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Sample records for active region formation

  1. ON THE FORMATION OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake E-mail: aake@nbi.dk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoconvection can produce an active region without an initial coherent flux tube. A simulation was performed where a uniform, untwisted, horizontal magnetic field of 1 kG strength was advected into the bottom of a computational domain 48 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep. The up and down convective motions produce a hierarchy of magnetic loops with a wide range of scales, with smaller loops riding 'piggy-back' in a serpentine fashion on larger loops. When a large loop approaches the surface, it produces a small active region with a compact leading spot and more diffuse following spots.

  2. On the Formation of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Åke

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoconvection can produce an active region without an initial coherent flux tube. A simulation was performed where a uniform, untwisted, horizontal magnetic field of 1 kG strength was advected into the bottom of a computational domain 48 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep. The up and down convective motions produce a hierarchy of magnetic loops with a wide range of scales, with smaller loops riding "piggy-back" in a serpentine fashion on larger loops. When a large loop approaches the surface, it produces a small active region with a compact leading spot and more diffuse following spots.

  3. Formation of active region and quiescent prominence magnetic field configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.; Bao, J. J.; Wu, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the formation of prominences, researchers studied chromospheric mass injection into an overlying coronal dipole magnetic field using a 2-D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model. Researchers propose that active region prominences are formed by chromospheric plasmas injected directly into the overlying coronal magnetic field and that quiescent prominences are formed by plasmas evaporated at the interface between spicules and corona. Hence, for the simulation of an active region prominence magnetic field we inject the mass from one side, but use a symmetric mass injection to form a quiescent prominence field configuration. Researchers try to find optimum conditions for the formation of Kippenhahn-Schuluter(K-S)type field configuration for stable support of the injection plasmas. They find that the formation of K-S type field configuration by mass injection requires a delicate balance between injection velocity, density, and overlying magnetic fields. These results may explain why a prominence does not form on every neutral line.

  4. FORMATION OF CORONAL HOLES ON THE ASHES OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Karachik, Nina V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Abramenko, Valentyna I. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.ed

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the formation of isolated non-polar coronal holes (CHs) on the remnants of decaying active regions (ARs) at the minimum/early ascending phase of sunspot activity. We follow the evolution of four bipolar ARs and measure several parameters of their magnetic fields including total flux, imbalance, and compactness. As regions decay, their leading and following polarities exhibit different dissipation rates: loose polarity tends to dissipate faster than compact polarity. As a consequence, we see a gradual increase in flux imbalance inside a dissipating bipolar region, and later a formation of a CH in place of more compact magnetic flux. Out of four cases studied in detail, two CHs had formed at the following polarity of the decaying bipolar AR, and two CHs had developed in place of the leading polarity field. All four CHs contain a significant fraction of magnetic field of their corresponding AR. Using potential field extrapolation, we show that the magnetic field lines of these CHs were closed on the polar CH at the North, which at the time of the events was in imbalance with the polar CH at the South. This topology suggests that the observed phenomenon may play an important role in transformation of toroidal magnetic field to poloidal field, which is a key step in transitioning from an old solar cycle to a new one. The timing of this observed transition may indicate the end of solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24.

  5. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M.; Rempel, M.; Schuessler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  6. Observation and Modelling of Micropore Formation in Active Network Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T. E.; Löfdahl, M. G.; Bercik, D. J.

    2002-06-01

    We present phase-diversity corrected G-band 4305 Å and 4364 Å continuum image time series showing the formation of a micropore in a small active region near disk center. The data were acquired at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma in June of 1997 and post-processed using the Phase Diverse Speckle (PDS) algorithm to produce diffraction limited images throughout the majority of both time series. The micropore dataset comprises a 29x29 Mm field of view and spans 5.1 hours with a 38 second cadence. The micropore forms in a strong sink area that can be seen to ``collect" many G-band bright points over the first 2 hours of the observation. During this time there is an occasional darkening at the sink point that may be the first unstable phase of the micropore formation. Once a stable dark pore forms in the flowfield, it grows to a maximum diameter of 1.2 Mm in approximately 1.9 hours. The pore persists for another 35 minutes before apparently being broken up by the intergranular flowfield. The total ``lifetime" of the stable pore phase is 2.5 hours. A separate nearby micropore of 1.5 Mm maximum diameter exists for the entire 5.2 hour data span. We show G-band and continuum movies of the micropore formation, correlation tracking flowfield analyses, G-band bright point tracking results, and area versus time plots for the micropore formation lifetime. The observational data are compared with fully compressible 3D MHD numerical simulations which show the development of a similar micropore structure within the computational domain. This research was supported by NASA SR&T grant NASW-98008, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, NSF and NASA funding at Michigan State University, and Lockheed Martin IRAD funding.

  7. Using Magnetic Helicity Diagnostics to Determine the Nature of Solar Active-Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    Employing a novel nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method that self-consistently infers instantaneous free magnetic-energy and relative magnetic-helicity budgets from single photospheric vector magnetograms, we recently constructed the magnetic energy-helicity (EH) diagram of solar active regions. The EH diagram implies dominant relative helicities of left-handed or right-handed chiralities for the great majority of active regions. The amplitude (budget) of these helicities scales monotonically with the free magnetic energy. This constructive, strongly preferential accumulation of a certain sense of magnetic helicity seems to disqualify recently proposed mechanisms relying on a largely random near-surface convection for the formation of the great majority of active regions. The existing qualitative formation mechanism for these regions remains the conventional Omega-loop emergence following a buoyant ascension from the bottom of the convection zone. However, exceptions to this rule include even eruptive active regions: NOAA AR 11283 is an obvious outlier to the EH diagram, involving significant free magnetic energy with a small relative magnetic helicity. Relying on a timeseries of vector magnetograms of this region, our methodology shows nearly canceling amounts of both senses of helicity and an overall course from a weakly left-handed to a weakly right-handed structure, in the course of which a major eruption occurs. For this and similarly behaving active regions the latest near-surface formation scenario might conceivably be employed successfully. Research partially supported by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No. PIRG07-GA-2010-268245 and by the European Union Social Fund (ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  8. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  9. High-wavenumber solar f-mode strengthening prior to active region formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant; Raichur, Harsha; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface mode, i.e. the f-mode, 1-2 days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location while no indication can yet be seen in the magnetograms. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the f-mode fans out in the diagnostic kΩ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and show for four ARs 11130, 11158, 11768, and 12051, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 km), the f-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. The idea that the f-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs on the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.

  10. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  11. Star formation activity in the southern Galactic H II region G351.63-1.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Verma, R. P.; Tamura, M.

    2014-06-01

    The southern Galactic high-mass star-forming region, G351.63-1.25, is an H II region-molecular cloud complex with a luminosity of ˜2.0 × 105 L⊙, located at a distance of 2.4 kpc from the Sun. In this paper, we focus on the investigation of the associated H II region, embedded cluster and the interstellar medium in the vicinity of G351.63-1.25. We address the identification of exciting source(s) as well as the census of the stellar populations, in an attempt to unfold star formation activity in this region. The ionized gas distribution has been mapped using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India, at three frequencies: 1280, 610 and 325 MHz. The H II region shows an elongated morphology and the 1280 MHz map comprises six resolved high-density regions encompassed by diffuse emission spanning 1.4 × 1.0 pc2. Based on the measurements of flux densities at multiple radio frequencies, the brightest ultracompact core has electron temperature Te˜7647 {±} 153 K and emission measure, EM˜2.0 {±} 0.8×107 cm-6 pc. The zero-age main-sequence spectral type of the brightest radio core is O7.5. We have carried out near-infrared observations in the JHKs bands using the SIRIUS camera on the 1.4 m Infrared Survey Facility telescope. The near-infrared images reveal the presence of a cluster embedded in nebulous fan-shaped emission. The log-normal slope of the K-band luminosity function of the embedded cluster is found to be ˜0.27 ± 0.03, and the fraction of the near-infrared excess stars is estimated to be 43 per cent. These indicate that the age of the cluster is consistent with ˜1 Myr. Other available data of this region show that the warm (mid-infrared) and cold (millimetre) dust emission peak at different locations indicating progressive stages of star formation process. The champagne flow model from a flat, thin molecular cloud is used to explain the morphology of radio emission with respect to the millimetre cloud and infrared brightness.

  12. STAR FORMATION IN SELF-GRAVITATING DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. EPISODIC FORMATION OF BROAD-LINE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    WangJianmin; Du Pu; Ge Junqiang; Hu Chen; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-02-20

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N{sub H} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the

  13. Formation of a double-decker magnetic flux rope in the sigmoidal solar active region 11520

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Guo, Y.; Sun, X. D.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s{sup –1}. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  14. Formation of a Double-decker Magnetic Flux Rope in the Sigmoidal Solar Active Region 11520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Sun, X. D.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s-1. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  15. Formation of δ-Sunspot in Simulations of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-04-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging pattherns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the -spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  16. δ-Sunspot Formation in Simulation of Active-region-scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  17. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  18. Formation and Eruption of an Active Region Sigmoid: NLFFF Modeling and MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Wu, S.; Feng, X.; Hu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    We present a magnetic analysis of the formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid in AR 11283 from 2011 September 4 to 6, which is jointly based on observations, static nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation and dynamic MHD simulation. A time sequence of NLFFF model's outputs are used to reproduce the evolution of the magnetic field of the region over three days leading to a X-class flare near the end of 2011 September 6. In the first day, a new bipolar emerges into the negative polarity of a pre-existing mature bipolar, forming a magnetic topology with a coronal null on the magnetic separatrix surface between the two flux system, while the field is still near potential at the end of the day. After then photospheric shearing and twisting build up non-potentiality in the embedded core region, with a flux rope (FR) formed there above the polarity inversion line by tether-cutting reconnection between the strongly sheared field lines. Within this duration, the core field has gained a magnetic free energy of ˜ 1032 erg. In this core a sigmoid is observed distinctly at 22:00 UT on September 6, closely before its eruption at 22:12 UT. Comparison of the SDO/AIA observations with coronal magnetic field suggests that the sigmoid is formed by emission due to enhanced current sheet along the BPSS (bald-patch separatrix surface, in which the field lines graze the line-tied photosphere at the neutral line) that separates the FR from the ambient flux. Quantitative inspection of the pre-eruption field on 22:00 UT suggests a mechanism for the eruption: tether cutting at the null triggers a torus instability of the FR--overlying field system. This pre-eruption NLFFF is then input into a time-dependent MHD model to simulate the fast magnetic evolution during eruption, which successfully reproduces the observations. The highly asymmetric magnetic environment along with the lateral location of the null leads to a strongly inclined non-radial direction of the eruption

  19. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  20. EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M.; Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.; Okamoto, T. J.; Otsuji, K.

    2010-07-20

    We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

  1. Formation and Eruption of an Active Region Sigmoid. I. A Study by Nonlinear Force-free Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  2. Formation of sunspots and active regions through the emergence of magnetic flux generated in a solar convective dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Rempel, Matthias D.; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    We present a realistic numerical model of sunspot and active region formation through the emergence of flux tubes generated in a solar convective dynamo. The magnetic and velocity fields in a horizontal layer near the top boundary of the solar convective dynamo simulation are used as a time-dependent bottom boundary to drive the near surface layer radiation MHD simulations of magneto-convection and flux emergence with the MURaM code. The latter code simulates the emergence of the flux tubes through the upper most layer of the convection zone to the photosphere.The emerging flux tubes interact with the convection and break into small scale magnetic elements that further rise to the photosphere. At the photosphere, several bipolar pairs of sunspots are formed through the coalescence of the small scale magnetic elements. The sunspot pairs in the simulation successfully reproduce the fundamental observed properties of solar active regions, including the more coherent leading spots with a stronger field strength, and the correct tilts of the bipolar pairs. These asymmetries come most probably from the intrinsic asymmetries in the emerging fields imposed at the bottom boundary, where the horizontal fields are already tilted and the leading sides of the emerging flux tubes are usually up against the downdraft lanes of the giant cells. It is also found that penumbrae with numerous filamentary structures form in regions of strong horizontal magnetic fields that naturally comes from the ongoing flux emergence. In contrast to previous models, the penumbrae and umbrae are divided by very sharp boarders, which is highly consistent with observations.

  3. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  4. Active region coronal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Scaling relations between coronal base pressure and longitudinal photospheric magnetic field strength are tested for the case of a single active region observed for five solar rotations from Skylab. The evolution of measureable quantities, such as coronal thermal energy content, total longitudinal photospheric magnetic flux, region scale size, and peak energy density, is traced throughout the five rotations observed. The theoretically derived scaling law of Golub et al. (1980) is found to provide an acceptable fit to the data throughout the entire evolutionary history of the region from an age of about 3 days to the fully evolved state in which the mature active region merges into the general large-scale structure of the quiet corona. An alternative scaling law obtained by including the results of Galeev et al. (1981), however, is found to provide a somewhat better fit to the data. The study is seen as providing additional justification for the belief that magnetic field-related heating is the operative mechanism in the solar corona.

  5. Evolution of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, Lucie May

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of active regions (AR) from their emergence through their long decay process is of fundamental importance in solar physics. Since large-scale flux is generated by the deep-seated dynamo, the observed characteristics of flux emergence and that of the subsequent decay provide vital clues as well as boundary conditions for dynamo models. Throughout their evolution, ARs are centres of magnetic activity, with the level and type of activity phenomena being dependent on the evolutionary stage of the AR. As new flux emerges into a pre-existing magnetic environment, its evolution leads to re-configuration of small-and large-scale magnetic connectivities. The decay process of ARs spreads the once-concentrated magnetic flux over an ever-increasing area. Though most of the flux disappears through small-scale cancellation processes, it is the remnant of large-scale AR fields that is able to reverse the polarity of the poles and build up new polar fields. In this Living Review the emphasis is put on what we have learned from observations, which is put in the context of modelling and simulation efforts when interpreting them. For another, modelling-focused Living Review on the sub-surface evolution and emergence of magnetic flux see Fan (2009). In this first version we focus on the evolution of dominantly bipolar ARs.

  6. OSL chronology of onshore cyclone deposits at Point Lefroy (Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia) - Implications for washover fan formation and regional cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dominik; May, Simon Matthias; Shah-Hosseini, Majid; Leopold, Matthias; Callow, Nik; Engel, Max; Scheffers, Anja; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Although frequently occurring, little is known about the geological imprint of (pre)historical tropical cyclones (TCs) in Northwestern Australia. Large washover fans at Point Lefroy (Exmouth Gulf) provide unambiguous morphological evidence of flooding by TCs capable to overtop and breach the local coastal barrier. Based on ground penetrating radar, unmanned aerial vehicle survey techniques, as well as geomorphological, sedimentological and chronological investigations, this research aims at reconstructing the formation of the washover fans, and understanding their significance for recording past TC activity. The stratigraphy of the washover fans is characterized by multiple depositional units, which are separated by palaeosurfaces with initial pedogenesis. Combining the chronostratigraphical record of the different washover fans at Point Lefroy is assumed to reflect the regional TC magnitude-frequency pattern, reaching far beyond historical records. While reworking of calcareous faunal remains biases the application of radiocarbon dating, we carried out optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating in order to establish a robust chronology of TC-induced washover deposition. OSL dating was challenged by spatially heterogeneous dose rates within the poorly sorted mixture of quartz and coral fragments, by incomplete signal resetting, and by sediment mixing during and, most likely, after transportation. However, by successfully constraining the contribution of each of these factors - using a combination of single-grain quartz dating, quasi-continuous luminescence profiling, spatially resolved dose rate determination, and dose rate modelling - the final chronology gives insight into the evolution of the geo-archive and, ultimately, into the local to regional TC history. Based on up to three sediment profiles from each fan structure, two different washover fans were OSL dated. While contemporaneous deposition at both landforms suggest that the two geomorphological

  7. EUV SPECTRAL LINE FORMATION AND THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOPS: OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Young, Peter R.; Warren, Harry P.

    2011-04-01

    With the aim of studying active region fan loops using observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), we investigate a number of inconsistencies in modeling the absolute intensities of Fe VIII and Si VII lines, and address why spectroheliograms formed from these lines look very similar despite the fact that ionization equilibrium calculations suggest that they have significantly different formation temperatures: log(T{sub e} /K) = 5.6 and 5.8, respectively. It is important to resolve these issues because confidence has been undermined in their use for differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, and Fe VIII is the main contributor to the AIA 131 A channel at low temperatures. Furthermore, the strong Fe VIII 185.213 A and Si VII 275.368 A lines are the best EIS lines to use for velocity studies in the transition region, and for assigning the correct temperature to velocity measurements in the fans. We find that the Fe VIII 185.213 A line is particularly sensitive to the slope of the DEM, leading to disproportionate changes in its effective formation temperature. If the DEM has a steep gradient in the log(T{sub e} /K) = 5.6-5.8 temperature range, or is strongly peaked, Fe VIII 185.213 A and Si VII 275.368 A will be formed at the same temperature. We show that this effect explains the similarity of these images in the fans. Furthermore, we show that the most recent ionization balance compilations resolve the discrepancies in absolute intensities. With these difficulties overcome, we combine EIS and AIA data to determine the temperature structure of a number of fan loops and find that they have peak temperatures of 0.8-1.2 MK. The EIS data indicate that the temperature distribution has a finite (but narrow) width < log ({sigma}{sub Te}/K) = 5.5 which, in one detailed case, is found to broaden substantially toward the loop base. AIA and EIS yield similar results on the temperature, emission

  8. EUV Spectral Line Formation and the Temperature Structure of Active Region Fan Loops: Observations with Hinode/EIS and SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.; Young, Peter R.

    2011-04-01

    With the aim of studying active region fan loops using observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), we investigate a number of inconsistencies in modeling the absolute intensities of Fe VIII and Si VII lines, and address why spectroheliograms formed from these lines look very similar despite the fact that ionization equilibrium calculations suggest that they have significantly different formation temperatures: log(Te /K) = 5.6 and 5.8, respectively. It is important to resolve these issues because confidence has been undermined in their use for differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, and Fe VIII is the main contributor to the AIA 131 Å channel at low temperatures. Furthermore, the strong Fe VIII 185.213 Å and Si VII 275.368 Å lines are the best EIS lines to use for velocity studies in the transition region, and for assigning the correct temperature to velocity measurements in the fans. We find that the Fe VIII 185.213 Å line is particularly sensitive to the slope of the DEM, leading to disproportionate changes in its effective formation temperature. If the DEM has a steep gradient in the log(Te /K) = 5.6-5.8 temperature range, or is strongly peaked, Fe VIII 185.213 Å and Si VII 275.368 Å will be formed at the same temperature. We show that this effect explains the similarity of these images in the fans. Furthermore, we show that the most recent ionization balance compilations resolve the discrepancies in absolute intensities. With these difficulties overcome, we combine EIS and AIA data to determine the temperature structure of a number of fan loops and find that they have peak temperatures of 0.8-1.2 MK. The EIS data indicate that the temperature distribution has a finite (but narrow) width < log (σ_{T_e}/K) = 5.5 which, in one detailed case, is found to broaden substantially toward the loop base. AIA and EIS yield similar results on the temperature, emission measure

  9. Nearby regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Cunningham, Nathaniel; Moeckel, Nickolas; Smith, Nathan

    Observations of the nearest regions of massive star formation such as Orion are reviewed. Early-type stars in the local OB associations, as well as their superbubbles and supershells provide a fossil record of massive star birth in the Solar vicinity over about the last 40 Myr. This record shows that most massive stars are born from dense, high-pressure, hot cores which spawn transient clusters that dissipate into the field soon after formation. A large fraction (15 to 30%) of massive stars are high-velocity runaways moving at more than 20 km s^{-1}. High-mass stars have a larger companion fraction than their lower-mass siblings. The Orion star forming complex contains the nearest site of on-going massive star formation. Studies of the Orion Nebula and the dense molecular cloud core located immediately behind the HII region provide our sharpest view of massive star birth. This region has formed a hierarchy of clusters within clusters. The Trapezium, OMC-1S, and OMC-1 regions represent three closely spaced sub-clusters within the more extended Orion Nebula Cluster. The oldest of these sub-clusters, which consists of the Trapezium stars, has completely emerged from its natal core. The OMC-1S and OMC-1 regions, are still highly embedded and forming clusters of additional moderate and high mass stars. Over a dozen YSOs embedded in OMC-1S are driving jets and outflows, many of which are injecting energy and momentum into the Orion Nebula. Recent proper motion measurements indicate that the Becklin-Neugebauer object is a high-velocity star moving away from the OMC1 core with a velocity of 30 km s^{-1}, making it the youngest high-velocity star known. Source I may be moving in the opposite direction with a velocity of about 12 km s^{-1}. The projected separation between source I and BN was less than few hundred AU about 500 years ago. The spectacular bipolar molecular outflow and system of shock-excited H_2 fingers emerging from OMC-1 has a dynamical age of about 1100

  10. Dense brine formation in Arctic coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmeister, Lon E.; Payne, James R.

    In the past 2 years, winter field programs have been conducted along the northeast coast of the Chukchi Sea to study the formation and fate of very cold and salty water produced during fall freeze up and lead refreezing processes. These programs, headed by Lon E. Hachmeister of Envirosphere Company, Bellevue, Wash., and James R. Payne of Science Applications International Corporation, La Jolla, Calif., have been funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (NOAA/OCSEAP) to better understand physical processes in arctic coastal regions in regard to potential impact bv oil and gas development.

  11. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  12. Far-IR selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complemenary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and c(18)0 observations of a sample of far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation. The clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40 micron to 180 micron spectra even through their 60 micron to 100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main sequence and pre-main sequence stars or consisting entirely of premain sequence objects. C(18)0 and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately .00005 - high enough to make t(sub dust) approximately t(sub gas).

  13. Far-infrared selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.; Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complementary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and C(O-18) observations of a sample of eight far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation are presented. The observations show that the sources of luminosity coincide with density peaks in the molecular clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40-180 micron spectra even though their 60-100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main-sequence and pre-main-sequence stars or consisting entirely of pre-main-sequence objects. C(O-18) and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately 100,000-high enough to make T(dust) approximately T(gas).

  14. Molecular emission in regions of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, Antoine

    2008-11-01

    Recent observations show that young stars being formed eject matter at several tens of kilometers per second, in the form of 'jets' that impact the matter whose collapse is at the origin of the formation of the star. The supersonic impact between this jet and the parent interstellar cloud of the star generates a shock front, in the form of a bow-shock, which propagates in the collapsing interstellar gas, and also an inverse shock that propagates along the jet itself. The structure of these shocks depends on their velocity as well as on the physical properties of the gas in which they propagate, and specially on the value of the local magnetic field. Numerical MagnetoHydroDynamical simulations of the propagation of such shocks are a way to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in which molecular lines are emitted. Interstellar shocks are modelled, both in stationary and non stationary ways, and grids of models are built for various ranges of input, preshock parameters (shock velocity, preshock density, magnetic field, and shock age for non stationary models). The case of molecular hydrogen is investigated first. Because of its particular importance (due to its large density and crucial role as a gas coolant or as a collision partner for molecular species), its level populations are solved within the shock code, as well as its population transfer. The shock wave modifies the chemical composition of the gas, partially or totally dissociating the molecular hydrogen, which is the main coolant of the gas. In the regions where molecular hydrogen still remains, H2 is collisionally excited, generating rovibrational and purely rotational transitions emission. These emissions are actually observed, from the ground in Infrared region, by ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) and Spitzer satellites. Excitation diagrams are used to compare the models with existing observations in the L1157 outflow around a young, Class 0 proto-star, confirming that non

  15. Formation of a Unique Cluster of G-Quadruplex Structures in the HIV-1 nef Coding Region: Implications for Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Rosalba; Nadai, Matteo; Poe, Jerrod A.; Frasson, Ilaria; Palumbo, Manlio; Palù, Giorgio; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Richter, Sara N.

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are tetraplex structures of nucleic acids that can form in G-rich sequences. Their presence and functional role have been established in telomeres, oncogene promoters and coding regions of the human chromosome. In particular, they have been proposed to be directly involved in gene regulation at the level of transcription. Because the HIV-1 Nef protein is a fundamental factor for efficient viral replication, infectivity and pathogenesis invitro and invivo, we investigated G-quadruplex formation in the HIV-1 nef gene to assess the potential for viral inhibition through G-quadruplex stabilization. A comprehensive computational analysis of the nef coding region of available strains showed the presence of three conserved sequences that were uniquely clustered. Biophysical testing proved that G-quadruplex conformations were efficiently stabilized or induced by G-quadruplex ligands in all three sequences. Upon incubation with a G-quadruplex ligand, Nef expression was reduced in a reporter gene assay and Nef-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity was significantly repressed in an antiviral assay. These data constitute the first evidence of the possibility to regulate HIV-1 gene expression and infectivity through G-quadruplex targeting and therefore open a new avenue for viral treatment. PMID:24015290

  16. Formation of a unique cluster of G-quadruplex structures in the HIV-1 Nef coding region: implications for antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Rosalba; Nadai, Matteo; Poe, Jerrod A; Frasson, Ilaria; Palumbo, Manlio; Palù, Giorgio; Smithgall, Thomas E; Richter, Sara N

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are tetraplex structures of nucleic acids that can form in G-rich sequences. Their presence and functional role have been established in telomeres, oncogene promoters and coding regions of the human chromosome. In particular, they have been proposed to be directly involved in gene regulation at the level of transcription. Because the HIV-1 Nef protein is a fundamental factor for efficient viral replication, infectivity and pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo, we investigated G-quadruplex formation in the HIV-1 nef gene to assess the potential for viral inhibition through G-quadruplex stabilization. A comprehensive computational analysis of the nef coding region of available strains showed the presence of three conserved sequences that were uniquely clustered. Biophysical testing proved that G-quadruplex conformations were efficiently stabilized or induced by G-quadruplex ligands in all three sequences. Upon incubation with a G-quadruplex ligand, Nef expression was reduced in a reporter gene assay and Nef-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity was significantly repressed in an antiviral assay. These data constitute the first evidence of the possibility to regulate HIV-1 gene expression and infectivity through G-quadruplex targeting and therefore open a new avenue for viral treatment. PMID:24015290

  17. Active Region Release Two CMEs

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material can be seen blowing off the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on the night of Feb. 5, 2013. This active region on the sun sent out two coronal ...

  18. Star Formation in the Central Regions of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Mengchun

    2015-08-01

    The galactic central region connects the galactic nucleus to the host galaxy. If the central black hole co-evolved with the host galaxies, there should be some evidence left in the central region. We use the environmental properties in the central regions such as star-forming activity, stellar population and molecular abundance to figure out a possible scenario of the evolution of galaxies. In this thesis at first we investigated the properties of the central regions in the host galaxies of active and normal galaxies. We used radio emission around the nuclei of the host galaxies to represent activity of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and used infrared ray (IR) emission to represent the star-forming activity and stellar population of the host galaxies. We determined that active galaxies have higher stellar masses (SMs) within the central kiloparsec radius than normal galaxies do independent of the Hubble types of the host galaxies; but both active and normal galaxies exhibit similar specific star formation rates (SSFRs). We also discovered that certain AGNs exhibit substantial inner stellar structures in the IR images; most of the AGNs with inner structures are Seyferts, whereas only a few LINERs exhibit inner structures. We note that the AGNs with inner structures show a positive correlation between the radio activity of the AGNs and the SFRs of the host galaxies, but the sources without inner structures show a negative correlation between the radio power and the SFRs. These results might be explained with a scenario of starburst-AGN evolution. In this scenario, AGN activities are triggered following a nuclear starburst; during the evolution, AGN activities are accompanied by SF activity in the inner regions of the host galaxies; at the final stage of the evolution, the AGNs might transform into LINERs, exhibiting weak SF activity in the central regions of the host galaxies. For further investigation about the inner structure, we choose the most nearby and luminous

  19. dlx3b/4b are required for the formation of the preplacodal region and otic placode through local modulation of BMP activity.

    PubMed

    Esterberg, Robert; Fritz, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The vertebrate inner ear arises from the otic placode, a transient thickening of ectodermal epithelium adjacent to neural crest domains in the presumptive head. During late gastrulation, cells fated to comprise the inner ear are part of a domain in cranial ectoderm that contain precursors of all sensory placodes, termed the preplacodal region (PPR). The combination of low levels of BMP activity coupled with high levels of FGF signaling are required to establish the PPR through induction of members of the six/eya/dach, iro, and dlx families of transcription factors. The zebrafish dlx3b/4b transcription factors are expressed at the neural plate border where they play partially redundant roles in the specification of the PPR, otic and olfactory placodes. We demonstrate that dlx3b/4b assist in establishing the PPR through the transcriptional regulation of the BMP antagonist cv2. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of Dlx3b/4b results in loss of cv2 expression in the PPR and a transient increase in Bmp4 activity that lasts throughout early somitogenesis. Through the cv2-mediated inhibition of BMP activity, dlx3b/4b create an environment where FGF activity is favorable for PPR and otic marker expression. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms of PPR specification as well as the role of dlx3b/4b function in PPR and otic placode induction. PMID:19007769

  20. Multithermal emission in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, Giulio

    High-resolution EUV observations from SDO/AIA, Hi-C and Hinode/EIS are used, together with updated new atomic data, to study the multi-thermal emission in active region structures. Previous observations are largely confirmed, with most structures being not co-spatial and having nearly isothermal cross-sections. Those at temperatures below 1 MK appear as nearly resolved but those at 1-3 MK are still largely unresolved even at the Hi-C resolution. Very little emission above 3 MK is present in quiescent active regions. Elemental abundances vary in different structures. The active region cores show FIP enhancements of about a factor of three. X-ray spectroscopy confirms the results of the EUV observations for the hot cores.

  1. SDO Sees Active Region Outbursts

    NASA Video Gallery

    This close up video by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows an active region near the right-hand edge of the sun’s disk, which erupted with at least a dozen minor events over a 30-hour period fr...

  2. Global oscillations and active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrant, C. J.

    The author presents further estimates of the amplitude of the modulation of the solar global velocity signal caused by the passage of active regions across the solar disc. Using measurements of the profile of the K I λ769.9 nm line in the quiet sun and in plages he finds a global velocity variation of ≡2 m s-1 during the transit of a typical active region of area 3300 millionths of the hemisphere. However, during the period in which a velocity amplitude of 6 m s-1 was reported by Claverie et al. (1982), the sunspot areas were exceptionally large and the author confirms Schröter's (1984) result that the combination of spot and plage contributions is sufficient to account for the observed signal. The velocity modulation is thus attributable to surface inhomogeneities, not to the structure of the solar core.

  3. Dust in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that protostars increase mass by accreting the surrounding gas and dust. Grains are destroyed as they near the central protostar creating a dust shell or cocoon. Radiation pressure acting on the grains can halt the inflow of material thereby limiting the amount of mass accumulated by the protostar. General constraints were considered on the initial dust-to-gas ratio and mass accretion rates that permit inflow. These results were constrained further by constructing a numerical model, including radiative deceleration on grains and grain destruction processes. Also the constraints on dust properties were investigated which allow the formation of massive stars. The obtained results seem to suggest that massive star formation requires rather extreme preconditioning of the grain and gas environment.

  4. Titan's Xanadu region: Geomorphology and formation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Migrjam; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Based on comprehensive mapping of the region, the recent theories of Xanadu's origin are examined and a chronology of geologic processes is proposed. The geologic history of Titan's Xanadu region is different from that of the other surface units on Saturn's moon. A previously proposed origin of western Xanadu from a giant impact in the early history of the moon is difficult to confirm given the scarcity of morphologic indications of an impact basin. The basic topographic structure of the landscape is controlled by tectonic processes that date back to the early history of Titan. More recently, the surface is intensely reworked and resurfaced by fluvial processes, which seem to have leveled out and compensated height differences. Although the surface age seems young at first view, the underlying processes that created this surface and the topographic structure appear to be ancient.

  5. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our emphasis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have included young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry, because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spectroscopic data sets. The program has the following goals: 1) Refine the data analysis of IS0 observations to obtain deeper and better SNR results on selected sources. The IS0 data itself underwent pipeline 10 reductions in early 2001, and the more 'hands-on data reduction packages' have been released. The IS0 Fabry-Perot database is particularly sensitive to noise and can have slight calibration errors, and improvements are anticipated. We plan to build on these deep analysis tools and contribute to their development. Model the atomic and molecular line shapes, in particular the OH lines, using revised montecarlo techniques developed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) team at the Center for Astrophysics. 2) 3) Use newly acquired space-based SIRTF or SOFIA spectroscopic data as they become available, and contribute to these observing programs as appropriate. 4) Attend scientific meetings and workshops. 5) E&PO activities, especially as related to infrared astrophysics and

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 and 15-lipoxygenase inhibition, synthesis, anti-inflammatory activity and ulcer liability of new celecoxib analogues: Determination of region-specific pyrazole ring formation by NOESY.

    PubMed

    Abdelall, Eman K A; Lamie, Phoebe F; Ali, Waleed A M

    2016-06-15

    Two new series of 1,5-diaryl pyrazoline (3a-f) and 1,5-diaryl pyrazole (5a and 5b) were designed as both COX-2 and 15-LOX inhibitors. All the prepared compounds were fully characterized by all spectral and element analysis. Their anti-inflammatory activity and ulcer index were included. Pyrazoline 3f is the most effective with IC50=1.14 and 4.7μM against COX-2 and 15-LOX respectively, and more potent than celecoxib and meclofenamate references. In addition 3a, 3b, 5a, and 5b were safer with low ulcer index than celecoxib. Docking study was performed for the most active compounds such as 2b, 3a, and 3f on COX-2 and 15-LOX enzymes. PMID:27158139

  8. The Star Formation Activity in the Shapley Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, P.-L.; Chen, L.-W.

    2013-10-01

    The Shapley supercluster (SSC) is the densest region in the local universe (z < 0.1)(Zucca et al. 1993), it hosts a wide variety of environments from massive clusters to filamentary structure. A total of 81 clusters and groups are identified in this region. In this study, a sample of 208 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) are used to study the effects of local galaxy density and cluster dynamic state on galaxy star formation activity. Our results show that the SFG fraction is highly suppressed in denser regions, for early type SFGs, they especially prefer the low density regions. As for the star formation activity in clusters/groups environment, higher SFG fractions are only detected in clusters/groups with velocity dispersion lower than ˜400 km sec-1, no matter the clusters/groups show merging evidence or not. These results may imply that the gas supply for star formation activity in denser and richer cluster/group regions has been removed by some cluster-specific processes, such as strangulation, ram pressure stripping and harassment, and thus the star formation activity is reduced.

  9. Volcanically Active Regions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shown here is a portion of one of the highest-resolution images of Io (Latitude: +10 to +60 degrees, Longitude: 180 to 225 degrees) acquired by the Galileo spacecraft, revealing immense lava flows and other volcanic landforms. Several high-temperature volcanic hot spots have been detected in this region by both the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and the imaging system of Galileo. The temperatures are consistent with active silicate volcanism in lava flows or lava lakes (which reside inside irregular depressions called calderas). The large dark lava flow in the upper left region of the image is more than 400 km long, similar to ancient flood basalts on Earth and mare lavas on the Moon.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The image covers an area 1230 kilometers wide and the smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. This image was taken on November 6th, 1996, at a range of 245,719 kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on the Galileo Spacecraft.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. The Object CLN 138 - a Double Star-Formation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    A double star formation region associated with the biconical cometary nebula CLN 138 is studied. 12CO(1-0) observations of a molecular cloud associated with this object reveal the existence of several molecular clouds in this region, as well as the existence of red and blue molecular outflows. Several new Herbig-Haro objects are found, two of which have undergone a luminosity increase of at least 8m. The first star formation region is basically embedded in the molecular cloud; most of the stars in it are infrared stars and many have dust envelopes. The second star formation region has already left the molecular cloud; it has no IR stars and few of its stars have dust clouds.

  11. Emerging flux in active regions. [of sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    The rates at which flux emerges in active and quiet solar regions within the sunspot belts are compared. The emerging flux regions (EFRs) were identified by the appearance of arch filament structures in H-alpha. All EFRs in high resolution films of active regions made at Big Bear in 1978 were counted. The comparable rate of flux emergence in quiet regions was obtained from SGD data and independently from EFRs detected outside the active region perimeter on the same films. The rate of flux emergence is 10 times higher in active regions than in quiet regions. A sample of all active regions in 31 days of 1983 gave a ratio of 7.5. Possible mechanisms which might funnel new magnetic flux to regions of strong magnetic field are discussed.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report details work done in a project involving spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star-formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data including some from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and other spectroscopic databases. We will include four kinds of regions: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star-formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR (infrared) galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. During this period, work proceeded fully on track and on time. Details on workshops and conferences attended and research results are presented. A preprint article entitled 'The Far Infrared Lines of OH as Molecular Cloud Diagnostics' is included as an appendix.

  13. Emission measure distribution for diffuse regions in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2014-11-01

    Our knowledge of the diffuse emission that encompasses active regions is very limited. In this paper we investigate two off-limb active regions, namely, AR 10939 and AR 10961, to probe the underlying heating mechanisms. For this purpose, we have used spectral observations from Hinode/EIS and employed the emission measure (EM) technique to obtain the thermal structure of these diffuse regions. Our results show that the characteristic EM distributions of the diffuse emission regions peak at log T = 6.25 and the coolward slopes are in the range 1.4-3.3. This suggests that both low- as well as high-frequency nanoflare heating events are at work. Our results provide additional constraints on the properties of these diffuse emission regions and their contribution to the background/foreground when active region cores are observed on-disk.

  14. 25 GHz methanol masers in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Tui R.; Voronkov, Maxim A.

    2012-07-01

    The bright 25 GHz series of methanol masers is formed in highly energetic regions of massive star formation and provides a natural signpost of shocked gas surrounding newly forming stars. A systematic survey for the 25 GHz masers has only recently been carried out. We present the preliminary results from the interferometric follow up of 51 masers at 25 GHz in the southern sky.

  15. Regional Book in Magazine Format: Project for Journalism Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthelot, Dolly

    "Pioneer Spirit 76," an original bicentennial anthology from the Smoky Mountains region, was begun to gain in-depth editing and publishing experience and to test the feasibility of having journalism students produce a publication for a market beyond campus. This report traces the development of this book in magazine format, offers a basic plan for…

  16. Formative Evaluation of PREL's Regional Educational Laboratory Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

    A formative evaluation was conducted to determine the types and amount of dissemination and services the Pacific Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) provided to its constituency in the first 9 months of 1999. The evaluation also studied how recipients of REL products and services perceived the usefulness and quality of the products and services…

  17. Activation of PAD4 in NET formation.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Amanda S; Slade, Daniel J; Thompson, Paul R; Mowen, Kerri A

    2012-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminases, or PADs, convert arginine residues to the non-ribosomally encoded amino acid citrulline in a variety of protein substrates. PAD4 is expressed in granulocytes and is essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) via PAD4-mediated histone citrullination. Citrullination of histones is thought to promote NET formation by inducing chromatin decondensation and facilitating the expulsion of chromosomal DNA that is coated with antimicrobial molecules. Numerous stimuli have been reported to lead to PAD4 activation and NET formation. However, how this signaling process proceeds and how PAD4 becomes activated in cells is largely unknown. Herein, we describe the various stimuli and signaling pathways that have been implicated in PAD4 activation and NET formation, including the role of reactive oxygen species generation. To provide a foundation for the above discussion, we first describe PAD4 structure and function, and how these studies led to the development of PAD-specific inhibitors. A comprehensive survey of the receptors and signaling pathways that regulate PAD4 activation will be important for our understanding of innate immunity, and the identification of signaling intermediates in PAD4 activation may also lead to the generation of pharmaceuticals to target NET-related pathogenesis. PMID:23264775

  18. [Formation and differentiation of the famous coptis regions].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bao-Lin; Liu, Xue-Yi

    2013-01-01

    From the Tang Dynasty, Xuanzhou has been considered as the famous area of genuine regional coptis as its production of high-quality. Till the Ming Dynasty, coptis resource in Xuanzhou was exhausted, and weilian, yalian (coptis produced in two districts in Sichuan) and yunlian (coptis produced in Yunnan) became famous-region coptis, three varieties of coptis coming from three districts. During the formation of new famous regions, species variation, geographical environment, historical background, cultivation technique and social economy played a role. For example, xuanlian became famous for doctors in Xinan area loved to use it to a large extent. And cultivation technique was the key point for weilian to become the famous-region herb. Now with the shrinking of planting area, yalian could be hardly considered as famous-region copitis and yunlian has withdrawn from commodity for its high cost and low production. PMID:23879980

  19. Teaching Statistics in an Activity Encouraging Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knypstra, Sytse

    2009-01-01

    In a statistics course for bachelor students in econometrics a new format was adopted in which students were encouraged to study more actively and in which cooperative learning and peer teaching was implemented. Students had to work in groups of two or three students where each group had to perform certain tasks. One of these tasks was: explaining…

  20. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  1. The Twist Limit for Bipolar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Gary, Allen

    2008-01-01

    We present new evidence that further supports the standard idea that active regions are emerged magnetic-flux-rope omega loops. When the axial magnetic twist of a cylindrical flux rope exceeds a critical amount, the flux rope becomes unstable to kinking, and the excess axial twist is converted into writhe twist by the kinking. This suggests that, if active regions are emerged omega loops, then (1) no active region should have magnetic twist much above the limit set by kinking, (2) active regions having twist near the limit should often arise from kinked omega loops, and (3) since active regions having large delta sunspots are outstandingly twisted, these arise from kinked omega loops and should have twist near the limit for kinking. From each of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions, we have measured (1) the total flux of the vertical field above 100 G, (2) the area covered by this flux, and (3) the net electric current that arches over the polarity inversion line. These three quantities yield an estimate of the axial magnetic twist in a simple model cylindrical flux rope that corresponds to the top of the active region s hypothetical omega loop prior to emergence. In all 36 cases, the estimated twist is below the critical limit for kinking. The 11 most twisted active regions (1) have estimated twist within a factor of approx.3 of the limit, and (2) include all of our 6 active regions having large delta sunspots. Thus, our observed twist limit for bipolar active regions is in good accord with active regions being emerged omega loops.

  2. Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Lin, L.; Li, J. R.; Zhou, X.; Zou, H.; Li, H. Y.; Chen, F. Z.; Du, W.; Fan, Z.; Mao, Y. W.; Wang, J.; Zhu, Y. N.; Zhou, Z. M.

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the 8˜10 m scale ground-based telescopes are helping astronomers learn much more about how galaxies develop. The existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes become less important for astrophysical researches. To use the existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes to address important issues in cosmology and extragalactic and galactic astronomy, we have to consider very carefully which kind of things we can do, and which we can not. For this reason, the Time Allocation Committee (TAC) of the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) 2.16 m telescope decides to support some key projects since 2013. Nearby galaxies supply us with the opportunity to study galaxy dynamics and star formation on large scales, yet are close enough to reveal the details. Star formation regions in nearby galaxies provide an excellent laboratory to study the star formation processes, the evolution of massive stars, and the properties of the surrounding interstellar medium. A wealth of information can be obtained from the spectral analysis of the bright emission lines and the stellar continuum. Considering these, we proposed a long-term project ``Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies'', and it becomes the key project of the NAOC 2.16 m telescope since 2013, supported with 30 dark/grey nights per year. The primary goal of this project is to observe the spectroscopy of star formation regions in 20 nearby galaxies, with the NAOC 2.16 m telescope and the Hectospec/MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) multifiber spectrograph by Telescope Access Program (TAP). With the spectra of a large sample of star formation regions, combining multi-wavelength data from UV to IR, we can investigate, understand, and quantify the nature of the deviation from the starbursts' IRX-β (the IR/UV ratio ``IRX'' versus the UV color ``β'') correlation. It will be important for a better understanding of the interaction of dust and

  3. SNS Devices With Pinhole-Defined Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D.; Barner, Jeffrey B.

    1996-01-01

    Superconductor/normal conductor/superconductor (SNS) microbridge devices with pinhole-defined active regions undergoing development. Device includes thin, electrically insulating layer deposited epitaxially, with controlled formation of pinholes, on one of two superconducting layers. Normally conducting metal deposited epitaxially in pinholes and on insulating layer, forming electrical contact between two superconducting layers. Junction resistances and maximum junction voltages expected to be increased.

  4. Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Southern H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Reiko; Saito, Hiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mine, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Akira; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    1999-12-01

    We have carried out extensive 13CO(J = 1-0) observations toward 23 southern H II regions associated with bright-rimmed clouds. In total, 95 molecular clouds have been identified to be associated with the H II regions. Among the 95, 57 clouds \\ are found to be associated with 204 IRAS point sources which are candidates for young stellar objects. There is a significant increase of star-formation efficiency on the side facing to the H II regions; the luminosity-to-mass ratio, defined as the ratio of the stellar luminosity to the molecular cloud mass, is higher by an order of magnitude on the near side of the H II \\ regions than that on the far side. This indicates that molecular gas facing to the H II regions is more actively forming massive s\\ tars whose luminosity is >~ 103 LO . In addition, the number density of the IRAS point sources increases by a factor of 2 on the near side of the H II regions compared with on the far side. These results strongly suggest that the active formation of massive stars on the near side of the H II regions is due to the effects of the H II regions, such as the compression of molecular material by the ionization/shock fronts. For the whole Galaxy, we estimate that the present star-formation rate under such effects is at least 0.2-0.4 MO yr-1, corresponding to a few 10% by mass.

