg(-1) diet with VC at 0.5 or 1 g kg(-1) diet showed higher growth, humoral and mucosal immune responses, anti-oxidative status, mucus secretion and LT50 as well as decreased plasma, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels than the fish fed control diet (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that dietary LP and VC had a significant interaction for red sea bream with the capability of improving growth performance and enhancing stress resistance by immunomodulation. PMID:27095173

  5. Comparative genomics reveals adaptations of a halotolerant thaumarchaeon in the interfaces of brine pools in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Kamanda Ngugi, David; Blom, Jochen; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Zhang, Guishan; Hikmawan, Tyas; Guan, Yue; Antunes, Andre; Siam, Rania; El Dorry, Hamza; Bajic, Vladimir; Stingl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The bottom of the Red Sea harbors over 25 deep hypersaline anoxic basins that are geochemically distinct and characterized by vertical gradients of extreme physicochemical conditions. Because of strong changes in density, particulate and microbial debris get entrapped in the brine-seawater interface (BSI), resulting in increased dissolved organic carbon, reduced dissolved oxygen toward the brines and enhanced microbial activities in the BSI. These features coupled with the deep-sea prevalence of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global ocean make the BSI a suitable environment for studying the osmotic adaptations and ecology of these important players in the marine nitrogen cycle. Using phylogenomic-based approaches, we show that the local archaeal community of five different BSI habitats (with up to 18.2% salinity) is composed mostly of a single, highly abundant Nitrosopumilus-like phylotype that is phylogenetically distinct from the bathypelagic thaumarchaea; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were absent. The composite genome of this novel Nitrosopumilus-like subpopulation (RSA3) co-assembled from multiple single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) from one such BSI habitat further revealed that it shares ∼54% of its predicted genomic inventory with sequenced Nitrosopumilus species. RSA3 also carries several, albeit variable gene sets that further illuminate the phylogenetic diversity and metabolic plasticity of this genus. Specifically, it encodes for a putative proline-glutamate ‘switch' with a potential role in osmotolerance and indirect impact on carbon and energy flows. Metagenomic fragment recruitment analyses against the composite RSA3 genome, Nitrosopumilus maritimus, and SAGs of mesopelagic thaumarchaea also reiterate the divergence of the BSI genotypes from other AOA. PMID:25105904

  6. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Nikitin, Mikhail A; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousova, Anna; Reimer, James D; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts. PMID:26840497

  7. Gene expression profiles during short-term heat stress in the red sea coral Stylophora pistillata.

    PubMed

    Maor-Landaw, Keren; Karako-Lampert, Sarit; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Goffredo, Stefano; Falini, Giuseppe; Dubinsky, Zvy; Levy, Oren

    2014-10-01

    During the past several decades, corals worldwide have been affected by severe bleaching events leading to wide-spread coral mortality triggered by global warming. The symbiotic Red Sea coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat is considered an opportunistic 'r' strategist. It can thrive in relatively unstable environments and is considered a stress-tolerant species. Here, we used a S. pistillata custom microarray to examine gene expression patterns and cellular pathways during short-term (13-day) heat stress. The results allowed us to identify a two-step reaction to heat stress, which intensified significantly as the temperature was raised to a 32 °C threshold, beyond which, coping strategies failed at 34 °C. We identified potential 'early warning genes' and 'severe heat-related genes'. Our findings suggest that during short-term heat stress, S. pistillata may divert cellular energy into mechanisms such as the ER-unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER-associated degradation (ERAD) at the expense of growth and biomineralization processes in an effort to survive and subsequently recover from the stress. We suggest a mechanistic theory for the heat stress responses that may explain the success of some species which can thrive under a wider range of temperatures relative to others.

  8. Distribution and shell selection by two hermit crabs in different habitats on Egyptian Red Sea Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kareem Ismail, Tarek Gad

    2010-05-01

    The present work aims to assess the spatial distribution, analyze shell utilization, shell fitness and determine the effect of coexistence of two hermit crabs Calcinus latens and Clibanarius signatus on used shell resources in various habitats on the Red Sea Coast. Also, to determine the choice of shells and investigate the shell species preference of C. latens and C. signatus in the laboratory. The hermit crabs C. latens and C. signatus were found to occupy shells of 39 gastropod species. The most commonly occupied gastropod shells are those belonging to genera Strombus, Nerita, Cerithium and Planaxis. The results showed that crab individuals utilized mainly the shell with elongate aperture. Laboratory experiments showed that two crab species preferred shells of Strombus followed by Cerithium and Nerita when offered shells of nearly similar size (optimal). Crab individuals showed a significant preference for optimal sized shells when given suboptimal shells as an alternative choice. Also, the hermit crabs avoid damaged shells when given a choice of optimal sized damaged shell and optimal sized intact one. In addition, two hermit crab species chose shells of smaller than optimal size when given a choice of damaged optimal sized shells and smaller intact ones. On the other hand, field observations showed that most crab individuals lived in adequate sized shells. The present data conclude that shell selection by hermit crabs C. latens and C. signatus depends mostly on shell internal volume, shell quality and shell aperture size than other factors, because they provide a maximum protection for hermit crabs.

  9. Endoscopic exploration of Red Sea coral reefs reveals dense populations of cavity-dwelling sponges.

    PubMed

    Richter, C; Wunsch, M; Rasheed, M; Kötter, I; Badran, M I

    2001-10-18

    Framework cavities are the largest but least explored coral reef habitat. Previous dive studies of caverns, spaces below plate corals, rubble and artificial cavities suggest that cavity-dwelling (coelobite) filter-feeders are important in the trophodynamics of reefs. Quantitative community data are lacking, however, as the bulk of the narrow crevices interlacing the reef framework are inaccessible to conventional analysis methods. Here we have developed endoscopic techniques to explore Red Sea framework crevices up to 4 m into the carbonate rock, revealing a large internal surface (2.5-7.4 m2 per projected m2 reef) dominated by encrusting filter-feeders. Sponges alone provided up to 60% of coelobite cover, outweighing epi-reefal filter-feeder biomass by two orders of magnitude. Coelobite community filtration removed more than 60% of the phytoplankton in the course of its less than 5-minute passage through the crevices, corresponding to an uptake of roughly 0.9 g carbon m-2 d-1. Mineralization of the largely allochthonous organic material is a principal source of nutrients supporting coral and algal growth. The supply of new material by coelobites may provide a key to understanding the 'coral reef paradox'-a rich ecosystem thriving in nutrient-poor water.

  10. Persistently betanodavirus-infected barramundi (Lates calcarifer) exhibit resistances to red sea bream iridovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Chi; Kai, Yu-Hsuan; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2013-12-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) and red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV) are two important pathogens that have caused acute, highly contagious, and widespread diseases among wild and cultured fish, especially at larval and juvenile stages. We discovered that the pathogenicity of NNV to the 80 days post-hatch (dph) barramundi is lower than that to the 14 dph barramundi. Following NNV challenge, no mortality occurred in the 80 dph barramundi, but NNV RNA2 and barramundi Mx (BMx) gene expression was detected in the brain and liver. The 80 dph barramundi pre-challenged with NNV became more resistant to the following RSIV challenge (mortality: 62%) compared to the NNV-free barramundi challenged with RSIV (mortality: 100%). A similar phenomenon was revealed in the cell culture system that RSIV proliferated less progeny in the barramundi brain (BB) cell line which exhibit persistent NNV infection than in NNV-free cured BB (cBB) cell line. The potential factors involved in the resistance of the persistently NNV-infected barramundi and BB cells to the secondary RSIV infection were examined in this study. We prove that barramundi anti-NNV polyclonal antibodies do not cross-neutralize RSIV, and NNV infection does not interfere with RSIV replication. However, the interferon (IFN) response and BMx gene expression in cBB cells suppresses the RSIV proliferation. Our study suggests that the NNV-induced IFN response and BMx expression are responsible for the resistance of barramundi to RSIV infection. PMID:23831937

  11. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Nikitin, Mikhail A; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousova, Anna; Reimer, James D; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  12. Hydrothermal fluid migration and brine pool formation in the Red Sea: the Atlantis II Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical heat and fluid flow simulations of the Atlantis II Deep in the Red Sea were conducted to investigate the development, migration, and discharge of hydrothermal fluids into a submarine depression and determine the conditions necessary to form a brine pool. High-salinity fluids are predicted to form by leaching Miocene evaporates, migrate and convect within young oceanic crust, and discharge onto the seafloor. Predicted fluid discharge temperatures ( T max, 301 °C), discharge fluid velocities ( V max, 0.09 m/s), and salinities ( S max, 21 wt%) increase over time and reach values comparable to modern seafloor observations. Established convection patterns and discharge behavior are robust and are not greatly affected by geometry of rock property changes. Modeling results were used to calculate the minimum conditions for hydrothermal fluids from a developing hydrothermal system to mix with seawater, reverse buoyancy, and begin to form a brine pool in a submarine depression. Under conditions encountered on the seafloor ( T, 25-300 °C; S, 5-25 wt%), fluid mixtures predicted to pond on the seafloor range from late in the mixing process (99 %) at low temperatures ( T, 26 °C) to much earlier (36 % mixing) at higher temperatures ( T, 94 °C). A model of brine pool evolution is proposed that describes the processes and conditions necessary to initiate brine pool formation and compares formation conditions with accumulated ore material in the Atlantis II Deep and other locations.

  13. Extracellular DNA amplicon sequencing reveals high levels of benthic eukaryotic diversity in the central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Pearman, John K; Irigoien, Xabier; Carvalho, Susana

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to characterize the benthic eukaryotic biodiversity patterns at a coarse taxonomic level in three areas of the central Red Sea (a lagoon, an offshore area in Thuwal and a shallow coastal area near Jeddah) based on extracellular DNA. High-throughput amplicon sequencing targeting the V9 region of the 18S rRNA gene was undertaken for 32 sediment samples. High levels of alpha-diversity were detected with 16,089 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being identified. The majority of the OTUs were assigned to Metazoa (29.2%), Alveolata (22.4%) and Stramenopiles (17.8%). Stramenopiles (Diatomea) and Alveolata (Ciliophora) were frequent in a lagoon and in shallower coastal stations, whereas metazoans (Arthropoda: Maxillopoda) were dominant in deeper offshore stations. Only 24.6% of total OTUs were shared among all areas. Beta-diversity was generally lower between the lagoon and Jeddah (nearshore) than between either of those and the offshore area, suggesting a nearshore-offshore biodiversity gradient. The current approach allowed for a broad-range of benthic eukaryotic biodiversity to be analysed with significantly less labour than would be required by other traditional taxonomic approaches. Our findings suggest that next generation sequencing techniques have the potential to provide a fast and standardised screening of benthic biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales.

  14. Euphyllia paradivisa, a successful mesophotic coral in the northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, Gal; Eyal-Shaham, Lee; Cohen, Itay; Tamir, Raz; Ben-Zvi, Or; Sinniger, Frederic; Loya, Yossi

    2016-03-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) host a thriving community of biota that has remained virtually unexplored. Here we report for the first time on a large population of the endangered coral species Euphyllia paradivisa from the MCEs of the Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba (GOE/A), Red Sea. The mesophotic zone in some parts of the study site harbors a specialized coral community predominantly comprising E. paradivisa (73 % of the total coral cover), distributed from 36 to 72 m depth. Here we sought to elucidate the strict distribution but high abundance of E. paradivisa in the MCEs at the GOE/A. We present 4 yr of observations and experiments that provide insight into the physiological plasticity of E. paradivisa: its low mortality rates at high light intensities, high competitive abilities, successful symbiont adaptation to the shallow-water environment, and tolerance to bleaching conditions or survival during prolonged bleaching. Despite its ability to survive under high irradiance in shallow water, E. paradivisa is not found in the shallow reef of the GOE/A. We suggest several factors that may explain the high abundance and exclusivity of E. paradivisa in the MCE: its heterotrophic capabilities; its high competition abilities; the possibility of it finding a deep-reef refuge there from fish predation; and its concomitant adaptation to this environment.

  15. New Nitrogen Sources in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea; Estimates from DINex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paytan, A.; Wankel, S.; Mulholland, M.; Altabet, M.; Foster, R.

    2006-12-01

    Distribution of excess dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DINex) in the ocean has been suggested as a measure of new nitrogen input to the ocean and/or the degree of denitrification. DINex values up to 2 umol kg-1 and excess nitrate input rates of 16-18 Gg N year-1 were found in the sub surface water of the oligotrophic waters of the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, during 2003-2004. These concentrations indicate substantial contribution of remineralized nitrogen-rich organic matter and correspond to a production rate of ~0.65 umol kg- 1 year-1. The sources for the excess nitrogen include fixation of di-nitrogen, dust deposition, and anthropogenic pollution (sewage and aquaculture). A seasonal trend with positive DINex detected at shallower depth during the spring and summer when the water is stratified is observed. The DINex typically increases with water depth. Our estimates for the contribution of the various potential sources of new nitrogen suggest that nitrogen fixation and dust deposition are important sources of new nitrogen to the system throughout the year. This is consistent with N isotope data of dissolved and particulate components. The seasonal variability in DINex is however, primarily a result of changes in hydrography (mixing and stratification) that determines the nutrient and light conditions and controls the ecosystem structure, the abundance of nitrogen fixing organisms and the depth of maximum regeneration.

  16. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A.; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.; Nikitin, Mikhail A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Belousova, Anna; Reimer, James D.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts. PMID:26840497

  17. Interspecific Communicative and Coordinated Hunting between Groupers and Giant Moray Eels in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Bshary, Redouan; Hohner, Andrea; Ait-el-Djoudi, Karim; Fricke, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Intraspecific group hunting has received considerable attention because of the close links between cooperative behaviour and its cognitive demands. Accordingly, comparisons between species have focused on behaviours that can potentially distinguish between the different levels of cognitive complexity involved, such as “intentional” communication between partners in order to initiate a joint hunt, the adoption of different roles during a joint hunt (whether consistently or alternately), and the level of food sharing following a successful hunt. Here we report field observations from the Red Sea on the highly coordinated and communicative interspecific hunting between the grouper, Plectropomus pessuliferus, and the giant moray eel, Gymnothorax javanicus. We provide evidence of the following: (1) associations are nonrandom, (2) groupers signal to moray eels in order to initiate joint searching and recruit moray eels to prey hiding places, (3) signalling is dependent on grouper hunger level, and (4) both partners benefit from the association. The benefits of joint hunting appear to be due to complementary hunting skills, reflecting the evolved strategies of each species, rather than individual role specialisation during joint hunts. In addition, the partner species that catches a prey item swallows it whole immediately, making aggressive monopolisation of a carcass impossible. We propose that the potential for monopolisation of carcasses by one partner species represents the main constraint on the evolution of interspecific cooperative hunting for most potentially suitable predator combinations. PMID:17147471

  18. Remote Sensing Method for Mesquite (Prosopis spp.) Control in Coastal area of Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buho, Hoshino; Abdelaziz, Karamalla; Ruichen, Jia; Nawata, Hiroshi; Abdel, Babiker

    Sudan Mesquite (Prosopis spp.) management and control is part of the study of human subsistence ecosystem in Arab societies. This part of this research will cover measures to control invasive Spp. Mesquite (Prosopis Spp) is identified as key tree spp invading the area between the Nile and Red Sea east including Tokar Delta. These areas are known to be most affected by mesquite spread, witch interfere with people livelihood. In this study, first of all, we classification and determination of mesquite pattern and distribution as invasive plant based on multi-spectral satellite data analysis and ground measurement; Second, we estimation of soil moisture distribu-tion area of invasive species (mesquite plant) and native plants using backscattering coefficient (dB) of L-band HH/HV polarization mode of ALOS/PALSAR radar imagery. Estimation of soil moisture by inversion of SAR data can be performed in using physical or semi-empirical approaches. In this study, we using backscattering coefficient (dB)from the sensor configura-tion and ground measurement data of soil moisture parameter about semi-empirical approach. Final, we estimated mesquite biomass (DMP) using ALOS PALSAR data. The relationships between forest physical parameters and L-band radar backscatter will be investigated using ground measurement, model simulation and radar data analysis.

  19. Acanthoplesiops cappuccino, a new species of acanthoclinine fish from the Red Sea (Teleostei: Plesiopidae) .

    PubMed

    Gill, Anthony C; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O

    2013-01-01

    Acanthoplesiops cappuccino is described from the 16.4 mm SL holotype collected from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Red Sea. The following combination of characters distinguishes it from congeners: dorsal-fin rays XVIII,4; anal-fin rays VII,4; pectoral-fin rays 18; caudal fin not connected to last rays of dorsal and anal fins by membrane; and caudal peduncle with a pale yellowish brown bar, which extends broadly on to caudal fin. An underwater photo of the anaesthetised holotype is provided, as well as one of the freshly dead holotype and only known specimen of the similar species A. naka. Tables summarizing diagnostic characters of the six known species of Acanthoplesiops are included. congeners by possessing both rostral and maxillary barbels; having the last simple dorsal-fin ray weak and smooth; the lateral line complete, with 40-42+1 pored scales; ½7-½8/1/3½ scales in transverse line from dorsal-fin origin to pelvic-fin origin; 4½ scales between lateral line and anal-fin origin. Hypselobarbus kolus is considered a synonym of H. curmuca, which is redescribed: it is distinguished from all congeners by possessing maxillary barbels only; the last simple dorsal-fin ray weak and smooth; 41-43+1 lateral-line scales; 9-10/1/4½-5 scales in transverse line between origins of dorsal and pelvic fins; and 5½-6 scales between lateral line and anal-fin origin.  

  20. Population structure of a whale shark Rhincodon typus aggregation in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J E M; Hardenstine, R S; Braun, C D; Skomal, G B; Thorrold, S R; Xu, K; Genton, M G; Berumen, M L

    2016-09-01

    The presence of whale sharks Rhincodon typus were recorded around Shib Habil, a small, coastal reef off the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia, from 2010 to 2015. A total of 267 suitable photographs resulting in the identification of 136 individuals, were documented from 305 encounters. Sharks were divided evenly between the sexes with no evidence of temporal or spatial segregation. All individuals were immature based on size estimates and, for males, juvenile clasper morphology. Scars were reported for 57% of R. typus with 15% showing evidence of propeller trauma. Estimates of population size and patterns of residency were calculated by modelling the lagged identification rate. Multiple models were run simultaneously and compared using the Akaike information criterion. An open population model was found to best represent the data and estimates a daily abundance between 15 and 34 R. typus during the aggregation season, with local residence times ranging from 4 to 44 days. Residence times away from Shib Habil range from 15 to 156 days with a permanent emigration-death rate between 0·07 and 0·58 individuals year(-1) . These results are broadly similar to those from other aggregations of R. typus, although the observed sexual parity and integration found at this site is unique for the species and needs further study. PMID:27401632

  1. Population structure of a whale shark Rhincodon typus aggregation in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J E M; Hardenstine, R S; Braun, C D; Skomal, G B; Thorrold, S R; Xu, K; Genton, M G; Berumen, M L

    2016-09-01

    The presence of whale sharks Rhincodon typus were recorded around Shib Habil, a small, coastal reef off the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia, from 2010 to 2015. A total of 267 suitable photographs resulting in the identification of 136 individuals, were documented from 305 encounters. Sharks were divided evenly between the sexes with no evidence of temporal or spatial segregation. All individuals were immature based on size estimates and, for males, juvenile clasper morphology. Scars were reported for 57% of R. typus with 15% showing evidence of propeller trauma. Estimates of population size and patterns of residency were calculated by modelling the lagged identification rate. Multiple models were run simultaneously and compared using the Akaike information criterion. An open population model was found to best represent the data and estimates a daily abundance between 15 and 34 R. typus during the aggregation season, with local residence times ranging from 4 to 44 days. Residence times away from Shib Habil range from 15 to 156 days with a permanent emigration-death rate between 0·07 and 0·58 individuals year(-1) . These results are broadly similar to those from other aggregations of R. typus, although the observed sexual parity and integration found at this site is unique for the species and needs further study.

  2. A new species of Fizesereneia Takeda & Tamura, 1980 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Cryptochiridae) from the Red Sea and Oman.