  5. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  6. Software Displays Data on Active Regions of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, Mike; Weyland, Mark; Raben, Vern

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System is a computer program that generates, in near real time, a graphical display of parameters indicative of the spatial and temporal variations of activity on the Sun. These parameters include histories and distributions of solar flares, active region growth, coronal mass ejections, size, and magnetic configuration. By presenting solar-activity data in graphical form, this program accelerates, facilitates, and partly automates what had previously been a time-consuming mental process of interpretation of solar-activity data presented in tabular and textual formats. Intended for original use in predicting space weather in order to minimize the exposure of astronauts to ionizing radiation, the program might also be useful on Earth for predicting solar-wind-induced ionospheric effects, electric currents, and potentials that could affect radio-communication systems, navigation systems, pipelines, and long electric-power lines. Raw data for the display are obtained automatically from the Space Environment Center (SEC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Other data must be obtained from the NOAA SEC by verbal communication and entered manually. The Solar Active Region Display System automatically accounts for the latitude dependence of the rate of rotation of the Sun, by use of a mathematical model that is corrected with NOAA SEC active-region position data once every 24 hours. The display includes the date, time, and an image of the Sun in H light overlaid with latitude and longitude coordinate lines, dots that mark locations of active regions identified by NOAA, identifying numbers assigned by NOAA to such regions, and solar-region visual summary (SRVS) indicators associated with some of the active regions. Each SRVS indicator is a small pie chart containing five equal sectors, each of which is color-coded to provide a semiquantitative indication of the degree of hazard posed by one aspect of the activity at

  7. Bipolar region formation in stratified two-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnecke, J.; Losada, I. R.; Brandenburg, A.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: This work presents an extensive study of the previously discovered formation of bipolar flux concentrations in a two-layer model. We interpret the formation process in terms of negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI), which is a possible mechanism to explain the origin of sunspots. Methods: In our simulations, we use a Cartesian domain of isothermal stratified gas that is divided into two layers. In the lower layer, turbulence is forced with transverse nonhelical random waves, whereas in the upper layer no flow is induced. A weak uniform magnetic field is imposed in the entire domain at all times. In most cases, it is horizontal, but a vertical and an inclined field are also considered. In this study we vary the stratification by changing the gravitational acceleration, magnetic Reynolds number, strength of the imposed magnetic field, and size of the domain to investigate their influence on the formation process. Results: Bipolar magnetic structure formation takes place over a large range of parameters. The magnetic structures become more intense for higher stratification until the density contrast becomes around 100 across the turbulent layer. For the fluid Reynolds numbers considered, magnetic flux concentrations are generated at magnetic Prandtl number between 0.1 and 1. The magnetic field in bipolar regions increases with higher imposed field strength until the field becomes comparable to the equipartition field strength of the turbulence. A larger horizontal extent enables the flux concentrations to become stronger and more coherent. The size of the bipolar structures turns out to be independent of the domain size. A small imposed horizontal field component is necessary to generate bipolar structures. In the case of bipolar region formation, we find an exponential growth of the large-scale magnetic field, which is indicative of a hydromagnetic instability. Additionally, the flux concentrations are correlated with strong large

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay (Technical Monitor); Smith, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our empha- sis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have in- cluded young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spec- troscopic data sets. Three papers are included:The Infrared Lines of OH: Diagnostics of Molecular Cloud Conditions in Infrared Bright Galaxies; The Far-Infrared Spectrum of Arp 220; andThe Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068.

  9. Identification of a region in the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin that is required for enzymatic activity and that contributes to the formation of a neutralizing antigenic determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, W; Burnette, W N; Mar, V L; Kaljot, K T; Morris, C F; Chen, K K; Sato, H; Keith, J M

    1988-01-01

    The S1 subunit of pertussis toxin possesses two regions (homology boxes), each spanning 8 residues, that are nearly identical in sequence to similarly located regions in the enzymatically active A fragments of two other ADP-ribosylating toxins: cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin. This observation suggests a functional role for one or both of these regions in enzymatic activity. We have examined the role of one of these regions, located near the amino terminus of the S1 subunit, by using a high-level recombinant expression system and progressive truncation of the gene sequence encoding the amino terminus of the molecule. A series of six truncated, recombinant proteins were produced at high levels in E. coli and examined for their enzymatic and antigenic properties. The three molecules that lacked most or all of the homology box delimited by amino acid residues 8 and 15 lacked detectable enzymatic activity. All of the three molecules in which the box was retained exhibited detectable activity. Only those recombinant molecules that possessed the homology box reacted with a neutralizing and passively protective monoclonal anti-S1 antibody. These findings identify the region of homology located near the amino terminus of S1 as an apparent enzymatic subsite and a potentially important antigenic determinant. Images PMID:2455296

  10. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  11. Hinode Captures Images of Solar Active Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    In these images, Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) zoomed in on AR 11263 on August 4, 2011, five days before the active region produced the largest flare of this cycle, an X6.9. We show images...

  12. Pattern formation in Active Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Hagan, Michael; Baskaran, Aparna

    2011-03-01

    Systems such as bacterial suspensions or cytoskeletal filaments and motility assays can be described within the paradigm of active polar fluids. These systems have been shown to exhibit pattern formation raging from asters and vortices to traveling stripes. A coarse-grained description of such a fluid is given by a scalar density field and a vector polarization field. We study such a macroscopic description of the system using weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations to map out the emergent pattern formation as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters in the context of two specific microscopic models - a quasi-2D suspension of cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins and a system of self propelled hard rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. The authors thank the Brandeis MRSEC center for financial support.

  13. CanSIS Regional Soils Data in Vector Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monette, Bryan; Knapp, David; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set is the original vector data set received from Canada Soil Information System (CanSIS). The data include the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Attribute tables provide the various soil data for the polygons; there is one attribute table for Saskatchewan and one for Manitoba. The data are stored in ARC/INFO export format files. Based on agreements made with Agriculture Canada, these data are available only to individuals and groups that have an official relationship with the BOREAS project. These data are not included on the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) CD-ROM set. A raster version of this data set titled 'BOREAS Regional Soils Data in Raster Format and AEAC Projection' is publicly available and is included on the BOREAS CD-ROM set.

  14. Circular polarization in star- formation regions: implications for biomolecular homochirality

    PubMed

    Bailey; Chrysostomou; Hough; Gledhill; McCall; Clark; Menard; Tamura

    1998-07-31

    Strong infrared circular polarization resulting from dust scattering in reflection nebulae in the Orion OMC-1 star-formation region has been observed. Circular polarization at shorter wavelengths might have been important in inducing chiral asymmetry in interstellar organic molecules that could be subsequently delivered to the early Earth by comets, interplanetary dust particles, or meteors. This could account for the excess of L-amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite and could explain the origin of the homochirality of biological molecules. PMID:9685254

  15. BOREAS Regional Soils Data in Raster Format and AEAC Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monette, Bryan; Knapp, David; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set was gridded by BOREAS Information System (BORIS) Staff from a vector data set received from the Canadian Soil Information System (CanSIS). The original data came in two parts that covered Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The data were gridded and merged into one data set of 84 files covering the BOREAS region. The data were gridded into the AEAC projection. Because the mapping of the two provinces was done separately in the original vector data, there may be discontinuities in some of the soil layers because of different interpretations of certain soil properties. The data are stored in binary, image format files.

  16. Cometary activity, discrete outgassing areas, and dust-jet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual models for various types of features observed in cometary comae (jets, spirals, halos, fans, etc.), their computer simulation, and the hydrodynamic models for jet formation are critically reviewed, and evidence for anisotropic, strongly collimated flows of ejecta emanating from discrete active regions (vents) on the rotating cometary nuclei is presented. Techniques employed to generate synthetic comet images that simulate the features observed are described, and their relevance to the primary objects of coma-morphology studies is discussed. Modeling of temporal variations in the water emission from discrete active regions suggests that production curves asymmetric with respect to perihelion should be commonplace. Critical comparisons with the activity profiles of Enke's comet and with light curves of disappearing comets and comets that undergo outbursts are presented. Recent developments in the understanding of the processes that cause the nongravitational perturbations of cometary motions are reviewed, and the observed discontinuities are identified with the birth of new sources and/or deactivation of old vents.

  17. Formation and Activation of Thermogenic Fat

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Jun, Heejin; McDermott, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermogenic fat cells that convert chemical energy into heat are present in both mice and humans. Recent years have witnessed a great advancement in our understanding of the regulation of these adipocytes and an increased appreciation of the potential these cells have to counteract obesity. Here we summarize recent efforts to understand the formation of these fat cells and critically review genetic models and other experimental tools currently available to further investigate the development and activation of both classical brown and inducible beige fat cells. We also discuss recent discoveries about the epigenetic regulation of these adipocytes, and finally present emerging evidence revealing the metabolic impacts of thermogenic fat in humans. PMID:25851693

  18. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikić, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  19. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  20. The flare productivity of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, N.; Christe, S.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the flare frequency distribution is consistent with a power-law. Furthermore, studies have shown that regions of higher magnetic complexity produce more large flares. This may imply that the flare frequency distribution is harder for magnetically complex active regions. However, the relationship between source active regions' magnetic complexity and the flare size distribution has not been extensively studied. We present a new study of 25,000 microflares detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) from March 2002 to February 2007. For each flare, we have obtained the two classifications of magnetic complexity, the Mount Wilson Magnetic Classification and the Zurich/McIntosh Sunspot Classification, from the Solar Region Summary prepared by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/ Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), and compared them with the RHESSI flare size distribution as observed in the 12 to 25 keV energy range. We investigate the relationship between the slope of the microflare size distribution and the magnetic properties of source active regions. For each flare we obtain the relevant MDI magnetogram to determine properties such as the area of the source active region and total unsigned magnetic flux. These properties are then compared to properties of the associated microflares such as peak flux and microflare size distribution. We find that, for both the Mount Wilson Magnetic Classification and the Zurich/McIntosh Sunspot Classification, the slopes of the microflare size distribution tend to get harder as a function of magnetic complexity. For example, in Mount Wilson Magnetic Classification the slope for α regions was 1.66 and the slope for βγδ region was 1.51.This suggests that βγδ regions are 50 % more likely to produce X class flares than α regions.

  1. Chromospheric Acoustic Oscillations in Active Flaring Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, T.; Hill, F.; Stassun, K.

    2014-12-01

    Chromospheric p-mode oscillations are studied in Hα to obtain helioseismic information regarding the local structural conditions around highly magnetic regions such as sunspots. Solar flares commonly occur in active regions where these sunspots exist therefore boosting the p-mode power. In our current study of analyzing p-modes in the chromosphere we study the time evolution of acoustic p-mode oscillation data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Hα, and investigate the p-modes across the frequency band (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). This study entails three active regions directly over sunspots, with accompanying flaring activity from two solar flares, occurring on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. Our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved around the flare region, to study the frequency bands. We then study how the frequency distribution evolves temporally by constructing a Power Map Movie (PMM) of the regions. From these PMMs we can take a survey of the chromospheric oscillations for each frequency band. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the behavior of the p-modes within different frequency bands. The suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures within the PMMs and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity.

  2. Regional variations in formation water chemistry: Major and minor elements, Frio Formation fluids, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Macpherson, G.L. )

    1992-05-01

    Spatial variation of major element content (Na, Ca, and Cl) in formation waters in the Oligocene Frio Formation, Texas, show that mixing occurs vertically and that the chemistry of Ca-rich fluids varies from northern coastal to southern Texas. Relative amounts of major and minor elements (Sr, Mg, and K) in Ca-rich fluids from south Texas differ from those in other areas of Texas and also are different from updip Mesozoic fluids. Such differences seem to preclude the known Mesozoic fluids as a source of Ca in the south Texas Frio Formation fluids, barring complicated, nonuniform water-rock alteration changing the Mesozoic-fluid composition. Approximately coast parallel (and strike parallel) cross sections show that Ca-rich fluids in the Frio are usually found at depth. Some anomalies occur where fluids are present near piercement structures and in a relatively large part of south Texas. In the latter region, Ca-rich fluids exist above the top of geopressure, suggesting that they may have been emplaced before geopressure became widespread (2-3 m.y. ago). Because there are no shallow Ca-rich fluids in the vicinity of major river systems in south Texas, meteoric fluids may have flushed Ca-rich fluids out of the areas near the rivers during past pluvial periods. This process does not preclude the dilution of formation water by clay dehydration reactions, another process that has been proposed to explain deep, dilute formation waters in Gulf basin reservoirs.

  3. Growth and Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobias, J. J.; Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.

    2002-05-01

    We report here on a study of growth and decay rates of sunspot and facular areas of solar active regions. The data used in this project come from an ongoing program of daily photometric observations of the sun with the Cartesian Full Disk Telescope No. 1 (CFDT1) at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). Sunspot regions are determined from images taken with a red filter centered at 672.3 nm with a bandpass of 9.7 nm, while images taken with a Ca II K line filter, centered at 393.4 nm and with a bandpass of only 1nm, are used to find facular areas. Before any areas can be found on any observed images, they have to be calibrated then flattened by removing limb darkening thus producing contrast images. Sunspot areas are then determined from any pixel with contrast of -8.5% or less, while any pixel on a K line contrast image with a contrast of +4.8%/μ or higher, where μ is the cosine of the heliocentric angle, is considered to be a facular pixel. To identify the areas as clearly as possible, studied active regions were usually observed on the sun with relatively low activity; that means that each region is either alone on the sun's disk or with only very few other active regions present. Furthermore, to obtain growth and decay patterns of the areas as reliably as possible, only such active regions must be chosen for which there is as complete observational coverage as possible. At the present time studies have been finished for only a few active regions, but analysis of several others is on going. Obtained results will be presented at the meeting. This work is supported by NSF grant ATM-9912132 and NASA grants NAG5-7191 and NAG5-7778.

  4. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  5. Potential formation of three pyrimidine bases in interstellar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Liton; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-12-01

    Work on the chemical evolution of pre-biotic molecules remains incomplete since the major obstacle is the lack of adequate knowledge of rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in interstellar conditions. In this work, we study the possibility of forming three pyrimidine bases, namely, cytosine, uracil and thymine in interstellar regions. Our study reveals that the synthesis of uracil from cytosine and water is quite impossible under interstellar circumstances. For the synthesis of thymine, reaction between uracil and :CH2 is investigated. Since no other relevant pathways for the formation of uracil and thymine were available in the literature, we consider a large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution of cytosine in gas and ice phases. Our modeling result shows that cytosine would be produced in cold, dense interstellar conditions. However, presence of cytosine is yet to be established. We propose that a new molecule, namely, C4N3OH5 could be observable in the interstellar region. C4N3OH5 is a precursor (Z isomer of cytosine) of cytosine and far more abundant than cytosine. We hope that observation of this precursor molecule would enable us to estimate the abundance of cytosine in interstellar regions. We also carry out quantum chemical calculations to find out the vibrational as well as rotational transitions of this precursor molecule along with three pyrimidine bases.

  6. Formation of the Bastille Day Merged Interaction Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2001-12-01

    We present a simulation study for the radial evolution of the large solar wind stream associated with the flare of July 14, 2000 (Bastille day). An interaction region bounded between a forward-reverse shock pair first formed near 1 AU at the leading edge of the large stream; the interaction region continued to interact with the solar wind structures and other shocks identified at the leading edges of nearby streams to form a merged interaction region (MIR). The model treats shocks as surfaces of zero thickness, and the Rankine-Hugoniot relations are used to calculate the jump conditions at all shocks. The simulation shows how merging of shocks, collision of shocks, and formation of new shocks contributed to the evolution process. The solar wind was restructured from a series of large and small streams at 1 AU to a huge MIR outside 5 AU. The magnetic field structure outside 5 AU bore no resemblance to the parent structure at 1 AU; the magnetic field had relatively small variation throughout the interior of the MIR, and the field intensity was a few times stronger than that outside the MIR. This MIR can act as a barrier to the propagation of galactic cosmic rays. Possible Voyager 2 observation of this MIR at 63 AU in January 2001 has been reported by Burlaga et al. [2001] and by Wang et al. [2001].

  7. On the formation and expansion of H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of H II regions in spherical clouds with small, constant-density cores and power-law density distributions r exp -w outside the core is described analytically. It is found that there is a critical exponent above which the cloud becomes completely ionized. Its value in the formation phase depends on the initial conditions, but it has a well-defined value w(crit) = 3/2 during the expansion phase. For w less than w(crit), the radius of the H II region grows at a given rate, while neutral mass accumulates in the interphase between the ionization and shock fronts. For w = w(crit), the fronts move together without mass accumulation. Cases with w greater than w(crit) lead to the champagne phase: once the cloud is fully ionized, the expansion becomes supersonic. For self-gravitating disks without magnetic fields, the main features include a new 'variable-size' stage. The initial shape of the H II region has a critical point beyond which the disk becomes completely ionized.

  8. An investigation of the role of the H II region environment on star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Kevin Robert

    Data from the Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey are used to investigate low-mass star formation in the vicinity of HII regions. The gas in H II regions is strongly affected by massive stars through their intense ultraviolet radiation and winds. The H II region environment is expected to affect the process of star formation, from triggering the collapse of cloud cores within the molecular cloud to truncating circumstellar disks in the interior of the H II region. Massive stars end their lives as supernovae, injecting freshly synthesized radionuclides and large amounts of radiant and kinetic energy into their surroundings. Most stars in the Galaxy form in such environments and recent measurements of meteorites demonstrate that the Solar System formed in this setting. The first part of this work describes a Very Large Array survey of water masers in portions of six H II regions. Previous observational studies demonstrate the link between star formation and water maser activity. This study uses high-resolution observations of water masers to pinpoint the sites of star formation in crowded or confused regions. The water maser survey identifies several sites of star formation that are very close to the ionization fronts being driven into the surrounding molecular cloud. The locations and numbers of these water masers indicate that the H II region environment may trigger the formation of protostars, but that the passage of the ionization front may play a role in prematurely terminating infall. Later evolutionary stages of star formation are characterized by infrared emission from circumstellar disks. Near-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey is used to show that stars with circumstellar disks in the star-forming region NGC 6357 cluster near ionization fronts, strongly suggesting exposure to the H II region environment rapidly (~10 4 years) evaporates circumstellar gas and dust. Hubble Space Telescope images in the

  9. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  10. Fluxon Modeling of Active Region Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Davey, A. R.; Rachmeler, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present current results and status on fluxon modeling of free energy buildup and release in active regions. Our publicly available code, FLUX, has the unique ability to track magnetic energy buildup with a truly constrained topology in evolving, nonlinear force-free conditions. Recent work includes validation of the model against Low &Lou force-free field solutions, initial evolution studies of idealized active regions, and inclusion of locally parameterized reconnection into the model. FLUX is uniquely able to simulate complete active regions in 3-D on a single workstation; we estimate that a parallelized fluxon model, together with computer vision code to ingest solar data, could run faster than real time on a cluster of \\textasciitilde 30 CPUs and hence provide a true predictive space weather model in the style of predictive simulations of terrestrial weather.

  11. Quantifying the Complexity of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, B.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1997-05-01

    While solar physicists have a better understanding of the importance magnetic fields play in the solar heating mechanism, it is still not possible to predict whether or when an active region will flare. In recent decades, qualitative studies of the changes in active region morphology have shown that there is generally an increase in the complexity of the spatial configuration of a solar active region leading up to a flare event. In this study, we quantify the spatial structure of the region using the Differential Box-Counting Method (DBC)of fractal analysis. We analyze data from NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's vector magnetograph from two flaring active regions: AR 6089 from June 10, 1990, which produced one M1.7 flare, and AR 6659 from June 8, 9 and 10, 1991, this data set including one C5.7 and two M(6.4 and 3.2) flares. (AR 6659 produced several other flares). Several magnetic parameters are studied, including the transverse and longitudinal magnetic field components (Bt and Bl), the total field (Bmag), and the magnetic shear, which describes the non-potentiality of the field. Results are presented for the time series of magnetograms in relation to the timing of flare events.

  12. Quantifying the Complexity of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, B.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    While solar physicists have a better understanding of the importance magnetic fields play in the solar heating mechanism, it is still not possible to predict whether or when an active region will flare. In recent decades, qualitative studies of the changes in active region morphology have shown that there is generally an increase in the complexity of the spatial configuration of a solar active region leading up to a flare event. In this study, we quantify the spatial structure of the region using the differential Box-Counting Method (DBC) of fractal analysis. We analyze data from NASA/Marshall Space Flight Centr's vector magnetograph from two flaring active regions: AR 6089 from June 10, 1990, which produced one M1.7 flare, and AR 6659 from June 8, 9 and 10, 1991, this data set including one C5.7 and two M(6.4 and 3.2) flare. (AR 6659 produced several other flares). Several magnetic parameters are studied, including the transverse and longitudinal magnetic field components (Bt and B1), the total field (Bmag), and the magnetic shear, which describes the non-potentiality of the field. Results are presented for the time series of magnetograms in relation to the timing of flare events.

  13. Organic molecules and water in the planet formation region of young circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Carr, John S; Najita, Joan R

    2008-03-14

    The chemical composition of protoplanetary disks is expected to hold clues to the physical and chemical processes that influence the formation of planetary systems. However, characterizing the gas composition in the planet formation region of disks has been a challenge to date. We report here that the protoplanetary disk within 3 astronomical units of AA Tauri possesses a rich molecular emission spectrum in the mid-infrared, indicating a high abundance of simple organic molecules (HCN, C2H2, and CO2), water vapor, and OH. These results suggest that water is abundant throughout the inner disk and that the disk supports an active organic chemistry. PMID:18339932

  14. Solar Eruptions Initiated in Sigmoidal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    active regions that have been shown to possess high probability for eruption. They present a direct evidence of the existence of flux ropes in the corona prior to the impulsive phase of eruptions. In order to gain insight into their eruptive behavior and how they get destabilized we need to know their 3D magnetic field structure. First, we review some recent observations and modeling of sigmoidal active regions as the primary hosts of solar eruptions, which can also be used as useful laboratories for studying these phenomena. Then, we concentrate on the analysis of observations and highly data-constrained non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models over the lifetime of several sigmoidal active regions, where we have captured their magnetic field structure around the times of major flares. We present the topology analysis of a couple of sigmoidal regions pointing us to the probable sites of reconnection. A scenario for eruption is put forward by this analysis. We demonstrate the use of this topology analysis to reconcile the observed eruption features with the standard flare model. Finally, we show a glimpse of how such a NLFFF model of an erupting region can be used to initiate a CME in a global MHD code in an unprecedented realistic manner. Such simulations can show the effects of solar transients on the near-Earth environment and solar system space weather.

  15. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  16. Asia Section. Regional Activities Division. Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Two papers on library and information activities in developing nations, particularly in India and other Asian countries, were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "IFLA in Asia: A Review of the Work of the Regional Section for Asia," Edward Lim Huck Tee (Malaysia) describes the low level of…

  17. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P < 0·05) dose- and time-related increases in the release of cellular DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  18. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  19. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  20. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  2. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  3. Preferential Pathway for Glycine Formation in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Baptista, L.; Santos A. C., F.

    Interstellar clouds, similar to that from which the solar system was formed, contain many organic molecules including aldehydes, acids, ketones, and sugars Ehrenfreund & Charnley (2000). Those organic compounds have important functions in terrestrial biochemistry and could also have been important in prebiotic synthesis. The simplest amino acid, glycine (NH2CH2COOH), was recently detected in the hot molecular cores Sgr B2(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2 Kuan et al. (2003). The formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid(CH3COOH) have also been detected in those regions Liu et al. (2002), Remijan et al. (2004). The goal of this work is to study experimentally photoionization and photodissociation processes of glycine precursor molecules, acetic acid and formic acid to elucidate a possible preferentially in the glycine synthesis between ice and gas phase. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator TGM) beamline (100 - 310 eV). The experimental set up consists of a high vacuum chamber with a Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOF-MS). Mass spectra were obtained using PhotoElectron PhotoIon Coincidence (PEPICO) technique. Kinetic energy distributions and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Dissociative and non-dissociative photoionization cross sections for both molecules were also determined Boechat-Roberty, Pilling & Santos (2005). Due to the high photodissociation cross section of formic acid it is possible that in PDRs regions, just after molecules evaporation from the grains surface, it is almost destructed by soft X-rays, justifying the observed low abundance of HCOOH in gaseous phase Ehrenfreund et al. (2001). Acetic acid have shown to be more stable to the ionizing field, and its main outcomes from dissociation process were the reactive ionic fragments COOH+ and CH3CO+. To

  4. Supergranule Diffusion and Active Region Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Models of the Sun's magnetic dynamo include turbulent diffusion to parameterize the effects of convective motions on the evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Supergranules are known to dominate the evolution of the surface magnetic field structure as evidenced by the structure of both the active and quiet magnetic network. However, estimates for the dif hivity attributed to su perymules differ by an order of magnitude from about 100 km sup2/s to more than 1000 km sup2/s. We examine this question of the e i v i t y using three merent approaches. 1) We study the decay of more than 30,000 active regions by determining the rate of change in the sunspot area of each active region from day-to-day. 2) We study the decay of a single isolated active region near the time of solar minimum by examining the magnetic field evolution over five solar rotations fiom SOHOMDI magnetograms obtained at 96-minute intervals. 3) We study the characteristics of supergranules that influence the estimates of their diffusive properties - flow speeds and lifetimes as functions of size - fiom SOHO/MDI Dopplergrams.

  5. Conditions of formation of glacial lakes in Mt Everest region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, F.; Thakuri, S.; D'Agata, C.; Smiraglia, C.; Manfredi, E. C.; Viviano, G.; Tartari, G.

    2012-04-01

    Mount Everest (southern central Himalayas) is the region most characterized by glacial lakes in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya range and also by wide debris-covered glaciers. This study provides a complete mapping of both these water resources (October 2008). Considering that these kind of measurements are essential in recent climate change impact studies, the analysis on uncertainty of measurements is discussed with the aim of proving a reference study when lakes are delineated using remote sensing imagery. Moreover, attention is focused on the conditions of formation of lakes, the greatest evidence of climate change impact at high altitudes characterized by debris covered glaciers. To achieve this goal, an ALOS image (October 2008) with medium-high resolution (10 m) was used. A total of 29 glaciers (356.2 ±2% km2) was plotted. The total number of lakes is 624, corresponding to an overall surface area of 7.43 (±18%) km2. We examine the analysis in depth, underlining the capability of ALOS imagery to properly characterize 64% of lakes (error <15%) in terms of surface whereas, concerning glaciers, this sensor allows correctly characterizing the whole resource (error 2%). Concerning the surfaces of lakes not directly connected with glaciers (unconnected-glacial lakes), we found they are correlated with the dimension of their drainage basin, while no correlation was found with the glacier cover in the basin. Considering the evaporation/precipitation ratio at these altitudes is around 0.34 the evolution of these lakes appears to be a helpful sign for detecting the precipitation trend. Regarding the formation process of supraglacial lakes on debris-covered glaciers, the main factors which seem responsible are the low velocity and high ablation rates at the glacier terminus. Our findings confirm that the slope of the glacier where lakes are located, mainly influencing the first factor, provides the boundary condition favourable for lake formation. Otherwise the novelty of

  6. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  7. Proper Motion Of Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lirong

    2009-05-01

    Observational and modeling results indicate that typically the leading magnetic field of bipolar active regions is often spatially more compact, while more dispersed and fragmented in following polarity. Tian & Alexander (2009, ApJ, 695) studied 15 emerging active regions and find that magnetic helicity flux injected into the corona by the leading polarity is generally several times larger than that injected by the following polarity. They argue that the asymmetry of the magnetic helicity should be responsible for the asymmetry of the magnetic morphology. This argument is supported by two resent model results that magnetic flux tubes with higher degree of twist (and therefor greater magnetic tension) have higher rates of emergence (Murray & Hood 2008, A&A, 479; Cheung et al. 2008, ApJ, 687). These results are consistent because the proper motion (related to the emergence) of the leading polarity was found to be faster than that of the following polarity (van Driel-Gesztelyi & Petrovay 1990, Solar Phys., 126). In this paper, we will reinvestigate the proper motion of leading and following polarities of the emerging active regions, and study possible relationship between the proper motion and magnetic helicity.

  8. Models of Impulsively Heated Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Klimchuk, J.

    2009-05-01

    A number of attempts to model solar active regions with steady coronal heating have been modestly successful at reproducing the observed soft X-ray emission, but they fail dramatically at explaining EUV observations. Since impulsive heating (nanoflare) models can reproduce individual EUV loops, it seems reasonable to consider that entire active regions are impulsively heated. However, nanoflares are characterized by many parameters, such as magnitude, duration, and time delay between successive events, and these parameters may depend on the strength of the magnetic field or the length of field lines, for example, so a wide range of active region models must be examined. We have recently begun such a study. Each model begins with a magnetic "skeleton” obtained by extrapolating an observed photospheric magnetogram into the corona. Field lines are populated with plasma using our highly efficient hydro code called Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL). We then produce synthetic images corresponding to emission line or broad-band observations. By determining which set of nanoflare parameters best reproduces actual observations, we hope to constrain the properties of the heating and ultimately to reveal the physical mechanism. We here report on the initial progress of our study.

  9. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  10. Wintertime Air Quality Impacts from Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Operations in the Bakken Formation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanoski-Cole, Ashley; Sive, Barkley; Zhou, Yong; Prenni, Anthony; Schurman, Misha; Day, Derek; Sullivan, Amy; Li, Yi; Hand, Jenny; Gebhart, Kristi; Schichtel, Bret; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Oil and natural gas extraction has dramatically increased in the last decade in the United States due to the increased use of unconventional drilling techniques which include horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. The impact of these drilling activities on local and regional air quality in oil and gas basins across the country are still relatively unknown, especially in recently developed basins such as the Bakken shale formation. This study is the first to conduct a comprehensive characterization of the regional air quality in the Bakken region. The Bakken shale formation, part of the Williston basin, is located in North Dakota and Montana in the United States and Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Canada. Oil and gas drilling operations can impact air quality in a variety of ways, including the generation of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), hazardous air pollutants, ozone, and greenhouse gas emissions. During the winter especially, PM formation can be enhanced and meteorological conditions can favor increased concentrations of PM and other pollutants. In this study, ground-based measurements throughout the Bakken region in North Dakota and Montana were collected over two consecutive winters to gain regional trends of air quality impacts from the oil and gas drilling activities. Additionally, one field site had a comprehensive suite of instrumentation operating at high time resolution to gain detailed characterization of the atmospheric composition. Measurements included organic carbon and black carbon concentrations in PM, the characterization of inorganic PM, inorganic gases, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), precipitation and meteorology. These elevated PM episodes were further investigated using the local meteorological conditions and regional transport patterns. Episodes of elevated concentrations of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide were also detected. The VOC concentrations were analyzed and specific VOCs that are known oil and gas tracers were used

  11. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  12. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  13. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-05-01

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergence based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.

  14. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  15. Hinode Observations of an Eruption from a Sigmoidal Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, L. M.; Wallace, A. J.; Kliem, B.

    2012-08-01

    We analyse the evolution of a bipolar active region which produces an eruption during its decay phase. The soft X-ray arcade develops high shear over a time span of two days and transitions to sigmoidal shortly before the eruption. We propose that the continuous sigmoidal soft X-ray threads indicate that a flux rope has formed which is lying low in the solar atmosphere with a bald patch separatrix surface topology. The formation of the flux rope is driven by the photospheric evolution which is dominated by fragmentation of the main polarities, motion due to supergranular flows and cancellation at the polarity inversion line.

  16. Pederson Current Dissipation In Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Pederson current dissipation in emerging active regions. Certain regions of the solar atmosphere, such as the photosphere and chromosphere, as well as prominences, contain a significant amount of neutral atoms, and a complete description of the plasma requires including the effects of partial ionization. In the chromosphere the dissipation of Pederson currents is important for the evolution of emerging magnetic fields. Due to the relatively high number density in the chromosphere, the ion-neutral collision time-scale is much smaller than timescales associated with flux emergence. Hence we use a single-fluid approach to model the partially ionized plasma. Looking at both the emergence of large-scale sub-surface structures, and the emergence and reconnection of undulatory fields, we investigate the effect of Pederson current dissipation on the state of the emerging field, on magnetic reconnection and on dissipative heating of the atmosphere. Specifically we examine the effect of motions across fieldlines in the partially ionized regions, and how this can increase the free energy supplied to the corona by flux emergence. We also look at reconnection associated with flux emergence in the partially ionized atmosphere, and how this can account for observed small-scale brightenings (Ellerman Bombs).

  17. Localizing Region-Based Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Lankton, Shawn; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a natural framework that allows any region-based segmentation energy to be re-formulated in a local way. We consider local rather than global image statistics and evolve a contour based on local information. Localized contours are capable of segmenting objects with heterogeneous feature profiles that would be difficult to capture correctly using a standard global method. The presented technique is versatile enough to be used with any global region-based active contour energy and instill in it the benefits of localization. We describe this framework and demonstrate the localization of three well-known energies in order to illustrate how our framework can be applied to any energy. We then compare each localized energy to its global counterpart to show the improvements that can be achieved. Next, an in-depth study of the behaviors of these energies in response to the degree of localization is given. Finally, we show results on challenging images to illustrate the robust and accurate segmentations that are possible with this new class of active contour models. PMID:18854247

  18. HEROES Observations of a Quiescent Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Christe, S.; Gaskin, J.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) observations of solar flares reveal the signatures of energetic electrons, and HXR images with high dynamic range and high sensitivity can distinguish between where electrons are accelerated and where they stop. Even in the non-flaring corona, high-sensitivity HXR measurements may be able to detect the presence of electron acceleration. The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon mission added the capability of solar observations to an existing astrophysics balloon payload, HERO, which used grazing-incidence optics for direct HXR imaging. HEROES measures HXR emission from ~20 to ~75 keV with an angular resolution of 33" HPD. HEROES launched on 2013 September 21 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, and had a successful one-day flight. We present the detailed analysis of the 7-hour observation of AR 11850, which sets new upper limits on the HXR emission from a quiescent active region, with corresponding constraints on the numbers of tens of keV energetic electrons present. Using the imaging capability of HEROES, HXR upper limits are also obtained for the quiet Sun surrounding the active region. We also discuss what can be achieved with new and improved HXR instrumentation on balloons.

  19. Radio magnetography of the solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfreikh, G. B.; Shibasaki, K.

    The observations of the solar magnetic fields is one of the most important basics for study of all important processes in structuring the solar atmosphere and most kinds of the release of the energy. The radio methods are of the special interest here because they gain the information on the magnetic field strength in the solar corona and upper chromosphere where traditional optical methods do not work. The construction of the Nobeyama radio heliograph opens a new era in usage radio methods for solar radio magnetography due to some unique property of the instrument: - The 2D mapping of the whole disk of the sun both in I and V Stokes parameters with resolution of 10 arcsec. - Regular observations (without breaks due to weather conditions), eight hours a day, already for seven years. The most effective and representative radio method of measuring the solar magnetic fields is to use polarization measurements of the thermal bremsstrahlung (free-free emission). It is applicable both to analysis of chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields and presents information on longitude component of the magnetic field strength in solar active regions. Three problems are met, however: (i) One needs to measure very low degree of polarization (small fraction of a percent); (ii) To get the real value of the field the spectral data are necessary. (iii) While observing an active region on the disk we have got the overlapping effects on polarized signal of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields. To get higher sensitivity the averaging of the radio maps over periods of about ten minutes were used with the results of sensitivity on V-maps of the order 0.1%. Observations for a number of dates have been analysed (August 22, 1992, October 31, 1992; June 30, 1993, July 22,1994, June 15, 1995 and some more). In all cases a very good similarity was found of the polarized regions (V-maps) with the Ca^ + plages in form and total coincidence with the direction of the magnetic fields on the

  20. FIP bias in a sigmoidal active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in an anemone active region (AR) - coronal hole (CH) complex using an abundance map derived from Hinode/EIS spectra. The detailed, spatially resolved abundance map has a large field of view covering 359'' × 485''. Plasma with high FIP bias, or coronal abundances, is concentrated at the footpoints of the AR loops whereas the surrounding CH has a low FIP bias, ~1, i.e. photospheric abundances. A channel of low FIP bias is located along the AR's main polarity inversion line containing a filament where ongoing flux cancellation is observed, indicating a bald patch magnetic topology characteristic of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  1. The composition of a coronal active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waljeski, K.; Moses, D.; Dere, K. P.; Saba, J. L. R.; Strong, K. T.; Webb, D. F.; Zarro, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The relative abundances of iron, oxygen, magnesium, and neon in a coronal active region are determined from measurements of soft X-ray line and broadband intensities. The emission measure, temperature, and column density are derived from these measured intensities and are used to place a constraint on the abundances of the heavier elements relative to hydrogen in the corona. The intensity measurements were made on 1987 December 11, when an active region was observed jointly by the American Science and Engineering (AS&E) High Resolution Soft X-Ray Imaging Sounding-Rocket Payload and the X-Ray Polychromator Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft. The coordinated observations include images through two broadband filters (8 to 29 A and 8 to 39, 44 to 60 A) and profiles of six emission lines: Fe XVII (15.01 A), FE VIII (15.26 A), O VIII (18.97 A), Mg XI (9.17 A), Ne IX (13.44 A), and Fe XVIII (14.21 A). The effects of resonance scattering are considered in the interpretation of the FCS line intensities. We calculated the expected intensity ratio of the two Fe XVII lines as a function of optical depth and compared this ratio with the observed intensity ratio to obtain the optical depths of each of the lines and the column density. The line intensities and the broadband filtered images are consistent with the emission from a thermal plasma where Fe, O, Mg, and Ne have the 'adopted coronal' abundances of Meyer (1985b) relative to one another, but are not consistent with the emission from a plasma having photospheric abundances: The ratios of the abundances of the low first ionization potential (FIP) elements (Fe and Mg) to the abundances of the high-FIP elements (Ne and O) are higher than the ratios seen in the photosphere by a factor of about 3.5. This conclusion is independent of the assumption of either an isothermal or a multithermal plasma. The column densities derived from the Fe XVII line ratio and the geometry of the active

  2. Active region upflows. I. Multi-instrument observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanninathan, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Galsgaard, K.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    responsible for the formation of the upflow region. High cadence Hα observations are used to study the chromosphere at the footpoints of the upflow region. We find no significant jet-like (spicule/rapid blue excursion) activity to account for several hours/days of plasma upflow. The jet-like activity in this region is not continuous and blueward asymmetries are a bare minimum. Using an image enhancement technique for imaging and spectral data, we show that the coronal structures seen in the AIA 193 Å channel are comparable to the EIS Fe xii images, while images in the AIA 171 Å channel reveal additional loops that are a result of contribution from cooler emission to this channel. Conclusions: Our results suggest that at chromospheric heights there are no signatures that support the possible contribution of spicules to active region upflows. We suggest that magnetic flux diffusion is responsible for the formation of the coronal upflows. The existence of two velocity components possibly indicates the presence of two different flows, which are produced by two different physical mechanisms, e.g. magnetic reconnection and pressure-driven jets. Movies associated to Figs. A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. METEOROLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE FORMATION OF REGIONAL HAZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research project was to determine the role of meteorological factors in the formation of widespread areas of haze in the eastern United States. Three case studies were made: A summer haze episode, an off-season haze episode and a non-haze episode.

  4. H II regions and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kennicutt, R.C.,JR.; Hodge, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    Photoelectrically calibrated maps of the H-alpha emission in the Magellanic Clouds have been used to measure integrated fluxes for several hundred H II regions and to study the properties of the H II region populations in the galaxies. The H II regions span a range of 10,000 in luminosity, from objects on the scale of the Orion Nebula to the 30 Doradus complex. The H-alpha luminosity function is well represented over this entire range by a power law function, indicating that there is no characteristic luminosity scale for the H II regions. The distributions of nebular diameters, on the other hand, are fitted well by exponential functions, with a scale length of 80 pc. Approximate fluxes for several of the extended filamentary networks in the galaxies have also been measured. This extended component probability contributes 15-25 percent of the total H-alpha luminosity of the galaxies. 42 references.

  5. H II regions and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Hodge, P. W.

    1986-07-01

    Photoelectrically calibrated maps of the H-alpha emission in the Magellanic Clouds have been used to measure integrated fluxes for several hundred H II regions and to study the properties of the H II region populations in the galaxies. The H II regions span a range of 10,000 in luminosity, from objects on the scale of the Orion Nebula to the 30 Doradus complex. The H-alpha luminosity function is well represented over this entire range by a power law function, indicating that there is no characteristic luminosity scale for the H II regions. The distributions of nebular diameters, on the other hand, are fitted well by exponential functions, with a scale length of 80 pc. Approximate fluxes for several of the extended filamentary networks in the galaxies have also been measured. This extended component probability contributes 15-25 percent of the total H-alpha luminosity of the galaxies.

  6. Formation of inner structure of a reconnection separatrix region.

    PubMed

    Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Vaivads, A; Retinò, A; André, M; Owen, C J; Nilsson, H

    2006-11-17

    We present multipoint spacecraft observations at the dayside magnetopause of a magnetic reconnection separatrix region. This region separates two plasmas with significantly different temperatures and densities, at a large distance from the X line. We identify which terms in the generalized Ohm's law balance the observed electric field throughout the separatrix region. The electric field inside a thin approximately c/omega pi Hall layer is balanced by the j x B/ne term while other terms dominate elsewhere. On the low density side of the region we observe a density cavity which forms due to the escape of magnetospheric electrons along the newly opened field lines. The perpendicular electric field inside the cavity constitutes a potential jump of several kV. The observed potential jump and field aligned currents can be responsible for strong aurora. PMID:17155688

  7. Formation of Inner Structure of a Reconnection Separatrix Region

    SciTech Connect

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Vaivads, A.; Retino, A.; Andre, M.; Owen, C. J.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-11-17

    We present multipoint spacecraft observations at the dayside magnetopause of a magnetic reconnection separatrix region. This region separates two plasmas with significantly different temperatures and densities, at a large distance from the X line. We identify which terms in the generalized Ohm's law balance the observed electric field throughout the separatrix region. The electric field inside a thin {approx}c/{omega}{sub pi} Hall layer is balanced by the jxB/ne term while other terms dominate elsewhere. On the low density side of the region we observe a density cavity which forms due to the escape of magnetospheric electrons along the newly opened field lines. The perpendicular electric field inside the cavity constitutes a potential jump of several kV. The observed potential jump and field aligned currents can be responsible for strong aurora.

  8. Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; Levin, Rebecca L.; Sass, Sarah M.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Depression and anxiety often involve high levels of trait anger and disturbances in anger expression. Reported anger experience and outward anger expression have recently been associated with left-biased asymmetry of frontal cortical activity, assumed to reflect approach motivation. However, different styles of anger expression could presumably involve different brain mechanisms and/or interact with psychopathology to produce various patterns of brain asymmetry. The present study explored these issues by comparing resting regional electroencephalographic activity in participants high in trait anger who differed in anger expression style (high anger-in, high anger-out, both) and participants low in trait anger, with depression and anxiety systematically assessed. Trait anger, not anger-in or anger-out, predicted left-biased asymmetry at medial frontal EEG sites. The anger-in group reported higher levels of anxious apprehension than did the anger-out group. Furthermore, anxious apprehension moderated the relationship between trait anger, anger-in, and asymmetry in favor of the left hemisphere. Results suggest that motivational direction is not always the driving force behind the relationship of anger and left frontal asymmetry. Findings also support a distinction between anxious apprehension and anxious arousal. PMID:18837620

  9. Fibrillar Amyloid Plaque Formation Precedes Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo. PMID:25799372

  10. Star Formation Activity in a z>4 Protocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Capak, Peter; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    Local studies show that galaxy properties are linked to the galaxy number density within their local environment. Galaxy clusters represent the most extreme density environments and are ideal laboratories to investigate the interplay between galaxy evolution and the environment. However, to understand the origin of the galaxy-environment relation, one needs to look back at the epoch of galaxy formation (z > 1), where the local high-density environments of well-established, virialized clusters give way to looser large-scale structures (LSS) extending over regions of several megaparsecs in size (protoclusters). Clustering analysis indicate that at z~2 submm-selected galaxies (SMGs) reside in very massive halos, suggesting that these may trace high-density environments that likely evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. Conversely, recent work has suggests that SMGs are tracers of a broader range of environments, including structures with more modest masses caught in highly active periods. This suggests that since galaxies in these structures are likely caught during episodes of peak starbursts, SMGs may be tracers of a wider range of environments beyond the progenitors of today’s very rich clusters, opening a window for a more complete exploration of the details underpinning the process of galaxy evolution in concert with the assembly of LSS. We undertook a large observing program comprising deep narrow-band Ly-alpha imaging and multi-object spectroscopy using the IMACS camera on Magellan (Las Campanas) to probe for the presence of a galaxy overdensity in the vicinity of a 4-member group of SMGs at z>4. With ~100 spectroscopically-confirmed Ly-alpha emitters, we are in a position to gauge the level of galaxy overdensity in this region. Furthermore, we have initiated a detailed follow-up study of these Ly-alpha emitters to obtain star-formation rates based on the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer archives, in an effort to probe for trends in the intra-LSS distribution.