    PubMed

    Van Der Meij, Sancia E T; Berumen, Michael L; Paulay, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    A new species of cryptochirid crab, Fizesereneia panda van der Meij, is described and illustrated based on specimens collected from the scleractinian corals Lobophyllia cf. hemprichii and L. cf. corymbosa from the Farasan Banks, Farasan Islands, and the reefs off Thuwal in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, and from Symphyllia recta from reefs in the Gulf of Oman. This is the second cryptochirid species with the Red Sea as type locality. It can be separated from its congeners by the subrectangular carapace, raised midline and the complete division of the carapace depressions, and reddish black colour pattern of these concavities in live specimens. This new species is the seventh assigned to Fizesereneia. A DNA barcode for the new species has been deposited in GenBank. PMID:25781848

  3. A new species of Centropages (Copepoda: Calanoida: Centropagidae) from the central Red Sea based on morphological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M

    2015-01-01

    Centropages mohamedi sp. nov. (Copepoda: Calanoida) is described from specimens collected in zooplankton samples off Obhur Creek on the Saudi Arabian coast of the central Red Sea. The new species is most closely related to C. orsinii Giesbrecht, 1889, a species described from the Red Sea and widely distributed in the neritic waters of the Indo-West Pacific region. The new species is mainly distinguished by the female genital double somite, male antennules, male leg 4, and leg 5 of both sexes. DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit one (mtCOI) of the two species differ by 20.8%, supporting their morphology-based identification as distinct species.  PMID:25661620

  4. A new species of Fizesereneia Takeda & Tamura, 1980 (Crustacea: Brachyura: Cryptochiridae) from the Red Sea and Oman.

    PubMed

    Van Der Meij, Sancia E T; Berumen, Michael L; Paulay, Gustav

    2015-03-16

    A new species of cryptochirid crab, Fizesereneia panda van der Meij, is described and illustrated based on specimens collected from the scleractinian corals Lobophyllia cf. hemprichii and L. cf. corymbosa from the Farasan Banks, Farasan Islands, and the reefs off Thuwal in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, and from Symphyllia recta from reefs in the Gulf of Oman. This is the second cryptochirid species with the Red Sea as type locality. It can be separated from its congeners by the subrectangular carapace, raised midline and the complete division of the carapace depressions, and reddish black colour pattern of these concavities in live specimens. This new species is the seventh assigned to Fizesereneia. A DNA barcode for the new species has been deposited in GenBank.

  5. A new species of Centropages (Copepoda: Calanoida: Centropagidae) from the central Red Sea based on morphological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M

    2015-01-20

    Centropages mohamedi sp. nov. (Copepoda: Calanoida) is described from specimens collected in zooplankton samples off Obhur Creek on the Saudi Arabian coast of the central Red Sea. The new species is most closely related to C. orsinii Giesbrecht, 1889, a species described from the Red Sea and widely distributed in the neritic waters of the Indo-West Pacific region. The new species is mainly distinguished by the female genital double somite, male antennules, male leg 4, and leg 5 of both sexes. DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit one (mtCOI) of the two species differ by 20.8%, supporting their morphology-based identification as distinct species. 

  6. Pachyseris inattesa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia): a new reef coral species from the Red Sea and its phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Terraneo, Tullia I.; Berumen, Michael L.; Arrigoni, Roberto; Waheed, Zarinah; Bouwmeester, Jessica; Caragnano, Annalisa; Stefani, Fabrizio; Benzoni, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new scleractinian coral species, Pachyseris inattesa sp. n., is described from the Red Sea. Despite a superficial resemblance with some species in the agariciid genus Leptoseris with which it has been previously confused, P. inattesa sp. n. has micro-morphological characters typical of the genus Pachyseris. This genus, once part of the Agariciidae, is comprised of five extant species and is widely distributed throughout the tropical Indo-Pacific. It is currently incertae sedis as a result of recent molecular analysis and appears to be closely related to the Euphylliidae. A molecular phylogenetic reconstruction including P. inattesa sp. n., the genus type species P. rugosa, and P. speciosa, all present in the Red Sea, was performed using the mitochondrial intergenic spacer between COI and 16S-rRNA. The results confirm that P. inattesa sp. n. is a monophyletic lineage closely related to the other Pachyseris species examined. PMID:25152672

  7. A pull-apart model for the Red Sea without a pole of rotation in the separation of Arabia and Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, J.; Rihm, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Wide-angle seismic surveys in the Red Sea and adjacent areas revealed fundamental asymmetries of the conjugate continental margins: the Western flank shows large areas of old oceanic crust, whereas the whole eastern flank is underlain by stretched continental crust. In addition, the African margin appears very abrupt over long sectors of the northern and central Red Sea. Gravity, magnetic, and heat flow density observations reveal the controlling structural trends, spreading history, and locations of recent magmatic intrusions, They confirm the seismic results and provide information on the entire basin. These geophysical results have implications for Red Sea evolution models: strike-slip processes controlled the breakup of the Arabian plate from Africa. The geometry of the early strike-slip zones reflects the configuration of major preexisting fault systems such as the Najd fault system, the Onib-Harnisana and Baraka suture zones, the Central African fault zone, or the Marda line. Further evolution introduced en echelon fracture systems of Aqaba orientation as major structural trends in the northern Red Sea, whereas symmetrical extension by sea floor spreading began in the axial trough of the southern Red Sea. The central Red Sea represents the zone of transition between these two contrasting domains. The significant changes across as well as along the rift cannot be explained by using a single pole of rotation to describe the separation of Arabia from Africa. Instead, several segments of both flanks have to be considered independently.

  8. Sub-seasonally resolved coral records of northern Red Sea - eastern Mediterranean climate during the Holocene and the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, T.; Rimbu, N.; Al-Rousan, S.; Kuhnert, H.; Lohmann, G.; Kölling, M.; Pätzold, J.

    2012-04-01

    The northern Red Sea represents a unique location where ocean currents transport warm tropical waters northward, enabling coral reef growth at unusually high latitudes of up to 29 °N. Moreover, one of the world's northernmost complexes of uplifted Pleistocene reef terraces can be found here at Aqaba (Jordan). We present sub-seasonally resolved reconstructions of surface ocean conditions in the northern Red Sea derived from annually banded Porites corals. The Sr/Ca and δ18O variations in the aragonitic skeletons of our modern and fossil coral colonies provide proxy records of temperature, salinity and hydrologic balance at the sea surface during the last centuries and during time windows (40 to 100 years length) of the Holocene and the last interglacial period. Previous work has shown that seasonality and interannual to decadal climate variability in the northern Red Sea as documented in our coral records is strongly coupled to climate variations in the eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Europe, reflecting the prominent role of atmospheric teleconnections of the Arctic Oscillation (AO)/North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in controlling regional climate on these timescales. New coral Sr/Ca data, in combination with δ18O, reveal an abrupt regime shift toward fresher surface ocean conditions in northern Red Sea surface waters at the end of the Little Ice Age. Possible mechanisms include a re-organization of the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. Sr/Ca records from a large number of fossil corals indicate a trend of decreasing temperature seasonality over the last 6000 years toward present-day. Such a trend is expected in the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere from insolation changes on orbital timescales. Coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records suggest an increased seasonality in the hydrologic balance during time intervals around 4400, 4600 and 6000 years ago, which could result from both enhanced winter evaporation or increased summer precipitation

  9. Genetic population structure of the endemic fourline wrasse (Larabicus quadrilineatus) suggests limited larval dispersal distances in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Froukh, Tawfiq; Kochzius, Marc

    2007-04-01

    The connectivity among marine populations is determined by the dispersal capabilities of adults as well as their eggs and larvae. Dispersal distances and directions have a profound effect on gene flow and genetic differentiation within species. Genetic homogeneity over large areas is a common feature of coral reef fishes and can reflect high dispersal capability resulting in high levels of gene flow. If fish larvae return to their parental reef, gene flow would be restricted and genetic differentiation could occur. Larabicus quadrilineatus (Labridae) is considered as an endemic fish species of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. The juveniles of this species are cleaner fish that feed on ectoparasites of other fishes. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure and gene flow in L. quadrilineatus among five locations in the Red Sea to infer connectivity among them. To estimate genetic diversity, we analysed 369 bp of 237 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were higher in the southern than in the northern Red Sea. Analysis of molecular variance (amova) detected the highest significant genetic variation between northern and central/southern populations (Phi(CT) = 0.01; P < 0.001). Migration analysis revealed a several fold higher northward than southward migration, which could be explained by oceanographic conditions and spawning season. Even though the Phi(ST) value of 0.01 is rather low and implies a long larval dispersal distance, estimates based on the isolation-by-distance model show a very low mean larval dispersal distance (0.44-5.1 km) compared to other studies. In order to enable a sustainable ornamental fishery on the fourline wrasse, the results of this study suggest that populations in the northern and southern Red Sea should be managed separately as two different stocks. The rather low larval dispersal distance of about 5 km needs to be considered in the design of marine protected areas to enable

  10. Molecular-based approaches to characterize coastal microbial community and their potential relation to the trophic state of Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Harb, Moustapha; Jones, Burton; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Molecular-based approaches were used to characterize the coastal microbiota and to elucidate the trophic state of Red Sea. Nutrient content and enterococci numbers were monitored, and used to correlate with the abundance of microbial markers. Microbial source tracking revealed the presence of >1 human-associated Bacteroides spp. at some of the near-shore sampling sites and at a heavily frequented beach. Water samples collected from the beaches had occasional exceedances in enterococci numbers, higher total organic carbon (TOC, 1.48-2.18 mg/L) and nitrogen (TN, 0.15-0.27 mg/L) than that detected in the near-shore waters. Enterococci abundances obtained from next-generation sequencing did not correlate well with the cultured enterococci numbers. The abundance of certain genera, for example Arcobacter, Pseudomonas and unclassified Campylobacterales, was observed to exhibit slight correlation with TOC and TN. Low abundance of functional genes accounting for up to 41 copies/L of each Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Campylobacter coli were detected. Arcobacter butzleri was also detected in abundance ranging from 111 to 238 copies/L. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus, Ostreococcus spp. and Gramella were more prevalent in waters that were likely impacted by urban runoffs and recreational activities. These OTUs could potentially serve as quantifiable markers indicative of the water quality. PMID:25758166

  11. Molecular-based approaches to characterize coastal microbial community and their potential relation to the trophic state of Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Harb, Moustapha; Jones, Burton; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Molecular-based approaches were used to characterize the coastal microbiota and to elucidate the trophic state of Red Sea. Nutrient content and enterococci numbers were monitored, and used to correlate with the abundance of microbial markers. Microbial source tracking revealed the presence of >1 human-associated Bacteroides spp. at some of the near-shore sampling sites and at a heavily frequented beach. Water samples collected from the beaches had occasional exceedances in enterococci numbers, higher total organic carbon (TOC, 1.48–2.18 mg/L) and nitrogen (TN, 0.15–0.27 mg/L) than that detected in the near-shore waters. Enterococci abundances obtained from next-generation sequencing did not correlate well with the cultured enterococci numbers. The abundance of certain genera, for example Arcobacter, Pseudomonas and unclassified Campylobacterales, was observed to exhibit slight correlation with TOC and TN. Low abundance of functional genes accounting for up to 41 copies/L of each Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Campylobacter coli were detected. Arcobacter butzleri was also detected in abundance ranging from 111 to 238 copies/L. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus, Ostreococcus spp. and Gramella were more prevalent in waters that were likely impacted by urban runoffs and recreational activities. These OTUs could potentially serve as quantifiable markers indicative of the water quality. PMID:25758166

  12. Molecular-based approaches to characterize coastal microbial community and their potential relation to the trophic state of Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Harb, Moustapha; Jones, Burton; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Molecular-based approaches were used to characterize the coastal microbiota and to elucidate the trophic state of Red Sea. Nutrient content and enterococci numbers were monitored, and used to correlate with the abundance of microbial markers. Microbial source tracking revealed the presence of >1 human-associated Bacteroides spp. at some of the near-shore sampling sites and at a heavily frequented beach. Water samples collected from the beaches had occasional exceedances in enterococci numbers, higher total organic carbon (TOC, 1.48-2.18 mg/L) and nitrogen (TN, 0.15-0.27 mg/L) than that detected in the near-shore waters. Enterococci abundances obtained from next-generation sequencing did not correlate well with the cultured enterococci numbers. The abundance of certain genera, for example Arcobacter, Pseudomonas and unclassified Campylobacterales, was observed to exhibit slight correlation with TOC and TN. Low abundance of functional genes accounting for up to 41 copies/L of each Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Campylobacter coli were detected. Arcobacter butzleri was also detected in abundance ranging from 111 to 238 copies/L. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus, Ostreococcus spp. and Gramella were more prevalent in waters that were likely impacted by urban runoffs and recreational activities. These OTUs could potentially serve as quantifiable markers indicative of the water quality.

  13. Red Sea coral reef trajectories over 2 decades suggest increasing community homogenization and decline in coral size.

    PubMed

    Riegl, Bernhard M; Bruckner, Andrew W; Rowlands, Gwilym P; Purkis, Sam J; Renaud, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Three independent line intercept transect surveys on northern Red Sea reef slopes conducted in 1988/9 and 1997/8 in Egypt and from 2006-9 in Saudi Arabia were used to compare community patterns and coral size. Coral communities showed scale-dependent variability, highest at fine spatial and taxonomic scale (species-specific within and among reef patterns). At coarser scale (generic pattern across regions), patterns were more uniform (regionally consistent generic dominance on differently exposed reef slopes and at different depths). Neither fine- nor coarse-scale patterns aligned along the sampled 1700 km latitudinal gradient. Thus, a latitudinal gradient that had been described earlier from comparable datasets, separating the Red Sea into three faunistic zones, was no longer apparent. This may indicate subtle changes in species distributions. Coral size, measured as corrected average intercept of corals in transects, had decreased from 1997 to 2009, after having remained constant from 1988 to 1997. Recruitment had remained stable (∼12 juvenile corals per m(2)). Size distributions had not changed significantly but large corals had declined over 20 years. Thus, data from a wide range of sites taken over two decades support claims by others that climate change is indeed beginning to show clear effects on Red Sea reefs.

  14. Vertical stratification of microbial communities in the Red Sea revealed by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Qian, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Lau, Stanley C K; Yang, Jiangke; Lafi, Feras F; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Wong, Tim Y H

    2011-03-01

    The ecosystems of the Red Sea are among the least-explored microbial habitats in the marine environment. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities in the water column overlying the Atlantis II Deep and Discovery Deep in the Red Sea. Taxonomic classification of pyrosequencing reads of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed vertical stratification of microbial diversity from the surface water to 1500 m below the surface. Significant differences in both bacterial and archaeal diversity were observed in the upper (20 [corrected] and 50 m) and deeper layers (200 and 1500 m). There were no obvious differences in community structure at the same depth for the two sampling stations. The bacterial community in the upper layer was dominated by Cyanobacteria whereas the deeper layer harbored a large proportion of Proteobacteria. Among Archaea, Euryarchaeota, especially Halobacteriales, were dominant in the upper layer but diminished drastically in the deeper layer where Desulfurococcales belonging to Crenarchaeota became the dominant group. The results of our study indicate that the microbial communities sampled in this study are different from those identified in water column in other parts of the world. The depth-wise compositional variation in the microbial communities is attributable to their adaptations to the various environments in the Red Sea. PMID:20668490

  15. Red Sea Coral Reef Trajectories over 2 Decades Suggest Increasing Community Homogenization and Decline in Coral Size

    PubMed Central

    Riegl, Bernhard M.; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Rowlands, Gwilym P.; Purkis, Sam J.; Renaud, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Three independent line intercept transect surveys on northern Red Sea reef slopes conducted in 1988/9 and 1997/8 in Egypt and from 2006–9 in Saudi Arabia were used to compare community patterns and coral size. Coral communities showed scale-dependent variability, highest at fine spatial and taxonomic scale (species-specific within and among reef patterns). At coarser scale (generic pattern across regions), patterns were more uniform (regionally consistent generic dominance on differently exposed reef slopes and at different depths). Neither fine- nor coarse-scale patterns aligned along the sampled 1700 km latitudinal gradient. Thus, a latitudinal gradient that had been described earlier from comparable datasets, separating the Red Sea into three faunistic zones, was no longer apparent. This may indicate subtle changes in species distributions. Coral size, measured as corrected average intercept of corals in transects, had decreased from 1997 to 2009, after having remained constant from 1988 to 1997. Recruitment had remained stable (∼12 juvenile corals per m2). Size distributions had not changed significantly but large corals had declined over 20 years. Thus, data from a wide range of sites taken over two decades support claims by others that climate change is indeed beginning to show clear effects on Red Sea reefs. PMID:22693620

  16. Purification and characterization of pepsin-solubilized collagen from skin and connective tissue of giant red sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zunying; Oliveira, Alexandra C M; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-27

    Pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) was extracted from giant red sea cucumbers ( Parastichopus californicus ) and characterized for denaturation temperature (T(d)), maximum transition temperature (T(m)), enzyme-digested peptide maps, and gel-forming capability. SDS-PAGE showed that PSCs from giant red sea cucumber skin and connective tissue were both type I collagens, consisting of three alpha(1) chains of approximately 138 kDa each. The amino acid composition and peptide maps of PSCs digested by V8 protease were different from those of calf skin type I collagen. The T(d) and T(m) are 18.5 and 33.2 degrees C, respectively, for skin PSC and are 17.9 and 32.7 degrees C, respectively, for connective tissue PSC. Both skin and connective tissue PSCs exhibited good gel-forming capability at pH 6.5 and at an ionic strength of 300 mM salt (NaCl). Collagen isolated from giant red sea cucumbers might be used as an alternative to mammalian collagen in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. [Distributions of COD and petroleum hydrocarbons and their relationships with occurrence of red tide in East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuansong; Wang, Xiulin; Shi, Xiaoyong; Han, Xiurong; Sun, Xia; Zhu, Chenjian; Lu, Rong

    2003-07-01

    Based on the data of COD and petroleum hydrocarbons collected in the cruise from April 25 to May 2, 2002 in intensive red tide occurrence areas in East China Sea, the distribution of COD, and petroleum hydrocarbons and the eutrophication index(EI) were analyzed. The results showed that the EI and COD value were both high in coastal water, and decreased gradually away from shore. After the preliminary study on the relationships between correlative factors and occurrence of red tide, it was found that high EI and COD were necessary. There would be great chances for the red tide to break out under conditions that the EI was between 2.5 and 15 and COD concentration was between 0.8 to 1.4 mg.L-1 in seawater, along with the favorable temperature and salinity.

  18. Diverse deep-sea fungi from the South China Sea and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Yun; Xu, Xin-Ya; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the diversity of fungal communities in nine different deep-sea sediment samples of the South China Sea by culture-dependent methods followed by analysis of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Although 14 out of 27 identified species were reported in a previous study, 13 species were isolated from sediments of deep-sea environments for the first report. Moreover, these ITS sequences of six isolates shared 84-92 % similarity with their closest matches in GenBank, which suggested that they might be novel phylotypes of genera Ajellomyces, Podosordaria, Torula, and Xylaria. The antimicrobial activities of these fungal isolates were explored using a double-layer technique. A relatively high proportion (56 %) of fungal isolates exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least one pathogenic bacterium or fungus among four marine pathogenic microbes (Micrococcus luteus, Pseudoaltermonas piscida, Aspergerillus versicolor, and A. sydowii). Out of these antimicrobial fungi, the genera Arthrinium, Aspergillus, and Penicillium exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities, while genus Aureobasidium displayed only antibacterial activity, and genera Acremonium, Cladosporium, Geomyces, and Phaeosphaeriopsis displayed only antifungal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate the diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable deep-sea-derived fungi in the South China Sea. These results suggest that diverse deep-sea fungi from the South China Sea are a potential source for antibiotics' discovery and further increase the pool of fungi available for natural bioactive product screening.

  19. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  20. Magnetic minerals in three Asian rivers draining into the South China Sea: Pearl, Red, and Mekong Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, Catherine; Liu, Zhifei; Li, Jinhua; Wandres, Camille

    2016-05-01

    The use of the marine sedimentary magnetic properties, as tracers for changes in precipitation rate and in oceanic water masses transport and exchanges, implies to identify and to characterize the different sources of the detrital fraction. This is of particular importance in closed and/or marginal seas such as the South China Sea. We report on the magnetic properties of sedimentary samples collected in three main Asian rivers draining into the South China Sea: the Pearl, Red, and Mekong Rivers. The geological formations as well as the present climatic conditions are different from one catchment to another. The entire set of performed magnetic analyses (low-field magnetic susceptibility, ARM acquisition and decay, IRM acquisition and decay, back-field acquisition, thermal demagnetization of three-axes IRM, hysteresis parameters, FORC diagrams, and low-temperature magnetic measurements) allow us to identify the magnetic mineralogy and the grain-size distribution when magnetite is dominant. Some degree of variability is observed in each basin, illustrating different parent rocks and degree of weathering. On average it appears that the Pearl River is rich in magnetite along the main stream while the Mekong River is rich in hematite. The Red River is a mixture of the two. Compared to clay mineral assemblages and major element contents previously determined on the same samples, these new findings indicate that the magnetic fraction brings complementary information of great interest for environmental reconstructions based on marine sediments from the South China Sea.

  1. Sea-surface temperature reconstruction from trace elements variations of tropical coralline red algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrenougue, Nicolas; De Deckker, Patrick; Eggins, Stephen; Payri, Claude

    2014-06-01

    We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) to obtain high-resolution variations of the Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca composition of free-living forms (i.e. rhodoliths) of the coralline red algal species Sporolithon durum in order to test their potential to archive seawater temperature information. A monitoring experiment was conducted based on alizarin red S (ARS) staining of rhodoliths specimens collected in various locations across a ˜1 km2 rhodolith bed in the vicinity of Nouméa, New Caledonia, where in situ temperature (IST) variations were recorded for 22 months between November 2009 and August 2011. A >45-year comparison of Mg and trace elements with sea-surface temperature (SST) was established from the analysis of 5 different branches belonging to three of the largest (7.4-8.5 cm in diameter) rhodolith specimens observed at the site. Consistent mean Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca concentrations and seasonal patterns are found for the rhodoliths' last living years (2009-2011) across 43 branches and for the full 1963-2008 period across the 5 branches. Average elemental concentrations (Mg/Ca: 0.31 ± 0.04 mol/mol; Sr/Ca: 3.5 ± 0.4 mmol/mol and Li/Ca: 0.08 ± 0.02 mmol/mol) fall within range of those found in the literature. Individual element variations show good reproducibility between records and Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca co-vary systematically. Combined records of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca are highly correlated with the IST monthly pattern for the 2009-2011 period (0.82 < r < 0.91; p < 0.001) and with local variations of monthly SST for the 1963-2008 period (0.65 < r < 0.85; p < 0.001), with Mg/Ca systematically being the best fit to monthly seawater temperature variations. Inter-annual Mg/Ca anomalies show significant correlation with the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI), indicating that S. durum rhodoliths also have the capacity to record the regional climate pattern in the tropical Pacific. Finally, consistent variations between the combined Mg

  2. Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall (Perciformes, Mullidae), a new subspecies of goatfish from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Randall, John E; Golani, Daniel; Bogorodsky, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    The number of goatfish species has increased recently, thanks in part to the application of molecular approaches to the taxonomy of a family with conservative morphology and widespread intraspecific color variation. A new subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall is described from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea, including Socotra and Gulf of Oman. It is characterized by a yellow caudal fin, 25-28 gill rakers, and 37-38 lateral-line scales and it is differentiated from nominal subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus by 1.7% sequence divergence at the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The morphometric examination of specimens of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus revealed variation in head length, eye diameter, and barbel length, in western direction from the Hawaiian Islands, South Pacific, Micronesia, and the East Indies to the Indian Ocean. The population of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus subsp. n. in the Gulf of Aqaba differs from that of the remaining Red Sea by shorter barbels, smaller eyes, shorter head, and shorter pelvic fins. We present a list of 26 endemic fishes from the Gulf of Aqaba and discuss the probable basis for the endemism in the light of the geological history of this region.

  3. Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall (Perciformes, Mullidae), a new subspecies of goatfish from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Randall, John E; Golani, Daniel; Bogorodsky, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    The number of goatfish species has increased recently, thanks in part to the application of molecular approaches to the taxonomy of a family with conservative morphology and widespread intraspecific color variation. A new subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall is described from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea, including Socotra and Gulf of Oman. It is characterized by a yellow caudal fin, 25-28 gill rakers, and 37-38 lateral-line scales and it is differentiated from nominal subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus by 1.7% sequence divergence at the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The morphometric examination of specimens of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus revealed variation in head length, eye diameter, and barbel length, in western direction from the Hawaiian Islands, South Pacific, Micronesia, and the East Indies to the Indian Ocean. The population of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus subsp. n. in the Gulf of Aqaba differs from that of the remaining Red Sea by shorter barbels, smaller eyes, shorter head, and shorter pelvic fins. We present a list of 26 endemic fishes from the Gulf of Aqaba and discuss the probable basis for the endemism in the light of the geological history of this region. PMID:27551217

  4. Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall (Perciformes, Mullidae), a new subspecies of goatfish from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Randall, John E.; Golani, Daniel; Bogorodsky, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The number of goatfish species has increased recently, thanks in part to the application of molecular approaches to the taxonomy of a family with conservative morphology and widespread intraspecific color variation. A new subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus Fernandez-Silva & Randall is described from the Red Sea and Arabian Sea, including Socotra and Gulf of Oman. It is characterized by a yellow caudal fin, 25–28 gill rakers, and 37–38 lateral-line scales and it is differentiated from nominal subspecies Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus by 1.7% sequence divergence at the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The morphometric examination of specimens of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavolineatus revealed variation in head length, eye diameter, and barbel length, in western direction from the Hawaiian Islands, South Pacific, Micronesia, and the East Indies to the Indian Ocean. The population of Mulloidichthys flavolineatus flavicaudus subsp. n. in the Gulf of Aqaba differs from that of the remaining Red Sea by shorter barbels, smaller eyes, shorter head, and shorter pelvic fins. We present a list of 26 endemic fishes from the Gulf of Aqaba and discuss the probable basis for the endemism in the light of the geological history of this region. PMID:27551217

  5. From rifting to passive margin: the examples of the Red Sea, Central Atlantic and Alpine Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, P.; Stampfli, G. M.

    1992-12-01

    Evolution of the Red Sea/Gulf of Suez and the Central Atlantic rift systems shows that an initial, transtensive rifting phase, affecting a broad area around the future zone of crustal separation, was followed by a pre-oceanic rifting phase during which extensional strain was concentrated on the axial rift zone. This caused lateral graben systems to become inactive and they evolved into rift-rim basins. The transtensive phase of diffuse crustal extension is recognized in many intra-continental rifts. If controlling stress systems relax, these rifts abort and develop into palaeorifts. If controlling stress systems persist, transtensive rift systems can enter the pre-oceanic rifting stage, during which the rift zone narrows and becomes asymmetric as a consequence of simple-shear deformation at shallow crustal levels and pure shear deformation at lower crustal and mantle-lithospheric levels. Preceding crustal separation, extensional denudation of the lithospheric mantle is possible. Progressive lithospheric attenuation entails updoming of the asthenosphere and thermal doming of the rift shoulders. Their uplift provides a major clastic source for the rift basins and the lateral rift-rim basins. Their stratigraphic record provides a sensitive tool for dating the rift shoulder uplift. Asymmetric rifting leads to the formation of asymmetric continental margins, corresponding in a simple-shear model to an upper plate and a conjugate lower plate margin, as seen in the Central Atlantic passive margins of the United States and Morocco. This rifting model can be successfully applied to the analysis of the Alpine Tethys palaeo-margins (such as Rif and the Western Alps).

  6. Environmental controls on daytime net community calcification on a Red Sea reef flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, W. N.; Hughen, K. A.; Langdon, C.; McCorkle, D. C.; Lentz, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Coral growth and carbonate accumulation form the foundation of the coral reef ecosystem. Changes in environmental conditions due to coastal development, climate change, and ocean acidification may pose a threat to net carbonate production in the near future. Controlled laboratory studies demonstrate that calcification by corals and coralline algae is sensitive to changes in aragonite saturation state (Ωa), as well as temperature, light, and nutrition. Studies also show that the dissolution rate of carbonate substrates is impacted by changes in carbonate chemistry. The sensitivity of coral reefs to these parameters must be confirmed and quantified in the natural environment in order to predict how coral reefs will respond to local and global changes, particularly ocean acidification. We estimated the daytime hourly net community metabolic rates, both net community calcification (NCC) and net community productivity (NCP), at Sheltered Reef, an offshore platform reef in the central Red Sea. Average NCC was 8 ± 3 mmol m-2 h-1 in December 2010 and 11 ± 1 mmol m-2 h-1 in May 2011, and NCP was 21 ± 7 mmol m-2 h-1 in December 2010 and 44 ± 4 mmol m-2 h-1 in May 2011. We also monitored a suite of physical and chemical properties to help relate the rates at Sheltered Reef to published rates from other sites. While previous research shows that short-term field studies investigating the NCC-Ωa relationship have differing results due to confounding factors, it is important to continue estimating NCC in different places, seasons, and years, in order to monitor changes in NCC versus Ω in space and time, and to ultimately resolve a broader understanding of this relationship.

  7. Long Term Seasonal Dynamics of Synechococcus Population Structure in the Gulf of Aqaba, Northern Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Post, Anton F.; Penno, Sigrid; Zandbank, Keren; Paytan, Adina; Huse, Susan M.; Welch, David Mark

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of marine Synechococcus diversity across ocean domains have been reported on extensively. However, much less is known of seasonal and multiannual patterns of change in Synechococcus community composition. Here we report on the genotypic diversity of Synechococcus populations in the Gulf of Aqaba, Northern Red Sea, over seven annual cycles of deep mixing and stabile stratification, using ntcA as a phylogenetic marker. Synechococcus clone libraries were dominated by clade II and XII genotypes and a total of eight different clades were identified. Inclusion of ntcA sequences from the Global Ocean Sampling database in our analyses identified members of clade XII from beyond the Gulf of Aqaba, extending its known distribution. Most of the Synechococcus diversity was attributed to members of clade II during the spring bloom, while clade III contributed significantly to diversity during summer stratification. Clade XII diversity was most prevalent in fall and winter. Clade abundances were estimated from pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA. Members of clade II dominated Synechococcus communities throughout the year, whereas the less frequent genotypes showed a pattern of seasonal succession. Based on the prevailing nutritional conditions we observed that clade I members thrive at higher nutrient concentrations during winter mixing. Clades V, VI and X became apparent during the transition periods between mixing and stratification. Clade III became prominent during sumeer stratification. We propose that members of clades V, VI, and X, and clade III are Synechococcus ecotypes that are adapted to intermediate and low nutrient levels respectively. This is the first time that molecular analyses have correlated population dynamics of Synechococcus genotypes with temporal fluctuations in nutrient regimes. Since these Synechococcus genotypes are routinely observed in the Gulf of Aqaba we suggest that seasonal fluctuations in nutrient levels

  8. Species delimitation in the coral genus Goniopora (Scleractinia, Poritidae) from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, Tullia I; Benzoni, Francesca; Arrigoni, Roberto; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-09-01

    Variable skeletal morphology, genotype induced plasticity, and homoplasy of skeletal structures have presented major challenges for scleractinian coral taxonomy and systematics since the 18th century. Although the recent integration of genetic and micromorphological data is helping to clarify the taxonomic confusion within the order, phylogenetic relationships and species delimitation within most coral genera are still far from settled. In the present study, the species boundaries in the scleractinian coral genus Goniopora were investigated using 199 colonies from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea and sequencing of four molecular markers: the mitochondrial intergenic spacer between CytB and NAD2, the nuclear ribosomal ITS region, and two single-copy nuclear genes (ATPsβ and CalM). DNA sequence data were analyzed using a variety of methods and exploratory species-delimitation tools. The results were broadly congruent in identifying five distinct molecular lineages within the sequenced Goniopora samples: G. somaliensis/G. savignyi, G. djiboutiensis/G. lobata, G. stokesi, G. albiconus/G. tenuidens, and G. minor/G. gracilis. Although the traditional macromorphological characters used to identify these nine morphospecies were not able to discriminate the obtained molecular clades, informative micromorphological and microstructural features (such as the micro-ornamentation and the arrangement of the columella) were recovered among the five lineages. Moreover, unique in vivo morphologies were associated with the genetic-delimited lineages, further supporting the molecular findings. This study represents the first attempt to identify species boundaries within Goniopora using a combined morpho-molecular approach. The obtained data establish a basis for future taxonomic revision of the genus, which should include colonies across its entire geographical distribution in the Indo-Pacific.

  9. Geochemical dynamics of the Atlantis II Deep (Red Sea): II. Composition of metalliferous sediment pore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Blanc, Gérard; Monnin, Christophe; Boulègue, Jacques

    2000-12-01

    The Atlantis II Deep is an axial depression of the Red Sea filled with highly saline brines and covered by layered metalliferous sediment. We report new data on the vertical distribution of major salts and trace metals dissolved in the pore waters of the metalliferous sediments. We have studied the chemical composition of interstitial waters of two sediment cores of the western (core 684) and southwestern (core 683) basins. The major dissolved elements are Na and Cl. Their concentrations are close to those of the brine overlying the sediment. The pore waters are undersaturated with respect to halite at the in situ conditions (62°C, 220 bars), but are saturated at the shipboard conditions (10°C, 1 bar). The salt and water contents of the bulk sediment show that core 683 contained halite in the solid fraction. A part of it precipitated after core collection, but most of it was present in situ. Thermodynamic calculations with a water-rock interaction model based on Pitzer's ion interaction approach reveal that equilibrium between the pore waters and anhydrite is achieved in sediment layers for which observations report the presence of this mineral. We used a transport model, which shows that molecular diffusion can smooth the profile of dissolved salt and partly erase the pore water record of past variations of salinity in the lower brine. For example, we calculated that the pore water record of modern variation of brine salinity is rapidly smoothed by molecular diffusion. The dissolved transition metals show large variations with depth in the interstitial waters. The profiles of core 683 reflect the possible advection of hydrothermal fluid within the sediment of the southwestern basin. The distribution of dissolved metals in core 684 is the result of diagenetic reactions, mainly the reduction of Mn-oxide with dissolved Fe(II), the recrystallization of primary oxide minerals, and the precipitation of authigenic Mn-carbonates.

  10. Seasonal mesophotic coral bleaching of Stylophora pistillata in the Northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Nir, Orit; Gruber, David F; Shemesh, Eli; Glasser, Eliezra; Tchernov, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when environmental stress induces breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis and the host initiates algae expulsion. Two types of coral bleaching had been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature; the first is primarily associated with mass coral bleaching events; the second is a seasonal loss of algae and/or pigments. Here, we describe a phenomenon that has been witnessed for repeated summers in the mesophotic zone (40-63 m) in the northern Red Sea: seasonal bleaching and recovery of several hermatypic coral species. In this study, we followed the recurring bleaching process of the common coral Stylophora pistillata. Bleaching occurred from April to September with a 66% decline in chlorophyll a concentration, while recovery began in October. Using aquarium and transplantation experiments, we explored environmental factors such as temperature, photon flux density and heterotrophic food availability. Our experiments and observations did not yield one single factor, alone, responsible for the seasonal bleaching. The dinoflagellate symbionts (of the genus Symbiodinium) in shallow (5 m) Stylophora pistillata were found to have a net photosynthetic rate of 56.98-92.19 µmol O2 cm(-2) day(-1). However, those from mesophotic depth (60 m) during months when they are not bleached are net consumers of oxygen having a net photosynthetic rate between -12.86 - (-10.24) µmol O2 cm(-2) day(-1). But during months when these mesophotic corals are partially-bleached, they yielded higher net production, between -2.83-0.76 µmol O2 cm(-2) day(-1). This study opens research questions as to why mesophotic zooxanthellae are more successfully meeting the corals metabolic requirements when Chl a concentration decreases by over 60% during summer and early fall.

  11. Two new species of Coryogalops (Perciformes: Gobiidae) from the Red Sea .

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marcelo; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O

    2014-11-10

    Two new species of the gobiid genus Coryogalops, C. guttatus sp. nov. and C. pseudomonospilus sp. nov., are described from the Red Sea. Coryogalops guttatus sp. nov. is distinguished from its congeners by having dorsal-fin rays VI + I,12; anal-fin rays I,10-11; pectoral-fin rays 17, three upper rays with free tips; pelvic fins I,5, joined to form a disc, weakly emarginate, with pelvic frenum reduced; longitudinal scale series 33-35; transverse scale rows 9-10; circumpeduncular scales 10-11; seven transverse suborbital rows of sensory papillae on cheek; no tentacle above upper eye margin; anterior nostril tubular, with triangular lappet extending from posterior rim, posterior nostril slightly raised; dark orange spots on many of the scales below body midline form a longitudinal pattern, each spot covering one scale; two distinct dark spots behind edge of preopercle, and similar pair of spots at pectoral-fin base. Coryogalops pseudomonospilus sp. nov. is distinguished from congeners by having dorsal-fin rays VI + I,11; anal-fin rays I,10; pectoral-fin rays 16-17, two upper rays with free tips; pelvic fins I,5, joined to form a disc, moderately emarginate, with pelvic frenum well-developed; longitudinal scale series 33-35; transverse scales rows 9; circumpeduncular scales 12; seven transverse suborbital rows of sensory papillae on cheek; no tentacle above upper eye margin; anterior nostril tubular, without lappet from posterior rim, posterior nostril slightly raised; and irregular dark maroon mark covering lower part of the first three membranes between spines of first dorsal fin. The distribution of species restricted to the western Indian Ocean is discussed, and a key to the species of the genus is provided.