  11. Dynamics of fragment formation in the nuclear spinodal region

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G.F.; Rapisarda, A. )

    1995-01-01

    The Vlasov-Nordheim equation is solved numerically on a lattice for nuclear matter in two dimensions. We discuss the reliability of the model at normal density and then study the response of the system to small perturbations. We find deterministic chaos inside the spinodal zone where fragment formation occurs. We discuss in detail the dynamical features of this phenomenon in order to clarify the mechanisms leading to nuclear disassembly in heavy-ion collisions.

  12. The Spectrum of Methyl Formate in the Thz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudorie, M.; Huet, T. R.; Margules, L.; Goubet, M.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Kleiner, I.

    2009-06-01

    The THz spectrum of methyl formate-HCOOCH_3 is currently investigated. At first a multi-pass cell having an optical path of 150 m coupled to an internal source of the Fourier Transform spectrometer of the AILES beamline, synchrotron SOLEIL (France), was used to obtain the methyl formate THz spectrum. Preliminary assignments of the pure rotation spectrum up to 80 cm^{-1}, and of the very weak torsion band v_t = 1-0 around 130 cm^{-1} are carried out. The assignments are based on the rotation-torsion energy levels calculated using the RAM approach. The particular interest in Δ v_t = 1 torsion-rotation band lies in the direct experimental determination of the barrier height V_3, which up to now was determined from pure rotational transitions only, and consequently in the contribution to the improvement of the global study of the rotational levels in the lowest torsional states of methyl formate. Secondly further measurements using the synchrotron radiation are planned. The latest results will be presented. [2] Ilyushin, Kryvda, Alekseev, J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2009), doi: 10.1016/j.jms.2009.01.016

  13. Dense molecular gas tracers in high mass star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jing-Wen

    2016-02-01

    We report the FCRAO observations that mapped HCN (1-0), CS (2-1), HNC (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in ten high-mass star forming cores associated with water masers. We present velocity integrated intensity maps of the four lines for these dense cores, compare their line profiles, and derive physical properties of these cores. We find that these four tracers identify areas with similar properties in these massive dense cores, and in most cases, the emissions of HCN and HCO+ are stronger than those of HNC and CS. We also use the line ratios of HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN and HNC/HCO+ as the diagnostics to explore the environment of these high-mass star forming regions, and find that most of the cores agree with the model that photodominated regions dominate the radiation field, except for W44, for which the radiation field is similar to an X-ray dominated region.

  14. The distribution and nature of star formation regions in NGC 1792

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Bomans, Dominik J.; Will, Jean-Marie

    1994-01-01

    A strong asymmetry with respect to the major axis has been found in the spatial distribution of H II regions in NGC 1792 detected on our H(alpha) image. In the radio continuum, this asymmetry is even stronger than in H(alpha), indicating that supernova activity set in earlier in the northeastern half of the disk than southwest of the nucleus. This suggests that we are viewing spatially propagating star formation (SF) in the disk, which set in about 10(exp 7) yr ago. The most luminous H II regions are distinctly different from the rest of the star-forming regions in NGC 1792, showing up as a peak in the H(alpha) luminosity near L(H(alpha)) approximately equals 3 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s. Around these giant H II regions large amounts of diffuse ionized gas are found, suggesting that this gas is heated by UV radiation escaping these regions. Attributing the radiation coming from the luminous H II regions to a temporarily increased level of SF activity, we estimate that on the order of 1200 OB stars were formed in each of them, with integrated Lyman-continuum luminosites in the range of 6 x 10(exp 51)/s. Although increased significantly near the galactic turnover of rotation, the global SF rate in NGC 1792 is only marginally affected (approximately 20%) by this phenomenon. The most plausible explanation of these results and those obtained for NGC 1808, the interaction partner of NGC 1792, is that the currently on-going SF was triggered by an interaction some 10(exp 8) yr ago.

  15. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  16. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions

    PubMed Central

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. PMID:25403179

  17. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2014-11-15

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. PMID:25403179

  18. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  19. Formation of giant H II regions following supernova explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartori, L.

    1971-01-01

    The principal optical properties of type I supernovae are summarized. These include the light curve and the spectrum. The spectra consist of broad bands with very little continuum. According to the theory presented, the observed light is principally fluorescence, excited in the medium surrounding the supernova by ultraviolet radiation originating from the explosion. It is proposed that the spectrum that impinges on the fluorescent medium while emission is taking place must fall abruptly across the Lyman edge of He II. Such a filtering action is plausibly provided by a much denser internal region, rich in helium, immediately surrounding the exploding object. This will form a Stromgren sphere during the time the intense UV pulse is passing through it. The dense region also slows down the photons below the edge by Thomson scattering, thereby spreading out the UV pulse in time. Various proposed mechanisms for the production of ionization in the Gum nebula are discussed.

  20. The stellar content and formation history of the Giant HII region W51 using IRMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; MacKenty, John; Clark, Simon; Figer, Don

    2007-08-01

    The W51 Giant Molecular Cloud is amongst the most massive within the Galaxy, and harbours widespread and significant massive star formation (SF). However this activity appears qualitatively different from the spatially segregated, sequentially triggered SF occuring in e.g. the G305 and the 30 Dor star forming regions, apparently being quasi- simultaneous and multi-seeded. We propose to obtain near-IR spectroscopy of selected regions within W51 to complement planned deep imaging observations, in order to (i) determine if SF at these sites is proceeding independently or instead is triggered by older, adjacent activity and (ii) to investigate the claims of Okumura et al. (2000) for a top heavy IMF and hence to investigate if the IMF shows an environmental dependence. Finally, a measurement of the total stellar mass in W51 will enable the SF efficiency to be determined and compared to other star forming regions, to investigate potential dependencies on environment or the mode of SF, e.g triggered or multi-seeded.

  1. Fluoride, hydrogen, and formate activate ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase formation in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Im, D S; Friedrich, C G

    1983-01-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus formed ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase; EC 4.1.1.39) when grown on fructose. Addition of sodium fluoride (NaF) to fructose minimal medium resulted in a slightly decreased growth rate and a rapid fivefold increase in RuBPCase specific activity. With citrate, a glucogenic carbon source, RuBPCase was also formed, However, addition of NaF to cells growing on citrate resulted in a 50% decrease in RuBPCase specific activity. Among the enzymes of fructose catabolism, NaF (10 mM) inhibited enolase in vitro by 98% and gluconate 6-phosphate dehydratase by 87%. Inhibition of the dehydratase by NaF was insignificant in vivo, as determined with a mutant defective in phosphoglycerate mutase activity. Growth of this mutant on fructose was not inhibited by NaF, and only a minor increase in RuBPCase activity was observed. From these results, we concluded that the product of the enolase reaction, phosphoenolpyruvate, played a role in RuBPCase formation. Addition of H2 or formate to the wild type growing on fructose or citrate did not affect the growth rate but resulted in rapid formation of RuBPCase activity. Mutants impaired in H2 metabolism formed RuBPCase at a low rate during growth on fructose plus H2 but at a high rate on formate. Apparently, additional reductant from H2 or formate metabolism induced RuBPCase formation in A. eutrophus. PMID:6841316

  2. Formation of secondary organic aerosol in the Paris pollution plume and its impact on surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. J.; Beekmann, M.; Freney, E.; Sellegri, K.; Pichon, J. M.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Colomb, A.; Bourrianne, T.; Michoud, V.; Borbon, A.

    2015-03-01

    Secondary pollutants such as ozone, secondary inorganic aerosol, and secondary organic aerosol formed in the plume of megacities can affect regional air quality. In the framework of the FP7/EU MEGAPOLI project, an intensive campaign was launched in the Greater Paris Region in July 2009. The major objective was to quantify different sources of organic aerosol (OA) within a megacity and in its plume. In this study, we use airborne measurements aboard the French ATR-42 aircraft to evaluate the regional chemistry-transport model CHIMERE within and downwind the Paris region. Slopes of the plume OA levels vs. Ox (= O3 + NO2) show secondary OA (SOA) formation normalized with respect to photochemical activity and are used for specific evaluation of the OA scheme in the model. Simulated and observed slopes are in good agreement, when the most realistic "high-NOx" yields are used in the Volatility-Basis-Set scheme implemented into the model. In addition, these slopes are relatively stable from one day to another, which suggest that they are characteristic for the given megacity plume environment. Since OA within the plume is mainly formed from anthropogenic precursors (VOC and primary OA, POA), this work allows a specific evaluation of anthropogenic SOA and SOA formed from primary semi-volatile and intermediate volatile VOCs (SI-SOA) formation scheme in a model. For specific plumes, this anthropogenic OA build-up can reach about 10 μg m-3. For the average of the month of July 2009, maximum increases occur close to the agglomeration for primary OA are noticed at several tens (for POA) to hundred (for SI-SOA) kilometers of distance from the Paris agglomeration.

  3. Recurrent flares in active region NOAA 11283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Berrilli, F.; Bruno, R.; Carbone, V.; Consolini, G.; de Lauretis, M.; Del Moro, D.; Elmhamdi, A.; Ermolli, I.; Fineschi, S.; Francia, P.; Kordi, A. S.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Laurenza, M.; Lepreti, F.; Marcucci, M. F.; Pallocchia, G.; Pietropaolo, E.; Romoli, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vellante, M.; Villante, U.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are solar phenomena that are not yet fully understood. Several investigations have been performed to single out their related physical parameters that can be used as indices of the magnetic complexity leading to their occurrence. Aims: In order to shed light on the occurrence of recurrent flares and subsequent associated CMEs, we studied the active region NOAA 11283 where recurrent M and X GOES-class flares and CMEs occurred. Methods: We use vector magnetograms taken by HMI/SDO to calculate the horizontal velocity fields of the photospheric magnetic structures, the shear and the dip angles of the magnetic field, the magnetic helicity flux distribution, and the Poynting fluxes across the photosphere due to the emergence and the shearing of the magnetic field. Results: Although we do not observe consistent emerging magnetic flux through the photosphere during the observation time interval, we detected a monotonic increase of the magnetic helicity accumulated in the corona. We found that both the shear and the dip angles have high values along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) before and after all the events. We also note that before the main flare of X2.1 GOES class, the shearing motions seem to inject a more significant energy than the energy injected by the emergence of the magnetic field. Conclusions: We conclude that the very long duration (about 4 days) of the horizontal displacement of the main photospheric magnetic structures along the PIL has a primary role in the energy release during the recurrent flares. This peculiar horizontal velocity field also contributes to the monotonic injection of magnetic helicity into the corona. This process, coupled with the high shear and dip angles along the main PIL, appears to be responsible for the consecutive events of loss of equilibrium leading to the recurrent flares and CMEs. A movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Low-land Gully Formation in the Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijkee, Pim; Keesstra, Saskia; Mekonnen Gethahun, Mulatie

    2015-04-01

    Land degradation and related processes such as gullying, flooding and sedimentation, are global phenomena. Their economic consequences however are more severe in developing countries, which lack resources for prevention and mitigation. In Ethiopia, therefore, gully erosion as a form of land degradation is a prime issue. Over the past decade, gullies have formed in the foothills of the Minizr sub-catchment in the highlands of North-Western Ethiopia. Local extension workers have reported increased gully growth rates in the past five years in the downslope foothill areas. This study answers the following questions: has the gully growth rate indeed increased over the past five years compared to historical rates? What is the mechanism behind gully formation in the study area? In addition, this study looked at three possible root causes for increased erosion rates: changing land use, an increase in the ground water level, and the implementation of soil and water conservation measures in the watershed of the study area. The merit of this study is twofold. First, it shows the applicability of a fast, accessible and accurate way to digitally represent gullies through the use of video footage and photogrammetry. Secondly, it shows the dominant processes in gully formation in the area, allowing for a justified selection of measures to halt further gully growth and rehabilitate existing gullies. Two medium and one large gully were selected for detailed analysis. All gullies were located in gently-sloped areas (0-5%), with Vertisol-dominated soils. Gully shape and volume were derived using terrestrial photogrammetry in AgiSoft PhotoScan Professional. Still frames exported from video footage served as input. Approximately 30 points per gully were sampled weekly for soil moisture content over the course of September, November, and December 2014. In addition, the sites were checked for signs of subsurface flow at the end of the rainy season and again 3 months into the dry season

  5. HELIOSEISMOLOGY OF PRE-EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS. II. AVERAGE EMERGENCE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C.; Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.; Javornik, B.

    2013-01-10

    We report on average subsurface properties of pre-emerging active regions as compared to areas where no active region emergence was detected. Helioseismic holography is applied to samples of the two populations (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, which were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Leka et al. We find that there are statistically significant signatures (i.e., difference in the means of more than a few standard errors) in the average subsurface flows and the apparent wave speed that precede the formation of an active region. The measurements here rule out spatially extended flows of more than about 15 m s{sup -1} in the top 20 Mm below the photosphere over the course of the day preceding the start of visible emergence. These measurements place strong constraints on models of active region formation.

  6. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  7. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  8. About Geodynamic Situation of the Formation and Development of the Inside Formation Throughs of the Volga-Ural Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, Irina

    2010-05-01

    The study area is the South Tatarstan Arch located in the Volgo-Ural Region, which is an enigmatic crustal segment occupying one third of the East European Platform. Tatarstan remains the oil-richest region of the Volga-Urals petroleum province. Sedimentary geological section consists of terrigenous-carbonate rocks of Devonian, Carboniferous and Permian systems. Its thickness is as much as 1,6 - 1,7 km in the most elevated parts of South Tatarsky Arch. It is supposed that deposits of Semilukian horizon (D3fm) represented by carbonate and argillo-carbonate silicified rocks characterized by the 3-5% abundance of organic carbon are major oil-generating complexes within the limits of this area. Oil accumulations are confined mostly to terrigenous reservoirs of the Lower Frasnian stage and to a lesser extent to sandy-aleurolite rocks of the Lower and Middle Carboniferous. Submeridional, latitudinal and diagonal faults related to processes taking place in the crystalline basement at the Early Paleozoic stage are predominating among faults identified within the limits of the studied area. The traces of discontinuities are identified from the gabbro - diabase dykes, products of the volcanic activity encountered in the Middle Devonian deposits, and from increased fracturing of rocks. Faults of various ranks are distinctly exhibited in the up-to-date relief. In the sedimentary cover faults are exhibited as flexure - discontinuity zones or structural terraces, they serve as boundaries between sharply replaced facies and sharp changes in the thickness of deposits. Problem of the origin and development of the Kama-Kinel inside formation through (KKIFT) as before is topical and significant for understanding of geodynamic situation of paleoshelf of East-European platform in Middle-Upper Devonian. Absence in KKIFT of thick, massive carbonaceous rocks and occurrence of decreased thickness of clay- silicon-carbonaceous organic-rich sediments - result of the different conditions of

  9. Chemical Fingerprints of Star Forming Regions and Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Beaupuits, Juan-Pablo

    2010-10-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and Galactic star-forming regions, using mostly single-dish millimeter observations. I first study the excitation conditions of dense gas in a group of Seyfert galaxies using radiative transfer models (Chapter 2). I then study the galaxy NGC 1068, and try to distinguish signatures of the contributions from the AGN and the starburst ring by incorporating observations of high-J transitions of dense gas tracers (Chapter 3). Later, I venture into the mid-infrared spectral region to study different aspects of the AGN and starburst components in the galaxy NGC 4945 (Chapter 4). In Chapter 5 I delve into theoretical aspects of the dynamical evolution of gas in an AGN torus. I use a 3D hydrodynamic simulation with chemical abundances driven by X-rays. The aim is to understand the effects of X-ray irradiation by the AGN on the temperature, formation and destruction of the molecular gas. I finally explore a Galactic star-forming region, the Omega Nebula, with high resolution single dish observations, to study the properties of the warm gas and to constrain chemical models (Chapters 6 and 7).

  10. Far infrared spectroscopy of star formation regions in M82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, P. B.; Erickson, E. F.; Haas, M. R.; Houck, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Emission lines of (O III) at 52 microns and 88 microns and of (N III) at 57 microns in the nucleus of the galaxy M82 have been observed from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory with the facility's cooled grating spectrometer. The (N III) line has not been previously detected in any extragalactic source. The fluxes in the lines indicate approx 4 x 10 to the 7th power M of ionized gas and a large population of massive stars (equivalent to 5 x 10 to the 5th power 08.5 stars), sufficient to power the infrared luminosity of the nucleus. We use the 52 to 88 micron line intensity ratio to find an average electron density of 210 + or 75 in the nucleus; this is 10 to 100 times lower than values typically observed in individual compact HII regions in our Galaxy. The relative line strengths of the (O III) and (N III) lines imply an N(++)/O(++) ratio of 0.45 + or - 0.1, significantly lower than is measured by the same method in individual HII regions at similar galactocentric distances (equal to or less than 400 pc) in our Galaxy. This lower N(++)/O(++) ratio may be due to a lower N/O ratio, higher stellar temperatures, or both, in M82. At spectral resolutions of approx. 90 km/s, all three line profiles are similarly asymmetric. They can be well fitted by two Gaussian distributions with widths of approx. 150 km/s and central velocities of approx. 110 and approx. 295 km/s, bracketing the systemic velocity of the nucleus of approx. 210 km/s. Within uncertainties, both the N(++)/O(++) ratio and the electron density are the same for both Gaussian components; this indicates no major large-scale gradient in either quantity within the nucleus.

  11. The Magnetic Classification of Solar Active Regions 1992-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Norton, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.

  12. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  13. Desmocollin-2 alone forms functional desmosomal plaques, with the plaque formation requiring the juxtamembrane region and plakophilins.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Miwako; Nagatomo, Azusa; Tsuda, Megumi; Obata, Shuichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2015-10-01

    The role of the juxtamembrane region of the desmocollin-2 cytoplasmic domain in desmosome formation was investigated by using gene knockout and reconstitution experiments. When a deletion construct of the desmocollin-2 juxtamembrane region was expressed in HaCaT cells, the mutant protein became localized linearly at the cell-cell boundary, suggesting the involvement of this region in desmosomal plaque formation. Then, desmocollin-2 and desmoglein-2 genes of epithelial DLD-1 cells were ablated by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The resultant knockout cells did not form desmosomes, but re-expression of desmocollin-2 in the cells formed desmosomal plaques in the absence of desmoglein-2 and the transfectants showed significant cell adhesion activity. Intriguingly, expression of desmocollin-2 lacking its juxtamembrane region did not form the plaques. The results of an immunoprecipitation and GST-fusion protein pull-down assay suggested the binding of plakophilin-2 and -3 to the region. Ablation of plakophilin-2 and -3 genes resulted in disruption of the plaque-like accumulation and linear localization of desmocollin-2 at intercellular contact sites. These results suggest that the juxtamembrane region of desmocollin-2 and plakophilins are involved in the desmosomal plaque formation, possibly through the interaction between this region and plakophilins. PMID:25972099

  14. Basophils exhibit antibacterial activity through extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, S; Morshed, M; Amini, P; Stojkov, D; Simon, D; von Gunten, S; Kaufmann, T; Simon, H-U

    2015-09-01

    Basophils are primarily associated with immunomodulatory functions in allergic diseases and parasitic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that both activated human and mouse basophils can form extracellular DNA traps (BETs) containing mitochondrial DNA and granule proteins. In this report, we provide evidence that, in spite of an apparent lack of phagocytic activity, basophils can kill bacteria through BET formation. PMID:26043360

  15. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  16. ISOCAM observations of the L1551 star formation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gålfalk, M.; Olofsson, G.; Kaas, A. A.; Olofsson, S.; Bontemps, S.; Nordh, L.; Abergel, A.; André, P.; Boulanger, F.; Burgdorf, M.; Casali, M. M.; Cesarsky, C. J.; Davies, J.; Falgarone, E.; Montmerle, T.; Perault, M.; Persi, P.; Prusti, T.; Puget, J. L.; Sibille, F.

    2004-06-01

    The results of a deep mid-IR ISOCAM survey of the L1551 dark molecular cloud are presented. The aim of this survey is a search for new YSO (Young Stellar Object) candidates, using two broad-band filters centred at 6.7 and 14.3 μm. Although two regions close to the centre of L1551 had to be avoided due to saturation problems, 96 sources were detected in total (76 sources at 6.7 μm and 44 sources at 14.3 μm). Using the 24 sources detected in both filters, 14 were found to have intrinsic mid-IR excess at 14.3 μm and were therefore classified as YSO candidates. Using additional observations in B, V, I, J, H and K obtained from the ground, most candidates detected at these wavelengths were confirmed to have mid-IR excess at 6.7 μm as well, and three additional YSO candidates were found. Prior to this survey only three YSOs were known in the observed region (avoiding L1551 IRS 5/NE and HL/XZ Tau). This survey reveals 15 new YSO candidates, although several of these are uncertain due to their extended nature either in the mid-IR or in the optical/near-IR observations. Two of the sources with mid-IR excess are previously known YSOs, one is a brown dwarf (MHO 5) and the other is the well known T Tauri star HH 30, consisting of an outflow and an optically thick disk seen edge on. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/420/945

  17. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars

  18. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  19. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The colorful image (top panel) is a large-scale composite mosaic assembled from data collected at a variety of different wavelengths. Views at visible wavelengths appear blue, near-infrared light is depicted as green, and mid-infrared data from the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is portrayed as red. The result is a contrast between structures seen in visible light (blue) and those observed in the infrared (yellow and red). A quick glance shows that most of the action in this image is revealed to the unique eyes of Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon.

    Each of the constituent images is shown below the large mosaic. The Digital Sky Survey (DSS) image (lower left) provides a familiar view of deep space, with stars scattered around a dark field. The reddish hue is from gas heated by foreground stars in this region. This fluorescence fades away in the near-infrared Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) image (lower center), but other features start to appear through the obscuring clouds of dust, now increasingly transparent. Many more

  20. Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region (RMCCS)

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Brian; Matthews, Vince

    2013-09-30

    The primary objective of the “Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region” project, or RMCCS project, is to characterize the storage potential of the most promising geologic sequestration formations within the southwestern U.S. and the Central Rocky Mountain region in particular. The approach included an analysis of geologic sequestration formations under the Craig Power Station in northwestern Colorado, and application or extrapolation of those local-scale results to the broader region. A ten-step protocol for geologic carbon storage site characterization was a primary outcome of this project.

  1. Embedded star formation in the extended narrow line region of Centaurus A: Extreme mixing observed by MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, F.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tadhunter, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the complex ionization structure in a small (~250 pc) extended narrow line region (ENLR) cloud near Centaurus A using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer. This cloud is located in the so-called outer filament of ionized gas (about 15 kpc from the nucleus) where jet-induced star formation has been suggested to occur by different studies. We find that, despite the small size, a mixture of ionization mechanisms is operating, resulting in considerable complexity in the spatial ionization structure. The area includes two H ii regions where star formation is occurring and another location where star formation must have ceased very recently. Interestingly, the extreme Balmer decrement of one of the star forming regions (Hα/Hβobs ~ 6) indicates that it is still heavily embedded in its natal cocoon of gas and dust. At all three locations a continuum counterpart is found with spectra matching those of O/B stars local to Centaurus A. The H ii regions are embedded in a larger gas complex which is photoionized by the radiation of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the O/B stars affect the spatial ionization pattern in the ENLR cloud very locally. In particular, in the surroundings of the youngest star forming region, we can isolate a tight mixing sequence in the diagnostic diagram going from gas with ionization due to a pure stellar continuum to gas only photoionized by the AGN. These results emphasize the complexity and the mixture of processes occurring in star forming regions under the influence of an AGN radiation. This is relevant for our understanding of AGN-induced star formation suggested to occur in a number of objects, including this region of Centaurus A. They also illustrate that these young stars influence the gas over only a limited region.

  2. Warrego Valles and Other Candidate Sites of Local Hydrothermal Activity Within The Thaumasia Region, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Lias, J. H.; Hare, T. M.; Anderson, R. C.; Gulick, V. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated for the Thaumasia region of Mars that: (1) valley formation peaked during the Noachian and declined substantially during the Hesperian and Amazonian Periods and (2) valleys, many of which form networking systems, largely occur near volcanoes, highly faulted terrains, and large impact craters of similar age, thus suggesting hydrothermal activity. In Tanaka et al, the various hypotheses for valley formation on Mars are presented, and a geologic explanation for valley erosion in the Thaumasia region is given that "best fits" the region's geographic and geologic datasets. That comprehensive GIS-based investigation suggests that hydrothermal and seismic activity were the primary causes of valley formation in the Thaumasia region; the data make widespread precipitation less likely as a major factor in valley formation, except perhaps during the Early Noachian, for which much of the geologic record has been destroyed. Based on the reconstruction of the stratigraphic, tectonic, volcanic, and erosional histories and the close association of valleys in time and space with Noachian to Early Hesperian volcanoes and rift systems and Hesperian to Early Amazonian impact craters less than 50 km in diameter, we propose 13 sites of hydrothermal activity within the Thaumasia region; these are the best examples of valleys associated with these geologic features, but there are other less pronounced correlations elsewhere in the region.

  3. Narrow-band Imaging of Massive Star-Forming Regions: Tracing Outflows and the Rate of Star-Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kendall; Willis, Sarah; Hora, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband images targeting ionized hydrogen (Brackett gamma, 2.17 microns) and molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) were obtained for six massive star-forming regions within the Milky Way, NGC 6334, G305, G3333, G3264, G3266, and G351. These regions are within 1-4 kpc from our solar system. The narrowband flux in Brackett gamma was used as a star-formation tracer to calculate a star-formation rate for each region. This is compared with other star-formation rates found using other methods such as the count of young stars and YSOs, and rates calculated from using other tracers (e.g. 70 micron monochromatic luminosity). The molecular hydrogen narrowband images were manually searched to locate outflows from young stars. Once these outflows are identified, it may help to get a better survey of the young stellar population. A better understanding of the stellar population distribution can lead to more accurate star-formation rates to compare to those calculated from star-formation tracers. We found the regions NGC 6334 and G3266 to have the highest levels of ongoing star formation activity as indicated by the number of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs) detected. There are a total of 279 cataloged MHOs in 181 categorized systems for the six regions. There are a total of 150 identified potential driving sources.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  4. Mapping the Innermost Regions of Massive Stars in Formation through Millimeter Recombination Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Liu, H. B.; Hernández-Gómez, A.; Carrasco-González, C.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter (mm) recombination lines (RLs) are intrinsically brighter than centimeter RLs and are free of pressure broadening. Mapping mm RLs in massive star formation (MSF) regions would trace the dynamics of the innermost volume where stars more massive than 10 or 20 ⊙ are forming. We report on our search using ALMA for mm RL emission in two MSF regions.

  5. Structural Basis for Glycyl Radical Formation By Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Activating Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Vey, J.L.; Yang, J.; Li, M.; Broderick, W.E.; Broderick, J.B.; Drennan, C.L.

    2009-05-26

    Pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme generates a stable and catalytically essential glycyl radical on G{sup 734} of pyruvate formate-lyase via the direct, stereospecific abstraction of a hydrogen atom from pyruvate formate-lyase. The activase performs this remarkable feat by using an iron-sulfur cluster and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), thus placing it among the AdoMet radical superfamily of enzymes. We report here structures of the substrate-free and substrate-bound forms of pyruvate formate-lyase-activating enzyme, the first structures of an AdoMet radical activase. To obtain the substrate-bound structure, we have used a peptide substrate, the 7-mer RVSGYAV, which contains the sequence surrounding G{sup 734}. Our structures provide fundamental insights into the interactions between the activase and the G{sup 734} loop of pyruvate formate-lyase and provide a structural basis for direct and stereospecific H atom abstraction from the buried G{sup 734}4 of pyruvate formate-lyase.

  6. Formation of secondary organic aerosol in the Paris pollution plume and its impact on surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. J.; Beekmann, M.; Freney, E.; Sellegri, K.; Pichon, J. M.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Colomb, A.; Bourrianne, T.; Michoud, V.; Borbon, A.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary pollutants such as ozone, secondary inorganic aerosol, and secondary organic aerosol formed in the plumes of megacities can affect regional air quality. In the framework of the FP7/EU MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) project, an intensive campaign was launched in the greater Paris region in July 2009. The major objective was to quantify different sources of organic aerosol (OA) within a megacity and in its plume. In this study, we use airborne measurements aboard the French ATR-42 aircraft to evaluate the regional chemistry-transport model CHIMERE within and downwind of the Paris region. Two mechanisms of secondary OA (SOA) formation are used, both including SOA formation from oxidation and chemical aging of primary semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SI-SOA) in the volatility basis set (VBS) framework. As for SOA formed from traditional VOC (volatile organic compound) precursors (traditional SOA), one applies chemical aging in the VBS framework adopting different SOA yields for high- and low-NOx environments, while another applies a single-step oxidation scheme without chemical aging. Two emission inventories are used for discussion of emission uncertainties. The slopes of the airborne OA levels versus Ox (i.e., O3 + NO2) show SOA formation normalized with respect to photochemical activity and are used for specific evaluation of the OA scheme in the model. The simulated slopes were overestimated slightly by factors of 1.1, 1.7 and 1.3 with respect to those observed for the three airborne measurements, when the most realistic "high-NOx" yields for traditional SOA formation in the VBS scheme are used in the model. In addition, these slopes are relatively stable from one day to another, which suggests that they are characteristic for the given megacity plume environment. The configuration with increased primary

  7. Tracked Active Region Patches for MDI and HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, Michael; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Bobra, Monica

    2014-06-01

    We describe tracked active-region patch data products that have been developed for HMI (HMI Active Region Patches, or HARPs) and for MDI (MDI Tracked Active Region Patches, or MDI TARPs). Both data products consist of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions. The now-released HARP data product covers 2010-present (>2000 regions to date). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. The TARPs contain 6170 regions spanning 72000 images taken over 1996-2010, and will be availablein the MDI resident archive (RA).MDI TARPs are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that they are in. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Also, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a cross-calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HMI HARPs and the MDI TARPs. We show results demonstrating region correspondence, region boundary agreement, and agreement of flux metadata using the approximately 140 regions in the May 2010-October 2010 time period. We envision several uses for these data

  8. Mineral-organic formations in Berezitovy deposit (the Amur region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakh, E. A.; Vakh, A. S.; Petukhov, V. I.; Nikulina, T. V.; Tarasenko, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The article examines the structure and composition of mineral-organic formations within the hypergenesis zone of Berezitovy deposit (the Amur region). The detailed study has shown that these recent formations are represented by algae identified as Trentepohlia jolithus (Linnaeus) Wallroth. The process of macro and micro element accumulation in these formations is likely to have a complex sediment-chemogenic-organogenic nature and results from the flow of the suspended and dissolved substances formed within the hypergenesis zone of sulphide ores. It is also assumed that some elements accumulated in the formations were previously absorbed by algae from the mineralized water environment.

  9. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  10. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mccabe, M. K.; Machado, M. E.; Saba, J. L. R.; Simnett, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372.

  11. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF SUBSURFACE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, L.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced into the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an {Omega}-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to those of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We further emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call 'magnetic necklace' and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also find that the asymmetry between the two legs of the loop is crucially dependent on the initial magnetic field strength. The tilt angle of the emerging regions is also studied in the stable and unstable cases and seems to be affected both by the convective motions and the presence of a differential rotation in the convective cases.

  12. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  13. Effects of regional differences in waste composition on the thermal formation of polychlorinated aromatics during incineration.

    PubMed

    Phan, Duong Ngoc Chau; Jansson, Stina; Marklund, Stellan

    2013-11-01

    Two artificial wastes (A and B) whose contents reflect regional differences in municipal solid waste composition, were used to investigate the thermal formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), and naphthalenes (PCNs) during incineration. Flue gas samples were simultaneously collected at three ports in the post-combustion zone corresponding to flue gas temperatures of 400, 300, and 200 °C. The combustion of Waste B, which had a higher chlorine and metal content than Waste A, produced greater levels of highly-chlorinated homologues, as demonstrated by a higher degree of chlorination. The total concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, and PCNs formed in the combustion of both wastes increased as temperature decreased along the convector. There were no significant differences in total concentrations between Waste A and Waste B combustion at specific temperatures, with exception of PCDFs at 400 °C. Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) modeling, used to evaluate the data for all compound groups, suggest that during flue gas quenching at temperatures of 400 °C low-chlorinated homologues are preferentially formed in the presence of copper, which is known to be a very active catalyst for this process. At 300 and 200 °C, the formation of highly-chlorinated homologues is favored. PMID:24007615

  14. Exploring Formative Assessment Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asghar, Mandy

    2013-01-01

    Formative assessment is a pedagogic practice that has been the subject of much research and debate, as to how it can be used most effectively to deliver enhanced student learning in the higher education setting. Often described as a complex concept it embraces activities that range from facilitating students understanding of assessment standards,…

  15. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on regional library activities which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Importance of Information Resources in National Development with Particular Reference to the Asian Scene" (Yogendra P. Dubey, India); (2) "Report of the Activities of the Regional Section for Asia…

  16. Multi-wavelength study of triggered star formation around 25 H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ning, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Chuan-Peng

    2014-01-01

    We investigate 25 H II regions that show bubble morphology in 13CO(1-0) and infrared data, to search for quantitative evidence of triggered star formation by processes described by the collect and collapse (CC) and radiatively driven implosion (RDI) models. These H II regions display the morphology of a complete or partial bubble at 8 μm, and are all associated with the molecular clouds that surround them. We found that the electron temperature ranges from 5627 K to 6839 K in these H II regions, and the average electron temperature is 6083 K. The age of these H II regions is from 3.0 × 105 yr to 1.7 × 106 yr, and the mean age is 7.7 × 105 yr. Based on the morphology of the associated molecular clouds, we divide these H II regions into three groups, which may support CC and RDI models. We select 23 young IRAS sources which have an infrared luminosity of > 103Lsolar in 19 H II regions. In addition, we identify some young stellar objects (including Class I sources), which are only concentrated in H II regions G29.007+0.076, G44.339-0.827 and G47.028+0.232. The poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions of the three H II regions all show a cometary globule. Comparing the age of each H II region with the characteristic timescales for star formation, we suggest that the three H II regions can trigger clustered star formation by an RDI process. In addition, we detect seven molecular outflows in the five H II regions for the first time. These outflow sources may be triggered by the corresponding H II regions.

  17. In situ conversion process systems utilizing wellbores in at least two regions of a formation

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Hsu, Chia-Fu

    2011-09-27

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of elongated heaters located in a plurality of openings in the formation. At least two of the heaters are substantially parallel to each other for at least a portion of the lengths of the heaters. At least two of the heaters have first end portions in a first region of the formation and second end portions in a second region of the formation. A source of time-varying current is configured to apply time-varying current to at least two of the heaters. The first end portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them. The second portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them.

  18. On the temperature and gas composition in the region of comet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Nun, Akiva; Kleinfeld, Idit

    1989-01-01

    The gas composition and temperature in the region of Comet Halley's formation are estimated on the basis of Giotto and Vega spacecraft results, in conjunction with an experimental study of gas-mixture trapping in amorphous water ice. A CO/CH4 ratio of the order of 100, and temperature about 48 K, are inferred for the case of Halley formation in the solar nebula through water vapor condensation in the presence of gas. This formation temperature, which implies that the ice was in amorphous form, is noted to be close to the temperatures observed in circumstellar dust shells by IRAS; it also lends support to the suggestion that short-period comets were formed outside the planet-formation region.

  19. The Importance of Ammonia for Winter Haze Formation in Two Oil and Gas Production Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L., Jr.; Li, Y.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Sullivan, A.; Day, D.; Archuleta, C.; Tigges, M.; Sewell, H. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fine particle ammonium nitrate formation results from the atmospheric reaction of gaseous ammonia and nitric acid. This reaction is most important in winter when low temperatures thermodynamically enhance particle formation. Nitrogen oxides emissions from oil and gas operations partially react in the atmosphere to form nitric acid. The availability of atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in determining whether the nitric acid formed results in wintertime ammonium nitrate formation. Here we contrast situations in two important U.S. oil and gas production regions. Measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and other species were made from 2007 to present near Boulder, Wyoming and in winters 2013 and 2014 in western North Dakota. The Boulder, Wyoming site is close to the large Jonah and Pinedale Anticline gas fields. Field sites at the north unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and Fort Union are situated in the large Bakken Formation oil and gas production region. Wintertime formation of nitric acid and ammonium nitrate, together comprising nitrogen in the +5 oxidation state (N(V)), was observed in both locations. Concentrations of N(V), however, are generally much lower at Boulder, WY than in the Bakken. An even bigger difference is seen in fine particle ammonium nitrate concentrations; limited regional ammonia is available in western Wyoming to react with nitric acid, leaving a portion of the nitric acid trapped in the gas phase. Higher concentrations of ammonia are observed in the Bakken where they support formation of much higher concentrations of ammonium nitrate. Comparison of these two regions clearly indicates the importance of understanding both local NOx emissions and regional concentrations of ammonia in predicting source impacts on formation of fine particles and haze.

  20. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  1. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  2. A WIDE-FIELD NARROWBAND OPTICAL SURVEY OF THE BRAID NEBULA STAR FORMATION REGION IN CYGNUS OB7

    SciTech Connect

    Magakian, Tigran Yu.; Nikogossian, Elena H.; Movsessian, Tigran; Aspin, Colin; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Khanzadyan, Tigran; Smith, Michael D.; Mitchison, Sharon; Davis, Chris J.; Beck, Tracy L.; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald H. E-mail: elena@bao.sci.am E-mail: pyo@subaru.naoj.org E-mail: smm23@kent.ac.uk E-mail: c.davis@jach.hawaii.edu E-mail: gerald.schieven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2010-03-15

    We study the population of Herbig-Haro (HH) flows and jets in an area of Cygnus OB7 designated the Braid Nebula star formation region. This complex forms part of the L 1003 dark cloud, and hosts two FU Orionis (FUor)-like objects as well as several other active young stars. To trace outflow activity and to relate both known and newly discovered flows to young star hosts we intercompare new, deep, narrowband H{alpha} and [S II] optical images taken on the Subaru 8 m Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Our images show that there is considerable outflow and jet activity in this region suggesting the presence of an extensive young star population. We confirm that both of the FUor-like objects drive extensive HH flows and document further members of the flows in both objects. The L 1003 star formation complex is a highly kinematically active region with young stars in several different stages of evolution. We trace collimated outflows from numerous young stars although the origin of some HH objects remains elusive.

  3. MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M.

    2010-08-20

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

  4. THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

  5. The relation between star formation and active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three questions relevant to the relation between an active nucleus and surrounding star formation are discussed. The infrared stellar CO absorption bands can be used to identify galaxies with large populations of young, massive stars and thus can identify strong starburst unambiguously, such as in NGC 6240, and can help identify composite active/starburst systems such as Arp 220. An active nucleus is probably not required for LINER spectral characteristics; dusty starburst galaxies, particularly if they are nearly edge-on, can produce LINER spectra through the shock heating of their interstellar media by supernovae combined with the obscuration of their nuclei in the optical. The Galactic Center would be an ideal laboratory for studying the interaction of starbursts and active nuclei, if both could be demonstrated to occur there. Failure to detect a cusp in the stellar distribution raises questions about the presence of an active nucleus, which should be answered by additional observations in the near future.

  6. Formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) by activated sludge at various salinities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Ai-Min; Xu, Juan; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-02-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) present a significant component of effluent organic matter from biological wastewater treatment reactors, and can affect the membrane fouling and formation of disinfection by-products. Thus, SMP have attracted increasing concerns in wastewater treatment and reclamation. In this work, the formation of SMP by activated sludge at various NaCl concentrations is investigated by using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and fluorescence regional integration (FRI). The results show that a high level of salinity decreases substrate removal efficiency and leads to an accumulation of SMP, especially proteins. Three components of SMP, one protein-like and two humic-acid-like components, are identified by PARAFAC, which exhibit different trends with the variation of NaCl concentration. FRI analysis reveals that the majority of protein fluorescence is attributed to tryptophan and tryptophan-like proteins, rather than tyrosine and tyrosine-like proteins. With an increase in NaCl concentration, the normalized volume percentages of tyrosine and tryptophan region increase, while those of humic- and fulvic-acid-like region decrease significantly. This work demonstrates that salinity affects the formation of SMP, and that EEM with PARAFAC in combination with FRI analysis is a useful tool to get insight into the formation of SMP by activated sludge. PMID:22622691

  7. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening. PMID:27526180

  8. Ozone formation along the California-Mexican border region during Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohui; Bei, Naifang; Zavala, Miguel; Molina, Luisa T.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ozone (O3) formation along the California-Mexico border region using the WRF-CHEM model in association with the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign. Four two-day episodes in 2010 are chosen based on plume transport patterns: 1) May 15-16 (plume north), 2) May 29-30 (plume southwest), 3) June 4-5 (plume east), and 4) June 13-14 (plume southeast). Generally, the predicted O3 spatial patterns and temporal variations agree well with the observations at the ambient monitoring sites in the San Diego-Tijuana region, but in the Calexico-Mexicali region, the model frequently underestimates the observation. In the San Diego-Tijuana region, the morning anthropogenic precursor emissions in the urbanized coastal plain are carried inland and mixed with the local biogenic emissions during transport, causing the high O3 level over the mountain region. Biogenic emissions enhance the O3 concentrations by up to 40 ppb over the mountain region in the afternoon. The factor separation approach is used to evaluate the contributions of trans-boundary transport of emissions from California and Baja California to the O3 level in the California-Mexico border region. The Baja California emissions play a minor role in the O3 formation in the San Diego region and do not seem to contribute to the O3 exceedances in the region, but have large potential to cause O3 exceedances in the Calexico region. The California emissions can considerably enhance the O3 level in the Tijuana region. Generally, the California emissions play a more important role than the Baja California emissions on O3 formation in the border region (within 40 km to the California-Mexico border). On average, the O3 concentrations in the border region are decreased by 2-4 ppb in the afternoon due to the interactions of emissions from California and Baja California. Further studies need to be conducted to improve the sea breeze simulations in the border region for evaluating O3 formation.

  9. Coagulation activity and white thrombus formation in the microminipig.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Nagasato, Tomoka; Yamada, Tomonobu; Ito, Takashi; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Shameshima, Hisayo; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Tanimoto, Akihide; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Swine are becoming increasingly attractive as animal models for clinical research and the recently developed Microminipig (MMPig) has emerged as a possible experimental animal model. In this study, we demonstrated age-dependent changes in hematological parameters and coagulation activity in healthy MMPigs (58 male and 67 females, aged 0-34 months), and investigated white thrombus formation (WTF) using an in vitro microchip flow-chamber system (four males and four females, aged 22-23 months). There was no clear sex or age-dependent differences in any hematological parameters. While activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was shorter than prothrombin time (PT), with APTT:PT of 0.88:1, microchip flow-chamber system analysis showed that WTF time was shorter than that in humans, suggesting a possible thrombotic tendency in the MMPig. These results could be useful to life science researchers in the use of the MMPig as an experimental model animal for thrombus formation. PMID:23606691

  10. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  11. Characteristics of regional new particle formation in urban and regional background environments in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hu, M.; Sun, J. Y.; Wu, Z. J.; Yue, D. L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Pei, X. Y.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-08-01

    Long-term measurements of particle number size distributions were carried out in the North China Plain both at an urban background site (Peking University, PKU) and a regional Global Atmospheric Watch station (Shangdianzi, SDZ) from March to November in 2008. In total, 52 new particle formation events were observed simultaneously at both sites, indicating that this is a regional phenomenon in the North China Plain. On average, the mean condensation sink value before the nucleation event start was 0.025 s-1 in the urban environment, which was 1.6 times higher than that at regional site. However, higher particle formation and growth rates were observed at PKU (10.8 cm-3 s-1 an 5.2 nm h-1) compared with those at SDZ (4.9 cm-3 s-1 and 4.0 nm h-1). These results implied that more precursors are needed to participate in the nucleation process to observe the occurrence of new particle formation event in a more polluted urban environment. Different from the observations in clean environments, the background condition of the observed nucleation events in the North China Plain could be characterized as the co-existing of the higher source and sink. The condensational growth of newly formed particles results in an increase in the particle mass concentration, particle light scattering coefficient, and CCN number concentration, with consequences on climate effects and air quality. In 34 investigated new particle formation cases at both sites, a significant particle nucleation and subsequent growth over a sufficient long time period were observed and investigated in terms of the particle light scattering and the number concentration of "potential" CCN. The results revealed that the new particle formation increases the particle light scattering coefficient and CCN number concentration in the North China Plain by factors in the range of 6.3-7.6 and 5.6-8.7, respectively. Moreover, the potential contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the CCN number concentration is more than 50

  12. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  13. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Long, Jianyin; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2005-02-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-beta/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-beta transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-beta. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control. PMID:15588252

  14. Probing the central regions of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohfink, Anne Maria

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are one of the key players in the Universe. Their energy output can strongly affect the growth of their host galaxy and can promote or suppress star formation on galactic scales. Most of the processes that determine the power of an AGN as well as the form in which that power is released take place in the immediate surroundings of its supermassive black hole, a region that is still not entirely understood. A comprehension of these inner regions is, however, crucial to any ultimate understanding of the AGN's vast influence. This dissertation explores these close-in environments of the black hole using two approaches: X-ray spectroscopy and variability studies. We begin by summarizing our current understanding of why AGN play such a significant role in galaxy formation. This is followed by a discussion of why X-ray spectroscopy is one of the best means to investigate them. We point out that, in particular, the X-ray reflection spectrum is interesting as it can directly probe parameters such as the black hole spin or the inclination of the accretion disk. Since the reflection spectrum is a broad band component, that usually only contributes a fraction of the total observed X-ray flux, the entire X-ray spectrum requires careful modeling. To perform such modeling and gain access to the parameters of the reflection spectrum, we first select a target in which the spectral decomposition is simplified by the absence of absorption - the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9. We apply a multi-epoch fitting method that uses more than one spectrum at a time to get the best possible results on the parameters of the reflection spectrum that are invariant on human timescales. This technique enables us to tightly constrain the reflection parameters and leads us to conclude that Fairall 9 most likely possesses a composite soft X-ray excess, consisting of blurred reflection and a separate component such as Comptonization. The reflection spectrum also provides a way

  15. Professional Motivation Formation of Future Specialists under the Conditions of Regional Educational Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kargina, Elena Mikhaylovna

    2015-01-01

    Motivation plays the leading role in the organization of the personality structure. It is a driving force of the activity. Motivation accounts for the behavior and activity and has a great impact on professional self-determination and person's satisfaction with the work. The problem of professional motivation formation of a future specialist is…

  16. Windblown soil crust formation under light rainfall in a semiarid region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many soils in arid and semi-arid regions of the world are affected by crusting, the process of forming a compact layer or thin mantle of consolidated material at the soil surface. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of rainfall quantity on crust formation of five soil types prominent in the Col...