  12. Species delimitation in the coral genus Goniopora (Scleractinia, Poritidae) from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, Tullia I; Benzoni, Francesca; Arrigoni, Roberto; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-09-01

    Variable skeletal morphology, genotype induced plasticity, and homoplasy of skeletal structures have presented major challenges for scleractinian coral taxonomy and systematics since the 18th century. Although the recent integration of genetic and micromorphological data is helping to clarify the taxonomic confusion within the order, phylogenetic relationships and species delimitation within most coral genera are still far from settled. In the present study, the species boundaries in the scleractinian coral genus Goniopora were investigated using 199 colonies from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea and sequencing of four molecular markers: the mitochondrial intergenic spacer between CytB and NAD2, the nuclear ribosomal ITS region, and two single-copy nuclear genes (ATPsβ and CalM). DNA sequence data were analyzed using a variety of methods and exploratory species-delimitation tools. The results were broadly congruent in identifying five distinct molecular lineages within the sequenced Goniopora samples: G. somaliensis/G. savignyi, G. djiboutiensis/G. lobata, G. stokesi, G. albiconus/G. tenuidens, and G. minor/G. gracilis. Although the traditional macromorphological characters used to identify these nine morphospecies were not able to discriminate the obtained molecular clades, informative micromorphological and microstructural features (such as the micro-ornamentation and the arrangement of the columella) were recovered among the five lineages. Moreover, unique in vivo morphologies were associated with the genetic-delimited lineages, further supporting the molecular findings. This study represents the first attempt to identify species boundaries within Goniopora using a combined morpho-molecular approach. The obtained data establish a basis for future taxonomic revision of the genus, which should include colonies across its entire geographical distribution in the Indo-Pacific. PMID:27321092

  13. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Adel, Mustafa; Ouf, Amged; Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Alam, Intikhab; Essack, Magbubah; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater) boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I) and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U) and Lower (KB-L) brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces. PMID:25295031

  14. Seasonal Mesophotic Coral Bleaching of Stylophora pistillata in the Northern Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Orit; Gruber, David F.; Shemesh, Eli; Glasser, Eliezra; Tchernov, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when environmental stress induces breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis and the host initiates algae expulsion. Two types of coral bleaching had been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature; the first is primarily associated with mass coral bleaching events; the second is a seasonal loss of algae and/or pigments. Here, we describe a phenomenon that has been witnessed for repeated summers in the mesophotic zone (40–63 m) in the northern Red Sea: seasonal bleaching and recovery of several hermatypic coral species. In this study, we followed the recurring bleaching process of the common coral Stylophora pistillata. Bleaching occurred from April to September with a 66% decline in chlorophyll a concentration, while recovery began in October. Using aquarium and transplantation experiments, we explored environmental factors such as temperature, photon flux density and heterotrophic food availability. Our experiments and observations did not yield one single factor, alone, responsible for the seasonal bleaching. The dinoflagellate symbionts (of the genus Symbiodinium) in shallow (5 m) Stylophora pistillata were found to have a net photosynthetic rate of 56.98–92.19 µmol O2 cm−2 day−1. However, those from mesophotic depth (60 m) during months when they are not bleached are net consumers of oxygen having a net photosynthetic rate between −12.86 - (−10.24) µmol O2 cm−2 day−1. But during months when these mesophotic corals are partially-bleached, they yielded higher net production, between −2.83–0.76 µmol O2 cm−2 day−1. This study opens research questions as to why mesophotic zooxanthellae are more successfully meeting the corals metabolic requirements when Chl a concentration decreases by over 60% during summer and early fall. PMID:24454772

  15. Depositional and diagenetic models of some miocene evaporites on the Red Sea coast, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed A. A., Youssef

    1986-06-01

    The Miocene evaporites on the Red Sea coast, Egypt, are interpreted as a sabkha-chenier complex, which includes deposition in shallow water as well as in supratidal environments Costal sabkhas and shallow subaqueous evaporite sequences are recognised. The subaqueous sequence is represented by nodular mosaic and massive crystalline gypsum covered by a surface layer of nodular, white, dense powdery anhydrite. The sabkha sequences are represented by (a) small mounds overlying the older rock unit (Gebel El Rusas Formation) composed of fenestral stromatolitic and nodular dolomites overlain by a dolomitic limestone layer, (b) thin layer overlying the subaqueous evaporite sequence and composed of fenestral stromatolitic dolomite overlain by a nodular anhydrite layer. The nodular structure in the subaqueous as well as the sabkha sequences is formed diagenetically by transformation and recrystallization process. The dolomites in both sabkha sequences (a and b) are characterised by low Na + concentrations (143 to 755 ppm) and low values of δ 18O (- 1.85 to -8.7‰ PDB). This indicates that the dolomites were formed from saline water mixed with fresh water. These dolomites are also characterised by a low δ 13C (-12.95 to -27.1‰ PDB). This shows that the light carbon produced by the degradation of organic matter through the sulphate reduction process has played a significant role in the formation of these dolomites. Both microcrystalline and megacrystalline white dolomites are recognised in sabkha sequences. Relatively high concentrations of lead, zinc and copper are associated with the high percent of megacrystalline white dolomite.

  16. New insights into the mineralogy of the Atlantis II Deep metalliferous sediments, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurila, Tea E.; Hannington, Mark D.; Leybourne, Matthew; Petersen, Sven; Devey, Colin W.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    The Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea hosts the largest known hydrothermal ore deposit on the ocean floor and the only modern analog of brine pool-type metal deposition. The deposit consists mainly of chemical-clastic sediments with input from basin-scale hydrothermal and detrital sources. A characteristic feature is the millimeter-scale layering of the sediments, which bears a strong resemblance to banded iron formation (BIF). Quantitative assessment of the mineralogy based on relogging of archived cores, detailed petrography, and sequential leaching experiments shows that Fe-(oxy)hydroxides, hydrothermal carbonates, sulfides, and authigenic clays are the main "ore" minerals. Mn-oxides were mainly deposited when the brine pool was more oxidized than it is today, but detailed logging shows that Fe-deposition and Mn-deposition also alternated at the scale of individual laminae, reflecting short-term fluctuations in the Lower Brine. Previous studies underestimated the importance of nonsulfide metal-bearing components, which formed by metal adsorption onto poorly crystalline Si-Fe-OOH particles. During diagenesis, the crystallinity of all phases increased, and the fine layering of the sediment was enhanced. Within a few meters of burial (corresponding to a few thousand years of deposition), biogenic (Ca)-carbonate was dissolved, manganosiderite formed, and metals originally in poorly crystalline phases or in pore water were incorporated into diagenetic sulfides, clays, and Fe-oxides. Permeable layers with abundant radiolarian tests were the focus for late-stage hydrothermal alteration and replacement, including deposition of amorphous silica and enrichment in elements such as Ba and Au.

  17. Environmental monitoring survey in Gemsa development lease of the Red Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazaly, S.E.

    1996-12-31

    An offshore oil field is located in the Gemsa development lease near the west coast of the Red Sea, 50 km north of Hurgada. The wells are accommodated at a 3 leg tripod jacket in 20m meter depth. The oil produced is exported untreated to treatment facilities onshore. Production commenced end 1991. The region of extensive coral reef formation is of considerable value in view of nature conservation, scientific studies, recreation and tourist industry and has a vulnerable ecology. The area is largely influenced by strong tidal currents and a prevailing NW wind. Bottom sediments are almost completely composed of carbonate material. Bapetco requested the National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries to carry out an environmental monitoring programme, which started early 1992. Sediment samples were collected from 13 locations according to the recommendation of the Group of Experts on oil pollution of the Paris commission up to 2 km from the wells. This was repeated early collected by a grab sampler from a survey vessel with occasional help of divers. For positioning a single GFS receiver was used. The samples were analyzed in MM ways covering both the chemical composition (hydrocarbons, metals, organic carbon) and the bioactivity. Particulars of the analysis can be summarized as follows: Concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in all samples were of the same order of magnitude except one location in the immediate vicinity of the platform, still being within the margins of accuracy of the analysis methodology. Bottom flora and fauna in all samples were consistently rich as far as the variety of species and of the number of individuals within the various species is concerned. The observed change of flora and fauna of metals should be characterized as an improvement rather than as a decline. The concentrations of heavy metals declined. Organic carbon content did not show any significant change.

  18. On the origin of framboidal pyrite in sediments of the Suakin Deep (Red Sea)Sur l'origine de la pyrite framboïdale dans les sédiments de la fosse Suakin (mer Rouge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, Marie-Claire; Blanc, Gérard; Clauer, Norbert

    2000-01-01

    Suakin Deep is one of the southern depressions of the Red Sea, with sediments containing up to 20 % of pyrite. Although metalliferous sediments result from hydrothermal activity in most deeps, those of Suakin have different characteristics. Pyrite is framboïdal and the REE patterns of its sediments are similar to those of biodetrital sediments. The sediments seem to be of biodetritic origin and to have undergone diagenetic changes without hydrothermal activity.

  19. Antioxidant activity of pasteurized and sterilized commercial red orange juices.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Alberto; La Fauci, Luca; Cervellati, Rinaldo; Guerra, Maria Clelia; Speroni, Ester; Costa, Stefano; Galvano, Giacomo; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bacchelli, Vanessa; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Galvano, Fabio

    2005-12-01

    Blood orange juice is a typical Italian product whose red color is primarily associated with anthocyanin pigments. Two orange-based products are present on the market: pasteurized pure juice with 40 days of shelf life, and sterilized beverage containing minimum 12% of concentrated fruit juice. The aim of the present paper is to verify the relationships between the antioxidant properties and the anthocyanins content in a sampling of pasteurized and sterilized commercial red orange juices. The anthocyanins composition was determined by HPLC-MS/MS, while the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the Briggs-Rauscher reaction, selected in order to acquire information at acid pH values, by three radical scavenging assays (DMPD, 2-2'-azinobis-(3-ethylenbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), DPPH), and by FRAP assay to monitor the ferric reducing power. Results showed that antioxidant activity, particularly when measured by ABTS method, is positively related to the content of anthocyanins and that the reduction of anthocyanins content, typical of commercial long-shelf life juices, leads to a remarkable loss of antioxidant power.

  20. Detection of starquakes on magnetically active red dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S. J.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Papantoniou, Ch.

    2015-07-01

    The scientific team of the Stephanion Observatory, University of Thessaloniki contributed to the research of high frequency optical oscillations on red dwarfs by participating in international programs for Multiwavelength observation of strong Flares of selected flare stars ([12]). These joined research shed plenty of light on the phenomenon of high frequency optical oscillations. Nevertheless a better understanding of the high-frequency oscillations demand a unified analysis of the flare light-curve for a wider time window covering pre-flare, flare and post flare and a broader band of frequencies. Thus in addition to the international campaign research the Stephanion Observatory group observe and analysis one colour (B, or U) observations of the Stephanion Observatory of different red dwarfs: EV Lac([1], [2] and [7]), AD Leo ([4] and [5]),YZ CMin ([3],[9]), V 390 Auri ([6],[10]), UV Cet([8]), at any stage of their activity (quiescence, weak flares, strong flare! s).In this paper we present the analysis of the quiet state observations of the stars EV Lac, BY Drac , AD Leo, YZ Cmin in order to realize if starquakes appear far apart from the observed flares, during the quiet state of the stars, as a result of the general magnetic activity of the star.

  1. Sea Searcher's Handbook: Activities from the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation, Monterey, CA.

    The activities in this book guide exploration of rocky shores, wetlands, sandy shores, kelp forests, the open sea and deep sea, and introduce students to a variety of topics and different approaches. This material is written by marine educators and was tested with over 70,000 children visiting the Monterey Bay Aquarium (California) each year. The…

  2. A hemagglutinin with mitogenic activity from dark red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 67-kDa hemagglutinin composed of two identical subunits was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Dark Red Kidney Bean'. It was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. The hemagglutinin was highly purified after the two aforementioned chromatographic steps as revealed by a single peak in gel filtration on Superdex 75 and a single band in SDS-PAGE. The hemagglutinating activity was stable between 25 degrees C and 70 degrees C, and between pH 4 and pH 11, and in the presence of a variety of divalent metal chlorides at 500 mM concentration. The activity was reduced by 50% at 80 degrees C, and also when the pH was lowered to 3 or elevated to 12. The activity was reduced by 75% in the presence of 250 mM KCl or NaCl. A variety of sugars tested failed to inhibit the hemagglutinating activity of the hemagglutinin. Although the hemagglutinin exhibited mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes, it had no effect on the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or mycelial growth in the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It exerted an antiproliferative activity on leukemia L1210 cells.

  3. A hemagglutinin with mitogenic activity from dark red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 67-kDa hemagglutinin composed of two identical subunits was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Dark Red Kidney Bean'. It was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. The hemagglutinin was highly purified after the two aforementioned chromatographic steps as revealed by a single peak in gel filtration on Superdex 75 and a single band in SDS-PAGE. The hemagglutinating activity was stable between 25 degrees C and 70 degrees C, and between pH 4 and pH 11, and in the presence of a variety of divalent metal chlorides at 500 mM concentration. The activity was reduced by 50% at 80 degrees C, and also when the pH was lowered to 3 or elevated to 12. The activity was reduced by 75% in the presence of 250 mM KCl or NaCl. A variety of sugars tested failed to inhibit the hemagglutinating activity of the hemagglutinin. Although the hemagglutinin exhibited mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes, it had no effect on the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or mycelial growth in the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It exerted an antiproliferative activity on leukemia L1210 cells. PMID:16945595

  4. Sea ice trends and cyclone activity in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Jack; McDonald, Adrian; Rack, Wolfgang; Dale, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Significant trends in the extent of Southern Hemisphere sea ice have been noted over the course of the satellite record, with highly variable trends between different seasons and regions. In this presentation, we describe efforts to assess the impact of cyclones on these trends. Employing a maximum cross-correlation method, we derive Southern Ocean ice-motion vectors from daily gridded SSMI 85.5 GHz brightness temperatures. We then derive a sea ice budget from the NASA-Team 25 km square daily sea ice concentrations. The budget quantifies the total daily change in sea ice area, and includes terms representing the effects of ice advection and divergence. A residual term represents the processes of rafting, ridging, freezing and thawing. We employ a cyclone tracking algorithm developed at the University of Canterbury to determine the timing, location, size and strength of Southern Hemisphere cyclones from mean sea-level pressure fields of the ERA-Interim reanalysis. We then form composites of the of sea ice budget below the location of cyclones. Unsurprisingly, we find that clockwise atmospheric flow around Southern Hemisphere cyclones exerts a strong influence on the movement of sea ice, an effect which is visible in the advection and divergence terms. Further, we assess the climatological importance of cyclones by comparing seasons of sea ice advance for periods with varying numbers of cyclones. This analysis is performed independently for each sea ice concentration pixel, thus affording us insight into the geographical importance of storm systems. We find that Southern Hemisphere sea ice extent is highly sensitive to the presence of cyclones in the periphery of the pack in the advance season. Notably, the sensitivity is particularly high in the northern Ross Sea, an area with a marked positive trend in sea ice extent. We discuss whether trends in cyclone activity in the Southern Ocean may have contributed to sea ice extent trends in this region.

  5. Coastal alluvial fans (fan deltas) of the Gulf of Aqaba (Gulf of Eilat), Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, A. B.

    1985-04-01

    Coastal sediments of the Gulf of Aqaba are dominated by alluvial fans that prograde directly into the sea. The fans can be subdivided into four types: (1) largely inactive alluvial fans that merge into a braided fluvial system and pass seaward into sabkha flats, lagoons, mangroves and fringing reefs; (2) large alluvial fans that pass directly into the sea with one major entrenched channel and a fringing reef with a large incised canyon; both of these were formed during the Pleistocene, present fluvial activity is confined to the entrenched channels; (3) medium-sized (1-2 km long, 3-4 km wide) moderate to highly active alluvial fans with fringing reefs and backreef lagoons; and (4) small short-headed wadis that empty directly into the sea. The scale, overall sediment body geometry and facies associations of type (3) coastal alluvial fans (fan deltas) provide a close and useful modern analogue for many ancient fan-delta sedimentary sequences. On subaerial parts of the fan, disorganised cobbles and boulders, at the apex, deposited by debris flows pass downslope into longitudinal bars deposited during the high flood stage of periodic flash-flood events. The bars extend over the entire fan surface becoming progressively smaller and finer grained down fan. In general, the fans are characterised by a low proportion of floodplain deposits and extensive modification by aeolian processes, producing widespread gravel pavements and small dune fields over inactive areas of the lower fan. In the marine environment the fans are modified by a combination of wave action and longshore drift. Sand beaches are characterised by low-angle seaward-dipping lamination. On shingle beaches all gravel clasts have a strong preferred seaward dipping orientation. In areas where the fringing reefs are situated offshore from the fan, mixed quartz-bioclastic sand-filled lagoons develop. The nearshore lagoon areas are characterised by large sand bars orientated parallel to the shore. These pass

  6. Assessment of Committed Effective Dose due to consumption of Red Sea coral reef fishes collected from the local market (Sudan).

    PubMed

    Hassona, Rifaat K; Sam, A K; Osman, O I; Sirelkhatim, D A; LaRosa, J

    2008-04-15

    An assessment of Committed Effective Dose (CED) due to consumption of Red Sea fish containing (210)Po and (137)Cs was performed for 23 different marine fish samples collected from the local market at Port Sudan. The fish were classified according to their feeding habits into three categories: carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores. Measured activity concentrations of (210)Po were found in the ranges 0.25-6.42 (carnivores), 0.7-5 (omnivores) and 1.5-3.8 (herbivores) Bq/kg fresh weight. In the same study, activity concentrations of Cs-137 were determined to be in the ranges 0.1-0.46 (carnivores), 0.09-0.35 (omnivores) and 0.09-0.32 (herbivores) Bq/kg fresh weight, which were several times lower than those of (210)Po. Appropriate conversion factors were used to derive the CED, which was found to be 0.012, 0.01 and 0.01 (microSv/yr) in carnivores, omnivores and herbivores, respectively, for (137)Cs. This contributes about 0.4% of the total dose exclusively by ingestion of fish. For (210)Po, it was found to be 3.47, 4.81 and 4.14 (microSv/yr) in carnivores, omnivores and herbivores, respectively, which represents 99.6% of the total dose (exclusively by ingestion of fish). The results of CED calculations suggest that the dose received by the Sudanese population from the consumption of marine fish is rather small and that the contribution of (137)Cs is negligible compared to (210)Po.

  7. [Antioxidant activity of different types of red grape wines].

    PubMed

    Ageeva, N M; Markosov, V A; Avidzba, A M; Ogay, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    This article represented the data about antioxidant activity in the red table and liqueurfaults, prepared from the types of grapes of Cabernet, Merlot and Saperavi. The antioxidant activity of faults in the conversion to TROLOX, the synthetic analog of gallic acid, was determined by voltammetric method. The determination of antioxidant activity was conducted in the young faults (through 2 month after the completion of fermentation) and through half a year the storage without the air inlet. It has been established that the value of antioxidant activity depended on the type of grapes and technology of the production of wine. It was shown that the addition of ethyl alcohol in the production of wines such as Cahors ensured an increase in the extraction of phenol connections from the skin of grapes. This lead to an increase of the antioxidant activity in the Cahors wines in the comparison with the table wine. During the storage of faults the value of antioxidant activity decreased. In the fault cahors wine it remained at the higher level. PMID:27228712

  8. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free shortwave direct radiative forcing of mineral dust aerosol over the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, G. L.; Brindley, H. E.; Osipov, S.; Bantges, R. J.; Smirnov, A.; Prakash, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    While there have been a number of campaigns designed to probe dust-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to the Red Sea. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements, which can be used to evaluate retrievals, are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based hand-held sun-photometer (microtops) observations gathered within the framework of NASA Aerosol Maritime Network from a series of cruises, which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Here we used the microtops measurements to evaluate the performance of co-located satellite retrievals from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the MODerate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Both algorithms show good agreement with the ship-based measurements and with each other, although it appears that the MODIS cloud detection scheme in particular is rather conservative. The stand alone Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) driven by reanalysis meteorological fields is used to estimate the cloud-free aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface and TOA along the ship tracks. The TOA effects are compared to co-located measurements from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument. Having evaluated both the quality of the retrievals and the ability of the model to capture the associated radiative effect, we will present a climatology of aerosol loading over the

  9. High-resolution regional modeling of summertime transport and impact of African dust over the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenderski, Stoitchko; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2016-06-01

    Severe dust outbreaks and high dust loading over Eastern Africa and the Red Sea are frequently detected in the summer season. Observations suggest that small-scale dynamic and orographic effects, from both the Arabian and African sides, strongly contribute to dust plume formation. To better understand these processes, we present here the first high-resolution modeling study of a dust outbreak in June 2012 developed over East Africa, the Red Sea, and the Arabian Peninsula. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) component, we identified several dust generating dynamical processes that range from convective to synoptic scales, including synoptic cyclones, nocturnal low-level jets, and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems. The simulations reveal an eastward transport of African dust across the Red Sea. Over the northern part of the Red Sea, most of the dust transport occurs above 2 km height, whereas across the central and southern parts of the sea; dust is mostly transported below 2 km height. Dust is the dominant contributor (87%) to the aerosol optical depth, producing a domain average cooling effect of -12.1 W m-2 at the surface, a warming of 7.1 W m-2 in the atmosphere, and a residual cooling of -4.9 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. Both dry and wet deposition processes contribute significantly to dust removal from the atmosphere. Model results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations but generally underestimate the observed maximum values of aerosol optical depth. The satellite-retrieved mean optical depth at some locations is underestimated by a factor of 2. A sensitive experiment suggests that these large local differences may result from poor characterization of dust emissions in some areas of the modeled domain. In this case study we successfully simulate the major fine-scale dust generating dynamical processes, explicitly resolving convection and haboob formation. The future

  10. Distribution of naturally occurring radioactivity and ¹³⁷Cs in the marine sediment of Farasan Island, southern Red Sea, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Zahrany, A A; Farouk, M A; Al-Yousef, A A

    2012-11-01

    The present work is a part of a project dedicated to measure the marine radioactivity near the Saudi Arabian coasts of the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf for establishing a marine radioactivity database, which includes necessary information on the background levels of both naturally occurring and man-made radionuclides in the marine environment. Farasan Islands is a group of 84 islands (archipelago), under the administration of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, in the Red Sea with its main island of Farasan, which is 50 km off the coast of Jazan City. The levels of natural radioactivity of (238)U, (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and man-made radionuclides such as (137)Cs in the grab sediment and water samples around Farasan Island have been measured using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs in the sediment samples were found to be 35.46, 1.75, 3.31, 0.92, 34.34 and 0.14 Bq kg(-1), respectively.

  11. Integrating multiple fish biomarkers and risk assessment as indicators of metal pollution along the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, Yemen Republic.

    PubMed

    Omar, Wael A; Saleh, Yousef S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S

    2014-12-01

    The marine environment of the Red Sea coast of Yemen Republic is subjected to increasing anthropogenic activities. The present field study assesses the impacts of metal pollutants on two common marine fish species; Pomadasys hasta and Lutjanus russellii collected from a reference site in comparison to two polluted sites along the Red Sea coast of Hodeida, Yemen Republic. Concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) in fish vital organs, metal pollution index (MPI), indicative biochemical parameters of liver functions (alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST]) and kidney functions (urea and creatinine) as well as histopathological changes in gills, liver and kidney of both fish species are integrated as biomarkers of metal pollution. These biomarkers showed species-specific and/or site-specific response. The hazard index (HI) was used as an indicator of human health risks associated with fish consumption. The detected low HI values in most cases doesn't neglect the fact that the cumulative risk effects for metals together give an alarming sign and that the health of fish consumers is endangered around polluted sites. The levels of ALT, AST and urea in plasma of both fish species collected from the polluted sites showed significant increase in comparison to those of reference site. Histopathological alterations and evident damage were observed in tissues of fish collected from the polluted sites. The investigated set of biomarkers proved to be efficient and reliable in biomonitoring the pollution status along different pollution gradients.

  12. The timing of uplift, volcanism, and rifting peripheral to the Red Sea: a case for passive rifting?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.; Naeser, C.W.; Schmidt, D.L.; Zimmermann, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Prior to the formation of the Red Sea the northeastern Afro/Arabian continent had low relief and was largely below sea level from the Late Cretaceous to the early Oligocene. The events leading to the formation of the Red Sea followed the sequence (1) alkaline volcanism and rifting beginning about 30-32 Ma affecting a narrow linear zone in the continent, (2) rotational block faulting and detachment faulting, well underway by 25 Ma, (3) gabbro and diorite magmatism, andesite to rhyolite volcanism, and fine-grained nonmarine sedimentation in the rift between 20 and 25 Ma, (4) fine-grained marine sedimentation in the rift as the early shelves started to subside in the middle Miocene, and (5) uplift of the adjacent continents (about 3 km) and subsidence of the shelves (about 4 km) between 13.8 and 5 Ma. The youth of the uplift is suggested by 44 fission track dates on apatites from rocks of the Proterozoic Arabian Shield that range in age from 13.8 to 568 Ma. The youngest of these ages, coupled with the present high relief along the Arabian escarpment and published heat flow measurements, indicate that 2.5-4 km uplift has occurred in the last 13.8 m.y. -from Authors

  13. [Screening of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in marines macroalgae from Mediterranean Sea].

    PubMed

    Chatter Riahi, R; Tarhouni, S; Kharrat, R

    2011-01-01

    Methanolic extracts of 13 seaweeds collected from the Mediterranean sea (Tunisian, Moroccan and Greek coasts) from different classes (Chlorophycae, Pheopbycae and Rhodophycae) are testedfor their analgesic and antiinflammatory effects. These activities were estimated in vivo, respectively by writhing test and carrageenan test. Nine species among 13 tested seaweeds showed an important analgesic activity. On the other hand only 5 seaweeds showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity (< 0.001 compared to control group). The percentage of inhibition reached 80% for the red algae Laurencia glandulifera but was only 50% for aspirin. The screening showed different pharmacological profiles. The red algae (Laurencia glandulfera and Hypnea musciformis) and brown algae (Cystoseira barbata and Sargassum vulgare) had endowed with the double analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. The red algae Geliduim sesquipedale have only anti-inflammatory activity and the other one endowed only with an analgesic activity (Enteromorpha compressa, Chaetomorpha linum, Cystoseira ericoidies, Sacchoriza bulbosa et Corralina officinalis). The simultaneous or individual presence of the analgesic and\\or anti-inflammatory activities of the various extracts can find its application in the therapeutic domain. PMID:23461139

  14. Effects of dietary administration of guanosine monophosphate on the growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-10-01

    The present study explored the dietary administration effects of guanosine monophosphate (GMP) on growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (GMP-0.1), 0.2% (GMP-0.2), 0.4% (GMP-0.4) and 0.8% (GMP-0.8) purified GMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The obtained results clearly indicated that, growth performance of red sea bream enhanced by dietary GMP supplementation compared to control and significantly higher final weight was found in fish fed diet group GMP-0.4. Specific growth rate (SGR) and percent weight gain (%WG) also significantly higher in diet group GMP-0.4 in compared to control and it was not differed (P > 0.05) with diet group GMP-0.8. Feed intake significantly increased with the supplementation of GMP. Feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) also improved (P < 0.05) when fish fed the diets containing GMP and diet group GMP-0.4 showed the significantly higher value in compared to control. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by GMP supplementation and the significantly higher protein digestibility was observed in fish fed diet groups GMP-0.2, GMP-0.4 and GMP-0.8. Among the measured non specific immune parameters peroxidase activity (PA), respiratory burst activity (NBT), Bactericidal activity (BA) were significantly affected by dietary supplementation and highest value obtained in diet group GMP-0.4. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity (LA), and agglutination antibody titer also increased (P > 0.05) by GMP supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with GMP supplementation. In terms of oxidative stress GMP-0.2 showed best condition with low oxidative stress and high antioxidant level. Moreover, the fish fed GMP

  15. Dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Sony, Nadia Mahjabin

    2016-09-01

    Our study explored the dietary effects of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to enhance growth, digestibility, innate immune responses and stress resistance of juvenile red sea bream. A semi-purified basal diet supplemented with 0% (Control), 0.1% (AMP-0.1), 0.2% (AMP-0.2), 0.4% (AMP-0.4) and 0.8% (AMP-0.8) purified AMP to formulate five experimental diets. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish (mean initial weight 3.4 g) for 56 days. The results indicated that dietary AMP supplements tended to improve growth performances. One of the best ones was found in diet group AMP-0.2, followed by diet groups AMP-0.1, AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. The Apparent digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein and lipid) also improved by AMP supplementation and the significantly highest dry matter digestibility was observed in diet group AMP-0.2. Fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 had significantly higher peroxidase and bactericidal activities than fish fed the control diet. Nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT) activity was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) greater in fish fed diet groups AMP-0.4 and AMP-0.8. Total serum protein, lysozyme activity and agglutination antibody titer were also increased (P > 0.05) by dietary supplementation. In contrast, catalase activity decreased with AMP supplementation. Moreover, the fish fed AMP supplemented diets had better improvement (P < 0.05) in body lipid contents, condition factor, hematocrit content and glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level than the control group. Supplementation also improved both freshwater and oxidative stress resistances. Interestingly, the fish fed diet groups AMP-0.2 and AMP-0.4 showed the least oxidative stress condition. Finally it is concluded that, dietary AMP supplementation enhanced the growth, digestibility, immune response and stress resistance of red sea bream. The regression analysis revealed that a dietary AMP supplementation between 0.2 and 0.4% supported weight gain and

  16. Please mind the gap - Visual census and cryptic biodiversity assessment at central Red Sea coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Pearman, John K; Anlauf, Holger; Irigoien, Xabier; Carvalho, Susana

    2016-07-01

    Coral reefs harbor the most diverse assemblages in the ocean, however, a large proportion of the diversity is cryptic and, therefore, undetected by standard visual census techniques. Cryptic and exposed communities differ considerably in species composition and ecological function. This study compares three different coral reef assessment protocols: i) visual benthic reef surveys: ii) visual census of Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) plates; and iii) metabarcoding techniques of the ARMS (including sessile, 106-500 μm and 500-2000 μm size fractions), that target the cryptic and exposed communities of three reefs in the central Red Sea. Visual census showed a dominance of Cnidaria (Anthozoa) and Rhodophyta on the reef substrate, while Porifera, Bryozoa and Rhodophyta were the most abundant groups on the ARMS plates. Metabarcoding, targeting the 18S rRNA gene, significantly increased estimates of the species diversity (p < 0.001); revealing that Annelida were generally the dominant phyla (in terms of reads) of all fractions and reefs. Furthermore, metabarcoding detected microbial eukaryotic groups such as Syndiniophyceae, Mamiellophyceae and Bacillariophyceae as relevant components of the sessile fraction. ANOSIM analysis showed that the three reef sites showed no differences based on the visual census data. Metabarcoding showed a higher sensitivity for identifying differences between reef communities at smaller geographic scales than standard visual census techniques as significant differences in the assemblages were observed amongst the reefs. Comparison of the techniques showed no similar patterns for the visual techniques while the metabarcoding of the ARMS showed similar patterns amongst fractions. Establishing ARMS as a standard tool in reef monitoring will not only advance our understanding of local processes and ecological community response to environmental changes, as different faunal components will provide complementary information but

  17. Please mind the gap - Visual census and cryptic biodiversity assessment at central Red Sea coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Pearman, John K; Anlauf, Holger; Irigoien, Xabier; Carvalho, Susana

    2016-07-01

    Coral reefs harbor the most diverse assemblages in the ocean, however, a large proportion of the diversity is cryptic and, therefore, undetected by standard visual census techniques. Cryptic and exposed communities differ considerably in species composition and ecological function. This study compares three different coral reef assessment protocols: i) visual benthic reef surveys: ii) visual census of Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) plates; and iii) metabarcoding techniques of the ARMS (including sessile, 106-500 μm and 500-2000 μm size fractions), that target the cryptic and exposed communities of three reefs in the central Red Sea. Visual census showed a dominance of Cnidaria (Anthozoa) and Rhodophyta on the reef substrate, while Porifera, Bryozoa and Rhodophyta were the most abundant groups on the ARMS plates. Metabarcoding, targeting the 18S rRNA gene, significantly increased estimates of the species diversity (p < 0.001); revealing that Annelida were generally the dominant phyla (in terms of reads) of all fractions and reefs. Furthermore, metabarcoding detected microbial eukaryotic groups such as Syndiniophyceae, Mamiellophyceae and Bacillariophyceae as relevant components of the sessile fraction. ANOSIM analysis showed that the three reef sites showed no differences based on the visual census data. Metabarcoding showed a higher sensitivity for identifying differences between reef communities at smaller geographic scales than standard visual census techniques as significant differences in the assemblages were observed amongst the reefs. Comparison of the techniques showed no similar patterns for the visual techniques while the metabarcoding of the ARMS showed similar patterns amongst fractions. Establishing ARMS as a standard tool in reef monitoring will not only advance our understanding of local processes and ecological community response to environmental changes, as different faunal components will provide complementary information but

  18. A new lineage of halophilic, wall-less, contractile bacteria from a brine-filled deep of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Antunes, André; Rainey, Fred A; Wanner, Gerhard; Taborda, Marco; Pätzold, Jürgen; Nobre, M Fernanda; da Costa, Milton S; Huber, Robert

    2008-05-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic bacterium designated strain SSD-17B(T) was isolated from the hypersaline brine-sediment interface of the Shaban Deep, Red Sea. Cells were pleomorphic but usually consisted of a central coccoid body with one or two "tentacle-like" protrusions. These protrusions actively alternated between a straight, relaxed form and a contracted, corkscrew-like one. A peptidoglycan layer was not detected by electron microscopy. The organism forms "fried-egg"-like colonies on MM-X medium. The organism is strictly anaerobic and halophilic and has an optimum temperature for growth of about 30 to 37 degrees C and an optimum pH of about 7. Nitrate and nitrite are reduced; lactate is a fermentation product. The fatty acid profile is dominated by straight saturated and unsaturated chain compounds. Menaquinone 4 is the major respiratory quinone. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated strain SSD-17B(T) represents a novel and distinct lineage within the radiation of the domain Bacteria. The branching position of strain SSD-17B(T) was equidistant to the taxa considered to be representative lineages of the phyla Firmicutes and Tenericutes (with its sole class Mollicutes). The phenotypic and phylogenetic data clearly show the distinctiveness of this unusual bacterium, and we therefore propose that strain SSD-17B(T) (= DSM 18853 = JCM 14575) represents a new genus and a new species, for which we recommend the name Haloplasma contractile gen. nov., sp. nov. We are also of the opinion that the organism represents a new order-level taxon, for which we propose the name Haloplasmatales.

  19. Deep-sea foraminifera from the Cassidaigne Canyon (NW Mediterranean): assessing the environmental impact of bauxite red mud disposal.

    PubMed

    Fontanier, C; Fabri, M-C; Buscail, R; Biscara, L; Koho, K; Reichart, G J; Cossa, D; Galaup, S; Chabaud, G; Pigot, L

    2012-09-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages were investigated from two sites along the axis of the Cassidaigne Canyon (NW Mediterranean Sea). Both areas are contaminated by bauxite red mud enriched in iron, titanium, vanadium and chromium. These elemental enrichments are related to bauxite-derived minerals and various amorphous phases. At the shallowest station located very close to the pipe outlet, the benthic living foraminiferal community is characterised by a very low diversity and by an unusual dominance of Gyroidina umbonata and Bulimina marginata. The mechanical stress related to downslope transport of red mud is a likely source of hydro-sedimentary pollution precluding the settlement of diverse fauna. The living and dead foraminiferal faunas from the deepest site are typical of oligo-mesotrophic conditions prevailing in natural environments. There, bauxite residues have obviously no environmental impact on foraminiferal faunas. The bioavailability of trace metals is likely low as elemental enrichments were not observed in foraminiferal test chemistry.

  20. [Nutrient distribution and its relationship with occurrence of red tide in coastal area of East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiurong; Wang, Xiulin; Sun, Xia; Shi, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Chenjian; Zhang, Chuansong; Lu, Rong

    2003-07-01

    Nutrient (NO3(-)-N, PO4(3-)-P, Sio3(2-)-Si, NH4(+)-N, etc.) concentrations in coastal area of East China Sea were measured during April 25 to May 2, 2002, and the relationship between the spatial distribution of the nutrients and the red tide occurrence in the studied area was analyzed. The results showed that compared to the 1st class seawater quality of the national standard, the concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and PO4(-)-P were 46% and 60% higher, respectively, showing that the studied area, especially the Changjiang River estuary and the Hangzhou Bay, was at a disadvantage of eutrophication. Furthermore, the nutrient concentrations inshore were much higher than those offshore, and the isolines nearly paralleled with the coastline, meaning that the nutrient distributions were mainly influenced by terrestrial discharges. It also showed that the relatively high concentrations of nutrients, especially DIN and PO4(3-)-P, might result in the red-tide occurrence. However, the red tide did not occur in the area with the highest concentrations of the nutrients, further demonstrating that the eutrophication was not the unique environmental factor inducing red-tide occurrence.

  1. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. PMID:26549842

  2. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A.; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. PMID:26549842

  3. Ultramafic inclusions and host alkali olivine basalts of the southern coastal plain of the Red Sea, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghent, Edward D.; Coleman, Robert Griffin; Hadley, Donald G.

    1979-01-01

    A variety of mafic and ultramafic inclusions occur within the pyroclastic components of the Al Birk basalt, erupted on the southern Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia from Pleistocene time to the present. Depleted harzburgites are the only inclusions contained within the basalts that were erupted through Miocene oceanic crust (15 km thick) in the vicinity of Jizan, whereas to the north in the vicinity of Al Birk, alkali basalts that were erupted through a thicker Precambrian crust (48 km thick) contain mixtures of harzburgites, cumulate gabbro, and websterite inclusions accompanied by large (> 2 cm) megacrysts of glassy alumina-rich clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and spinel. Microprobe analyses of individual minerals from the harzburgites, websterites, and cumulate gabbros reveal variations in composition that can be related to a complex mantle history during the evolution of the alkali basalts. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts may represent early phases that crystallized from the alkali olivine basalt magma at depths less than 35 km. Layered websterites and gabbros with cumulate plagioclase and clinopyroxene may represent continuing crystallization of the alkali olivine basalt magma in the lower crust when basaltic magma was not rapidly ascending. It is significant that the megacrysts and cumulate inclusions apparently form only where the magmas have traversed the Precambrian crust, whereas the harzburgite-bearing basalts that penetrated a much thinner Miocene oceanic crust reveal no evidence of mantle fractionation. These alkali olivine basalts and their contained inclusions are related in time to present-day rifting in the Red Sea axial trough. The onshore, deep-seated, undersaturated magmas are separated from the shallow Red Sea rift subalkaline basalts by only 170 km. The contemporaneity of alkaline olivine and subalkaline basalts requires that they must relate directly to the separation of the Arabian plate from the African plate.

  4. The effects of 2-bromopalmitate on the fatty acid composition in differentiating adipocytes of red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    PubMed

    Oku, Hiromi; Tokuda, Masaharu; Umino, Tetsuya

    2009-04-01

    To determine whether external factors affect the adipogenic function of fish adipocytes, the effects of 2-bromopalmitate (a PPAR agonist) on the fatty acid composition in differentiating adipocytes of red sea bream were investigated in vitro. In the presence of 2-bromopalmitate, the red sea bream adipocytes were differentiated and the effects on the fatty acid composition and the adipogenic gene expression were analyzed. With the level of 2-bromopalmitate, the content of 16:1n-7, a delta-9 desaturation product, increased in association with the increase in a stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression level while the triglyceride accumulation was not affected. Subsequently, the effects on the bioconversion of the n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, which are main series of dietary essential fatty acids, were examined. In the presence of 300 microM of 18:3n-3 or 18:2n-6, red sea bream stromal-vascular cells accumulated the lipid in the cytoplasm within 3 days by the fatty acid uptake with the increase of corresponding fatty acid contents. Furthermore, in both the 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 stored cells, the products of delta-6 desaturation (18:4n-3 and 18:3n-6, respectively) and C(18-20) elongation (20:3n-3 and 20:2n-6, respectively) were detected. However, neither the delta-6 desatutration nor C(18-20) elongation of 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 were enhanced by 2-bromopalmitate treatment. In conclusion, the results indicate that the adipocyte function in fish, e.g. adipogenic gene expression and fatty acid composition, can be modified by external factors and a main effect of 2-bromopalmitate is the increase in the content of delta-9 desaturation product by stimulating the SCD gene expression.

  5. Bio-optical properties of the northern Red Sea and the Gulf of Eilat (Aqaba) during winter 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambler, Noga

    2005-10-01

    Underwater light field, chlorophyll-a concentration , phytoplankton absorption spectra, chlorophyll-a specific absorption coefficients, and phytoplankton diversity in the Gulf of Eilat (Aqaba) and northern Red Sea, were studied during a cruise on the RV 'Meteor' in winter - early spring, February-March 1999. The mean euphotic depth of the entire area was 86 ± 8 m. The vertical attenuation coefficient, K d (PAR), averaged from the surface down to 100 m depth, was only 0.054 ± 0.006 m - 1, as might be expected from the low chlorophyll-a concentrations (< 0.4 μg l - 1). The spectral attenuation coefficients were similar in the entire area. The contribution of yellow substances to attenuation was negligible. Chlorophyll-a specific absorption coefficients for both the UV and PAR domains in the entire study area were representative of the dominant picophytoplankton. When mixing depth reached 600 m, on average each alga was exposed to 3% of surface light. Phytoplankton populations, as quantified by flow cytometry, were typical of oligotrophic oceans. In the Red Sea, the deep chlorophyll maximum developed at about 50-60 m, ˜ 1 × 10 8 cells l - 1, dominated by high concentrations of Prochlorococcus (˜ 75%) , whereas in the Gulf of Eilat (Aqaba), ˜ 4 × 10 7 cells l - 1, eukaryotic algae (˜ 20%), cyanobacteria ( Synechococcus) (˜ 50%), and Prochlorococcus (˜ 25%), were distributed throughout the water column. The cell size and pigment concentrations did not depend on depth distribution or geographic location. The northern Red Sea is permanently stratified, while at that time of year, the Gulf waters were deeply mixed. The results illustrate the common features of these two domains, while underscoring their differences. Even though they share the typical phytoplankton attributes of oligotrophic ocean provinces, mixing regimes still set them apart.