  17. Imaging Polarized Dust Emission in Star Formation Regions with the OVRO MM Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akeson, Rachel; Carlstrom, John

    1996-01-01

    We present OVRO interferometric observations of linearly polarized emission from magnetically aligned dust grains which allow the magnetic field geometry in nearby star formation regions to be probed on scales ranging from 100 to 3000 AU. Current results include observations of the young stellar objects NGC1333/IRAS 4A, IRAS 16293-2422 and Orion IRc2-KL.

  18. The magnetic field structure in high-mass star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Jacqueline A.; Schleuning, D.; Dotson, J. L.; Dowell, C. Darren; Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1995-01-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of far-IR polarimetric observations, which were made to study the magnetic field structure in the high-mass star formation regions of M42, NGC2024, and W3. These observations were made from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), using the University of Chicago far-IR polarimeter, Stokes.

  19. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  20. Communication: Activation energy of tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-08-01

    Tension plays a vital role in pore formation in biomembranes, but the mechanism of pore formation remains unclear. We investigated the temperature dependence of the rate constant of constant tension (σ)-induced pore formation in giant unilamellar vesicles of lipid membranes using an experimental method we developed. By analyzing this result, we determined the activation energy (Ua) of tension-induced pore formation as a function of tension. A constant (U0) that does not depend on tension was found to contribute significantly to Ua. Analysis of the activation energy clearly indicated that the dependence of Ua on σ in the classical theory is correct, but that the classical theory of pore formation is not entirely correct due to the presence of U0. We can reasonably consider that U0 is a nucleation free energy to form a hydrophilic pre-pore from a hydrophobic pre-pore or a region with lower lateral lipid density. After obtaining U0, the evolution of a pre-pore follows a classical theory. Our data provide valuable information that help explain the mechanism of tension-induced pore formation in biomembranes and lipid membranes.

  1. THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.

    2012-09-10

    The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

  2. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  3. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Md. Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand. PMID:27375903

  4. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  5. Differential activity of regions of transversus abdominis during trunk rotation.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Donna M; Hodges, Paul W

    2005-05-01

    The role of the abdominal muscles in trunk rotation is not comprehensively understood. This study investigated the electromyographic (EMG) activity of anatomically distinct regions of the abdominal muscles during trunk rotation in six subjects with no history of spinal pain. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the right abdominal wall; upper region of transversus abdominis (TrA), middle region of TrA, obliquus internus abdominis (OI) and obliquus externus abdominis (OE), and lower region of TrA and OI. Surface electrodes were placed over right rectus abdominis (RA). Subjects performed trunk rotation to the left and right in sitting by rotating their pelvis relative to a fixed thorax. EMG activity was recorded in relaxed supine and sitting, and during an isometric hold at end range. TrA was consistently active during trunk rotation, with the recruitment patterns of the upper fascicles opposite to that of the middle and lower fascicles. During left rotation, there was greater activity of the lower and middle regions of contralateral TrA and the lower region of contralateral OI. The upper region of ipsilateral TrA and OE were predominately active during right rotation. In contrast, there was no difference in activity of RA and middle OI between directions (although middle OI was different between directions for all but one subject). This study indicates that TrA is active during trunk rotation, but this activity varies between muscle regions. These normative data will assist in understanding the role of TrA in lumbopelvic control and movement, and the effect of spinal pain on abdominal muscle recruitment. PMID:15940481

  6. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  7. Radio Coronal Magnetography of a Large Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Timothy S.; Gary, Dale E.; White, Stephen; Fleishman, Gregory; Chen, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of coronal magnetic fields is fundamental to understanding energetic phenomena such as solar flares. Flares occur in solar active regions where strong, non-potential magnetic fields provide free energy. While constraints on the coronal magnetic field topology are readily available through high resolution SXR and EUV imaging of solar active regions, useful quantitative measurements of coronal magnetic fields have thus far been elusive. Recent progress has been made at infrared (IR) wavelengths in exploiting both the Zeeman and Hanle effects to infer the line-of-sight magnetic field strength or the orientation of the magnetic field vector in the plane of the sky above the solar limb. However, no measurements of coronal magnetic fields against the solar disk are possible using IR observations. Radio observations of gyroresonance emission from active regions offer the means of measuring coronal magnetic fields above the limb and on the solar disk. In particular, for plasma plasma conditions in the solar corona, active regions typically become optically thick to emission over a range of radio frequencies through gyroresonance absorption at a low harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The specific range of resonant frequencies depends on the range of coronal magnetic field strengths present in the active region.The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array was used in November 2014 to image NOAA/USAF active region AR12209 over a continuous frequency range of 1-8 GHz, corresponding to a wavelength range of 3.75-30 cm. This frequency range is sensitive to coronal magnetic field strengths ranging from ~120-1400G. The active region was observed on four different dates - November 18, 20, 22, and 24 - during which the active region longitude ranged from -15 to +70 degrees, providing a wide range of aspect angles. In this paper we provide a preliminary description of the coronal magnetic field measurements derived from the radio observations.

  8. Some features of active regions and bursts in millimetric range.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xingfeng; Yao, Jinxing

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics of active regions and bursts at mm wavelengths, observed with the 13.7 m radio telescope at Quinghai from Nov 16 to Dec 1, 1993, are analyzed. It appears that the active region collapsed and vanished while there occurred a coronal loop with two polarities. GRE bursts at mm wavelength may be interpreted by thermal gyro-resonance radiation and are part of the chromospheric eruption. There is no indication of FFS in 10 ms recordings.

  9. Europe in world regional perspective: formations of modernity and major historical transformations.

    PubMed

    Delanty, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The paper seeks to present a world regional approach to the analysis of modernity and in doing so it also aims to make a contribution to comparative sociology and social theory. It is argued that world regions are the most suitable entry-point for comparing different socio-political constellations of our time, preferable to continents, civilizations and nation-states. However, a world regional foundation on its own is insufficient, due to the internal plurality and historically changing forms of world regions, and therefore needs to be accompanied by a concept that provides some degree of coherence within world regions and a tool for comparison with other world regions. The notion of modernity offers this level of generality while at the same time allowing for variety in its historical forms. Six main formations of modernity are identified, of which the European model was the first one and often a cultural reference for many other parts of the world. The thesis is that in the present day the most important developments are in the Asian and Latin American varieties, which unlike Europe are witnessing major historical transformation. Decisive in all of this is the question of democratization in the shaping of social imaginaries. Beginning with the problem of how to define the specificity of Europe, the paper provides an exploratory analysis of some of the salient considerations around a number of world regions, their formations of modernity, and the extent of major historical transformations in their present constitution. PMID:26364573

  10. Odours stimulate neuronal activity in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation during path integration

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, P. E.; Phillips, J. B.; Gonçalves, A.; Marques, P. A. M.; Nĕmec, P.

    2014-01-01

    The dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of birds is commonly assumed to play a central role in processing information needed for geographical positioning and homing. Previous work has interpreted odour-induced activity in this region as evidence for an ‘olfactory map’. Here, we show, using c-Fos expression as a marker, that neuronal activation in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of pigeons is primarily a response to odour novelty, not to the spatial distribution of odour sources that would be necessary for an olfactory map. Pigeons exposed to odours had significantly more neurons activated in this area of the brain than pigeons exposed to filtered air with odours removed. This increased activity was observed only in response to unfamiliar odours. No change in activity was observed when pigeons were exposed to home odours. These findings are consistent with non-home odours activating non-olfactory components of the pigeon's navigation system. The pattern of neuronal activation in the triangular and dorsomedial areas of the hippocampal formation was, by contrast, consistent with the possibility that odours play a role in providing spatial information. PMID:24671977

  11. Formation of structures around HII regions: ionization feedback from massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.; Audit, E.; Minier, V.; Schmidt, W.; Schneider, N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new model for the formation of dense clumps and pillars around HII regions based on shocks curvature at the interface between a HII region and a molecular cloud. UV radiation leads to the formation of an ionization front and of a shock ahead. The gas is compressed between them forming a dense shell at the interface. This shell may be curved due to initial interface or density modulation caused by the turbulence of the molecular cloud. Low curvature leads to instabilities in the shell that form dense clumps while sufficiently curved shells collapse on itself to form pillars. When turbulence is high compared to the ionized-gas pressure, bubbles of cold gas have sufficient kinetic energy to penetrate into the HII region and detach themselves from the parent cloud, forming cometary globules. Using computational simulations, we show that these new models are extremely efficient to form dense clumps and stable and growing elongated structures, pillars, in which star formation might occur (see Tremblin et al. 2012a). The inclusion of turbulence in the model shows its importance in the formation of cometary globules (see Tremblin et al. 2012b). Globally, the density enhancement in the simulations is of one or two orders of magnitude higher than the density enhancement of the classical ``collect and collapse`` scenario. The code used for the simulation is the HERACLES code, that comprises hydrodynamics with various equation of state, radiative transfer, gravity, cooling and heating. Our recent observations with Herschel (see Schneider et al. 2012a) and SOFIA (see Schneider et al. 2012b) and additional Spitzer data archives revealed many more of these structures in regions where OB stars have already formed such as the Rosette Nebula, Cygnus X, M16 and Vela, suggesting that the UV radiation from massive stars plays an important role in their formation. We present a first comparison between the simulations described above and recent observations of these regions.

  12. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  13. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  14. BRIGHT ULTRAVIOLET REGIONS AND STAR FORMATION CHARACTERISTICS IN NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Melena, Nicholas W.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Zernow, Lea; Elmegreen, Bruce G. E-mail: dah@lowell.edu E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com

    2009-11-15

    We compare star formation in the inner and outer disks of 11 dwarf irregular galaxies (dIm) within 3.6 Mpc. The regions are identified on Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-UV images, and modeled with UV, optical, and near-IR colors to determine masses and ages. A few galaxies have made 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M {sub sun} complexes in a starburst phase, while others have not formed clusters in the last 50 Myr. The maximum region mass correlates with the number of regions as expected from the size-of-sample effect. We find no radial gradients in region masses and ages, even beyond the realm of H{alpha} emission, although there is an exponential decrease in the luminosity density and number density of the regions with radius. H{alpha} is apparently lacking in the outer parts only because nebular emission around massive stars is too faint to see. The outermost regions for the five galaxies with H I data formed at average gas surface densities of 1.9-5.9 M {sub sun} pc{sup -2}. These densities are at the low end of commonly considered thresholds for star formation and imply either that local gas densities are higher before star formation begins or subthreshold star formation is possible. The first case could be explained by supernovae triggering and other local processes, while the second case could be explained by gravitational instabilities with angular momentum loss in growing condensations. The distribution of regions on a log(mass) - log(age) plot is examined. The distribution is usually uniform along log(age) for equal intervals of log(mass) and this implies a region count that varies as 1/age. This variation results from either an individual region mass that varies as 1/age or a region disruption probability that varies as 1/age. A correlation between fading-corrected surface brightness and age suggests the former. The implied loss of mass is from fading of region envelopes below the surface brightness limit.

  15. Active Transport Can Greatly Enhance Cdc20:Mad2 Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Henze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To guarantee genomic integrity and viability, the cell must ensure proper distribution of the replicated chromosomes among the two daughter cells in mitosis. The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a central regulatory mechanism to achieve this goal. A dysfunction of this checkpoint may lead to aneuploidy and likely contributes to the development of cancer. Kinetochores of unattached or misaligned chromosomes are thought to generate a diffusible “wait-anaphase” signal, which is the basis for downstream events to inhibit the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). The rate of Cdc20:C-Mad2 complex formation at the kinetochore is a key regulatory factor in the context of APC/C inhibition. Computer simulations of a quantitative SAC model show that the formation of Cdc20:C-Mad2 is too slow for checkpoint maintenance when cytosolic O-Mad2 has to encounter kinetochores by diffusion alone. Here, we show that an active transport of O-Mad2 towards the spindle mid-zone increases the efficiency of Mad2-activation. Our in-silico data indicate that this mechanism can greatly enhance the formation of Cdc20:Mad2 and furthermore gives an explanation on how the “wait-anaphase” signal can dissolve abruptly within a short time. Our results help to understand parts of the SAC mechanism that remain unclear. PMID:25338047

  16. Ligand Mobility Modulates Immunological Synapse Formation and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Jung; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Waldman, Abraham; Clarke, Fiona; Huseby, Eric S.; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement induces clustering and recruitment to the plasma membrane of many signaling molecules, including the protein tyrosine kinase zeta-chain associated protein of 70 kDa (ZAP70) and the adaptor SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76). This molecular rearrangement results in formation of the immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic protein array that modulates T cell activation. The current study investigates the effects of apparent long-range ligand mobility on T cell signaling activity and IS formation. We formed stimulatory lipid bilayers on glass surfaces from binary lipid mixtures with varied composition, and characterized these surfaces with respect to diffusion coefficient and fluid connectivity. Stimulatory ligands coupled to these surfaces with similar density and orientation showed differences in their ability to activate T cells. On less mobile membranes, central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC) formation was delayed and the overall accumulation of CD3ζ at the IS was reduced. Analysis of signaling microcluster (MC) dynamics showed that ZAP70 MCs exhibited faster track velocity and longer trajectories as a function of increased ligand mobility, whereas movement of SLP76 MCs was relatively insensitive to this parameter. Actin retrograde flow was observed on all surfaces, but cell spreading and subsequent cytoskeletal contraction were more pronounced on mobile membranes. Finally, increased tyrosine phosphorylation and persistent elevation of intracellular Ca2+ were observed in cells stimulated on fluid membranes. These results point to ligand mobility as an important parameter in modulating T cell responses. PMID:22384241

  17. Characteristics of regional new particle formation in urban and regional background environments in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hu, M.; Sun, J. Y.; Wu, Z. J.; Yue, D. L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Pei, X. Y.; Cheng, Y. F.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term measurements of particle number size distributions were carried out both at an urban background site (Peking University, PKU) and a regional Global Atmospheric Watch station (Shangdianzi, SDZ) from March to November in 2008. In total, 52 new particle formation (NPF) events were observed simultaneously at both sites, indicating that this is a regional phenomenon in the North China Plain. On average, the mean condensation sink value before the nucleation events started was 0.025 s-1 in the urban environment, which was 1.6 times higher than that at regional site. However, higher particle formation and growth rates were observed at PKU (10.8 cm-3 s-1 and 5.2 nm h-1) compared with those at SDZ (4.9 cm-3 s-1 and 4.0 nm h-1). These results implied that precursors were much more abundant in the polluted urban environment. Different from the observations in cleaner environments, the background conditions of the observed particle homogeneous nucleation events in the North China Plain could be characterized as the co-existing of a stronger source of precursor gases and a higher condensational sink of pre-existing aerosol particles. Secondary aerosol formation following nucleation events results in an increase of particle mass concentration, particle light scattering coefficient, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration, with consequences on visibility, radiative effects, and air quality. Typical regional NPF events with significant particle nucleation rates and subsequent particle growth over a sufficiently long time period at both sites were chosen to investigate the influence of NPF on the number concentration of "potential" CCN. As a result, the NPF and the subsequent condensable growth increased the CCN number concentration in the North China Plain by factors in the range from 5.6 to 8.7. Moreover, the potential contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the CCN number concentration was more than 50%, to which more attention should be drawn in

  18. Earth resources-regional transfer activity contracts review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensko, J., Jr.; Daniels, J. L.; Downs, S. W., Jr.; Jones, N. L.; Morton, R. R.; Paludan, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    A regional transfer activity contracts review held by the Earth Resources Office was summarized. Contracts in the earth resources field primarily directed toward applications of satellite data and technology in solution of state and regional problems were reviewed. A summary of the progress of each contract was given in order to share experiences of researchers across a seven state region. The region included Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. Research in several earth science disciplines included forestry, limnology, water resources, land use, geology, and mathematical modeling. The use of computers for establishment of information retrieval systems was also emphasized.

  19. FOXO1 Mediates RANKL Induced Osteoclast Formation and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Dong, Guangyu; Jeon, Hyeran Helen; Elazizi, Mohamad; La, Lan B.; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Xiao, E; Tian, Chen; Alsadun, Sarah; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the transcription factor FOXO1 is elevated in conditions with high levels of bone resorption. To investigate the role of FOXO1 in the formation of osteoclasts we examined mice with lineage specific deletion of FOXO1 in osteoclast precursors and by knockdown of FOXO1 with siRNA. The receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL), a principal bone resorbing factor, induced FOXO1 expression and nuclear localization two days after stimulation in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) and RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors. RANKL- induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity was reduced in half in vivo and in vitro with lineage specific FOXO1 deletion (LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L) compared to matched controls (LyzM.Cre−FOXO1L/L). Similar results were obtained by knockdown of FOXO1 in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, FOXO1-mediated osteoclast formation was linked to regulation of NFATc1 nuclear localization and expression as well as a number of downstream factors including dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), ATP6vod2, cathepsin K and integrin αν Lastly, FOXO1 deletion reduced M-CSF induced RANK expression and migration of osteoclast precursors. Studies presented here provide the evidence that FOXO1 plays a direct role in osteoclast formation by mediating the effect of RANKL on NFATc1 and several downstream effectors. This is likely to be significant since FOXO1 and RANKL are elevated in osteolytic conditions. PMID:25694609

  20. Differential Magnetic Field Shear in an Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeider, B.; DeMoulin, P.; Aulanier, G.; Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional extrapolation of magnetic field lines from a magnetogram obtained at Kitt Peak allows us to understand the global structure of the NOAA active region 6718, as observed in X-rays with the Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) and in Ha with the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph (MSDP) in Meudon on 1991 July 11. This active region was in a quiet stage. Bright X-ray loops connect plages having field strengths of approx. 300 G, while H-alpha fibriles connect penumbrae having strong spot fields to the surrounding network. Small, intense X-ray features in the moat region around a large spot, which could be called X-ray-bright points, are due mainly to the emergence of magnetic flux and merging of these fields with surrounding ones. A set of large-scale, sheared X-ray loops is observed in the central part of the active region. Based on the fit between the observed coronal structure and the field configurations (and assuming a linear force-free field), we propose a differential magnetic field shear model for this active region. The decreasing shear in outer portions of the active region may indicate a continual relaxation of the magnetic field to a lower energy state in the progressively older portions of the AR.

  1. Panoramic spectroscopy of galaxies with star-formation regions. a study of SBS 1202 + 583

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.; Dodonov, S. N.; Moiseev, A. V.; Smirnova, A. A.

    2012-03-01

    The methods of panoramic (3D) spectroscopy are used by us in a detailed study of galaxies with ongoing star formation chosen from among objects in seven selected fields of the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS). This article deals with the irregular galaxy SBS 1202 + 583, which our classification scheme identifies as being in a continuous phase of star formation. Observations were made with the panoramic spectrographs MPFS at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) of the Russian Academy of Sciences and VAGR at the 2.6-m telescope of the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) in Armenia. The data are used to construct maps of the radiative fluxes in the continuum and various emission lines. Special attention is devoted to analyzing the emission in the H α hydrogen recombination line and in the forbidden low-ionization doublets of nitrogen [NII] λλ6548, 6583 and sulfur [SII] λλ6716, 6731, and the ratios of the intensities of the forbidden lines to H α. The observable characteristics (size, H α fluxes, etc.) of nine HII regions are studied. The estimated current rates of star formation in the individual HII regions based on the H α fluxes lie within the range of 0.3-1.2⨀ M /year. The dependence of the ratio of the intensities of the emission in these above mentioned forbidden doublets on the rate of star formation in the HII regions is found.

  2. Active Tectonics And Modern Geodynamics Of Sub-Yerevan Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanesyan, M.

    2004-05-01

    The given work is dedicated to active tectonics and modern geodynamics of Sub-Yerevan region. This region is interesting as a one of regions with maximal seismic activity in Armenia. The high level of seismic risk of this region is conditioned by high level of seismic hazard, high density of the population, as well as presence of objects of special importance and industrial capacities. The modern structure of Sub-Yerevan region and the adjacent area, as well as the Caucasus entirely, has mosaic-block appearance, typical for collision zone of Arabian and Eurasian plates. Distinctively oriented active faults of various ranges and morphological types are distinguished. These faults, in their turn, form various-scale active blocks of the Earth's crust and their movement defines seismic activity of the region. The researches show, that all strong earthquakes in the region were caused by movements by newest and activated ancient faults. In order to reveal the character of Earth's crust active blocks movement, separation of high gradients of horizontal and vertical movements and definition of stress fields highest concentration regions by GPS observations, high-accuracy leveling and study of earthquake focal mechanisms a new seismotectonic model is developed, which represents a combination of tectonic structure, seismic data, newest and modern movements. On the basis of comparison and analysis of these data zones with potential maximal seismic hazard are separated. The zone of joint of Azat-Sevan active and Yerevan abysmal faults is the most active on the territory of Sub-Yerevan region. The directions relatively the Earth's crust movement in the zones of horizontal and vertical movement gradients lead to conclusion, that Aragats-Tsakhkunian and Gegam active blocks undergo clockwise rotation. This means, that additional concentration of stress must be observed in block corners, that is confirmed by location of strong earthquakes sources. Thus, on the North 1988 Spitak (M

  3. Universities and Economic Development Activities: A UK Regional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decter, Moira; Cave, Frank; Rose, Mary; Peers, Gill; Fogg, Helen; Smith, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    A number of UK universities prioritize economic development or regeneration activities and for some of these universities such activities are the main focus of their knowledge transfer work. This study compares two regions of the UK--the North West and the South East of England--which have very different levels of economic performance.…

  4. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y. C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lebohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nagai, T.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2009-12-01

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse γ-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of γ-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV γ-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250eVcm-3 in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  5. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  6. Spitzer Follow-up of HST Observations of Star Formation in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jeff; Bally, John; Desch, Steve; Healy, Kevin; Snider, Keely

    2005-06-01

    Images of regions of star formation taken with HST have given us an extraordinary view of young stellar objects and their natal environments. These views differ tremendously between low-mass YSOs seen in regions of isolated low-mass star formation such as Taurus-Auriga, and the proplyds, EGGs, and other structures seen in regions of massive star formation. While YSOs in Taurus spend their adolescence buried in the dark interiors of molecular clouds, YSOs near massive stars quickly find themselves overrun by ionization fronts and exposed to the intense UV radiation from nearby massive stars. This difference in environment has a profound effect on the way in which the protoplanetary disk around a star evolves -- a fact that is of great importance to us, given the strength of the evidence suggesting that the Sun formed near a massive star. But HST while HST can inform us about the evolution of YSOs in HII region environments once they are overrun by ionization fronts, it cannot show us the birth of the stars themselves. These remain hidden in the dense molecular material beyond the ionized volumes of these regions. Only Spitzer can show us the properties of the YSOs that lie hidden in the dark shadows of HST images of HII regions, and only Spitzer can provide us with information about PDRs, warm dust, and other tracers of the interaction of massive stars with their surroundings. The combination of HST and Spitzer observations of star forming regions is far greater than the sum of its parts. If we are to build a complete picture of low-mass star formation and the evolution of disks near massive stars, we need to combine HST and Spitzer observations of the same regions. In this proposal we request time to obtain both IRAC and MIPS 24 micron images of each HII region that has been observed by HST, but has yet to be observed with Spitzer. Together with previous images obtained from the archives, this will comprise an indispensible data set for testing hypotheses about

  7. Spectroscopic Observations of Fe XVIII in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teriaca, Luca; Warren, Harry P.; Curdt, Werner

    2012-08-01

    The large uncertainties associated with measuring the amount of high temperature emission in solar active regions (ARs) represents a significant impediment to making progress on the coronal heating problem. Most current observations at temperatures of 3 MK and above are taken with broadband soft X-ray instruments. Such measurements have proven difficult to interpret unambiguously. Here, we present the first spectroscopic observations of the Fe XVIII 974.86 Å emission line in an on-disk AR taken with the SUMER instrument on SOHO. Fe XVIII has a peak formation temperature of 7.1 MK and provides important constraints on the amount of impulsive heating in the corona. Detailed evaluation of the spectra and comparison of the SUMER data with soft X-ray images from the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode confirm that this line is unblended. We also compare the spectroscopic data with observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 94 Å channel on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The AIA 94 Å channel also contains Fe XVIII, but is blended with emission formed at lower temperatures. We find that it is possible to remove the contaminating blends and form relatively pure Fe XVIII images that are consistent with the spectroscopic observations from SUMER. The observed spectra also contain the Ca XIV 943.63 Å line that, although a factor 2-6 weaker than the Fe XVIII 974.86 Å line, allows us to probe the plasma around 3.5 MK. The observed ratio between the two lines indicates (isothermal approximation) that most of the plasma in the brighter Fe XVIII AR loops is at temperatures between 3.5 and 4 MK.

  8. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  9. EVIDENCE OF IMPULSIVE HEATING IN ACTIVE REGION CORE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-11-01

    Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained emission measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely, static equilibrium, strong condensation, and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strikingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T[K] = 5.15-6.3. Using photospheric abundances, we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EM{sub con}), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and possibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The downflows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

  10. Aircraft Spacings that Produce a Vortex-Free Region Below Flight Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical estimates are presented for the motion of vortex wakes shed by multiple aircraft flying in close formation. The purpose of the theoretical study was to determine whether the spacings between adjacent aircraft in close formations could be designed so that the lift-generated vortices being trailed would move upward rather than downward. In this way, a region below the formation is produced that is free of vortices. It was found that aircraft can be arranged in formations so that the inboard wake vortices all move upward rather than downward. The two outboard vortices travel downward at a greatly reduced velocity that depends on the number of aircraft in the formation. If the desired motions are to be produced, the lateral spacings between adjacent aircraft centerlines must be between 1.1 and 1.5 wingspans, and the vertical spacings between -0.025 and -0.15 wingspans. Since the range of acceptable spacings is small, it is recommended that the position accuracy between aircraft in the formation be kept within about + or - 0.01 wingspan of the center of acceptable spacings so that aircraft meandering do not cause unwanted vortex excursions. It was also found that, if the in-trail spacings between adjacent aircraft are more than 4 wingspans, the foregoing vertical spacings must be adjusted to allow for the additional downward travel of the vortices shed by leading aircraft.

  11. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  12. Mantle diapirism and the formation of newly formed basins and surrounding centrifugally vergence orogens in the Mediterranean and Caribbean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, M. A.; Koronovskii, N. V.; Raznitsin, Yu. N.; Svalova, V. B.

    2015-11-01

    Mantle diapirism contributes considerably to the formation of newly formed basins and surrounding centrifugally vergence fold-thrust belts in the Mediterranean and Caribbean regions. Mantle diapirism results from density inversion in the geosphere of astenosphere+lithosphere geosystem. Such inversion has become a driving force in the background of increasing heat flow caused by the heat-resistant convergence of Africa and Eurasia (in the case of the Mediterranean region) and North and South Americas (Caribbean region) in the Cenozoic. Mantle diapirism is caused by unstable gravity in the periods of tectonomagmatic activations. The analytical solution of the problem yields the critical parameters coupling the mantle flow dynamics and surface relief evolution. The difference between the structures and evolutions for Mediterranean and Caribbean regions is the following. In the Mediterranean region, the mantle diapirism produces newly formed basins of intercontinental seas at the final stage of Africa-Eurasia convergence (in the Cenozoic). In the Caribbean region, intensive mantle diapirism first disjoined the North and South Americas in the Mesozoic, and then played the same role as in the Mediterranean for the convergence of these continents in the Cenozoic.

  13. A biologically active surface enzyme assembly that attenuates thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zheng; Muthukrishnan, Sharmila; Urlam, Murali K.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Marzec, Ulla M.; Elkasabi, Yaseen; Lahann, Joerg; Hanson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hemostatic pathways by blood-contacting materials remains a major hurdle in the development of clinically durable artificial organs and implantable devices. We postulate that surface-induced thrombosis may be attenuated by the reconstitution onto blood contacting surfaces of bioactive enzymes that regulate the production of thrombin, a central mediator of both clotting and platelet activation cascades. Thrombomodulin (TM), a transmembrane protein expressed by endothelial cells, is an established negative regulator of thrombin generation in the circulatory system. Traditional techniques to covalently immobilize enzymes on solid supports may modify residues contained within or near the catalytic site, thus reducing the bioactivity of surface enzyme assemblies. In this report, we present a molecular engineering and bioorthogonal chemistry approach to site-specifically immobilize a biologically active recombinant human TM fragment onto the luminal surface of small diameter prosthetic vascular grafts. Bioactivity and biostability of TM modified grafts is confirmed in vitro and the capacity of modified grafts to reduce platelet activation is demonstrated using a non-human primate model. These studies indicate that molecularly engineered interfaces that display TM actively limit surface-induced thrombus formation. PMID:23532366

  14. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  15. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanianfar, G.; Popesso, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Wuyts, S.; Wilman, D.; Biviano, A.; Ziparo, F.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Lutz, D.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Tanaka, M.; Mirkazemi, M.; Balogh, M. L.; Altieri, M. B.; Aussel, H.; Bauer, F.; Berta, S.; Bielby, R. M.; Brandt, N.; Cappelluti, N.; Cimatti, A.; Cooper, M.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Magnelli, B.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Nordon, R.; Newman, J. A.; Poglitsch, A.; Pozzi, F.

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass (ΣM*) and halo occupation distribution (HOD) in massive haloes by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of star formation rate (SFR) for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high-redshift groups (0.5 < z < 1.1) is higher with respect to the low-redshift (0.15 < z < 0.5) sample at any mass by 0.8 ± 0.12 dex. A milder difference (0.35 ± 0.1 dex) is observed between the low-redshift bin and the groups at z ˜ 0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive haloes than in the more common lower mass haloes. We do not observe any evolution in the HOD and total stellar mass-halo mass relations in groups. The picture emerging from our findings suggests that the galaxy population in the most massive systems is evolving faster than galaxies in lower mass haloes, consistently with a `halo downsizing' scenario.

  16. Contrail formation in the tropopause region caused by emissions from an Ariane 5 rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ch.; Schumann, U.; Graf, K.

    2016-07-01

    Rockets directly inject water vapor and aerosol into the atmosphere, which promotes the formation of ice clouds in ice supersaturated layers of the atmosphere. Enhanced mesospheric cloud occurrence has frequently been detected near 80-kilometer altitude a few days after rocket launches. Here, unique evidence for cirrus formation in the tropopause region caused by ice nucleation in the exhaust plume from an Ariane 5-ECA rocket is presented. Meteorological reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts show significant ice supersaturation at the 100-hectopascal level in the American tropical tropopause region on November 26, 2011. Near 17-kilometer altitudes, the temperatures are below the Schmidt-Appleman threshold temperature for rocket condensation trail formation on that day. Immediately after the launch from the Ariane 5-ECA at 18:39 UT (universal time) from Kourou, French Guiana, the formation of a rocket contrail is detected in the high resolution visible channel from the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) on the METEOSAT9 satellite. The rocket contrail is transported to the south and its dispersion is followed in SEVIRI data for almost 2 h. The ice crystals predominantly nucleated on aluminum oxide particles emitted by the Ariane 5-ECA solid booster and further grow by uptake of water vapor emitted from the cryogenic main stage and entrained from the ice supersaturated ambient atmosphere. After rocket launches, the formation of rocket contrails can be a frequent phenomenon under ice supersaturated conditions. However, at present launch rates, the global climate impact from rocket contrail cirrus in the tropopause region is small.

  17. TARPs: Tracked Active Region Patches from SoHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe progress toward creating a retrospective MDI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated TARPs (Tracked Active Region Patches). The TARPs are being developed as a backward-looking extension (covering approximately 3500 regions spanning 1996-2010) to the HARP (HMI Active Region Patch) data product that has already been released for HMI (2010-present). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is designed to be a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. TARPs from MDI are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and pseudo-continuum intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that the faculae/sunspots are part of. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. The final data product is indexed by a nominal AR number and time. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Additionaly, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu, Hoeksema et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HARPs (from HMI) and the MDI TARPs. We anticipate that this will allow a consistent catalog spanning both instruments. We envision several uses for the TARP data product, which will be

  18. SNAP-25 in hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Qiuling; Gao Xiang; Lu Qi; Zhang Xuehan; Tu Yanyang; Jin Meilei; Zhao Guoping; Yu Lei; Jing Naihe; Li Baoming . E-mail: bmli@fudan.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    SNAP-25 is a synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa, a key component of synaptic vesicle-docking/fusion machinery, and plays a critical role in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. We previously reported that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA1 region is involved in consolidation of contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory (Hou et al. European J Neuroscience, 20: 1593-1603, 2004). SNAP-25 is expressed not only in the CA1 region, but also in the CA3 region, and the SNAP-25 mRNA level in the CA3 region is higher than in the CA1 region. Here, we provide evidence that SNAP-25 in the CA3 region is also involved in learning/memory. Intra-CA3 infusion of SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide impaired both long-term contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory, with short-term memory intact. Furthermore, the SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide suppressed the long-term potentiation (LTP) of field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the mossy-fiber pathway (DG-CA3 pathway), with no effect on paired-pulse facilitation of the fEPSP. These results are consistent with the notion that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation.

  19. Active Region Moss: Doppler Shifts from Hinode/EIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard Hinode on 12-Dec- 2007 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low density cut-off as derived by Tripathi et al. (2010). We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described in Young, O Dwyer and Mason (2012). For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km/s with an estimated error of 4 km/s. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blue shift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries towards blue-shift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. Further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

  20. Active folded structures of the Western Caucasus (Sochi region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trikhunkov, Yaroslav; Zelenin, Egor

    2014-05-01

    anticlinal Galitsinsky Ridge. The axial zone of the ridge hosts the famous Paleolithic site of the Akhshtyr Cave. Its infilling deposits span the time interval from 112 ka to Recent. According to the archeological data, this habitat was earlier much closer to the river level and provided a direct access to water. At present the cave is located directly under the steep wall of the Akhshtyr canyon on the shelf of 110 m high erosion terrace (a fragment of the second terrace). Thus Sochi region of Western Caucasus demonstrates the active formation of folded relief of the anticlinal ridges and synclinal depressions. Considering the age and the modern height of the terraces we can evaluate relative uplift velocity of the Galitsinsky Ridge as 0,5 - 0,6 mm per year, and the minimum evaluation of the folding deformation of 50 m during the last ca. 100 ka. The active uplift of the folded structures with the main Caucasus direction indicates domination of lateral contraction with SW - NE direction.

  1. Formation of compact HII regions possibly triggered by cloud-cloud collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohama, Akio; Torii, Kazufumi; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Fukui, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Compact HII regions are ionized by young high-mass star(s) and ~1000 compact HII regions are cataloged in the Galaxy (Urquhart et al. MNRAS 443, 1555-1586 (2014)). Compact HII regions are one of the major populations of Galactic HII regions. The molecular environments around compact HII regions are however not well understood due to lack of extensive molecular surveys. In order to better understand formation of exciting stars and compact HII regions, we have carried out a systematic study of molecular clouds toward compact HII regions by using the 12CO datasets obtained with the JCMT and NANTEN2 telescopes for l = 10 - 56, and present here the first results.In one of the present samples, RCW166, we have discovered that the HII region is associated with two molecular clouds whose velocity separation is ~10 km s-1 the two clouds show complimentary spatial distributions, where one of the clouds have a cavity-like distribution apparently embracing the other. We present an interpretation that the two clouds collided with each other and the cavity-like distribution represents a hole created by the collision in the larger cloud as modeled by Habe and Ohta (1992). Similar molecular distributions are often found in the other compact HII regions in the present study.A recent study by Torii et al. (2015, arXiv:1503.00070) indicates that the Spitzer bubble RCW120 was formed by cloud-cloud collision where the inside of the cavity is fully ionized by the exiting stars. RCW166, on the other hand, shows that only a small part of the cavity, the compact HII region, is ionized. We thus suggest that RCW166 represents an evolutionary stage corresponding to an earlier phase of RCW120 in the collision scenario.

  2. Formation of Tankyrase Inhibitor-Induced Degradasomes Requires Proteasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nina Marie; Thorvaldsen, Tor Espen; Schultz, Sebastian Wolfgang; Wenzel, Eva Maria; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In canonical Wnt signaling, the protein levels of the key signaling mediator β-catenin are under tight regulation by the multimeric destruction complex that mediates proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. In colorectal cancer, destruction complex activity is often compromised due to mutations in the multifunctional scaffolding protein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC), leading to a stabilization of β-catenin. Recently, tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi), a novel class of small molecule inhibitors, were shown to re-establish a functional destruction complex in APC-mutant cancer cell lines by stabilizing AXIN1/2, whose protein levels are usually kept low via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by the tankyrase enzymes (TNKS1/2). Surprisingly, we found that for the formation of the morphological correlates of destruction complexes, called degradasomes, functional proteasomes are required. In addition we found that AXIN2 is strongly upregulated after 6 h of TNKS inhibition. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 counteracted TNKSi-induced degradasome formation and AXIN2 stabilization, and this was accompanied by reduced transcription of AXIN2. Mechanistically we could implicate the transcription factor FoxM1 in this process, which was recently shown to be a transcriptional activator of AXIN2. We observed a substantial reduction in TNKSi-induced stabilization of AXIN2 after siRNA-mediated depletion of FoxM1 and found that proteasome inhibition reduced the active (phosphorylated) fraction of FoxM1. This can explain the decreased protein levels of AXIN2 after MG132 treatment. Our findings have implications for the design of in vitro studies on the destruction complex and for clinical applications of TNKSi. PMID:27482906

  3. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  4. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  5. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shan, Tzu -Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-11

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed bymore » coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. Furthermore, the formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.« less

  6. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-01

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed by coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. The formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.

  7. A Novel Analysis of Acoustic Oscillations in Chromospheric Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, Teresa; Hill, Frank; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2015-04-01

    A helioseismic analysis of the chromosphere is employed in H-alpha to study how solar flares around active regions affect the behavior of acoustic oscillations. Our analysis deals with flares directly over sunspots, where the region is highly magnetized. In our current study of analyzing these oscillations in the chromosphere we study the temporal evolution of the oscillatory behavior from data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) H-alpha detectors. We investigate the wave behavior across different frequency bands (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). In order to analyze the frequency bands of the oscillations, our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved and temporally evolved around the flare region; thereby creating a movie of each frequency band. This study entails three active regions, directly over sunspots, in which flaring activity is taking place from two solar flares, which occurred on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the oscillations within different frequency bands. A suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures across the total frequency bands and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity. We find that, in the heart of all three regions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency and time dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flaring region. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset.

  8. Regional brain effects of sodium azide treatment on cytochrome oxidase activity: a quantitative histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Cada, A; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Rose, G M; Bennett, M C

    1995-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine if regional variation in brain cytochrome oxidase activity was observed following systemic administration of sodium azide. An image analysis system calibrated with internal standards of known cytochrome oxidase activity was used to quantify cytochrome oxidase in histochemically stained brain sections. Rats receiving chronic infusion of sodium azide (400 micrograms/hr), which were sacrificed after two weeks, showed a substantial decrease in brain cytochrome oxidase activity over those infused with saline. All of the 22 regions sampled from telencephalic, diencephalic, and mesencephalic levels, showed a significant activity reduction which ranged between 26% and 37%. The regions that appeared significantly more vulnerable to the sodium azide effects were the mesencephalic reticular formation and the central amygdala, which displayed the largest decrease in activity. In addition, interregional correlations of activity showed a deeply modified pattern of correlative metabolic activity between hippocampal, amygdaloid and cortical areas after azide treatment. The regional effects found were consistent with azide-induced learning and memory dysfunctions. PMID:8847994

  9. On the Active Region Bright Grains Observed in the Transition Region Imaging Channels of IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skogsrud, H.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De Pontieu, B.

    2016-02-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si iv 1394 and 1403 Å lines, reveal ubiquitous bright “grains” which are short-lived (two to five minute) bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.″5-1.″7 that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s-1. In this paper, we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in Hα. We find that the grains show the strongest emission in the ascending phase of the DF, that the emission is strongest toward the top of the DF, and that the grains correspond to a blueshift and broadening of the Si iv lines. We note that the SJI 1400 grains can also be observed in the SJI 1330 channel which is dominated by C ii lines. Our observations show that a significant part of the active region transition region dynamics is driven from the chromosphere below rather than from coronal activity above. We conclude that the shocks that drive DFs also play an important role in the heating of the upper chromosphere and lower transition region.

  10. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Matteo; Marleau, Francine R.; Fadda, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present a study of star formation and central black hole accretion activity of galaxies that are hosted in the two nearby (z ~ 0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We aim to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy at 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations (~3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star-forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates that are comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. Analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with respect to the more uniform distribution of A983. The emerging picture is compatible with A983 being a fully evolved cluster, in contrast with the still actively accreting A1731. Conclusions: Analysis of the specific star formation rate reveals evidence of ongoing galaxy pre-processing along A1731's filament-like structure. Furthermore, the decrease in the number of star-forming galaxies and AGN towards the cluster cores suggests that the cluster environment is accelerating the ageing process of the galaxies and blocking further accretion of the cold gas that fuels both star formation and black hole accretion activity. The catalogue and the reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A105

  11. Numerical modeling of the flow in intracranial aneurysms: prediction of regions prone to thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, V.L.; Boussel, L.; Lawton, M.T.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Ge, L.; Young, W.L.; Higashida, R.T.; Saloner, D.