  6. Redescription of Cheilinus quinquecinctus Rüppell, 1835 (Pisces: Perciformes, Labridae), a valid endemic Red Sea wrasse.

    PubMed

    Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Alpermann, Tilman J; Mal, Ahmad O

    2016-01-01

    The labrid fish Cheilinus quinquecinctus Rüppell, originally described from the Red Sea, has long been regarded as a junior synonym of C. fasciatus (Bloch). Herein, both nominal species are redescribed, based on examination of the types and additional material from the Red Sea (for C. quinquecinctus) and the Indo-West Pacific (for C. fasciatus). Rüppell's description of Cheilinus quinquecinctus was originally based on three syntypes, and the most representative adult specimen is designated as the lectotype. We show that Cheilinus quinquecinctus is restricted to the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, and it differs from the similar C. fasciatus in having modally fewer gill rakers on the first gill arch, a total of 13-16 (mean 13.9, usually 13 or 14 ) (vs. 13-16, mean 14.7, usually 14 or 15), in developing a ragged posterior margin of the caudal fin with age (versus only upper and lower caudal-fin lobes developing with age), and in its color pattern. The phylogenetic analysis of the COI barcoding region accords with the species status of C. quinquecinctus with the placement of the two sister species in two divergent and reciprocally monophyletic evolutionary lineages. A full description of C. quinquecinctus and diagnosis of C. fasciatus is provided here for comparison. In addition, the data include a table of the results of the meristic and morphological examination of type and additional specimens of both species from throughout their distribution ranges as well as a table of gill-raker counts of all examined specimens. Underwater color photographs are provided for comparison of juveniles, females and males of both species. PMID:27615897

  7. Tectonic development of passive continental margins of the southern and central Red Sea with a comparison to Wilkes Land, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.; Eittreim, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    The continental margins of the southern and central Red Sea and most of Wilkes Land, Antarctica have bulk crustal configurations and detailed structures that are best explained by a prolonged history of magmatic expansion that followed a brief, but intense period of mechanical extension. Extension on the Red Sea margins was spatially confined to a rift that was 20-30 km in width. The rifting phase along the Arabian margin of the central and southern Red Sea occurred 25-32 Ma ago, primarily by detachment faulting at upper crustal levels and ductile uniform stretching at depth. Rifting was followed by an early magmatic phase during which the margin was invaded by dikes and plutons, primarily of gabbro and diorite, at 20-24 Ma, after the crust was mechanically thinned from 40 km to ??? 20 km. We infer continued spreading after that in which broad shelves were formed by a process of magmatic expansion, because the offshore crust is only 8-15 km thick, including sediment, and seismic reflection data do not depict horst and graben or half graben structures from which mechanical extension might be inferred. The Wilkes Land margin is similar to the Arabian example. The margin is about 150 km in width, the amount of upper crustal extension is too low to explain the change in sub-sediment crustal thickness from ??? 35 km on the mainland to < 10 km beneath the margin and reflectors in the deepest seismic sequence are nearly flat lying. Our model requires large volumes of melt in the early stages of continental rifting. The voluminous melt might be partly a product of nearby hot spots, such as Afar and partly the result of an initial period of partial fusion in the deep continental lithosphere under lower temperatures than ordinarily required by dry solidus conditions. ?? 1991.

  8. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On On; Yang, Jiangke; Bougouffa, Salim; Wang, Yong; Batang, Zenon; Tian, Renmao; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2012-01-01

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals. PMID:22865078

  9. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported.

  10. Organochlorine contaminants in loggerhead sea turtle blood: extraction techniques and distribution among plasma and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Keller, J M; Kucklick, J R; McClellan-Green, P D

    2004-02-01

    Few studies have described the organochlorine (OC) contaminant concentrations found in sea turtle tissues. These studies have relied on the opportunistic sampling of either eggs or tissues from stranded carcasses. In this study, the use of whole blood samples as well as both blood components (plasma and red blood cells) were examined as a non-destructive alternative for monitoring OCs in free-ranging loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (n = 12) captured in Core Sound, North Carolina, USA and analyzed for 55 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 24 OC pesticides by gas chromatography with electron capture detection and mass spectrometry. Using pooled loggerhead sea turtle whole blood, three different liquid:liquid extraction techniques were compared. Results were similar in terms of recovery of internal standards, lipids, and OC concentrations. An extraction technique, employing formic acid and 1:1 methyl-tert-butyl-ether: hexane, was found to be satisfactory. This method was applied to the extraction of OCs from whole blood, plasma, and red blood cell (RBC) samples from five loggerhead sea turtles. Plasma contained the highest OC concentrations on a wet mass basis, followed by whole blood and RBCs. The majority of each OC compound was found in the plasma rather than the RBCs, suggesting that OC compounds preferentially partition into the plasma. On average (SD), 89.4% (3.1 %) of total PCBs, 83.4% (11.9%) of total chlordanes, 74.3% (15.1%) of mirex, 72.6% (4.8%) of total DDTs, and 80.1% (16.6%) of dieldrin were found in the plasma. The concentrations of total PCBs, mirex, total chlordanes, and total DDTs measured in both components of the blood significantly correlated to those in whole blood. These are the first reported OC concentrations in sea turtle blood. They were found to be similar to previously reported levels in blood components of humans and of reptiles from relatively clean

  11. Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: Process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiao; Jiang, Xiaohui; Li, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box-Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 3.5, and CCR = 160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 6.1, and CDR80 = 110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of -2.81% and -0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  12. Incidence of lesions on Fungiidae corals in the eastern Red Sea is related to water temperature and coastal pollution.

    PubMed

    Furby, K A; Apprill, A; Cervino, J M; Ossolinski, J E; Hughen, K A

    2014-07-01

    As sea surface temperatures rise and the global human population increases, large-scale field observations of marine organism health and water quality are increasingly necessary. We investigated the health of corals from the family Fungiidae using visual observations in relation to water quality and microbial biogeochemistry parameters along 1300 km of the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. At large scales, incidence of lesions caused by unidentified etiology showed consistent signs, increasing significantly from the northern to southern coast and positively correlated to annual mean seawater temperatures. Lesion abundance also increased to a maximum of 96% near the populous city of Jeddah. The presence of lesioned corals in the region surrounding Jeddah was strongly correlated with elevated concentrations of ammonium and changes in microbial communities that are linked to decreased water quality. This study suggests that both high seawater temperatures and nutrient pollution may play an indirect role in the formation of lesions on corals.

  13. Identification and interpretation of tectonic features from ERTS-1 imagery: Southwestern North America and the Red Sea area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator); Tubbesing, L.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ERTS-1 imagery was utilized to study major fault and tectonic lines and their intersections in southwestern North America. A system of transverse shear faults was recognized in the California Coast Ranges, the Sierra Nevada, the Great Basin, and Mexico. They are interpreted as expressions of a major left-lateral shear which predated the San Andreas system, the opening of the Gulf of California and Basin and Range rift development. Tectonic models for Basin and Range, Coast Ranges, and Texas-Parras shears were developed. Geological structures and Precambrian metamorphic trend lines of schistosity were studied across the Red Sea rift.

  14. Composition and antioxidant activity of red fruit liqueurs.

    PubMed

    Sokół-Łętowska, Anna; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Wińska, Katarzyna; Szumny, Antoni; Nawirska-Olszańska, Agnieszka; Mizgier, Paulina; Wyspiańska, Dorota

    2014-08-15

    Fruits traditionally used for liqueurs are a good source of phenolic compounds endowed with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to compare the content of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins and the antioxidant capacity of liqueurs made from red fruits. The liqueurs were made from fruits of 10 species: chokeberry, cornelian cherry, black rose, blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, mahonia, sloe, strawberry, and sour cherry. The liqueurs from black rose, chokeberry, sloe and mahonia fruits contained the most of substances which react with the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (671, 329, 271 and 218 mg GAE/100 mL, respectively) and had the highest antioxidant activity. The samples stored at a temperature of 30 °C had antioxidant activity from 3% to 11% lower than the fresh samples. After 6 months, anthocyanins degraded almost completely in the samples stored at 30 °C and at 15 °C there was from 0% (blackcurrant liqueurs) to 47% (sloe liqueurs) of their initial content and slightly more in sweet liqueurs. PMID:24679815

  15. Antioxidant Activity of a Red Lentil Extract and Its Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Amarowicz, Ryszard; Estrella, Isabell; Hernández, Teresa; Dueñas, Montserrat; Troszyńska, Agnieszka; Agnieszka, Kosińska; Pegg, Ronald B.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from red lentil seeds using 80% (v/v) aqueous acetone. The crude extract was applied to a Sephadex LH-20 column. Fraction 1, consisting of sugars and low-molecular-weight phenolics, was eluted from the column by ethanol. Fraction 2, consisting of tannins, was obtained using acetone-water (1:1; v/v) as the mobile phase. Phenolic compounds present in the crude extract and its fractions demonstrated antioxidant and antiradical activities as revealed from studies using a β-carotene-linoleate model system, the total antioxidant activity (TAA) method, the DPPH radical-scavenging activity assay, and a reducing power evaluation. Results of these assays showed the highest values when tannins (fraction 2) were tested. For instance, the TAA of the tannin fraction was 5.85 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, whereas the crude extract and fraction 1 showed 0.68 and 0.33 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, respectively. The content of total phenolics in fraction 2 was the highest (290 mg/g); the tannin content, determined using the vanillin method and expressed as absorbance units at 500 nm per 1 g, was 129. There were 24 compounds identified in the crude extract using an HPLC-ESI-MS method: quercetin diglycoside, catechin, digallate procyanidin, and p-hydroxybenzoic were the dominant phenolics in the extract. PMID:20054484

  16. Composition and antioxidant activity of red fruit liqueurs.

    PubMed

    Sokół-Łętowska, Anna; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Wińska, Katarzyna; Szumny, Antoni; Nawirska-Olszańska, Agnieszka; Mizgier, Paulina; Wyspiańska, Dorota

    2014-08-15

    Fruits traditionally used for liqueurs are a good source of phenolic compounds endowed with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to compare the content of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins and the antioxidant capacity of liqueurs made from red fruits. The liqueurs were made from fruits of 10 species: chokeberry, cornelian cherry, black rose, blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, mahonia, sloe, strawberry, and sour cherry. The liqueurs from black rose, chokeberry, sloe and mahonia fruits contained the most of substances which react with the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (671, 329, 271 and 218 mg GAE/100 mL, respectively) and had the highest antioxidant activity. The samples stored at a temperature of 30 °C had antioxidant activity from 3% to 11% lower than the fresh samples. After 6 months, anthocyanins degraded almost completely in the samples stored at 30 °C and at 15 °C there was from 0% (blackcurrant liqueurs) to 47% (sloe liqueurs) of their initial content and slightly more in sweet liqueurs.

  17. Mycobacteriosis in wild rabbitfish Siganus rivulatus associated with cage farming in the Gulf of Eilat, Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Diamant, A; Banet, A; Ucko, M; Colorni, A; Knibb, W; Kvitt, H

    2000-02-01

    Infection patterns of Mycobacterium marinum were studied over a period of 3 yr in wild rabbitfish Siganus nivulatus populations associated with commercial mariculture cages and inhabiting various sites along the Israeli Red Sea coastline. Mycobacteriosis was first recorded from the Red Sea in 1990 in farmed sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax and is absent from records of studies on parasites and diseases of wild rabbitfish carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. A sharp increase in the prevalence of the disease in cultured and wild fish in the region has occurred since. A total of 1142 rabbitfish were examined over a 3 yr period from inside mariculture net cages, from the cage surroundings and from several sites along the coast. Histological sections of spleens were examined for presence of granulomatous lesions. Overall prevalence levels of 50% were recorded in the rabbitfish sampled inside the net cages and 39% at the cages' close surroundings, 21% at a sandy beach site 1.2 km westwards, 35% at Eilat harbour 3 km to the south and 42% at a coral reef site about 10 km south of the cages. In addition, 147 fish belonging to 18 native Red Sea species were sampled from 2 sites, the net cage farm perimeter and the coral reef area, and examined for similar lesions. None of those from the coral reef were infected with Mycobacterium; however, 9 of 14 species collected from the cage surroundings were infected. An increase in prevalence of mycobacteriosis in the mariculture farm area was noted from 1995 to 1997. At the same time, a significant increase in prevalence was also apparent at the coral reef sampling site. Two M. marinum isolates from rabbitfish captured at Eilat harbour and the coral reef site were shown by 16S rDNA sequencing analysis to be identical to isolates from rabbitfish trapped inside the mariculture cages as well as isolates from locally cultured sea bass D. labrax. The implications of spreading of M. marinum infection in wild fish populations in the Gulf of

  18. Discovery of a red quasar with recurrent activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S.; Baes, M.; Gentile, G.; Roy, R.; Saikia, D.J.; Singh, M.; Joshi, R.; Chandola, H.C.; Patgiri, M. E-mail: Sumana.Nandi@UGent.be

    2014-07-01

    We report a new double-double radio quasar (DDRQ) J0746+4526 which exhibits two cycles of episodic activity. From radio continuum observations at 607 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and 1400 MHz from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey we confirm its episodic nature. We examine the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optical spectrum and estimate the black hole mass to be (8.2 ± 0.3)×10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} from its observed Mg II emission line, and the Eddington ratio to be 0.03. The black hole mass is significantly smaller than for the other reported DDRQ, J0935+0204, while the Eddington ratios are comparable. The SDSS spectrum is significantly red-continuum-dominated, suggesting that it is highly obscured with E(B – V){sub host} = 0.70 ± 0.16 mag. This high obscuration further indicates the existence of a large quantity of dust and gas along the line of sight, which may have a key role in triggering the recurrent jet activity in such objects.

  19. Offshore Evidence for an Undocumented Tsunami Event in the ‘Low Risk’ Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat, Northern Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Goodman Tchernov, Beverly; Katz, Timor; Shaked, Yonathan; Qupty, Nairooz; Kanari, Mor; Niemi, Tina; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-01-01

    Although the Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat is located in the tectonically active northern Red Sea, it has been described as low-risk with regard to tsunami activity because there are no modern records of damaging tsunami events and only one tsunami (1068 AD) referred to in historical records. However, this assessment may be poorly informed given that the area was formed by and is located along the seismically active Dead Sea Fault, its population is known to fluctuate in size and literacy in part due to its harsh hyper-arid climate, and there is a dearth of field studies addressing the presence or absence of tsunamigenic deposits. Here we show evidence from two offshore cores for a major paleotsunami that occurred ~2300 years ago with a sedimentological footprint that far exceeds the scarce markers of the historically mentioned 1068 AD event. The interpretation is based on the presence of a laterally continuous and synchronous, anomalous sedimentological deposit that includes allochtonous inclusions and unique structural characteristics. Based on sedimentological parameters, these deposits could not be accounted for by other transport events, or other known background sedimentological processes. PMID:26815553

  20. Sediment characteristics and water quality in the two hyper-saline lagoons along the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasul, Najeeb; Al-Farawati, Radwan; Al-Harbi, Omer; Naser Qutub, Abdul

    2013-04-01

    widens. In the case of Khawr ash Shaibah al Masdudah the mouth is wide and it faces the open sea directly, whereas the mouth of Khawr ash Shaibah al Maftuhah, although narrower, the tidal current is only strong until the channel to the lagoon bends almost 90° where the tidal current dissipates, resulting in the restricted water and sediment movement in the lagoon. The coarser sediments are stained gray-black because of a reducing environment and formation of authigenic pyrite. Stagnant condition prevails inside the lagoons because of insufficient exchange of water with the open sea and lack of rainfall causes hyper-saline conditions. Higher salinity values were evident in the shallow waters, whereas oxygen saturation ranged between 77 % (southern lagoon) and 107 % (northern lagoon) which could be attributed to the complex nature of the southern lagoon. Reactive phosphate and nitrite concentrations in the surface waters were low and in many locations under the detection limit reflecting the oligotrophic behaviour of the Red Sea and limited supply of nutrients from adjacent areas. There is an abundant presence of trace metals especially in fine sediments that has the tendency to adsorb the metals more efficiently. There is an inverse correlation between heavy metals and carbonate content in the sediments, and much stronger particularly with Cr, V and Co. The Landsat ETM identifies two depth zones in the lagoons and shows the effects of the influence of flooding and ebbing on the sediment distribution and the extent of the water cover seasonally.

  1. In situ effects of simulated overfishing and eutrophication on settlement of benthic coral reef invertebrates in the Central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Christian; Voolstra, Christian R; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the Central Red Sea, healthy coral reefs meet intense coastal development, but data on the effects of related stressors for reef functioning are lacking. This in situ study therefore investigated the independent and combined effects of simulated overfishing through predator/grazer exclusion and simulated eutrophication through fertilizer addition on settlement of reef associated invertebrates on light-exposed and -shaded tiles over 4 months. At the end of the study period invertebrates had almost exclusively colonized shaded tiles. Algae were superior settling competitors on light-exposed tiles. On the shaded tiles, simulated overfishing prevented settlement of hard corals, but significantly increased settlement of polychaetes, while simulated eutrophication only significantly decreased hard coral settlement relative to controls. The combined treatment significantly increased settlement of bryozoans and bivalves compared to controls and individual manipulations, but significantly decreased polychaetes compared to simulated overfishing. These results suggest settlement of polychaetes and hard corals as potential bioindicators for overfishing and eutrophication, respectively, and settlement of bivalves and bryozoans for a combination of both. Therefore, if the investigated stressors are not controlled, phase shifts from dominance by hard corals to that by other invertebrates may occur at shaded reef locations in the Central Red Sea. PMID:24765573

  2. A new species of Coryogalops (Perciformes: Gobiidae) and the first adult record of Feia nympha from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marcelo; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the gobiid genus Coryogalops, C. nanus sp. nov. is described from the Red Sea. Coryogalops nanus sp. nov. is distinguished from congeners in having dorsal-fin rays VI + I,10; anal-fin rays I,9; pectoral-fin rays 12-14 (lowest count known for the genus), two upper rays with free tips; pelvic fins I,5, joined to form an emarginate disc, no pelvic frenum; predorsal area and narrow area at base of first dorsal fin naked; longitudinal scale series 26-29; transverse scale rows counted forward 6-7; transverse scale rows counted backward 7-8; circumpeduncular scale rows 11-12; seven transverse suborbital rows of sensory papillae; no tentacle above upper eye margin; anterior nostril tubular, without flap at its tip, posterior nostril pore-like; body semitranslucent, covered with small scattered orange-yellow spots and speckles, those in predorsal area contain black dots; an internal row of white spots along ventral part of body above anal-fin base and on caudal peduncle; head with small scattered orange to yellowish brown spots; first dorsal fin with two broad white bands at base of fin and distally, and with hyaline area densely dotted with melanophores in the middle of fin; preserved specimens opaque white to yellowish with sparse melanophores. An adult specimen of Feia nympha is recorded for the first time in the Red Sea and the lateral line system of this species is described. PMID:27394550

  3. In situ effects of simulated overfishing and eutrophication on settlement of benthic coral reef invertebrates in the Central Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Voolstra, Christian R.; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the Central Red Sea, healthy coral reefs meet intense coastal development, but data on the effects of related stressors for reef functioning are lacking. This in situ study therefore investigated the independent and combined effects of simulated overfishing through predator/grazer exclusion and simulated eutrophication through fertilizer addition on settlement of reef associated invertebrates on light-exposed and -shaded tiles over 4 months. At the end of the study period invertebrates had almost exclusively colonized shaded tiles. Algae were superior settling competitors on light-exposed tiles. On the shaded tiles, simulated overfishing prevented settlement of hard corals, but significantly increased settlement of polychaetes, while simulated eutrophication only significantly decreased hard coral settlement relative to controls. The combined treatment significantly increased settlement of bryozoans and bivalves compared to controls and individual manipulations, but significantly decreased polychaetes compared to simulated overfishing. These results suggest settlement of polychaetes and hard corals as potential bioindicators for overfishing and eutrophication, respectively, and settlement of bivalves and bryozoans for a combination of both. Therefore, if the investigated stressors are not controlled, phase shifts from dominance by hard corals to that by other invertebrates may occur at shaded reef locations in the Central Red Sea. PMID:24765573

  4. Changing composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Cold seeps are unique ecosystems that are generally characterized by high salinity and reducing solutions. Seepage fluid, the major water influx of this system, contains hypersaline water, sediment pore water, and other components. The Thuwal cold seeps were recently discovered on the continental margin of the Red Sea. Using 16S rRNA gene pyro-sequencing technology, microbial communities were investigated by comparing samples collected in 2011 and 2013. The results revealed differences in the microbial communities between the two sampling times. In particular, a significantly higher abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota was coupled with lower salinity in 2013. In the brine pool, the dominance of Desulfobacterales in 2011 was supplanted by MGI Thaumarchaeota in 2013, perhaps due to a reduced supply of hydrogen sulfide from the seepage fluid. Collectively, this study revealed a difference in water components in this ecosystem between two sampling times. The results indicated that the seawater in this cold seep displayed a greater number of characteristics of normal seawater in 2013 than in 2011, which might represent the dominant driving force for changes in microbial community structures. This is the first study to provide a temporal comparison of the microbial biodiversity of a cold seep ecosystem in the Red Sea. PMID:26059861

  5. Geothermal measurements in the northern Red Sea: Implications for lithospheric thermal structure and mode of extension during continental rifting

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Cochran, J.R. )

    1989-09-10

    The northern Red Sea is a continental rift in the process of transition from continental to oceanic rifting. We present 191 new heat flow measurements from the northern Red Sea forming three traverses across the water covered portion of the rift. The heat flow across the rift systematically increases from values of about 125 mW/m{sup 2} seaward of the coasts to average values greater than 250 mW/m{sup 2} in the axial depression. The heat flow measurements are evaluated for environmental disturbances. These are found to be generally small. The largest estimated disturbance results from the relief of the seafloor and of the top of a subbottom evaporite layer. The relief on these surfaces can account for the 20% point to point scatter typically observed in the heat flow measurements. Limits are placed on systematic disturbances to the heat flow pattern across the rift. The estimated largest systematic disturbance results from sediment blanketing which may cause a reduction in the heat flow on the order of 10%.

  6. Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Snider, Allison; Rosebraugh, Sydney; Devine, Amanda M; Devine, Thomas D; Plaisance, Laetitia; Knowlton, Nancy; Leray, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)) deployed for 18 months. DNA barcoding of non-sessile specimens >2 mm revealed 83 OTUs in six phyla, of which only 25% matched a reference sequence in public databases. Metabarcoding of the 2 mm - 500 μm and sessile bulk fractions revealed 1197 OTUs in 15 animal phyla, of which only 4.9% matched reference barcodes. These results highlight the scarcity of COI data for cryptobenthic organisms of the Red Sea. Compared with data obtained using similar methods, our results suggest that Gulf of Aqaba reefs are less diverse than two Pacific coral reefs but much more diverse than an Atlantic oyster reef at a similar latitude. The standardized approaches used here show promise for establishing baseline data on biodiversity, monitoring the impacts of environmental change, and quantifying patterns of diversity at regional and global scales. PMID:27584940

  7. A new species of Coryogalops (Perciformes: Gobiidae) and the first adult record of Feia nympha from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marcelo; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O

    2016-03-31

    A new species of the gobiid genus Coryogalops, C. nanus sp. nov. is described from the Red Sea. Coryogalops nanus sp. nov. is distinguished from congeners in having dorsal-fin rays VI + I,10; anal-fin rays I,9; pectoral-fin rays 12-14 (lowest count known for the genus), two upper rays with free tips; pelvic fins I,5, joined to form an emarginate disc, no pelvic frenum; predorsal area and narrow area at base of first dorsal fin naked; longitudinal scale series 26-29; transverse scale rows counted forward 6-7; transverse scale rows counted backward 7-8; circumpeduncular scale rows 11-12; seven transverse suborbital rows of sensory papillae; no tentacle above upper eye margin; anterior nostril tubular, without flap at its tip, posterior nostril pore-like; body semitranslucent, covered with small scattered orange-yellow spots and speckles, those in predorsal area contain black dots; an internal row of white spots along ventral part of body above anal-fin base and on caudal peduncle; head with small scattered orange to yellowish brown spots; first dorsal fin with two broad white bands at base of fin and distally, and with hyaline area densely dotted with melanophores in the middle of fin; preserved specimens opaque white to yellowish with sparse melanophores. An adult specimen of Feia nympha is recorded for the first time in the Red Sea and the lateral line system of this species is described.

  8. Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient suggests limited acclimatization potential to warming.

    PubMed

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R; Wahl, Martin

    2015-03-10

    Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This suggests regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This suggests variable acclimatization potential to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization potential in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals.

  9. Epinephelus geoffroyi (Klunzinger, 1870) (Pisces: Serranidae), a valid species of grouper endemic to the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.

    PubMed

    Randall, John E; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Krupp, Friedhelm; Rose, Jean Michel; Fricke, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The grouper Epinephelus geoffioyi (Klunzinger), type locality Red Sea, previously regarded as a synonym of E. chlorostigma (Valenciennes) is recognized as a valid species. It is differentiated from E. chlorostigma by having 25-29 (modally 27) gill rakers vs. 23-26 (modally 24), a more angular anal fin, the dark spots on the abdomen more widely separated, and lacking a clear white margin posteriorly on the caudal fin. The missing holotype of E. geoffroyi was found at the Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart (SMNS 233, 191 mm). Epinephelits chlorostigma is wide-ranging from the Gulf of Aden and east coast of Africa to Samoa; it is reported from the depth range of 32-280 m. Epinephelus geoffroyi is presently known only from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden at depths of 3-32 m. Illustrations are provided for three other species of groupers with numerous small dark spots, E. areolatus (Forsskål), E. gabriellae Randall & Heemstra, and E. polylepis Randall & Heemstra, that are, or might be, sympatric with E. geoffroyi. PMID:26287104

  10. Extensive phenotypic plasticity of a Red Sea coral over a strong latitudinal temperature gradient suggests limited acclimatization potential to warming.

    PubMed

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmoshin; Hohn, Sönke; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R; Wahl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Global warming was reported to cause growth reductions in tropical shallow water corals in both, cooler and warmer, regions of the coral species range. This suggests regional adaptation with less heat-tolerant populations in cooler and more thermo-tolerant populations in warmer regions. Here, we investigated seasonal changes in the in situ metabolic performance of the widely distributed hermatypic coral Pocillopora verrucosa along 12° latitudes featuring a steep temperature gradient between the northern (28.5°N, 21-27°C) and southern (16.5°N, 28-33°C) reaches of the Red Sea. Surprisingly, we found little indication for regional adaptation, but strong indications for high phenotypic plasticity: Calcification rates in two seasons (winter, summer) were found to be highest at 28-29°C throughout all populations independent of their geographic location. Mucus release increased with temperature and nutrient supply, both being highest in the south. Genetic characterization of the coral host revealed low inter-regional variation and differences in the Symbiodinium clade composition only at the most northern and most southern region. This suggests variable acclimatization potential to ocean warming of coral populations across the Red Sea: high acclimatization potential in northern populations, but limited ability to cope with ocean warming in southern populations already existing at the upper thermal margin for corals. PMID:25754672

  11. In situ effects of simulated overfishing and eutrophication on settlement of benthic coral reef invertebrates in the Central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Christian; Voolstra, Christian R; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the Central Red Sea, healthy coral reefs meet intense coastal development, but data on the effects of related stressors for reef functioning are lacking. This in situ study therefore investigated the independent and combined effects of simulated overfishing through predator/grazer exclusion and simulated eutrophication through fertilizer addition on settlement of reef associated invertebrates on light-exposed and -shaded tiles over 4 months. At the end of the study period invertebrates had almost exclusively colonized shaded tiles. Algae were superior settling competitors on light-exposed tiles. On the shaded tiles, simulated overfishing prevented settlement of hard corals, but significantly increased settlement of polychaetes, while simulated eutrophication only significantly decreased hard coral settlement relative to controls. The combined treatment significantly increased settlement of bryozoans and bivalves compared to controls and individual manipulations, but significantly decreased polychaetes compared to simulated overfishing. These results suggest settlement of polychaetes and hard corals as potential bioindicators for overfishing and eutrophication, respectively, and settlement of bivalves and bryozoans for a combination of both. Therefore, if the investigated stressors are not controlled, phase shifts from dominance by hard corals to that by other invertebrates may occur at shaded reef locations in the Central Red Sea.

  12. Seismic anisotropy and subduction-induced mantle fabrics beneath the Arabian and Nubian Plates adjacent to the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Gao, Stephen S.; Liu, Kelly H.; Mohamed, Abdelnasser A.; Yu, Youqiang; Fat-Helbary, Raafat E.

    2014-04-01

    For most continental areas, the mechanisms leading to mantle fabrics responsible for the observed anisotropy remain ambiguous, partially due to the lack of sufficient spatial coverage of reliable seismological observations. Here we report the first joint analysis of shear-wave splitting measurements obtained at stations on the Arabian and Nubian Plates adjacent to the Red Sea. More than 1100 pairs of high-quality splitting parameters show dominantly N-S fast orientations at all 47 stations and larger-than-normal splitting times beneath the Afro-Arabian Dome (AAD). The uniformly N-S fast orientations and large splitting times up to 1.5 s are inconsistent with significant contributions from the lithosphere, which is about 50-80 km thick beneath the AAD and even thinner beneath the Red Sea. The results can best be explained by simple shear between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere associated with northward subduction of the African/Arabian Plates over the past 150 Ma.

  13. Geothermal reconnaissance of the area between Marsa Alam and Ras Banas, northern Red Sea, Egypt, using aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, Saada A.

    2016-06-01

    Aeromagnetic data of the area between Marsa Alam and Ras Banas were interpreted to estimate the Curie point isotherm, investigate the geothermal gradient and to determine its surface heat flow. Appling spectral analysis and 2-D inverse modeling techniques to aeromagnetic anomalies has provided equitable promising geological results, useful to further geothermal exploration. Spectral analysis indicates that, the area is underlined by an average Curie-point depth of about 10.58 km. This implies an average thermal heat flow (137 mW/m2) greater than the average heat flow of the Red Sea margins (116 mW/m2). The investigated area was divided into three subregions and the average depth to centroid was estimated for each subregion. 2-D inverse modeling technique indicated that the magnetic sources can be interpreted by a set of dykes dipping to the NE and SW. The integration of radially power spectrum and 2-D inverse modeling was used to estimating the depths to the bottom of these magnetic bodies (equivalent to the Curie-point depth). It indicated a general decrease from 24 to 10 km from west to east toward the Red Sea rifting zone. The calculated surface heat flow increases from 55 mW/m2 to >150 mW/m2 in the same direction. Consequently, the offshore area between Ras Banas and Marsa Alam is a promising area for further exploration of geothermal resources.

  14. Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Snider, Allison; Rosebraugh, Sydney; Devine, Amanda M; Devine, Thomas D; Plaisance, Laetitia; Knowlton, Nancy; Leray, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)) deployed for 18 months. DNA barcoding of non-sessile specimens >2 mm revealed 83 OTUs in six phyla, of which only 25% matched a reference sequence in public databases. Metabarcoding of the 2 mm - 500 μm and sessile bulk fractions revealed 1197 OTUs in 15 animal phyla, of which only 4.9% matched reference barcodes. These results highlight the scarcity of COI data for cryptobenthic organisms of the Red Sea. Compared with data obtained using similar methods, our results suggest that Gulf of Aqaba reefs are less diverse than two Pacific coral reefs but much more diverse than an Atlantic oyster reef at a similar latitude. The standardized approaches used here show promise for establishing baseline data on biodiversity, monitoring the impacts of environmental change, and quantifying patterns of diversity at regional and global scales.

  15. Resilience of a High Latitude Red Sea Frining Corals Exposed to Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, M.; Moustafa, M. S.; Moustafa, S.; Moustafa, Z. D.

    2013-05-01

    Since 2004, multi-year study set out to establish linkages between fringing coral reefs in the northern Gulf of Suez, Red Sea, and local weather. Insight into local meteorological processes may provide a better understanding of the direct influence weather has on a fringing coral reef. To establish trends, seawater temperature and meteorological record were collected at a small fringing coral reef (Zaki's Reef), located near Ein Sokhna, Egypt (29.5oN & 32.4oE). Monitoring air and water temperature provides evidence of seasonality and interannual variability and may reveal correlations between reef health and climate conditions in this region. Prior to this study, there were no known long-term studies investigating coral reefs in this region. Approximately 35 coral taxa are known to survive the extreme temperature and salinity regime found here, yet only six corals compose 94% of coral cover on Zaki's Reef. Dominant corals include: Acropora humilis, A. microclados, A. hemprichii, Litophyton arboretum, Stylophora pistillata, Porites columna, and P. plantulata. Seawater temperatures were collected at 30 minutes intervals at 5 locations. Seawater temperature data indicate that corals experience 4-6.5oC daily temperature variations and seasonal variations that exceed 29oC. Air temperatures were collected just landward of the reef were compared to Hurghada and Ismailia 400 and 200 km south and north of the study site, respectively. Time series analysis results indicate that air temperature dominant frequencies are half-daily, daily, and yearly cycles, while water temperatures show yearly cycles. A comparison of air temperature with neighboring locations indicates that air temperatures at Ein Sokhna ranged between near 0o C to an excess of 55o C, yet, daily means for Ein Sokhna and Hurghada were very similar (24.2o C and. 25.2o C, respectively). Maximum daily air temperatures at the study site exceeded maximum air temperature at Hurghada (400 km south) by almost 7o C

  16. First record and redescription of Macandrewella cochinensis Gopalakrishnan, 1973 (Copepoda, Scolecitrichidae) from the Red Sea, with notes on swarm formation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M.; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract During a study of the epipelagic zooplankton carried out near the fringing reef around Sharm El-Sheikh area, in the northern Red Sea, female and male specimens of the poorly known calanoid copepod Macandrewella cochinensis Gopalakrishnan, 1973 were collected. This is the first record of species occurrence in the Red Sea. Macandrewella cochinensis was previously known only from the offshore water of Cochin, south west of India. The Red Sea specimens are described in details herein to allow their comparison with the specimens from the type locality, because original description of M. cochinensis is incomplete and causes some taxonomic confusion. The most important characters that may have been overlooked in the original description are: shape of projections of the female distolateral prosomal borders, details of morphology of the asymmetrical female genital double-somite and presence of leg 5 in female. PMID:24194657

  17. The characteristics and dynamics of wave-driven flow across a platform coral reef in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, S. J.; Churchill, J. H.; Davis, K. A.; Farrar, J. T.; Pineda, J.; Starczak, V.

    2016-02-01

    Current dynamics across a platform reef in the Red Sea near Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, are examined using 18 months of current profile, pressure, surface wave, and wind observations. The platform reef is 700 m long, 200 m across with spatial and temporal variations in water depth over the reef ranging from 0.6 to 1.6 m. Surface waves breaking at the seaward edge of the reef cause a 2-10 cm setup of sea level that drives cross-reef currents of 5-20 cm s-1. Bottom stress is a significant component of the wave setup balance in the surf zone. Over the reef flat, where waves are not breaking, the cross-reef pressure gradient associated with wave setup is balanced by bottom stress. The quadratic drag coefficient for the depth-average flow decreases with increasing water depth from Cda = 0.17 in 0.4 m of water to Cda = 0.03 in 1.2 m of water. The observed dependence of the drag coefficient on water depth is consistent with open-channel flow theory and a hydrodynamic roughness of zo = 0.06 m. A simple one-dimensional model driven by incident surface waves and wind stress accurately reproduces the observed depth-averaged cross-reef currents and a portion of the weaker along-reef currents over the focus reef and two other Red Sea platform reefs. The model indicates the cross-reef current is wave forced and the along-reef current is partially wind forced.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Analyses of Symbiodinium Physiology of the Coral Pocillopora verrucosa along Large-Scale Nutrient and Temperature Gradients in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmohsin; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Algal symbionts (zooxanthellae, genus Symbiodinium) of scleractinian corals respond strongly to temperature, nutrient and light changes. These factors vary greatly along the north-south gradient in the Red Sea and include conditions, which are outside of those typically considered optimal for coral growth. Nevertheless, coral communities thrive throughout the Red Sea, suggesting that zooxanthellae have successfully acclimatized or adapted to the harsh conditions they experience particularly in the south (high temperatures and high nutrient supply). As such, the Red Sea is a region, which may help to better understand how zooxanthellae and their coral hosts successfully acclimatize or adapt to environmental change (e.g. increased temperatures and localized eutrophication). To gain further insight into the physiology of coral symbionts in the Red Sea, we examined the abundance of dominant Symbiodinium types associated with the coral Pocillopora verrucosa, and measured Symbiodinium physiological characteristics (i.e. photosynthetic processes, cell density, pigmentation, and protein composition) along the latitudinal gradient of the Red Sea in summer and winter. Despite the strong environmental gradients from north to south, our results demonstrate that Symbiodinium microadriaticum (type A1) was the predominant species in P. verrucosa along the latitudinal gradient. Furthermore, measured physiological characteristics were found to vary more with prevailing seasonal environmental conditions than with region-specific differences, although the measured environmental parameters displayed much higher spatial than temporal variability. We conclude that our findings might present the result of long-term acclimatization or adaptation of S. microadriaticum to regionally specific conditions within the Red Sea. Of additional note, high nutrients in the South correlated with high zooxanthellae density indicating a compensation for a temperature-driven loss of photosynthetic

  19. Spatio-temporal analyses of Symbiodinium physiology of the coral Pocillopora verrucosa along large-scale nutrient and temperature gradients in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Sawall, Yvonne; Al-Sofyani, Abdulmohsin; Banguera-Hinestroza, Eulalia; Voolstra, Christian R

    2014-01-01

    Algal symbionts (zooxanthellae, genus Symbiodinium) of scleractinian corals respond strongly to temperature, nutrient and light changes. These factors vary greatly along the north-south gradient in the Red Sea and include conditions, which are outside of those typically considered optimal for coral growth. Nevertheless, coral communities thrive throughout the Red Sea, suggesting that zooxanthellae have successfully acclimatized or adapted to the harsh conditions they experience particularly in the south (high temperatures and high nutrient supply). As such, the Red Sea is a region, which may help to better understand how zooxanthellae and their coral hosts successfully acclimatize or adapt to environmental change (e.g. increased temperatures and localized eutrophication). To gain further insight into the physiology of coral symbionts in the Red Sea, we examined the abundance of dominant Symbiodinium types associated with the coral Pocillopora verrucosa, and measured Symbiodinium physiological characteristics (i.e. photosynthetic processes, cell density, pigmentation, and protein composition) along the latitudinal gradient of the Red Sea in summer and winter. Despite the strong environmental gradients from north to south, our results demonstrate that Symbiodinium microadriaticum (type A1) was the predominant species in P. verrucosa along the latitudinal gradient. Furthermore, measured physiological characteristics were found to vary more with prevailing seasonal environmental conditions than with region-specific differences, although the measured environmental parameters displayed much higher spatial than temporal variability. We conclude that our findings might present the result of long-term acclimatization or adaptation of S. microadriaticum to regionally specific conditions within the Red Sea. Of additional note, high nutrients in the South correlated with high zooxanthellae density indicating a compensation for a temperature-driven loss of photosynthetic

  20. Biological activity of a red-tide alga--A. tamarense under co-cultured condition with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian-qiang; Yu, Zhi-ming; Tian, Yun; Song, Xiu-xian; Hong, Hua-sheng; Zheng, Tian-ling

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech, one of red-tide alga, and two strains of marine bacteria, Bacillius megaterium (S7) and B. halmapulus (S10) isolated from Xiamen Western Sea, was investigated by evaluating the growth state of A. tamarense and the variation of beta-glucosidase activity in co-culture system. The results showed the growth and multiplication of the alga were related with the concentration, genus speciality of the bacteria, and growth stage of the alga itself. The growth of A. tamarense was obviously inhibited by S7 and S10 at high concentration. Either inhibition or promotion contributed much more clearly in earlier than in later stage of the growth of the alga. Furthermore, there was a roughly similar variation trend of the activity of extra-cellular enzyme, beta-glucosidase, in the water of the separately co-cultured bacteria S7 and S10 with the alga. The beta-glucosidase activity (beta-GlcA) rapidly increased during the later algal growth accompanying the increase of the lysis of the alga cells. The obvious inhibition of A. tamarense by marine bacteria at high concentration and evident increase of beta-GlcA in co-colture system would help us in better understanding the relationship between red-tide alga and bacteria, and also enlightenedus the possible use of bacteria in the bio-control of red-tide.