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of intralumenal thrombus in intracranial aneurysms adds a risk of thrombo-embolism over and above that posed by mass-effect and rupture. In addition to biochemical factors, hemodynamic factors that are governed by lumenal geometry and blood flow rates likely play an important role in the thrombus formation and deposition process. In this study, patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of blood flow were constructed from MRA data for three patients who had fusiform basilar aneurysms that were thrombus-free and then proceeded to develop intra-lumenal thrombus. In order to determine whether features of the flow fields could suggest which regions had an elevated potential for thrombus deposition, the flow was modeled in the baseline, thrombus-free geometries. Pulsatile flow simulations were carried out using patient-specific inlet flow conditions measured with MR velocimetry. Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood behavior was considered. A strong similarity was found between the intra-aneurysmal regions with CFD-predicted slow, recirculating flows and the regions of thrombus deposition observed in vivo in the follow-up MR studies. In two cases with larger aneurysms, the agreement between the low velocity zones and clotted off regions improved when non-Newtonian blood behavior was taken into account. A similarity was also found between the calculated low shear stress regions and the regions that were later observed to clot. PMID:18787954

  12. Transcription-Associated R-Loop Formation across the Human FMR1 CGG-Repeat Region

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Erick W.; Sanz, Lionel A.; Chédin, Frédéric; Hagerman, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of a trinucleotide (CGG) repeat element within the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the human FMR1 gene is responsible for a number of heritable disorders operating through distinct pathogenic mechanisms: gene silencing for fragile X syndrome (>200 CGG) and RNA toxic gain-of-function for FXTAS (∼55–200 CGG). Existing models have focused almost exclusively on post-transcriptional mechanisms, but co-transcriptional processes could also contribute to the molecular dysfunction of FMR1. We have observed that transcription through the GC-rich FMR1 5′UTR region favors R-loop formation, with the nascent (G-rich) RNA forming a stable RNA:DNA hybrid with the template DNA strand, thereby displacing the non-template DNA strand. Using DNA:RNA (hybrid) immunoprecipitation (DRIP) of genomic DNA from cultured human dermal fibroblasts with both normal (∼30 CGG repeats) and premutation (55formation in human genomic DNA. Using a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible episomal system in which both the CGG-repeat and transcription frequency can be varied, we further show that R-loop formation increases with higher expression levels. Finally, non-denaturing bisulfite mapping of the displaced single-stranded DNA confirmed R-loop formation at the endogenous FMR1 locus and further indicated that R-loops formed over CGG repeats may be prone to structural complexities, including hairpin formation, not commonly associated with other R-loops. These observations introduce a new molecular feature of the FMR1 gene that is directly affected by CGG-repeat expansion and is likely to be involved in the associated cellular dysfunction. PMID:24743386

  13. Variation of CCN activity during new particle formation events in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan; Zhao, Chunsheng; Tao, Jiangchuan; Wu, Zhijun; Kecorius, Simonas; Wang, Zhibin; Größ, Johannes; Liu, Hongjian; Bian, Yuxuan; Kuang, Ye; Teich, Monique; Spindler, Gerald; Müller, Konrad; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Hu, Min; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to obtain a better understanding of the variability of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity during new particle formation (NPF) events in an anthropogenically polluted atmosphere of the North China Plain (NCP). We investigated the size-resolved activation ratio as well as particle number size distribution, hygroscopicity, and volatility during a 4-week intensive field experiment in summertime at a regional atmospheric observatory in Xianghe. Interestingly, based on a case study, two types of NPF events were found, in which the newly formed particles exhibited either a higher or a lower hygroscopicity. Therefore, the CCN activity of newly formed particles in different NPF events was largely different, indicating that a simple parameterization of particle CCN activity during NPF events over the NCP might lead to poor estimates of CCN number concentration (NCCN). For a more accurate estimation of the potential NCCN during NPF events, the variation of CCN activity has to be taken into account. Considering that a fixed activation ratio curve or critical diameter are usually used to calculate NCCN, the influence of the variation of particle CCN activity on the calculation of NCCN during NPF events was evaluated based on the two parameterizations. It was found that NCCN might be underestimated by up to 30 % if a single activation ratio curve (representative of the region and season) were to be used in the calculation; and might be underestimated by up to 50 % if a fixed critical diameter (representative of the region and season) were used. Therefore, we suggest not using a fixed critical diameter in the prediction of NCCN in NPF. If real-time CCN activity data are not available, using a proper fixed activation ratio curve can be an alternative but compromised choice.

  14. Skylab observations of X-ray loops connecting separate active regions. [solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. C.; Krieger, A. S.; Svestka, Z.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    One hundred loops interconnecting 94 separate active solar regions detectable in soft X-rays were identified during the Skylab mission. While close active regions are commonly interconnected with loops, the number of such interconnections decreases steeply for longer distances; the longest interconnecting loop observed in the Skylab data connected regions separated by 37 deg. Several arguments are presented which support the point of view that this is the actual limit of the size of magnetic interconnections between active regions. No sympathetic flares could be found in the interconnected regions. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that accelerated particles can be guided in interconnecting loops from one active region to another over distances of 100 deg or more and eventually produce sympathetic flares in them.

  15. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making PMID:27355465

  16. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  17. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  18. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  19. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  20. The effect of binary evolution on the theoretically predicted distribution of WR and O-type stars in starburst regions and in abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.; De Donder, E.

    1997-01-01

    We first discuss in detail the massive close binary evolutionary model and how it has to be used in a population number synthesis study. We account for the evolution of case A, case B and case C systems, the effect of stellar wind during core hydrogen burning, hydrogen shell burning, the red supergiant phase and the WR phase, the effect of common envelope evolution in binaries with large periods, the consequences of spiral-in in binaries with small mass ratio, the effect of an asymmetric supernova explosion on binary system parameters using recent studies of pulsar velocities, the evolution of binaries with a compact companion. The parameters entering the population model where close binaries are included, are constrained by comparing predictions and observations of the massive star content in regions of continuous star formation. We then critically investigate the influence of massive close binary evolution on the variation of the massive star content in starburst regions. We separately consider regions where, after a long period of continuous star formation, the star formation rate decreases sharply (we propose to call this an abruptly-terminated star formation region) and we show that also in these regions WR/O number ratios are reached which are significantly larger than in regions of continuous star formation. The most important conclusion of the study is that within our present knowledge of observations of massive stars, massive close binary evolution plays an ESSENTIAL role in the evolution of starbursts and abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

  1. 77 FR 75198 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear... Format and Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report.'' This guide describes a method...) 1.185, ``Standard Format and Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report,''...

  2. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the seven papers in this collection focus on regional library activities in Africa, Asia and Oceania, and Latin America and the Caribbean: (1) "Libraries and Information Services in a Changing World: The Challenges African Information Services Face at the End of the 1980s" (Dejen Abate, Ethiopia); (2) "The Computer and Knowledge Information…

  3. A solar cycle timing predictor - The latitude of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1990-01-01

    A 'Spoerer butterfly' method is used to examine solar cycle 22. It is shown from the latitude of active regions that the cycle can now be expected to peak near November 1989 + or - 8 months, basically near the latter half of 1989.

  4. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  5. Urban, Rural, and Regional Variations in Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sarah Levin; Kirkner, Gregory J.; Mayo, Kelly; Matthews, Charles E.; Durstine, J. Larry; Hebert, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: There is some speculation about geographic differences in physical activity (PA) levels. We examined the prevalence of physical inactivity (PIA) and whether US citizens met the recommended levels of PA across the United States. In addition, the association between PIA/PA and degree of urbanization in the 4 main US regions (Northeast,…

  6. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  7. Inferred flows of electric currents in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Y. J.; Hong, Q. F.; Hagyard, M. J.; Deloach, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to identify sources of major current systems in active regions and their channels of flow are explored. Measured photospheric vector magnetic fields together with high resolution white light and H-alpha photographs provide the data base to derive the current systems in the photosphere and chromosphere of a solar active region. Simple mathematical constructions of active region fields and currents are used to interpret these data under the assumptions that the fields in the lower atmosphere (below 200 km) may not be force free but those in the chromosphere and higher are. The results obtained for the complex active region AR 2372 are: (1) Spots exhibiting significant spiral structure in the penumbral filaments were the source of vertical currents at the photospheric surface; (2) Magnetic neutral lines where the transverse magnetic field was strongly sheared were channels along which a strong current system flowed; (3) The inferred current systems produced a neutral sheet and oppositely-flowing currents in the area of the magnetic delta configuration that was the site of flaring.

  8. Heating of active region cores: Impulsive or steady?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh

    The question of active region heating has proven to be highly challenging since its discovery in 1940s. The recent observational facilities have shed new lights towards the understanding of this problem. In this paper we review some of the new measurements to study the heating mechanisms in the hot core loops of active regions using the observations recorded by Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) onboard SoHO and the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode. These new measurements show that the properties of hot core loops are consistent with by impulsive heating -- low frequency nanoflare - scenario. However, the evidences are not strong enough to rule-out steady heating completely. Further measurement using better spectral resolution and temperature coverage is required, which will be provided by Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and Solar-C in near future.

  9. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  10. Doppler Shifts in Active Region Moss Using SOHO/SUMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Del Zanna, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    The velocity of the plasma at the footpoint of hot loops in active region cores can be used to discriminate between different heating frequencies. Velocities on the order of a few kilometers per second would indicate low-frequency heating on sub-resolution strands, while velocities close to zero would indicate high-frequency (steady) heating. To discriminate between these two values requires accurate velocity measurements; previous velocity measurements suffer from large uncertainties, mainly due to the lack of an absolute wavelength reference scale. In this paper, we determine the velocity in the loop footpoints using observations from Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. We use neutral spectral lines to determine the wavelength scale of the observations with an uncertainty in the absolute velocity of <3.5 km s-1 and co-aligned Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images to identify footpoint regions. We studied three different active regions and found average redshifts in the Ne VIII 770 Å emission line (formed at 6 × 105 K) of 5.17 ± 5.37 km s-1 and average redshifts in the C IV 1548 and 1550 Å emission lines (formed at 1 × 105 K) of 13.94 ± 4.93 km s-1 and 14.91 ± 6.09 km s-1, respectively. We find no correlation between the brightness in the spectral line and the measured velocity, nor do we find correlation between the Ne VIII and C IV velocities measured co-spatially and co-temporally. SUMER scanned two of the active regions twice; in those active regions we find positive correlation between the co-spatial velocities measured during the first and second scans. These results provide definitive and quantitative measurements for comparisons with simulations of different coronal heating mechanisms.

  11. A conserved motif mediates both multimer formation and allosteric activation of phosphoglycerate mutase 5.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jordan M; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A; Hannink, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  12. A Conserved Motif Mediates both Multimer Formation and Allosteric Activation of Phosphoglycerate Mutase 5*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Jordan M.; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A.; Hannink, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  13. Synchronous and Asynchronous Theta and Gamma Activity during Episodic Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John F.; Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Jacobs, Joshua; Williams, Ryan B.; Sperling, Michael R.; Sharan, Ashwini D.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that neural oscillations synchronize to mediate memory encoding, we analyzed electrocorticographic recordings taken as 68 human neurosurgical patients studied and subsequently recalled lists of common words. To the extent that changes in spectral power reflect synchronous oscillations, we would expect those power changes to be accompanied by increases in phase synchrony between the region of interest and neighboring brain areas. Contrary to the hypothesized role of synchronous gamma oscillations in memory formation, we found that many key regions that showed power increases during successful memory encoding also exhibited decreases in global synchrony. Similarly, cortical theta activity that decreases during memory encoding exhibits both increased and decreased global synchrony depending on region and stage of encoding. We suggest that network synchrony analyses, as used here, can help to distinguish between two major types of spectral modulations: (1) those that reflect synchronous engagement of regional neurons with neighboring brain areas, and (2) those that reflect either asynchronous modulations of neural activity or local synchrony accompanied by global disengagement from neighboring regions. We show that these two kinds of spectral modulations have distinct spatiotemporal profiles during memory encoding. PMID:23283342

  14. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  15. Active sonar, beaked whales and European regional policy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Evans, Peter G H; Notarbartolo-di-Sciara, Giuseppe; Frisch, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Various reviews, resolutions and guidance from international and regional fora have been produced in recent years that acknowledge the significance of marine noise and its potential impacts on cetaceans. Within Europe, ACCOBAMS and ASCOBANS have shown increasing attention to the issue. The literature highlights concerns surrounding the negative impacts of active sonar on beaked whales in particular, where concerns primarily relate to the use of mid-frequency active sonar (1-10kHz), as used particularly in military exercises. The authors review the efforts that European regional policies have undertaken to acknowledge and manage possible negative impacts of active sonar and how these might assist the transition from scientific research to policy implementation, including effective management and mitigation measures at a national level. PMID:20451221

  16. THE STAR-FORMATION RELATION FOR REGIONS IN THE GALACTIC PLANE: THE EFFECT OF SPATIAL RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans II, Neal J.; Battersby, Cara

    2014-12-20

    We examined the relations between molecular gas surface density and star-formation rate surface density in an 11 deg{sup 2} region of the Galactic plane. Dust continua at 1.1 mm from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey and 22 μm emission from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey were used as tracers of molecular gas and the star-formation rate, respectively, across the Galactic longitude of 31.5 ≥ l ≥ 20.5 and Galactic latitude of 0.5 ≥ b ≥ –0.5. The relation was studied over a range of resolutions from 33'' to 20' by convolving images to larger scales. The pixel-by-pixel correlation between 1.1 mm and 22 μm increases rapidly at small scales and levels off at the scale of 5'-8'. We studied the star-formation relation based on a pixel-by-pixel analysis and on an analysis of the 1.1 mm and 22 μm peaks. The star-formation relation was found to be nearly linear with no significant changes in the form of the relation across all spatial scales, and it lies above the extragalactic relation from Kennicutt. The average gas-depletion time is ≈200 Myr and does not change significantly at different scales, but the scatter in the depletion time decreases as the scale increases.

  17. Molar tooth structures in calcareous nodules, early Neoproterozoic Burovaya Formation, Turukhansk region, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Michael C.; Bartley, Julie K.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Petrov, Peter Yu.

    2003-05-01

    Molar tooth structures are abundant in large (1-2 m diameter) carbonate nodules within fine-grained, subtidal carbonates of the early Neoproterozoic (lower Upper Riphean) Burovaya Formation along the Sukhaya Tunguska River, Turukhansk Uplift, northwestern Siberia. Although molar tooth structures are regionally abundant in this unit, here they occur only within the nodules. Stable isotopic compositions of molar-tooth-filling dolomicrospar cements and of thinly bedded dolomicrite within and surrounding the nodules are indistinguishable from one another. The carbon isotopic compositions (mean δ13C=+2.8‰ PDB±0.4) reflect mean average oceanic surface water composition during their formation; the light oxygen isotopic compositions (mean δ18O=-6.4‰ PDB±2.2) are generally similar to those of other little-altered Meso- to Neoproterozoic limestones and dolostones. These molar tooth structures have no features that would support a tectonic origin; they more likely formed through bacterial processes. Carbonate cement filling of these voids occurred soon after their formation, but the mechanism responsible for this carbonate precipitation is currently uncertain. Local restriction of molar tooth structures to early diagenetic nodules suggests that penecontemporaneous lithification was required for the formation, or at least preservation, of these widespread Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic features.

  18. Relationship between synoptic forcing and polynya formation in the Cosmonaut Sea: 2. Regional climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David A.; Lynch, Amanda H.; Arbetter, Todd E.

    2004-04-01

    In part I of this series [, 2004], a relationship was found in the observations between synoptic atmospheric systems and polynya formation in the Cosmonaut Sea region of Antarctica. In this study, we use a regional coupled atmosphere-sea ice model to investigate the role of atmospheric forcing of the polynyas in this area. The model successfully simulates both latent and sensible heat polynyas which are found in the region. In particular, a deep-ocean polynya is formed coincident with the passage of an atmospheric synoptic scale system. The divergence in the sea ice is found to be highly correlated with the atmospheric divergence. We conclude that the initial formation of a polynya can be caused by the interaction of the atmospheric synoptic scale and the continental katabatic wind regimes. While we cannot directly evaluate the role of the ocean using the present model simulations, we performed experiments with different levels of prescribed basal heat flux. These experiments highlight a polynya which could be initiated by the winds and maintained by the oceanic heat. This leads to the concept of a wind-driven sensible heat polynya, not typical of other deep-ocean polynyas such as the Weddell polynya of the 1970s.

  19. Intense star formation within resolved compact regions in a galaxy at z = 2.3.

    PubMed

    Swinbank, A M; Smail, I; Longmore, S; Harris, A I; Baker, A J; De Breuck, C; Richard, J; Edge, A C; Ivison, R J; Blundell, R; Coppin, K E K; Cox, P; Gurwell, M; Hainline, L J; Krips, M; Lundgren, A; Neri, R; Siana, B; Siringo, G; Stark, D P; Wilner, D; Younger, J D

    2010-04-01

    Massive galaxies in the early Universe have been shown to be forming stars at surprisingly high rates. Prominent examples are dust-obscured galaxies which are luminous when observed at sub-millimetre wavelengths and which may be forming stars at a rate of 1,000 solar masses (M(middle dot in circle)) per year. These intense bursts of star formation are believed to be driven by mergers between gas-rich galaxies. Probing the properties of individual star-forming regions within these galaxies, however, is beyond the spatial resolution and sensitivity of even the largest telescopes at present. Here we report observations of the sub-millimetre galaxy SMMJ2135-0102 at redshift z = 2.3259, which has been gravitationally magnified by a factor of 32 by a massive foreground galaxy cluster lens. This magnification, when combined with high-resolution sub-millimetre imaging, resolves the star-forming regions at a linear scale of only 100 parsecs. We find that the luminosity densities of these star-forming regions are comparable to the dense cores of giant molecular clouds in the local Universe, but they are about a hundred times larger and 10(7) times more luminous. Although vigorously star-forming, the underlying physics of the star-formation processes at z approximately 2 appears to be similar to that seen in local galaxies, although the energetics are unlike anything found in the present-day Universe. PMID:20305639

  20. The Repeat Region of the Circumsporozoite Protein is Critical for Sporozoite Formation and Maturation in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Wall, Richard J.; Hopp, Christine S.; Poulin, Benoit; Mohmmed, Asif; Malhotra, Pawan; Coppi, Alida; Sinnis, Photini; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is the major surface protein of the sporozoite stage of malaria parasites and has multiple functions as the parasite develops and then migrates from the mosquito midgut to the mammalian liver. The overall structure of CSP is conserved among Plasmodium species, consisting of a species-specific central tandem repeat region flanked by two conserved domains: the NH2-terminus and the thrombospondin repeat (TSR) at the COOH-terminus. Although the central repeat region is an immunodominant B-cell epitope and the basis of the only candidate malaria vaccine in Phase III clinical trials, little is known about its functional role(s). We used the rodent malaria model Plasmodium berghei to investigate the role of the CSP tandem repeat region during sporozoite development. Here we describe two mutant parasite lines, one lacking the tandem repeat region (ΔRep) and the other lacking the NH2-terminus as well as the repeat region (ΔNΔRep). We show that in both mutant lines oocyst formation is unaffected but sporozoite development is defective. PMID:25438048

  1. The heptad repeats region is essential for AcMNPV P10 filament formation and not the proline-rich or the C-terminus basic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chunsheng; Deng Fei; Li Dan; Wang Hualin; Hu Zhihong

    2007-09-01

    Baculovirus P10 protein is a small conserved protein and is expressed as bundles of filaments in the host cell during the late phase of virus infection. So far the published results on the domain responsible for filament structural formation have been contradictory. Electron microscopy revealed that the C-terminus basic region was involved in filament structural formation in the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) [van Oers, M.M., Flipsen, J.T., Reusken, C.B., Sliwinsky, E.L., Vlak, J.M., 1993. Functional domains of the p10 protein of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedorsis virus. J. Gen. Virol. 74, 563-574.]. While in the Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), the heptad repeats region but not the C-terminus domain was proven to be responsible for filament formation [Dong, C., Li, D., Long, G., Deng, F., Wang, H., Hu, Z., 2005. Identification of functional domains required for HearNPV P10 filament formation. Virology 338, 112-120.]. In this manuscript, fluorescence confocal microscopy was applied to study AcMNPV P10 filament formation. A set of plasmids containing different P10 structural domains fused with a fluorescent protein were constructed and transfected into Sf-9 cells. The data indicated that the heptad repeats region, but not the proline-rich region or the C-terminus basic region, is essential for AcMNPV P10 filament formation. Co-transfection of P10s tagged with different fluorescent revealed that P10s with defective heptad repeats region could not interact with intact heptad repeats region or even full-length P10s to form filament structure. Within the heptad repeats region, deletion of the three amino acids spacing of AcMNPV P10 appeared to have no significant impact on the formation of filament structures, but the content of the heptad repeats region appeared to play a role in the morphology of the filaments.

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF DARK CANOPIES AROUND ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Robbrecht, E.; Muglach, K. E-mail: eva.robbrecht@oma.be

    2011-05-20

    As observed in spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, transition region, and low corona, active regions are surrounded by an extensive 'circumfacular' area which is darker than the quiet Sun. We examine the properties of these dark moat- or canopy-like areas using Fe IX 17.1 nm images and line-of-sight magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The 17.1 nm canopies consist of fibrils (horizontal fields containing extreme-ultraviolet-absorbing chromospheric material) clumped into featherlike structures. The dark fibrils initially form a quasiradial or vortical pattern as the low-lying field lines fanning out from the emerging active region connect to surrounding network and intranetwork elements of opposite polarity. The area occupied by the 17.1 nm fibrils expands as supergranular convection causes the active-region flux to spread into the background medium; the outer boundary of the dark canopy stabilizes where the diffusing flux encounters a unipolar region of opposite sign. The dark fibrils tend to accumulate in regions of weak longitudinal field and to become rooted in mixed-polarity flux. To explain the latter observation, we note that the low-lying fibrils are more likely to interact with small loops associated with weak, opposite-polarity flux elements in close proximity, than with high loops anchored inside strong unipolar network flux. As a result, the 17.1 nm fibrils gradually become concentrated around the large-scale polarity inversion lines (PILs), where most of the mixed-polarity flux is located. Systematic flux cancellation, assisted by rotational shearing, removes the field component transverse to the PIL and causes the fibrils to coalesce into long PIL-aligned filaments.

  3. Doppler shift of hot coronal lines in a moss area of an active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadashi, N.; Teriaca, L.; Tripathi, D.; Solanki, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2012-12-01

    The moss is the area at the footpoint of the hot (3 to 5 MK) loops forming the core of the active region where emission is believed to result from the heat flux conducted down to the transition region from the hot loops. Studying the variation of Doppler shift as a function of line formation temperatures over the moss area can give clues on the heating mechanism in the hot loops in the core of the active regions. We investigate the absolute Doppler shift of lines formed at temperatures between 1 MK and 2 MK in a moss area within active region NOAA 11243 using a novel technique that allows determining the absolute Doppler shift of EUV lines by combining observations from the SUMER and EIS spectrometers. The inner (brighter and denser) part of the moss area shows roughly constant blue shift (upward motions) of 5 km s-1 in the temperature range of 1 MK to 1.6 MK. For hotter lines the blue shift decreases and reaches 1 km s-1 for Fe xv 284 Å (~2 MK). The measurements are discussed in relation to models of the heating of hot loops. The results for the hot coronal lines seem to support the quasi-steady heating models for nonsymmetric hot loops in the core of active regions.

  4. Patterns of Activity in a Global Model of a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Viall, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of frequencies. What differs is the average frequency of the distributions. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes with a magnetic field extrapolation to create a model active region and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is not to reproduce a particular set of observations in detail, but to recover some typical properties and patterns observed in active regions. Our key findings are the following. (1) Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. (2) Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. (3) All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line of sight passes through coronal loop footpoints. (4) There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a timescale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies are operating across active regions. (5) Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation regulates in vitro bone formation and bone mass.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Kola, B; Bataveljic, A; Arnett, T R; Viollet, B; Saxon, L; Korbonits, M; Chenu, C

    2010-08-01

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of energy homeostasis, has a central role in mediating the appetite-modulating and metabolic effects of many hormones and antidiabetic drugs metformin and glitazones. The objective of this study was to determine if AMPK can be activated in osteoblasts by known AMPK modulators and if AMPK activity is involved in osteoblast function in vitro and regulation of bone mass in vivo. ROS 17/2.8 rat osteoblast-like cells were cultured in the presence of AMPK activators (AICAR and metformin), AMPK inhibitor (compound C), the gastric peptide hormone ghrelin and the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol. AMPK activity was measured in cell lysates by a functional kinase assay and AMPK protein phosphorylation was studied by Western Blotting using an antibody recognizing AMPK Thr-172 residue. We demonstrated that treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with AICAR and metformin stimulates Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK and dose-dependently increases its activity. In contrast, treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with compound C inhibited AMPK phosphorylation. Ghrelin and propranolol dose-dependently increased AMPK phosphorylation and activity. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were not affected by metformin treatment while AICAR significantly inhibited ROS 17/2.8 cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity at high concentrations. To study the effect of AMPK activation on bone formation in vitro, primary osteoblasts obtained from rat calvaria were cultured for 14-17days in the presence of AICAR, metformin and compound C. Formation of 'trabecular-shaped' bone nodules was evaluated following alizarin red staining. We demonstrated that both AICAR and metformin dose-dependently increase trabecular bone nodule formation, while compound C inhibits bone formation. When primary osteoblasts were co-treated with AICAR and compound C, compound C suppressed the stimulatory effect of AICAR on bone nodule formation

  6. The evolution and orientation of early cycle 22 active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Anne T.; Marquette, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of six major active regions which appeared during the first phase of the present solar cycle (cycle 22) has been studied. It was found that the northern hemisphere regions exhibited a broad range of evolutionary behavior in which the commonly accepted 'normal pattern' (whereby the follower flux moves preferentially polewards ahead of the leader flux) is represented at one end of the range. At the other end of the range, the leader flux is displaced polewards of the follower flux. In the latter cases equatorward extensions of the polar coronal hole are noted.

  7. Circular polarization in star-formation regions: implications for biomolecular homochirality.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J; Chrysostomou, A; Hough, J H; Gledhill, T M; McCall, A; Clark, S; Ménard, F; Tamura, M

    1998-07-31

    Strong infrared circular polarization resulting from dust scattering in reflection nebulae in the Orion OMC-1 star-formation region has been observed. Circular polarization at shorter wavelengths might have been important in inducing chiral asymmetry in interstellar organic molecules that could be subsequently delivered to the early Earth by comets, interplanetary dust particles, or meteors. This could account for the excess of L-amino acids found in the Murchison meteorite and could explain the origin of the homochirality of biological molecules. PMID:9714676

  8. Extreme storm activity in North Atlantic and European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N.

    2010-09-01

    The extreme storm activity study over North Atlantic and Europe includes the analyses of extreme cyclone (track number, integral cyclonic intensity) and extreme storm (track number) during winter and summer seasons in the regions: 1) 55°N-80N, 50°W-70°E; 2) 30°N-55°N, 50°W-70°E. Extreme cyclones were selected based on cyclone centre pressure (P<=970 mbar). Extreme storms were selected from extreme cyclones based on wind velocity on 925 mbar. The Bofort scala was used for this goal. Integral cyclonic intensity (for region) includes the calculation cyclone centers number and sum of MSLP anomalies in cyclone centers. The analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm, 6-hourly MSLP and wind data (u and v on 925 gPa) from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses from January 1948 to March 2010. The comparision of mean, calculated for every ten years, had shown, that in polar region extreme cyclone and storm track number, and integral cyclonic intensity gradually increases and have maximum during last years (as for summer, as for winter season). Every ten years means for summer season are more then for winter season, as for polar, as for tropical region. Means (ten years) for tropical region are significance less then for polar region.

  9. Armenia as a Regional Centre for Astronomy for Development activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO, Armenia, http://www.bao.am) are among the candidate IAU Regional Nodes for Astronomy for Development activities. It is one of the main astronomical centers of the former Soviet Union and the Middle East region. At present there are 48 qualified researchers at BAO, including six Doctors of Science and 30 PhDs. Five important observational instruments are installed at BAO, the larger ones being 2.6m Cassegrain (ZTA-2.6) and 1m Schmidt (the one that provided the famous Markarian survey). BAO is regarded as a national scientific-educational center, where a number of activities are being organized, such as: international conferences (4 IAU symposia and 1 IAU colloquium, JENAM-2007, etc.), small workshops and discussions, international summer schools (1987, 2006, 2008 and 2010), and Olympiads. BAO collaborates with scientists from many countries. The Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS, http://www.aras.am/) is an NGO founded in 2001; it has 93 members and it is rather active in the organization of educational, amateur, popular, promotional and other matters. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) is one of the 17 national VO projects forming the International Virtual Observatories Alliance (IVOA) and is the only VO project in the region serving also for educational purposes. A number of activities are planned, such as management, coordination and evaluation of the IAU programs in the area of development and education, establishment of the new IAU endowed lectureship program and organization of seminars and public lectures, coordination and initiation of fundraising activities for astronomy development, organization of regional scientific symposia, conferences and workshops, support to Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP), production/publication of educational and promotional materials, etc.

  10. On the formation and destruction of chlorine negative ions in the D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    We have investigated the possible reactions of chlorine atoms, chlorine monoxide, and hydrogen chloride with D region negative ions. The mesospheric concentrations of the neutral chlorine gases have been predicted with a diurnally varying one-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere. Despite the low abundances of chlorine compounds in air their high reactivity leads to the formation of substantial quantities of clorine negative ions at high altitudes. The concentration of chlorine ions is limited in daylight by rapid reactions with oxygen and hydrogen atoms and at night by the competitive production of other stable ions. The presence of chlorine negative ions in the upper atmosphere is consistent with in situ mass spectrometer observations of charged species. The abundance of chlorinated ions in the D region may be correlated with mesospheric nitric oxide and water vapor concentrations.

  11. Risk Assessment of Geologic Formation Sequestration in The Rocky Mountain Region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the outcome of a targeted risk assessment of a candidate geologic sequestration site in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. Specifically, a major goal of the probabilistic risk assessment was to quantify the possible spatiotemporal responses for Area of Review (AoR) and injection-induced pressure buildup associated with carbon dioxide (CO₂) injection into the subsurface. Because of the computational expense of a conventional Monte Carlo approach, especially given the likely uncertainties in model parameters, we applied a response surface method for probabilistic risk assessment of geologic CO₂ storage in the Permo-Penn Weber formation at a potential CCS site in Craig, Colorado. A site-specific aquifer model was built for the numerical simulation based on a regional geologic model.

  12. Hot flow anomaly formation by magnetic deflection. [regions of hot plasma in earth magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Winske, D.

    1990-01-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) are localized plasma structures observed in the solar wind and magnetosheath near the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. This paper presents one-dimensional hybrid computer simulations illustrating a formation mechanism for HFAs in which the single hot ion population results from a spatial separation of two counterstreaming ion beams. The higher-density cooler regions are dominated by the background (solar wind) ions, and the lower-density hotter internal regions are dominated by the beam ions. The spatial separation of the beam and background is caused by the deflection of the ions in large-amplitude magnetic fields which are generated by ion/ion streaming instabilities.

  13. The influence of spectral nudging on typhoon formation in regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Frauke; Barcikowska, Monika

    2012-03-01

    Regional climate models can successfully simulate tropical cyclones and typhoons. This has been shown and was evaluated for hindcast studies of the past few decades. But often global and regional weather phenomena are not simulated at the observed location, or occur too often or seldom even though the regional model is driven by global reanalysis data which constitute a near-realistic state of the global atmosphere. Therefore, several techniques have been developed in order to make the regional model follow the global state more closely. One is spectral nudging, which is applied for horizontal wind components with increasing strength for higher model levels in this study. The aim of this study is to show the influence that this method has on the formation of tropical cyclones (TC) in regional climate models. Two ensemble simulations (each with five simulations) were computed for Southeast Asia and the Northwestern Pacific for the typhoon season 2004, one with spectral nudging and one without. First of all, spectral nudging reduced the overall TC number by about a factor of 2. But the number of tracks which are similar to observed best track data (BTD) was greatly increased. Also, spatial track density patterns were found to be more similar when using spectral nudging. The tracks merge after a short time for the spectral nudging simulations and then follow the BTD closely; for the no nudge cases the similarity is greatly reduced. A comparison of seasonal precipitation, geopotential height, and temperature fields at several height levels with observations and reanalysis data showed overall a smaller ensemble spread, higher pattern correlations and reduced root mean square errors and biases for the spectral nudged simulations. Vertical temperature profiles for selected TCs indicate that spectral nudging is not inhibiting TC development at higher levels. Both the Madden-Julian Oscillation and monsoonal precipitation are reproduced realistically by the regional model

  14. Formation of double sheaths and the J-V characteristics of the obstructed region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.

    1980-06-01

    The arc drop of the vapor thermionic converter is determined by the difference of sheath heights and the potential difference across the plasma. The J-V characteristics of cesium vapor diodes operating in the ignited mode show a knee corresponding to near optimum power. When the diode is operating in the region above the knee, the dominant contributor to the arc drop is the difference of the sheath heights (i.e., the potential difference across the plasma produces either a very small loss or may, in fact, reverse sign and reduce the arc drop). In this region the power decreases because the increase in output current is usually not able to compensate for the loss of output voltage. When the diode is operating in the region below the knee, the potential difference in the plasma becomes the dominant contributor to the arc drop. For these reasons, the shape of the J-V characteristics below the knee is different from that above the knee. The location of the knee is a good indicator of the maximum power and the maximum efficiency points. Under the fully optimized conditions, the knee also indicates the barrier index of the diode. Therefore, how and where the knee will appear is of great theoretical and practical interest. Some workers in the thermionic field have speculated that the appearance of the knee is due to the formation of the double sheath. However, this study indicates that the formation of the double sheath takes place significantly below the knee. In addition, this study evaluates J-V characteristics in the obstructed region.

  15. Tilt Angles of Quiescent Filaments and Filaments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Kuzanyan, K. M.; Vasil'yeva, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We carry out study of tilt angles of solar filaments using the data from the two observatories: Meudon Observatory and Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station for the century-long period 1919-2014. We developed special software for digitization of the filaments structures on Hα synoptic maps. The filaments were vectorized in semi-automatic mode. The tilt angles of filaments with respect to the equator (τ) were analyzed. Approximately 2/3 of the filaments have positive angles τ >0, which is defined as when the eastern end of the filaments are closer to the poles than the western ones. We have separated tilts for the filaments which are close to the active region structures and those of quiescent filaments. We found that long quiescent filaments mainly have negative tilts. The filaments which are close to active regions mainly have positive tilt angles.

  16. Fine structure of the magnetic field in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Lev; Beskrovnaya, Nina; Ikhsanov, Nazar

    High-resolution observations with SOHO, SDO, TRACE, HINODE suggest that the solar magnetic field in active regions has a complicated fine structure. There is a large number of thin magnetic arcs extended from the photosphere to corona with almost constant cross-section. We explore a possibility to model the complex of interacting arcs in terms of a dynamical percolating network. A transition of the system into flaring can be triggered by the flute instability of prominences and/or coronal condensations. We speculate around an assumption that the energy release in active regions is governed by the same scenario as dynamical current percolation through a random resistors network in which the saltatory conduction is controlled by a local current level.

  17. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  18. Case study of a complex active-region filament eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Deng, L. H.; Xue, Z. K.

    2013-09-01

    Context. We investigated a solar active-region filament eruption associated with a C6.6 class flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME) in NOAA active region 08858 on 2000 February 9. Aims: We aim to better understand the relationship between filament eruptions and the associated flares and CMEs. Methods: Using BBSO, SOHO/EIT, and TRACE observational data, we analyzed the process of the active-region filament eruption in the chromosphere and the corona. Using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms, we investigated the change of the magnetic fields in the photosphere. Using the GOES soft X-ray flux and the SOHO/LASCO images, we identified the flare and CME, which were associated with this active-region filament eruption. Results: The brightenings in the chromosphere are a precursor of the filament expansion. The eruption itself can be divided into four phases: In the initial phase, the intertwined bright and dark strands of the filament expand. Then, the bright strands are divided into three parts with different expansion velocity. Next, the erupting filament-carrying flux rope expands rapidly and combines with the lower part of the expanding bright strands. Finally, the filament erupts accompanied by other dark strands overlying the filament.The overlying magnetic loops and the expansion of the filament strands can change the direction of the eruption. Conclusions: The time delay between the velocity peaks of the filament and that of the two parts of the bright strands clearly demonstrates that the breakup of the bright loops tying on the filament into individual strands is important for its eruption. The eruption is a collection of multiple processes that are physically coupled rather than a single process.

  19. Simulation of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.

    2015-12-01

    Shear flows long observed in solar active regions are now understood to be a consequence of the Lorentz force that develops from a complex interaction between magnetic fields and the thermal pressure of the Sun's gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The shearing motions transport magnetic flux and energy from the submerged portion of the field to the corona providing the necessary energy for flares, filament eruptions and CMEs. To further examine this shearing process, we simulate flux emergence on the scale of active regions with a large-scale model of the near surface convection zone constructed on an adaptive spherical grid. This model is designed to simulate flux emerging on the scale of active regions from a depth of 30 Mm. Here, we show results of a twisted flux rope emerging through the hierarchy of granular convection, and examine the flow patterns that arise as the flux approaches the photosphere. We show how these organized flows driven by the Lorentz force cause the coronal field evolve to a highly non-potential configuration capable of driving solar eruptions such as CMEs and flares.

  20. Metabolites and DNA adduct formation from flavoenzyme-activated porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Pan, S S; Iracki, T

    1988-08-01

    Porfiromycin was reductively metabolized by NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase and xanthine oxidase under anaerobic conditions. The production of metabolites varied with the pH and the contents of the reaction buffer. In Tris buffer, two major metabolites were produced at pH 7.5 and above, whereas one major metabolite was produced at pH 6.5. The three major metabolites were separated and isolated by HPLC. Identification by californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry showed that the two major metabolites from pH 7.5 were (trans) and (cis)-forms of 7-amino-1-hydroxyl-2-methylaminomitosene and the major metabolite from pH 6.5 was 7-amino-2-methylaminomitosene. All three major metabolites showed substitutions at the C-1 position. DNA was alkylated readily by enzyme-activated porfiromycin. Digestion of porfiromycin-alkylated DNA by DNase, snake venom phosphodiesterase, and alkaline phosphatase resulted in an insoluble nuclease-resistant fraction and a soluble fraction. The nuclease-resistant fraction reflected a high content of cross-linked adducts. Upon HPLC analysis, the solubilized fraction contained two monofunctionally linked porfiromycin adducts and a possibly cross-linked dinucleotide. The major adduct was isolated by HPLC and identified by NMR, as N2-(2'-deoxyguanosyl)-7-amino-2-methylaminomitosene. The N2 position of deoxyguanosine appeared as the major monofunctional alkylating site for DNA alkylation by porfiromycin. Thus, mitomycin C and porfiromycin (which differs from mitomycin C only by the addition of a methyl group to the aziridine nitrogen) share the same enzymatic activating mechanism that leads to the formation of the same types of metabolites and the same specificity of DNA alkylation. PMID:3412325

  1. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  2. Regulation of contractile vacuole formation and activity in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Edwards, Kimberly; Shen, Zhouxin; Sun, Binggang; De Lozanne, Arturo; Briggs, Steven; Firtel, Richard A

    2008-08-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) system is the osmoregulatory organelle required for survival for many free-living cells under hypotonic conditions. We identified a new CV regulator, Disgorgin, a TBC-domain-containing protein, which translocates to the CV membrane at the late stage of CV charging and regulates CV-plasma membrane fusion and discharging. disgorgin(-) cells produce large CVs due to impaired CV-plasma membrane fusion. Disgorgin is a specific GAP for Rab8A-GTP, which also localizes to the CV and whose hydrolysis is required for discharging. We demonstrate that Drainin, a previously identified TBC-domain-containing protein, lies upstream from Disgorgin in this pathway. Unlike Disgorgin, Drainin lacks GAP activity but functions as a Rab11A effector. The BEACH family proteins LvsA and LvsD were identified in a suppressor/enhancer screen of the disgorgin(-) large CV phenotype and demonstrated to have distinct functions in regulating CV formation. Our studies help define the pathways controlling CV function. PMID:18636095

  3. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium.

    PubMed

    Valent, Erik T; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. PMID:27498166

  4. Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

  5. Accelerated gravity testing of aquitard core permeability and implications at formation and regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Crane, R.; Anderson, D. J.; Bouzalakos, S.; Whelan, M.; McGeeney, D.; Rahman, P. F.; Guinea, A.; Acworth, R. I.

    2015-03-01

    Evaluating the possibility of leakage through low permeability geological strata is critically important for sustainable water supplies, the extraction of fuels from strata such as coal beds, and the confinement of waste within the earth. The current work demonstrates that relatively rapid and reliable hydraulic conductivity (K) measurement of aquitard cores using accelerated gravity can inform and constrain larger scale assessments of hydraulic connectivity. Steady state fluid velocity through a low K porous sample is linearly related to accelerated gravity (g-level) in a centrifuge permeameter (CP) unless consolidation or geochemical reactions occur. The CP module was custom designed to fit a standard 2 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge (550 g maximum) with a capacity for sample dimensions of 30 to 100 mm diameter and 30 to 200 mm in length, and a maximum total stress of ~2 MPa at the base of the core. Formation fluids were used as influent to limit any shrink-swell phenomena which may alter the permeability. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) results from CP testing of cores from three sites within the same regional clayey silt formation varied (10-7 to 10-9 m s-1, n = 14). Results at one of these sites (1.1 × 10-10 to 3.5 × 10-9 m s-1, n = 5) that were obtained in < 24 h were similar to in situ Kv values (3 × 10-9 m s-1) from pore pressure responses over several weeks within a 30 m clayey sequence. Core scale and in situ Kv results were compared with vertical connectivity within a regional flow model, and considered in the context of heterogeneity and preferential flow paths at site and formation scale. More reliable assessments of leakage and solute transport though aquitards over multi-decadal timescales can be achieved by accelerated core testing together with advanced geostatistical and numerical methods.

  6. Modeled aerosol nitrate formation pathways during wintertime in the Great Lakes region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo Jung; Spak, Scott N.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Riemer, Nicole; Stanier, Charles O.

    2014-11-01

    Episodic wintertime particle pollution by ammonium nitrate is an important air quality concern across the Midwest U.S. Understanding and accurately forecasting PM2.5 episodes are complicated by multiple pathways for aerosol nitrate formation, each with uncertain rate parameters. Here, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) simulated regional atmospheric nitrate budgets during the 2009 LADCO Winter Nitrate Study, using integrated process rate (IPR) and integrated reaction rate (IRR) tools to quantify relevant processes. Total nitrate production contributing to PM2.5 episodes is a regional phenomenon, with peak production over the Ohio River Valley and southern Great Lakes. Total nitrate production in the lower troposphere is attributed to three pathways, with 57% from heterogeneous conversion of N2O5, 28% from the reaction of OH and NO2, and 15% from homogeneous conversion of N2O5. TNO3 formation rates varied day-to-day and on synoptic timescales. Rate-limited production does not follow urban-rural gradients and NOx emissions due, to counterbalancing of urban enhancement in daytime HNO3 production with nocturnal reductions. Concentrations of HNO3 and N2O5 and nighttime TNO3 formation rates have maxima aloft (100-500 m), leading to net total nitrate vertical flux during episodes, with substantial vertical gradients in nitrate partitioning. Uncertainties in all three pathways are relevant to wintertime aerosol modeling and highlight the importance of interacting transport and chemistry processes during ammonium nitrate episodes, as well as the need for additional constraint on the system through field and laboratory experiments.

  7. Formation pumping of molecular hydrogen in the Messier 17 photodissociation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. G.; Londish, D.; Brand, P. W. J. L.

    2002-07-01

    We have imaged the emission from the near-infrared v=1-0 S(1), 1-0 S(7), 2-1 S(1) and 6-4 O(3) lines of molecular hydrogen in the Northern and South Western Bars of M17, together with the hydrogen Brγ and Br10 lines. This includes the first emission-line image ever to be obtained of a line from the highly excited v=6 level of molecular hydrogen. In both Bars, the H2 emission is generally distributed in clumps along filamentary features. The 1-0 S(1) and 2-1 S(1) images have similar morphologies. Together with their relative line ratios, this supports a fluorescent origin for their emission, within a photodissociation region. The SW-Bar contains a clumpy medium, but in the N-Bar the density is roughly constant. The 1-0 S(7) line image is also similar to the 1-0 S(1) image, but the 6-4 O(3) image is significantly different from it. Since the emission wavelengths of these two lines are similar (1.748 to 1.733μm), this cannot be due to differential extinction between the v=6 and the v=1 lines. We attribute the difference to the pumping of newly formed H2 into the v=6, or to a nearby, level. However, this also requires a time-dependent photodissociation region (where molecule formation does not balance dissociation), rather than it to be in steady state, and/or for the formation spectrum to vary with position in the source. If this interpretation of formation pumping of molecular hydrogen is correct, it is the first clear signature from this process to be seen.

  8. Seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols in the outdoor environment of the Qingdao coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xi; Qi, Jianhua; Li, Hongtao; Dong, Lijie; Gao, Dongmei

    2016-09-01

    Microbial activities in the atmosphere can indicate the physiological processes of microorganisms and can indirectly affect cloud formation and environmental health. In this study, the microbial activity in bioaerosols collected in the Qingdao coastal region was investigated using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis method to detect the enzyme activity of microorganisms. The results showed that the microbial activity ranged from 5.49 to 102 ng/m3 sodium fluorescein from March 2013 to February 2014; the average value was 34.4 ng/m3. Microbial activity has no statistical correlation with total microbial quantity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that meteorological factors such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed accounted for approximately 35.7% of the variation of the microbial activity, although their individual impacts on microbial activity varied. According to the correlation analysis, atmospheric temperature and wind speed had a significant positive and negative influence on microbial activity, respectively, whereas relative humidity and wind direction had no significant influence. The seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols was in the order of summer > autumn > winter > spring, with high fluctuations in the summer and autumn. Microbial activity in bioaerosols differed in different weather conditions such as the sunny, foggy, and hazy days of different seasons. Further in situ observations in different weather conditions at different times and places are needed to understand the seasonal distribution characteristics of microbial activity in bioaerosols and the influence factors of microbial activity.