  1. Toxic effects of zinc on the development, growth, and survival of red sea bream Pagrus major embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Liang; Shan, Xiujuan; Xiao, Zhizhong; Wang, Qiyao; Dou, Shuozeng

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the zinc toxicity to red sea bream Pagrus major embryos and larvae at 18 +/- 1 degrees C (33 +/- 1 per thousand in salinity) under laboratory conditions. The acute toxicity tests indicated that zinc 48-h LC50 to embryos and 96-h LC50 to larvae were 4.3 (3.3-6.3; 95% confidence limits) and 10.1 (9.0-11.4) mg l(-1), respectively, suggesting that embryos were more sensitive than larvae to zinc exposure. The subchronic toxicity test, in which embryos and larvae were continuously exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mg Zn2+ l(-1) solutions for 10 days, demonstrated that waterborne zinc had distinctly toxic effects on the development, growth, and survival of red sea bream embryos and larvae. Zinc exposure at concentrations > or = 0.5 mg l(-1) would lead to a low hatching rate (19-78%, vs. 98% in controls), high mortality (29-91%, vs. 10% in controls), and morphological abnormality (12-77%, vs. 0.3% in controls) in embryos and larvae, while it caused delay in time-to-hatch in embryos at concentrations > or = 1.0 mg l(-1). These four biological parameters were zinc concentration dependent and could be effective bioindicators for evaluating the toxicity of zinc to the early life stage of this fish. Heartbeats of embryos (9-13 beats 10 s(-1)) were relatively low and were not significantly influenced by zinc concentration, although they rose remarkably with elevated zinc concentration in larvae at the end of the test, particularly when it was > or = 1.0 mg l(-1) (36-38, vs. 31 beats 10 s(-1) in controls). The total length (LT) of the larvae at the end of the test was reduced by 12.2% and 15.6% in the 1.0 and 2.0 mg l(-1) solutions but did not vary significantly in other solutions in comparison with the controls. Heartbeat and LT were less sensitive to zinc exposure and might not be good biological parameters for determining the toxicity of zinc to the early life stage of red sea bream. PMID:19504147

  2. Diel patterns in sea urchin activity and predation on sea urchins on the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. A. L.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2011-09-01

    Understanding diel patterns in sea urchin activity is important when assessing sea urchin populations and when interpreting their interactions with predators. Here we employ a combination of surveys and a non-invasive tethering technique to examine these patterns in an intact coral reef system on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). We also assess local scale variation in relative diurnal predation pressure. Surveys revealed that sea urchins were active and exposed at night. Echinometra mathaei and Echinothrix calamaris were the most abundant species with significantly higher night densities (0.21 and 0.03 ind. m-2, respectively), than daytime densities (0.05 and 0.001, respectively). Bioassays revealed that exposed adult E. mathaei (the most abundant sea urchin species) were 30.8 times more likely to be eaten during the day than at night when controlling for sites. This observation concurs with widely held assumptions that nocturnal activity is a risk-related adaptive response to diurnal predation pressure. Despite relatively intact predator communities on the GBR, potential predation pressure on diurnally exposed E. mathaei assays was variable at a local scale and the biomass of potential fish predators at each site was a poor predictive measure of this variation. Patterns in predation appear to be more complex and variable than we may have assumed.

  3. Photoperiod, temperature, and food availability as drivers of the annual reproductive cycle of the sea urchin Echinometra sp. from the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, Omri; Loya, Yossi

    2015-03-01

    In spite of the efforts invested in the search for the environmental factors that regulate discrete breeding periods in marine invertebrates, they remain poorly understood. Here, we present the first account of the annual reproductive cycle of the pantropical sea urchin Echinometra sp. from the Gulf of Aqaba/Eilat (Red Sea) and explore some of the main environmental variables that drive echinoid reproduction. Monthly measurements of gonado-somatic indexes and histological observations of 20 specimens revealed a single seasonal reproductive cycle, with gametogenesis in males and females being highly synchronized. Gametogenesis commenced in June and peak spawning occurred between September and October. Gonado-somatic indexes were significantly correlated with seawater temperatures but not with photoperiod. The latter cycle lagged behind the gonado-somatic cycle by two months, suggesting that the onset of gametogenesis corresponds to shortening day length, while spawning may be driven by warming seawater temperatures. Gonads remained quiescent throughout the winter and spring (January through May) when temperatures were at their lowest. Chlorophyll- a concentrations increased significantly in the months following spawning (October through January). These high concentrations are indicative of high phytoplankton abundance and may reflect the increase in food availability for the developing larvae. Of the external test dimensions, length presented the highest correlation to body weight, indicating length as the best predictor for body size in Echinometra. Neither sexual dimorphism nor size differences between males and females were detected, and the sex ratios were approximately 1:1 in three distant Echinometra populations. Environmentally regulated reproduction, as occurs in sea urchins, might face severe outcomes due to anthropogenic disturbances to the marine environment. Consequently, there is a need to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms that drive and

  4. Mechanisms and Effects of Summertime Transport of African Dust Through the Tokar Mountain Gap to the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Very high dust loading over the Red Sea region in summer strongly affects the nutrition balance and thermal and dynamic regimes of the sea. The observations suggest that small-scale local dynamic and orographic effects, from both the Arabian and African sides, strongly contribute to dust plume formation. To better understand and quantify these processes we present here the first high resolution modeling study of the dust outbreak phenomena in June 2012 over East Africa, the Red Sea, and the Arabian Peninsula using the WRF-Chem model. We identified several dust generating dynamical processes that range from convective to synoptic scales, including: synoptic cyclones, nocturnal low-level jets, and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems. The simulations reveal an eastward transport of African dust across the Red Sea. Over the northern part of the Red Sea most of the dust transport occurs beyond 2 km above ground level and is strengthened by a pressure gradient formed by low pressure over the eastern Mediterranean and high pressure over the Arabian Peninsula. Across the central and southern parts of the Red Sea dust is mostly transported below 2 km height. During the study period dust is a dominant contributor (87%) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), producing a domain average cooling effect of -12.1 W m-2 at surface, a warming of 7.1 W m-2 in the atmosphere, and a residual cooling of -4.9 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. WRF-Chem simulations demonstrate that both dry and wet deposition processes contribute significantly to dust removal from the atmosphere. During the dust outbreak 49.2 Tg of dust deposits within the calculation domain, which is approximately 90% of the total dust emission of 54.5 Tg. Model results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations but generally underestimate the observed AOD maximum values.

  5. Lonely populations in the deep: genetic structure of red gorgonians at the heads of submarine canyons in the north-western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Portela, Rocío; Cerro-Gálvez, Elena; Taboada, Sergi; Tidu, Carlo; Campillo-Campbell, Carolina; Mora, Joan; Riesgo, Ana

    2016-09-01

    The red gorgonian Paramuricea clavata plays a central role in coralligenous ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea, being relatively abundant in shallow habitats (5-35 m depth). Recently, deeper populations have been discovered at the heads of submarine canyons in the north-western Mediterranean Sea, between 50 and 70 m deep. Colonies from some of these deeper populations were exceptionally large (>1 m high), contrasting with the general prevalence of smaller size classes in shallower populations. Importantly, the high pressure of trawling activities on the nearby continental shelf could threaten these populations of large and old colonies. Although the genetic diversity and structure of populations in shallow habitats is relatively well known, very little is known about deeper populations. We aimed to assess the genetic structure, connectivity and potential demographic decline of six deep populations of P. clavata located at the heads of La Fonera, Blanes and Arenys de Mar submarine canyons, as well as potential gene flow between those and the two nearest shallow populations. A total of 188 individuals were genotyped using nine microsatellite loci. Results showed strong genetic differentiation among populations in different submarine canyons, among populations within one of the canyons and between shallow and deep populations. Gene flow among populations was very limited, estimates of effective population size in some populations were small, and evidence of recent population reductions (bottlenecks) was detected in several populations. The large genetic differentiation in populations of P. clavata among canyons is related to limited effective dispersal.

  6. Characterization of the putatively introduced red alga Acrochaetium secundatum (Acrochaetiales, Rhodophyta) growing epizoically on the pelage of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentall, Gena B.; Rosen, Barry H.; Kunz, Jessica M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Saunders, Gary W.; LaRoche, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological associations between epibionts (organisms that live on the surface of another living organism) and vertebrates have been documented in both marine and terrestrial environments, and may be opportunistic, commensal, or symbiotic (Lewin et al. 1981, Holmes 1985, Allen et al. 1993, Bledsoe et al. 2006, Pfaller et al. 2008, Suutari et al. 2010). Although epibiont proliferation is frequently reported on slow-moving, sparsely haired organisms such as manatees and sloths, reports from densely furred, highly mobile mammals are much less common. There are reports of epizoic algae for several species of pinnipeds (Kenyon and Rice 1959, Scheffer 1962, Baldridge 1977, Allen et al. 1993), which rely to varying degrees on both pelage and blubber for thermoregulation, but the phenomenon has not been widely described. Scheffer (1962) noted that red algae was fairly common on the pelage of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), pinnipeds for which fur likely makes a comparatively high contribution to thermoregulation (Donohue et al. 2000). For species with pelage that plays a critical role of thermal insulation, it seems implausible that an epibiont would persist on healthy individuals that devote significant energy resources toward grooming and actively maintaining their coat. Biological characteristics of epibiont settlement and attachment, and physiological requirements of epizoic species play key roles in their successful colonization and potential host impacts. To investigate this relationship, we explore a novel discovery of an epizoic alga from southern sea otters, including describing algal development on sea otter hair and molecular identification of the algae.

  7. Coral microbial community dynamics in response to anthropogenic impacts near a major city in the central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Maren; Roik, Anna; Porter, Adam; Zubier, Khalid; Mudarris, Mohammed S; Ormond, Rupert; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-04-30

    Coral-associated bacteria play an increasingly recognized part in coral health. We investigated the effect of local anthropogenic impacts on coral microbial communities on reefs near Jeddah, the largest city on the Saudi Arabian coast of the central Red Sea. We analyzed the bacterial community structure of water and corals (Pocillopora verrucosa and Acropora hemprichii) at sites that were relatively unimpacted, exposed to sedimentation & local sewage, or in the discharge area of municipal wastewaters. Coral microbial communities were significantly different at impacted sites: in both corals the main symbiotic taxon decreased in abundance. In contrast, opportunistic bacterial families, such as e.g. Vibrionaceae and Rhodobacteraceae, were more abundant in corals at impacted sites. In conclusion, microbial community response revealed a measurable footprint of anthropogenic impacts to coral ecosystems close to Jeddah, even though the corals appeared visually healthy. PMID:26763316

  8. Source water quality shaping different fouling scenarios in a full-scale desalination plant at the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Manes, Carmem-Lara de O; Aubry, Cyril; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The complexity of Reverse Osmosis (RO) membrane fouling phenomenon has been widely studied and several factors influencing it have been reported by many researchers. This original study involves the investigation of two different fouling profiles produced at a seawater RO desalination plant installed on a floating mobile barge. The plant was moved along the coastline of the Red Sea in Saudi Arabia. The two locations where the barge was anchored showed different water quality. At the second location, two modules were harvested. One of the modules was pre-fouled by inorganics during plant operation at the previous site while the other was installed at the second site. Fouled membranes were subjected to a wide range of chemical and microbiological characterization procedures. Drastically different fouling patterns were observed in the two membranes which indicates the influence of source water quality on membrane surface modification and on fouling of RO membranes.

  9. Coral microbial community dynamics in response to anthropogenic impacts near a major city in the central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Maren; Roik, Anna; Porter, Adam; Zubier, Khalid; Mudarris, Mohammed S; Ormond, Rupert; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-04-30

    Coral-associated bacteria play an increasingly recognized part in coral health. We investigated the effect of local anthropogenic impacts on coral microbial communities on reefs near Jeddah, the largest city on the Saudi Arabian coast of the central Red Sea. We analyzed the bacterial community structure of water and corals (Pocillopora verrucosa and Acropora hemprichii) at sites that were relatively unimpacted, exposed to sedimentation & local sewage, or in the discharge area of municipal wastewaters. Coral microbial communities were significantly different at impacted sites: in both corals the main symbiotic taxon decreased in abundance. In contrast, opportunistic bacterial families, such as e.g. Vibrionaceae and Rhodobacteraceae, were more abundant in corals at impacted sites. In conclusion, microbial community response revealed a measurable footprint of anthropogenic impacts to coral ecosystems close to Jeddah, even though the corals appeared visually healthy.

  10. Zschokkella icterica sp. nov. (Myxozoa, Myxosporea), a pathogen of wild rabbitfish Siganus luridus (Ruppell, 1829) from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Diamant, A; Paperna, H

    1992-02-21

    Zschokkella icterica sp. nov. is described from the liver and gall bladder of wild rabbitfish Siganus luridus from the Red Sea. This coelozoic myxosporean produces large (300 × 400 μm) Plasmodia that inhabit the hepatic bile ducts. The species is disporoblastic and pansporoblast forming. Small plasmodia are found in the gall bladder. Spores average 9.9 urn in length, 5.8 μm in width and 3.5 um in thickness, and the polar filament has 3-4 coils. It is suggested that the hepatic bile ducts are the primary target organ, their blockage by the parasite producing cholestasis and duct breakdown. In severe infections, invasion of the liver parenchyma by the parasite occurred. In these cases, the infection was often associated with massive hepatic necrosis, ascites and jaundice.

  11. Source water quality shaping different fouling scenarios in a full-scale desalination plant at the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Manes, Carmem-Lara de O; Aubry, Cyril; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The complexity of Reverse Osmosis (RO) membrane fouling phenomenon has been widely studied and several factors influencing it have been reported by many researchers. This original study involves the investigation of two different fouling profiles produced at a seawater RO desalination plant installed on a floating mobile barge. The plant was moved along the coastline of the Red Sea in Saudi Arabia. The two locations where the barge was anchored showed different water quality. At the second location, two modules were harvested. One of the modules was pre-fouled by inorganics during plant operation at the previous site while the other was installed at the second site. Fouled membranes were subjected to a wide range of chemical and microbiological characterization procedures. Drastically different fouling patterns were observed in the two membranes which indicates the influence of source water quality on membrane surface modification and on fouling of RO membranes. PMID:23164217

  12. [The activities of the Russian Society of Red Cross during the First World War].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, L Ye; Rudoiy, N A

    2013-01-01

    During the First World War, the Russian Society of Red Cross used experience of previous wars expanded its activities. The medical service functioned in the conditions of cruel war. For the first time in history, the weapon of mass destruction was applied The merit of the Russian society of Red Cross was development of specialized medical care.

  13. 76 FR 46325 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Red Ribbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...: Red Ribbon Week Patch DEA Form 316 and 316A ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection under... Participate and Red Ribbon Week Patch Activity Report. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable... the information from Boy/Girl Scout Troop Leaders that express an interest in participating in DEA...

  14. Evolution of the Red Sea Continental Margin from Integrated Analyses of Gravity, Magnetic, and Receiver Function Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Mohamed, A. A.; Gao, S. S.; Mickus, K. L.; Liu, K. H.; Yu, Y.; Elsheikh, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The development of evolutionary models and constraints for the extensional mechanisms which govern continental rifting is of fundamental significance toward understanding the breakup of continents and the role of volcanism in achieving successful rifting. To analyze the transitional nature of the Red Sea rift (RSR) passive margins and to quantify the mechanism through which extension has been accommodated, we examined a total of 3531 high-quality radial receiver functions from multiple temporary deployments in Saudi Arabia and the Levant as well as data recently acquired by the Egyptian National Seismic Network. Egypt is characterized by a relatively constant crustal thickness of approximately 37 km, while the southern Arabian Shield is roughly 35 km on average. The crust beneath the Eastern Desert of Egypt is significantly thinned with an average thickness of about 26 km. Observations of Vp/Vs across the Arabian-Nubian Shield indicate highly similar intermediate to mafic compositions, supporting well-accepted theories for juvenile arc accretion of relatively uniform makeup. Thinned crust as far as 130 km inland on the Egyptian margin indicates a highly asymmetric crustal structure across the Red Sea, supporting a model invoking simple shear extensional mechanisms. Joint modeling using satellite gravity and magnetic data with RF Moho depth constraints reveals the presence of high-density high-magnetic susceptibility mafic complexes which we interpret as volcanic margins in the northern RSR at ~25.5°N and the southern RSR at ~19.5°N. We believe the development of the northern RSR margin is accompanied by isolated volcanism associated with slow spreading rates since the Oligocene.

  15. In-situ effects of eutrophication and overfishing on physiology and bacterial diversity of the red sea coral Acropora hemprichii.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Christian; Villa Lizcano, Javier Felipe; Bayer, Till; Roder, Cornelia; Aranda, Manuel; Wild, Christian; Voolstra, Christian R

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs of the Central Red Sea display a high degree of endemism, and are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic effects due to intense local coastal development measures. Overfishing and eutrophication are among the most significant local pressures on these reefs, but there is no information available about their potential effects on the associated microbial community. Therefore, we compared holobiont physiology and 16S-based bacterial communities of tissue and mucus of the hard coral Acropora hemprichii after 1 and 16 weeks of in-situ inorganic nutrient enrichment (via fertilizer diffusion) and/or herbivore exclusion (via caging) in an offshore reef of the Central Red Sea. Simulated eutrophication and/or overfishing treatments did not affect coral physiology with respect to coral respiration rates, chlorophyll a content, zooxanthellae abundance, or δ (15)N isotopic signatures. The bacterial community of A. hemprichii was rich and uneven, and diversity increased over time in all treatments. While distinct bacterial species were identified as a consequence of eutrophication, overfishing, or both, two bacterial species that could be classified to the genus Endozoicomonas were consistently abundant and constituted two thirds of bacteria in the coral. Several nitrogen-fixing and denitrifying bacteria were found in the coral specimens that were exposed to experimentally increased nutrients. However, no particular bacterial species was consistently associated with the coral under a given treatment and the single effects of manipulated eutrophication and overfishing could not predict the combined effect. Our data underlines the importance of conducting field studies in a holobiont framework, taking both, physiological and molecular measures into account. PMID:23630625

  16. In-situ Effects of Eutrophication and Overfishing on Physiology and Bacterial Diversity of the Red Sea Coral Acropora hemprichii

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Christian; Villa Lizcano, Javier Felipe; Bayer, Till; Roder, Cornelia; Aranda, Manuel; Wild, Christian; Voolstra, Christian R

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs of the Central Red Sea display a high degree of endemism, and are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic effects due to intense local coastal development measures. Overfishing and eutrophication are among the most significant local pressures on these reefs, but there is no information available about their potential effects on the associated microbial community. Therefore, we compared holobiont physiology and 16S-based bacterial communities of tissue and mucus of the hard coral Acropora hemprichii after 1 and 16 weeks of in-situ inorganic nutrient enrichment (via fertilizer diffusion) and/or herbivore exclusion (via caging) in an offshore reef of the Central Red Sea. Simulated eutrophication and/or overfishing treatments did not affect coral physiology with respect to coral respiration rates, chlorophyll a content, zooxanthellae abundance, or δ 15N isotopic signatures. The bacterial community of A. hemprichii was rich and uneven, and diversity increased over time in all treatments. While distinct bacterial species were identified as a consequence of eutrophication, overfishing, or both, two bacterial species that could be classified to the genus Endozoicomonas were consistently abundant and constituted two thirds of bacteria in the coral. Several nitrogen-fixing and denitrifying bacteria were found in the coral specimens that were exposed to experimentally increased nutrients. However, no particular bacterial species was consistently associated with the coral under a given treatment and the single effects of manipulated eutrophication and overfishing could not predict the combined effect. Our data underlines the importance of conducting field studies in a holobiont framework, taking both, physiological and molecular measures into account. PMID:23630625

  17. Spatial heterogeneity of zooplankton abundance and diversity in the Saudi coastal waters of the Southern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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