  9. Special Issues Related to Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region and the First Regional Activity Report

    PubMed Central

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Zaidi, Syed Z; El Solh, Hassan; Hussain, Fazal; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Mahmoud, Hossam Kamel; Shamsi, Tahir; Othman, Tarek Ben; Sarhan, Mahmoud M.; Dennison, David; Ibrahim, Ahmad; Benchekroun, Said; Chaudhri, Naeem; Labar, Boris; Horowitz, Mary; Niederwieser, Dietger; Gratwohl, Alois

    2012-01-01

    Although several centers are now performing allogeneic HSCT in the Eastern Mediterranean (EM) region, the availability is still limited. Special issues including compatible donor availability and potential for alternate donor programs are discussed. In comparison to Europe & North America, differences in pattern of diseases and pre-HSCT general status particularly for patients with BM failure are described. Other differences including high seropositivity for CMV, Hepatitis B and C infection and specific observations about GVHD with its relation to genetically homogeneous community are also discussed. We report that a total of 17 HSCT programs (performing 5 or more HSCTs annually) exist in 9 countries of the EM region. Only 6 programs are currently reporting to EBMT or IBMTR. A total of 7617 HSCTs have been performed by these programs including 5701 allogeneic HSCTs. Due to low HSCT team density (1.5583 teams/10 million inhabitants vs. 14.4333 in Europe) and very low HSCT team distribution (0.2729 teams/10,000 sq km area vs. <1 to 6 teams in Europe). GNI/capita had no clear association with low HSCT activity; however improvement in infrastructure & formation of EM regional HSCT registry are needed. PMID:19043456

  10. YB-1 regulates stress granule formation and tumor progression by translationally activating G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Leprivier, Gabriel; Cheng, Hongwei; Hajee, Shamil; Grunewald, Thomas G.P.; Zhang, Fan; Ng, Tony; Delattre, Olivier; Evdokimova, Valentina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Gleave, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Under cell stress, global protein synthesis is inhibited to preserve energy. One mechanism is to sequester and silence mRNAs in ribonucleoprotein complexes known as stress granules (SGs), which contain translationally silent mRNAs, preinitiation factors, and RNA-binding proteins. Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) localizes to SGs, but its role in SG biology is unknown. We now report that YB-1 directly binds to and translationally activates the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of G3BP1 mRNAs, thereby controlling the availability of the G3BP1 SG nucleator for SG assembly. YB-1 inactivation in human sarcoma cells dramatically reduces G3BP1 and SG formation in vitro. YB-1 and G3BP1 expression are highly correlated in human sarcomas, and elevated G3BP1 expression correlates with poor survival. Finally, G3BP1 down-regulation in sarcoma xenografts prevents in vivo SG formation and tumor invasion, and completely blocks lung metastasis in mouse models. Together, these findings demonstrate a critical role for YB-1 in SG formation through translational activation of G3BP1, and highlight novel functions for SGs in tumor progression. PMID:25800057

  11. Altered regional activity and inter-regional functional connectivity in psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Li, Yibo; An, Dongmei; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Dong; Chen, Huafu

    2015-01-01

    Although various imaging studies have focused on detecting the cerebral function underlying psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), the nature of PNES remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined the resting state fMRI with fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) and functional connectivity based on the seed voxel linear correlation approach to examine the alterations of regional and inter-regional network cerebral functions in PNES. A total of 20 healthy controls and 18 patients were enrolled. The PNES patients showed significantly increased fALFF mainly in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), parietal cortices, and motor areas, as well as decreased fALFF in the triangular inferior frontal gyrus. Thus, our results add to literature suggesting abnormalities of neural synchrony in PNES. Moreover, PNES exhibited widespread inter-regional neural network deficits, including increased (DLPFC, sensorimotor, and limbic system) and decreased (ventrolateral prefrontal cortex) connectivity, indicating that changes in the regional cerebral function are related to remote inter-regional network deficits. Correlation analysis results revealed that the connectivity between supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate cortex correlated with the PNES frequency, further suggesting the skewed integration of synchronous activity could predispose to the occurrence of PNES. Our findings provided novel evidence to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of PNES. PMID:26109123

  12. Massive Star Formation in NGC4038/4039: HII Regions and Supernova Remnants in "The Antennae"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Fisher, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nearest merger, NGC4038/4039 ("The Antennae, Arp244), is undergoing a starburst apparently triggered and driven by the ongoing interaction. The system provides an excellent laboratory to study star formation processes because well-studied and nearby (21 Mpc assumed here). Models of the interaction suggest that the interaction's first periapse occurred 200 Myr ago, and that final coalescence will occur in another 100 Myr. Blue and H alpha images show a continuous loop of bright knots around the NGC4038 (northern) nucleus, continuing down through the NGC4039 (southern) nucleus. Recent HST V and I images resolve the star-forming knots into several thousand blue compact clusters, with ages 5Myr for the youngest clusters. Far Ultraviolet (lambda 1500A) observations directly detect O and B stars in regions of low extinction; the total mass of young stars so observed is approximately 8 x 10 (exp 5) solar mass. FIR observations imply a star formation rate of approximately 5 M (sub 0) dot yr (sup -1) or greater. We used the VLA at 6 and 4 cm to obtain high resolution radio images of the star-formation regions in NGC4038/4038. We used high resolution imaging to identify compact radio emitting regions and spectral indices of the compact regions to differentiate between thermal sources such as HII regions (flat spectra) and supernova, remnants (steep spectra). We found that compact radio sources produce approximately 12% and/sim 25 strongest radio emission occurs between the galaxies, at an optically unremarkable location near but not coincident with an extremely red cluster. The radio peak is at a location of intense star formation (as detected in the mid-IR, reference?) and of dense molecular gas. We identify 115 individual compact 6cm radio sources and 63 individual 4 cm sources in the system, to a limiting luminosity of approximately 2 x 10 (exp 1) 8 W Hz (sup -1) (or /sim4x the luminosity of Cas A). Of the strongest sources, for which the h flux densities are large

  13. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  14. Formation of low-dimensional crystalline nucleus region during insulin amyloidogenesis process

    SciTech Connect

    Amdursky, Nadav; Gazit, Ehud; Rosenman, Gil

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observe lag-phase crystallization process in insulin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystallization is a result of the formation of higher order oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystallization also changes the secondary structure of the protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spectroscopic signature can be used for amyloid inhibitors assay. -- Abstract: Insulin, as other amyloid proteins, can form amyloid fibrils at certain conditions. The self-assembled aggregation process of insulin can result in a variety of conformations, starting from small oligomers, going through various types of protofibrils, and finishing with bundles of fibrils. One of the most common consensuses among the various self-assembly processes that are suggested in the literature is the formation of an early stage nucleus conformation. Here we present an additional insight for the self-assembly process of insulin. We show that at the early lag phase of the process (prior to fibril formation) the insulin monomers self-assemble into ordered nanostructures. The most notable feature of this early self-assembly process is the formation of nanocrystalline nucleus regions with a strongly bound electron-hole confinement, which also change the secondary structure of the protein. Each step in the self-assembly process is characterized by an optical spectroscopic signature, and possesses a narrow size distribution. By following the spectroscopic signature we can measure the potency of amyloid fibrils inhibitors already at the lag phase. We further demonstrate it by the use of epigallocatechin gallate, a known inhibitor for insulin fibrils. The findings can result in a spectroscopic-based application for the analysis of amyloid fibrils inhibitors.

  15. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Airborne Measurements of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Oil Sands Region of Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Hayden, K.; Liu, P.; Leithead, A.; Moussa, S. G.; Staebler, R. M.; Gordon, M.; O'brien, J.; Li, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Alberta oil sands (OS) region represents a strategic natural resource and is a key driver of economic development. Its rapid expansion has led to a need for a more comprehensive understanding of the associated potential cumulative environmental impacts. In summer 2013, airborne measurements of various gaseous and particulate substances were made in the Athabasca oil sands region between August 13 and Sept 7, 2013. In particular, organic aerosol mass and composition measurements were performed with a High Resolution Time of flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) supported by gaseous measurements of organic aerosol precursors with Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) and Chemical Ionization (CI) mass spectrometers. These measurement data on selected flights were used to estimate the potential for local anthropogenic OS emissions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) downwind of precursor sources, and to investigate the importance of the surrounding biogenic emissions to the overall SOA burden in the region. The results of several flights conducted to investigate these transformations demonstrate that multiple distinct plumes were present downwind of OS industrial sources, each with differing abilities to form SOA depending upon factors such as NOx level, precursor VOC composition, and oxidant concentration. The results indicate that approximately 100 km downwind of an OS industrial source most of the measured organic aerosol (OA) was secondary in nature, forming at rates of ~6.4 to 13.6 μgm-3hr-1. Positive matrix factor (PMF) analysis of the HR-ToF-AMS data suggests that the SOA was highly oxidized (O/C~0.6) resulting in a measured ΔOA (difference above regional background OA) of approximately 2.5 - 3 despite being 100 km away from sources. The relative contribution of biogenic SOA to the total SOA and the factors affecting SOA formation during a number of flights in the OS region will be described.

  17. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Wilman, D.; Salvato, M.; Magnelli, B.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Ziparo, F.; Berta, S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Lutz, D.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Cimatti, A.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Nordon, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase, between redshifts 1 and 2, is dominated by more massive galaxies, which evolve more quickly. Aims: Massive galaxies tend to inhabit very massive haloes, such as galaxy groups and clusters. We aim to understand whether the observed "galaxy downsizing" could be interpreted as a "halo downsizing", whereas the most massive haloes, and their galaxy populations, evolve more rapidly than the haloes with lower mass. Methods: We studied the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies inhabiting group-sized haloes. This is done through the study of the evolution of the infra-red (IR) luminosity function of group galaxies from redshift 0 to redshift ~1.6. We used a sample of 39 X-ray-selected groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN), and the COSMOS field, where the deepest available mid- and far-IR surveys have been conducted with Spitzer MIPS and with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel satellite. Results: Groups at low redshift lack the brightest, rarest, and most star forming IR-emitting galaxies observed in the field. Their IR-emitting galaxies contribute ≤10% of the comoving volume density of the whole IR galaxy population in the local Universe. At redshift ≳1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are mainly located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR) vs. density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z ~ 1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the

  18. Coordinated activation of the secretory pathway during notochord formation in the Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Rebbert, Martha L; Dawid, Igor B

    2009-11-01

    We compared the transcriptome in the developing notochord of Xenopus laevis embryos with that of other embryonic regions. A coordinated and intense activation of a large set of secretory pathway genes was observed in the notochord, but not in notochord precursors in the axial mesoderm at early gastrula stage. The genes encoding Xbp1 and Creb3l2 were also activated in the notochord. These two transcription factors are implicated in the activation of secretory pathway genes during the unfolded protein response, where cells react to the stress of a build-up of unfolded proteins in their endoplasmic reticulum. Xbp1 and Creb3l2 are differentially expressed but not differentially activated in the notochord. Reduction of expression of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 by injection of antisense morpholinos led to strong deficits in notochord but not somitic muscle development. In addition, the expression of some, but not all, genes encoding secretory proteins was inhibited by injection of xbp1 morpholinos. Furthermore, expression of activated forms of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 in animal explants could activate a similar subset of secretory pathway genes. We conclude that coordinated activation of a battery of secretory pathway genes mediated by Xbp1 and Creb/ATF factors is a characteristic and necessary feature of notochord formation. PMID:19793890

  19. Coordinated activation of the secretory pathway during notochord formation in the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Rebbert, Martha L.; Dawid, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We compared the transcriptome in the developing notochord of Xenopus laevis embryos with that of other embryonic regions. A coordinated and intense activation of a large set of secretory pathway genes was observed in the notochord, but not in notochord precursors in the axial mesoderm at early gastrula stage. The genes encoding Xbp1 and Creb3l2 were also activated in the notochord. These two transcription factors are implicated in the activation of secretory pathway genes during the unfolded protein response, where cells react to the stress of a build-up of unfolded proteins in their endoplasmic reticulum. Xbp1 and Creb3l2 are differentially expressed but not differentially activated in the notochord. Reduction of expression of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 by injection of antisense morpholinos led to strong deficits in notochord but not somitic muscle development. In addition, the expression of some, but not all, genes encoding secretory proteins was inhibited by injection of xbp1 morpholinos. Furthermore, expression of activated forms of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 in animal explants could activate a similar subset of secretory pathway genes. We conclude that coordinated activation of a battery of secretory pathway genes mediated by Xbp1 and Creb/ATF factors is a characteristic and necessary feature of notochord formation. PMID:19793890

  20. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. II. The Star-formation History of the Starburst Region NGC 2070 in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Sabbi, E.; van der Marel, R. P.; Tosi, M.; Zaritsky, D.; Anderson, J.; Lennon, D. J.; Aloisi, A.; de Marchi, G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Smith, L. J.; Zeidler, P.

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the recent star formation (SF) of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the panchromatic imaging survey Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. In this paper we focus on the stars within 20 pc of the center of 30 Doradus, the starburst region NGC 2070. We recovered the SF history by comparing deep optical and near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with state-of-the-art synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) models, which include all stellar phases from pre-main-sequence to post-main-sequence. For the first time in this region we are able to measure the SF using intermediate- and low-mass stars simultaneously. Our results suggest that NGC 2070 experienced prolonged activity. In particular, we find that the SF in the region (1) exceeded the average LMC rate ≈ 20 Myr ago, (2) accelerated dramatically ≈ 7 Myr ago, and (3) reached a peak value 1-3 Myr ago. We did not find significant deviations from a Kroupa initial mass function down to 0.5 {M}⊙ . The average internal reddening E(B-V) is found to be between 0.3 and 0.4 mag. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  1. Holocene fire activity in the Carpathian region: regional climate vs. local controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Gabriela; Feurdean, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Introduction. Fire drives significant changes in ecosystem structure and function, diversity, species evolution, biomass dynamics and atmospheric composition. Palaeodata and model-based studies have pointed towards a strong connection between fire activity, climate, vegetation and people. Nevertheless, the relative importance of these factors appears to be strongly variable and a better understanding of these factors and their interaction needs a thorough investigation over multiple spatial (local to global) and temporal (years to millennia) scales. In this respect, sedimentary charcoal, associated with other proxies of climate, vegetation and human impact, represents a powerful tool of investigating changes in past fire activity, especially in regions with scarce fire dataset such as the CE Europe. Aim. To increase the spatial and temporal coverage of charcoal records and facilitate a more critical examination of the patterns, drivers and consequences of biomass burning over multiple spatial and temporal scales in CE Europe, we have investigated 6 fossil sequences in the Carpathian region (northern Romania). These are located in different geographical settings, in terms of elevation, vegetation composition, topography and land-use. Specific questions are: i) determine trends in timing and magnitude of fire activity, as well as similarities and differences between elevations; ii) disentangle the importance of regional from local controls in fire activity; iii) evaluate ecological consequences of fire on landscape composition, structure and diversity. Methods. We first determine the recent trends in fire activity (the last 150 years) from charcoal data and compare them with instrumental records of temperature, precipitation, site history and topography for a better understanding of the relationship between sedimentary charcoal and historical fire activity. We then statistically quantify centennial to millennial trends in fire activity (frequency, magnitude) based on

  2. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Half of the world's population depends on rice for survival. Rice agriculture thus plays an important role in the developing world's economy. Vietnam is one of the largest rice producers and suppliers on earth and more than 80% of the exported rice was produced from the Mekong Delta region, which is situated in the southwestern Vietnam and encompasses approximately 40,000 km2. Changes in climate conditions could likely trigger the increase of insect populations and rice diseases, causing the potential loss of rice yields. Monitoring rice-farming activities through crop phenology detection can provide policymakers with timely strategies to mitigate possible impacts on the potential yield as well as rice grain exports to ensure food security for the region. The main objective of this study is to develop a logistic-based algorithm to investigate rice sowing and harvesting activities from the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Landsat fusion data. We processed the data for two main cropping seasons (i.e., winter-spring and summer-autumn seasons) through a three-step procedure: (1) MODIS-Landsat data fusion, (2) construction of the time-series enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2) data, (3) rice crop phenology detection. The EVI2 data derived from the fusion results between MODIS and Landsat data were compared with that of Landsat data indicated close correlation between the two datasets (R2 = 0.93). The time-series EVI2 data were processed using the double logistic method to detect the progress of sowing and harvesting activities in the region. The comparisons between the estimated sowing and harvesting dates and the field survey data revealed the root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 8.4 and 5.5 days for the winter-spring crop and 9.4 and 12.8 days for the summer-autumn crop, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the double logistic-based algorithm for rice crop monitoring from temporal MODIS-Landsat fusion data

  3. Geological study of uranium potential of the Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley Region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, D.; Kettler, R.M.; Swanson, S.C.

    1980-09-01

    The results of a geological survey of the Kingston Peak Formation on the western slope of the Panamint Range near Death Valley are discussed. The geology of the Panamint mountains was mapped on topographic base maps of the Telescope Peak and Manly Peak quadrangles. Radiometric suveys of the area were conducted using gamma ray spectrometers. Samples of the conglomerate were analyzed using delayed neutron, neutron activation, atomic absorption, and LECO analysis. It is concluded that uranium mineralization in the Favorable Submember is significant and further exploration is warranted. The monazite-fenotime related uranium and thorium mineralization in the Mountain Girl quartz pebble conglomerate is of no economic interest. (DMC)

  4. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  5. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  6. Evidence for the correlation of the upper part of the Llewellyn Formation (Pennsylvania Anthracite region), with the Monongahela Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, J.R.; Wnuk, C.; Edmunds, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    A plant fossil assemblage from the roof shale of the No. 25 anthracite bed in Pennsylvania indicates that the upper part of the Llewellyn Formation is much younger than the lower part of the Allegheny Group or Conemaugh Group correlation that was indicated by Read and Mamay (1960). These results confirm the conclusions of Fontaine and White (1880), White (1900), and Darrah (1969) who suggested that the highest coals of the Llewellyn Formation could be equivalent to the Monongahela Group.

  7. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (∼0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ∼ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ∼24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ∼15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  8. Ancient Tectonic and Volcanic Activity in the Tharsis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, S. C.; Kronberg, P.; Hauber, E.; Grott, M.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Neukum, G.

    The two topographically dominating volcanic provinces on Mars are the Tharsis and the Elysium regions, situated close to the equator on the dichotomy boundary between the heavily cratered (older) highlands and the northern lowlands (about 100 degrees apart). The regions are characterized by volcanoes whose morphologies are analogous to volcanic landforms on Earth, and the huge volcanoes in the Tharsis region (Olympus Mons and Tharsis Montes) are prime examples resembling many characteristics of Hawaiian shield volcanoes. The main difference between the Martian and terrestrial volcanoes are their size and the length of the flows, possibly due to higher eruption rates, the "stationary" character of the source (no plate tectonics) and the lower gravity. The Tharsis plateau is the topographically most prominent region on Mars, and associated with an areoid high. On Earth, large geoid highs are related to longlived heterogeneities near the core-mantle boundary that are sources for large igneous provinces. The Tharsis' volcanic vent structures were active at least episodically over the past 4 billion years (based on crater count statistics), which indicates long-lived volcanic and magmatic activity. Two major groups of tectonic features are related to the Tharsis bulge: a concentric set of wrinkle ridges indicating compression radial to Tharsis,and several sets of extensional structures that radiate outward from different centers within Tharsis, indicating tension circumferential to Tharsis. No landforms imply ancient plate tectonics. Here, we present surface ages associated with volcanic and tectonic landforms with a special focus on the ancient magma-tectonic environment (see Grott et al. 2006, this volume). We will examine the long-lived volcanism and tectonic surface expressions and discuss whether Mars volcanism could represent deep mantle plumes.

  9. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  10. Outflow-confined HII Regions. I. First Signposts of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-02-01

    We present an evolutionary sequence of models of the photoionized disk-wind outflow around forming massive stars based on the Core Accretion model. The outflow is expected to be the first structure to be ionized by the protostar and can confine the expansion of the H ii region, especially in lateral directions in the plane of the accretion disk. The ionizing luminosity increases as Kelvin-Helmholz contraction proceeds, and the H ii region is formed when the stellar mass reaches ˜10-20{M}⊙ depending on the initial cloud core properties. Although some part of the outer disk surface remains neutral due to shielding by the inner disk and the disk wind, almost the whole of the outflow is ionized in 103-{10}4 {{y}}{{r}} after initial H ii region formation. Having calculated the extent and temperature structure of the H ii region within the immediate protostellar environment, we then make predictions for the strength of its free-free continuum and recombination line emission. The free-free radio emission from the ionized outflow has a flux density of ˜(20-200) × \\quad {(ν /10{{GHz}})}p {{mJy}} for a source at a distance of 1 kpc with a spectral index p ≃ 0.4-0.7, and the apparent size is typically ˜500 AU at 10 GHz. The {{H}}40α line profile has a width of about 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1. These properties of our model are consistent with observed radio winds and jets around forming massive protostars.

  11. Geography of follicle formation in the embryonic mouse ovary impacts activation pattern during the first wave of folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Marília H; Kim, So-Youn; Ebbert, Katherine; Duncan, Francesca E; Ramalho-Santos, João; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2015-10-01

    During embryonic development, mouse female germ cells enter meiosis in an anterior-to-posterior wave believed to be driven by retinoic acid. It has been proposed that ovarian follicle formation and activation follow the same general wave of meiotic progression; however, the precise anatomic specification of these processes has not been delineated. Here, we created a mouse line using Mvh, Gdf9, and Zp3 promoters to drive distinct temporal expression of three fluorescent proteins in the oocytes and to identify where the first follicle cohort develops. The fluorescent profile revealed that the first growing follicles consistently appeared in a specific region of the ovary, the anterior-dorsal region, which led us to analyze if meiotic onset occurred earlier in the dorsal ovarian region. Surprisingly, in addition to the anterior-to-posterior wave, we observed an early meiotic entry in the ventral region of the ovary. This additional anatomic stratification of meiosis contrasts with the localization of the initial follicle formation and activation in the dorsal region of the ovary. Therefore, our study suggests that the specification of cortical and medullar areas in the ventral and dorsal regions on the ovary, rather than the onset of meiosis, impacts where the first follicle activation event occurs. PMID:26246221

  12. Formation of the twin galactic starburst regions NGC6334 and NGC6357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Kazufumi; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Since 2009, several molecular line observations toward the galactic high-mass star forming regions have indicated that cloud-cloud collisions (CCC) play an important role in forming high-mass stars; for example, super star clusters Westerlund2, NGC3603, and RCW38 (Furukawa et al. 2009; Fukui et al. 2014, 2015) and small galactic HII regions M20 and RCW120 which are each excited by a single O star (Torii et al. 2011, 2015). Using the NANTEN2 4-m telescope situated at Atacama, Chile, we have completed a large-scale molecular line mapping toward young galactic starburst regions NGC6334 and NGC6357. The two regions have several clusetrs which are rich in O stars having 30-100 MSun and are suggested to be physically connected with each other, although they are separated by 100 pc. Our new CO observations show that two molecular cloud complexes are distributed toward NGC6334 and NGC6357 at two different velocities, -3 km/s and -18 km/s. They have filamentary distributions elongated for over 100 pc nearly parallel to the galactic plane. The -3km/s complex apparently shows morphological agreements with the nebulosity in NGC6334 and NGC6357, and the -18km/s complex shows complementary distributions with the -3 km/s complex especially toward the O stars. Furthermore, intermediate velocity features which connect the two complexes are seen toward the same direction. These observational signatures indicate the physical association of the two cloud complexes with NGC6334 and NGC6357. We postulate a scenario that a collision between the two filamentary cloud complexes with a colliding velocity ~15 km/s triggered high-mass star formation in NGC6334 and NGC6357. The timescale of the collision, thus the high-mass star formation, is estimated to be less than 0.5 Myrs, which corresponds to a mass accretion rate up to 2×10-4 MSun/yr. Previous known CCC origin objects are the ones in which high-mass star were formed at a very limited volume less than 1pc3. In contrast, the CCC in NGC

  13. An Analysis of Water Line Profiles in Star Formation Regions Observed by SWAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Plume, Rene; Carpenter, John M.; Neufeld, David A.; Chin, Gordon; Erickson, Neal R.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Harwit, Martin; Howe, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    We present spectral line profiles for the 557 GHz 1(sub 1,0) yields 1(sub 0,1) ground-state rotational transition of ortho-H2(16)O for 18 galactic star formation regions observed by SWAS. 2 Water is unambiguously detected in every source. The line profiles exhibit a wide variety of shapes, including single-peaked spectra and self-reversed profiles. We interpret these profiles using a Monte Carlo code to model the radiative transport. The observed variations in the line profiles can be explained by variations in the relative strengths of the bulk flow and small-scale turbulent motions within the clouds. Bulk flow (infall, outflow) must be present in some cloud cores, and in certain cases this bulk flow dominates the turbulent motions.

  14. 2D spectroscopy of galaxies with star formation regions. Study of SBS 1533+574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.; Dodonov, S. N.; Movsessian, T. A.

    2006-10-01

    A preliminary analysis is given of 2D spectroscopic data on the galaxy SBS 1533+574(AB) obtained using the multipupil spectrographs on the 2.6-m telescope at the BAO (VAGR) and the 6-m telescope at the SAO (MPFS). The two components of the galaxy are star formation regions in different stages. The component SBS 1533+574B is known to be a BCDG. The plots of the intensity distribution of the radiation in the recombination lines of hydrogen and the forbidden lines of gases with a low degree of ionization obtained here make it possible to compare the basic characteristics of the HII-zones and the surrounding shell. The velocity distribution over the field of the galaxy is indicative of a common rotation of the system and of an intrinsic rotation of the components which is more distinct for component B.

  15. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  16. Implications of Special Regions to Conducting Human Activities on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Barlow, N. G.; Beaty, D. W.; Jones, M. A.; Hipkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    A MEPAG Science Analysis Group (SAG) has undertaken an analysis of Special Regions (SR) on Mars—regions where indigenous martian life could exist or where Earth microbes, if introduced, could survive and reproduce. The SR-SAG has considered the impact of SR on future human activities on the martian surface. Human exploration requires access to in-situ resources, some of which may be found in SR. Water and oxygen for ISRU are found in the atmosphere, surface/near-surface ice, hydrated minerals, and perchlorates. Water ice is most abundant at latitudes poleward of ~60 degrees, but polar darkness, cold temperatures, and CO2 degassing present hazards to human operations in these regions. Accessible water is more limited toward the equator, though temperature and solar energy conditions become more favorable. The possible presence of liquid water in Recurring Slope Lineae and active gullies leads to their treatment as SR. Fuel for surface operations and propellants for crew ascent could be manufactured from the martian atmosphere and surface materials, but dust in the atmosphere may clog ISRU equipment and perchlorate is toxic to humans. Power may be produced from solar or nuclear energy. Reliance on solar energy limits operations to the equatorial zone where easily accessible ice resources are limited. Nuclear power allows surface operations at a range of latitudes, but waste heat could convert some non-SR into SR. Radiation shielding is necessary for long-term human operations on Mars and could be obtained by deposition of regolith or by water storage in tanks or as ice around habitats, or the use of underground habitats. SR-SAG recognizes that it will be impossible for all human-associated processes and operations to be conducted within entirely closed systems. Protocols need to be established so (1) human missions to Mars will not contaminate SR nor be contaminated by materials from them, and (2) human activities on Mars will avoid converting areas into SR.

  17. THE EXPANSION OF ACTIVE REGIONS INTO THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Jeska, Lauren; Leonard, Drew

    2013-06-01

    Advanced image processing of Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 observations reveals the expansion of the active region closed field into the extended corona. The nested closed-loop systems are large, with an apparent latitudinal extent of 50 Degree-Sign , and expanding to heights of at least 12 R{sub Sun }. The expansion speeds are {approx}10 km s{sup -1} in the AIA/SDO field of view, below {approx}20 km s{sup -1} at 2.3 R{sub Sun }, and accelerate linearly to {approx}60 km s{sup -1} at 5 R{sub Sun }. They appear with a frequency of one every {approx}3 hr over a time period of around three days. They are not coronal mass ejections (CMEs) since their gradual expansion is continuous and steady. They are also faint, with an upper limit of 3% of the brightness of background streamers. Extreme ultraviolet images reveal continuous birth and expansion of hot, bright loops from a new active region at the base of the system. The LASCO images show that the loops span a radial fan-like system of streamers, suggesting that they are not propagating within the main coronal streamer structure. The expanding loops brighten at low heights a few hours prior to a CME eruption, and the expansion process is temporarily halted as the closed field system is swept away. Closed magnetic structures from some active regions are not isolated from the extended corona and solar wind, but can expand to large heights in the form of quiescent expanding loops.

  18. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  19. BAR EFFECTS ON CENTRAL STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seulhee; Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2012-01-01

    Galactic bars are often suspected to be channels of gas inflow to the galactic center and to trigger central star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. However, the current status on this issue based on empirical studies is unsettling, especially regarding AGNs. We investigate this question based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. From the nearby (0.01 < z < 0.05) bright (M{sub r} < -19) database, we have constructed a sample of 6658 relatively face-on late-type galaxies through visual inspection. We found 36% of them to have a bar. Bars are found to be more common in galaxies with earlier morphology. This makes sample selection critical. Parameter-based selections would miss a large fraction of barred galaxies of early morphology. Bar effects on star formation or AGNs are difficult to understand properly because multiple factors (bar frequency, stellar mass, black hole mass, gas contents, etc.) seem to contribute to them in intricate manners. In the hope of breaking these degeneracies, we inspect bar effects for fixed galaxy properties. Bar effects on central star formation seem higher in redder galaxies. Bar effects on AGNs on the other hand are higher in bluer and less massive galaxies. These effects seem more pronounced with increasing bar length. We discuss possible implications in terms of gas contents, bar strength, bar evolution, fueling timescale, and the dynamical role of supermassive black hole.

  20. Regional-scale flow of formation waters in the Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bachu, S.; Hitchon, B.

    1996-02-01

    The Williston basin is a structurally simple intracratonic sedimentary basin that straddles the United States-Canada border east of the Rocky Mountains and that contains an almost continuous stratigraphic record since the Middle Cambrian. Based on the wealth of data generated by the oil industry, the regional-scale characteristics of the flow of formation waters were analyzed for the Canadian side of the basin, and integrated with previous studies performed on the American side. Several aquifers and aquifer systems identified in the basin were separated by intervening aquitards and aquicludes. The Basal, Devonian, and Mannville (Dakota) aquifers are open systems, being exposed at the land surface in both recharge and discharge areas. Recharge takes place in the west-southwest at relatively high altitude in the Bighorn and Big Snowy mountains and at the Black Hills and Central Montana uplifts, whereas discharge takes place in the east and northeast at outcrop along the Canadian Precambrian shield in Manitoba and the Dakotas. The Mississippian and Pennsylvanian aquifer systems are semi-open, cropping out only in the west-southwest where they recharge, but discharging in the northeast into adjacent aquifers through confining aquitards. On regional and geological scales, the entire system seems to be at steady-state, although locally transient flow is present in places due to water use and hydrocarbon exploitation, and to some erosional rebound in the uppermost confining shales. On the western flank of the basin, the interplay between the northeastward structural downdip direction and the northeastward flow of formation waters creates conditions favorable for hydrodynamic oil entrapment.

  1. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Astorga, Joaquín; Pérez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio; Romero, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed (i) the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and (ii) the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog. PMID:25628606

  2. Glacial lake distribution in the Mount Everest region: Uncertainty of measurement and conditions of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Franco; Thakuri, Sudeep; D'Agata, Carlo; Smiraglia, Claudio; Manfredi, Emanuela Chiara; Viviano, Gaetano; Tartari, Gianni

    2012-07-01

    This study provides a complete mapping (October 2008) of glacial lakes and debris-covered glaciers in the Mount Everest region. These types of analyses are essential in studies of the impact of recent climate change, and therefore the uncertainty of measurements is discussed with the aim of creating a reference study for use when glaciers and lakes are delineated using remote sensing imagery. Moreover, attention is focused on conditions related to the formation of lakes, which is the greatest evidence of the impact of climate change at high altitudes characterized by debris-covered glaciers. Regarding the formation process of supraglacial lakes, our findings confirm that the slope of the glacier where lakes are located is primarily responsible for the low flow velocity of this zone. Otherwise, this study is novel in its identification of a further boundary condition. The slope of the glacier upstream is able to influence both the low flow velocity and the high ablation rates at the glacier terminus. In fact, the imbalance between the two glacier zones generates the down-slope passage of debris, snow and ice. We found the slope of the glacier upstream to be inversely correlated with the relevant total surface of the lakes downstream. The multiple regression model developed in this study, considering the slopes of the two glacier areas distinctly, has been able to predict 90% of the supraglacial lake surfaces. Concerning the surfaces of lakes not directly connected with glaciers (unconnected glacial lakes), we found they are correlated with the dimensions of their drainage basin, whereas no correlation was found with the glacier cover in the basin. Considering that the evaporation/precipitation ratio at these altitudes is approximately 0.34, the evolution of these lakes appears to be a helpful sign for detecting the precipitation trend of these high-altitude regions.

  3. Storm activity in North Atlantic and precipitation anomalies in European region during winter seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N. A.; Vyazilova, A. E.

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the storm activity influence on the formation of wet and dry zone in North Atlantic and European region during winter seasons 1994/95, 2006/07 and 2007/08 years with positive mode of NAO, 1995/96, 2000/01 and 2005/06 years with negative mode of NAO. The study of storm activity includes the analyses of cyclonic intensity and cyclone track number. Analyses of cyclonic intensity based on calculation cyclone centers number (CCN) and sum of cyclone centers MSLP anomalies (CCMA). This analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm and the 6-hourly MSLP from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses 2 from 1979 to 2009. Precipitation anomalies were calculated from CMAP archive. Analyses had included the calculation of cyclone track number in all region [30°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E]and selected latitude zone for long cyclones (with lifetime more 2 day) and short cyclones (with lifetime less 2 day). The study had shown the special features of CCN and CCMA patterns in region for long and short cyclones. The study shows, that every winter season short cyclone track number twice as much long cyclone track number. However, the contribution of long cyclones in main determines the CCMA in region. Study had shown that winter seasons with positive NAO mode Nord Europe were outstanding by strong positive precipitation anomalies and strong cyclonic intensity, and during winter seasons with negative NAO mode in this region were observed negative precipitation anomalies and weak cyclonic activity. Standartizide anomalies of integral CCMA for selected latitude zone [55°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E] had shown the intensification of cyclonic activity over North Atlantic and North European region in last years.

  4. Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM/T(exp 2.4) from log T = 5.55 up to a peak at log T = 6.57. The observations are explained extremely well by a simple nanoflare model. However, in the absence of additional constraints, the observations could possibly also be explained by steady heating.

  5. SOI/MDI studies of active region seismology and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Ted D.; Title, Alan; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Scherrer, Phil; Zweibel, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    The solar oscillations investigation (SOI) will study solar active regions using both helioseismic and conventional observation techniques. The Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) can perform Doppler continuum and line depth imagery and can produce longitudinal magnetograms, showing either the full disk or a high resolution field of view. A dynamics program of continuous full disk Doppler observations for two months per year, campaign programs of eight hours of continuous observation per day, and a synoptic magnetic program of about 15 full disk magnetograms per day, are planned. The scientific plans, measurements and observation programs, are described.

  6. C IV Doppler shifts observed in active region filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Doppler shift properties of 21 active region filaments were studied using C IV Dopplergram data. Most are associated with corridors of weak magnetic field that separate opposite polarity strong fields seen in photospheric magnetograms. A majority of the filaments are relatively blue shifted, although several lie very close to the dividing lines between blue and red shift. Only one filament in the samples is clearly red shifted. A new calibration procedure for Dopplergrams indicates that sizable zero point offsets are often required. The center-to-limb behavior of the resulting absolute Doppler shifts suggests that filament flows are usually quite small. It is possible that they vanish.

  7. Substrate-emitting semiconductor laser with a trapezoidal active region

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N V; Nekorkin, S M; Karzanova, M V; Zvonkov, B N; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A; Afonenko, A A

    2014-04-28

    Semiconductor lasers with a narrow (∼2°) directional pattern in the planes both parallel and perpendicular to the p–n junction are fabricated. To achieve a low radiation divergence in the p–n junction plane, the active region in this plane was designed in the form of a trapezium. The narrow directional pattern in the plane perpendicular to the p–n junction was ensured by the use of a leaky mode, through which more than 90% of laser power was coupled out. (lasers)

  8. H2O and CO emission towards IRAS point sources in regions of star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiegle, K.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Brand, J.

    H2O masers are good indicators for the presence of star formation in molecular clouds. Wouterloot and Walmsley (1986) showed that all H2O maser sources in regions of star formation are associated with IRAS point sources with specific colours, so that the IRAS Point Source Catalog can be used to select maser candidates. The authors have searched for 22 GHz H2O maser emission using the 100-m radiotelescope in Effelsberg and the 32-m radiotelescope in Medicina, Italy. The total sample of sources consists of 1390 objects, selected according to their IRAS colour indices. Spectra and line parameters are given in Wouterloot et al. (1993). The H2O data are compared with results of observations of 12CO (1-0) (and of 12CO (2-1) and 12CO(3-2) in some cases) towards a large fraction of these sources, made with the 30-m IRAM, 15-m SEST, or 3-m KOSMA telescopes.

  9. Chondrule formation in particle-rich nebular regions at least hundreds of kilometres across.

    PubMed

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Alexander, Conel M O'D

    2006-05-25

    Chondrules are millimetre-sized spherules (mostly silicate) that dominate the texture of primitive meteorites. Their formation mechanism is debated, but their sheer abundance suggests that the mechanism was both energetic and ubiquitous in the early inner Solar System. The processes suggested--such as shock waves, solar flares or nebula lightning--operate on different length scales that have been hard to relate directly to chondrule properties. Chondrules are depleted in volatile elements, but surprisingly they show little evidence for the associated loss of lighter isotopes one would expect. Here we report a model in which molten chondrules come to equilibrium with the gas that was evaporated from other chondrules, and which explains the observations in a natural way. The regions within which the chondrules formed must have been larger than 150-6,000 km in radius, and must have had a precursor number density of at least 10 m(-3). These constraints probably exclude nebula lightning, and also make formation far from the nebula midplane problematic. The wide range of chondrule compositions may be the result of different combinations of the local concentrations of precursors and the local abundance of water ice or vapour. PMID:16724060

  10. Characteristics of fluxes of energetic electrons in the transition region during times of enhanced geophysical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Y.V.; Spir'kova, E.S.

    1986-05-01

    In January 1976, the Interplanetary Magnetospheric Study (IMS) began. During the period January-March 1976, geomagnetic disturbances coincided mainly with a recurring sequence of earth passages through sector structures in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In March, unusually large enhancements in energetic electron fluxes were recorded by Prognoz 4. The observations were made during intersections of the flanks of the transition region (TR) in conditions of enhanced geomagnetic activity, and the enhancements were of significant duration. Intense bursts of these particles were also observed in the outer magnetosphere at high latitudes. We discuss possible mechanisms for creating such formations.

  11. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  12. Peptides of the constant region of antibodies display fungicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C; Pinto, Marcia R; Travassos, Luiz R; Pertinhez, Thelma A; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  13. Post-formation Modification of Sinuous Ridges in the Aeolis-Zephyria Planum Region, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, A.; Burr, D. M.; Beyer, R. A.; Howard, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Aeolis-Zephyria Plana region on Mars hosts a large population of sinuous ridges (SRs), interpreted as inverted paleochannels, formed by precipitation, indurated by chemical cementation, buried by subsequent deposition and finally exhumed (Burr et al. 2009, 2010). They are located within the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF), dated to the Hesperian/Amazonian epochs. This study concentrates on a dense network of SRs, shown in Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data to be more integrated and extensive than previously thought. With CTX images as the basemap, HiRISE images for close-up morphological investigations, and the MOLA DEM, MOLA tracks and a CTX DEM for topographic information, we have examined this network, estimating thicknesses, cross-section and longitudinal profiles and slope directions. Because of its triangular plan view, this network had previously been interpreted as a fan, with flow to the northeast. However, all the available topographic data show most of the SR slopes decrease toward the southwest, although some segments, notably in the northern part of the network do decrease toward the northeast (figure 1). In addition, the slopes do not decrease monotonically, but both increase and decrease along their profile. This inconsistency of slopes suggests that the network has been subject to post-formation modification. We propose two major causes for these inconsistent slopes: 1) localized erosion and 2) differential settling. Localized erosion would have removed the capping layer, exposing underlying and less indurated sediments to collapse. We hypothesize that localized erosion occurred preferentially in locations where i) the flat upper surface of an SR has been removed and ii) the reduction in elevation of the SR surface along profile is less than the average SR relief. Differential settling would have entailed the compaction of porous material under a now-eroded overlaying mass. We hypothesize that differential settling occurred where i) the flat upper

  14. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. II - NOAA active region 5747 (1989 October)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Mcclymont, A. N.; De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Fan, Yuhong; Tang, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes October 1989 observations in NOAA Active Region 5747 of the morphology of energetic electron precipitation and high-pressure coronal flare plasmas of three flares and their relation to the vector magnetic field and vertical electric currents. The H-alpha spectroheliograms were coaligned with the vector magnetograms using continuum images of sunspots, enabling positional accuracy of a few arcsec. It was found that, during the gradual phase, the regions of the H-alpha flare that show the effects of enhanced pressure in the overlying corona often encompass extrema of the vertical current density, consistent with earlier work showing a close relationship between H-alpha emission and line-of-sight currents. The data are also consistent with the overall morphology and evolution described by erupting-filament models such as those of Kopp and Pneuman (1976) and Sturrock (1989).

  15. Plasma Beta Above a Solar Active Region: Rethinking the Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model of the plasma beta above an active region and discuss its consequences in terms of coronal magnetic field modeling. The beta-plasma model is representative and derived from a collection of sources. The resulting beta variation with height is used to emphasize the assumption that the magnetic pressure dominates over the plasma pressure must be carefully considered depending on what part of the solar atmosphere is being considered. This paper points out (1) that the paradigm that the coronal magnetic field can be constructed from a force-free magnetic field must be used in the correct context, since the forcefree region is sandwiched between two regions which have beta greater than 1, (2) that the chromospheric MgIICIV magnetic measurements occur near the beta-minimum, and (3) that, moving from the photosphere upwards, beta can return to 1 at relatively low coronal heights, e.g. R approximately 1.2R(sub)s.

  16. Behaviour of oscillations in loop structures above active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, D. Y.; Kobanov, N. I.; Chelpanov, A. A.; Kochanov, A. A.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Chupin, S. A.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Tomin, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we combine the multiwavelength ultraviolet-optical (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO) and radio (Nobeyama Radioheliograph, NoRH) observations to get further insight into space-frequency distribution of oscillations at different atmospheric levels of the Sun. We processed the observational data on NOAA 11711 active region and found oscillations propagating from the photospheric level through the transition region upward into the corona. The power maps of low-frequency (1-2 mHz) oscillations reproduce well the fan-like coronal structures visible in the Fe IX 171 Å line. High frequency oscillations (5-7 mHz) propagate along the vertical magnetic field lines and concentrate inside small-scale elements in the umbra and at the umbra-penumbra boundary. We investigated the dependence of the dominant oscillation frequency upon the distance from the sunspot barycentre to estimate inclination of magnetic tubes in higher levels of sunspots where it cannot be measured directly, and found that this angle is close to 40° above the umbra boundaries in the transition region.

  17. Two formation regions for Titan's hazes: indirect clues and possible synthesis mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefière, E.; Cabane, M.

    1995-02-01

    It is suggested that aerosol particles forming the detached and main haze layers of Titan's atmosphere do not originate in the same atmospheric levels. Particles present above ≈350 km could be formed of polyacetylenes synthetized in the 500-800 km altitude range through successive insertion reactions involving the C 2H radical under the action of solar ultraviolet photons (Yung et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl.55, 465, 1984). They might contain CN oligomers in comparable amounts, as well as CHN oligomers synthetized at high altitude (900-1000 km) by the action of suprathermal Saturn plasma electrons. Physically, they are expected to consist of fluffy aggregates of density ≈0.01-0.1 g cm -3. Their mass production rate is small (10 -15-10 -14 kg m -2 s -1), that is typically 10% or less of the main haze production rate. Due to their low fall velocity, they are very sensitive to large scale horizontal motions and one substantial part of them may be swept away by meridional circulation at the detached haze level. The altitude range where these aerosols are created is well above the range proposed by Cabane et al. ( Planet. Space Sci.41, 257, 1993) for aerosols of the main haze layer, on the basis of a new fractal microphysical modeling of Titan's aggregates, that is ≈ 350-400 km. A natural outcome of this apparent discrepancy is to suppose that there is a second formation region, below ≈400 km altitude, giving rise to the main haze layer. The aim of the present paper is to review the different possible formation mechanisms of this main haze layer and assess their ability to account for the observed characteristics of the haze Several conditions are established. The first one, called "condition A", concerns the formation altitude range imposed by fractal modeling. Possible chemical and energy sources are examined. Two additional constraints, relative to the minimum gas mass ("condition B") and input energy ("condition C") required for efficient conversion of

  18. Active Region Filaments Might Harbor Weak Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Baso, C. J.; Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric observations of active region filaments have revealed polarization profiles with signatures typical of the strong field Zeeman regime. The conspicuous absence in those observations of scattering polarization and Hanle effect signatures was then pointed out by some authors. This was interpreted as either a signature of mixed “turbulent” field components or as a result of optical thickness. In this article, we present a natural scenario to explain these Zeeman-only spectropolarimetric observations of active region (AR) filaments. We propose a two-component model, one on top of the other. Both components have horizontal fields, with the azimuth difference between them being close to 90°. The component that lies lower in the atmosphere is permeated by a strong field of the order of 600 G, while the upper component has much weaker fields, of the order of 10 G. The ensuing scattering polarization signatures of the individual components have opposite signs, so its combination along the line of sight reduces—and even can cancel out—the Hanle signatures, giving rise to an apparent Zeeman-only profile. This model is also applicable to other chromospheric structures seen in absorption above ARs.

  19. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  20. High power VCSEL device with periodic gain active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Y. Q., II; Qin, L.; Sun, Y. F.; Li, T.; Cui, J. J.; Peng, B.; Liu, G. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, L. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2007-11-01

    High power vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with large aperture have been fabricated through improving passivation, lateral oxidation and heat dissipation techniques. Different from conventional three quantum well structure, a periodic gain active region with nine quantum wells was incorporated into the VCSEL structure, with which high efficiency and high power operation were expected. The nine quantum wells were divided into three groups with each of them located at the antinodes of the cavity to enhance the coupling between the optical field and the gain region. Large aperture and bottom-emitting configuration was used to improve the beam quality and the heat dissipation. A maximum output power of 1.4W was demonstrated at CW operation for a 400μm-diameter device. The lasing wavelength shifted to 995.5nm with a FWHM of 2nm at a current of 4.8A due to the internal heating and the absence of active water cooling. A ring-shape farfield pattern was induced by the non-homogeneous lateral current distribution in large diameter device. The light intensity at the center of the ring increased with increasing current. A symmetric round light spot at the center and single transverse mode operation with a divergence angle of 16° were observed with current beyond 4.8A.

  1. Past storminess recorded in the internal architecture of coastal formations of Estonia in the NE Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõnisson, Hannes; Vilumaa, Kadri; Kont, Are; Sugita, Shinya; Rosentau, Alar; Muru, Merle; Anderson, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 50 years, storminess has increased in northern Europe because of the changes in cyclonic activity. The cyclone season in the Baltic Sea area has shifted from autumn to winter; this has led to intensification of shore processes (erosion, sediment transport and accumulation) and has increased pressure to the economy (land use, coastal protection measures) of the coastal regions in the Baltic states. Therefore, studing the effects of such changes on shore processes in the past is critical for prediction of the future changes along the Baltic coasts. Beach ridge plains are found worldwide, where cyclones and storm surges affect accumulation forms. These sandy shores are highly susceptible to erosion. Due to the isostatic uplift on the NE coast of the Baltic Sea, the signs of major past events are well-preserved in the internal architecture of old coastal formations (dune ridge-swale complexes). Wave-eroded scarps in beach deposits are visible in subsurface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) records, indicating the past high-energy events. Several study areas and transects were selected on the NW coast of Estonia, using high-resolution topographic maps (LiDAR). Shore-normal subsurface surveys have been conducted with a digital GSSI SIR-3000 georadar with a 270 MHz antenna at each transect. Interpretation of GPR facies was based on hand auger and window sampler coring, which provided accurate depths of key stratigraphic boundaries and bounding surfaces. Several samples for luminescence and 14C dating were collected to determine the approximate chronology of the coastal formations along the Estonian coast. We have found that changes in storminess, including the periods of high and low intensity of storms in late Holocene, are clearly reflected in the internal patterns of ancient coastal formations. The sections with small ridges with short seaward-dipped layers (interface between wave-built and aeolian deposits) in deeper horizons are probably formed during

  2. Instant Stereoscopic Tomography of Active Regions with STEREO/EUVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.; Wuelser, J.; Nitta, N.; Lemen, J.; Sandman, A.

    2008-12-01

    We develop a novel 3D reconstruction method of the coronal plasma of an active region by combining stereoscopic triangulation of loops with density and temperature modeling of coronal loops with a filling factor equivalent to tomographic volume rendering. Because this method requires only a stereoscopic image pair in multiple temperature filters, which are sampled within ~1 minute with the recent STEREO/EUVI instrument, this method is about 4 orders of magnitude faster than conventional solar rotation-based tomography. We reconstruct the 3D density and temperature distribution of active region NOAA 10955 by stereoscopic triangulation of 70 loops, which are used as a skeleton for a 3D field interpolation of some 7000 loop components, leading to a 3D model that reproduces the observed fluxes in each stereosocpic image pair with an accuracy of a few percent (of the average flux) in each pixel. With the stereoscopic tomography we infer also a differential emission measure (DEM) distribution over the entire temperature range of T~0.01-10 MK, with predictions for the transition region and hotter corona in soft X-rays. The tomographic 3D model provides also large statistics of physical parameters. We find that the EUV loops with apex temperatures of T = 1- 3 MK tend to be super-hydrostatic, while hotter loops with T = 4-7 MK are near-hydrostatic. The new 3D reconstruction model is fully independent of any magnetic field data and is promising for future tests of theoretical magnetic field models and coronal heating models.

  3. Photospheric electric current and transition region brightness within an active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, A. C.; Hagyard, M. J.; Rabin, D.; Moore, R. L.; Smith, B. J., Jr.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1984-01-01

    Distributions of vertical electrical current density J(z) calculated from vector measurements of the photospheric magnetic field are compared with ultraviolet spectroheliograms to investigate whether resistive heating is an important source of enhanced emission in the transition region. The photospheric magnetic fields in Active Region 2372 were measured on April 6 and 7, 1980 with the Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph; ultraviolet wavelength spectroheliograms (L-alpha and N V 1239 A) were obtained with the UV Spectrometer and Polarimeter experiment aboard the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Spatial registration of the J(z) (5 arcsec resolution) and UV (3 arcsec resolution) maps indicates that the maximum current density is cospatial with a minor but persistent UV enhancement, but there is little detected current associated with other nearby bright areas. It is concluded that, although resistive heating may be important in the transition region, the currents responsible for the heating are largely unresolved in the present measurements and have no simple correlation with the residual current measured on 5-arcsec scales.

  4. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  5. Nuclear activity versus star formation: emission-line diagnostics at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltre, A.; Charlot, S.; Gutkin, J.

    2016-03-01

    In the context of observations of the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical emission from distant galaxies, we explore the emission-line properties of photoionization models of active and inactive galaxies. Our aim is to identify new line-ratio diagnostics to discriminate between gas photoionization by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation. We use a standard photoionization code to compute the emission from AGN narrow-line regions and compare this with calculations of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies achieved using the same code. We confirm the appropriateness of widely used optical spectral diagnostics of nuclear activity versus star formation and explore new diagnostics at ultraviolet wavelengths. We find that combinations of a collisionally excited metal line or line multiplet, such as C IV λλ1548, 1551, O III] λλ1661, 1666, N III] λ1750, [Si III] λ1883+Si III] λ1892 and [C III] λ1907+C III] λ1909, with the He II λ1640 recombination line are individually good discriminants of the nature of the ionizing source. Diagrams involving at least three of these lines allow an even more stringent distinction between active and inactive galaxies, as well as valuable constraints on interstellar gas parameters and the shape of the ionizing radiation. Several line ratios involving Ne-based emission lines, such as [Ne IV] λ2424, [Ne III] λ3343 and [Ne V] λ3426, are also good diagnostics of nuclear activity. Our results provide a comprehensive framework to identify the sources of photoionization and physical conditions of the ionized gas from the ultraviolet and optical nebular emission from galaxies. This will be particularly useful to interpret observations of high-redshift galaxies with future facilities, such as the James Webb Space Telescope and extremely large ground-based telescopes.

  6. The Strength of an Ig Switch Region is Determined by its Ability to Drive R-loop Formation and its Number of WGCW Sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Z.; Pannunzio, Nicholas R.; Han, Li; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY R-loops exist at the murine IgH switch regions and possibly other locations, but their functional importance is unclear. In biochemical systems, R-loop initiation requires DNA sequence regions containing clusters of G nucleotides, but cellular studies have not been done. Here, we vary the G-clustering, total switch region length, and the number of target sites (WGCW sites for the activation-induced deaminase) at synthetic switch regions in a murine B cell line to determine the effect on class switch recombination (CSR). G-clusters increase CSR, regardless of their immediate proximity to the WGCW sites. This increase is accompanied by an increase in R-loop formation. CSR efficiency correlates better with the absolute number of WGCW sites in the switch region rather than the total switch region length or density of WGCW sites. Thus, the overall strength of the switch region depends on G-clusters, which initiate R-loop formation, and on the number of WGCW sites. PMID:25017067

  7. THE STAR FORMATION IN RADIO SURVEY: GBT 33 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF NEARBY GALAXY NUCLEI AND EXTRANUCLEAR STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E. J.; Bremseth, J.; Mason, B. S.; Condon, J. J.; Schinnerer, E.; Aniano, G.; Armus, L.; Helou, G.; Turner, J. L.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2012-12-20

    We present 33 GHz photometry of 103 galaxy nuclei and extranuclear star-forming complexes taken with the Green Bank Telescope as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. Among the sources without evidence for an active galactic nucleus, and also having lower frequency radio data, we find a median thermal fraction at 33 GHz of Almost-Equal-To 76% with a dispersion of Almost-Equal-To 24%. For all sources resolved on scales {approx}<0.5 kpc, the thermal fraction is even larger, being {approx}>90%. This suggests that the rest-frame 33 GHz emission provides a sensitive measure of the ionizing photon rate from young star-forming regions, thus making it a robust star formation rate (SFR) indicator. Taking the 33 GHz SFRs as a reference, we investigate other empirical calibrations relying on different combinations of warm 24 {mu}m dust, total infrared (IR; 8-1000 {mu}m), H{alpha} line, and far-UV continuum emission. The recipes derived here generally agree with others found in the literature, albeit with a large dispersion that most likely stems from a combination of effects. Comparing the 33 GHz to total IR flux ratios as a function of the radio spectral index, measured between 1.7 and 33 GHz, we find that the ratio increases as the radio spectral index flattens which does not appear to be a distance effect. Consequently, the ratio of non-thermal to total IR emission appears relatively constant, suggesting only moderate variations in the cosmic-ray electron injection spectrum and ratio of synchrotron to total cooling processes among star-forming complexes. Assuming that this trend solely arises from an increase in the thermal fraction sets a maximum on the scatter of the non-thermal spectral indices among the star-forming regions of {sigma}{sub {alpha}{sup N}{sup T}}{approx}<0.13.

  8. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  9. 2D-Spectroscopy of Two SBS Galaxies with Star Formation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, Susanna

    2007-08-01

    About 500 SBS-galaxies in the selected fields were classified using a scheme, adapted to slit spectroscopic data obtained for them. Continuing the investigation of these objects as the members of subclasses of objects with nuclear and starforming activity, we are using 2D - spectroscopy, allowing to extend in understanding of the details of morphology, dynamic and kinematic processes and physical nature, by which the differences and similarities in subclasses are caused. This work presents a detailed study of two starforming galaxies in different stages of activity, both consisting of HII-regions, SBS 1202+583 and SBS 1533+574. Observations have been carried out with multipupil spectrographs VAGR at 2.6m and MPFS at 6m telescopes.

  10. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  11. The Mechanism of Fibril Formation of a Non-inhibitory Serpin Ovalbumin Revealed by the Identification of Amyloidogenic Core Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Naoki; Morimoto, Yumi; Noguchi, Yurika; Tada, Tomoko; Waku, Tomonori; Kunugi, Shigeru; Morii, Takashi; Lee, Yin-Fai; Konno, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Ovalbumin (OVA), a non-inhibitory member of the serpin superfamily, forms fibrillar aggregates upon heat-induced denaturation. Recent studies suggested that OVA fibrils are generated by a mechanism similar to that of amyloid fibril formation, which is distinct from polymerization mechanisms proposed for other serpins. In this study, we provide new insights into the mechanism of OVA fibril formation through identification of amyloidogenic core regions using synthetic peptide fragments, site-directed mutagenesis, and limited proteolysis. OVA possesses a single disulfide bond between Cys73 and Cys120 in the N-terminal helical region of the protein. Heat treatment of disulfide-reduced OVA resulted in the formation of long straight fibrils that are distinct from the semiflexible fibrils formed from OVA with an intact disulfide. Computer predictions suggest that helix B (hB) of the N-terminal region, strand 3A, and strands 4–5B are highly β-aggregation-prone regions. These predictions were confirmed by the fact that synthetic peptides corresponding to these regions formed amyloid fibrils. Site-directed mutagenesis of OVA indicated that V41A substitution in hB interfered with the formation of fibrils. Co-incubation of a soluble peptide fragment of hB with the disulfide-intact full-length OVA consistently promoted formation of long straight fibrils. In addition, the N-terminal helical region of the heat-induced fibril of OVA was protected from limited proteolysis. These results indicate that the heat-induced fibril formation of OVA occurs by a mechanism involving transformation of the N-terminal helical region of the protein to β-strands, thereby forming sequential intermolecular linkages. PMID:21156792

  12. STAR FORMATION IN RELIC H II REGIONS OF THE FIRST STARS: BINARITY AND OUTFLOW DRIVING

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: machiam@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.j

    2009-11-01

    Star formation in relic H II regions of the first stars is investigated using magnetohydrodynamical simulations with a nested-grid method that covers approx10 orders of magnitude in spatial scale and approx20 orders of magnitude in density contrast. Due to larger fraction of H{sub 2} and HD molecules, its prestellar thermal evolution is considerably different from that in the first star formation. Reflecting the difference, two hydrostatic cores appear in a nested manner: a protostar is enclosed by a transient hydrostatic core, which appears during the prestellar collapse. If the initial natal core rotates fast at a rate with rotational to gravitational energy ratio beta{sub 0} approx> 0.01-0.1, the transient hydrostatic core fragments to approx10 M {sub sun} subcores at density approx10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. With smaller rotation energy, fragmentation occurs at higher density while a single protostar forms without fragmentation if rotation is extremely slow with beta{sub 0} approx< 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -5}. If magnetic field is present, these threshold values of beta{sub 0} are boosted owing to angular momentum transport by the magnetic breaking. Magnetic field also drives the protostellar outflows. With strong magnetic field, two distinct outflows are observed: the slower one emanates from the transient hydrostatic core, while the faster one from the protostar. These flows may affect the final stellar mass by ejecting some of masses in the initial core, and also may play some role in driving and maintenance of interstellar turbulence in young galaxies.

  13. A detailed study of the L1641N star formation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gâlfalk, M.; Olofsson, G.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We search for young stellar objects (YSOs) in the L1641N cluster and characterize the star formation activity through determination of the age distribution, mass function, spatial distribution, and the star formation history. Methods: Multi-wavelength broad band photometry both from space and the ground are used to look for IR excess in order to separate field stars from YSOs and to sample the spectral energy distributions. Space-based observations were obtained using the ISO satellite (ISOCAM) in two filters, centred at 6.7 and 14.3 μm, and Spitzer (IRAC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm. Our ground-based observations were made with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) using ALFOSC (I band), NOTCam (J, KS and 2.12 μm H2), and SIRCA (L'). More than 50 of the brightest I-band sources were then studied with follow-up optical spectroscopy (5780-8340 Å) to check for signs of accretion (Hα in emission) and youth (Li I λ6707 in absorption) and to determine their effective temperatures. By comparing theoretical evolution tracks with our YSO sample in the H-R diagram, we calculated an age, luminosity, and mass distribution. Results: We detect a total of 216 (Spitzer or I band) sources in L1641N, 89 of which are YSO candidates. Most of the spectra are of M-type with Hα strongly in emission, and many have Li 6707 in absorption. The four brightest I band sources (F and G stars) are suggested as foreground stars, and the L1641N IRAS source is shown to be the combined flux of at least four sources. We find that the interstellar extinction is well-fit in the optical and near-IR by a power law with an exponent of 1.58, although in the mid-IR the Spitzer observations show a higher extinction than expected from theory. The median age of the YSO sample is ~1 Myr and the resulting MF has a flat distribution for low masses down to the completeness limit. There is evidence of a constant star formation rate of one star in 3.7 × 104 yr during the past few Myr. We find 11 sources

  14. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  15. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  16. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  17. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  18. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  19. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  20. On the formation of new ignition kernels in the chemically active dispersed mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    The specific features of the combustion waves propagating through the channels filled with chemically active gaseous mixture and non-uniformly suspended micro particles are studied numerically. It is shown that the heat radiated by the hot products, absorbed by the micro particles and then transferred to the environmental fresh mixture can be the source of new ignition kernels in the regions of particles' clusters. Herewith the spatial distribution of the particles determines the features of combustion regimes arising in these kernels. One can highlight the multi-kernel ignition in the polydisperse mixtures and ignition of the combustion regimes with shocks and detonation formation in the mixtures with pronounced gradients of microparticles concentration.

  1. Irradiated interfaces in the Ara OB1, Carina, Eagle Nebula, and Cyg OB2 massive star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Palmer, J.; Cleeves, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Regions of massive star formation offer some of the best and most easily-observed examples of radiation hydrodynamics. Boundaries where fully-ionized H II regions transition to neutral/molecular photodissociation regions (PDRs) are of particular interest because marked temperature and density contrasts across the boundaries lead to evaporative flows and fluid dynamical instabilities that can evolve into spectacular pillar-like structures. When detached from their parent clouds, pillars become ionized globules that often harbor one or more young stars. H2 molecules at the interface between a PDR and an H II region absorb ultraviolet light from massive stars, and the resulting fluoresced infrared emission lines are an ideal way to trace this boundary independent of obscuring dust. This paper presents H2 images of four regions of massive star formation that illustrate different types of PDR boundaries. The Ara OB1 star formation region contains a striking long wall that has several wavy structures which are present in H2, but the emission is not particularly bright because the ambient UV fluxes are relatively low. In contrast, the Carina star formation region shows strong H2 fluorescence both along curved walls and at the edges of spectacular pillars that in some cases have become detached from their parent clouds. The less-spectacular but more well-known Eagle Nebula has two regions that have strong fluorescence in addition to its pillars. While somewhat older than the other regions, Cyg OB2 has the highest number of massive stars of the regions surveyed and contains many isolated, fluoresced globules that have head-tail morphologies which point towards the sources of ionizing radiation. These images provide a collection of potential astrophysical analogs that may relate to ablated interfaces observed in laser experiments of radiation hydrodynamics.

  2. Dynamics mechanism on fault basin formation in the Lower Yangtze region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Wang, W.; Xu, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is one of the critical issues of the rift basin to study the specific dynamical mechanism of the basin formulation in the Lower Yangtze Region. There still exist controversies on the genetical mechanism, although some previous studies have revealed various formulation models, such as rift basin model related to the Pacific subduction, continental rift basin model, transtensional basin model related to the dextral slip of TanLu fault, simple shear inherited thin skin basin model, basin mode related to extension and detachment of basement, pull-apart basin model related to Mekenzie(1978) pure shear. Among these various tectonic models, the dynamics of formation of fault basin in the Lower Yangtze block is not yet fully understood. Our purpose is to explain comprehensively the formation of the fault basin by an integrated approach, drawing conclusions from our geological field investigation, seismic interpretation and literatures and using the numerical modeling. By contributing a two-dimensional finite element model of the Lower Yangtze block and its environs in the Paleogene, we are able to estimate the surface velocity, stress field and strain rate field of model. The results reveal that there is the nearly southwestward movement of the northeast part of block in an equilibrium of the nearly NEE-SWW trending displacement field with the reference velocity of 100 mm/a, and crustal plastic flow from north to south in internal model, dragging the upper crust to produce nearly N-S striking tension. Displacement and deformation, associated with current seismologic correlation analysis, can be extended to the depth of at least 30KM. Consequently, The deformation of the Lower Yangtze block and its environs is not influenced by the dextral movement of Tan-Lu fault, but the regional extension and strain in the Subei-Southern South Yellow Sea area which has the extensional stress filed in the upper crust. The observations of modeling and evidence from our data and the

  3. Comparison of Solar Active Region Complexity Andgeomagnetic Activity from 1996 TO 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Nikbakhsh, S.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Hackman, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the influence of magnetic complexity of solar Active Regions (ARs)on geomagnetic activity from 1996 to 2014. Sunspots are visual indicators of ARswhere the solar magnetic field is disturbed. We have used International, American,Space Environment Service Center (SESC) and Space Weather Prediction Center(SWPC) sunspot numbers to examine ARs. Major manifestations of solar magneticactivity, such as flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), are associated withARs. For this study we chose the Mount Wilson scheme. It classifies ARs in terms oftheir magnetic topology from the least complex (?) to the most complex one ( ?).Several cases have been found where the more complex structures produce strongerflares and CMEs than the less complex ones. We have a list of identified substormsavailable with different phases and their durations. This will be compared to ourmagnetic complexity data to analyse the effects of active region magnetic complexityto the magnetic activity on the vicinity of the Earth.

  4. Accelerated gravity testing of aquitard core permeability and implications at formation and regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Crane, R.; Anderson, D. J.; Bouzalakos, S.; Whelan, M.; McGeeney, D.; Rahman, P. F.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the possibility of leakage through low-permeability geological strata is critically important for sustainable water supplies, the extraction of fuels from coal and other strata, and the confinement of waste within the earth. The current work demonstrates that relatively rapid and realistic vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) measurements of aquitard cores using accelerated gravity can constrain and compliment larger-scale assessments of hydraulic connectivity. Steady-state fluid velocity through a low-K porous sample is linearly related to accelerated gravity (g level) in a centrifuge permeameter (CP) unless consolidation or geochemical reactions occur. A CP module was custom designed to fit a standard 2 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge (550 g maximum) with a capacity for sample dimensions up to 100 mm diameter and 200 mm length, and a total stress of ˜ 2 MPa at the base of the core. Formation fluids were used as influent to limit any shrink-swell phenomena, which may alter the permeability. Kv results from CP testing of minimally disturbed cores from three sites within a clayey-silt formation varied from 10-10 to 10-7 m s-1 (number of samples, n = 18). Additional tests were focussed on the Cattle Lane (CL) site, where Kv within the 99 % confidence interval (n = 9) was 1.1 × 10-9 to 2.0 × 10-9 m s-1. These Kv results were very similar to an independent in situ Kv method based on pore pressure propagation though the sequence. However, there was less certainty at two other core sites due to limited and variable Kv data. Blind standard 1 g column tests underestimated Kv compared to CP and in situ Kv data, possibly due to deionised water interactions with clay, and were more time-consuming than CP tests. Our Kv results were compared with the set-up of a flow model for the region, and considered in the context of heterogeneity and preferential flow paths at site and

  5. New results of studying of the Devonian shale formation in the Volga-Ural region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Pronin, Nikita; Morozov, Vladimir; Nosova, Fidania

    2015-04-01

    The objects of the study are Upper Devonian carbonate rocks in the territory of South-Tatar arch and Melekess basin in the Volga- Urals region. We studied core material and organic matter of Domanicoid facies from the sediments of Semilukskiy and Rechitskiy (Domanik) horizons of the Upper Devonian. Basic analytical research methods included the following: study of the composition, structural and textural features of the rocks, the structure of their voids, filter and reservoir properties and composition of the fluid. The complex research consisted of macroscopic description of the core material, optical microscopy analysis, radiographical analysis, thermal analysis, x-ray tomography, electron microscopy, gas-liquid chromatography, chromate-mass spectrometry, isotopic analysis of oil and organic matter, light hydrocarbons analysis using paraphase assay, adsorbed gases analysis, and thermal vacuum degassing method. In addition, we performed isotopic studies of hydrocarbons saturating shale rocks. The study of biomarkers was carried out with the help of chromato-mass spectrometry in the Laboratory of Geochemistry of Fossil Fuels, Kazan Federal University. GC/MS method was used in oil to investigate the individual composition of naphthenic hydrocarbons, primarily steranes and terpanes and another new biological markers. In this study we used several informative parameters characterizing the depositional environment, the type of source OM and its maturity. In the evaluation of the facial conditions of sedimentation and the degree of catagenetic conversion of the OM, the quantitative characteristics based not only on the distribution of steranes and terpanes, which are related to the lithology and maturity of the OM.New biomarkers parameters (carotenoids) were used to study the conditions of formation of shale strata. Based on these new data, a new model of geological and environmental conditions for the formation of shale strata saturated bituminous matter (organic

  6. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2006 – JULY 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities, Federal Agencies, and other audiences outs...

  7. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Dallner, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelength operation.

  8. Active region studies with coordinated SOHO, microwave, and magnetograph observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific justification for an observing campaign to study the quantitative magnetic and plasma properties of coronal loops in active regions is presented. The SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) instruments of primary relevance are CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer), EIT, SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation), and MDI. The primary ground based instruments would be the VLA (Very Large Array), the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, and vector and longitudinal field magnetographs. Similar campaigns have successfully been carried out with the Solar Maximum Mission x-ray polychromator and the Soft X-ray Imaging Sounding Rocket Payload (CoMStOC '87), the Goddard Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph, the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment rocket payload, and the Soft X-ray Telescope in Yohkoh (CoMStoc '92). The scientific payoff from such a campaign is discussed in light of the results from these previous campaigns.

  9. Hedgehog induces formation of PKA-Smoothened complexes to promote Smoothened phosphorylation and pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted glycoprotein that binds its receptor Patched to activate the G protein-coupled receptor-like protein Smoothened (Smo). In Drosophila, protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates and activates Smo in cells stimulated with Hh. In unstimulated cells, PKA phosphorylates and inhibits the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci). Here, we found that in cells exposed to Hh, the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) bound to the juxtamembrane region of the C terminus of Smo. PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo further enhanced its association with PKAc to form stable kinase-substrate complexes that promoted the PKA-mediated trans-phosphorylation of Smo dimers. We identified multiple basic residues in the C-terminus of Smo that were required for interaction with PKAc, Smo phosphorylation, and Hh pathway activation. Hh induced a switch from the association of PKAc with a cytosolic complex of Ci and the kinesin-like protein Costal2 (Cos2) to a membrane-bound Smo-Cos2 complex. Thus, our study uncovers a previously uncharacterized mechanism for regulation of PKA activity and demonstrates that the signal-regulated formation of kinase-substrate complexes plays a central role in Hh signal transduction. PMID:24985345

  10. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  11. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  12. A multi-method analysis of cyclone activity in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Isabel F.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Nissen, Katrin; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Lionello, Piero; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Ulbrich, Sven; Ulbrich, Uwe; Ordóñez, Paulina

    2013-04-01

    The Mediterranean Basin is a particularly active region in terms of cyclone formation and development. The geographical features of the area, including its location between the mid-latitudes and the sub-tropics, the almost closed sea and the mountain ranges near the coast play an important role determining the dominant meteorological characteristics of the region. This study revisits monthly climatologies of Mediterranean storms through the analysis of databases obtained from multiple methods for cyclone identification and tracking. Within the context of the IMILAST project, these methodologies were all applied to fields provided by ERA-Int reanalysis, available 6-hourly and at 0.75° x 0.75° spatial resolution. They consist of a set of objective criteria to identify cyclone signatures near the surface, through the search for minima in mean sea level pressure or 1000 hPa geopotential height, or for vorticity maxima at 850 hPa. The tracking is then performed through the analysis of centres identified in consecutive time slots and imposing a set of a priory conditions on the maximum velocity admissible for mid-latitude cyclones. The distributions of cyclone characteristics obtained from the different databases are analysed focusing on system duration, intensity and velocity. The spatial distributions and density of cyclone centres are also compared among the different storm-track databases, with particular emphasis on the location of the most active regions in terms of cyclogenesis. These are generally well defined in the Mediterranean region, being mostly determined by orographic features mentioned above and land-sea temperature gradients. As such, methodologies tend to agree in the areas that favour cyclone formation, particularly during winter months, while discrepancies among methods tend to be mostly related to number of detections. Finally, we make a critical analysis of some of the options/criteria within each methodology that favour or not the identification

  13. CIRCUMSTELLAR STRUCTURE AROUND EVOLVED STARS IN THE CYGNUS-X STAR FORMATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Price, Stephan D.

    2010-06-15

    We present observations of newly discovered 24 {mu}m circumstellar structures detected with MIPS around three evolved stars in the Cygnus-X star-forming region. One of the objects, BD+43 3710, has a bipolar nebula, possibly due to an outflow or a torus of material. A second, HBHA 4202-22, a Wolf-Rayet candidate, shows a circular shell of 24 {mu}m emission suggestive of either a limb-brightened shell or disk seen face-on. No diffuse emission was detected around either of these two objects in the Spitzer 3.6-8 {mu}m IRAC bands. The third object is the luminous blue variable candidate G79.29+0.46. We resolved the previously known inner ring in all four IRAC bands. The 24 {mu}m emission from the inner ring extends {approx}1.'2 beyond the shorter wavelength emission, well beyond what can be attributed to the difference in resolutions between MIPS and IRAC. Additionally, we have discovered an outer ring of 24 {mu}m emission, possibly due to an earlier episode of mass loss. For the two shell stars, we present the results of radiative transfer models, constraining the stellar and dust shell parameters. The shells are composed of amorphous carbon grains, plus polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the case of G79.29+0.46. Both G79.29+0.46 and HBHA 4202-22 lie behind the main Cygnus-X cloud. Although G79.29+0.46 simply may be on the far side of the cloud, HBHA 4202-22 is unrelated to the Cygnus-X star formation region.

  14. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  15. Terrace Formation in the Upper Headwater Region of the Mattole River Watershed Across the Mendocino Triple Junction, Northwest California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M.; Flanagan, S., II; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mattole River, in northwestern California, is located in a tectonically active and geologically complex area, the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), where the North American, Pacific and Gorda plates meet. The Mattole River does not follow the classic river "concave-up" profile. Instead, the river headwaters have wide valleys of low gradient fill, cut and strath terraces with deeply incised active channels. In fact, the river has a "convex-up" profile with a low gradient headwater leading to a higher gradient midcourse. Terrace formation in the upper headwater region of the Mattole River records times of disequilibrium of channel profile and incision as the river responds to changes that are, in large part, due to the passage of the northwardly migrating, thermally buoyant MTJ. In order to investigate the distribution and relative ages of terraces, detailed surveys of terrace surfaces and bedrock strath positions were conducted along four headwater tributaries: Thompson Creek, Baker Creek, Lost River and Ancestor Creek. Additionally, across the terraces, hand borings were excavated to bedrock to provide a three dimensional image of terrace thickness. Terrace morphology and stratigraphy provide information on terrace forming mechanisms and timing. This study includes high-resolution geomorphic data regarding the relation of Mattole headwater terraces to the MTJ, as well as provides more temporal information about the fluvial system's response to the ongoing northward migration of the MTJ.

  16. Effect of phosphate activating group on oligonucleotide formation on montmorillonite: the regioselective formation of 3',5'-linked oligoadenylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabahar, K. J.; Cole, T. D.; Ferris, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of amine structure on the montmorillonite-catalyzed oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoramidates of adenosine are investigated. 4-Aminopyridine derivatives yielded oligoadenylates as long as dodecamers with a regioselectivity for 3',5'-phosphodiester bond formation averaging 88%. Linear and cyclic oligomers are obtained and no A5'ppA-containing products are detected. Oligomers as long as the hexanucleotide are obtained using 2-aminobenzimidazole as the activating group. A predominance of pA2'pA is detected in the dimer fraction along with cyclic 3',5'-trimer; no A5'ppA-containing oligomers were detected. Little or no oligomer formation was observed when morpholine, piperidine, pyrazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and 2-pyridone are used as phosphate-activating groups. The effects of the structure of the phosphate activating group on the oligomer structure and chain lengths are discussed.

  17. Mineral ecophysiological evidence for microbial activity in banded iron formation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Yi-Liang; Konhauser, Dr, Kurt; Cole, David R; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor.

  18. Enhancement effect of relative humidity on the formation and regional respiratory deposition of secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuo-Pin; Lin, Chi-Chi; Yang, Shang-Chun; Zhao, Ping

    2011-07-15

    In this study, we investigated the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the ozonolysis of d-limonene in an environmental chamber. The mass yield and the number concentration of SOA increased seven and eight times, respectively, when the RH increased from 18% to 82%. The measured total loss rates (apparent loss rates) of the number and mass concentration of SOA in the chamber ranged from 1.70 to 1.77 h(-1) and from 2.51 to 2.61 h(-1), respectively, at a controlled ventilation rate of 0.72±0.04 h(-1). The wall-deposition-loss-rate coefficient observed (1.00±0.02 h(-1)) was approximate to the estimated value based on Zhao and Wu's model which includes the factors of turbulence, Brownian diffusion, turbophoresis and surface roughness. According to the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) model, the inhaled SOA particles are deposited primarily in the alveoli of the lung. The integrated alveolar deposited dose of the mass (surface area) of SOA over 3h accounted for 74.0-74.8% (74.3-74.9%) of the total deposited dose at the investigated RH. Raising the RH resulted in the growth of SOA particle sizes and increment of the deposition dose but did not cause significant changes in the ratio of regional to the total respiratory deposition of SOA. PMID:21570180

  19. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AROUND MID-INFRARED BUBBLES IN THE G8.14+0.23 H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chakraborti, S.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2012-09-10

    Mid-infrared shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material along the bubbles and the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) velocity map reveals that the molecular gas in the bubbles is physically associated around the G8.14+0.23 region. We have detected 244 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region and about 37% of these YSOs occur in clusters. Interestingly, these YSO clusters are associated with the collected material on the edges of the bubbles. We have found good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the kinematical timescale of bubbles (from the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) line data) with the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain possible 'collect and collapse' process around the G8.14+0.23 region. However, one cannot entirely rule out the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave. We have also found two massive embedded YSOs (about 10 and 22 M{sub Sun }) which are associated with the dense fragmented clump at the interface of the bubbles. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these two young massive embedded YSOs in the G8.14+0.23 region.

  20. Cores, filaments, and bundles: hierarchical core formation in the L1495/B213 Taurus region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacar, A.; Tafalla, M.; Kauffmann, J.; Kovács, A.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Core condensation is a critical step in the star-formation process, but it is still poorly characterized observationally. Aims: We have studied the 10 pc-long L1495/B213 complex in Taurus to investigate how dense cores have condensed out of the lower density cloud material. Methods: We observed L1495/B213 in C18O(1-0), N2H+(1-0), and SO(JN = 32-21) with the 14 m FCRAO telescope, and complemented the data with dust continuum observations using APEX (870 μm) and IRAM 30 m (1200 μm). Results: From the N2H+ emission, we identify 19 dense cores, some starless and some protostellar. They are not distributed uniformly, but tend to cluster with relative separations on the order of 0.25 pc. From the C18O emission, we identify multiple velocity components in the gas. We have characterized them by fitting Gaussians to the spectra and by studying the distribution of the fits in position-position-velocity space. In this space, the C18O components appear as velocity-coherent structures, and we identify them automatically using a dedicated algorithm (FIVE: Friends In VElocity). Using this algorithm, we identify 35 filamentary components with typical lengths of 0.5 pc, sonic internal velocity dispersions, and mass-per-unit length close to the stability threshold of isothermal cylinders at 10 K. Core formation seems to have occurred inside the filamentary components via fragmentation, with few fertile components with higher mass-per-unit length being responsible for most cores in the cloud. On large scales, the filamentary components appear grouped into families, which we refer to as bundles. Conclusions: Core formation in L1495/B213 has proceeded by hierarchical fragmentation. The cloud fragmented first into several pc-scale regions. Each of these regions later fragmented into velocity-coherent filaments of about 0.5 pc in length. Finally, a small number of these filaments fragmented quasi-statically and produced the individual dense cores we see today. Based on

  1. Massive Star Formation of the SGR a East H (sub II) Regions Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km/s molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of approximately 6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 micron) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa alpha, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 =/- 3 solar mass star with a luminosity of 8 +/- 3 x 10(exp 4) Solar luminosity . The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3x (exp 4) years giving a mass flux approximately 3 x 10(exp -5) Solar Mass / year and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  2. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION OF THE SGR A EAST H II REGIONS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-12-20

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of {approx}6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 {mu}m) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa{alpha}, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 {+-} 3 M{sub sun} star with a luminosity of 8 {+-} 3 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}. The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3 x 10{sup 4} years giving a mass flux {approx}3 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  3. Long-Period ULF Wave Activity in the Cusp Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    We compare simultaneous observations of long-period ULF wave activity from the Svalbard/IMAGE and Greenland fluxgate magnetometer profiles covering the expected cusp geomagnetic latitudes. Irregular Pulsations at Cusp Latitudes (IPCL) and narrow-band Pc5 waves are found to be a ubiquitous element of ULF activity in the dayside high-latitude region. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of the return signal of the SuperDARN radar covering the Svalbard archipelago, predictions of empirical cusp models, and augmented whenever possible by DMSP identification of magnetospheric boundary domains. The meridional spatial structure of IPCL/Pc5 pulsation spectral power has been found to have a localized latitudinal peak, but not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. Possible mechanisms and their relevance to observational data are discussed. The occurrence of IPCL and Pc5 waves in the dayside boundary layers is a challenge to modelers, because so far their mechanism has not been firmly identified.

  4. Neuronal activity is not required for the initial formation and maturation of visual selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kenta M; Murakami, Tomonari; Yoshida, Takashi; Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Ohki, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Neuronal activity is important for the functional refinement of neuronal circuits in the early visual system. At the level of the cerebral cortex, however, it is still unknown whether the formation of fundamental functions such as orientation selectivity depends on neuronal activity, as it has been difficult to suppress activity throughout development. Using genetic silencing of cortical activity starting before the formation of orientation selectivity, we found that the orientation selectivity of neurons in the mouse visual cortex formed and matured normally despite a strong suppression of both spontaneous and visually evoked activity throughout development. After the orientation selectivity formed, the distribution of the preferred orientations of neurons was reorganized. We found that this process required spontaneous activity, but not visually evoked activity. Thus, the initial formation and maturation of orientation selectivity is largely independent of neuronal activity, and the initial selectivity is subsequently modified depending on neuronal activity. PMID:26523644

  5. Reengineering Activities in K-8 Classrooms: Focus on Formative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Patrick N.

    2006-01-01

    Almost every K-8 technology activity includes feedback. Technology teachers generally view the input-process-output paradigm as being incomplete. A step toward completion would be the inclusion of a "feedback" component incorporating reengineering. This article provides an example of how one activity evolved through several stages to include…

  6. Regional Triggering of Volcanic Activity Following Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Butler, Charley; Blackett, Matthew; Wright, Robert

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous reports of a spatial and temporal link between volcanic activity and high magnitude seismic events. In fact, since 1950, all large magnitude earthquakes have been followed by volcanic eruptions in the following year - 1952 Kamchatka M9.2, 1960 Chile M9.5, 1964 Alaska M9.2, 2004 & 2005 Sumatra-Andaman M9.3 & M8.7 and 2011 Japan M9.0. While at a global scale, 56% of all large earthquakes (M≥8.0) in the 21st century were followed by increases in thermal activity. The most significant change in volcanic activity occurred between December 2004 and April 2005 following the M9.1 December 2004 earthquake after which new eruptions were detected at 10 volcanoes and global volcanic flux doubled over 52 days (Hill-Butler et al. 2014). The ability to determine a volcano's activity or 'response', however, has resulted in a number of disparities with <50% of all volcanoes being monitored by ground-based instruments. The advent of satellite remote sensing for volcanology has, therefore, provided researchers with an opportunity to quantify the timing, magnitude and character of volcanic events. Using data acquired from the MODVOLC algorithm, this research examines a globally comparable database of satellite-derived radiant flux alongside USGS NEIC data to identify changes in volcanic activity following an earthquake, February 2000 - December 2012. Using an estimate of background temperature obtained from the MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product (Wright et al. 2014), thermal radiance was converted to radiant flux following the method of Kaufman et al. (1998). The resulting heat flux inventory was then compared to all seismic events (M≥6.0) within 1000 km of each volcano to evaluate if changes in volcanic heat flux correlate with regional earthquakes. This presentation will first identify relationships at the temporal and spatial scale, more complex relationships obtained by machine learning algorithms will then be examined to establish favourable

  7. The Pliocene Yafo Formation in Israel: Hydrogeologically inert or active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avisar, D.; Rosenthal, E.; Shulman, H.; Zilberbrand, M.; Flexer, A.; Kronfeld, J.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Fleischer, L.

    For several decades the ``Saqiye beds'' (later renamed Yafo Formation) underlying the Coastal Plain aquifer (Kurkar Group) aquifer of Israel, were regarded as an extremely thick, tectonically undisturbed, and absolutely impervious aquiclude. Following intensive groundwater exploitation from the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer, brackish and saline waters were locally encountered in the lower parts of this aquifer and always at the contact with the underlying Yafo Formation aquiclude. The present study revealed that this aquiclude is not a uniform and impervious rock unit, but rather an alternation of pervious and impervious strata within the Yafo Formation containing highly pressured fluids of different - mostly high - salinities. The permeable beds are at an angular unconformity and in direct contact with the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer. The Yafo Formation and the underlying and overlying rock units are dislocated by numerous fault systems, which facilitate accessibility of brines into the Kurkar Group aquifer. The mobilization of the saline fluids and their injection into the Kurkar Group aquifer could be due either to diffusion of saline fluids occurring in the permeable horizons of the Petah Tiqva Member through the clays of the Yafo Formation or to their upconing following intensive pumping in the Coastal Plain aquifer. It could have also been caused by up-dip movement of saline water as the result of overpressure generated by major accumulation of gas in the permeable horizons. Another possible mechanism could be hydraulic contact with pressurized brines up-flowing along fault zones from deep-seated Jurassic or Cretaceous reservoirs. The squeezing of saline interstitial water from the clays of the Yafo Formation into the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer, is of secondary importance for groundwater salinization (its input is comparable with salt input from rain). Depuis longtemps, les «couches de Saqiye», nommées maintenant formation de Yafo, constituant le

  8. 77 FR 24952 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... ICR (August 26, 2009; 74 FR 43118). The last collection request anticipated the program progressing... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Regional Haze... organizations and facilities potentially regulated under the regional haze rule. Title: Regional...

  9. Thermodynamic calculation and interatomic potential to predict the favored composition region for the Cu-Zr-Al metallic glass formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y Y; Wang, T L; Li, J H; Dai, Y; Liu, B X

    2011-03-01

    For the Cu-Zr-Al system, the glass forming compositions were firstly calculated based on the extended Miedema's model, suggesting that the amorphous phase could be thermodynamically favored over a large composition region. An n-body potential was then constructed under the smoothed and long-range second-moment-approximation of tight-binding formulism. Applying the constructed Cu-Zr-Al potential, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted using solid solution models to compare relative stability of crystalline solid solution versus its disordered counterpart. Simulations reveal that the physical origin of metallic glass formation is crystalline lattice collapsing while solute concentration exceeding the critical value, thus predicting a hexagonal composition region, within which the Cu-Zr-Al ternary metallic glass formation is energetically favored. The molecular dynamics simulations predicted composition region is defined as the quantitative glass-forming-ability or glass-forming-region of the Cu-Zr-Al system. PMID:21229150

  10. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. III - NOAA active region 6233 (1990 August)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Canfield, Richard C.; Leka, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between vertical electric currents and flare phenomena in NOAA Active Region 6233, which was observed 1990, August 28-31 at Mees Solar Observatory. The two flares studied are the 1N/M1.8 flare on August 28, 22:30 UT and the 1N/M1.6 flare on August 29, 20:35 UT. Using Stokes polarimetry we make magnetograms of the region and compute the vertical current density. Using H-alpha imaging spectroscopy we identify sites of intense nonthermal electron precipitation or of high coronal pressure. The precipitation in these flares is barely strong enough to be detectable. We find that both precipitation and high pressure tend to occur near vertical currents, but that neither phenomenon is cospatial with current maxima. In contrast with the conclusion of other authors, we argue that these observations do not support a current-interruption model for flares, unless the relevant currents are primarily horizontal. The magnetic morphology and temporal evolution of these flares suggest that an erupting filament model may be relevant, but this model does not explicitly predict the relationship between precipitation, high pressure, and vertical currents.

  11. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns. PMID:26722949

  12. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  13. Large Solar Energetic Particle Events Associated With Filament Eruptions Outside Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Thakur, N.; Kahler, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded mostly to C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds approx. 1000 km/s) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range, indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2-3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency, indicating a shock formation height of approx.2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index >4) in the 10-100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectral indices ?4. Some of these events are likely FE-SEP events, but were not classified as such in the literature because they occurred close to active regions. Some were definitely associated with large active region flares, but the shock formation height was large. We definitely find a diminished role for flares and complex type III burst durations in these large SEP events. Fast CMEs and shock formation at larger distances from the Sun seem to be the primary characteristics of the FE-associated SEP events.

  14. Large Solar Energetic Particle Events Associated with Filament Eruptions Outside of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Mäkelä, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Thakur, N.; Kahler, S. W.

    2015-06-01

    We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded mostly to C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds ˜ 1000 km s-1) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range, indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2-3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency, indicating a shock formation height of ˜2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index >4) in the 10-100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectral indices ≥4. Some of these events are likely FE-SEP events, but were not classified as such in the literature because they occurred close to active regions. Some were definitely associated with large active region flares, but the shock formation height was large. We definitely find a diminished role for flares and complex type III burst durations in these large SEP events. Fast CMEs and shock formation at larger distances from the Sun seem to be the primary characteristics of the FE-associated SEP events.

  15. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 × 107 M ⊙ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  16. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  17. TRACE and SVST Observations of an Active-Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Deluca, E. E.

    1999-05-01

    In June 1998 the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observed filaments and prominences in coordination with various ground-based solar observatories, including the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope (SVST) on La Palma. Here we present results for an active-region filament observed on June 21-22. This horse-shoe shaped filament had a "barb" that reached down from the filament spine to the chomosphere below. We use high-resolution images obtained at the SVST on June 21 from 18:03 to 19:04 UT to study the fine structure and dynamics of plasmas in the barb and other parts of the filament. The data consist of narrowband Hα images taken with the Lockheed Tunable Filtergraph operating at a cadence of 20 s. We present Doppler maps derived from these images. The filament erupted six hours after the SVST observations. The eruption was observed with TRACE, which obtained images in Fe IX/X 171, Fe XII 195, Fe XV 284 and H I Lyalpha . At the start of the event, a thin bright loop appears high above the filament at the location of the barb. We interpret this feature as the outline of a magnetic "bubble" which forms as a result of kink instability in the magnetic field that supports the filament. The bright loop appears to be due to particle acceleration and impulsive heating along certain field lines on the periphery of this magnetic structure. A few minutes later, the dark filament threads turn into emission and move outward, exhibiting a helical structure. We discuss the magnetic structure of the barb and its possible role in the filament eruption.

  18. Breakout coronal mass ejections from solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Lynch, Benjamin; MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin; Antiochos, Spiro

    We are performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of single bipolar active regions (ARs) embedded in the Sun's global background field and of pairs of ARs interacting with each other. The magnetic flux near the polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the ARs is subjected to twisting footpoint displacements that introduce strong magnetic shear between the two polarities and gradually inflate the coronal volume occupied by the AR fields. If the initially current-free coronal field contains a magnetic null, then it is vulnerable to eruptions triggered by magnetic breakout, which reconnects aside the previously restraining field lines overhead. The sheared core flux promptly expands outward at the Alfven speed, opening the magnetic field in the vicinity of the PIL. Flare reconnection below the ejecta, across the vertical current sheet thus established, thereafter reforms the magnetic-null configuration above the AR. This reformation sets the stage for subsequent homologous episodes of breakout reconnection and eruption, if the energizing footpoint motions are sustained. The magnetic flux and energy of an isolated AR, relative to those of the background field, determine whether the eruption is confined or ejective, as the sheared flux either comes to rest in the corona or escapes the Sun to interplanetary space, respectively. In the latter case, the field lines accompanying the coronal mass ejection can comprise a weakly twisted "magnetic bottle" as readily as a strongly twisted flux rope, both of which are observed routinely in situ. The latest developments in this research will be reported. In particular, we will emphasize the observational signatures inferred from the simulations that could be sought in STEREO data, such as multiple three-dimensional views, EUV brightenings at reconnection sites, and coronal dimmings in regions of strong expansion. Our research is sponsored by NASA and ONR.

  19. Nuclear star formation activity and black hole accretion in nearby Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Esquej, P.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Roche, P.; Mason, R. E.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Levenson, N. A.; Aretxaga, I.; Packham, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and observational works indicate the presence of a correlation between the star-formation rate (SFR) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity (and, therefore, the black hole accretion rate, M-dot {sub BH}) of Seyfert galaxies. This suggests a physical connection between the gas-forming stars on kpc scales and the gas on sub-pc scales that is feeding the black hole. We compiled the largest sample of Seyfert galaxies to date with high angular resolution (∼0.''4-0.''8) mid-infrared (8-13 μm) spectroscopy. The sample includes 29 Seyfert galaxies drawn from the AGN Revised Shapley-Ames catalog. At a median distance of 33 Mpc, our data allow us to probe nuclear regions on scales of ∼65 pc (median value). We found no general evidence of suppression of the 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the vicinity of these AGN, and we used this feature as a proxy for the SFR. We detected the 11.3 μm PAH feature in the nuclear spectra of 45% of our sample. The derived nuclear SFRs are, on average, five times lower than those measured in circumnuclear regions of 600 pc in size (median value). However, the projected nuclear SFR densities (median value of 22 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) are a factor of 20 higher than those measured on circumnuclear scales. This indicates that the SF activity per unit area in the central ∼65 pc region of Seyfert galaxies is much higher than at larger distances from their nuclei. We studied the connection between the nuclear SFR and M-dot {sub BH} and showed that numerical simulations reproduce our observed relation fairly well.

  20. Nuclear Star Formation Activity and Black Hole Accretion in Nearby Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquej, P.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; González-Martín, O.; Hönig, S. F.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Roche, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Mason, R. E.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Levenson, N. A.; Aretxaga, I.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Packham, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and observational works indicate the presence of a correlation between the star-formation rate (SFR) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity (and, therefore, the black hole accretion rate, \\dot{M}_BH) of Seyfert galaxies. This suggests a physical connection between the gas-forming stars on kpc scales and the gas on sub-pc scales that is feeding the black hole. We compiled the largest sample of Seyfert galaxies to date with high angular resolution (~0.''4-0.''8) mid-infrared (8-13 μm) spectroscopy. The sample includes 29 Seyfert galaxies drawn from the AGN Revised Shapley-Ames catalog. At a median distance of 33 Mpc, our data allow us to probe nuclear regions on scales of ~65 pc (median value). We found no general evidence of suppression of the 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the vicinity of these AGN, and we used this feature as a proxy for the SFR. We detected the 11.3 μm PAH feature in the nuclear spectra of 45% of our sample. The derived nuclear SFRs are, on average, five times lower than those measured in circumnuclear regions of 600 pc in size (median value). However, the projected nuclear SFR densities (median value of 22 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2) are a factor of 20 higher than those measured on circumnuclear scales. This indicates that the SF activity per unit area in the central ~65 pc region of Seyfert galaxies is much higher than at larger distances from their nuclei. We studied the connection between the nuclear SFR and \\dot{M}_BH and showed that numerical simulations reproduce our observed relation fairly well.

  1. The role of active DNA demethylation and Tet enzyme function in memory formation and cocaine action.

    PubMed

    Alaghband, Yasaman; Bredy, Timothy W; Wood, Marcelo A

    2016-06-20

    Active DNA modification is a major epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene expression in an experience-dependent manner, which is thought to establish stable changes in neuronal function and behavior. Recent discoveries regarding the Ten eleven translocation (Tet1-3) family of DNA hydroxylases have provided a new avenue for the study of active DNA demethylation, and may thus help to advance our understanding of how dynamic DNA modifications lead to long-lasting changes in brain regions underlying learning and memory, as well as drug-seeking and propensity for relapse following abstinence. Drug addiction is a complex, relapsing disorder in which compulsive drug-seeking behavior can persist despite aversive consequences. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the onset and persistence of drug addiction, as well as the pronounced propensity for relapse observed in addicts, is necessary for the development of selective treatments and therapies. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of the involvement of active DNA demethylation with an emphasis on the Tet family of enzymes and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in learning and memory, as well as in drug-seeking behavior. Memory and addiction share overlapping molecular, cellular, and circuit functions allowing research in one area to inform the other. Current discrepancies and directions for future studies focusing on the dynamic interplay between DNA methylation and demethylation, and how they orchestrate gene expression required for neuronal plasticity underlying memory formation, are discussed. PMID:26806038

  2. Warm dust and aromatic bands as quantitative probes of star-formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Charmandaris, V.

    2004-05-01

    We combine samples of spiral galaxies and starburst systems observed with ISOCAM on board ISO to investigate the reliability of mid-infrared dust emission as a quantitative tracer of star formation activity. The total sample covers very diverse galactic environments and probes a much wider dynamic range in star formation rate density than previous similar studies. We find that both the monochromatic 15 μm continuum and the 5-8.5 μm emission constitute excellent indicators of the star formation rate as quantified by the Lyman continuum luminosity LLyc, within specified validity limits which are different for the two tracers. Normalized to projected surface area, the 15 μm continuum luminosity Σ15 μm,ct is directly proportional to ΣLyc over several orders of magnitude. Two regimes are distinguished from the relative offsets in the observed relationship: the proportionality factor increases by a factor of ≈5 between quiescent disks in spiral galaxies, and moderate to extreme star-forming environments in circumnuclear regions of spirals and in starburst systems. The transition occurs near ΣLyc ˜ 102 L⊙ pc-2 and is interpreted as due to very small dust grains starting to dominate the emission at 15 μm over aromatic species above this threshold. The 5-8.5 μm luminosity per unit projected area is also directly proportional to the Lyman continuum luminosity, with a single conversion factor from the most quiescent objects included in the sample up to ΣLyc ˜ 104 L⊙ pc-2, where the relationship then flattens. The turnover is attributed to depletion of aromatic band carriers in the harsher conditions prevailing in extreme starburst environments. The observed relationships provide empirical calibrations useful for estimating star formation rates from mid-infrared observations, much less affected by extinction than optical and near-infrared tracers in deeply embedded H II regions and obscured starbursts, as well as for theoretical predictions from evolutionary

  3. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that playessential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization utilize presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2, and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. PMID:23252894

  4. Triggered massive-star formation on the borders of Galactic H II regions. III. Star formation at the periphery of Sh2-219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deharveng, L.; Lefloch, B.; Massi, F.; Brand, J.; Kurtz, S.; Zavagno, A.; Caplan, J.

    2006-10-01

    Context: .Massive-star formation triggered by the expansion of H ii regions. Aims: .To understand if sequential star formation is taking place at the periphery of the H ii region Sh2-219. Methods: .We present 12CO J=2→ 1 line observations of this region, obtained at the IRAM 30-m telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain). Results: .In the optical, Sh2-219 is spherically symmetric around its exciting star; furthermore it is surrounded along three quarters of its periphery by a ring of atomic hydrogen. This spherical symmetry breaks down at infrared and millimetre wavelengths. A molecular cloud of about 2000 M_⊙ lies at the southwestern border of Sh2-219, in the H i gap. Two molecular condensations, elongated along the ionization front, probably result from the interaction between the expanding H ii region and the molecular cloud. In this region of interaction there lies a cluster containing many highly reddened stars, as well as a massive star exciting an ultracompact H ii region. More surprisingly, the brightest parts of the molecular cloud form a "chimney", perpendicular to the ionization front. This chimney is closed at its south-west extremity by Hα walls, thus forming a cavity. The whole structure is 7.5 pc long. A luminous Hα emission-line star, lying at one end of the chimney near the ionization front, may be responsible for this structure. Confrontation of the observations with models of H ii region evolution shows that Sh2-219 is probably 105 yr old. The age and origin of the near-IR cluster observed on the border of Sh2-219 remain unknown.

  5. High resolution studies of complex solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na

    Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are energetic events, which can even impact the near-Earth environment and are the principal source of space weather. Most of them originate in solar active regions. The most violent events are produced in sunspots with a complex magnetic field topology. Studying their morphology and dynamics is helpful in understanding the energy accumulation and release mechanisms for flares and CMEs, which are intriguing problems in solar physics. The study of complex active regions is based on high-resolution observations from space missions and new instruments at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). Adaptive optics (AO) in combination with image restoration techniques (speckle masking imaging) can achieve improved image quality and a spatial resolution (about 100 km on the solar surface) close to the diffraction limit of BBSO's 65 cm vacuum telescope. Dopplergrams obtained with a two-dimensional imaging spectrometer combined with horizontal flow maps derived with Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) provide precise measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field in sunspots. Magnetic field measurements from ground- and space-based instruments complement these data. At the outset of this study, the evolution and morphology of a typical round sunspot are described in some detail. The sunspot was followed from disk center to the limb, thus providing some insight into the geometry of the magnetic flux system. Having established a benchmark for a stable sunspot, the attention is turned to changes of the sunspot structure associated with flares and CMEs. Rapid penumbral decay and the strengthening of sunspot umbrae are manifestations of photospheric magnetic field changes after a flare. These sudden intensity changes are interpreted as a result of magnetic reconnection during the flare, which causes the magnetic field lines to be turned from more inclined to more vertical. Strong photospheric shear flows along the flaring magnetic

  6. Balanoglossites ichnofabrics from the Middle Ordovician Volkhov formation (St. Petersburg Region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaust, D.; Dronov, A.

    2013-05-01

    The limestone succession of the Middle Ordovician Volkhov Formation in the St. Petersburg region (Russia) exposes numerous horizons with firm- and hardgrounds below omission surfaces, which contain trace fossils attributable to the ichnogenus Balanoglossites Mägdefrau, 1932. Although known from the literature since 75 years, such trace fossils were previously only informally described as "Korrosionsgruben", "Karandashi", or ascribed to different ichnotaxa such as Trypanites, Arenicolites and Pseudopolydorites. Owing to their complexity and often high bioturbation density, the morphology of these trace fossils is difficult to capture. Ichnofabrics containing Balanoglossites triadicus were studied in detail from sawn rock faces, broken rock blocks and sectioned slabs, including those from historical buildings in St. Petersburg. Accordingly, different trace-fossil elements can be revealed in dependence on the original substrate consistency, reflecting various stages of lithification: Mineral-stained and Trypanites-perforated hardground surfaces are bioeroded with long elongated grooves which are assigned to the ichnogenus Sulcichnus. Subtle openings lead into the partly lithified limestone where they branch into complex galleries of B. triadicus. They are characterized by J-, U- and Y-shaped shafts and multiply branched tunnels, which gradually continue into the underlying firmground. Other portions of the ichnofabric only exhibit biodeformational structures or the strongly compacted and branched burrow networks Labyrintichnus, which is due to the original soft sediment consistency. Balanoglossites ichnofabrics demarcate certain omission surfaces within the Dikari Limestone and can be traced for more than 300 km, supporting the regional lithostratigraphical correlation. The trace maker of B. triadicus and related trace fossils is interpreted to be a eunicid polychate with the ability to bioerode and burrow the sediment. The studied material from the Ordovician is

  7. FIP Bias Evolution in a Decaying Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; Yardley, S. L.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.

    2015-04-01

    Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR)11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR during the period 2012 January 4-6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR’s decay phase, small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing timescales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Finally, the FIP bias still remains dominantly coronal only in a part of the AR’s high-flux density core. We conclude that in the decay phase of an AR’s lifetime, the FIP bias is becoming increasingly modulated by episodes of small-scale flux emergence, i.e., decreasing the AR’s overall FIP bias. Our results show that magnetic field evolution plays an important role in compositional changes during AR development, revealing a more complex relationship than expected from previous well-known Skylab results showing that FIP bias increases almost linearly with age in young ARs.

  8. Geochemistry of regionally extensive dolomites, Burlington and Keokuk Formations (Mississippian), Iowa and Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Banner, J.; Hanson, G.; Meyers, W.; Prosky, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Burlington and Keokuk Formations (Mississippian) contain 2 major generations of dolomite throughout the several ten-thousand square kilometers of study area. Dolomite I (oldest) is luminescently zoned, Ca-rich, Fe- and Mn-poor, and has Mississippian /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr; dolomite II is unzoned, nearly stoichiometric, Fe- and Mn-rich, and has radiogenic /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr; dolomite III, a minor zone, is nonluminescent and very Fe-rich. Dolomites I and II formed before nonmarine calcite cements, and all dolomites formed before Late Mississippian under shallow burial conditions. Stable isotopes of dolomite I average +2.3 per thousand delta/sup 13/C and -0.3 per thousand delta/sup 18/O PDB. Dolomite I is slightly depleted in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O with respect to estimated Mississippian marine dolomite. Thus, dolomite I may have formed in waters only slightly depleted in /sup 18/O and /sup 13/C compared with seawater at low temperatures (approx. 25/sup 0/C). Dolomite II averages -4.1 per thousand delta/sup 18/O PDB, +2.8 per thousand delta/sup 13/C PDB, and has a wide range of delta/sup 18/O (-0.5 to -6.6 per thousand PDB) and a narrower range of delta/sup 13/C (+1 to +4 per thousand). These data suggest that temperatures of precipitation were less than the 80/sup 0/C-110/sup 0/C ranges implied by the contained 2-phase fluid inclusions, unless the waters were isotopically heavy (approx. +3 to 11 per thousand delta/sup 18/O SMOW). Dolomite II shows a regional geographic trend of decreasing delta/sup 18/O and increasing delta/sup 13/ from north to south. This trend can be accounted for by either a northward decrease in temperature or in /sup 18/O content of diagenetic waters.

  9. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations. PMID:25915112

  10. Biomineral formation as a biosignature for microbial activities Precambrian cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón Tomás, Blanca; Mühlen, Dominik; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    In recent anoxic sediments manganese(II)carbonate minerals (e.g., rhodochrosite, kutnohorite) derive mainly from the reduction of manganese(IV) compounds by microbial anaerobic respiration. Small particles of rhodochrosite in stromatolite-like features in the Dresser chert Fm (Pilbara supergroup, W-Australia), associated with small flakes of kerogen, account for biogenic formation of the mineral in this early Archaean setting. Contrastingly, the formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling, also conducted by various microbial processes, mainly requiring conditions of the early and late Proterozoic (Kirschvink et al., 2000; Nealson and Saffrani 1994). However, putative anaerobic pathways like microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation (Hulth et al., 1999), anoxygenic photosynthesis (Johnson et al., 2013) and oxidation in UV light may facilitate manganese cycling even in a reducing atmosphere. Thus manganese redox cycling might have been possible even before the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis. Hence, there are several ways how manganese carbonates could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. Thus, the minerals may be suitable biosignatures for microbial redox processes in many respects. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum produces rhodochrosite during growth on hydrogen and organic compounds and may be a putative model organism for the reduction of Mn(IV). References Hulth S, Aller RC, Gilbert F. (1999) Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 63, 49-66. Johnson JE, Webb SM, Thomas K, Ono S, Kirschvink JL, Fischer WW. (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 110, 11238-11243. Kirschvink JL, Gaidos EJ, Bertani LE, Beukes NJ, Gutzmer J, Maepa LN, Steinberger LE. (2000) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 97, 1400-1405. Nealson KH, Saffarini D. (1994). Annu Rev Microbiol, 48, 311-343.

  11. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2005 – SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Science and Ecosytem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students in EPA Region 4. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities and other Federal Agencies in the are...

  12. Mapping of Sand Types and Dune Morphologies in the Aeolis Dorsa Region, Western Medusae Fossae Formation, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, A. S.; Burr, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    Preliminary mapping of low- and high-albedo sand deposits in the Aeolis Dorsa region, Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF), suggests sand transport from the north, consistent with sand source(s) in Elysium Mons, the Cerberus plains, or the MFF itself.

  13. Foreign Body Giant Cell Formation Is Preceded by Lamellipodia Formation and Can Be Attenuated by Inhibition of Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Skokos, Eleni; Laiwalla, Farah; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2007-01-01

    Macrophages that are recruited to the site of implanted biomaterials undergo fusion to form surface-damaging foreign body giant cells. Exposure of peripheral blood monocytes to interleukin-4 can recapitulate the fusion process in vitro. In this study, we used interleukin-4 to induce multinucleation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and observed changes in cell shape, including elongation and lamellipodia formation, before fusion. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are regulated by small GTPases, we examined the effects of inhibitors of Rho kinase (Y-32885) and Rac activation (NSC23766) on fusion. Y-32885 did not prevent cytoskeletal changes or fusion but limited the extent of multinucleation. NSC23766, on the other hand, inhibited lamellipodia formation and fusion in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that in control cells, these changes were preceded by Rac1 activation. However, NSC23766 did not block the uptake of polystyrene microspheres. Likewise, short interfering RNA knockdown of Rac1 limited fusion without limiting phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis and fusion can be partially decoupled based on their susceptibility to NSC23766. Furthermore, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) scaffolds containing NSC23766 attenuated foreign body giant cell formation in vivo. These observations suggest that targeting Rac1 activation could protect biomaterials without compromising the ability of macrophages to perform beneficial phagocytic functions at implantation sites. PMID:17556592

  14. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  15. Activation of cutaneous immune responses in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Birklein, Frank; Drummond, Peter D.; Li, Wenwu; Schlereth, Tanja; Albrecht, Nahid; Finch, Philip M.; Dawson, Linda F.; Clark, J. David; Kingery, Wade S.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is unresolved, but TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated in experimental skin blister fluid from CRPS affected limbs, as is tryptase, a marker for mast cells. In the rat fracture model of CRPS exaggerated sensory and sympathetic neural signaling stimulate keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation, causing the local production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines leading to pain behavior. The current investigation used CRPS patient skin biopsies to determine whether keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation occur in CRPS skin and to identify the cellular source of the up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6, and tryptase observed in CRPS experimental skin blister fluid. Skin biopsies were collected from the affected skin and the contralateral mirror site in 55 CRPS patients and the biopsy sections were immunostained for keratinocyte, cell proliferation, mast cell markers, TNF-α, and IL-6. In early CRPS keratinocytes were activated in the affected skin, resulting in proliferation, epidermal thickening, and up-regulated TNF-α and IL-6 expression. In chronic CRPS there was reduced keratinocyte proliferation with epidermal thinning in the affected skin. Acute CRPS patients also had increased mast cell accumulation in the affected skin, but there was no increase in mast cell numbers in chronic CRPS. PMID:24462502

  16. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ∼ T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  17. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  18. Plasma Composition in a Sigmoidal Anemone Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  19. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Carlyle, J.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-20

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  20. Theoretical model for calculation of helicity in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, P.

    We (Choudhuri, Chatterjee and Nandy, 2005) calculate helicities of solar active regions based on the idea of Choudhuri (2003) that poloidal flux lines get wrapped around a toroidal flux tube rising through the convection zone, thereby giving rise to the helicity. Rough estimates based on this idea compare favourably with the observed magnitude of helicity. We use our solar dynamo model based on the Babcock--Leighton α-effect to study how helicity varies with latitude and time. At the time of solar maximum, our theoretical model gives negative helicity in the northern hemisphere and positive helicity in the south, in accordance with observed hemispheric trends. However, we find that, during a short interval at the beginning of a cycle, helicities tend to be opposite of the preferred hemispheric trends. Next we (Chatterjee, Choudhuri and Petrovay 2006) use the above idea along with the sunspot decay model of Petrovay and Moreno-Insertis, (1997) to estimate the distribution of helicity inside a flux tube as it keeps collecting more azimuthal flux during its rise through the convection zone and as turbulent diffusion keeps acting on it. By varying parameters over reasonable ranges in our simple 1-d model, we find that the azimuthal flux penetrates the flux tube to some extent instead of being confined to a narrow sheath outside.

  1. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global corona is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations, respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, and repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  2. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  3. Investigation of Strath Terrace Formation in the Upper Headwater Region of the Mattole River Watershed, Northwest California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M.; Flanagan, S., II; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mattole River, in northwestern California, is located in a tectonically active and geologically complex area, the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ), where the North American, Pacific and Gorda plates meet. The Mattole River does not follow the classic river "concave-up" profile. Instead, the river headwaters have low gradients with broad strath terraces and deeply incised channels. In fact, it could be stated that the river has a "convex-up" profile with a low gradient headwater leading to a higher gradient midcourse. Strath terrace formation in the upper headwater region of the Mattole River records times of disequilibrium of channel profile and bedrock incision. In order to investigate the distribution and relative ages of strath terraces, a detailed survey of the terrace surface and bedrock strath position was conducted along several headwater tributaries. Additionally, hand borings were excavated across the terraces to bedrock to provide a three dimensional image of terrace thickness. Terrace morphology and stratigraphy provide information on terrace forming mechanisms and timing. This study includes high-resolution geomorphic data regarding the relation of Mattole headwater terraces to the MTJ, as well as provides more temporal information about the relation between a fluvial system's response to the ongoing northward migration of the MTJ.

  4. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, X.; Geng, F.; Guenther, A.; Cao, J.; Greenberg, J.; Zhang, R.; Apel, E.; Li, G.; Weinheimer, A.; Chen, J.; Cai, C.

    2013-06-01

    The MIRAGE-Shanghai experiment was designed to characterize the factors controlling regional air pollution near a Chinese megacity (Shanghai) and was conducted during September 2009. This paper provides information on the measurements conducted for this study. In order to have some deep analysis of the measurements, a regional chemical/dynamical model (version 3 of Weather Research and Forecasting Chemical model - WRF-Chemv3) is applied for this study. The model results are intensively compared with the measurements to evaluate the model capability for calculating air pollutants in the Shanghai region, especially the chemical species related to ozone formation. The results show that the model is able to calculate the general distributions (the level and the variability) of air pollutants in the Shanghai region, and the differences between the model calculation and the measurement are mostly smaller than 30%, except the calculations of HONO (nitrous acid) at PD (Pudong) and CO (carbon monoxide) at DT (Dongtan). The main scientific focus is the study of ozone chemical formation not only in the urban area, but also on a regional scale of the surrounding area of Shanghai. The results show that during the experiment period, the ozone photochemical formation was strongly under the VOC (volatile organic compound)-limited condition in the urban area of Shanghai. Moreover, the VOC-limited condition occurred not only in the city, but also in the larger regional area. There was a continuous enhancement of ozone concentrations in the downwind of the megacity of Shanghai, resulting in a significant enhancement of ozone concentrations in a very large regional area in the surrounding region of Shanghai. The sensitivity study of the model suggests that there is a threshold value for switching from VOC-limited condition to NOx (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide)-limited condition. The threshold value is strongly dependent on the emission ratio of NOx / VOCs. When the ratio is about

  5. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, X.; Geng, F.; Guenther, A.; Cao, J.; Greenberg, J.; Zhang, R.; Apel, E.; Li, G.; Weinheimer, A.; Chen, J.; Cai, C.

    2013-01-01

    The MIRAGE-Shanghai experiment was designed to characterize the factors controlling regional air pollution near a Chinese Megacity (Shanghai) and was conducted during September 2009. This paper provides an overview of the measurements conducted for this study. In addition to the measurements, a regional chemical/dynamical model (version 3 of Weather Research and Forecasting Chemical model - WRF-Chemv3) is applied for this study. The model results are intensively compared with the measurements to evaluate the model capability for calculating air pollutants in the Shanghai region, especially the chemical species related to ozone formation. The results show that the model is able to calculate the general distributions (the level and the variability) of air pollutants in the Shanghai region, and the difference between the model calculation and the measurement are mostly smaller than 30%, except the calculations of HONO at PD (Pudong) and CO at DT (Dongtan). The main scientific focus is the study of ozone chemical formation not only in the urban area, but also on a regional scale of the surrounding area of Shanghai. The results show that during the experiment period, the ozone photochemical formation was strongly under the VOC-limited condition in the urban area of Shanghai. Moreover, the VOC-limited condition occurred not only in the city, but also in the larger regional area. There was a continuous enhancement of ozone concentrations in the downwind of the megacity of Shanghai, resulting in a significant enhancement of ozone concentrations in a very large regional area in the surrounding region of Shanghai. The sensitivity study of the model suggests that there is a threshold value for switching from VOC-limited condition to NOx-limited condition. The threshold value is strongly dependent on the emission ratio of NOx/VOCs. When the ratio is about 0.4, the Shanghai region is under a strong VOC-limited condition over the regional scale. In contrast, when the ratio is

  6. Transcription activation at class II CRP-dependent promoters: the role of different activating regions.

    PubMed Central

    Rhodius, V A; West, D M; Webster, C L; Busby, S J; Savery, N J

    1997-01-01

    Transcription activation by the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) at Class II promoters is dependent on direct interactions between two surface-exposed activating regions (AR1 and AR2) and two contact sites in RNA polymerase. The effects on transcription activation of disrupting either AR1 or AR2 have been measured at different Class II promoters. AR2 but not AR1 is essential for activation at all the Class II promoters that were tested. The effects of single positive control substitutions in AR1 and AR2 vary from one promoter to another: the effects of the different substitutions are contingent on the -35 hexamer sequence. Abortive initiation assays have been used to quantify the effects of positive control substitutions in each activating region on the kinetics of transcription initiation at the Class II CRP- dependent promoter pmelRcon. At this promoter, the HL159 substitution in AR1 results in a defect in the initial binding of RNA polymerase whilst the KE101 substitution in AR2 reduces the rate of isomerization from the closed to the open complex. PMID:9016561

  7. 78 FR 38739 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ..., DG-1272, in the Federal Register on December 19, 2012 (77 FR 75198), for a 60-day public comment... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear... (NRC) is issuing Revision 1 of Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.185, ``Standard Format and Content for...

  8. Psycho-Pedagogical Conditions of Formation of Professional Creative Activity of Future Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askarovna, Uzakbayeva Sakypzhamal; Yertaevna, Abeltayeva Zhanel; Erhanovna, Sadykova Ayzhan; Rysbekova, R.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational, psychological and pedagogical conditions (the position of student in the educational process, the inclusion of students in active and independent activities, the creation of a positive creative environment and psychological climate, the active use of the forms, methods, technologies, adequate formation of professional creative…

  9. Comparing the validity of 2 physical activity questionnaire formats in African-American and Hispanic women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of 2 physical activity questionnaire formats—one that lists activities (Checklist questionnaire) and one that assesses overall activities (Global questionnaire) by domain. Two questionnaire formats were validated among 260 African-American and Hi...

  10. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  11. ASYMMETRY OF HELICITY INJECTION FLUX IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Lirong; Alexander, David

    2009-04-20

    Observational and modeling results indicate that typically the leading magnetic field of bipolar active regions (ARs) is often spatially more compact, while more dispersed and fragmented in following polarity. In this paper, we address the origin of this morphological asymmetry, which is not well understood. Although it may be assumed that, in an emerging {omega}-shaped flux tube, those portions of the flux tube in which the magnetic field has a higher twist may maintain its coherence more readily, this has not been tested observationally. To assess this possibility, it is important to characterize the nature of the fragmentation and asymmetry in solar ARs and this provides the motivation for this paper. We separately calculate the distribution of the helicity flux injected in the leading and following polarities of 15 emerging bipolar ARs, using the Michelson Doppler Image 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms and a local correlation tracking technique. We find from this statistical study that the leading (compact) polarity injects several times more helicity flux than the following (fragmented) one (typically 3-10 times). This result suggests that the leading polarity of the {omega}-shaped flux tube possesses a much larger amount of twist than the following field prior to emergence. We argue that the helicity asymmetry between the leading and following magnetic field for the ARs studied here results in the observed magnetic field asymmetry of the two polarities due to an imbalance in the magnetic tension of the emerging flux tube. We suggest that the observed imbalance in the helicity distribution results from a difference in the speed of emergence between the leading and following legs of an inclined {omega}-shaped flux tube. In addition, there is also the effect of magnetic flux imbalance between the two polarities with the fragmented following polarity displaying spatial fluctuation in both the magnitude and sign of helicity measured.

  12. Identifying the Main Driver of Active Region Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; Murray, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) has discovered ubiquitous outflows of a few to 50 km s-1 from active regions (ARs). The characteristics of these outflows are very curious in that they are most prominent at the AR boundary and appear over monopolar magnetic areas. They are linked to strong non-thermal line broadening and are stronger in hotter EUV lines. The outflows persist for at least several days. Whereas red-shifted down flows observed in AR closed loops are well understood, to date there is no general consensus for the mechanism(s) driving blue-shifted AR-related outflows. We use Hinode EIS and X-Ray Telescope observations of AR 10942 coupled with magnetic modeling to demonstrate for the first time that the outflows originate from specific locations of the magnetic topology where field lines display strong gradients of magnetic connectivity, namely quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), or in the limit of infinitely thin QSLs, separatrices. The strongest AR outflows were found to be in the vicinity of QSL sections located over areas of strong magnetic field. We argue that magnetic reconnection at QSLs, separating closed field lines of the AR and either large-scale externally connected or ‘open’ field lines, is a viable mechanism for driving AR outflows which are potentially sources of the slow solar wind. In fact, magnetic reconnection along QSLs (including separatricies) is the first theory to explain the most puzzling characteristics of the outflows, namely their occurrence over monopolar areas at the periphery of ARs and their longevity.

  13. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

  14. MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2014-04-01

    We compute for the first time the magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 2011 February 11-15 at 20° southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of the magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The magnetic helicity normalized to its theoretical maximum value, here referred to as relative helicity, is around 4% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ≈ 0.4 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to a scale of 2π/k ≈ 16 Mm. The same sign and a similar value are also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The modulus of the magnetic helicity spectrum shows a k {sup –11/3} power law at large wavenumbers, which implies a k {sup –5/3} spectrum for the modulus of the current helicity. A k {sup –5/3} spectrum is also obtained for the magnetic energy. The energy spectra evaluated separately from the horizontal and vertical fields agree for wavenumbers below 3 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to scales above 2 Mm. This gives some justification to our assumption of isotropy and places limits resulting from possible instrumental artifacts at small scales.

  15. ON THE ROLE OF ROTATING SUNSPOTS IN THE ACTIVITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Ambastha, A.; Maurya, R. A. E-mail: ambastha@prl.res.in

    2012-12-10

    We study the role of rotating sunspots in relation to the evolution of various physical parameters characterizing the non-potentiality of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 and its eruptive events using the magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and multi-wavelength observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From the evolutionary study of HMI intensity and AIA channels, it is observed that the AR consists of two major rotating sunspots, one connected to a flare-prone region and another with coronal mass ejection (CME). The constructed space-time intensity maps reveal that the sunspots exhibited peak rotation rates coinciding with the occurrence of major eruptive events. Further, temporal profiles of twist parameters, namely, average shear angle, {alpha}{sub av}, {alpha}{sub best}, derived from HMI vector magnetograms, and the rate of helicity injection, obtained from the horizontal flux motions of HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, correspond well with the rotational profile of the sunspot in the CME-prone region, giving predominant evidence of rotational motion causing magnetic non-potentiality. Moreover, the mean value of free energy from the virial theorem calculated at the photospheric level shows a clear step-down decrease at the onset time of the flares revealing unambiguous evidence of energy release intermittently that is stored by flux emergence and/or motions in pre-flare phases. Additionally, distribution of helicity injection is homogeneous in the CME-prone region while in the flare-prone region it is not and often changes sign. This study provides a clear picture that both proper and rotational motions of the observed fluxes played significant roles in enhancing the magnetic non-potentiality of the AR by injecting helicity, twisting the magnetic fields and thereby increasing the free energy, leading to favorable conditions for the observed transient activity.

  16. Functional Anatomy of T Cell Activation and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.; Vardhana, Santosh; Vasiliver-Shamis, Gaia; Liese, Jan; Blair, David; Waite, Janelle; Sacristán, Catarina; Victora, Gabriel; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Dustin, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation and function require a structured engagement of antigen-presenting cells. These cell contacts are characterized by two distinct dynamics in vivo: transient contacts resulting from promigratory junctions called immunological kinapses or prolonged contacts from stable junctions called immunological synapses. Kinapses operate in the steady state to allow referencing to self-peptide-MHC (pMHC) and searching for pathogen-derived pMHC. Synapses are induced by T cell receptor (TCR) interactions with agonist pMHC under specific conditions and correlate with robust immune responses that generate effector and memory T cells. High-resolution imaging has revealed that the synapse is highly coordinated, integrating cell adhesion, TCR recognition of pMHC complexes, and an array of activating and inhibitory ligands to promote or prevent T cell signaling. In this review, we examine the molecular components, geometry, and timing underlying kinapses and synapses. We integrate recent molecular and physiological data to provide a synthesis and suggest ways forward. PMID:19968559

  17. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  18. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are (sup L) WL(sub SG), a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and sup L(sub theta), a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 R(sub Sun) central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size (sup L) (sub theta) of the active region, (2) in (Log (sup L)WL(sub SG), Log(sup L) theta) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: =- theta/A approximately equal to 300 G, where theta is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (less than 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division and NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences.

  19. Chemical and conformational changes in chromosome regions being actively transcribed.

    PubMed Central

    Pagés, M; Alonso, C

    1978-01-01

    U.V. microspectrophotometry has been used to calculate quantities of nucleic acids and proteins of complete polytene chromosomal sets and specific regions of these chromosomes. It has been found that in chromosomes the ratio of DNA to proteins is approximately 1:4. This ratio however changes when specific regions are compared. The average ratio of DNA to proteins in a puffed region (2-48B4C5) increases to 1:16 in contrast to 1:6 from the same region but in non puffed state. At the same time the RNA quantity increases by a factor of 2. thermal denaturation profiles of formaldehyde fixed chromosomes show that the Tm of this region in puffed and non puffed state differ by 10 degrees C. Moreover these profiles suggest that a large fraction of histone-bound DNA is destabilized during puffing. PMID:634798

  20. Comparative internal kinematics of the H II regions in interacting and isolated galaxies: implications for massive star formation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John E.; Font, Joan; García-Lorenzo, Begoña; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Fathi, Kambiz; James, Philip A.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cisternas, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    We have observed 12 interacting galaxy pairs using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GH αFaS (Galaxy H α Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma. We present here the Hα surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion maps for the 10 systems we have not previously observed using this technique, as well as the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosities and velocity dispersion) of 1259 H II regions from the full sample. We also derive the physical properties of 1054 H II regions in a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare the two populations of H II regions. We find a population of the brightest H II regions for which the scaling relations, for example the relation between the Hα luminosity and the radius, are clearly distinct from the relations for the regions of lower luminosity. The regions in this bright population are more frequent in the interacting galaxies. We find that the turbulence, and also the star formation rate (SFR), are enhanced in the H II regions in the interacting galaxies. We have also extracted the Hα equivalent widths for the H II regions of both samples, and we have found that the distribution of H II region ages coincides for the two samples of galaxies. We suggest that the SFR enhancement is brought about by gas flows induced by the interactions, which give rise to gravitationally bound gas clouds which grow further by accretion from the flowing gas, producing conditions favourable to star formation.

  1. DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun; Su Jiangtao; Li Hui; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-08-20

    We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

  2. Minifilament Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-04-01

    We present observations of eruptive events in an active region adjacent to an on-disk coronal hole on 2012 June 30, primarily using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and STEREO-B. One eruption is of a large-scale (∼100″) filament that is typical of other eruptions, showing slow-rise onset followed by a faster-rise motion starting as flare emissions begin. It also shows an “EUV crinkle” emission pattern, resulting from magnetic reconnections between the exploding filament-carrying field and surrounding field. Many EUV jets, some of which are surges, sprays and/or X-ray jets, also occur in localized areas of the active region. We examine in detail two relatively energetic ones, accompanied by GOES M1 and C1 flares, and a weaker one without a GOES signature. All three jets resulted from small-scale (∼20″) filament eruptions consistent with a slow rise followed by a fast rise occurring with flare-like jet-bright-point brightenings. The two more-energetic jets showed crinkle patters, but the third jet did not, perhaps due to its weakness. Thus all three jets were consistent with formation via erupting minifilaments, analogous to large-scale filament eruptions and to X-ray jets in polar coronal holes. Several other energetic jets occurred in a nearby portion of the active region; while their behavior was also consistent with their source being minifilament eruptions, we could not confirm this because their onsets were hidden from our view. Magnetic flux cancelation and emergence are candidates for having triggered the minifilament eruptions.

  3. SOFT X-RAY IRRADIATION OF METHANOL ICE: IMPLICATION FOR H{sub 2}CO FORMATION IN INTERSTELLAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaravella, A.; Collura, A.; Caro, G. Munoz; Escobar, A. Jimenez; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Giarrusso, S.; Barbera, M.

    2010-10-10

    We performed 0.3 keV soft X-ray irradiation of a methanol ice at 8 K under ultra-high vacuum conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that soft X-rays are used to study photolysis of ice analogs. Despite the low irradiation dose of 10{sup -6} photons molecule{sup -1}, the formation of formaldehyde has been observed. The results of our experiments suggest that X-rays may be a promising candidate to the formation of complex molecules in regions where UV radiation is severely inhibited.

  4. Inverted Regional Metamorphism in the Coaxially Refolded Tonga Formation: Evidence for Cretaceous Accretional Tectonics in the Cascades Crystalline Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, L. A.; Lebit, H. D.; Paterson, S. R.; Miller, R. B.; Vernon, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    The Tonga Formation, on the westernmost boundary of the Cascades crystalline core, records Cretaceous plutonism, contact to regional metamorphism, and multiple episodes of folding related to intense east-west contractional deformation. The Tonga Formation is exposed in a fault-bounded, north-south elongate tectonic domain that comprises pelite-psammite metasediments, which increase from greenschist to amphibolite grade (south to north). This metamorphic gradient is inverted relative to a major westward verging and downward facing fold system that dominates the internal architecture of the formation. Sedimentary structures are remarkably well-preserved in the Tonga Formation, which allowed for the determination of younging directions. Using these and bedding-cleavage relationships, detailed field mapping indicates a stratigraphically overturned section that forms a large-scale antiformal syncline (exposed in the northern and eastern domain) and related synformal anticline (southern and western domain). The overturned nature of the strata and the geometry of gently north-plunging folds imply upsection a pre-existing tight, recumbent anticline refolded into a co-axial (type III) fold interference pattern. The core of this early anticline, exposed in the northern domain, corresponds with the higher metamorphic conditions of the inverted metamorphic gradient and early Cascades regional metamorphism ('M1') rarely decipherable in the adjacent Chiwaukum Schist. The co-axial, superposed folding in the Tonga Formation and the overall N-S arrangement of the component fold generations suggests a strong component of east-west shortening in the foreland of the Cascades core. Fold geometries account for the inverted metamorphic zonation as well as control the localization of plutons, which also elongate parallel to the regional fold axes. The central and southern and portion of Tonga Formation records subsequent contact ('M2') and regional ('M3') metamorphism, and appears to be a

  5. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  6. A METHOD FOR DATA-DRIVEN SIMULATIONS OF EVOLVING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; DeRosa, Marc L.

    2012-10-01

    We present a method for performing data-driven simulations of solar active region formation and evolution. The approach is based on magnetofriction, which evolves the induction equation assuming that the plasma velocity is proportional to the Lorentz force. The simulations of active region (AR) coronal field are driven by temporal sequences of photospheric magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Under certain conditions, the data-driven simulations produce flux ropes that are ejected from the modeled AR due to loss of equilibrium. Following the ejection of flux ropes, we find an enhancement of the photospheric horizontal field near the polarity inversion line. We also present a method for the synthesis of mock coronal images based on a proxy emissivity calculated from the current density distribution in the model. This method yields mock coronal images that are somewhat reminiscent of images of ARs taken by instruments such as SDO's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths.

  7. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  8. Satellite formation design in orbits of high eccentricity for missions with performance criteria specified over a region of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, Christopher William Thomas

    Several methods are presented for the design of satellite formations for science missions in high-eccentricity reference orbits with quantifiable performance criteria specified throughout only a portion the orbit, called the Region of Interest (RoI). A modified form of the traditional average along-track drift minimization condition is introduced to account for the fact that performance criteria are only specified within the RoI, and a robust formation design algorithm (FDA) is defined to improve performance in the presence of formation initialization errors. Initial differential mean orbital elements are taken as the design variables and the Gim-Alfriend state transition matrix (G-A STM) is used for relative motion propagation. Using mean elements and the G-A STM allows for explicit inclusion of J2 perturbation effects in the design process. The methods are applied to the complete formation design problem of the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission and results are verified using the NASA General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). Since satellite formations in high-eccentricity orbits will spend long times at high altitude, third-body perturbations are an important design consideration as well. A detailed analytical analysis of third-body perturbation effects on satellite formations is also performed and averaged dynamics are derived for the particular case of the lunar perturbation. Numerical results of the lunar perturbation analysis are obtained for the example application of the MMS mission and verified in GMAT.

  9. Activation of protein kinase C induces mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation and pronucleus formation in rat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Smith, Gary D; Chen, Da-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2002-07-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at metaphase of the second meiotic division (MII) before fertilization. When oocytes are stimulated by spermatozoa, they exit MII stage and complete meiosis. It has been suggested that an immediate increase in intracellular free calcium concentration and inactivation of maturation promoting factor (MPF) are required for oocyte activation. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and their interplay in rat oocyte activation. We found that MAP kinase became dephosphorylated in correlation with pronucleus formation after fertilization. Protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myriatate 13-acetate (PMA) and 1,2-dioctanoyl-rac-glycerol (diC8), triggered dephosphorylation of MAP kinase and pronucleus formation in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Dephosphorylation of MAP kinase was also correlated with pronucleus formation when oocytes were treated with PKC activators. Effects of PKC activators were abolished by the PKC inhibitors, calphostin C and staurosporine, as well as a protein phosphatase blocker, okadaic acid (OA). These results suggest that PKC activation may cause rat oocyte pronucleus formation via MAP kinase dephosphorylation, which is probably mediated by OA-sensitive protein phosphatases. We also provide evidence supporting the involvement of such a process in fertilization. PMID:12080000

  10. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    PubMed

    Ugajin, Atsushi; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Ono, Masato; Yoshida, Tadaharu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica), on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei) of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing. PMID:22431987

  11. THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-05-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  12. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  13. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from ac